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Word of the Day

English, Education, 2188 seasons, 1907 episodes, 23 hours, 28 minutes
About
The huge Amazon Alexa hit Word of the Day is now available as a podcast! Word of the Day teaches you a useful word, its definition, etymology, and gives you examples of how to use it in a sentence. A new word each and every day! Perfect for those looking to expand their vocabulary, learning English and looking for a boost and anyone who loves words.
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Acrophobia

Acrophobia is a noun that refers to a fear of heights.  The Greek word akron (AK ron) means ‘summit,’ while the Greek suffix P-H-O-B-I-A means fear. Since the late 19th century people terrified of high places have used our word of the day to describe their condition. Here’s an example: Tammy has such gripping acrophobia that she won’t date a man over six feet tall. She’s afraid that just reaching up to give him a kiss will make her dizzy. 
2/25/202446 seconds
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Mendicant

Mendicant is a noun that refers to a beggar.  The Latin verb mendicare (med duh CAR ay) refers to a ‘beggar.’ Our word of the day entered English in the Late Middle English period. Here’s an example of it in use: Jeff spent many years on the street as a mendicant. Being a beggar has a way of putting your success into perspective. 
2/24/202435 seconds
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Jeremiad

Jeremiad is a noun that refers to a list of complaints.  Our word of the day has its origin in the Biblical figure Jeremiah, whose lamentations were featured in the Old Testament. Since the late 18th century, a jeremiad has been known as a series of criticisms. Here’s an example of it in use: After several years of living with Cheryl, I’ve gathered a jeremiad I’ve been wanting to share with her. I only hope her list of complaints about me isn’t longer than mine. 
2/23/202439 seconds
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Jardiniere

Jardiniere is a noun that refers to an ornamental pot or stand for plants for flowers.  Our word of the day is a loan word that comes directly from the French word for ‘gardener.’ It’s been used since the mid-19th century to describe places to display plants or flowers. Here’s an example: When I first saw that jardiniere, I assumed it was from someplace exotic like the Far East. It turned out to be just a pot from Cleveland. I wish I had known that before I paid two hundred dollars for it.
2/22/202446 seconds
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Schlep

Schlep is a verb that means to haul or carry in an awkward way.  Our word of the day comes from the Yiddish word ‘shepn’ (SHLEP - in.) which means ‘to drag.’ Its English offspring has been around since the early 20th century. Here’s an example: Next year when we go on vacation, I think I’ll leave my computer at home. It’s too much trouble to schlep that thing all the way to Florida. 
2/21/202445 seconds
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Jactitation

Jactitation is a noun that refers to the restless tossing of a body.  The Latin word jactare (jock TAR ay) means ’to toss.’ Its English variation has been around since the 16th century, getting most of its use in a medical context. Here’s an example: All that jactitation I heard on the other side of the bed had me worried about my wife’s health. But it turned out all that tossing and turning didn’t come from her. It was just our Golden Retriever, Rex joining us in the middle of the night. 
2/20/202447 seconds
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Jacquerie

Jacquerie is a noun that refers to a peasant’s revolt.  Our word of the day comes from the French name ‘Jacques’ (zhock) which was a common name among the poor and working class. The term was first used to describe a revolt that took place against the ruling class in the 14th century. It later came to refer to any sort of revolt or protest. Here’s an example: If conditions at the office don’t get better, well have to stage a jacquerie. I don’t usually like such radical actions, but there’s only so much I can take of not having diet soft drinks available in the vending machine. 
2/19/202454 seconds
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Presentism

Presentism is an attitude toward the past dominated by present-day beliefs.  A recent addition to the English language, presentism emerged in the late 20th century to describe a tendency to view the past through the lens of current conventions. It combines the word ‘present,’ a word of Middle English origin with the suffix I-S-M, which denotes a distinctive practice or philosophy. Here’s an example of presentism in use:- All the presentism in history class made it difficult to truly understand things from the point of view of ancient civilizations. I wish we could have just ditched our current way of viewing things. 
2/17/202453 seconds
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Endarken

Endarken is a verb that means to make dark or darker.  You can think of the word endarken as a counterpoint to ‘enlighten.’ Both take words of Old English origin and add the prefix E-N which expresses entry into a specified state or location. Here’s an example of endarken in use: Every time we start talking about camping our friend Sam seems to endarken the conversation by talking about all the dangerous creatures lurking in the woods. That guy has a way of making almost any conversation needlessly dark. 
2/16/202447 seconds
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Forgettery

Forgettery is a noun that refers to the tendency to forget.  Our word of the day is a neologism, meaning it’s a recent addition to the English language. Forgettery combines a word of Old English origin that means ‘fail to remember’ with the suffix E-R-Y which denotes a behavior. We see this also in words like bravery, tomfoolery and archery. Forgettery isn’t usually used in formal contexts. Here’s an example of where it is best used: I come from a long line of people skilled in the art of forgettery. We even have our own Facebook that celebrates our inability to remember stuff. The only problem is nobody can recall the group’s password. 
2/15/202459 seconds
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Scroyle

Scroyle is a noun that refers to a scoundrel or a mean fellow.  Our word of the day’s origin is unknown, but we know it’s not a word you’d ever want to be called. It’s a synonym of such unfriendly words as rascal, charlatan and reprobate. Here’s an example: I’ve been called a scroyle for this, but I really don’t like people making too much noise near my house. Come to think of it, I’m not crazy about birds making noise near my house either.
2/14/202440 seconds
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Contiguous

Contiguous is an adjective that means sharing next or together in sequence.  The Latin word contiguus (con TEE goose) means ‘touching.’ Our word of the day is derived from this adjective and has been around the English language since the early 16th century. Here’s an example of its use The contiguous businesses had a difficult time getting along. Maybe there was something about two touching buildings that made them too close for comfort. 
2/13/202441 seconds
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Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence is a noun that refers to the ability to naturally glow.  Our word of the day comes from two Latin words, ‘bio’ (BEE oh), meaning ‘life,’ and ‘lumin,’ (LOO men) which means ‘light.’ Its descendent, bioluminescence has been around since the early 20th century describing a wide array of glowing creatures. Here’s an example: Bugs that can glow in the dark have often creeped me out, but when I get lost in the woods, I’m happy to have them around. Without the bioluminescence of my tiny friends, I might get lost in the dark. 
2/12/202453 seconds
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Echolocation

Echolocation is a noun that refers to the location of objects by reflected sound.  Our word of the day combines two words of Greek origin. Echo, which refers to the reflection of sound that occurs when sound bounces off a surface, and location, which means ‘place.’ Animals like bats that possess the ability to locate things without seeing, are skilled at echolocation. Here’s an example of its use: Learning about bats at school was both fascinating and disappointing. It was fascinating to learn about the echolocation that these animals do because of their limited vision. But it was disappointing to not learn anything about Batman.
2/11/20241 minute
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Legerdemain

Legerdemain is a noun that refers to sleight of hand.  The French phrase ‘legerete de main’ (lay ZHEY ray de mahn) translates to ‘lightness of hand.’ It’s a synonym for ‘dextrous’ and it’s often used to describe magicians or others skilled with hand trickery. Our word of the day comes directly from this term. Example: Mike’s legerdemain would have made him a great illusionist. But unfortunately, he chose a different career path. Somehow I don’t think his chosen profession of pickpocket is nearly as appreciated by people. 
2/10/202449 seconds
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Intendiment

Intendiment is a noun that refers to consideration or attention.  Our word of the day shares its Latin roots with words like ‘intention’ and ‘intend.’ Intendiment, however, is a synonym for words like ‘attention.’ Here’s an example: When the TV commercial announced a buy one, get one free sale, they had my intendiment right away. But when I saw they were selling private jets, they lost me. 
2/9/202442 seconds
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Abulia

Abulia is a noun that refers to an absence of willpower.  The Greek word boule (boo LEE) means ‘the will.’ By adding an ‘A’ to our word of the day, we get a word that means ‘without will.’ Abulia has been with us since the mid 19th century. Here’s an example of it in use: Last night there was no time for abulia. I know we were hungry, but to me, when a restaurant refuses to give us free fortune cookies, that’s when it’s time to choose another restaurant. 
2/8/202442 seconds
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Syncope

Syncope is a noun that refers to the temporary loss of consciousness caused by a fall in blood pressure.  Our word of the day comes almost directly from a Greek word that means ‘strike’ or ‘cut off.’ By the Late Middle English period, syncope had been adopted into English. Here’s an example: Having a significant drop in blood pressure may not seem like a huge problem. But frankly, it would terrify me to experience the syncope that often comes with it. I can’t imagine anything scarier than losing consciousness. 
2/7/202444 seconds
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Sternutation

Sternutation is a noun that refers to the act of sneezing.  The Latin word ‘sternuere’ (stern you AIR ay) means ‘to sneeze.’ After a few modifications, this word moved into the English language in the Late Middle English period. Here’s an example of sternutation in use. After my eye surgery, the doctor told me to avoid sternutation if possible for a few days. As you can imagine, it was quite a challenge. I mean, how do you avoid something as natural and inescapable as a sneeze?
2/6/202451 seconds
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Villatic

Villatic is an adjective that means rural.  The Latin word villa (WILL uh) has given birth to English words ‘village’ and our word of the day villatic. It’s been around since the late 16th century. Here’s an example of it in use: The villatic surroundings of my uncle’s home were a little unusual for me. But after about three months, living in a small town began to feel perfectly normal. 
2/5/202439 seconds
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Ballyrag

Ballyrag is a verb that means to intimidate by bullying.  The origin of our word of the day is unclear, but you can think of it as a synonym for words like ‘berate,’ ‘scold,’ and, of course, ‘bully.’ Here’s an example: I tried to ballyrag everybody in the office into allowing me to listen to non-stop polka music. It didn’t work out so well. I guess there are some things people just can’t get bullied into.
2/4/202442 seconds
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Eclat

Eclat is a noun that refers to a brilliant display or effect.  Our word of the day comes almost directly from the French word for ‘burst out.’ Since the late 17th century, it’s been used as a noun to refer to anything that bursts out in a prominent or audacious way. Here’s an example of it in use: Say what you will about George, but he sure has eclat. When he showed up for work in a sequined tuxedo, he caught everybody’s eye immediately. 
2/3/202443 seconds
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Misbegotten

Misbegotten is an adjective that means badly conceived or planned.  The Middle English word ‘beget’ means ‘to produce offspring.’ Our word of the day originally referred to people who were born out of wedlock. But more recently, it refers to ideas or things that weren’t planned well. For example: My plans to have an office party were horribly misbegotten. Not only did I not properly plan the entertainment, but I didn’t realize that a pool party in December wouldn’t make much sense in Minnesota. 
2/2/202448 seconds
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Obnubilate

Obnubilate is a verb that means to darken or obscure.  The Latin word obnubilare (ob new be LAR ay) means ‘to hide’ or ‘to obscure.’ Since the late 16th century our word of the day has been carrying out the same function in English. Example: People thought the scarf I was wearing was an attempt to be fashionable. But in truth, I was just hoping to obnubilate that coffee stain on my shirt. You’d be surprised how much of my clothing choices are really just attempts to mask my clumsiness.
2/1/202446 seconds
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Zhuzh

Zhuz is a verb that means to make something more lively.  Our word of the day has been around since the 1960s, but nobody knows for certain where it came from. Here’s an example of it in use: I was hoping my ten-gallon hat would zhuzh up my swimming trunks. But it just made me look like a really confused cowboy. 
1/31/202446 seconds
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Operose

Operose is an adjective that means displaying much effort.  The Latin word opus (OH poose) means ‘work,’ since the mid-18th century, our word of the day has been used to describe someone hard at work. Here’s an example of operose in use: Kevin could be pretty operose at the factory, but personally, I never felt he showed much industry when it mattered most — at the company’s annual softball tournament. 
1/30/202438 seconds
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Buccula

Buccula is a noun that refers to a fold of flesh known as a double chin.  Our word of the day comes directly from the Latin word for ‘little cheek.’ For centuries it’s been used to describe an extra fold of skin under someone’s face. Here’s an example: I could tell I had gained a little weight when I looked up to see I had a double chin. Some people may find buccula attractive, but it’s never been a look I’ve cultivated.
1/29/202439 seconds
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Figmental

Figmental is an adjective that means imaginary.  The Latin word fignare (feeg NARE ay) means ’to form’ or ‘contrive.’ By the late Middle English period, the word ‘figment’ came to mean something formed through our imagination. Our word of the day is the adjective form of the word. Here’s an example of it in use: As a kid, I had a number of figmental conversations with people who weren’t actually there. I understood they were imaginary, but I was just having too much fun to let reality get in my way. 
1/28/202445 seconds
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Brachiate

Brachiate is a verb that means to swing from branches like a monkey.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word brachium (BRA key oom) meaning ‘arm.’ Since the mid-18th century, its variant, brachiate has been used to describe anyone — or anything — using their arms to swing through branches. I never understood most of the exercises we did in gym class. For example, why did they have us brachiate through the monkey bars? Unless we were training for a spot in the local zoo, it seemed pretty pointless.
1/27/202447 seconds
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Corniche

Corniche is a noun that refers to a road running along the coast.  Our word of the day comes directly from French. Since the mid 19th century it’s been used to describe a road along the edge of a cliff or the coast. Here’s an example: Taking the corniche to San Francisco may be a little more time-consuming, but the view makes it worth it. Whoever decided to put a road along the coast gets my vote for the state Governor. 
1/26/202440 seconds
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Caesura

Caesura is a noun that refers to an interruption or break.  The Latin word caedere (ky DARE ay) means ‘to cut.’ Since the mid-16th century, our word of the day has been used by English speakers to refer to something that cuts someone off. Example: After about an hour of a really tedious meeting, we were mercifully given a caesura. This much-needed break was a helpful way to let us rest up and prepare for three more boring hours. 
1/25/202442 seconds
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Lowery

Lowery is an adjective that means gloomy or sullen.  The origin of our word of the day is unknown. But we know it’s the adjective form of the verb lower, meaning to look angry or sullen. Here’s an example: That lowery look on my son’s face can be explained by tonight’s dinner. He really hates spinach. 
1/24/202433 seconds
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Balefire

Balefire is a noun that refers to a large, open-air fire.  Our word of the day combines two words ‘bale’ and ‘fire’ that have an origin in Old English. A balefire is a large fire often used for ceremonial purposes. Here’s an example of balefire in use: The village gathered around the balefire gave me chills. It was a joy to see everyone participating in such a lovely ritual. 
1/23/202438 seconds
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Inextricable

Inextricable is an adjective that means impossible to disentangle. The Latin word extricare (ex truh CAR ay) means ‘to unravel’ or ‘disentangle.’ If something is inextricable, it can’t be unravelled. Our word of the day has been impossible to disentangle from English since the mid-16th century. Here’s an example of it in use: I know it’s weird for me to wear those lucky tennis shoes fifteen years after wearing them to win a medal at the track meet. But for me, they are inextricable from that big victory. I just can’t separate them from the joy I felt picking up that gold.
1/22/202455 seconds
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Oppugnant

Oppugnant is an adjective that means opposing or antagonistic. Having been around since the early 16th century, our word of the day comes from the Latin verb oppugnare (oh pug NAR ay) which means ‘to oppose.’ oppugnant can be used in nearly any context where someone or something opposes us.  The oppugnant students may not have liked my idea of implementing a school uniform, but I felt we needed some discipline in that place. Not many people agreed with me. The opposing forces would win that debate. 
1/21/202446 seconds
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Dux

Dux is a noun that refers to the top pupil in school.  Our word of the day comes directly from Latin where it can be used to describe a leader. Since the mid 18th century, dux has been used mainly in a scholastic context to describe the highest ranking student. Example: I was the dux of our fifth-grade geography class. When it came to knowing the state capitals, I was truly the champ.
1/20/202434 seconds
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Mizzle

Mizzle is a noun that refers to a light rain.  The Middle English word ‘misun’ (MEE sun) was used to describe a light mist of rain. Centuries later, our word of the day can be used in a similar way. Here’s an example of mizzle in use: A downpour of rain can make things difficult for my morning jog, but a mizzle can feel great. Not only does it not interfere with my running, but that light mist of water feels cool against my skin. 
1/19/202437 seconds
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Quaternary

Quaternary is an adjective that means fourth in order or rank.  The Latin word ‘quattuor’ (KWAT too or) denotes the number ‘four.’ Just as we use the words ‘primary,’ ‘secondary’ and ‘tertiary’ to describe things that are first, second and third in rank or order, our word of the day refers to something fourth in order. Here’s an example: I wasn’t the fastest runner on our high school track team, but I take some pride in being the quaternary-ranked runner in the one-hundred-meter dash. Unfortunately, there’s no medal handed out for fourth place. 
1/18/202448 seconds
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Equilibrist

Equilibrist is a noun that describes a person skilled at balancing. It can be used as a synonym for ‘acrobat,’ or ‘tightrope walker.’ The Latin word aequi (EY kwee) means ‘equal’ or ‘balanced.’ It has given English speakers such words as ‘equality’ and ‘equilibrium,’ a word that refers to, among other things,’ a state of physical balance. You can think of an equilibrist as someone remarkably skilled at keeping their balance — especially at dangerous heights. Here’s an example of equilibrist in use: I often thought of pursuing a career as an equilibrist. I always could keep my balance even several stories up. Unfortunately, you hardly ever see the phrase ‘tightrope walker wanted’ in the want ads.
1/17/20241 minute, 1 second
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Tensile

Tensile is an adjective that means capable of being drawn out or stretched.  Our word of the day has its origin in the Latin word tendere (ten DARE ay) which means ‘to stretch.’ Since the 17th century it’s been used by English speakers to describe things that can be lengthened or elongated. Here’s an example: The stiff, immovable pole we tried to use on the construction site simply didn’t get the job done. We needed something tensile to reach the space above us. 
1/16/202441 seconds
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Slumberous

Slumberous is an adjective that means sleepy.  Coming from Middle English, our word of the day is the adjective version of slumber, a synonym for sleep. Here’s an example of slumberous in use: After two hours of boring lectures, I was so slumberous I could barely drive home that night. 
1/15/202434 seconds
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Lambent

Lambent is an adjective that means flickering with a soft radiance.  Our word of the day comes directly from the Latin word for ‘licking,’ which was used to describe the flickering of flames. Lambent has been with us since the mid-17th century.  Here’s an example: The lambent of our fireplace still looms large in my childhood memories. Those soft, flickering images made me warm on the inside and out. 
1/14/202437 seconds
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Frore

Frore is an adjective that means frozen or frosty.  Coming directly from Middle English, our word of the day has been with us since the 14th century.  The frore fields of western Michigan are where I learned to play football. There’s no better place to develop speed because when it’s cold outside, you want to get inside very quickly. 
1/13/202430 seconds
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Opsimath

Opsimath is a noun that refers to a person who begins to learn or study late in life.  The Greek word opsi (OPP see) meaning ‘late’ and math (MATH) meaning ‘learn’ give us a word for those who learn late. Our word of the day has been with us since the late 19th century.  My son is planning on becoming an opsimath. He figures that if he doesn’t graduate from high school until his thirties, he can be recognized as a late bloomer. 
1/12/202439 seconds
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Surcease

Surcease is a noun that refers to relief or consolation.  The Latin word cessare (say SAR ay) means ‘stop.’ From this word came the word ‘cease’ and others like it, including our word of the day. Here’s an example: On the car ride, from New Orleans, Phil annoyed us without surcease. By the time we got home, it was great to finally get some relief. 
1/11/202435 seconds
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Cheeseparing

Cheeseparing is an adjective that means careful or stingy with money.  During the 16th century, it was common for people to cut away the rind, or outer layer of cheese. This act of stinginess came to be called ‘cheeseparing.’ Today the term is used to describe any stingy act, cheese-related or not. Here’s an example: The cheeseparing that takes place at that restaurant is truly outrageous. Not only are they too cheap to give you napkins with your order,  but they also charge you extra for ice. 
1/10/202449 seconds
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Inconnu

Inconnu is a noun that refers to an unknown person or thing.  Coming directly from the French word for ‘unknown,’ our word of the day has been around since the early 19th century. Here’s an example of it in use: When traveling to inconnu locations, it’s best to use as much technology as possible. It’s easy to get lost when going to places unknown to you. 
1/9/202435 seconds
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Quandary

Quandary is a noun that refers to a situation featuring a difficult choice.  It’s not clear where exactly our word of the day came from, but it may have emerged from the Latin word quando (KWAN doe) which means ‘when.’ Quandary is a synonym for dilemma, but our word of the day is more likely to be used in formal settings. Here’s an example: The judge ruled that the defendant was not at fault when faced with a quandary. The choice may have been a tough one, but he did the right thing. 
1/8/202443 seconds
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Chthonic

Chthonic is an adjective that means concerning, belonging to or inhabiting the underworld.  Our word of the day comes from a term in Greek mythology to describe the underworld. By the late 19th century, chthonic had risen from the depths of Greek mythology to inhabit English. Here’s an example: My son loves reading about Greek myths, especially the really creepy ones about chthonic activity from down below. 
1/7/202440 seconds
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Chintzy

Chintzy is an adjective that means cheap or gaudy.  In the 17th century, an Indian fabric called Chintz became popular in Europe. It was inexpensive, but ornate. In time this fabric gained a reputation as gaudy and unfashionable. The word remains with us today, maintaining the same meaning. Here’s an example: The chintzy decorations at Mike’s house could get a little embarrassing at times. He may have had good taste, but he was too cheap to show it. 
1/6/202442 seconds
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Locus

Locus is a noun that refers to a particular position, point or place. Our word of the day comes directly from the Latin word that means ‘place’ or ‘location.’ By the early 18th century, locus had entered English with its current meaning. Here’s an example: The locus of power in our city government had always been the city council. If you want to get anything done here, that’s the place you simply have to be. 
1/5/202434 seconds
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Tumid

Tumid is an adjective that means enlarged or swollen.  The Latin word tumere (to MARE ay) means ‘to swell.’ By the mid-16th century, its English counterpart, tumid, had emerged. Our word of the day can refer to many different kinds of states of enlargement. Here’s an example of tumid used in a more figurative sense: The critics found my novel poorly written and objected to my tumid use of language. Personally, I’m flummoxed and flabbergasted that someone can find my verbiage inundated with a bombastic surfeit of prolixity.
1/4/202444 seconds
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Choler

Choler is a noun that refers to anger or irascibility.  The Greek word Kholera (ko LEH rah) refers to a disease of a gastrointestinal disease. As the word entered Latin and later English, it took on a more benign form and came to refer to a person’s anger. Here’s an example: Fred’s choler can be difficult to deal with. You have to make sure you don’t say anything to set off his short fuse. 
1/3/202434 seconds
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Repast

Repast is a noun that refers to a meal.  The Latin word pascere (PA share ay) means ‘to feed.’ This is the origin of our word of the day which has been with us since the late Middle English period. Here’s an example: A slice of cheese may not have made much of a repast, but I suppose it’s better than going around hungry.
1/2/202430 seconds
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Inutile

Inutile is an adjective that means useless or pointless.  The Latin word utilis (oo TEE lis) means ‘useful.’ We see the offspring of it in words like ‘utilize’ and ‘utility.’ Our word of the day adds the prefix I-N to it and we get a word that means ‘not useful.’ Here’s an example: After six weeks of working as a coder, I began to feel pretty useless. I might have been more helpful if I actually knew how to write code. 
1/1/202439 seconds
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Calque

Calque is a noun that refers to a word that comes from one language and enters another with the same meaning. Our word of the day comes from the French word calquer (kal KAY) which means ‘copy.’ When a word gets copied from one language to another it is a calque. It may be helpful to remember that calque itself is a calque. Here’s an example: For an English speaker, Spanish is a relatively easy language to learn. Because there are so many calques, It’s not so difficult to remember Spanish words that are the same in English. 
12/31/202344 seconds
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Benignant

Benignant is an adjective that means kindly or benevolent.  In addition to our word of the day, the Latin word bene (BEN ay) has given the English language words like ‘beneficial,’ ‘benefactor,’ and ‘benediction.’ Benignant is best used to describe sweet or kind behavior, for example: I’ve always found that acting in a benignant manner is a good idea for salesman. After all, who wants to buy a car from somebody who acts like a jerk?
12/30/202341 seconds
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Idler

Idler is a noun that refers to a habitually lazy person. Our word of the day has its origin in the Old English word idel (EE deel) meaning ‘empty’ or ‘useless.’ It soon evolved into the contemporary English word idle and with it, came the word idler to describe someone inclined to be idle or useless. Here’s an example: You can’t really be an idler in the real estate business. If you sit around and waste your time when you should be hustling, someone else will take your sales. 
12/29/202341 seconds
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Venturesome

Venturesome is an adjective that means willing to take risks. Coming from Middle English, the word venture is an abbreviated version of ‘adventure,’ or exciting hazardous activity. The suffix SOME means ‘characterized by being.’ We see it in words like ‘tiresome,’ ‘fearsome’ and our word of the day venturesome. Here’s an example of it in use: I wasn’t what you’d call a venturesome child. My idea of taking risks was riding my bike across the street without the training wheels. 
12/28/202346 seconds
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Bane

Bane is a noun that refers to a cause of great distress or annoyance. The Old English word bana (BAH nah) means ‘death or poison.’ In time this word drifted into English with a less lethal meaning. It now simply refers to a source of irritation or frustration. Example: That annoying construction crew next door has become the bane of the neighborhood. How can anybody get any sleep with all that noise?
12/27/202334 seconds
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Maladroit

Maladroit is an adjective that means ineffective or bungling.  The word adroit has French origins and means skilful or clever. Our word of the day adds the prefix M-A-L which means ‘not,’ and gets us a word that means useless or unskilled. Here’s an example of maladroit in use: Given our basketball team’s tendency toward maladroit ball handling, it’s a wonder we ever scored any points. An inability to handle the ball with skill is usually not a good sign for a team. 
12/26/202345 seconds
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Whirligig

Whirligig is a noun that refers to a toy that spins around.  Our word of the day came from Late Middle English and meant ‘a whipping top.’ Although it originally referred to a specific toy, it later was used to describe any kind of toy that spins. Example: That whirligig had my son transfixed all day. I’m sure in time, it’ll take much more to capture his attention, but for now, it's fun to see that a simple spinning toy can give him so much joy. 
12/25/202340 seconds
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Coppice

Coppice is a noun that refers to a thick growth of shrubbery, small trees or underbrush.  The Latin word colpus (COLE poos) means ‘a blow.’ From there our word of the day shifted its meaning and by the Late Middle English period, it came to refer to a shrubbery. Here’s an example: The coppice out back was lovely. It’s nice to see some greenery this far into the desert. 
12/24/202333 seconds
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Tetchy

Tetchy is an adjective that means bad-tempered and irritable.  Our word of the day has something of a mysterious origin, but it seems it may have been derived from the Scots word tache (TACH) which means ‘fault.’ After drifting into English it’s maintained its current form since the late 16th century.  Steve is a brilliant plumber but his tetchy personality makes it hard for him to get clients. Sometimes the best career advice is to simply not be a grouch.  
12/23/202339 seconds
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Covey

Covey is a noun that refers to a small party or flock of birds.  The Latin word cubare (coo BAR ay) means ‘lie down.’  Our word of the day began life in the Middle English period and has since mostly been used to describe a gathering of birds, but can be used to describe anything — even people. Here’s an example: I was shocked to see a covey of trick-or-treaters at my door last week, partly because it wasn’t even dark outside yet, but also because it won’t be Halloween for another ten months. 
12/22/202341 seconds
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Riparian

Riparian is an adjective that means related to rivers or streams.  Our word of the day, which has been around since the mid-19th century, can refer to something situated on the bank of a river, or it can simply mean something pertaining to a river. here’s an example of the latter: My dog Bobby used to love those walks we would take to the river. Those riparian strolls were some of the most fun we would ever have. 
12/21/202335 seconds
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Mure

Mure is a verb that means to shut in an enclosed space.  Our word of the day comes from the Old French word for ‘to wall up’ or enclose. It’s been enclosed in the English language since the Middle English period. Here’s an example of mure in use:  As a kid, I would always try to mure my comics in a narrow crack in the wall. That way, my little brother couldn’t find them and mess them all up.
12/20/202335 seconds
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Prevenient

Prevenient is an adjective that means preceding  The Latin prefix P-R-E means ‘before.’ You can find it in a number of English words like prevent, preheat and prefix. The word venire (vuh NEAR ay), also from Latin, means ‘to come.’ To come before something means to be prevenient to it. Here’s an example of it in use: I’m not sure what happened on the prevenient day, but on Friday, there was a huge argument at the office over Jane’s parking space. Since I had missed work on Thursday, I can’t say for sure what came before the fight.
12/19/202347 seconds
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Propaedeutic

Propaedeutic is a noun that refers to a preparatory study or instruction.  Derived from the Greek word propaideuein (pro pie DEH oo een) which means ‘to teach beforehand,’ our word of the day has been used by English speakers since the mid-17th century. Here’s an example of it in use: My history as a college student was pretty mixed. When I didn’t prepare, I got awful grades. But when I spent a great deal of time on a propaedeutic, I got slightly less awful grades.
12/18/202344 seconds
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Taxonomy

Taxonomy is a noun that refers to a system of classification.  Our word of the day comes from the Greek word taxis (TAK sees) which means ‘arrangement’ along with the Greek suffix N-O-M-A-N-I-A, which means ‘distribution.’ Taxonomy emerged in the early 19th century and is mostly used in reference to classifying organisms. Here’s an example: It’s a good thing the people who discovered this cave were skilled at taxonomy. Otherwise, nerds like me would never know what kind of creatures existed here centuries ago.
12/17/202347 seconds
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Oxytone

Oxytone is an adjective that means having an accent on the last syllable. It’s also a noun that refers to a word that has an accent on the last syllable.  The Greek words oxus (ocks oose) and tonos (TOE nose) mean ‘sharp’ and ‘tone.’ Our word of the day has been with us since the mid 18th century. Here’s an example: Learning a new language can get easier once you learn that words in other languages are more likely to be oxytones. After a while stressing the last syllable of a word just becomes second nature. 
12/16/202342 seconds
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Taurine

Taurine is an adjective that refers to a bull.  The Latin word taurus (TAR oos) means bull. By adding the suffix INE, our word of the day turns taurus into an adjective to describe behavior that is stubborn like a bull. Here’s an example: Shelly’s taurine demeanor can take a while to get used to. But once you accept that you’re never going to win an argument with her, you can get along with her pretty well.
12/15/202335 seconds
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Epicrisis

Epicrisis is a noun that refers to something that follows a crisis.  Our word of the day combines the Greek prefix E-P-I, meaning ‘upon,’ with krisis (KREE sis) meaning ‘decision’ or ‘judgment.’ The word has been with us since the 15th century. Here’s an example: As if the result of our team’s game wasn’t horrific enough, there was a shocking epicrisis at our home. We ran out of cheese dip. 
12/14/202339 seconds
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Syllogism

Syllogism is a noun that refers to a form of logical argument featuring two propositions and a conclusion.  Our word of the day combines the Greek word sullogismos (soo low GISS mos) with another Greek word logos (LOW goes) which means ‘reasoning.’ Here’s an example of syllogism in use: I was perplexed by my philosophy teacher’s behavior, I tried to use a syllogism to understand his logic. It didn’t get me anywhere. I found two propositions, but the only conclusion I reached was that Mr. Dolenz is weird.
12/13/202345 seconds
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Asportation

Asportation is a noun that refers to the illegal carrying away of property.  The Latin word asportare (as poor TAR ay) means ‘to carry away.’ Our word of the day is related to other kinds of carrying like transportation or deportation. It’s been with us since the late 15th century. Here’s an example: The sudden asportation of my lunch from the office deeply annoyed me. It’s one thing to grab a napkin or two from the break room. But carrying away a whole sandwich and side order of fries is just unforgivable. 
12/12/202346 seconds
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Suppliant

Suppliant is an adjective that means ‘making or expressing a plea to someone in power.’ it is also a noun that refers to a person making a humble plea to someone in power.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word supplicare (soop lee CAR ay) which means to ‘plea’ or ‘beg.’ Suppliant may refer to a person inclined to be to someone in power or it may describe the person doing the begging. Here’s an example of the latter: Tommy’s suppliant conversations with his boss got pretty embarrassing after a while. You can only watch a man beg so much before you truly pity him.
12/11/202349 seconds
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Cantrip

Cantrip is a noun that refers to a mischievous or playful act or trick. The origin of our word of the day is not clear, but we can say with certainty that it’s been around since the late 16th century and it’s used as a synonym for prank. Here’s an example: I’ve been known to play a cantrip or two on co-workers from time to time. It’s gotten to the point where every time somebody sits down they have to check the seat to make sure they’re not getting victimized by another prank.
12/10/202339 seconds
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Sociometry

Sociometry is a noun that refers to the quantitative study and measurement of relationships within a group of people.  Stemming from the Latin words socius (SO see oos) meaning ‘companion’ or ‘associate’ and metrum (MET room) meaning ‘measurement,’ our word of the day has been with us since the early 20th century. Here’s an example: If someone had done a sociometry of our high school football team, they might have been troubled by what they would have found. Some of those guys were so weird their behavior would have puzzled the sociologists of the world. 
12/9/202349 seconds
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Corporeal

Corporeal is an adjective that means ‘consisting of material as opposed to spiritual objects.’ Our word of the day has been around since the late Middle English period. It comes from the Latin word corpus (CORE poos) which means ‘body.’ Here’s an example: No matter how spiritual a person is, when they find themselves in shark-infested waters, their corporeal concerns tend to take centre stage. Nothing is scarier than having your body attacked by a great white shark. 
12/8/202342 seconds
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Erewhonian

Erewhonian is an adjective that means ‘opposed to machinery or technological progress.’ Our word of the day gets its origin from an 1872 speculative fiction novel called ‘Erewhone.’ The title is roughly ‘nowhere’ spelled backwards and the novel is about a fictional utopian society in which technology runs amok. Erewhon could be thought of as a synonym of luddite.  I’m no erewhon, but I strongly believe we should limit the progress of technology. If we don’t, there’ll be nothing left for humans to mess up in the future.
12/7/202350 seconds
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Hoke

Hoke is a verb that means ‘to give a false or artificial quality to.’  Our word is of an unknown origin. All we know is that it’s been around since the early 20th century — along with its close relative the noun ‘hokum.’ Initially used to describe bad acting or writing, hoke has more recently been used to describe anything that rings false. Here’s an example: My lawyer warned me not to hoke it up when my case went to trial. He feared that if the jury sensed my injury was fake, I’d have no chance to win the lawsuit
12/6/202340 seconds
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Schematic

Schematic is an adjective that means symbolic or simplified.  The root word of our word of the day, scheme, came from the Latin word schema (SKEH ma) and arrived in English in the mid 16th century. It referred to a celestial diagram. In time, its offspring came to refer to a diagram of any kind. Schematic could be thought of as the adverb version of it. It can also be used as a noun that refers to a diagram. Here’s an example: The schematic Paul showed us was very helpful. It was great to be able to see a diagram of the pool before the crew began building it.
12/5/202350 seconds
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Craic

Craic is a noun that refers to an enjoyable social activity, or a good time.  Our word of the day began as the German word for crack. After it drifted into Old English, it meant ‘to make an explosive noise.’ In time, it took on its current meaning. Here’s an example of it: The craic at Jeff’s house was the most fun I’ve had in years. His parties always were a blast. 
12/4/202332 seconds
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Sanctum

Sanctum is a noun that refers to a private place from which most people are excluded.  The Latin word sanctus (SONG toose) means ‘holy.’ Our word of the day emerged in the late 16th century, taking with it a religious connotation. A sanctum is not necessarily holy, but it is often treated as if it were.  My dad’s study was a sanctum around our house and he treated it like a shrine. No one was allowed to enter except him. 
12/3/202338 seconds
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Quash

Quash is a verb that means ‘to put an end to.’ The Latin word cassus (cah SOOSE) means ‘null and void.’ Our word of the day emerged during the middle English period and has since been used as a verb and often in a legal context. Here’s an example: The lawsuit was quashed when it became clear the plaintiff had no evidence. I’m no lawyer, but even I know that if you have no evidence, you have no case.
12/2/202333 seconds
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Cabotinage

Cabotinage is an adjective that means overacting or hamming.  Originally stemming from the French word for a cabinet, our word of the day entered English in the 19th century to describe over-the-top bad acting. Here’s an example: All the cabotinage in the movie really put me off. A character couldn’t even catch a migraine without screaming and shouting.
12/1/202340 seconds
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Plumbeous

Plumbeous is an adjective that means ‘dull gray in color.’  Our word of the day gets its origin from the Latin word plumbum (PLUME boom) which means ‘lead.’ By the late 16th century, plumbeous became the word to describe the color of lead. Here’s an example: When we first moved into our home, we knew we had some painting to do. Neither one of us were fond of the plumbeous walls. That dull gray just didn’t excite us. 
11/30/202339 seconds
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Microcosm

Microcosm is a noun that refers to a thing regarded as encapsulating in miniature the characteristics of something much larger.  Our word of the day has been with us since the 14th century. It’s derived from the Greek prefix M-I-C-R-O, which means ‘small,’ and Kosmos (COS mose) meaning ‘world’ or ‘order.’ Here’s an example of microcosm in use: Our baseball team had become a microcosm for our country. Not only did we embody America’s belief in hard work and a ‘can do’ spirit, but we also believed in drinking lots of beer after victory was won. 
11/29/202353 seconds
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Alluvion

Alluvion is a noun that refers to the flow of water against a shore.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word luere (lou WEAR ay) which means ‘to wash.’ Arriving at our shores in the mid16th century, alluvion soon came to refer specifically to water washing against the shores. Here’s an example: The alluvion at the beach is a truly breathtaking sight. I could sit back and watch the tide crash into the sand all day long. 
11/28/202341 seconds
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Sluice

Sluice is a verb that means to cleanse or rinse with water.  Dating back from the 17th century, our word of the day was first used as a noun to describe a gate used to hold back water. In time it became a verb to describe the act of watering something. Here’s an example: I really need to sluice that porch. All that mildew and dirt need to be rinsed off before our party guests arrive and are too disgusted to enter our home.
11/27/202339 seconds
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Synderesis

Synderesis is a noun that refers to inborn knowledge of the basic principles of morality. Originally stemming from Greek philosophy and the Greek language, our word of the day may be used to describe an innate understanding of right and wrong. Here’s an example of synderesis in use: My dog’s synderesis must not have been properly functioning when he gobbled up all the apples yesterday. He should have known by now that he was only allowed one per day.
11/26/202343 seconds
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Posit

Posit is a verb that means to propose an explanation.  Our word of the day began as the Latin word for ‘placed,’ By the mid-17th century, it had placed itself in English as a word that specifically meant to place something as a proposed explanation. Here’s an example of posit in use: It may seem obvious that the missing cookie from the cabinet was eaten by me, but I posit that the ants stole it away in the middle of the night. This explanation may seem far-fetched, but ants are known for their great strength, aren’t they?
11/25/202344 seconds
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Euthenics

Euthenics is a noun that refers to the study of the effect of living conditions on humanity. The Greek prefix E-U means ‘good,’ while ‘Thenein’ is Greek for ‘to make or do.’ Euthenics is a word that refers to the efforts to improve human conditions. Here’s an example of it in use: Back when we were living in the desert, we could have really used some kind euthenics program. In fact, the best way to improve our lives would have been to give us an air conditioner. 
11/24/202342 seconds
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Inchmeal

Inchmeal is an adverb that means ‘little by little.’  The Old English word meal, in addition to its contemporary use, also meant ‘measure’ or ‘quantity.’ By the mid 16th century, it was combined with the measurement ‘inch’ to describe something happening slowly. Here’s an example: The worm was crawling inchmeal across the floor. It may take him a while to get there, but he sure seems determined. 
11/23/202339 seconds
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Infrasocial

Infrasocial is an adjective that means lacking social organization.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word ‘socius’ (SO see oos) meaning ‘friend’ and adds the prefix I-N-F-R-A meaning ‘below.’ If something or someone is infrasocial, their behavior is less than ideal. Used by researchers, infrasocial came into use in the mid-20th century. Here’s an example: The guys in my old Fraternity could be infrasocal at times. Unless they were looking for a fight, they weren’t very interested in getting know people outside of the house.
11/22/202351 seconds
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Autumnal

Autumnal is an adjective that means ‘characteristic of autumn.  The word autumn comes from Latin and has always meant ‘the fall,’ as in the season that follows summer. Our word of the day ads and N-A-L to give us an adjective to describe anything related to this season. Here’s an example: Football has always been my favorite autumnal activity. As soon as those leaves hit the ground, I’m ready to hear somebody’s ankle snap on the field.
11/21/202342 seconds
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Favonian

Favonian is an adjective that means ‘related to the west wind’ or ‘mild wind.’ Coming from Roman mythology, our word of the day gets its origin from Favonius (fay VONE ee us), the Roman personification of the west wind. It breezed into English in the late 16th century and came to refer to a gentle gust of wind. Here’s an example: My daughter’s flute playing has a gentle favonian quality. It hits my ears like a gentle breeze.
11/20/202340 seconds
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Terricolous

Terricolous is an adjective that means ‘living in or on the ground.’ Our word of the day comes from the Latin words ‘terra,’ (TEAR uh) meaning ‘land’ or ‘the earth,’ and colore (coe LOW air) which means ‘to inhabit.’ It’s often used to describe various animals that live underground. My favorite part about fishing is digging for worms. I’ve always been fascinated by the creepy little terricolous creatures I’d encounter when plowing into the earth.
11/19/202343 seconds
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Gerund

Gerund is a noun that refers to a verb that functions as a noun.  Our word of the day has its origin in 16th century Latin and is derived from the word ‘gerere’ (jer AIR ay) which means ‘do.’ Gerunds typically end in I-N-G. Here’s an example: The hardest part about teaching my friend Tanja about English was helping her understand how to use a gerund. She struggled with understanding how ‘swim’ was a verb, but ‘swimming’ could be a noun.
11/18/202342 seconds
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Clowder

Clowder is a noun that refers to a group of cats.  Coming from a Middle English word for ‘a mass’ or ‘a rock,’ our word of the day is used in the same way the word ‘pack’ is used to describe a gathering of wolves. Here’s an example of clowder in use: That large clowder of cats outside made me a little uneasy at first, but there’s something about cats that just melt my heart even when they’re feral and trying to nip at your ankles. 
11/17/202342 seconds
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Prelusive

Prelusive is an adjective that means ‘introductory.’  The prefix P-R-E means before. If something is preslusive. If something is prelulusive it relates to a prelude or an introduction. Here’s an example of prelusive in use: The mayor’s prelusive statements suggested he’d be answering questions related to his current scandal. But his early remarks were the only time he addressed his recent troubles. Instead, he spent the hour extolling those in attendance to get out and vote for him in the next election. 
11/16/202341 seconds
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Daphnean

Daphnean is an adjective that means shy or bashful.  Taking its name from a beautiful but demure muse, Daphnean has been around since the Late Middle English period to describe anyone who embodies the qualities of this mythical figure. Example: That librarian was awfully Daphnean when I first met her. She was so shy and retiring that after knowing her for three weeks, I still don’t know her name. 
11/15/202338 seconds
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Postcenal

Postcenal is an adjective that means ‘occurring after dinner.’  The prefix P-O-S-T means ‘after,’ while the Latin word for dinner is cena (KEN uh). Together we get our word of the day which refers to activities taking place after dinner. Here’s an example of postcenal in use: The postcenal political arguments at our dinner table could get pretty heated. It’s probably just as well that we saved those talks until after dinner. That way, people could get up and leave without missing a meal.  
11/14/202342 seconds
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Chirk

Chirk is a verb that means to make cheerful or lively. Our word of the day was born in the Middle English period as a sound made to cheer people up. It’s been a part of English language ever since. Here’s an example of chirk in use: The sound of the ice cream man’s music chirked in the early afternoon air. It brought a smile to my face because it evoked childhood memories of chasing down the ice cream man for several blocks.
11/13/202337 seconds
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Precariat

Precariat is a noun that refers to someone whose employment and income are considered unstable.  Our word of the day came around in the 1980s as a blend of the words ‘precarious,’ meaning ‘insecure’ or ‘likely to collapse’ and ‘proletariate’ meaning ‘a member of the working class.’ As with proletariat, our word of the day is often used to describe the precariat collectively. Here’s an example: Back in my days as a waiter in a greasy spoon diner, it was often tough to watch those wealthy businessmen come in wearing expensive tailored suits while those of us in the precariat weren’t sure if we’d have a job the next week. 
11/12/202352 seconds
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Chanteuse

Chanteuse is a noun that refers to a female singer, especially in a nightclub.The French word for ‘sing’ is chanter (SHAWN tay). Our word of the day has been used by English speakers since roughly the mid-20th century. Here’s an example: That chanteuse at the downtown jazz club is one great vocalist. The last time I heard a singer that gifted, she became a star.
11/11/202337 seconds
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Pleroma

Pleroma is a noun that refers to a state of perfect fullness.  Coming directly from the Greek word that translates into ‘that which fills,’ pleroma has been with us since the mid-18th century. It may be used in a religious context or in a more secular sense, for example: That glass of lemonade wasn’t just good. It was perfection itself. I would even go so far as to say it helped me reach a state of pleroma. 
11/10/202340 seconds
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Caliban

Caliban is a noun that refers to a man having a savage, beastly nature.  Derived from a character of the same name in the Shakespeare play ‘The Tempest,’ known for his rebellious and volatile nature, Caliban is often used to describe individuals of such a temperament. Example: That Caliban behind the counter at the hot dog stand refused to give me extra mustard unless I paid an additional dollar. If I wanted that kind of hostility during a meal, I’d eat dinner at home. 
11/9/202341 seconds
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Calenture

Calenture is a noun that refers to a fever or illness brought on by heat.  The Latin word calere means ‘be warm.’ By the late 16th century, our word of the day had begun being employed to describe a fever often caught by sailors in the tropics. More recently, it’s been used to describe any kind of feverish delirium caused by heated temperatures. Example: After one week, the Bahamas, I found myself suffering from calenture. I was so delirious I nearly passed up a fried fish sandwich — something I would never do in my right mind.
11/8/202347 seconds
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Fastidious

Fastidious is an adjective that means very attentive and concerned about accuracy.  Coming from the Middle English period, our word of the day gets its origin from the Latin word fastidiosus (foss tee dee OH soose) which initially meant ‘disagreeable.’ By the late 17th century, the word shifted into fastidious and took on its current meaning. Here it is in use: I can be pretty fastidious when it comes to doing my job as the local baseball team’s scorekeeper. If I wasn’t extremely careful and attentive to it, we could award a victory to the wrong team. 
11/7/202347 seconds
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Nomenclature

Nomenclature is a noun that refers to the devising or choosing of names for things.  Our word of the day comes from two Latin words. ‘nomen’ (KNOW men) which means ‘name,’ and clatura (claw TOUR ah) meaning ‘to call.’ Nomenclature has been used since the early 17th century to refer to the act of choosing a name.  Cindy’s Nomenclature when it comes to naming her menagerie of pets can get pretty silly. She’s used up so many names for her cats that she’s started to name a few cats after some of her dogs. 
11/6/202345 seconds
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Twee

Twee is an adjective that means ‘excessively quaint or dainty.  Our word of the day’s origin is from a child’s pronunciation of the word ‘sweet.’ It’s been used since the early 20th century to describe things that are a little too adorable. Here’s an example: I know everybody’s crazy about that new show on Netflix, but I find it a little bit twee for my tastes. If it got any more full of sweetness, it would induce its viewers into diabetic shock.
11/5/202339 seconds
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Sitzkrieg

Sitzkrieg is a noun that refers to a war or phase of war in which there is little or no active warfare.  Our word of the day was based on the German-based word blitzkrieg. It was first coined to describe an intense bombing during World War Two and has since been used to describe any intense bombing intended to bring about a swift victory. But while blitzkrieg meant ‘lighting war,’ sitzkrieg means ‘sitting war.’ Here’s an example of sitzkrieg in use: After a week of heavy bombing, the sitzkrieg that took place in April was considerably less intense. Sadly, this period without active warfare didn’t last.
11/4/202353 seconds
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Transmarine

Transmarine is an adjective that means passing over or crossing the sea.  The Latin prefix TRANS means ‘across.’ We see it in words like ‘transatlantic’ or ‘transfer.’ Marine comes from the Latin word for ‘of the sea.’ It’s often used to describe sea animals, for example: Those transmarine turtles sure do travel fast. It only takes them a few hours to reach the other side of the Lake we fish on. 
11/3/202344 seconds
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Temerarious

Temerarious is an adjective that means ‘reckless or rash.’ Our word of the day comes directly from the Latin word for ‘rashly.’ It’s been around since the mid-16th century. Here’s an example of it in use: As a kid, my temerarious behavior was a problem from time to time. Throwing a tantrum because you didn’t get what you wanted was, in my house, the best way to get grounded for a week.
11/2/202338 seconds
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Discompose

Discompose is a verb that means to disturb or agitate from a calm state.  Compose is a Latin-based word that’s been around since the late Middle English period and it  means ’to order or arrange.’ When we add the prefix D-I-S to it, we get our word of the day, which means to remove or disturb that order. Here’s an example: Things were going well at the party until those hoodlums came in to discompose the environment. Soon, all that sense of calm just evaporated and we had a gang fight on our hands. 
11/1/202347 seconds
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Balter

Balter is a verb that means to dance or move clumsily.  Our word of the day comes from Old English and has been around since the 16th century. Here’s an example of balter in use: Watching my dad balter around the living room when he hears his favorite song can be embarrassing. But let’s be honest, I’ve been known to dance around like a dork myself on occasion. 
10/31/202331 seconds
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Astrogate

Astrogate is a verb that means to guide a rocket or ship through space.  The Greek prefix A-S-T-R-O means ‘star.’ It’s used by English speakers in words like ‘astrology’ and ‘astronaut,’ to describe things related to the stars or outer space. Our word of the day combines astro with the suffix GATE which is often used to describe any kind of travel, as in ‘navigate’ or ‘congregate.’ Here’s an example of astrogate in use: As a child, I dreamt of being an astronaut and pictured myself steering a giant spaceship into the unknown. As a grown up the closest I came to realizing this dream is when I get to astrogate a make-believe spaceship through a video game.
10/30/202358 seconds
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Babylonic

Babylonic is an adjective that means tumultuous.  Babylon was an ancient city in Mesopotamia and was noted for its great luxury as well as its corruption. Since the mid-20th century, the adjective babylonic has been used to describe an environment that resembles Ancient Babylon. Here’s an example: I enjoyed working at the post office but found the place babylonic. There was air conditioning, snacks and free back rubs — but only for the upper management.
10/29/202342 seconds
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Argonaut

Argonaut is a noun that refers to an adventurer on a quest.  Fans of Greek Mythology may be familiar with the Argonauts, a group of heroes who accompanied Jason on board the ship Argo in the quest for the Golden Fleece. But since the 17th century, the word Argonaut has been used more broadly by English speakers to describe anyone engaged in an adventurous quest, for example: Those Argonauts in the shipping department have been trying to beat us in the annual darts tournament for years. But as long they face our office in the competition’s final round, their quest for immortality will be denied.
10/28/202350 seconds
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Animalcule

Animalcule is a noun that refers to a microscopic animal, nearly or completely invisible to the naked eye.  The Latin word ‘animalculum’ (ahn ee MAL kyoo loom) means ‘little animal.’ Since the 17th century, the word has been used — mostly in a scientific context — to describe animals too small to be seen without the aid of a microscope. Here’s an example: The discovery of an anmalcule in the patient’s hair helped the scientists better understand the source of her illness. It’s fascinating to consider that had she developed the conditions in the years before microscope, her malady would have remained a mystery. 
10/27/202351 seconds
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Pierian

Pierian is an adjective that means related to the arts.  Our word of the day gets its name from a region in ancient Macedonia known as the Perian mountains. In this mythical place, the Muses were said to bestow people with artistic ability and inspiration. Since the 16th century, Pierian has been used to describe anything of an artistic nature.  My son’s pierian tendencies haven’t served him well in school. His writings on the bathroom walls may have been the result of artistic inspiration, but they’re usually frowned upon by the principal. 
10/26/202347 seconds
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Anomalistics

Anomalistics is a noun that refers to the use of scientific methods to try and find a rational explanation for seemingly unusual phenomena.  An anomaly refers to something that deviates from the norm. Its origin is the Greek word anomilos (ah NO me losse) which means ‘against the laws or norms.’ A study of something abnormal to understand it is called anomalistics. Example: Even after years of anomalistics, the group of scientists couldn’t understand the social phenomenon taking place in town. Apparently, some strange behavior can never be fully understood.
10/25/202352 seconds
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Anhedonia

Anhedonia is a noun that refers to the inability to feel pleasure. Our word of the day comes directly from the Greek word for ‘without pleasure.’ Anhedonia may be used in a clinical sense to describe a psychiatric condition or it may be used informally, for example: My loss in the ping-pong tournament last week left me in a state of anhedonia for two or three days. Even apple pie didn’t give me pleasure. Of course, a few days and apple pies later, I was feeling my usual buoyant sense. 
10/24/202346 seconds
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Infodemic

Infodemic is a noun that refers to a glut of useless information.  Our word of the day has only been around for a few short years, but it combines to words ‘information’ and ‘epidemic’ that have been around much longer. Information is Latin in origin and refers to ‘facts provided or learned about something or someone.’ Epidemic comes from Greek and means ‘upon the people.’ When lousy information is foisted upon the people, you’ve got an infodemic on your hands.  Last summer’s infodemic about all kinds of political figures made me so skeptical about the news, I was told it would be partly cloudy with a high of seventy, I didn’t believe it. I guess that’s what a downpour of useless information can do.
10/23/202356 seconds
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Higgler

Higgler is a noun that refers to a person who travels around selling items or ‘a peddler.’ Our word of the day has been around since the 17th century as a way to describe a traveler who engages in the act of higgling. It is believed that this word was a variation on the word ‘haggle,’ as in, ‘haggling over a price.’ Here’s an example of higgler in use: When people saw me traveling around with my bags across my shoulder, they assumed I was some kind of higgler. But no, I wasn’t peddling those items I was carrying with me. I was just too cheap to rent a moving van.
10/22/202343 seconds
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Intermontane

Intermontane is an adjective that means ‘situated between mountains.’  The Latin prefix I-N-T-E-R means ‘between,’ while montanus (mon TAHN oose) means 'mountains.’ Our word of the day’s first known use came in 1807. Here’s an example: Our intermontane location of the army base made them difficult to find by enemy forces. Unfortunately being located among the mountains also made it difficult to have access to electricity. So we spent a cold six months until the war was over.
10/21/202349 seconds
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Impuberal

Impuberal is an adjective that means ‘having not reached puberty’ or ‘immature.’  The Latin word pubertas (poo BURR toss) means ‘the age of maturity or adulthood.’ Its young English descendant, puberty means the same. The addition of the prefix I-M, meaning ‘not,’ gives us a word that means ‘not yet mature.’ Example: All those impuberal jokes at our workplace get to be a bit annoying after a while. There are only so many whoopie cushions a person can endure from his co-workers before reaching the breaking point.
10/20/202347 seconds
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Glossolalia

Glossolalia is a noun that refers to the practice of speaking in an unknown language.  Our word of the day comes from two Greek words: glossa (GLOSS uh) for ‘language’ and ‘lalia’(la lee AH) which means ‘speech.’ It’s been part of the English language since the late 19th century and is sometimes used in a religious context to describe the practice of ‘speaking in tongues.’ Here’s an example of glossolalia in use: Ted was so upset, he couldn’t string together a coherent sentence. All that mumbling and bumbling seemed to resemble some strange form of glossolalia. 
10/19/202350 seconds
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Amaranthine

Amaranthine is an adjective that means never fading or undying.  Our word of the day comes from a plant called an amaranth that is known for never fading. Its name comes from the Greek word amarantos (ah mar RAHN tose) which means ‘not fading.’ Amaranthine is an adjective that can be used to describe any object that doesn’t fade. Example: Most of my clothes tend to lose their lustre after a few years, but not my amaranthine Grateful Dead t-shirt. It remains as bright and vibrant as I bought it twenty-two years ago. 
10/18/202347 seconds
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Interjacent

Interjacent is an adjective that means lying among or between other things.  The Latin prefix I-N-T-E-R means ‘between.’ The Latin word jacere (juh SARE ay) means ‘to be situated,’ Since the late 16th century, our word of the day has been used to describe things situated between things. Example: The mountains were a gorgeous view, but as a fan of hamburgers, I was a little distracted by all the interjacent fast food restaurants. How do they expect you to hike through any mountains with all those tasty burger places between them?
10/17/202351 seconds
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Intempestive

Intempestive is an adjective that means untimely or out of season. The Latin word tempestivus (tem PESS teev oose) means timely. With the addition of the prefix I-N, meaning ‘not,’ we get a word that means ‘untimely.’ Here’s an example of intempestive in use: I normally enjoy a good Christmas parade, but last week’s was a little intempestive. Maybe having it take place in early June wasn’t such a good idea.
10/16/202342 seconds
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Yips

Yips is a noun that refers to nervousness affecting an athlete before a big play or game.  Nobody knows the origin of our word of the day, but we know it’s been used in the sports world since the 1930s. Here’s an example of yips in use: Those missed free throws I made at the end of the game were clearly an example of the yips. With the game on the line and two seconds left on the clock, I simply panicked. But the other ten free throws I missed for the rest of the game, that was just poor effort.
10/15/202341 seconds
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Altisonant

Altisonant is an adjective that means lofty or pompous.  The Latin prefix A-L-T-I comes from ‘altus’ (AWL toose) meaning high, as in ‘altitude’ or ‘alto.’ Sonant (SEW nant) means ‘sound.’ Since the 16th century, altisonant has been used by English speakers to describe someone who sounds ‘high and mighty.’ Here’s an example: Rex can get a little big for his britches from time to time. Most of the time, he’s a fairly down-to-earth fellow, but when he starts referring to himself in the third person, you know he’s about to get altisonant. 
10/14/202344 seconds
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Afterclap

Afterclap is a noun that refers to unexpected damage after a supposedly closed event. Our word of the day is a portmanteau, meaning it combines two words. Afterclap combines the Old English ‘after’ with the Middle English ‘clap’ and the result is a perfect way to describe unforeseen consequences. Here’s an example: The afterclap of our cleaning up of our yard is that all the neighbors want to come and visit — which makes the yard dirty again. I guess you never know the consequences of your actions until you do them. 
10/13/202344 seconds
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Adorkable

Adorkable is an adjective that means fashionable or socially awkward in a way regarded as appealing or cute.  Although it’s a very recent addition to the English language, it’s a combination of two words that have been around for a while. The Latin-derived ‘adorable’ has been with us since the early 17th century while ‘dork’ emerged in the 1960s. Together they describe someone just goofy enough to be cute. Here’s an example of adorkable in use: When Shelly described me as adorkable, I took it as a compliment. But maybe I shouldn’t have. Especially when she talked about how cute it was when I couldn’t walk and chew gum at the same time.
10/12/202351 seconds
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Brunt

Brunt is a noun that refers to the worst part of a specified thing.  Coming from middle English, our word of the day was once used to describe a violent blow. In more recent years, it is more likely to be used to figuratively refer to an emotional blow someone may receive through criticism or an insult. Example: The brunt of Kevin’s rant was borne by Sheila. It was, after all, her bad decisions that he focused on during his angry harangue.
10/11/202335 seconds
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Filigree

Filigree is a noun that refers to an ornamental wire made of gold or silver.  The Latin word filum (FEE loom) means ‘thread.’ By the late 17th century, filum had evolved into our word of the day and had come to refer to a form of decoration. Here’s an example of filigree in use: Stacy always had flamboyant tastes, but the way she decorated her dog’s house with gold filigree was a little excessive.
10/10/202346 seconds
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Plebiscite

Plebiscite is a noun that refers to a direct vote of all the members of an electorate on an important issue.  The Latin prefix P-L-E-B means ‘the common people,’ much like the word ‘plebeian,’ while scitum (SKI toom) also Latin, means ‘decree’ or ‘resolution.’ Here’s an example of plebiscite in use: The local plebiscite was greeted with great enthusiasm and passed with overwhelming success. I guess that’s what happens when you ask the public to vote on whether or not they want a parade this summer.
10/9/202343 seconds
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Anamnesis

Anamnesis is a noun that refers to the medical or psychiatric history of a patient.  Our word of the day comes from Greek where it simply referred to ‘memory.’ Since the 17th century, the word has been adopted into English and used mainly in the medical field. Here’s an example: The doctors didn’t see anything in Mrs Miller’s history that suggested she needed blood pressure medication, but it’s always a good idea to check a patient’s anamnesis just to make sure.
10/8/202352 seconds
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Obreptitious

Obreptitous is an adjective that means done falsely or secretly.  Coming from the Latin word obrepere (oh brep AIR ay) which means ‘to creep upon,’ our word of the day can be thought of as a synonym for ‘sneaky’ or ‘underhanded.’ Example: I don’t know what happened to the last donut in the break room, but I have my suspicions that it was taken through obreptitious means. It’s the only way to explain how someone could have snatched something I was watching so closely.
10/7/202344 seconds
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Macaronism

Macaronism is a noun that refers to the excessive use of big, showy words in writing or speech.  Originally coming from French, macaronism was used in the 17th century to refer to the excessive use of foreign words for the sake of sounding sophisticated and learned. In time it came to mean any showy or extravagant use of words. Here’s an example: Daryl’s macaronism has really gotten out of hand. It’s reached the point where he can’t even say “good morning” in less than ten minutes. 
10/6/202345 seconds
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Epaulette

Epaulette is a noun that refers to an ornamental shoulder piece on an item of clothing.  Our word of the day comes fairly directly from the French word for ‘shoulder.’ In more recent years it has come to be used to refer figuratively to any kind of honor given. Example: After my performance in the play, I received the most flattering epaulette of my acting career. The critic said, and I quote, “This actor wasn’t exactly good, but he was considerably less awful than the rest of the cast.”
10/5/202349 seconds
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Centrifugal

Centrifugal is an adjective that means moving or tending to move away from a centre.  Dating back to the early 18th century, our word of the day comes from two Latin words, centrum (SCENT room) meaning ‘center,’ and fugus (FOO goose) meaning ‘fleeing.’  Centrifugal is often used to describe a particular act of physics in which a spinning object moving at a high speed will move from the center. Example: It could watch the centrifugal forces of my son’s model all day. Watching the thing spin in a circle is as fascinating as any movie I’ve ever seen.
10/4/202348 seconds
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Cynology

Cynology is a noun that refers to the study of dogs.  The prefix of our word of the day C-Y-N comes from the Greek word kynos (KYE nos) which means ‘Dog.’ The suffix O-L-O-G-Y means ‘the study of’ as in ‘biology,’ ‘geography’ or ‘archaeology.’ Cynology is often used in a scientific context, for example: My professor’s work in the field of cynology was interesting, but not exactly groundbreaking. For example, his work revealed that in ancient times, dogs liked to play fetch.
10/3/202347 seconds
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Hobbyhorse

Hobbyhorse is a noun that refers to a topic that someone talks about frequently.  Dating back to the 15th century, our word of the day came from Old English as a reference to a toy given to children. In time, the word developed a metaphorical meaning and came to refer to a topic that someone is greatly preoccupied with. Here’s an example: Michael’s hobbyhorse had always been the swimming pool at the park. For as long as I can recall, he always began his day with a long-winded rant about how nice the pool was until the park board stopped cleaning it up. 
10/2/202348 seconds
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Matrifocal

Matrifocal is an adjective that means ‘based on the mother as the head of the family or household.’ The Latin word mater (MA ter) means mother. This mother has given birth to many English words like ‘maternity’ and ‘maternal.’ It’s also the basis for our word of the day. Matrifocal could be thought of as a synonym for matriarchal. Example: In college, I studied matrifocal societies. It was fascinating to learn about cultures that place mothers as the leaders of the home.
10/1/202341 seconds
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Displume

Displume is a verb that means to strip of honors or an award.  The word of the displume is plume, a Latin-based word that refers to the covering or feathers of a bird. The prefix D-I-S means to remove, so to displume a bird means to remove its feathers. Our word of the day may be used in this way or in a more figurative sense, for example: The committee decided to displume the athlete when they discovered he’d been using performance-enhancing drugs. It’s a shame to see someone stripped of an honor simply because they refused to play by the rules. 
9/30/202346 seconds
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Unfeigned

Unfeigned is an adjective that means genuine or sincere.  The root word of unfeigned is feign, a word of Latin origin that means to invent or pretend. Our word of the day adds the prefix U-N which means ‘not.’ If something is unfeigned, it’s not invented or pretended. In other words, it’s real or honest. Here’s an example of unfeigned in use: When I developed a cold on the day of our big history test, my parents suspected I was faking. After taking my temperature, they learned my illness was unfeigned — but still the product of good timing. 
9/29/202350 seconds
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Sybarite

Sybarite is a noun that refers to a person accustomed to luxury.  Our word of the day is a toponym, meaning it is a word derived from a location. In this case, the location is an ancient Greek city called Sybaris located in what is now Southern Italy. Sybaris was well known among those who sought great luxury and extravagance. Centuries later, the word named for it lives on as a noun to describe those who are lovers of luxury.  Don’t get me wrong. I’m no sybarite. I’m not looking for great refinement and decor in a hotel. But it would be nice to find a place where the towels aren’t welded to the racks. 
9/28/202350 seconds
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Sward

Sward is a noun that refers to an expanse of grass.  Coming from an Old English word for ‘skin,’ our word of the day soon became a term for the upper layer of soil. More recently it’s come to refer to an upper layer that is covered with grass. Here’s an example: I once got a little confused when my dad told me to cut the sward out back. After learning that he meant the grass, I apologized for sawing the fence in half. 
9/27/202334 seconds
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Logophile

Logophile is a noun that refers to a lover of words.  The Greek word logo (LOW go) means ‘words,’ while the suffix P-H-I-L-E means ‘a lover of.’ Here’s an example of logophile in use: When Annette told me she never misses an episode of Word of the Day, she explained to me that she was such a logophile that her love of words makes her hungry to learn new ones. And here I was thinking it was the dulcet tones of the show’s host that made her a fan.
9/26/202342 seconds
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Disapprobation

Disapprobation is a noun that refers to a strong disapproval.  The Latin word probus (PRO boose) means ‘good.’ By adding the prefix D-IS-, we get a word to describe behavior that is bad enough to receive disapproval.  My family is usually comfortable with all the decisions I make except where clothes are concerned. When I show up with an ill-fitting pair of bell-bottom jeans, I face some pretty heavy disapprobation. 
9/25/202341 seconds
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Blatherskite

Blatherskite is a noun that may refer to foolish talk, or it may refer to a person who engages in foolish talk. Coming from the mid-17th century, our word of the day was first used in the Scottish song Maggie Lauder. It soon became popular among Americans as well as Brits. Example: There was a lot of blatherskite spoken at the party, but perhaps the most foolish thing said was that we needed another beer run. Believe me, at that hour, we’d already had enough beer.
9/24/202343 seconds
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Engender

Engender is a verb that means to cause or give rise to a feeling, situation or condition.  Our word of the day comes from the Old English word ‘beget’ (buh GET) which means to give birth to. Engender may be used to describe anyone giving birth to a particular feeling or emotion, for example: Whenever I hear that song, it engenders feelings of great joy. That thunderous crescendo at the end always reminds me of a happy time in childhood. It’s rare that a song is able to give rise to that much emotion.
9/23/202342 seconds
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Requisite

Requisite is an adjective that means made necessary by particular circumstances or regulations.  The Latin word requisitus (wreck we SUITE oose) meaning, ‘deemed necessary’ provides the basis for requisite. It shares its root with other English words like ‘require’ and ‘inquire.’ Example: There I was, the last batter with two outs in the ninth inning and I was ready to hit a game-winning home run. The only problem was I forgot my requisite bat. 
9/22/202342 seconds
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Gomer

Gomer is a noun that refers to a stupid colleague.  The precise origin of our word of the day is something of a mystery. There is a man named Gomer in the Bible, but some believe that the name became an insult after it was used on the character Gomer Pyle, the inept soldier depicted in the popular 1960s sitcom of the same name. Regardless of its source, Gomer has become an unflattering term for somebody not very good at his job. Here’s an example:At the ice cream stand, I developed a reputation as a Gomer after I made a few mistakes. But honestly, I didn’t feel I was that incompetent. Anybody can mistake a five-pound order for a five-gallon order, can’t they?
9/21/202349 seconds
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Paronomasia

Paronomasia is a noun that refers to a play on words.  Coming directly from a Greek word that means ‘beside’ and ‘name,’ our word of the day has been around since the late 16th century. Here’s an example of paronomasia in use: I call my dad the Prince of Paronomasia. There is no play on words that is too silly or too corny for him to use at a family function. 
9/20/202339 seconds
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Datum

Datum is a noun that refers to a piece of information.  Having been around the English language since the mid-18th century, our word of the day comes directly from the Latin word for ‘something given.’ It is the singular version of the commonly used plural word ‘data.’ Here’s an example: While eating a hot dog at the company picnic, Harvey walked up to me and delivered this fun fact: The average hot dog contains approximately one rat hair each. I just thanked him for the datum and threw my plate in the trash can.
9/19/202337 seconds
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Depuration

Depuration is a noun that refers to the act or process of freeing something of impurities.  The root word of depuration is the Latin-based word, ‘pure.’ By adding the prefix D-E, meaning ‘completely.’ we get a word that means to make something completely pure. Here’s an example of our word of the day in use: The depuration of our city’s water supply was an important step toward creating better health. Purifying water can be expensive, but it’s worth the cost.
9/18/202342 seconds
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Logogram

Logogram is a noun that refers to a sign or character representing a word or phrase.  Coming from two Geek words ‘logos’ for ‘word’ and ‘gram’ for letter, our word of the day has been around since the 19th century. Here’s an example: It wasn’t easy to make sense of all the logograms contained in the graffiti. But it helps to understand that certain letters or symbols have a meaning related to certain words. 
9/16/202339 seconds
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Cyclopean

Cyclopean is an adjective that means made of huge blocks of stone.  The cyclops of Ancient Greek mythology were giant one-eyed creatures. Our word of the day has been around since the mid-17th century to describe a style of buildings built with huge stones. Here’s an example of cyclopean in use: Those cyclopean buildings look strange around all these steel and glass structures.
9/15/202341 seconds
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Squall

Squall is a noun that refers to a sudden gust of wind.  Our word of the day has been around since the mid-17th century. It is thought to be an alteration of the word squeal, in imitation of the sound made by a strong gust. Here’s an example: As if the rain wasn’t bad enough, that squall nearly knocked me off my feet. The last thing you want is to be thrown by a strong gale into a giant puddle. 
9/14/202337 seconds
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Thersitical

Thersitical is an adjective that means given to scurrilous language.  Our word of the day comes from the Greek word for ‘little beast.’ In time, thersitical came to refer to plays that were rude or crude. It may also be used to describe the temperament of an unpleasant person, for example: After grumbling all day about the weather, Paul had established a reputation as a thersitical guy. It wasn’t just that he didn’t like all those clouds. It’s more that he used such ugly language to articulate his contempt for them. 
9/13/202351 seconds
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Fetor

Fetor is a noun that refers to a strong, foul smell.  Our word of the day comes directly from the Latin word for ‘soul smell.’ It’s been around since the 17th century and is used to describe foul smells that have been around much longer. Example: The fetor coming from the parking lot dumpster became such a distraction that we had to move it. Rotten smells aren’t exactly the kind of things you want customers to be exposed to after leaving a restaurant. 
9/12/202346 seconds
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Theriac

Theriac is a noun that refers to a medicine that is reputed to cure all.  Our word of the day comes directly from ancient Greece where it referred to the venom of a snake reputed to contain healing properties. Centuries later, doctors no longer believe in prescribing snake venom to their patients, but the term theriac is still very much around describing all manner of cure-alls.  After getting sick, I tried a little of the theriac that my friend insists will offer an immediate cure. Not only did this so-called theriac not cure me, but it also added to my list of problems a giant stomach ache.
9/11/202351 seconds
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Agglutinate

Agglutinate is a verb that means to firmly stick together to form a mass.  The Latin word gluten (GLUE ten) meaning ‘to adhere’ has given birth to the word ‘glue’ as well as our word of the day. Agglutinate has stuck around since the mid-16th century. It’s often sued in a medical context. Here’s an example: In medical school, we learned how red blood cells often agglutinate and form intricate meshes. We later learned how important it is for these cells to stick together. 
9/10/202347 seconds
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Palladian

Palladian is an adjective that means wise or learned.  Our word of the day is an eponym, meaning it is a word named after a historical figure. Palladian takes its name from an architect of the 18th century named Andrea Palladio. Palladio was known for his elegant style. Here’s an example: This Palladian apartment building I’ve just moved into makes me feel like I’ve stumbled into 18th-century Europe. I love the elegance but I just hope the plumbing is a little more up-to-date.
9/9/202347 seconds
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Mimesis

Mimesis is a noun that refers to duplication or mimicry.  Our word of the day comes directly from the Greek word that means ‘to imitate.’ It’s been around since the mid-16th century. Example: As a kid, I drove my parents crazy trying to imitate them. This got laughs from everybody — except my parents. They didn’t have much admiration for skill at mimesis. 
9/8/202337 seconds
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Macrology

Macrology is a noun that refers to the use of more words than necessary.  Our word of the day is derived from two words of Greek origin, ‘macro,’ meaning ‘long,’ and ‘logos,’ which means ‘words.’ Simply put, macrology is the use of too many words. Example: The Mayor’s tendency toward macrology made listening to him a very tedious affair. It would take him five thousand words to say ‘good morning.’
9/7/202340 seconds
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Ostensible

Ostensible is an adjective that means stated or appearing to be true, but not necessarily so.  Having been around since the mid-18th century, our word of the is derived from the Latin word ostentere (oh sten TEAR ay) which means ‘to display.’ Here’s an example: The ostensible reason for not giving the employees free coffee anymore was that the company could no longer afford it. But looking at the money the company spends on decorating the hallways makes it hard to believe that.
9/6/202346 seconds
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Deipnosophist

Deipnosophist is a noun that refers to a person skilled at dinner talk.  The Greek word for ‘meal’ provides the prefix D-E-I-P-N-O of our word of the day, while the suffix S-O-P-H-I-S-T comes from the Greek word for ‘wisdom.’ Here’s an example of it in use: My son has become something of a deipnosophist at the dinner table lately. He can discuss a wide range of topics, but his favorite thing to talk about at the table is what he wants for dessert.
9/5/202346 seconds
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Deepfake

Deepfake is a noun that refers to an image or recording altered to misrepresent someone.  A recent addition to the English language, our word of the day is derived from two common words of Old English origin, ‘Deep’ and ‘fake’ and describes a practice that has only become possible in the past few decades. Here’s an example: That deepfake of my favorite actor looked so convincing I nearly believed they were preparing to star in a new production. But I soon realized they were being misrepresented when they claimed to be staring in a new production on the moon. 
9/4/202349 seconds
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Satiate

Satiate is a verb that means to satisfy a desire.  The Latin word satis (saw TEES) means ‘enough.’ Its linguistic offspring satiate has been around since the Late Middle English period and can be thought of as a synonym for quench or satisfy.  After a long day at work, it takes more than a tiny sandwich to satiate me. Some days it may take nine or ten sandwiches before I can truly consider myself satisfied. 
9/3/202341 seconds
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Technocracy

Technocracy is a noun that refers to the government or control of society or industry by an elite of technical experts.  Technocracy is a fairly recent word that has an old origin. It came to be in the early 20th century and uses the prefix T-E-C-H, which refers to technology, and the suffix CRACY, which means ‘rule.’ Here’s an example: In a technocracy, those who control the technology, rule the world. That’s why I always make sure I hold onto the remote control in my house. Nobody controls my TV but me.
9/2/202356 seconds
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Biophilia

Biophilia is a noun that refers to the desire or tendency to commune with nature.  Our word of the day combines the Greek prefix B-I-O, meaning ‘life’ with the Greek suffix P-H-I-L-I-A meaning ‘a love for.’ More specifically, having biophilia means having a love of nature.  There are some who when in the midst of nature are swept away by the biophilia of the moment, in awe of the majesty of nature all around us. And there are some like Kenny, who only love nature when it gives him something tasty to put on his barbecue pit. 
9/1/202350 seconds
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Fulcrum

Fulcrum is a noun that refers to something that plays a central or essential role in an activity, event or situation.  The Latin word fulcire (full CHEER ay) means ‘to prop up’ or ‘support up.’ When our word of the day first joined the English language in the late 17th century, fulcrum was used to refer to a lever used to support something. This meaning still exists, but today the word is more likely to be used in reference to a role or event that supports something, for example: The quarterback is generally the fulcrum of any football team. Without his support, the rest of the team has no chance of winning.
8/31/202348 seconds
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Orrery

Orrery is a noun that refers to a model representing the solar system.  Our word of the day got its name from a historical figure known as the Fourth Earl of Orrery for whom a model of the solar system was made in the early 18th century. The model and the name for it are still with us today. Here’s an example of orrery in use: As a teenager, I wanted to make an orrery for the annual school science fair. But because I was a little lazy in gathering all the necessary equipment, I couldn’t make a model of the whole solar system. I had to settle for a light bulb to represent the sun. 
8/30/202345 seconds
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Subaltern

Subaltern is an adjective that means of a lower status.  Our word of the day comes from the prefix S-U-B for ‘below’ and the Latin word alternus (ALL ter noose) which means ‘every other.’ Initially used as a rank in the British army, subaltern soon came to be used more broadly in reference to anyone below someone else’s status. Here’s an example: My boss at the restaurant wasn’t the easiest to get along with. When dealing with the lowly wait staff, he seemed to act as if he was working with subaltern people. 
8/29/202347 seconds
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Philter

Philter is a noun that refers to a potion credited with magical powers.  The Greek verb for ‘to love’ provides the basis for our word of the day. Philter has been with us since the late 16th century. Here’s an example of it in use: I’m a big fan of those old corny fantasy movies from the 1950s, especially the ones that feature some guy falling in love with a gorgeous gal after sipping from a philter. They make me laugh by suggesting you’d have to drink a magic potion to fall head over heels for a Marylyn Monroe or a Barbara Stanwyck. 
8/28/202347 seconds
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Ocher

Ocher is a noun that refers to a pale, brownish color.  Our word of the day comes directly from the Greek word for ‘yellow.’ It’s been with us since the Middle English period. Here’s an example: My wife insists on buying me bright clothes for our summer vacations, but I just don’t like the way I look in anything too shiny and bright. I’ll stick with my good old ocher sweaters, thank you very much.
8/27/202340 seconds
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Polydipsia

Polydipsia is a noun that refers to excessive thirst.  The Greek word for thirst forms the basis for our word of the day and it’s joined by its prefix P-O-L-Y, which, in this context, means ‘very much.’ Polydipsia has been around since the mid-17th century. It’s often used in a medical context, but can also be used in an informal setting. Example: After two hours in the Nevada sun, I was ready to guzzle down a gallon of iced tea. I haven’t experienced this kind of polydipsia since I spent a summer in Central America.
8/26/202351 seconds
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Nonfeasance

Nonfeasance is a noun that refers to the failure to perform an act that is required by law.  The Latin word facare (fah CAR ay) means to do. The addition of the prefix N-O-N –  meaning ‘no’ or ‘not’ –  means that our word of the day is a reference to not doing something, in this case something that is demanded by legal responsibility. Frequently used in law, nonfeasance has been with us since the early 17th century. Here’s an example: The jury ruled that James was guilty of nonfeasance by not correcting the problem with the wiring. Essentially, they were saying that because he failed to repair the damaged wires, he was responsible for the ensuing fire that took place.
8/25/202357 seconds
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Papal

Papal is an adjective that means related to a pope. The Latin word papa (PA pa) refers to the ‘bishop of Rome.’ Our word of the day comes from the Late Middle English period. Here’s an example: Last year’s papal visit had everybody enthralled. Even those who weren’t Catholic found themselves taken by the majesty of the pope.
8/24/202330 seconds
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Preceptor

Preceptor is a noun that refers to a tutor or instructor.  The Latin word praeceptor (pry CEP tor) means ‘teacher’ or ‘instructor.’ Joining English in the Late Middle English period, our word of the day is a synonym of teacher but is more likely to be used in a formal, academic context like medical school. For example: The wisest advice I’ve ever gotten from a teacher came to me in medical school where my preceptor recommended I spend some time to touch up my Latin. After all, I’d never become a doctor if I couldn’t pronounce words like cranium, femur or dorsalis pedis.
8/23/202348 seconds
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Prow

Prow is an adjective that means gallant or valiant.  Coming from the Latin word pro, meaning ‘in front,’ our word of the day has been with us since the mid-16th century as a reference to those brave enough to fight at the front of a boat or ship. Here’s an example: I tend to think of myself as a fairly prow individual. But when we’re in the woods and I hear the growl of a grizzly bear, I figure that’s the time to let someone else be courageous.
8/22/202335 seconds
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Telekinesis

Telekinesis is a noun that refers to the ability to move objects by nonphysical means.  The word of our word of the day is kinesis (ken EE sis) a Greek word for ‘motion.’ The Greek prefix T-E-L-E means ‘at a distance,’ as we see in words like ‘telescope’ or ‘television.’ When combined, we get a word that refers to moving things at a distance. Example: It’s times like this I wish I had telekinesis powers. When I’m too tired to get up and carry my bags to the bedroom, the ability to move things without touching them would be a great power to have. 
8/21/202352 seconds
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Tramontane

Tramontane is an adjective that means traveling to or situated on the other side of the mountains.  The Latin prefix T-R-A means ‘across’ or ‘beyond,’ while the Latin word mons (MONS) means ‘mountain’. If something is located transmontane, it is located ‘across the mountains.’  After spending several weeks on the eastern side of the Alps, it never occurred to me how lovely the other side of the mountains were. Once we traveled there, I was stunned by the beauty of the tramontane region.
8/20/202345 seconds
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Morphology

Morphology is a noun that refers to the study of words and how they form.  The prefix M-O-R-P-H comes from the Greek word for ‘form.’ In time it came to refer to a change in form. The suffix of our word of the day is O-L-O-G-Y which means ‘the study of.’ So morphology is a study in the forms of words. Example: I’ve always been fascinated with the way certain words change as they transition from one language to another. In fact, there’s a great book by on morphology that details all these changes in form that many words have undergone. 
8/19/202352 seconds
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Dialectician

Dialectician is a noun that refers to a person who is skilled in philosophical debate.  Coming from the Greek word for ‘the art of conversation’ or ‘debate,’ dialectic is an English word for discussion that sometimes took on a philosophical meaning. By the mid-16th century, our word of the day came to mean ‘philosophical debate’ in some contexts. A dialectician became the word for someone skilled at it. Here’s an example: Being married to someone who never loses an argument isn’t always a lot of fun. My wife, the dialectician, has an undefeated record when it comes to engaging in philosophical arguments with me.
8/18/202357 seconds
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Glottologist

Glottologist is a noun that refers to a person who is an expert at language. The Greek word ‘gotta’ (GLAH TA) means ‘tongue,’ and the suffix O-L-O-G-I-S-T means ‘one who studies.’ You could think of our word of the day as a synonym of ‘linguist.’ Here’s an example: When I wanted to know the origin of our family name, I consulted a glottologist. When we learned our surname was of French origin, we decided to take a trip to France. Given my love of French food, I’m really glad we took the time to meet with that language expert.
8/17/202348 seconds
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Otaku

Otaku is a noun that refers to a young person who is obsessed with computers and similar interests to the detriment of their social skills.  A loan word from Japanese, otaku could be thought of as a synonym of ‘nerd.’ Here’s an example of it in use: My son looks exactly like the same kind of Otaku as his father. He spends all day in school studying and learning, and all night studying and learning. Just like me, the only social skill he’s developed is talking about mathematic equations.
8/16/202344 seconds
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Nearlywed

Nearlywed is a noun that refers to someone who is about to be married. It can also refer to someone who lives with a significant other but has not married.  Our word of the day could be thought of as a takeoff of ‘newlywed,’ a word that entered English in the early 19th century. It described a person who had recently been married.  Newarlywed, on the other hand, is a more recent addition to the English language and is almost always used in an informal setting. Here’s an example: After a few years as a nearlywed, Brian decided to make his union to Angie official. So he proposed marriage. Unfortunately, she turned him down. I guess some people prefer being almost married to being married.
8/15/202355 seconds
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Flammiferous

Flammiferous is an adjective that means bright with a flame.  The Latin word flamma (FLAM uh) means ‘flame.’ A flammiferous object is one that contains flames. Here’s an example: Whatever the source of that flammigerous object in the distance, we could tell it was seriously on fire. When something that big is ablaze, it’s hard to miss.
8/14/202337 seconds
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Importune

Importune is a verb that means to annoy or harass someone. The Latin word importunus (im poor TWO noose) means ‘inconvenient.’ In the early 16th century, this word gave birth to our word of the day. Here’s an example: I didn’t mean to importune the mayor by bombarding him with silly questions. But I felt it was vital that we get his opinion on Sunday’s game. And if that meant harassing him repeatedly with queries, so be it.
8/13/202340 seconds
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Mauka

Mauka is an adverb and an adjective that means toward the mountains.  Coming from the Hawaiian language and still very popular in the fiftieth state, our word of the day has commonalities with words like ‘close’ and ‘fast’ as it may be used as an adjective and an adverb. Here’s an example of it as an adverb: We walked mauka for a few hours before realizing we were heading in the wrong direction. We should have known the place we were seeking was closer to the shore than the mountains. 
8/12/202343 seconds
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Mellisonant

Mellisonant is an adjective that means pleasing to the ear.  Coming from the Latin words for ‘honey,’ “(mel EESE) and ‘sound’ (SO noose) our word of the day has been used to describe sweet sounds since the early 17th century. Here’s an example: That band’s mellisonant first album has been used in our home for over a decade. After all, what better way to put kids to sleep than to have sweet sounds echoed throughout the home.
8/11/202343 seconds
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Curio

Curio is a noun that refers to a rare, unusual or intriguing object.  Our word of the day began as an abbreviated variation on the word ‘curiosity,’ Which is derived from the Latin word cuiosus (koo ree OH soos) meaning, ‘curious.’ By the mid 19th century, curio had established an identity of its own. Here’s an example: The bookshelf I attempted to make has become a curio. This odd-looking item hasn’t been used to store books, but it sure has gotten its share of confused gawks over the years. People describe it as the most unusual thing in our home. 
8/10/202348 seconds
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Reboant

Reboant is an adjective that means resonating or reverberating loudly.  Sharing a common ancestor with words like reverb or reverberation, our word of the day comes from the Greek word for roar or cry. When the prefix RE is added, it implies an echo.  Reboant has been a part of the English language since the early 17th century. Here’s an example: Those reboant screams at the end of the movie have been haunting my dreams for the last five years. Hearing those echoes all these years reminds me of the most horrifying movie I’ve ever seen. 
8/9/202350 seconds
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Overdetermined

Overdetermined is an adjective that means having many causes. The Latin-derived English word ‘determine’ means ‘to identify something as a cause.’  When the prefix O-V-E-R is added, it means ‘an excess or exaggeration’ of causes. Something that has many causes is overdetermined. Example: According to social scientists, reading ability is overdetermined. There is not one cause for it, but many. 
8/8/202348 seconds
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Cespitose

Cespitose is an adjective that means growing in clumps.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word caespes (KIE ay space) meaning ‘turf’ or ‘sod.’ Its recently emerging offspring is used to refer to grass or other kinds of plants that grow in clumps. Example: That cespitose grass around the cactus isn’t very plentiful here in the desert. As it gets warmer and warmer, those small clumps of grass will become even less common.
8/7/202341 seconds
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Ocellus

Ocellus is a noun that refers to the eye of a small creature.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word oculus (OH koo loose) which means ‘eye.’ Ocullus has been around since the early 19th century and is always used in reference to the smaller eyes of animals. Here’s an example: When I saw those tiny worms, I was stunned to learn they had the ability to see. But when Mr. Hammel showed me the creature’s small eyes, I realized that sight was possible for them. True, an ocellus doesn’t always grant an animal a very vivid sense of sight, but for some beings, all they need to survive is the ability to detect differences in light. a
8/6/202354 seconds
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Littoral

Littoral is an adjective that means relating to or situated on the shore of the sea or a lake.  The Latin word litus (LEE toos) means ‘beach.’ Our word of the day has been around since the mid-17th century as an adjective that references the beach and, less commonly, as a noun that, like its ancestor, means ‘beach.’ Here’s an example of littoral in use: My favorite thing about the movie was its depiction of the littoral scenes. Nothing is more stunning than the image of miles and miles of gorgeous shoreline.
8/5/202343 seconds
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Ethology

Ethology is a noun that refers to the study of animal behavior.  The Greek word ethos (EE thoss) refers to ‘nature’ or ‘disposition’ and the common suffix O-L-O-G-Y means ‘study of.’ When combined, we get a word that refers to the study of the nature of animals. Examples: I have to whistle and scream my brains out to get our bulldog Sparky to come in from the yard at the end of the day. But somehow, my daughter only needs to lift a finger to get him in. One of these days that girl’s knowledge of animals is going to make her a fortune in ethology.
8/4/202348 seconds
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Monopsony

Monopsony is a noun that refers to a market situation in which there is only one buyer. The Greek word mono (MA no) means ‘one,’ as in monopoly, a word that refers to a market situation with one seller. With monopsony, the word ends with P-S-O-N-Y which comes from the Greek word for ‘buying.’ Here’s an example: Our baseball factory had no choice but to accept the terms of the local baseball team because they were the only buyer in town. It wasn’t a great situation, but with a monopsony, there’s no other option.
8/3/202345 seconds
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Vicissitude

Vicissitude is a noun that refers to a change of circumstances or fortune.  The Latin word vicissim (vee CHEESE eem) means ‘by turns or changes.’ Our word of the day has been English since the early 17th century. Here’s an example of it in use: The daily vicissitudes of owning a business were simply too stressful for me to take. Whether it was ordering mustard or ketchup or buns or wieners, operating a hot dog stand had so many changes, I just couldn’t keep up. 
8/2/202347 seconds
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Startlish

Startlish is an adjective that means ‘easily startled.’ The Old English word ‘start’ provides the basis of our word of the day as well as the word startle. Startlish refers to someone inclined to be startled. It is a synonym of the word skittish. Here’s an example of it in use: My sister’s startlish behavior made her a perfect victim for my scary pranks. When she’d object to my shenanigans, I’d tell there that if she wasn’t so easily terrified, I wouldn’t have spent so much time terrifying her. 
8/1/202344 seconds
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Orthography

Orthography is a noun that refers to the conventional spelling system of a language.  The Greek word orthos (OR those) means ‘correct,’ while the suffix G-R-A-P-H-Y comes from the Greek word for ‘writing.’ So our word of the day may be used to refer to the way of spelling a word. Here’s an example: My daughter is such a word nerd that when I asked her how cat was spelled, she gave me a ten-minute dissertation on the orthography of the word. I didn’t want to know why the word was spelled that way — just how it was spelled. 
7/31/202350 seconds
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Gravamen

Gravamen is a noun that refers to the most significant part of a complaint.  The Latin word gravis (GRAH vees) means ‘heavy.’ shifting into English in the early 17th century, our word of the day is used to describe the weightiest or most important part of a person’s complaint. Here’s an example: I have to admit I didn’t care for the lame music playing in Dr. Simon’s office, but I wouldn’t say it was the gravamen of my complaint regarding my experience there. My biggest problem with the visit is that he spent two hours drilling into my gums.
7/30/202343 seconds
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Hippocampus

Hippocampus is a noun that refers to the part of the brain responsible for emotion and memory.  Our word of the day has its origin in Greek mythology. The word ‘hippo’ is derived from the Greek word for a sea creature. In time, this word was used to describe the section of the brain that governed emotion and memory because this section was curved like a seahorse. Here’s an example of hippocampus in use: There’s something about that song that stimulates my hippocampus and nearly brings me to tears. After a few seconds, I’m launched back into memories of listening to it in seventh grade at the roller skating rink, experiencing the soul-crushing heartbreak of a 13-year old. 
7/29/202359 seconds
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Psychographics

Psychographics is a noun that refers to the classification of people according to psychological criteria.  The prefix P-S-Y-C-H-O comes from the Greek word for ‘soul’ or ‘mind.’ In words like psychology and psychiatry, it refers to the art of exploring deep into people’s souls. The word graphic, from the Greek word for ‘writing’ or ‘drawing’ is used to indicate data. Our word of the day is used to describe the practice of using data to understand how people think and act. Here’s an example: According to our psychographics, most people don’t care to wake up in the morning to loud music. In fact, the psychographics indicate that softer, more dulcet tones are ideal for selling our early morning commercials. 
7/28/20231 minute, 5 seconds
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Scenography

Scenography is a noun that refers to the representation of objects in perspective.  Our word of the day’s root word is ‘scene’, which comes from the Greek word for ‘stage.’ So it’s appropriate that it’s commonly used in theatre to describe the art of arranging scenery. Example: Last night’s play was something of a disappointment. The acting was fine, but they had arranged the scenery in such a way that we could barely get a sense that the action was set in post-war France. Sometimes bad scenography can ruin an otherwise exceptional play. 
7/27/202350 seconds
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Rort

Rort is a noun that refers to a fraudulent or dishonest act or practice.  The origin of our word of the day is unclear, but it’s often thought to be a mix of the words ‘report’ and ‘retort.’ Rort is a slang word that’s almost always used in an informal context. Here’s an example: Jeff was a good boss who generally did the right things, but he’s been known to have the occasional rort from time to time. The way he figured it, if you slave over the grill all day long, it’s no big deal if you take home a few burgers from time to time. 
7/26/202343 seconds
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Hackle

Hackle is a noun that refers to the hair along the back of the neck that rises when a person is angry.  Coming from Late Middle English, our word of the day is frequently used in reference to dogs that are not in a great mood. Here’s an example: Like many Dobermans, Roscoe’s hackles get raised when he hears weird noises at the front door. After all these years of being around him, I find the hairs on my back standing up too when someone is a little too loud at the door. 
7/25/202341 seconds
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Falstaffian

Falstaffian is an adjective that means having a love of food, drink and humor.  Sir John Falstaff is a Shakespearean character who appears in many of the Bard’s plays. Known for being jolly and good-natured, his name provides the basis for our word of the day and may be used to describe anyone blessed with a similar temperament. Example: It’s probably not a good idea to have too many falstaffian guys on your softball team. Sure, having fun-loving, wise-cracking players on the squad can make the game more fun. But after a while, you have to stop guzzling beer and cracking jokes long enough to actually get some practicing done. 
7/24/202353 seconds
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Anastrophe

Anastrophe is a noun that refers to an inversion of the usual order of words. Derived from the Greek words for ‘back’ and turning,’ our word of the day has been around since the mid-16th century. Here’s an example: I’ve always been a fan of that lovable Star Wars character Yoda and his odd habit of inverting the normal order of words in a sentence. It takes a lot of charm to turn anastrophe into a unique personality trait.
7/23/202349 seconds
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Acescent

Acescent is an adjective that means turning sour.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word acescere (ah che SHARE ay) which means ’to become sour.’ Its earliest use in English can be traced back to the mid-17th century. In addition to being implemented to describe food or beverage, acescent may also be used to describe a mood or atmosphere. Here’s an example: I got the sense that people at the dinner party didn’t like my cooking. No one said this in so many words, but every time the subject of my fried turkey sandwiches came up, the mood in the room turned sour. That kind of acescent atmosphere is usually a red flag. 
7/22/202352 seconds
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MacGyver

MacGyver is a verb that means to make or repair an object in an improvised or inventive way.  Our word of the day is derived from a popular television show of the 1980s whose titular star was skilled at creating weaponry or assorted items from everyday items. It’s recently become a verb. Here’s an example of it in use: On our canoe trip, we found ourselves without a way to signal to the other campers that dinner was ready. So we had to MacGyver a dinner bell out of an old hub cap we found half buried in the dirt. If it weren’t for that ability to improvise, I get the feeling those guys would still be waiting for dinner. 
7/21/202351 seconds
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Motley

Motley is an adjective that means ‘of diverse composition.’  Our word of the day’s precise origin is unknown, but we know it’s from the Late Middle English period and can be thought of as a synonym of assorted or varied. Here’s an example of motley in use: They sent a pretty motley group of employees to the conference. The group included guys with varying levels of competence, dependability and ability. They might have been better off making sure everyone at the conference was equally skilled. 
7/20/202342 seconds
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Materiel

Materiel is a noun that refers to military equipment.  Our word of the day is not to be confused with the word material, M-A-T-E-R-I-A-L, but both words are derived from the Latin word materia (mah TEAR ee uh) meaning ‘matter.’ Here’s an example of our word of the day in use: It never made sense to me that in the army we would spend hours hauling materiel from one site to another, only to haul it back a few hours later. It didn’t seem to me that our commanding officers put much time into thinking about how to deal with army equipment. 
7/19/202352 seconds
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Hyperopia

Hyperopia is a noun that refers to the condition of seeing distant things more clearly than those that are near.  Our word of the day combines the Greek prefix H-Y-P-E-R, meaning ‘beyond,’ and the Greek word ops (OPS) meaning ‘eye.’ The condition of hyperopia is commonly known as farsightedness.  Being farsighted can be pretty awkward in public, especially when trying to read a book. If my hyperopia gets any worse, I’ll have to stand ten feet away from the book in order to see the print. 
7/18/202347 seconds
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Immure

Immure is a verb that means to enclose within.  The Latin word murus (MOO roos) refers to a ‘wall.’ To immure someone is to wall them in. Our word of the day has been with us since the late 16th century. Here’s an example of it in use: Last night’s movie was one of the scariest I’ve ever seen. Especially the part where the villain tried to immure the hero inside a chamber of horrors.
7/17/202336 seconds
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Homiletic

Homiletic is an adjective that means related to preaching or writing a sermon.  The Greek word homilia (ho MEAL ee uh) means ‘to converse with.’ In time, this word gave birth to the English word homily which referred to a sermon or a story with a religious meaning. Homiletic has been with us since the mid 17th century. Example: I enjoyed the story my dad told me about his days as a young hunter. But it seemed to be the stories had no moral. They may have had a greater impact had they had more of a homiletic purpose. 
7/16/202349 seconds
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Hinterlands

Hinterlands is a noun that refers to the land beyond the city.  The German word hinter (HIN ter) means ‘behind,’ while land simply means ‘land.’ This word to describe the often uncharted lands behind the big cities was been a part of English since the late 19th century. Example: Having grown up in the big city, I often feel a little out of my element in the hinterlands. Those small-town expressions and terms often float right over my head. 
7/15/202346 seconds
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Furbelow

Furbelow is a verb that means to adorn with trimmings.  The French word forbole (for BOWL) refers to a piece of ribbon or fabric that is used for trimming or decoration. It’s been a part of the English language since the late 17th century. Here’s an example: It seemed odd to me that Annie would furbelow her dress just above the hem like that. But I later learned she used that adornment to hide a coffee stain.
7/14/202339 seconds
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Funicular

Funicular is an adjective that means hauled by a rope or cable.  Coming from the mid 17th century, funicular takes its root from the Latin word funis (FOO nis) which means rope. Our word of the day is often used to describe means of transportation that feature rope. Here’s an example: I love skiing, but I get a little uneasy when riding those chair lifts up the mountain. Something about funicular travel causes me to worry about what might happen if the cable should snap.
7/13/202346 seconds
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Freebooter

Freebooter is a noun that refers to a pirate or adventurer.  Derived from a word that combines the Dutch word for ‘free’ and ‘booty,’ our word of the day was first used in reference to Dutch privateers who operated in the Caribbean to plunder Spanish ships. In time the word came to refer to anyone in the habit of taking free booty, or goods. Here’s an example: Those bagels Margie brought into the office looked awfully tasty, but I had to resist. I’m afraid that after my unfortunate habit of chowing down on free food, I’ve gained a reputation as a freebooter. 
7/12/202353 seconds
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Gerontocracy

Gerontocracy is a noun that refers to a government ruled by the elderly.  The Greek word geron (Jer ON) means ‘old man,’ while the suffix C-R-A-C-Y — also seen in words like democracy, plutocracy and meritocracy — refers to ‘power’ or ‘rule.’ Gerontocracy has been around since the mid19th century. Here’s an example: With all those city council members in their sixties and seventies, I’m beginning to think our city is run by a gerontocracy. I have nothing against the elderly, I’m just worried that I’ll have to wait too long before it’s my turn to have any power. 
7/11/202357 seconds
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Gamine

Gamine is a noun that refers to a girl with a mischievous, boyish charm.   Coming directly from the French word for ‘street urchin.’  gamine was introduced to English speakers in the late 19th century. Gamine can be used as a synonym of ‘tomboy.’ Here’s an example: My sister always had a boyish charm that got us both into a lot of trouble. Having a gamine for a little sister certainly got me into a lot of playground fights. 
7/10/202340 seconds
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Frangible

Frangible is an adjective that means easily broken.  The Latin word frangere (fran JARE ay) means ‘to break.’ The addition of the suffix I-B-L-E gets us to a word to describe something that can be broken. The word fragile is a synonym that also shares this origin.  I warned the moving guys that some of the items in the boxes were frangible, but that didn’t seem to matter. They just tossed those boxes around without regard for how brittle the contents were.
7/9/202344 seconds
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Flambe

Flambe is an adjective that means served with flaming liquor.  Coming directly from the French word for flame, flambe has been used by English speakers since the late 19th century. In addition to being an adjective that describes the way a particular food is cooked, it can also be used as a verb to describe the actual cooking. Here’s an example of the verb version: Having always been a fan of French cooking, I thought it would be a good idea to flambe something I served for dinner. In retrospect, I probably should have chosen something besides a plate of pancakes to set on fire. 
7/8/202348 seconds
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Xeric

ic is an adjective that means very dry or having little moisture.  The Greek word keros (ZEE ros) means dry. This is the basis of our word of the day which has been with us since the early 20th century. Here’s an example of xeric in use: The xeric conditions didn’t make our vacation much fun. I like warm weather as much as anyone, but it would be nice if we had at least a little rain for the month we were there.
7/7/202336 seconds
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Somatopsychic

Somatopsychic is an adjective that means related to the body’s effect on the mind.  The Greek word soma (SOMA) means ‘soul,’ while psyche (SY key) means ‘mind.’ When combined into our word of the day, we get a word that describes how physical health can affect emotional states. Here’s an example of it in use: At first I thought my upbeat moods were just a result of being a generally energetic person, but after looking into things from a somotopsychic perspective, I’ve come to see that my moods tend to get better after I’ve been working out for a few hours. 
7/6/202354 seconds
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Hornswoggle

Hornswoggle is a verb that means to cheat or deceive.  Despite its colorful sound, our word of the day’s origin is unknown. We do know however that it’s been around since the early 19th century and it’s not a thing anyone would want to be accused of.  I can’t believe I trusted Terry enough to buy a car from him. I knew he'd be guilty of cheating other customers, but I never thought he’d hornswoggle me — a guy he’d known since the sixth grade. 
7/5/202346 seconds
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Sylph

Sylph is a noun that refers to a slender woman or girl.  Coming from the Latin word sylphi (SILL fee) which refers to a mythic nymph of the woods, our word of the day has been around since the mid 17th century. Example: When I saw the mysterious Sylph in the woods, I thought I was seeing a mythical spirit rise to the sky. But it turned out Erica was just trying out her new silver leotard. 
7/4/202335 seconds
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Glyph

Glyph is a noun that refers to a small graphic symbol.  The Greek word dulphe (dool FAY) is where our word of the day began life. Although it’s not a coincidence that our word of the day is contained in the word hieroglyphic, glyph is a broader word that may refer to any kind of graphic symbol. Here’s an example: It’s a good thing I noticed that tiny glyph on my computer screen. If I hadn’t seen that tiny symbol, I might have overlooked the instruction to turn my computer off immediately.
7/3/202339 seconds
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Scry

Scry is a verb that means to foretell the future using a crystal ball.  Our word of the day is derived from the Old English word descrian (DESK ree ann) which had a broader meaning than today. In its early days, it referred to any act of divination. It later came to refer more specifically to acts of divination through a crystal ball. Here’s an example of scry in use: When Kelly pulled out a giant crystal ball in her home, she caught my attention immediately. I thought she was going to scry the future, but it turned out she was just showing me a new lamp she’d just bought. 
7/2/202347 seconds
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Alienee

Alienee is a noun that refers to one to whom property is transferred.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word alienus (ah lee AY noose) which means ‘foreign’ or ‘belonging to another.’ The word entered English in the mid 16th century and is most typically used in the world of law. Example: The alienee of the home didn’t seem especially grateful for having inherited such an enormous estate. I guess some people are so accustomed to being gifted great things that a new mansion is no big deal.
7/1/202344 seconds
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Ague

Ague is a noun that refers to a shivering fit.  The Latin word acuta (ah KOO tah) means ‘acute fever.’ In past years, it was often used specifically to refer to malaria. More recently, it may describe any shivering fit.  After that bad batch of berries, I was left with a shivering fit for days. That kind of ague can definitely cause you to get more selective when choosing berries to pick in the woods. 
6/30/202338 seconds
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Annex

Annex is a verb that means to take for oneself. Coming from late Middle English, our word of the day is derived from the Latin prefix A-D as well as the Latin word nectere (neck TEAR ay) meaning ‘to tie or fasten.’ Often used to describe something a nation does with additional territory, annex may be used in a more informal sense, for example: My coffee addiction at one point had become such a problem that I confess I would occasionally annex somebody else’s espresso. When I found myself guzzling down a cold cup of coffee I’d swiped from a co-worker, I knew I was deep in the throes of addiction. 
6/29/202350 seconds
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Zymurgy

Zymurgy is a noun that refers to the fermentation in brewing, winemaking and distilling.  The Greek word zume (zoo MAY) means ‘leaven.’ Since zymurgy’s move to English in the mid-19th century, its meaning has shifted from a process done to bread to a process done to alcohol. Example: Distilling whiskey isn’t as easy as it seems. In fact, I would even say zymurgy is a dangerous skill if done incorrectly. When drinkers don’t get the results they want, they can get downright ornery. 
6/28/202345 seconds
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Infelicitous

Infelicitous is an adjective that means unfortunate or inappropriate.  The Latin word Felix (FAY licks) means ‘happy.’ Coming from Late Middle English, our word of the day has undergone some changes, but still basically means ‘unhappy’ or ‘unfortunate.’ Here’s an example: In spite of the infelicitous results, I’m glad I decided to start cutting my own hair. The money I’ve saved on barbers is well worth the price I’ve had to pay in stupid-looking haircuts. 
6/27/202347 seconds
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Akimbo

Akimbo is an adverb that means with hands on the hips and elbows turned outward.  Coming from Old Norse, akimbo has been around since the middle English period, holding the same meaning. Here’s an example of it in use: I could always immediately tell when I’d been busted for skipping school. Usually my mom would be standing at the doorway, arms akimbo and face red from anger. 
6/26/202338 seconds
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Depredation

Depredation is a noun that refers to the act of attacking or plundering.  Our word of the day has been around since the late 15th century, having originated from the Latin word depraedari (dep rye DAR ay) which holds the same meaning as its English descendant.  The depredation that took place in the stadium after the home team’s tragic loss was truly horrific. That kind of plundering hasn’t been seen since world war two.  
6/25/202342 seconds
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Usurp

Usurp is a verb that means to take by force.  The Latin word usurpare (ooh zoo PAR ay) means ‘to seize for use.’ The word was then seized by English speakers during the Middle English period and is still being used today with the same basic meaning. Here’s an example: As a reporter, you have to hold on to your press pass at all costs. You’ll meet people who will try to usurp it from you — and for good reason. There’s a lot of power in that backstage pass to the dog show
6/24/202341 seconds
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Fusillade

Fusillade is a noun that refers to a spirited outburst.  Coming from the French word for ‘to shoot,’ our word of the day has been with us since the early 19th century. In the past, it was mainly used in a military context, referring to missiles or bullets being shot. But more recently it’s likely to be used in a metaphorical sense, referring to words being fired away in the form of a rant or tirade. Here’s an example: Frank’s angry fusillade about the failures or our computers appears to have spurred management to make some changes in the system. Sometimes all it takes is a hot-tempered tirade to get what you want.
6/23/202353 seconds
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Pecuniary

Pecuniary is an adjective that means related to money.  The latin word pecu (PECK ooh) means ‘cattle’ or ‘money.’ Our word of the day originated there and joined the English language in the early 16th century. Here’s an example of pecuniary in use: In spite of Chuck’s pecuniary shortcomings, he’s been able to enjoy a nice, happy life. I guess it’s true that money isn’t everything. 
6/22/202341 seconds
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Polypod

Polypod is an adjective that means having many legs.  Our word of the day combines the Greek prefix P-O-L-U, meaning ‘many’ with the Greek word Pod (pod) which means ‘foot.’ The result is a word that describes a creature with many feet, be that creature an insect or an alien from a science fiction movie. Example: I don’t know what kind of creature came in and ravaged our picnic food while we were gone, but judging by those multiple, tiny footprints left in the dirt, it must have been some kind of polypod bug. 
6/21/202346 seconds
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Noctivagant

Noctivigant is a noun that refers to someone who wanders around at night. It is also an adjective that means ‘wandering in the night.’ The latin prefix N-O-C-T means ‘night,’ while V-A-G-U-S means ‘wandering.’ Here’s an example of our word of the day in use as a noun.  I didn’t know Cheryl was a noctivigant at first. I’d wake up in the middle of the night and wonder where she’d gone to. Turns out she was just another nighttime creature who craved those late-night meanderings. 
6/20/202349 seconds
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Spindrift

Spindrift is a spray of water, snow or sand blown by the wind.  Our word of the day combines two Old English words that, together, mean ‘run before wind or sea.’ Spindrift has been around since the early 17th century. Here’s an example of it: Walking back to our cabin was going great until a giant spindrift cut off my vision for a while. With eyes full of snow, it’s not so easy to see where you're going. 
6/19/202341 seconds
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Nemophilist

Nemophilist is a noun that refers to someone who loves the forrest.  The Greek Prefix N-E-M-O refers to ‘wooded pasture.’ And the P-H-I-L-O means ‘a love of.’ So having a love of the forrest is all it takes to be deemed a nomophilist.  I used to be a nemophilist, but getting bitten by a few snakes cured me of that fascination. It’s hard to love the forest when your eyes are constantly shifting around in search of the next snake.
6/18/202350 seconds
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Stelliferous

Stelliferous is an adjective that means being full of stars.  The Latin word stella (STELL uh) means ‘star.’ This word has given birth to such words as interstellar, asterisk and the name Stella. When the sky is full of stars, that’s a good time to utilize our word of the day. For example: When I proposed to Mindy, the sky was gorgeously stelliferous. All those twinkling diamonds up above filled me with such a sense of romance that I had no choice but to pop the question. 
6/17/202349 seconds
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Mussitate

Mussitate is a verb that means to talk indistinctly or mutter.  The Latin word mussare (moose ARE ay) means ‘silence.’ It is believed that our word of the day is imitative in origin, meaning the word came to be because somebody thought it sounded like mumbling or muttering. Example: I can always tell when my eight-year-old isn’t being totally honest. He avoids eye contact and begins to mussitate. All that mumbling and bumbling around is usually a sign that he’s not giving me the truth. 
6/16/202344 seconds
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Encyclical

Encyclical is an adjective that means for wide release. Our word of the day comes from the Greek word enkyklios (en KEY klee ose) which means ‘circular’ or ‘general.’ Encyclical has been circulating throughout English since the mid-17th century. Example: When Angie resigned as mayor, she did so with an encyclical letter. She wanted everyone in town to clearly understand her reasons for leaving.
6/15/202340 seconds
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Rotiform

Rotiform is an adjective that means wheel-shaped.  The Latin word rota (ROE tuh) means ‘wheel.’ The addition of the suffix I-F-O-R-M gets us a word that means ‘shaped like a wheel.’ Here’s an example: All those rotiform objects in that boring art museum sent my mind elsewhere. It reminded me of the car and how I wished I could just leave the museum and drive away. 
6/14/202338 seconds
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Aesculapian

Aesculapian is an adjective that means relating to medicine or physicians.  Our word of the day gets its origin from Aesculapius, the Roman god of medicine. The word entered English in the late 16th century. Here’s an example: Shelly has been working as a nurse for nearly a year and her vocabulary has been peppered with all kinds of aesculapian terminology. She can barely tell me to wash my hands without using medical jargon that makes my head explode. 
6/13/202347 seconds
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Golem

Golem is a noun that refers to a mythical artificial being brought to life.  Our word of the day comes directly from the Yiddish word for ‘a shapeless mass.’ In Jewish legend, a golem is a clay figure brought to life by magic. The word can also be used in reference to a robot. Here’s an example of golem in use: On those rare occasions at the office when Dominick leaves his desk, people gawk at him like he’s a golem magically animated. Magic is the only way to explain why he would ever move.
6/12/202346 seconds
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Fructify

Fructify is a verb that means to make fruitful or productive.  The Latin word fructus (FROOK toos) means fruit in the sense of ‘the result or reward of work or activity.’ In other words, when we fructify something, we make it fruitful. Here’s an example of our word of the day in use: I was hoping to fructify all the excess milk in my refrigerator by using it to make ice cream. But in the end, the only thing I was making productive was the mop I had to use to clean up all that mess.
6/11/202343 seconds
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Calembour

Calembour is a noun that refers to a play on words.  The origin of our word of the day is unknown, but you could think of it as a synonym of pun. Here’s an example of calembour in use: I was hoping I could break the ice at the job interview with a calembour or two. I mean, who doesn’t like a good pun every now and then. Apparently, the guy interviewing me didn’t like them. My pun-manship didn’t get a single snicker out of him. 
6/10/202341 seconds
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Elysium

Elysium is a noun that refers to a place or state of perfect happiness. Our word of the day has its origin in a Greek word that means ‘Land of the blessed.’ Elysium is often used as an actual location in Greek mythology, but it may also be used as synonym of paradise. Example: Working in a candy store, my daughter was practically in Elysium for eight hours a day. Of course, the hours she spent with a sour stomach after eating all that free candy was a little short of paradise.
6/9/202347 seconds
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Helot

Helot is a noun that refers to a serf or a servant.  Ancient Greek Region of Helos was known for the subjugation of its people. Soon, our word of the day became a synonym of slave or servant. Here’s an example of it in use: Chris may be known for treating his assistant like a helot, but I will say this for him: his assistant Jimmy may not have had much freedom, but he was a lot better paid than most. 
6/8/202336 seconds
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Capuan

Capuan is an adjective that means luxurious.  Our word of the day is a toponym, meaning it is a word that takes its origin from a place. In this instance, the place was an ancient Italian city named Capua which was known as a place of great opulence and luxury.  Capuan emigrated from this city and arrived in the English language in the 16th century. Here’s an example of it in use: When it comes to capuan eateries, my favorite would have to be the one on 17th and Broadway. it’s so fancy, even the doggie bags are plated with gold.
6/7/202349 seconds
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Aliquot

Aliquot is a noun that refers to a portion of a larger whole, especially a sample taken for analysis.  Our word of the day has its origin in the Latin words alus (AH loose) meaning ‘one of two’ and quot (KO) meaning ‘how many.’ Often used in science, aliqot has been a part of the English language since the late 16th century. Example: After examining the aliquot closely, Dr. Himmelman deduced that the swamp water wasn’t toxic. It’s amazing to me that they can make such a determination about the entire lake from a tiny sample.
6/6/202348 seconds
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Solemnize

Solemnize is a verb that means to mark with a ceremony.  The Latin word sollsemnis (suh LEM nis) means ‘customary.’ From this we get a word that refers to rituals performed at ceremonies. Solemnize has been with us since the Middle English period. Here’s an example of it in use: After twenty years with the company, you’d think upper management would want to solemnize Eric’s service with some kind of dinner. But instead of a fancy ceremony, they just gave the poor guy a free cheeseburger and a coupon for a car wash. 
6/5/202346 seconds
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Kith

Kith is a noun that refers to one’s friends and acquaintances.  Our word of the day has its origin in an Old English word that means ‘one’s native land.’  The popular phrase ‘kith and kin’ initially referred to one’s country and relatives. More recently it has come to mean ‘one’s friends and family.’  Here’s an example of Kith in use - Don’t get me wrong. I love to see my family during the holidays. But after several days of nothing but kith and kin, I’m usually in the mood to find some strangers to hang out with.
6/4/202342 seconds
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Saturnalian

Saturnalian is an adjective that means marked by unrestrained revelry.  Our word of the day comes from Latin and means ‘related to Saturn.’ Saturn was the Roman god known as a source of renewal and liberation. The ancient Roman festival of Saturn was used as a period of merrymaking. Here’s an example of Saturnalian in use: All the Saturnalian regalia outside my house made it difficult to sleep last night. Why can’t my neighbors be sensible and have chaotic fun early in the morning like everybody else?
6/3/202352 seconds
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Neurodiverse

Neurodiverse is an adjective that means displaying atypical neurological behavior.  A recent addition to the English language, our word of the day has been around since earlier this century when scientists were developing a deeper understanding of what made some people think and act differently than others. The scientists involved in this area are called neuroscientists, a word that shares the Greek prefix N-E-U-R-O— meaning related to the brain or nervous system — with our word of the day.  The second half of neurodiverse is the word diverse, which comes from Middle English meaning, ‘coming from different ways.’ A neurodiverse person has a brain that works in ways that differ from typical people. Here’s an example: Mike has been called neurodiverse because of his idiosyncratic ways, but when it comes to arriving on time for dinner, he’s as typical as they come. 
6/2/20231 minute, 13 seconds
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Foundress

Foundress is a noun that refers to a female founder. It is also a noun that refers to a female leader of a colony.  The root word of foundress is founder, which is from Old English and refers to ‘the originator of something.’ The suffix R-E-S-S indicates that we’re talking about a woman. This is true in both definitions of the word. Here’s an example: The foundress of our company would probably be ashamed to see the kinds of practices we’ve been up to lately. The company she originated a hundred years ago once stood for dignity, pride and excellence. Now it just stands for profit at any cost. 
6/1/202351 seconds
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Recuse

Recuse is a verb that means to remove oneself from participation to avoid a conflict of interest.  The Latin word recurare (ray coo SAR ay) means ‘to reject.’ Often used in a legal context, our word of the day has been with us since the early 19th century. Example: A Juror was asked to recuse himself because it was felt that he couldn’t objectively serve on a jury in which his father was being tried. That kind of conflict of interest can make serving on jury duty awfully difficult.
5/31/202342 seconds
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Introrse

Introrse is an adjective that means turned inward.  Our word of the day takes its meaning and basic spelling from the Latin word inrorses (in TROR sus). Here’s an example: The first step in getting our basketball team to play better was to have all the players introrse. It’s a lot easier to communicate when everybody can actually see each other. 
5/30/202333 seconds
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Extrorse

Extrorse is an adjective that means turned outward.  The Latin adverb extrorus (ex TROR sus) means outwards. Our word of the day has turned itself toward the English language since the mid-19th century and holds the same basic meaning as its ancestor. Example: With the lights extrose, our backyard looked pretty cool to those passing by. But to anybody wanting to see where they were going, it might have been a better idea to turn the lights inward. 
5/29/202343 seconds
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Intemperance

Intemperance is a noun that refers to a lack of moderation or restraint.  The Latin word temperare (temp er ARE ay) means ‘to restrain.’ Our word of the day has been around since Middle English. By adding the prefix I-N, meaning ‘not,’ we get a word that means ‘not able to restrain.’ Here’s an example: My intemperance with true crime shows has become a real problem lately. Because I can’t stop watching them all the time, I’m in danger of losing my job. I can’t get anything done at home with all that intrigue taking place on my TV Screen.
5/28/202351 seconds
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Clapperclaw

Clapperclaw is a verb that means to claw with fingernails.  Our word of the day combines two words of Old English origin ‘clapper’ and ‘claw.’ Clapperclaw has been with us since the late 16th century. here’s an example of it in use: I really enjoyed last night’s movie, but I have to say it wasn’t terribly realistic — especially the scene where the heroine was able to clapperclaw her way up the side of a steep mountainside. I don’t care how long her nails were, it just didn’t seem plausible to me at all. 
5/27/202347 seconds
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Bewray

Bewray is a verb that means to betray.  Our word of the day comes from an Old English word that means ‘to accuse.’ When someone is rightly accused of bewraying a friend, it means they’re guilty of treason. Example: When I switched softball teams, there were some pretty bad feelings among my former teammates. I didn’t mean to bewray them, I just felt like it would be fun to win an occasional game. And if that meant betraying my team, so be it.
5/26/202339 seconds
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Nesh

Nesh is an adjective that means soft and tender.  Our word of the day comes from Old English and has been around for several centuries. In addition to being an adjective, it can also be used as a verb that means to act timidly. Here’s an example of the adjective version: If there’s one thing I love it’s having a nice, nesh cookie for dessert. Taking a big bite into something soft and tender is a perfect way to punctuate a perfect meal. 
5/25/202336 seconds
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Bevel

Bevel is a verb that means to change to a sloped angle.  Coming from the Old English word for ‘open mouthed’ bevel has been with us since the late 16th century. It’s often used in carpentry, as a noun to refer to a sloped angle or a tool to create such angles. Here’s an example: Rex has a tendency to get sloppy when trying to make angles by hand, so that’s why he uses a bevel. He feels it’s better to get the job done right than try to show off and have the result look bad.
5/24/202341 seconds
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Desipience

Desipience is a noun that refers to silliness.  The Latin word sapere (suh PAIR ay) means ‘to be wise.’ By adding the prefix D-E for ‘away from,’ we get a word for behavior that is far away from being wise. Here’s an example: It’s embarrassing to consider how much of my youth I wasted on various forms of despience. Being a full-time goof may be more fun than being productive and industrious, but I can say from personal experience, it doesn’t pay very well. 
5/23/202347 seconds
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Cyesis

Cyesis is a noun that refers to pregnancy.   Coming from the Greek word Kuesis (koo ESS es) which means ‘pregnancy’ our word of the day was given birth to in the mid-16th century. Here’s an example of cyesis in use: After nine months of cyesis, Laura couldn’t wait to get back to running again. It felt good to be able to engage in the things that pregnancy had denied her. 
5/22/202337 seconds
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Exuviate

Exuviate is a verb that means to shed or cast out.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word exuviae (eks SOU vee uh) and refers to the skin of an animal that has been shed. From this, we get exuviate, which refers to anything that has been shed. Here’s an example: Before leaving New Orleans, we had to cast off everything in our car that we didn’t absolutely need. But it turned out that it wasn’t so easy to exuviate everything unnecessary. Getting rid of all those Mardi Gras beads was a really tough pill to swallow. 
5/21/202347 seconds
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Fiat

Fiat is a noun that refers to a formal authorization or proposition.  The Latin word feiri (fee AIR ee) mean’s ‘be done or made.’ By the Late Middle English period, fiat had become a word to describe a decree by a powerful leader. Example: The principal didn’t care for the new school colors, so he had it changed by fiat. His choice of new colors were several times more atrocious, but no one dared challenge his rule. 
5/20/202338 seconds
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Ferrous

Ferrous is an adjective that means containing or consisting of iron.  The Latin word ferrum (FAIR oom) means ‘iron.’ By the mid 19th century, this word had evolved into our word of the day as it came to describe anything made of iron.  Those farrous bars on my window are intended to scare away any potential intruder. There’s something about the firmness of irons that makes dangerous people take notice. 
5/19/202337 seconds
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Farouche

Farouche is an adjective that means sullen or shy in company.  The Latin word foras (FOUR as) means ‘outdoors.’ As this word evolved into our word of the day, it came to refer to someone used to living outdoors. This soon referred to someone who was uneasy around others because of their outdoor lifestyle. These days, its meaning is a little simpler. It is a synonym of words like ‘shy’ and ‘introverted.’ Here’s an example: I used to be farouche as a child, but I outgrew some of my introverted ways as I got older and more comfortable around others. 
5/18/202349 seconds
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Wamble

Wamble is a verb that means to feel nauseous or dizzy.  The Latin word vomare (voe MAR ay) means ‘to vomit.’ From this origin, came our word of the day that refers to all kinds of stomach problems likely to induce vomiting. Here’s an example of wamble in use: As much as I like Carol’s cooking, I have to admit that any more than one helping tends to make me wamble. Any more than two helpings will have me racing from the dinner table in record time with an upset stomach. 
5/17/202342 seconds
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Dandle

Dandle is a verb that means to bounce on one’s knees or in one’s arms.  The exact origin of our word of the day is unknown, but we know it’s been with us since the mid 16th century and it has a very specific use, meaning it should not be used to refer to bouncing anything on one’s knee except a baby. Here’s an example of dandle in use: I would say it was somewhere around their fiftieth birthday that it was no longer a good idea to dandle my kids on my knee. Not only were they getting bigger by then, but my knees were getting far too tender for such wear and tear. 
5/16/202350 seconds
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Countermand

Countermand is a verb that means to revoke an order.  Our word of the day combines the Latin prefix C-O-N-T-R-A which means ‘against,’ and the Latin word mandare (man DARE ay) which means ‘to order.’ Countermand dates back to the late Middle English period. Here’s an example: I had previously ordered all employees to be fired if they showed up late, but when it became clear that such an edict would result in the complete eradication of our workplace, I decided to countermand my decree. I guess you could say I had a history of reversing previous orders once I realized they didn’t make sense. 
5/15/202351 seconds
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Febrile

Febrile is an adjective that means having or showing a great deal of nervous excitement or energy.  Our word of the day comes from the Latin word febris (FAY brees) means ‘fever.’ Our word of the day has been around since the mid 17th century and may be used as a literal reference to a fever or may be used figuratively to mean ‘showing great excitement.’ Example: Tommy’s Febrile demeanor tends to make some people uneasy. But others find themselves falling into a sense of excitement themselves. 
5/14/202342 seconds
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Contravention

Contravention is a noun that refers to an action that violates a law or treaty.  The Latin prefix C-O-N-T-R-A means ‘against and the Latin word venire (vay NEAR ay) means ‘come.’ A contravention is any violation of rules. Example: After a few contraventions, Harry found himself in so much trouble, he straightened up right away. Getting caught breaking the law has a way of changing people’s behavior. 
5/13/202346 seconds
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Benighted

Benighted is an adjective that means in a state of intellectual or moral ignorance.  The Old English word benight was a verb that meant ‘to obscure’ or ‘to cover in the darkness of night.’ When something is benighted it is ‘in the dark,’ if you will. Our word of the day is used to describe someone who is ‘in the dark’ in the sense of being ignorant or unaware. Here’s an example: While the rest of us immediately got the joke Rachel told, William remained benighted for hours. Some guys are just destined to be in the dark when it comes to understanding sophisticated humor. 
5/12/202351 seconds
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Judicature

Judicature is a noun that refers to the authority or jurisdiction of a court of law.  The Latin word judicare (joo duh CAR ay) means ‘to judge.’ It’s given birth to a number of English words like ‘adjudicate, ‘judicious’ and, of course, ‘judge.’ Our word of the day can be used to refer very specifically to a particular court, or to judges in general. Example: The judicature of the state is among the finest in our nation. There simply is no other collection of judges that have the wisdom, the insight and the sense of restraint that ours do. 
5/11/202351 seconds
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Aggiornamento

Aggiornamento is a noun that refers to the process of modernization or bringing something up to date.  Our word of the day comes from the Italian word aggionare (ah gee oh NARE ay) a verb that means ‘to update.’ Here’s an example of aggiornamento in use: I understand the aggiornamento of those old stadiums from a standpoint of public safety. But it seems to me that there's beauty in an old structure that simply doesn’t survive the modernization process. 
5/10/202347 seconds
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Tousle

Tousle is a verb that means to make hair messy or untidy.  Derived from German and related to the word ‘tussle,’ our word of the day has been with us since the late Middle English period. Here’s an example: Just before entering the bar, I tousled my hair to make sure I looked appropriately rugged. But the problem is I have so little hair left, I’m not sure anybody would notice a change. 
5/9/202338 seconds
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Unilateral

Unilateral is an adjective that means performed by only one person, group or country.  The Latin word latus (LA toose) means ‘side.’ By adding the prefix U-N-I meaning ‘one, ‘ we get a word that means ‘taking place on only one side.’ Our word of the day is often used in the context of conflict between nations. Here’s an example: Ending the agreement between the countries in a unilateral fashion wasn’t such a good move. When things happen in such a one-sided way, there are often unpleasant repercussions. 
5/8/202350 seconds
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Amerce

Amerce is a verb that means to punish with a fine.  Coming from Middle English, our word of the day isn’t as commonly used as it had been centuries ago, but it does pop up in some legal contexts. Here’s an example: After pleading guilty, the defendant was amerced. It was hoped that fining him with a crime would deter him from doing the same in the future. 
5/7/202334 seconds
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Amanuensis

Amanuensis is a noun that refers to an assistant who takes dictation.  Our word of the day comes from a Latin phrase that refers to ‘a servant at handwriting.’ More recently, an amanuensis is likely to be thought of as a secretary or assistant. Here’s an example of the word in use: After years of being an amanuensis, I was eager to make a career change. All that dictation can get tedious after a while. 
5/6/202342 seconds
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Unremitting

Unremitting is an adjective that means incessant or never relaxing.  The root word of our word of the day is remit, which goes back to the early 20th century and is derived from the Latin word remittere (ree ma TARE ay) which means ‘send back’ or ‘restore.’ An unremitting person refuses to be sent back or to restore anything. Here’s an example: Monica’s unremitting demeanor didn’t always make her popular at the office, but she was a great boss just the same. Sometimes a strong leader has to be someone who just keeps on the attack. 
5/5/202352 seconds
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Wan

Wan is an adjective that means pale or light in complexion.  Coming from Old English, our word of the day’s origin is something of a mystery. But we do know it is something of a synonym of words like pallid or ashen. Example: Having a wan complexion can often make people not seem healthy. But in Steve’s case, his pale skin has nothing to do with being ill. He’s just the product of very light-complected people. 
5/4/202336 seconds
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Junoesque

Junoesque is an adjective that means marked by stately beauty.  Dating back to the 19th century, our word of the day combines the Roman Goddess Juno with the suffix E-S-Q-U-E. Here’s an example of Junoesque in use.  At five-ten, Carly could be fairly imposing. If she were any taller or any more stunning, she’d be Junoesque. 
5/3/202339 seconds
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Spiel

Spiel is a noun that refers to a long or fast speech or story.  Coming from a German word for a game, our word of the day was imported into English in the 19th century and has seen a shift in its meaning. Its current meaning makes it a synonym of ‘speech.’ Here’s an example: The teacher’s spiel about the need to be on time lasted way too long. In fact, by the time he’d finished it, I wound up being ten minutes late. 
5/2/202336 seconds
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Cahoots

Cahoots is a noun that refers to colluding or conspiring together secretly.  The origin of cahoots is unknown, but we know it emerged in the early 19th century and it’s pretty always used in the plural. Example: I quit my job when I discovered that my boss was in cahoots with the company executives. But I might have reacted differently if I’d known that they were secretly conspiring a surprise birthday party for me. 
5/1/202338 seconds
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Dregs

Dregs is a noun that refers to the remnants of a liquid left in a container.  The origin of our word of the day is unclear, but it seems to have emerged from Scandinavian, then later found its way into Middle English. Dregs may refer to the remnants of a liquid or an undesirable part of society. Either way, it is almost always used in the plural.  I’ve been trying to clean my thermos for a while and for some reason, I just can’t get those dregs off of it. The remnants of all that orange juice can get really gummed in there. 
4/30/202340 seconds
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Techlash

Techlash is a noun that refers to a backlash against the perceived negative effects of technology on society.  Our word of the day is inspired by the word ‘backlash,’ which means a strong and adverse reaction by a large number of people. In this case, the reaction is to technology, which gets shortened to the prefix T-E-C-H. Example:  I sense a little techlash from people in the last few years. That may explain why people aren’t buying laptops as much as they used to. Perhaps people are just reacting to having too much technology in their lives. 
4/29/202350 seconds
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J.O.M.O

Jomo is an acronym that means Joy Of Missing Out.  Our word of the day was inspired by another acronym, FOMO, which stood for ‘fear of missing out.’ Within the past decade or so, some folks began to notice that missing out on certain activities brought as much joy as fear. Here’s an example of JOMO in use.  I always thought I’d get excited about joining a bird watching club. But let’s face it, here in the big city, without many birds to watch, I began to feel a little JOMO whenever I missed a meeting. Some things are more joyful to miss than others. 
4/28/202345 seconds
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Upcycle

Upcycle is a verb that means ‘to reuse a product in such a way that elevates its value.’  Using the word ‘up’ as a prefix, our word of the day is a recent word that is closely related to the verb ‘recycle.’ The difference is that upcycling adds value to a recycled product.  I’d love to upcycle my roommate’s old CDs as coasters. Considering how bad some of the music was, using them to place a beverage on would definitely make them more useful. 
4/27/202343 seconds
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Nomophobia

Nomophobia is a noun that refers to the fear of being without a cell phone.  Our word of the day is a recent addition to the English language that gets its origin from the words ‘no moble phone’ as well as the Greek suffix P-H-O-B-I-A which refers to an all-consuming fear of. Here’s an example of nomophobia in use: While camping in the woods, I often feel overcome with a sense of nomophobia. But that feeling fades in the middle of a spooky ghost story told around the campfire. At moments like that, the last thing you want is a scary buzz of your iPhone.
4/26/202354 seconds
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Vexillology

Vexillology is a noun that refers to the study of flags.  Dating back to the 1950s, the latin word vexillum (vecks ee LOOM) means ‘flag.’ By adding the suffix L-O-G-Y, which means ‘study of,’ we get our word of the day.  As a kid, I was always a fan of cars, but as I’ve gotten older, I’d say I’ve leaned more toward vexillology as a hobby, if only because flags are a lot less expensive to collect than cars. 
4/25/202344 seconds
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Ebullition

Ebullition is a noun that refers to the action of bubbling or boiling.  The Latin word ebullire (ee boo LEAR ay) means ‘to boil up.’ Our word of the day may be used in the literal sense of referring to water boiling, or it may be used figuratively, to refer to someone’s temper boiling over and exploding. Example: When I told Sandy that she’d parked in the wrong space, I wasn’t expecting an ebullition of rage. I knew she’d be a little unhappy, but I had no idea she had such a violent temper regarding her car. 
4/24/202346 seconds
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Mumpish

Mumpish is an adjective that means Sullen or sulky.  The origin of our word of the day isn’t clear, but we know the word mump has been with us since the 16th century, with the adjective mumpish emerging in the 17th century. Here’s an example of it use: Carl’s mumpish demeanour probably harmed his political career. After all, who wants to vote for somebody who seems moody and sullen all the time. 
4/23/202339 seconds
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Macrosmatic

Macrosmatic is an adjective that means having a highly developed sense of smell.  Our word of the day comes from a combination of the Greek prefix M-A-C-R-O meaning ‘large,’ and osme (OSS me) meaning ‘smell.’ Originally used to describe animals like bears or dogs, that have a highly developed sense of smell, it has, more recently been used to describe people whose ability to smell is greater than normal. Here’s an example: Me and my trusty bulldog Scout have a lot in common apart from our macrosmatic skills. Not only can we smell a chicken from a long distance away, we both enjoy eating them — although I prefer them cooked. 
4/22/20231 minute, 2 seconds
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Sciamachy

Sciamachy is a noun that refers to the act of fighting an imaginary foe.  Coming from Greek, this word fought its way into the English language in the early 17th century. It gets its prefix from the word skia (SKI uh) meaning ‘shadow’ and the rest from makhia (MOCK ee uh) which means ‘fighting.’  Our word of the day may refer to someone taking swings at an imaginary opponent, but it’s most commonly used to describe something called ‘shadow boxing,’ something a boxer does when training alone. Example: All that sciamachy may have kept me in pretty good shape, but it didn’t prepare me very well for an actual bout. It turns out it’s a lot harder to battle a person than a shadow
4/21/20231 minute
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Echolalia

Echolalia is a noun that refers to the meaningless repetition of another person’s spoken words.  Coming from the late 19th century, our word of the day takes its prefix from the Greek word echo (EK oh) a word used to describe a repetition, and combines that with the Latin word lalia (LA lee uh) meaning ‘speech.’  Originally used to describe a medical condition, echolalia may describe any kind of meaningless repetition of someone else’s words. Here’s an example: The arguments between my kids can get pretty tedious. It’s basically just fifteen minutes of echolalia followed by doors slamming loudly. 
4/20/202354 seconds
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Pantisocracy

Pantisocracy is a noun that refers to a utopian society in which all are equal.  Coined by an 18th century English poet named Samuel Taylor Coleridge, our word of the day begins with the Greek prefix P-A-N, which means ‘all,’ and ends with I-S-O-C-R-A-C-Y, meaning ‘equal rule.’ Example: Our bowling team was very much a pantisocracy, which annoyed me. You’d think that as the team’s highest scorer, I’d have more voting power than the others when it came to selecting pizza. 
4/19/202357 seconds
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Pogonotomy

Pogonotomy is a noun that refers to the cutting of a beard.  The Greek word pogon (POE gon) means ‘beard.’ That addition of tome (TOE me) meaning knife, gives us our word of the day, which basically means shaving off a beard. Although often used in a medical context, pogonotomy may be used in an everyday context as well. Example: After years of having a long beard, pogonotomy made me look kind of odd. Maybe shaving off a beard isn’t such a good idea if you have a funny looking face. 
4/18/202348 seconds
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Interpunction

Interpunction is a noun that refers to the insertion of a punctuation mark.  Emerging in the mid 18th century, our word of the day comes from the Latin word punctum (POONK toom) meaning ‘point,’ the same word that gave us ‘punctuate.’ Unlike the verb punctuate, interpunction is a noun that refers to the act of adding punctuation. Here’s an example: I’ve learned that in office memos, it is best to be careful with interpunction. Adding an explanation mark to a sentence can make you sound more angry than you intend to. 
4/17/202350 seconds
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Emolument

Emolument is a noun that refers to a salary or fee from employment.  Our word of the day comes from a Latin word that referred to payment given to a miller for grinding corn. That explains why the origin of emolument is the Latin word molere (mo LARE ay) which means ‘to grind.’ Here’s an example of emolument in use: After three weeks of putting together a terrific presentation, I was hoping my emoluments would be pretty impressive. But sadly the pay was pretty meager. 
4/16/202342 seconds
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Pinion

Pinion is a verb that means to cut off the wing of a bird to prevent flight.  Dating back to the 17th century, our word of the day comes from the French word pignon (PEEN yone) which referred to the part of a bird’s wings that make flight possible. Pinion may still be used as a noun to refer to this part of the wing or it can be a verb that means to clip the wing to prevent a bird from flying.  Similarly, our word of the day may be used metaphorically to refer to shackling someone. For example: As a kid in class, I hated not being permitted to use my calculator for math problems. It seemed the teacher was trying to pinion me in my quest for mathematical knowledge. 
4/15/202351 seconds
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Chevelure

Chevelure is a noun that refers to a head of hair.  Coming almost directly from French, our word of the day has been used as a sophisticated way of referring to a person’s hair since the 15th century. Here’s an example: I have to admit that Genevieve looked stunning when she entered the ballroom. Not only was she decked out in a long, flowing evening gown, but that chevelure on top of her head made her look like royalty. 
4/14/202341 seconds
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Commination

Commination is a noun that means the actin of threatening divine vengeance.  Derived from late Middle English, our word of the day combines the Latin prefix C-O-M, meaning expressing intensive force with the latin verb minari (me NAR ee) meaning to threaten.  Our word of the day is often used in a biblical or spiritual context in reference to a divine creature threatening to punish sinners, but it may also be used metaphorically. Here’s an example: When our boss threatened to dock the pay of anyone who left work early, it seemed to come from the loudspeakers like the voice of God. One thing for sure: the commination kept everybody at work until the final whistle. 
4/13/20231 minute, 3 seconds
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Prolegomenon

Prolegomenon is a noun that refers to an introduction to a book.  Coming from the 17th century, our word of the day combines the Latin prefix P-R-O which means ‘before’ and the Latin word legein (lay JEN) meaning ‘to read.’ Before you read the actual content of a book, you read its introduction, or its prolegomenon.  I loved that book I recently read on the modern problem of short attention spans, but I had to skip past that prolegomenon. I guess my attention span was just too short to endure a long, boring introduction.  
4/12/202352 seconds
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Antidromic

Antidromic is an adjective that means traveling in a direction that is the opposite of normal.  Coming from Greek, our word of the day combines the prefix A-N-T-I, meaning ‘against.’ and the word dromos (DRO mose) which means ‘running.’ It’s a fairly recent addition to English, having just arrived in the early 20th century.  I often find that jogging in the opposite direction from my usual path is a good way to keep me on my toes. All that antidromic movement, if nothing else keeps things from getting boring. 
4/11/202350 seconds
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Manuduction

Manuduction is a noun that refers to the act of guiding or leading as if by hand.  Our word of the day combines the Latin word manus (MAN oose) meaning ‘hand’ and ductio (DUCK she oh) which means ‘to lead.’ Together they get the word that means ‘to lead by hand.’ Here’s an example of manuduction in use: I was completely lost on my first day of work at the toy store. I needed someone to lead me by hand through all the inventory, but unfortunately no such manuduction was available. 
4/10/202347 seconds
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Disconsolate

Disconsolate is an adjective that means without consolation or comfort.  Our word of the day is derived from the Latin word consolari (con so LAR ay) meaning, ’to console’ and the prefix D-I-S, which means ‘not.’ When someone is disconsolate, they cannot be consoled.  Fred was disconsolate after his team’s loss last Sunday. I tried to cheer him up with the news that at least my team won. But for some reason, that did nothing to ease his sadness.
4/9/202349 seconds
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Oppugn

Oppugn is a verb that means to call into question the truth or validity of.  Our word of the day combines the Latin prefix O-B which means ‘against,’ and the word pugnare (poog NAR ay) which means ‘to fight.’ To oppugn something means to oppose it, more specifically, to oppose the validity or truth of it. Example: I didn’t mean to oppugn the judge's decision last week, but anybody watching that pie-eating contest could clearly see that I was the winner. 
4/8/202342 seconds
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Vellicate

Vellicate is a verb that means to twitch.  The Latin word vellicare (vel ee CAR ay) means ‘to pluck or pull.’ By the early 17th century the word was brought into English and had taken on the more specific meaning it has today. It now refers to an involuntary twitch. Here’s an example: When my eye began to vellicate, I panicked immediately. The last time a twitch like that came to my eye, I would up having a very serious eye condition. 
4/7/202341 seconds
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Agley

Agley is an adverb that means askew or wrong.  The precise origin of our word of the day is unknown, but we do know it comes from the Scottish word gley (GLAY) which means ‘squint.’ Here’s an example of agley in use: I knew something was agley in the kitchen when I walked into the house. When I immediately caught the scent of baked cookies in the air, I knew exactly what was askew. Donna had made cookies earlier that day and failed to invite me!
4/6/202342 seconds
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Astern

Astern is an adverb that means ‘backwards.’ Coming from the Middle English word ‘stern,’ (STERN) which means ‘rear,’ our word of the day is typically — but not always — used within the context of a boat or an aircraft.  I have to admit that I can get a little seasick when I hang out on Steve’s yacht. Things are a little less scary on the back of the boat, so when we pick up speed, I usually start moving astern. 
4/5/202336 seconds
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Dyad

Dyad is a noun that refers to something consisting of two parts.  The Greek word duo (DOO oh) means two. By the late 17th century, our word of the day found its way into English and came to refer to anything divided into two parts. Example: Chris and I made an impressive dyad as a folk band. With him on banjo and me on guitar and vocals were a two-part musical force to be reckoned with. 
4/4/202336 seconds
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Ejecta

Ejecta is a noun that refers to something that is thrown out.  The Latin word ejectus (ee JEK toose) means ‘thrown out.’ Our word of the day is derived from ejectus and has landed in English in the late 19th century. Here’s an example of ejecta in use: Eddie tends to make a mess when he goes canoeing. All that ejecta from his canoe winds up polluting the lake with beer cans, food wrappers and other nasty stuff he tosses in the water. 
4/3/202341 seconds
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Gossamer

Gossamer is an adjective that means light and delicate.  Our word of the day dates back to Middle English and combines the words ‘goose’ and ‘summer,’ as a reference to the time of year when geese were eaten. The word soon came to refer to anything silky or filmy — just like the down of geese.  The gossamer substance of my sleeping bag makes sleeping in the woods a lot more comfortable than it would be otherwise. Now all I need is to do something about all those mosquitoes. 
4/2/202343 seconds
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Titular

Titular is an adjective that means related to a title.  The Latin word titulus (TEA too loose) means name, and was morphed into the word title in late 16th century. Our word of the day is an adjective that came around soon after. Here’s an example of titular in use: I love the Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield, but found the titular character kind of boring. You’d think if someone’s name was used as a title of a book, they’d be more dynamic and charismatic. 
4/1/202342 seconds
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Cleave

Cleave is a verb that means to separate or divide into parts.  Our word of the day comes from Old English and is ultimately derived from German. Here’s an example of it in use: Looking back, it was kind of a waste of time to cleave that cake into eight pieces. I could have simply cut it in half and eaten half for breakfast and the other half for brunch. 
3/31/202333 seconds
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Virescent

Virescent is an adjective that means green-colored.  The Latin word virides (VEER ee dees) means green. Our word of the day emerged in the 19th century from this noun that became the adjective virescent. Here’s an example of it in use: The virescent lawns we saw in the countryside were truly a stunning sight. On the other hand, the green colored smog we spotted in the distance was stunning in a different kind of way. 
3/30/202339 seconds
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Sumptuary

Sumptuary is an adjective that means relating to or denoting laws that limit private expenditure on food and personal items.  Dating back to the early 17th century, our word of the day is derived from the Latin word sumptus (SOOM toose) which means ‘cost.’ Sumptuary describes anything related to a limit on costs on food or personal items. Here’s an example: I’ve heard that during the war, sumptuary laws limited the amount of chocolate a person could buy. Personally, it would have driven me insane to have someone cut off my regular chocolate supply.
3/29/202350 seconds
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Argent

Argent is an adjective that means silvery white colored.  If you’re familiar with the periodic table you’ll know that AG is the symbol for silver. The origin of this is the Latin word argentum (are GEN toom) meaning ‘silver.’ This word dating back to Middle English is also the origin of our word of the day. Here’s an example of argent in use: That argent glow always catches people's attention when they see me driving down the street. People say I look like a giant bullet racing through the highway. 
3/28/202343 seconds
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Clade

Clade is a noun that refers to a group that comes from a common ancestor.  Our word of the day comes from the Greek word klados (KLA dose) which means ‘branch.’ It may help to think of members of the same clade as different branches from the same family tree. Clade has been with us since the 1950s and was originally used to refer to organisms. More recently, it’s come to refer to humans and is roughly a synonym of tribe or lineage. My dad and I are proof that members of the same clade can be very different. He spends nearly all his time watching and playing sports, while I can’t dribble a basketball without accidentally breaking my jaw. 
3/27/202350 seconds
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Aeneous

Aeneous is an adjective that means brass colored.  Dating back to the 17th century, our of the day is derived from the Latin word aes (EYE ess) which means ‘brass.’ Example: Getting that beautiful aeneous desk as a birthday gift is a mixed blessing. People sure do love to gawk at its stunning appearance. But it takes a lot of work to keep it that brass-colored hue. 
3/26/202338 seconds
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Annular

Annular is an adjective that means ring-shaped.  The Latin word annulus (ANN ooh loose) means ‘ring.’ Our word of the day can be used to describe anything shaped like a ring. Here’s an example of it in use: The annular configuration of last night’s eclipse was a joy to behold. I could gaze at that ring-shaped solar phenomenon all day. 
3/25/202334 seconds
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Annular

Annular is an adjective that means ring-shaped.  The Latin word annulus (ANN ooh loose) means ‘ring.’ Our word of the day can be used to describe anything shaped like a ring. Here’s an example of it in use: The annular configuration of last night’s eclipse was a joy to behold. I could gaze at that ring-shaped solar phenomenon all day. 
3/24/202334 seconds
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Substratum

Substratum is a noun that refers to a foundation or basis of something.  The Latin prefix S-U-B means ‘below,’ while the root word stratum, also Latin in origin, refers to a layer. Something below a layer could be thought of as a foundation holding things up from beneath. Our word of the day began as a geological term that referred to the foundation beneath the earth’s surface. More recently, it’s been used to refer to any kind of foundation, for example: The substratum of our business is good customer service. Without that firm foundation, we wouldn’t be the biggest shoe store in town. 
3/23/202351 seconds
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Secern

Secern is a verb that means to discriminate in thought. The Latin word cernere (sir NARE ay) means ‘to separate.’ Our word of the day is similar in meaning and origin to the word discern. A person able to secern things could be said to have discriminating tastes. In order for the office to succeed we needed someone who would secern the good offers from the bad ones. The inability to distinguish them would be bad news for the company.
3/22/202338 seconds
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Brinkmanship

Brinkmanship is a noun that refers to the practice of pursuing a dangerous policy. The word brink refers to something unwelcome that is about to occur. Our word of the day combines this word with the suffix M-A-N-S-H-I-P which means ‘skill.’ Originally coined during the cold war of the mid-twentieth century, it initially referred to the act of a nation putting itself on the brink of war for political gain. Here’s an example: There was a great deal of brinkmanship at that point in history that later proved to be unpopular with the nation. Most people deeply resent being placed in peril for the sake of politics.
3/21/202358 seconds
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Doomscrolling

Doomscrolling is a verb that means seeking internet updates on bad news. A recent addition to the English language, doomscrolling combines the English word ‘doom,’ meaning a terrible fate and scrolling, the act of moving a computer display screen to view material. I’m no big fan of doomscrolling, but when boredom sets in I can move up and down on a screen in search of bad news like them best of them.
3/20/202345 seconds
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Linchpin

A linchpin is a person or thing vital to an enterprise or organization. Our word of the day has its origin in the Middle English word ‘lync’ (LINK) which means axle and the word pin. Lynchpin was used to refer to a pin or bolt used to secure an axle in place, preventing the wheel from coming loose. In time, the word came to be used metaphorically to refer to something or someone who needs to remain in place to keep something together. Here’s an example of linchpin in use: My van was used so frequently in our company that it became something of a linchpin. Without it, we would have never been able to take care of so many transportation needs.
3/19/20231 minute, 4 seconds
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Fitful

Fitful is an adjective that means sporadic or disrupted. Our word of the day combines the Middle English word fit (meaning ‘appropriate’) with the suffix FUL (meaning ‘full of.’) Here’s an example of it in use: My sleep last week was fitful. I’d have a good night here or a good night there, but overall it was too sporadic for me to feel well-rested.
3/18/202333 seconds
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Exurb

Exurb is a noun that refers to a district beyond the suburbs. Our word of the day was coined in 1955 by author A.C. Spectorsky in reference to regions that were far beyond the suburbs. The word combines The prefix E-X (meaning ‘out of’) with U-R-B (meaning city). Here’s an example of it in use: Having grown up in an exurb, I wasn’t accustomed to crowded environments. Out there, our family would practically have entire blocks to ourselves.
3/17/202343 seconds
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Armipotent

Armipotent is an adjective that means strong in battle. Our word of the day comes from the Latin words ‘arma’ (ARM uh) which means ‘arms’ and potent (POE tent) which means ‘powerful.’ Here’s an example of armipotent in use: The king’s armipotent forces insured that the land would be protected for years to come. Without such a powerful army, the land would have been laid to waste very quickly.
3/16/202340 seconds
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Naif

Naif is a noun that refers to a naive person. Our word of the day comes directly from the French word for ‘naive.’ The word conjures up images of a young, inexperienced person lost in a world too sophisticated for them to understand. When it came to the political world, I was something of a naif for the first few years. I had no idea what kind of indecorous behavior went on in the corridors of power.
3/15/202335 seconds
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Ressentiment

Ressentiment is a noun that refers to a psychological state arising from suppressed feelings of envy and hatred. Our word of the day was first coined by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. The term is typically used in a philosophical or psychological context, but here’s an example of it being used in casual speech: The feeling of resentment inside me made it difficult to express my feelings, but I’m sure it had something to do with my career frustrations. It’s not such a good idea to suppress those feelings instead of addressing them.
3/14/202350 seconds
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Querulous

Querulous is an adjective that means complaining in a petulant or whining manner. The Latin word queri (KWERE ee) means complain, and it serves as the origin of our word of the day. Querulous has been with the English language since the late 15th century. Here’s an example of it in use: I’m not a fan of my kids acting in a querulous manner to get what they want. But I have to admit that after several minutes of whimpering and whining, the approach usually gets the results they want.
3/13/202345 seconds
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In medias res

In medias res is an adjective that means ‘in the midst.’ Our word of the day comes directly from the Latin phrase ‘in the middle of things.’ Here’s an example of it: The day was already chaotic enough, but then in medas res, a fire alarm went off, causing things to get more insane.
3/12/202336 seconds
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Prospero

Prospero is a noun that refers to a person who is capable of influencing others’ behavior or perceptions. Our word of the day gets its origin from the William Shakespeare play The Tempest. It features a character named Prospero who is a deposed Duke and magician. Named for this highly influential character, prospero may be used to describe anyone of great influence. Here’s an example: My agent initially came across as some kind of prospero, but it soon became clear that he didn’t have nearly the influence he pretended to have.
3/11/202348 seconds
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Repristinate

Repristinate is a verb that means to restore to original state or condition. The root word of repristinate is pristine, an adjective of Latin origin that means ‘spotless.’ When we repristinate an object, we return it to its original spotless condition. Here’s an example: I like to repristinate old colonial furniture, but it sure is hard work. It takes a lot of scrubbing and sanding down to get those artifacts back to their original condition.
3/10/202347 seconds
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Cosh

Cosh is a noun that refers to a thick heavy stick or bar used as a weapon. It’s also a verb that means to hit someone over the head with a cosh. Our word of the day’s origin is unknown, but we know it’s been around since the 19th century. Here’s an example of cosh in use: When walking in the woods, I usually carry a large, wooden cosh with me just in case I run into Bigfoot or something like that. I know it’s an unlikely thing to happen, but if it does I’ll be ready to strike that behemoth on the head in my defence.
3/9/202346 seconds
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Chaebol

Chaebol is a noun that refers to a large family-owned business conglomerate. Coming from the Korean words chae (CHAY) which means ‘money,’ and bol (BALL) which means ‘faction,’ our word of the day has been with us since the 1970s. Here’s an example of it in use: I had no idea the local comedy club scene was a chaebol. It didn’t take long to learn that seven of the ten clubs were owned by one man, and the other three were owned by his brothers.
3/8/202339 seconds
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Waggle

Waggle is a verb that means to get by devious means. Our word of the day comes from the Old English word wag. Before it referred to something a dog did to its tail, the word meant ‘to sway.’ When someone engages in excessive swaying to achieve their goals, they are waggling. Here’s an example: I tried to waggle my way to the top at the movie theatre through a combination of flattery, hard work and grovelling. But in the end, I just didn’t have the sinister mind needed to rise beyond ticket usher.
3/7/202348 seconds
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Medicaster

Medicaster is a noun that refers to a fake doctor. Our word of the day combines the prefix M-E-D-I, which means ‘medical,’ and A-S-T-E-R, which indicates something of inferior or low quality. You could think of medicaster as a synonym for quack. Here’s an example: After spending thousands of dollars on supplements advertised on his show, I concluded that the guy on TV was a medicaster. It became pretty clear that he was a charlatan when my illness didn’t improve after years of gobbling up pills.
3/6/202349 seconds
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Indexical

Indexical is an adjective that means varying depending on context. It can also be a noun that refers to a word whose meaning depends on context. Derived from the Latin word index, which means ‘sign.’ our word of the day has been around since the early 19th century. Here’s an example of indexical in use: When learning a new language, it’s helpful to understand the full context of every word you use. If you use an indexical word like ‘here’ it might help to know where here is, or the person you are talking to may get confused.
3/5/202350 seconds
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Trachle

Trachle is a verb that means to fatigue or wear out. Coming directly from Scottish, our word of the day may also be used as a noun that refers to the source of fatigue. Here’s an example of the former: All that work I used to do on the weekends used to trachle me. But these days the only thing wearing me out is the work I do at my job during the week.
3/4/202332 seconds
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Aporia

Aporia is a noun that refers to an internal contradiction. Our word of the day comes from the Greek word aporos (uh POOR ose) which means ‘impassable.’ Aporias are commonly seen in philosophy. Here’s an example: When my former roommate told me that everything he said was a lie, I wondered if he was aware that his statement was an aporia. This turned out to be one of many internal contradictions I’d find in his words.
3/3/202338 seconds
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Vulpine

Vulpine is an adjective that means like a fox. The Latin word vulpes (VOOL pez) means ‘fox.’ When someone behaves like a fox — meaning sly or cunning — our word of the day is a great adjective to describe them. Here’s an example: As a kid, I had my vulpine ways when I really wanted to play video games. The most cunning thing I did was pretend to do my homework when I was secretly playing my favorite game on my phone.
3/2/202340 seconds
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Sneakernet

Sneakernet is a noun that refers to the transfer of electronic information by moving it physically. A recent addition to the English language, our word of the day has been around for about a decade and gets its origin from the word ‘sneak’ and the suffix ’N-E-T.’ Here’s an example of it in use: The world of tech features a great deal of secretive behavior. On more than one occasion, we’ve had to use sneakernet to get our intellectual property transferred without it getting stolen. All that cloak-and-dagger stuff can get pretty intense, but truth be told, it can also be lots of fun.
3/1/202351 seconds
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Prattle

Prattle is a verb that means to talk at length in a foolish way. Coming from the Low German word prate (PRATE) which has the same meaning as our word of the day, prattle is a word almost never used in a flattering way. Here’s an example: After two hours of hearing the salesman prattle on about the car’s special features, I was fairly sure I had no interest in the new convertible. It wasn’t until he got beyond all the nonsense and onto the low discounted price that he actually had my interest.
2/28/202341 seconds
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Vendible

Vendible is an adjective that means ‘able to be bought or sold.’ It is also a noun that refers to an item that can be bought or sold. The Latin word vendere (ven DARE ay) means ‘to sell.’ This is the origin of our word of the day which has been around since the early 17th century. Here’s an example of its use: As a kid, I enjoyed making and eating sloppy joes, but it never seemed to me that my creations were vendible. If I could have found a way to make a living selling my sloppy joes, I would have chosen that as my career path instead of accounting.
2/27/202345 seconds
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Nutate

Nutate is a verb that means to nod the head. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word nutare (new TAR ay) which means ‘to nod.’ In a general sense, it can refer to anything moving back and forth from a fixed point, but it’s most commonly used to indicate the nodding of a person’s head. Here’s an example: When the waiter asked if I wanted fried scorpions with my meal, I was so taken aback, all I could do was nutate nervously. In the end, I’m glad I nodded ‘yes’ to this awkward question. It turns out fried scorpion meat isn’t half bad.
2/26/202346 seconds
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Unco

Unco is an adjective that means strange or unknown. Coming directly from Scottish, our word of the day’s origin isn’t clear, although some believe it’s derived from the word ‘unkenned,’ which means ‘unknown.’ Here’s an example of unco in use: During my trip to Spain, I found myself in a number of unco settings. Thankfully though, my Spanish was good enough to help me navigate back to the hotel whenever I got lost.
2/25/202336 seconds
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Mumpsimus

Mumpsimus is a noun that refers to someone who sticks to old erroneous ways. Our word of the day is derived from a tale of a medieval priest who persistently used the word ‘mumpsimus’ instead of ‘sumpsimus’ in prayer, despite frequent corrections from his superior. The priest replied that he’d been saying it the wrong way for so long that it had become a tradition. Here’s an example of mumpsimus in use: Call me a mumpsimus if you want, but I prefer to use my old high school ball when bowling even though I know it’s too light to get the job done. I’ve been using it so long now that I simply can’t kick the habit — despite the ways it brings my game down.
2/24/202354 seconds
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Hyperacusis

Hyperacusis is a noun that refers to a heightened sensitivity to sound. You may recognize the Greek prefix H-Y-P-E-R from words like hyperactive or hyperdrive. It means ‘above normal.’ The Greek word aukusis (ah KOOSE is) is where we get words like ‘acoustic’ and it means ‘hearing.’ When combined, we get our word of the day which refers to a condition of hearing things more loudly or harshly than normal. Here’s an example: At first I thought my neighbors’ reaction to my band playing in the garage indicated some form of hyperacusis. After all, why else would our music affect their ears so harshly? But it turned out they didn’t have any medical condition. It was just that our band wasn’t so good.
2/23/20231 minute, 4 seconds
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Recondite

Recondite is an adjective that means unknown or abstruse. Coming from the Latin word reconditus (ray con DEE toose) which means ‘hidden’ or ‘put away,’ our word of the day has been with us since the mid-17th century. In more recent years, it is likely to refer to knowledge or information that is not well known. Here’s an example: Although I enjoyed the poetry class I took last year, it was a little tough to keep up with it without a familiarity of obscure texts from the past. Because I didn’t have much recondite knowledge, I wound up not learning much from the class.
2/22/202347 seconds
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Schmatte

Schmatte is a noun that refers to a ragged or shabby garment. Our word of the day comes from the Yiddish word for ‘rag’ and has been part of the English language since the 1970s. Here’s an example of schmatte in use: There’s nothing more embarrassing than having to attend a fancy dinner without any good clothes to wear. Here I was being honored by my peers and instead of a fresh tuxedo, I was clad in a schmatte.
2/21/202346 seconds
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Malinger

Malinger is a verb that means to exaggerate or feign illness to escape work. The French word malingre (MAL ange) means ‘sickly.’ But once the word was imported into English, its meaning shifted to mean pretending to be sick — specifically to avoid work. Here’s a sample: With so much to complete at the office, I was tempted to malinger. But in the end, I just felt that faking illness would I would saddle my co-workers with too much to do, so I decided against it.
2/20/202343 seconds
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Rive

Rive is a verb that means to split or tear apart violently. Our word of the day’s origin isn’t fully known, but we do know it comes from Old Norse and has been with us since the 14th century. Here’s an example of rive in use: I was so angry at the tiny amount I was paid for my landscaping work that I decided to rive the check right in front of my boss. But when I realized I needed to pay my rent that week, I felt that tearing my check up might not be the best way to express my displeasure.
2/19/202340 seconds
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Glabrous

Glabrous is an adjective that means smooth and hairless. The Latin word glaber (GLOB er) means smooth and has been with us since the mid 17th century. Here’s an example of glabrous in use: At my age I don’t really get upset about finding the occasional gray hair. I’m just happy that when I look at the top of my head, I still find hair and not a slick, glabrous surface.
2/18/202335 seconds
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Crag

Crag is a noun that refers to a steep rock formation rising higher than its surrounding rocks. Our word of the day is Celtic in origin and dates back to the mid-18th century. Here’s an example of crag in use. There’s something about rock climbing that gives me a breathtaking sense of rising above everything. My favorite moments involve standing on a crag and gazing down from its dizzying heights at the ground below.
2/17/202335 seconds
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Haverel

Haverel is a noun that refers to a half-wit. Coming directly from Scottish, our word of the day is related to verb ‘haver’ which means ‘to hem and haw.’ Here’s an example of haverel in use: I was so confused by the instructions given to me that I must have come across like a haverel with all that fumbling and bumbling of my words.
2/16/202332 seconds
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Collate

Collate is a verb that means to collect and combine in proper order. The Latin word conferre (con FAIR ay) means ‘to bring together.’ When we bring things together in a logical order, we collate them. Here’s an example of our word of the day in use: My job at the office is to collate all the information from our many clients. Keeping them in proper order can be a bit difficult because after a while, they all just seem the same.
2/15/202339 seconds
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Apprise

Apprise is a verb that means to inform or tell someone. Coming from the French word for ‘to teach,’ our word of the day has been around since the late 17th century. Here’s an example: When I found myself in legal trouble, I was hoping someone would apprise me of my rights. But unfortunately, by the time anyone passed that information along to me, I was already sitting in a jail cell.
2/14/202335 seconds
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Chafe

Chafe is a verb that means to make someone annoyed or impatient. The Latin word calere (kuh LARE ay) means ’to make hot.’ Initially, our word of the day’s meaning was ‘to rub.’ But in time, it came to define the act of annoying someone. I have to admit that the sound of our next door neighbor’s drum set tends to chafe me. After a few hours of rehearsal, I’m really impatient for all that racket to stop.
2/13/202336 seconds
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Beatific

Beatific is an adjective that means happy or angelic. Our word of the day is derived from the Latin word beatus (BEE ah toos) which means ‘blessed.’ In strictly religious terms, beatific refers to spiritual creatures such as angels, but when used casually, it simply means ‘similar to an angel.’ Michelle’s Beatific smile has always inspired me. It looks like something you’d see on the face of an otherworldly being floating down from the heavens above.
2/12/202344 seconds
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Adulterate

Adulterate is a verb that means ‘to corrupt or make impure.’ The Latin verb aldulterare (all do Ter RAWR ay) means ’to corrupt.’ Our word of the day has been around since the 16th century. Here’s an example: At first, I was afraid that adding a violin player to our punk rock band would adulterate our sound. But it turned out the only thing that corrupted out sound was the fact that we weren’t very good.
2/11/202339 seconds
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Accord

Accord is a verb that means ‘to bring into agreement. It can also be a noun that refers to ‘an agreement.’ Our word of the day combines the prefix A-D with the word cord (chord) which means ‘heart.’ Here’s an example of accord used properly: After a month of tense negotiation, the factions reached an accord. The pro jelly donut coalition would get their jelly donuts on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, while team apple fritter would get their way on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
2/10/202343 seconds
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Expatriate

Expatriate is a verb that means to leave one’s home country and resettle in another. The Latin word ‘patria’ (POT ree uh) refers to ‘a native country.’ Words like patriot and patriotism derive from this. As a noun, expatriate refers to someone who has left their native land, but our word of the day is a verb that means the act of leaving a native land. After all the awful weather we've had in the last few months, I was tempted to expatriate and perhaps settle in a place with warmer climates. But I’ve since realized that all I really had to do was repair our fireplace.
2/9/202351 seconds
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Creditable

Creditable is an adjective that means worthy of belief. Although the word ‘credit’ is used in a wide variety of ways, its basis is in the Latin word ‘credere’ (cruh DARE ay) means ‘trust’ or ‘believe.’ When something has been deemed creditable, that means we can believe and trust what has been said about it. Example: The first lawyer I approached for my case, didn’t exactly seem like a creditable fellow. Sure, there were plenty of glowing words said of him on his website, but I later discovered that all those glowing reviews came from his mother.
2/8/202347 seconds
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Equidistant

Equidistant is an adjective that means ‘at equal distances.’ Our word of the day combines the prefix E-Q-U-I with the word ‘distant.’ Not surprisingly, the result is a word that means ‘equally distant.’ When faced with the option of going to college in sunny southern California or North Dakota, the choice wasn’t difficult. They were both equidistant from home, but let’s face it, distance isn’t always the most important factor when making such a decision.
2/7/202345 seconds
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Abrade

Abrade is a verb that means ‘to rub or wear away.’ Coming from the Latin word ‘abradere’ (ab rah DARE ay) which means ‘to scrape away,’ our word of the day has been with us since the late 17th century. Here’s an example of abrade in use: I was always afraid that if I left my bike outside, the rain and wind would abrade its frame over time, and let’s face it, metal that’s been all scraped away is not nearly as strong and stable.
2/6/202336 seconds
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Germinant

Germinant is an adjective that means able to grow or develop. The Latin word germinare (jer ee NAR may) means ’to sprout.’ It’s given us such words as ‘germ,’ ‘germinate,’ and our word of the day. Germinant can be used literally or metaphorically. Here’s an example of the later: While working as an ad executive, some of my ideas worked out better than others. The most germinant of them developed with the help of hard-working staff.
2/5/202341 seconds
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Foretaste

Foretaste is a noun that refers to a sample or suggestion of something that lies ahead. Our word of the day combines the prefix F-O-R-E, meaning ‘before’ with the Old English word ‘taste’ which can mean ‘experience’ as in ‘I got a taste of reality.’ As a noun, foretaste can refer to an advance sample of something. As a verb it can be thought of as a synonym of ‘anticipate.’ Here are examples of both: I’ve always had an uncanny ability to foretaste bad weather. For example, when a blizzard is on its way, I can always anticipate it days in advance. The earliest foretaste of it is a strange chill I feel when everybody else feels normal.
2/4/202357 seconds
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Parquetry

Parquetry is a noun that refers to a floor design made of geometric shapes. Coming from the French term for ‘small enclosed space,’ our word of the day refers to a pattern commonly used on flooring or furniture. It entered the English language in the early 19th century at the same time the pattern was gaining popularity. Here’s an example of parquetry in use: As a math enthusiast, I tend to get excited when I see parquetry anywhere. The image of geometric shapes carved into an end table or chest of drawers tends to make me far more excited about furniture than any reasonable person should be.
2/3/202349 seconds
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Proviso

Proviso is a noun that refers to a condition attached to an agreement. The Latin word providere (pro vee DARE ay) means ‘to foresee or provide.’ Our word of the day came about in the late Middle English period as part of the phrase ‘it being provided that.’ Centuries later, proviso is used in a more informal manner. Here’s an example: I went to the bowling match between my co-workers, but only with the proviso that I could bring my ear buds with me. Let’s just say bowling isn’t exactly a thrill a minute.
2/2/202343 seconds
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Ignescent

Ignescent is an adjective that means emitting sparks of fire. The Latin word ignis (EEN yees) means fire. From this origin, we get our word of the day which has been a part of the English language since the early 19th century. It may be used in a literal sense to refer to sparks of a fire or in a metaphorical sense as a synonym of volatile. Here’s an example of the later: It’s not like the mayor to make provocative speeches, but last Sunday
2/1/202344 seconds
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Clinquant

Clinquant is a noun that refers to false glitter. Our word of the day comes directly from French. Its origin is imitative, meaning it is derived from the clink sound that comes from tapping against glitter. Here’s an example: The journalism industry is full of all kinds of clinquant. It may seem glamorous, but, believe me, all the glitter of that world is heartbreakingly false.
1/31/202337 seconds
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Precocity

Precocity is a noun that refers to the state of flowering. The Latin prefix P-R-A-E means ‘before’ and the verb coquere (ko ku WHERE ay) means ’to cook.’ These provide the basis for a word that means ‘to ripen.’ Related to the adjective ‘precocious’ as in ‘a precocious, or developing child,’ our word of the day grew into the English language in the 17th century. The precocity of our little puppies makes me reluctant to feed them the same treats we feed our older dogs. I’m not sure if the developing bodies of those tiny creatures can handle grown-up food just yet.
1/30/202350 seconds
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Geniture

Geniture is a noun that refers to a person’s birth or parentage. The Latin word genitura (jen uh TOUR ah) means ‘birth,’ This word has given birth to such English words as ‘generation,’ ‘generate’ and ‘progenitor.’ Here’s an example: While the resemblance between parent and child can vary from one family to another, physical similarity is usually a good indication of a child’s geniture. Most kids look a lot like one or both parents.
1/29/202339 seconds
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Rusticate

Rusticate is a verb that means to abandon city life in favor of the country. The Latin word rusticus (ROOS de coos) gives us the English word ‘rustic,’ an adjective that means ‘relating to the countryside or the country.’ Our word of the day is a verb used to indicate the process of moving to the country. Here’s an example: I hope that when I rusticate I’ll be able to get better sleep at night. All those loud, intrusive sounds of traffic are a lot less peaceful than the sounds I’ll experience in the open fields of the country.
1/28/202343 seconds
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Cumbrous

Cumbrous is an adjective that means awkward or ungainly. Our word of the day is related to the more common word cumbersome which comes from the Latin word combre (COMB bray). Here’s an example of cumbrous in use: After a day of working in packaging, my back can get pretty sore. Those boxes may look small, but they can be pretty cumbrous.
1/27/202331 seconds
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Gainsay

Gainsay is a verb that means to deny or contradict. The combination of two Middle English words provides the basis of our word of the day. The word ‘gain’ means against, while ‘say’ has the same meaning it does today. To gainsay is to speak against something or someone. As much as I don’t like to gainsay anyone arguing for the addition of donuts for our weekly meeting, I had to contradict Aurora’s claims about the nutritional value of apple fritters.
1/26/202340 seconds
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Splutter

Splutter is a verb that means to say something with a spitting sound, as a result of a strong emotion. It is also a noun that refers to a short explosive noise. Our word of the day goes back to the 17th century and appears to have been imitative in origin. Here’s an example of splutter in use: Watching the boss splutter in rage for an hour in the office like that suggested that the mistake made was a huge one. I hadn’t seen him explode like that since someone stole his stapler.
1/25/202343 seconds
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Apportion

Apportion is a verb that means to divide and allocate. Having been around since the 15th century, our word of the day derives from the Latin word portionner (POOR shun her) which means ’to divide.’ We were told the coach would apportion the pizza equally between players. But the pizza was so tiny, that just meant everybody received an equally sized crumb.
1/24/202333 seconds
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Allay

Allay is a verb that means to diminish or put to rest. The Old English word Alegan (al uh GAN) means ‘to lay down or aside.’ This is the basis for our word of the day. Here’s an example: In an effort to allay my daughter’s disgust of Brussels sprouts, I ate several of them myself. Unfortunately, the upset stomach I had afterwards, didn’t do much to put aside her dislike of the vegetable.
1/23/202335 seconds
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Metagrobolize

Metagrobolize is a verb that means to puzzle or mystify. Our word of the day comes almost directly from the French variation of it that has basically the same meaning. Here’s an example of metagrobalize in use: This week’s installment of my favorite science fiction series really started to metagrobalize me. All those characters and plots and subplots and planets can really get your head spinning after a few episodes.
1/22/202343 seconds
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Deglutition

Deglutition is a noun that refers to the act or process of swallowing. The Latin word deglutire (de glue TIRE ay) means ’to swallow down.’ Deglutition re