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Where We Live

English, Talk, 1 season, 1855 episodes, 5 days, 21 hours, 39 minutes
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Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.
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Fewer Americans are considering careers in the military and branches are looking for solutions to recruiting

During the last fiscal year, the army alone missed their recruiting goal by 25%. All branches of the military are struggling to recruit new cadets. With an all-volunteer service, the military relies on recruitment efforts to get more people to serve. But fewer Americans than ever are eligible to do so. And attracting the next generation of cadets has been a challenge. Today, we talk about the military recruiting crisis. We will hear from Captain Benjamin Keffer, Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command. Later, we hear how some extremist groups are working to get veterans and others with tactical experience into their organizations. GUESTS: Dr. Nora Bensahel: Professor of the Practice at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a Contributing Editor, War on the Rocks Captain Benjamin Keffer: Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command Sonner Kehrt: Investigative Reporter at the War Horse and Coast Guard Veteran Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired on October 6, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/19/202441 minutes
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'We need a moonshot for long COVID': What we know (and don't know) about the illness

Nearly one in four adults who contracted COVID-19 have developed long COVID symptoms, according to the latest Census report. This hour, Dr. Akiko Iwasaki, an immunobiology expert at Yale who is focused on researching long COVID, joins us to share what we know and don't know about the illness, and the many ways it can manifest. The Patient-Led Research Collaborative has authored several seminal surveys and studies. We also hear from co-founder Lisa McCorkell about this bank of patient-led research. She says, "We need a moonshot for long COVID: at least a billion dollars a year in research funding to adequately address this crisis." Plus, Yale American Studies professor Dr. Daniel HoSang has written about the “twin pandemics” of COVID-19 and racism. He joins us to reflect on the four-year mark of the virus, and the links he sees to the long COVID response. GUESTS: Dr. Daniel HoSang: Professor of American Studies, Yale University; Co-Author, Under the Blacklight: The Intersectional Vulnerabilities that the Twin Pandemics Lay Bare Dr. Akiko Iwasaki: Co-Lead Investigator, Yale COVID-19 Recovery Study; Sterling Professor of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Lisa McCorkell: Co-Founder, Patient-Led Research Collaborative Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/18/202441 minutes, 13 seconds
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A conversation with the new head of the Archdiocese of Hartford

Although church attendance has dwindled across all faiths, 39% of Catholics say they attend services at least once a week. The Archdiocese of Hartford includes over 400,000 Catholics across the state of Connecticut, and is now being overseen by a new Archbishop. After years of service, Archbishop Leonard Paul Blair will be succeeded by the newly appointedCoadjutor Archbishop Christopher Coyne, who recently served as a Bishop in Burlington, Vermont. Today, we talk about the future of the Catholic Church, serving the Catholic population in Connecticut and a recent document published by the Vatican and its statements on gender identity and gender affirming surgery, surrogacy, and human dignity. GUESTS: Coadjutor Archbishop Christopher Coyne: Archdiocese of Hartford Joshua McElwee: News Editor of National Catholic Reporter Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/16/202439 minutes, 53 seconds
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Connecticut's 'Aerospace Alley' celebrates the state's aviation past and future

Throughout history, our state has made some big contributions to aviation technology. Today, we’re talking about the history and future of aviation in our state. We hear from some aviation enthusiasts who’s love of all things plane is going to make you soar. The New England Air Museum houses some unbelievable vintage aircrafts. We hear from them. And we hear from someone with experience flying in some of these vintage aircrafts. If flying in a vintage plane is not your speed, there are more ways you can tap into your inner pilot. There are many model plane clubs here in all four corners of Connecticut. We learn how you can get involved. GUESTS: Stephanie Abrams: President & CEO of the New England Air Museum Mike Thornton: Curator of the New England Air Museum Edward Deming: President of the RC Propbusters of Salem, CT Bob Creter: crew chief and docent for D-Day Squadron in Oxford, Connecticut Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired on February 2.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/15/202441 minutes, 23 seconds
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For autistic adults, getting services can be an uphill battle

For adults on the autism spectrum, getting services can be a challenging task to navigate. A new bill passed last year means that more autistic adults could receive services from the state from the Connecticut Autism Waiver. But services still remain limited. There is currently a ten year waiting list to receive the waiver leaving thousands scrambling for services. Today, we talk about the Connecticut Autism Waiver program. Later, we hear about businesses working to make their establishments more accommodating to neurodiverse clientele. GUESTS: Jimna Miller: Co-Chair of Autism Advisory Council and Volunteer Jennifer Twachtman-Bassett: Autism Clinical Specialist and Research Coordinator at Connecticut Children's Hospital Emma McKeever (left): resident of Glastonbury who is currently on the Autism Waiver Waitlist Pam McKeever: resident of Glastonbury and parent of autistic adult Sarah Spear: CEO and Founder of Empowered Together Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/12/202442 minutes, 4 seconds
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There's no singularity when it comes to honoring Lunar New Year, including in Connecticut

In Connecticut, the Asian American and Pacific Islander community is vast and varied, with more than 170,000 AAPI people in the state. And with a diversity of AAPI cultures, there is also a diversity of New Year traditions and celebrations that span across months. We’re just days away from the Laotian New Year and Thai New Year, as well as a Khmer New Year event hosted by the Cambodian Buddhist Society of Connecticut in Bristol. This hour, we’ll discuss the diversity of Lunar New Year celebrations where we live, and unpack some of the debate around terminology. GUESTS: Quan Tran: Co-chair, Asian Pacific American Coalition of Connecticut; Senior Lecturer on Race, Ethnicity and Migration, Yale University Sounthaly Thammavong: Board Member, Asian Pacific American Coalition of Connecticut Mike Keo: Senior Communication Officer, Hartford Foundation for Public Giving; Founder, #IAMNOTAVIRUS Connecticut Public intern Sajina Shrestha contributed to this report.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/11/202448 minutes, 58 seconds
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What to expect from your financial literacy course

Starting with the class of 2027, all Connecticut high school students are now required to take a financial literacy course. April is National Financial Literacy Month, and today, we hear from those that advocated to get this course work in schools. For many, personal finance is just that - it’s deeply personal. Later, we hear about efforts to offer financial literacy courses to adults, and the opportunities to learn about financing beyond high school. GUESTS: Nan Morrison: President and Chief Executive Officer of the Council for Economic Education State Representative Corey Paris: Stamford State Representative Barbara Angelicola-Manzolli: Business Education Teacher at Lewis S. Mills High School in Burlington Sabrina Acosta: Connecticut Money School Program Manager Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/9/202449 minutes
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How wonder unites us: Total solar eclipse draws millions to the path of totality

Today, Connecticut is expected to enjoy a partial solar eclipse, the most intense since 1924. That’s according to local astronomer and Wesleyan professor Dr. Meredith Hughes. Still, the Federal Highway Administration says 5 million Americans could be traveling to the path of totality. This hour, we discuss the science of the eclipse, and how to safely enjoy it, with Dr. Hughes. Plus, "umbraphile" or eclipse-chaser Kate Russo explains why these natural phenomena are such a unifying social event. Wesleyan University is prepared to host hundreds of onlookers, with four solar telescopes in operation. We'll hear from one astronomy student who’s helping to ensure the event is accessible to Spanish speakers. GUESTS: Dr. Meredith Hughes: Associate Professor of Astronomy, Wesleyan University Carlos Ordoñez: Astronomy Student, Wesleyan University Kate Russo: Author, Being in the Shadow: Stories of the First-Time Total Eclipse Experience; Psychologist  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/8/202449 minutes
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A look at Connecticut's bridges and other infrastructure

Five percent of bridges in Connecticut are in “poor condition.” Today, we talk about what needs to be done to update the bridges and roads in our state, and we talk about the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore. We hear from The Accountability Project from right here at Connecticut Public. And later, we hear about the infrastructure workforce and the training needed to staff these jobs. We’ll also talk about the future of green infrastructure, a small solution to increased rainfall and subsequent flooding. GUESTS: Jim Haddadin: Editor for the Accountability Project, Connecticut Public’s investigative reporting team Ron Harichandran: Dean of the Tagliatela College of Engineering at the University of New Haven Michael Dietz: Extension Educator at UConn and Director of the Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Chris DiPentima: President and CEO Connecticut Business & Industry Association. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/5/202449 minutes
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Author Garrard Conley explores queerness in Puritan New England

Author Garrard Conley published his first book in 2016, "Boy Erased". The bestselling memoir, relaying Conley's experience undergoing conversion therapy at 19, inspired a major motion picture two years later. This hour, Conley discuss his newest book and his first foray into fiction. "All the World Beside" explores queerness in Puritan New England. Set in 1700s Massachusetts and inspired by Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," an affair unfolds between Arthur Lyman, a physician, and Nathaniel Whitfield, a reverend. GUESTS: Garrard Conley: Author, All the World Beside and Boy Erased Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/4/202449 minutes
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Elmo is the internet's new therapist. But can he help solve burnout?

Beloved Muppet Elmo recently asked social media a simple question, "How is everybody doing?" The answers ranged from incredulous to raging. The trauma-dumping on Elmo begged the question: Are we burnt out? Burnout has been reported in many industries: Connecticut Public has previously covered burnout in health care, and among early child care educators and teachers, for example. When Where We Live covered burnout in the nonprofit world in 2022, our phone lines were flooded. This hour, we hear from Emily Ballesteros, a management coach and the author of the new book, The Cure for Burnout. She defines the phenomenon, and fields your questions. Plus, Elizabeth Thompson is a local news researcher focused on burnout in local journalism. A 2020 report from UNC found that more than one-quarter of American newspapers had shut down since 2005, forcing more than half of all local journalists out of the industry, and "leaving many remaining newsrooms staffed by a small number of reporters burdened by excessive workloads and unable to dedicate themselves to particular topics of local interest." GUESTS: Emily Ballesteros: Management Coach; Author, The Cure for Burnout Elizabeth Thompson: Local News Researcher, Center for Innovation and Sustainability in Local Media at the University of North Carolina Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show that originally aired February 29, 2024.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/2/202448 minutes
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Exploring the 'new' Yale Peabody Museum

In a 2022 survey from CT Humanities, only 26% of Connecticut residents had said they had visited a museum in-person in the last two years. Some 83% of those museum-goers identified as white. There are many museums where we live working to open their doors to a broader public, and to engage their local community more meaningfully. We’ve covered some of those efforts on this program, including over the course of the Yale Peabody Museum’s four-year renovation process. We even got a sneak preview of one of the museum’s partnerships with local artists, celebrated New Haven-based artist and architect Mohamad Hafez's "Eternal Cities." Last week, the museum reopened to the public, now 50% larger and with free admission. There are some familiar and many new exhibitions, as well as new research facilities and eight classrooms staffers hope will be used by schools in the area. This hour, we hear from curators, educators and students about their hopes for the new Peabody. Plus, producer Katie Pellico takes a tour with director David Skelly and associate director of exhibitions Kailen Rogers. GUESTS: Chris Norris: Director of Public Programs, Peabody Museum Andrea Motto: Director of Education, Peabody Museum Lindsay Pierce: Digital Content Assistant, Peabody Museum Kelsey Jenkins: Paleontology Doctoral Student, Yale University Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/1/202449 minutes
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Bigfoot gets all the glory, but Connecticut has its own cast of cryptids

You’ve heard of Bigfoot and Nessie, but did you know Connecticut is home to a host of creatures, or "cryptids"? Cryptozoology is the study of animals whose existence is a matter of debate. While Bigfoot sightings have been reported where we live, sea serpents, the Glastonbury Glawackus, and plenty of others call Connecticut home. This hour, we hear from Patrick Scalisi and Valerie Ruby-Omen, the author and illustrator of a new field guide to this cast of Connecticut cryptids. Plus, Stephen Olbrys Gencarella explains how folklore can deepen our understanding of these fantastic creatures, and how the stories about them are shaped over time. Patrick Scalisi: Author, Connecticut Cryptids: A Field Guide to the Weird and Wonderful Creatures of the Nutmeg State Valerie Ruby-Omen: Illustrator, Connecticut Cryptids Stephen Olbrys Gencarella: Professor of Folklore Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show that originally aired on January 18, 2024.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/29/202448 minutes
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Reflecting on Joe Lieberman's career, impact and legacy

Longtime U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman has died at 82. His family said he died due to complications from a fall. His wife, Hadassah, and members of his family were with him when he passed. Lieberman represented Connecticut in the U.S. Senate for more than two decades. In 2000, he made history as the first Jewish American on a major party’s presidential ballot when he became Al Gore’s running mate. This hour, be talking about his legacy, and we want to hear from you. Our newsroom has been compiling tributes from elected officials across Connecticut. We’ll be hearing from some of them this hour, including Senator Richard Blumenthal. GUESTS: Colin McEnroe: Host, The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Frankie Graziano: Host, Wheelhouse on Connecticut Public Ebong Udoma: Senior Political Reporter, WSHU Public Radio John Craven: Political Reporter, News 12 Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/28/202448 minutes, 58 seconds
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Author Rebecca F. Kuang on 'Babel,' revolution and students as visionaries

"An act of translation is always an act of betrayal." This idea, and the questions it inspires, are central to author Rebecca or RF Kuang’s 2022 novel, Babel: Or the Necessity of Violence: An Arcane History of the Oxford Translators' Revolution. As the title promises, the book also explores the nature of revolution and the "necessity of violence," in addition to those complex questions surrounding the art of translation. This hour, we revisit our conversation with the author, which was focused on the award-winning book, during an event organized by local bookseller RJ Julia. On the importance of student revolutions, Kuang reflects, "The student's weakness is precisely his allure. The fact that the student is so naïve and doesn't have the jadedness of somebody who's been through more; the fact that students are dreamers, that they are romantic idealists; that kind of hope, that kind of ability to imagine an alternate future is beautiful and it matters and I hope we keep seeing that." GUESTS: RF or Rebecca Kuang: Award-winning author of the Poppy War trilogy, Babel: An Arcane History, Yellowface, and Katabasis (forthcoming). She has an MPhil in Chinese Studies from Cambridge and an MSc in Contemporary Chinese Studies from Oxford; she is now pursuing a PhD in East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. This episode originally aired December 18, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/26/202448 minutes, 30 seconds
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'Kinks in the movement': Staging a curly hair revolution in New Haven

The curly hair movement – and market – is growing, as more people learn to style and to celebrate their natural hair. This hour, we hear from one salon that’s just for natural curls in Connecticut. Luvena Leslie opened The Curly Hair Salon in 2011. "So many people have had bad experiences before they come to us," Leslie says. Viola Clune, a Yale student and editor of the New Journal, recently wrote a piece about salons like Leslie's, and the work they do to untangle "hair trauma," titled "Kinks in the Movement." She joins the conversation. Clune writes that The Curly Hair Salon "exists as a contradiction, intervention, remembrance, and stagnation at once. The ever-growing salon industry in New Haven suggests that there is something complementary about these contradictions, something inherent about them..." Plus, the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford has a new exhibit all about the optics and politics of hair. A curator joins us to discuss Styling Identities: Hair’s Tangled Histories, on view through August 11. We also hear from one archivist who contributed to the exhibition and created an accompanying zine. GUESTS: Luvena Leslie: Owner, The Curly Hair Salon in New Haven Viola Clune: Editor, The New Journal and author of the article “Kinks in the Movement" Jama Holchin: Lead Curator for "Styling Identities: Hair’s Tangled Histories" at The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/25/202449 minutes
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Unforgotten: Connecticut's Hidden History of Slavery

Today, we're airing the first and second episode of the new podcast Unforgotten. It’s a history lesson many of us didn’t get in school: Slavery has deep roots in Connecticut and across New England. Enslaved people helped build the foundation of much of this state. In this five-episode podcast from reporter and producer Diane Orson and editorial consultant and curator Frank Mitchell talk about efforts to shed light on this history and they explore why it matters. Visit ctpublic.org/unforgotten to learn more, including videos, photos and digital stories.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/22/202450 minutes, 28 seconds
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Pet shelters in the state still flooded with requests to surrender animals

In 2023, more than 6 million animals entered shelters and rescues in the U.S., according to a recent report from Shelter Animals Count. Believe it or not, those numbers are down from pre-pandemic reports. Over the summer, Connecticut news outlets reported that animal shelters in our state were "bursting at the seams" and unable to keep up with calls from people trying to surrender pets. This hour, we’ll be checking back in with some of those pet shelters. How is the so-called "pandemic boomerang" affecting them now? Plus, we’ll switch gears and talk to farm animal and wildlife rescues in Connecticut. Whether you’ve got questions about your pandemic puppy or a stray opossum you think might need some help, join the conversation. GUESTS: Laura Burban: Director, Dan Cosgrove Animal Shelter in Branford Marla C. Riley: MSN, MBA, RN; President and Founder, The Riley Farm Rescue in Canterbury Pamela A. Lefferts: Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator, Ferncroft Wildlife Rescue in Woodstock Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired February 5, 2024.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/21/202448 minutes, 3 seconds
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State-approved schools serving special education students are "operating in the shadows"

A multi-year investigative report has shown that High Road Schools, a group of eight publicly funded, privately run schools for children in special education, must make improvements.  The report cites several incidents of teachers without proper certification managing classrooms,overuse of restraint and seclusion, and a total lack of proper education for “the state’s most vulnerable students.”  Today, we hear from the authors of this report: the Office of the Child Advocate and Disability Rights Connecticut. You can read the full report here. If you have a student at High Road Schools, or if you're a parent navigating special education, we want to hear from you. The Connecticut State Department of Education and High Roads Schools have responded to this report. You can view their response to investigation GUESTS: Sarah Eagen: Connecticut Child Advocate Tom Cosker: Disability Advocate at Disability Rights Connecticut Penny Spencer: Educational Consultant, Associate Professor, Department of Education at the University of Saint Joseph Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/19/202449 minutes
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'Avant Colony': Celebrating the history of avant-garde art-making in Connecticut

This hour, we preview several historical exhibits spotlighting local artists, many of whom were touched by the Pop Art Movement percolating just over the border in New York. This includes prolific artist couple Leo Jensen and Dalia Ramanauskas. We'll explore what it means to be an artist in community — in Connecticut or New York — and how Pop Art changed that. 1 of 6The exhibit "Avant Colony: Unearthing the Westbrook Gallery" is currently running through March 31 at Ely Center of Contemporary Art in New HavenEric Litke / Ely Center of Contemporary Art in New Haven2 of 6Saturday Night: New London, ca 1935, is on view in "Beatrice Cuming: Connecticut Precisionist," through May 26 at Lyman Allyn Art Museum.Provided / Tanya Pohrt / Lyman Allyn Art Museum3 of 6Bell Buoys on the Dock, ca. 1937, is on view in "Beatrice Cuming: Connecticut Precisionist," through May 26 at Lyman Allyn Art Museum.Provided / Tanya Pohrt / Lyman Allyn Art Museum4 of 6Leo Jensen (1926–2019), Baseball Machine, 1963. Painted wood, mixed media kinetic sculpture, 90 x 76 x 23 in. Collection of the Artist.Provided / Florence Griswold Museum5 of 6Leo Jensen (1926–2019), The Lure of the Turf, 1963. Wood, steel, 90 x 63 x 22 1/2 in. Collection of the Artist.Provided / Florence Griswold Museum6 of 6Leo Jensen (1926–2019), Secrets of a Home Run Hitter, 1964. Polychromed wood and mixed media assemblage (electric), 39 x 40 x 8 in. Collection of the Artist.Provided / Florence Griswold Museum February 4 – March 31: Avant Colony: Unearthing the Westbrook Gallery at the Ely Center of Contemporary Art in New Haven February 10 – April 14: Art in Play: Leo Jensen at the Lyman Allyn Art Museum in New London   February 20 – May 19: Fun & Games? Leo Jensen's Pop Art at the Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme "Dalia Ramanauskas: As We Embark" just wrapped up at the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, and an exhibit dedicated to William Kent is in the works at the New Haven Museum. GUESTS: Eric Litke: Museum Assistant, Yale University Art Gallery Amy Kurtz Lansing: Curator, Florence Griswold Museum Tanya Pohrt: Curator, Lyman Allyn Art Museum Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/18/202449 minutes
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Flannel is always in fashion

Flannel and blue jeans - these staples are the backbone of American fashion and the textile industry. Are they part of your wardrobe? Textiles, fabrics and clothing is a dying industry here in the U.S. But author Steven Kurutz says that some makers and creators are trying to change that. New York Times reporter and author Steven Kurutz joins us today to talk about his new book American Flannel: How a Band of Entrepreneurs are bringing the art and business of making clothes back home. We hear about the rise and decline of this industry. We’ll also learn about the history of mills right here in Connecticut, and local artisan joins us to talk about their efforts to bring back the American mill. GUESTS: Steven Kurutz: author of American Flannel and a reporter for New York Times covering cultural trends and the world of design Jacob Harrison Long: President and CEO of American Woolen Company in Stafford, Springs, Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/15/202449 minutes
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The 'wild rumpus' continues: Maurice Sendak's legacy lives on at Ridgefield Foundation

Maurice Sendak is often celebrated for his contributions to children’s book art. You’re likely familiar with Where The Wild Things Are, or even Higglety Pigglety Pop. But in the late artist’s own words, "I do not believe that I have ever written a children's book. I do not know how to write a children’s book. How do you set out to write a children’s book?" This hour, we’re exploring the Maurice Sendak Foundation in Ridgefield, where Sendak lived for forty years. There, the many layers of his artistic legacy live on, with the help of the experts and friends who knew and loved him best. We hear from them. Twelve years after the artist's passing, the Foundation and HarperCollins are releasing Ten Little Rabbits. GUESTS: Lynn Caponera: President and Treasurer, Maurice Sendak Foundation Dr. Jonathan Weinberg: Curator, Maurice Sendak Foundation Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired February 12, 2024.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/14/202456 minutes, 7 seconds
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How the artist captures climate change

Around the globe, artists are using their mediums to show how climate change is impacting our planet. Today, we’re exploring the convergence of art and science. We'll be talking with artists using their craft to have conversations about the environment. Earlier this year, Where We Live talked about how snow loss is impacting our ecosystems and community here in Connecticut. Today, we hear from Lynn Cazabon, the artist behind the multidisciplinary project “Losing Winter” who will join us from Australia. But first up, we’re hearing from the Mattatuck Museum. The exhibit “Sea Change | See Change” is raising awareness of how climate change is impacting our oceans. GUESTS: Sam Schwann: underwater explorer and ocean artist Keffie Feldman: Chief Curator at the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, Connecticut Lynn Cazabon: artist behind the project Losing Winter Elizabeth Ellenwood: an artist from Pawcatuck, Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show that originally aired on February 6, 2024.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/12/202448 minutes
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Connecticut is the land of steady habits, but no steady identity

Tri-state area or New England? Nutmeg or Constitution State? "Stuffy, preppy, sleepy"? What really makes Connecticut Connecticut, and what stereotypes can we stand to shake off? After the state's recent rebranding effort, it's a debate that has found its way to the national stage. This hour, Catherine Shen is joined by a roundtable of Connecticut Public hosts, as we debate what defines Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. What characterizes or typifies where you live? What do you think people get wrong or right about Connecticut's reputation? GUESTS: Colin McEnroe: Host, The Colin McEnroe Show Chion Wolf: Host, Audacious with Chion Wolf Dr. Khalilah Brown-Dean: Host, Disrupted Dr. Jonathan Wharton: Associate Professor of Political Science and Urban Affairs, Southern Connecticut State University; Columnist, CT News Junkie and Hearst Connecticut Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired on January 25, 2024.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/11/202447 minutes, 31 seconds
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Rethinking weight and health in the age of Ozempic

According to the National Institutes of Health, average body weight drastically increased across the board for men and women during the pandemic lockdown. Simply eating less and exercising more hasn’t been that effective when it comes to weight loss. In efforts to fight weight stigma, doctors are embracing a new idea that weight loss isn’t all about willpower and health is defined by more than just someone’s weight. In 2021, the FDA approved Semaglutide for weight loss for the general population. Doctors and patients are flocking to get this medication. Children over the age of 12 are now eligible to be prescribed this drug as well. Many celebrities have confirmed their personal use of the drugs, including Oprah. Influencers across the social sphere are partnering with pharmaceutical companies to promote the drugs. Today, we talk about these drugs, and combating weight stigma in and out the doctor’s office. GUESTS: Dr. Mara Gordon: Family Practice Physician from New Jersey Devika Umashanker: System Medical Director for Obesity Medicine at Hartford Healthcare Dr. Maria Asnis: Director of the Center for Weight Management at Stamford Health Dr. Sherry Pagoto: Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Professor at University of Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/8/202449 minutes
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Unpacking the calls for a 'cease-fire' in Gaza, locally and beyond

In late January, Reuters reported that “some 70 U.S. cities, including Chicago and Seattle, have passed resolutions on the Israel-Gaza war," with the majority calling for a cease-fire. Several Connecticut city and town councils have considered resolutions calling for an immediate ceasefire in Gaza. Bridgeport passed one of these non-binding agreements in January, Hartford City Council recently rejected a resolution, and Hamden’s Town Council is considering one. In New Haven, organizers staged an open hearing for a ceasefire at City Hall on Monday, after they say the Board of Alders "ignored" their requests. Coming up, we discuss the significance of these local resolutions with Eddy Martinez, Connecticut Public breaking news reporter, plus University of Hartford politics and government expert Bilal Sekou, and Dartmouth University professor of government Dr. Nadia Brown. But first, NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre discusses the significance of Sunday’s announcement, and the very latest around diplomatic negotiations. GUESTS: Greg Myre: NPR National Security Correspondent Dr. Bilal Sekou: Associate Professor of Politics and Government, University of Hartford Dr. Nadia Brown: Professor of Government, Georgetown University Dr. Emy Matesan: Associate Professor of Government, Wesleyan University Eddy Martinez: General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter, Connecticut Public Christine Squires: President and CEO, Americares Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/7/202449 minutes
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The realities of being a Kidfluencer

For kids today, there’s a whole new career path: social media influencer. In fact, 57 percent of Gen Zs say they’d be an influencer. But some young people aren’t waiting to become social media influencers; they’re already ones. These parent-run, kid centric accounts aren't all brand deals, and free merchandise. A new investigation by the New York Times showcases the darker side of the Kidfluencer world. Today, we hear about the realities of working in this space — and how some young people are advocating to get their privacy back. GUESTS: Jennifer Valentino-DeVries: Reporter for the New York Times Chris McCarty: Student Founder and Executive Director of Quit Clicking Kids Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/5/202449 minutes
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Book ban requests still 'soaring' in Connecticut. Plus, vigil held at Capitol for Nex Benedict

Librarians in Connecticut say the number of book ban requests they’re fielding is still "soaring," and that the focus is on content relating to LGBTQIA+ identity and themes. Librarians have even looked to lawmakers for support. This hour, we get the latest from state and national Library Associations. But first, advocates and lawmakers hosted a vigil at the State Capitol last week for Nex Benedict, the teenager who died after a fight in the school bathroom in Oklahoma. Keith Brown with Gay Spirit Radio reports. GUESTS: Keith Brown: Host and Producer, Gay Spirit Radio Deborah Caldwell-Stone: Director of the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom Samantha Lee: Chair, Connecticut Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee; Head of Reference Services at Enfield Public Library Mary Richardson: Teen Services Librarian, Simsbury Public Library; Co-Host "The Book Jam" Podcast Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/4/202449 minutes
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The FAFSA, student loans and untangling the state of financial aid

Applying for financial aid is no easy task. Whether you’re the parent or the incoming student. And a new FAFSA form hasn’t made things any easier. The online FAFSA form - or the Free Application for Federal Student Aid was recently updated. But it’s come with a lot of glitches causing headaches for students and parents alike. Today on Where We Live, we talk about what’s happening with this form and how universities are responding. We’ll also talk about how some universities here in Connecticut are working to eliminate student loans from their financial aid packages. GUESTS: Danielle Douglas-Gabriel: Reporter for the Washington Post Eric Hoover: Senior Writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education  Jen Duncan: Director of Financial Aid at Wesleyan University Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/1/202449 minutes
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Elmo is the internet's new therapist. But can he help solve burnout?

Beloved Muppet Elmo recently asked social media a simple question, "How is everybody doing?" The answers ranged from incredulous to raging. The trauma-dumping on Elmo begged the question: Are we burnt out? Burnout has been reported in many industries: Connecticut Public has previously covered burnout in health care, and among early child care educators and teachers, for example. When Where We Live covered burnout in the nonprofit world in 2022, our phone lines were flooded. This hour, we hear from Emily Ballesteros, a management coach and the author of the new book, The Cure for Burnout. She defines the phenomenon, and fields your questions. Plus, Elizabeth Thompson is a local news researcher focused on burnout in local journalism. A 2020 report from UNC found that more than one-quarter of American newspapers had shut down since 2005, forcing more than half of all local journalists out of the industry, and "leaving many remaining newsrooms staffed by a small number of reporters burdened by excessive workloads and unable to dedicate themselves to particular topics of local interest." GUESTS: Emily Ballesteros: Management Coach; Author, The Cure for Burnout Elizabeth Thompson: Local News Researcher, Center for Innovation and Sustainability in Local Media at the University of North Carolina Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/29/202449 minutes
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Two years after the invasion, Ukrainians are not giving up hope

Two years ago, Russia invaded Ukraine and launched a full scale attack on the country. This hour, we hear what life looks like in Ukraine today and how Ukrainian refugees are adjusting to life in the United States. Since the recent invasion, many Ukrainians have made the difficult decision to leave the region, while others have stayed behind. Americares, a humanitarian aid organization based here in Connecticut has worked to bring in over 300 tons of medical aid to the region. But providing mental health first aid is becoming as important as providing medical first aid. Ukrainian refugees are also seeking mental health support, but finding Ukrainian speaking therapists and support systems is a challenge. We hear from those working to help this population and hear how refugees are adjusting to life here in the United States. GUESTS: Adam Keehn: Director of Complex Emergencies at Americares, a humanitarian organization based in Stamford, Connecticut Olena Lennon: Adjunct Professor of Political Science (National Security) at the University of New Haven Dana Bucin: Immigration Attorney at Murtha Cullina and Honorary Consul of Romania to Connecticut Anne Howard: co-author and translator of the bookEscape from Mariupol: A Survivor's True Story. She is also an attorney and author. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/27/202449 minutes
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Creating the Quantum Corridor in Connecticut

Quantum mechanics is a theory that even some scientists have trouble wrapping their heads around. But this industry is booming, and some physicists here in Connecticut are hoping to make our state the “Quantum Corridor” for research, workforce development and education. In May 2023, “the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded a $1 million federal planning grant to Yale University and the University of Connecticut toward developing quantum technology related businesses in Connecticut.” Today, we hear about this project and learn about the future of quantum. We’ll attempt to answer the question: “what is quantum mechanics?” We only have an hour, but we will try our best. We’ll hear how this field could eventually touch every area of science. GUESTS: Michael DiDonato: UConn Tech Park Business Development Manager, and QuantumCT UConn Project Manager Steven Girvin: Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics at Yale Dr. Brian Sullivan: High School STEM teacher teaching physics, calculus and statistics at the Wooster School, a private co-educational school in Danbury Connecticut Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired January 16, 2024.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/26/202448 minutes, 31 seconds
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Snoopy crying, Julia Child and comedy, with Paula Poundstone

Paula Poundstone has had a nearly 45 year career in standup comedy. She’s the host of the comedy podcast, Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone. And we would be remiss not to say, She is also a regular panelist on NPR's comedy news quiz show, Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! Today, she joins us for the hour. And like her comedy, we kind of touched on everything! We get into her signature stand up style, never shying away from engaging the audience, and making each show a little unique. If you’ve seen Paula on one of her many stand up specials, or maybe live in person, you probably know that talking with the audience is a big part of her routine. And you can experience her comedy firsthand this weekend. She’ll be performing at the Infinity Music Hall in Hartford on Saturday, February 24. GUEST: Paula Poundstone: standup comedian Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/23/202448 minutes
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PMJA Submission: WWL "Centering adoption stories with Angela Tucker"

There is not one single narrative when it comes to adoption and it can be a lot more complicated than what’s depicted in films, television and even social media. And for a long time, these stories have been told by adoptive parents. Angela Tucker says it’s time to flip the script and let adoptees tell their stories. She is the author of "You Should Be Grateful": Stories of Race, Identity, and Transracial Adoption.    Growing up as a transracial adoptee, Angela Tucker's friends, family, and even strangers would make comments and assumptions about what her life would have been like if she hadn’t been adopted. In this interview, we talk about the intricacies of navigating life as a transracial adoptee. Angela is also the Executive Director of the Adoptee Mentoring Society, a nonprofit and adoptee support group. She speaks to the need to give adoptees safe spaces to process complicated feelings about adoption.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/22/202415 minutes, 1 second
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A sit-down with Public Health Commissioner Manisha Juthani

This hour, we sit down with Connecticut Department of Public Health Commissioner Manisha Juthani to tackle a range of topics and questions, including what's on your mind. How have you fared this flu season? What questions about COVID-19, or long COVID, do you have? According to data from the Census Bureau, 23% of adults in Connecticut who tested positive for COVID-19 have experienced symptoms lasting longer than three months. We also discusss recent reports about possible changes in guidance from CDC, reported shortages in mental health services for kids, implementation for Connecticut's health care worker ratio law, and more. GUESTS: Manisha Juthani: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/22/202449 minutes
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Addressing misconceptions around food insecurity: 'It's about more than food'

For a Connecticut family of four, it costs over $126,000 just to meet their basic needs, according to a recent United Way report. That’s more than four times the federal poverty level. Food insecurity is a big part of the problem, affecting more than 1 in 10 Connecticut residents, according to Connecticut Foodshare. A new report from the United States Department of Agriculture found the national rate of food insecurity jumped by more than 2% from 2021 to 2022, now 12.8% of U.S. households. This hour, UConn's Dr. Caitlin Caspi joins us to address some of the misconceptions around food insecurity. "Food insecurity isn't happening in a vacuum," she says. "It's really intersecting with a lot of other challenges that people face," including stable housing, health insurance, job security, disability, and other factors. "Food insecurity isn't primarily a story about food," says Dr. Caspi. "It's about many facets of economic instability." Plus, we'll discuss some of Connecticut Foodshare’s efforts to address food insecurity where we live, including an income-based grocery store coming soon to Hartford, where food insecurity rates are highest in the state. Hartford High School just launched the Grub Pub, an in-school pantry. Principal Flora Padro joins us later in the hour, describing the "new normal" she envisions. GUESTS: Dr. Caitlin Caspi: Associate Professor, University of Connecticut's Department of Allied Health Sciences; Director of Food Security Initiatives, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Health Jason Jakubowski: President & CEO, Connecticut Foodshare Ben Dubow: Executive Director, Forge City Works Flora Padro: Principal, Hartford High School Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired October 26, 2023. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/20/202448 minutes
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Love has no age: Dating as an older adult

Dating in 2024 can be tough. There are no shortage of stories about dating in the age of Tinder, Bumble, Hinge, and more! But today, we're going to talk about dating, and falling in love, when you're an older adult. Last fall, the spinoff show “The Golden Bachelor” started a national conversation about falling in love in midlife and beyond. Today we hear from experts about dating in this age range, and we’ll even get to hear some love stories that will put "The Notebook" to shame. And if you are dating or have fallen in love, at any age, we want to hear from you! GUESTS: Dr. Kristina Zdanys: Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Division Chief for Geriatric Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at UConn Health Chip Conley: Founder & CEO of the Modern Elder Academy Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/16/202449 minutes, 18 seconds
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Connecticut disability advocates push for legislation to improve medical access

Disability rights advocates in Connecticut are demanding better medical access. And this legislative session, they’re pushing lawmakers to pass two bills. Both aim to improve medical equipment and training, and access to better care when examining, diagnosing and treating patients with disabilities. We hear from one advocacy group involved in this effort, the Citizens Coalition for Equal Access, or CC=A. Public Health Committee Co-Chair and State Sen. Saud Anwar also shares his hopes for the pair of bills — one focused on medical diagnostic equipment, the other on lifts — which he helped to draft after an informational hearing with disability rights advocates across Connecticut last September. Where We Live heard from eight members of CC=A prior to this program, who talked about some of their negative experiences in the medical setting. As Jamie Mosier shared, "Something has to be passed to make sure we get what I need, that we get what everybody needs, before we're all dead." Plus later today, wheelchair users and advocates across the state will gather at the State Capitol. They plan to rally in support of the "transformational recommendations by the legislative Wheelchair Repair Task Force to tackle the absurd delays faced by 90% of roughly 5,000 CT consumers." Task Force member and consumer advocate Jonathan Sigworth joins us to discuss this legislative push. GUESTS: Dr. Cindy Miller: Member, Citizens Coalition for Equal Access; Former Associate Professor, Yale University Ruth Grobe: Secretary, Citizens Coalition for Equal Access Jonathan Sigworth: Consumer Spokesperson, Connecticut Wheelchair Task Force; Member, CT Wheelchair Reform Coalition; Member, State Independent Living Council; Co-Founder, CEO and President, More Than Walking Carly Malesky: Student, UConn Medical School; Member, Disability Interest Group Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/15/202449 minutes
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'What's eating at America': Addressing the loneliness and isolation epidemic

Approximately half of U.S. adults reported experiencing loneliness, even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The issue recently moved U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to issue an advisory around the "loneliness epidemic" in America. Soon after, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy introduced a bill that would launch an Office of Social Connection Policy, and fund CDC research to "better understand the epidemic of social isolation and loneliness." While on The Colin McEnroe Show in July, Murphy said the move was "part of a broader exploration for me of what is eating in America... I have come to the conclusion that there's a lot of new and unique things that are hurting Americans and making them feel unhappy today," chief among them loneliness or "aloneness." This hour, we explore how loneliness, isolation and social disconnection are being addressed where we live. Deb Bibbins and Gary Sekorski founded For All Ages, and more recently, the Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness, to help bolster and centralize resources. How does loneliness or isolation affect you? GUESTS: Deb Bibbins: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Gary Sekorski: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Connie Malone: Canton Resident Siri Palreddy: Senior at Amherst College Dr. Sowmya Kurtakoti: Chief of Geriatric Medicine, Hartford Hospital Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired September 18, 2023. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/13/202447 minutes, 31 seconds
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The 'wild rumpus' continues: Maurice Sendak's legacy lives on at Ridgefield Foundation

Maurice Sendak is often celebrated for his contributions to children’s book art. You’re likely familiar with Where The Wild Things Are, or even Higglety Pigglety Pop. But in the late artist’s own words, "I do not believe that I have ever written a children's book. I do not know how to write a children’s book. How do you set out to write a children’s book?" This hour, we’re exploring the Maurice Sendak Foundation in Ridgefield, where Sendak lived for more than forty years. There, the many layers of his artistic legacy live on with the help of the experts and friends who knew and loved him best. We hear from them. Twelve years after the artist's passing, the Foundation and HarperCollins are releasing Ten Little Rabbits GUESTS: Lynn Caponera: President and Treasurer, Maurice Sendak Foundation Dr. Jonathan Weinberg: Curator, Maurice Sendak Foundation Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/12/20241 hour, 2 minutes, 38 seconds
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A conversation with Clarence B. Jones

February is Black History Month. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday was in January. Around this time, we often see his quotes circulate on social media. And we also hear about his legacy as an activist and a minister, and his fight for civil rights in the U.S. Today, we’re going to listen back to a recent interview with Clarence B. Jones. Clarence B. Jones was one of the many giants of the civil rights movement. He served as personal counsel to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He was also his speech writer and personal friend. John Henry Smith spoke with him earlier this year about his work in the civil rights movement and we’ll hear about his thoughts of where civil rights is today. GUESTS Clarence B. Jones: civil rights activist, attorney and speech writer John Henry Smith: Host of All Things Considered at Connecticut Public Rev. Dr. Stephen G. Ray Jr: minister of United Church on the Green in New Haven Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/9/202449 minutes
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Examining the history and legacy of 'sundown towns' in Connecticut

For decades, there were cities and towns that were all-white on purpose. These communities are known as "sundown towns." Because this practice was both formal and informal, researchers put together a database of these laws, customs and firsthand accounts, under the leadership of the late sociologist and civil rights champion James Loewen. At the peak of the exclusionary practice in 1970, an estimated 10,000 communities across the U.S. kept out African-Americans through "force, law, or custom." Many sundown suburbs also excluded Jewish and Chinese Americans, and other minority groups. There are 40 towns listed as possible or probable past sundown towns in Connecticut. This hour, we hear about this history and what it can tell us. You can add to this research too. GUESTS: Dr. Stephen Berrey: Assistant Professor of American Culture and History, University of Michigan Logan Jaffe: Reporter, ProPublica Paul Saubestre: Volunteer Researcher, Hamden Historical Society Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired November 27, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/8/202448 minutes, 30 seconds
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How the artist captures climate change

Around the globe, artists are using their mediums to show how climate change is impacting our planet. Today, we’re exploring the convergence of art and science. We'll be talking with artists using their craft to have conversations about the environment. Earlier this year, Where We Live talked about how snow loss is impacting our ecosystems and community here in Connecticut. Today, we hear from Lynn Cazabon, the artist behind the multidisciplinary project “Losing Winter” who will join us from Australia. But first up, we’re hearing from the Mattatuck Museum. The exhibit “Sea Change | See Change” is raising awareness of how climate change is impacting our oceans. GUESTS: Sam Schwann: underwater explorer and ocean artist Keffie Feldman: Chief Curator at the Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, Connecticut Lynn Cazabon: artist behind the project Losing Winter Elizabeth Ellenwood: an artist from Pawcatuck, Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/6/202449 minutes
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Pet shelters in the state still flooded with requests to surrender animals

In 2023, more than 6 million animals entered shelters and rescues in the U.S., according to a recent report from Shelter Animals Count. Believe it or not, those numbers are down from pre-pandemic reports. Over the summer, Connecticut news outlets reported that animal shelters in our state were "bursting at the seams," and unable to keep up with calls from people trying to surrender pets. This hour, we’ll be checking back in with some of those pet shelters. How is the so-called "pandemic boomerang" affecting them now? Plus, we’ll switch gears and talk to farm animal and wildlife rescues in Connecticut. Whether you’ve got questions about your pandemic puppy, or a stray opossum you think might need some help, join the conversation. GUESTS: Laura Burban: Director, Dan Cosgrove Animal Shelter in Branford Marla C Riley: MSN, MBA, RN; President and Founder, The Riley Farm Rescue in Canterbury Pamela A. Lefferts: Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator, Ferncroft Wildlife Rescue in Woodstock Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/5/202449 minutes
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Connecticut's "Aerospace Alley" celebrates the state's aviation past and future

Throughout history, our state has made some big contributions to aviation technology. Today, we’re talking about the history and future of aviation in our state. We hear from some aviation enthusiasts who’s love of all things plane is going to make you soar. The New England Air Museum houses some unbelievable vintage aircrafts. We hear from them. And we hear from someone with experience flying in some of these vintage aircrafts. If flying in a vintage plane is not your speed, there are more ways you can tap into your inner pilot. There are many model plane clubs here in all four corners of Connecticut. We learn how you can get involved. If you're an aviation enthusiast, we want to hear from you! GUESTS: Stephanie Abrams: President & CEO of the New England Air Museum Mike Thornton: Curator of the New England Air Museum Edward Deming: President of the RC Propbusters of Salem, CT Bob Creter: crew chief and docent for D-Day Squadron in Oxford, Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/2/202441 minutes, 8 seconds
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Taking a 'holistic approach' to treating congenital heart disease

Heart disease has been the leading cause of death in the United States for decades, putting much of the focus squarely and rightly on cardiovascular disease. But what about congenital heart conditions, something affecting your heart since birth? There are 13 million adults living with congenital heart disease, and that number has grown as treatments advance; survival rates have improved by 75% since the 1940s. But those diagnoses can come later in life, and even with sure signs, the need for specialized, lifelong care is often unmet. This hour, we're joined by the co-authors of Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease. Plus, we hear from one of 50 clinics accredited by the Adult Congenital Heart Association in the U.S., right here in Connecticut. GUESTS: Tracy Livecchi: Social Worker; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease Dr. Liza Morton: Psychologist; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds Dr. Robert Elder: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and Internal Medicine (Cardiology); Director, Adult Congenital Heart Program; Director Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program, Pediatric Cardiology Cat Pastor contributed to this program which originally aired October 11. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/1/202439 minutes, 30 seconds
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Fewer Americans are considering careers in the military and branches are looking for solutions to recruiting

During the last fiscal year, the army alone missed their recruiting goal by 25%. All branches of the military are struggling to recruit new cadets. With an all-volunteer service, the military relies on recruitment efforts to get more people to serve. But fewer Americans than ever are eligible to do so. And attracting the next generation of cadets has been a challenge. Today, we talk about the military recruiting crisis. We will hear from Captain Benjamin Keffer, Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command. Later, we hear how some extremist groups are working to get veterans and others with tactical experience into their organizations. GUESTS: Dr. Nora Bensahel: Professor of the Practice at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a Contributing Editor, War on the Rocks Captain Benjamin Keffer: Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command Sonner Kehrt: Investigative Reporter at the War Horse and Coast Guard Veteran Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired on October 6, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/30/202441 minutes
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Yehyun Kim’s ‘A Diaspora in Focus’ puts a lens on Connecticut residents with Asian roots

This hour, photo and video journalist Yehyun Kim joins us to discuss A Diaspora in Focus, a three-part project she launched for the Connecticut Mirror in 2023. The project was in response to landmark legislation passed in the state that will require public schools to offer Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI, history. Yehyun interviewed and photographed one resident from each of the 21 Asian ethnicities as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, and this included our very own Catherine Shen. This hour, she joins us to discuss this moving series for the Connecticut Mirror. As Yehyun explained, "It would be impossible for any single project to capture the totality of the Asian American experience in the state. But, when woven together, the lives of the people represented here provide a glimpse into the richness and diversity of Connecticut’s Asian residents." Jenny Heikkila Díaz, or JHD, also joins us, to discuss their role in the photo project, as well as the state's AAPI curriculum development. GUESTS: Yehyun Kim: Freelance Photo and Video Journalist Jennifer Heikkila Díaz (JHD): Professional Development Coordinator, Connecticut Council for the Social Studies; Activist-in-Residence, UConn Asian and Asian American Studies Institute; Co-Chair, Asian Pacific American Coalition of CT; Co-Founder, aapiNHV; Steering Committee Member, Anti-Racist Teaching & Learning Collective Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/202449 minutes
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A conversation with Palestinian journalist Plestia Alaqad

As journalists, it’s been challenging for us to watch what is happening to our fellow members of the press in Gaza. 83 journalist casualties have occurred in this region. The blue press vest and helmet is a heavy weight to carry, for so many still trying to report what’s happening. This week, we spoke with Plestia Alaqad. She is a 22 year old journalist from Gaza. She recently made the difficult decision to leave the region.  This week, Where We Live spoke to her about her experience. GUESTS: Plestia Alaqad: Palestinian journalist who's been documenting the war on social media Lila Hassan: Independent investigative journalist Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/26/202449 minutes
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Connecticut is the land of steady habits, but no steady identity

Tri-state area or New England? Nutmeg or Constitution State? "Stuffy, preppy, sleepy"? What really makes Connecticut Connecticut, and what stereotypes can we stand to shake off? After the state's recent rebranding effort, it's a debate that has found its way to the national stage. This hour, Catherine Shen is joined by a roundtable of Connecticut Public hosts, as we debate what defines Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. What characterizes or typifies where you live? What do you think people get wrong or right about Connecticut's reputation? GUESTS: Colin McEnroe: Host, The Colin McEnroe Show Chion Wolf: Host, Audacious with Chion Wolf Dr. Khalilah Brown-Dean: Host, Disrupted Dr. Jonathan Wharton: Associate Professor of Political Science and Urban Affairs, Southern Connecticut State University; Columnist, CT News Junkie and Hearst Connecticut Find more about the show here: Where We LiveSupport the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/25/202449 minutes
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When snow goes away...

Depending on where you live,warmer winters could mean less and less snow. In some places, it’s only one or two degrees that could make a difference. Joining us today are two scientists looking at the data around snow in our region and beyond to start to calculate how much snow loss is impacting us, and what it means for our environment. Less snow can mean a lot of things, including a big impact on winter sports. We also hear from a local ski resort. And later, we learn about solastalgia. GUESTS: Laura Loffredo: Director of Sales & Marketing at Powder Ridge Mountain Park & Resort Alex Gottlieb: PhD Candidate Ecology, Evolution, and Society at Dartmouth College Justin Mankin: Associate Professor of Geography at Dartmouth College and Director of the Climate Modeling and Impact Group Dr. Karen Steinberg Gallucci, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Public Health Sciences UConn Health Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/23/202449 minutes
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An update on efforts to address flooding in Hartford's North End, plus a look at how farms are faring

2023 was the sixth rainiest year on record for Connecticut, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In July alone, more than 1,500 acres of Connecticut farmland flooded over, representing $21 million in lost sales revenue. This hour, we hear from Chris Bassette of Killam & Bassette Farmstead in South Glastonbury, who says she is still holding out hope for relief for the nearly half-a-million dollars in losses she logged from July’s floods. We also get an update from State Department of Agriculture Commissioner Bryan Hurlburt. Plus, the Hartford Flood Compensation Program is aimed at providing some short-term relief to residents who have been dealing with systemic flooding and sewage problems. State Comptroller Sean Scanlon is overseeing the program, and discusses the efforts to focus these funds on the North End of the Capital City. Sharon Lewis is the Executive Director of the CT Coalition for Environmental Justice. Her North End home has been uninhabitable for over a year due to flooding and sewage in her basement and first floor. She joins us, along with Connecticut Mirror investigative reporter Dave Altimari. GUESTS: Christine Bassette: Owner-Operator, Killam & Bassette Farmstead Bryan Hurlburt: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Agriculture Dave Altimari: Investigative Reporter, Connecticut Mirror Sharon Lewis: Executive Director, CT Coalition for Environmental Justice; North End Resident Sean Scanlon: Connecticut State Comptroller Bridgitte Prince: Human and Environmental Rights Activist James Chow: Enforcement and Compliance Assurance Division Deputy Director, Environmental Protection Agency Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/22/202449 minutes
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How war influences media and media influences war

In our newsroom, we’ve been having a lot of conversations about how we cover the Israel-Hamas War. And sometimes, we find ourselves conflicted about who to talk to, what stories to cover, what language we use, and what we can do to make our coverage as fair and truthful as possible. Where are you getting your information on the Israel-Hamas War? Odds are you're probably following the war through social media. According to the Washington Post, TikTok is drawing billions of views from #Palestine and #Israel. As journalists, we understand that how the war is presented on social and news media can shape public opinion. Today, we’re talking about just that. GUESTS: Professor Scott Wallace: Associate Professor in the Department of Journalism at UConn Adrian Bonenberger: Writer and journalist Michael Spikes: Lecturer & Program Director; Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University Georgia Wells: Tech Reporter Wall Street Journal Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Where We Live twitter facebook Tess TerribleTess is a senior producer for Connecticut Public news-talk show Where We Live. She enjoys hiking Connecticut's many trails and little peaks, gardening and writing in her seven journals.See stories by Tess TerribleCatherine ShenCatherine is the Host of Connecticut Public’s morning talk show and podcast, Where We Live. Catherine and the WWL team focus on going beyond the headlines to bring in meaningful conversations that put Connecticut in context.See stories by Catherine ShenTOP HEADLINES What to expect in the Bridgeport, Connecticut, do-over mayoral primary Quantum technology: What is it? Why does it matter? Where will it take CT? CT’s Sarah Russell gets committee nod for federal judgeship New Haven Pride Center expands services after moving to bigger space CT takes a leap forward with a new website to foster workforce growth Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/19/202449 minutes
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Bigfoot gets all the glory, but Connecticut has its own cast of cryptids

You’ve heard of Bigfoot and Nessie, but did you know Connecticut is home to a host of creatures, or "cryptids"? Cryptozoology is the study of animals whose existence is a matter of debate. While Bigfoot sightings have been reported where we live, sea serpents, the Glastonbury Glawackus, and plenty of others call Connecticut home. This hour, we hear from Patrick Scalisi and Valerie Ruby-Omen, the author and illustrator of a new field guide to this cast of Connecticut cryptids. Plus, Stephen Olbrys Gencarella explains how folklore can deepen our understanding of these fantastic creatures, and how the stories about them are shaped over time. Patrick Scalisi: Author, Connecticut Cryptids: A Field Guide to the Weird and Wonderful Creatures of the Nutmeg State Valerie Ruby-Omen: Illustrator, Connecticut Cryptids Stephen Olbrys Gencarella: Professor of Folklore Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/18/202449 minutes
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Creating the Quantum Corridor in Connecticut

Quantum mechanics is a theory that even some scientists have trouble wrapping their heads around. But this industry is booming, and some physicists here in Connecticut are hoping to make our state the “Quantum Corridor” for research, workforce development and education. In May 2023, “the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded a $1 million federal planning grant to Yale University and the University of Connecticut toward developing quantum technology related businesses in Connecticut.” Today, we hear about this project and learn about the future of quantum. We’ll attempt to answer the question: “what is quantum mechanics?” We only have an hour, but we will try our best. We’ll hear how this field could eventually touch every area of science. GUESTS: Michael DiDonato: UConn Tech Park Business Development Manager, and QuantumCT UConn Project Manager Steven Girvin: Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics at Yale Dr. Brian Sullivan: High School STEM teacher teaching physics, calculus and statistics at the Wooster School, a private co-educational school in Danbury Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/16/202449 minutes
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"Flawless" Author Elise Hu dives into the world of K-Beauty

In 2015, journalist Elise Hu moved to South Korea to open the NPR Seoul bureau. During her time in South Korea, she witnessed the rise of K-beauty culture or “Korean beauty.” K-beauty encompasses a multitude of beauty treatments. It doesn’t just include luxury skincare lines, and expensive facemasks; there's also LED light therapy, injections, fillers, and a myriad of options for plastic surgery. These procedures are becoming an increasingly normal part of daily life in South Korea, but also in the United States. They are also more accessible than ever to anyone that wants to change the way they look. Although some are starting to question the pursuit of keeping up with today’s beauty standards, this multibillion dollar beauty industry isn't going away. Today, Elise Hu joins us on Where We Live to talk about her book Flawless: Lessons in Looks and Culture from the K-Beauty Capital. We talk about the pursuit and pain of keeping up with today’s beauty standards. GUEST: Elise Hu: host of TED Talks Daily and also a host-at-large for NPR. She is the author of Flawless: Lessons in Looks and Culture from the K-Beauty Capital Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired September 19, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/12/202448 minutes, 30 seconds
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A look at efforts to address Spanish-language mis- and disinformation ahead of the 2024 election

When an error was spotted in the Spanish-language instructions for the capital city’s ballot, just before the November election, officials moved to correct it. Advocates have said the error underscores the language access issues many Connecticut residents face, and the different kinds of Spanish-language mis- and disinformation there are to tackle. Former Rhode Island Secretary of State and Pell Center senior cybersecurity fellow Nellie Gorbea recently hosted a workshop for Latino elected officials in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts, to address mis- dis- and malinformation. This hour, we discuss the layered issue of Spanish-language mis- and disinformation, and the efforts to address it. Nellie Gorbea joins us, along with UConn's Dr. Charles Venator, to discuss the important role state and local governments play, particularly as the 2024 election approaches. Plus, Madeleine Bair is the founding director of El Tímpano, a news outlet that recently trained over 100 Latino immigrants in disinformation defense. GUESTS: Dr. Charles Venator: Faculty Director, UConn's Puerto Rican Studies Initiative; Director, El Instituto: Institute of Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies Madeleine Bair: Founding Director, El Tímpano Nellie Gorbea: Visiting Senior Fellow on Cybersecurity, Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy; Former Secretary of State, Rhode Island Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired December 7, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/11/202448 minutes, 31 seconds
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Transracial adoptee Angela Tucker talks about centering adoption stories on adoptees

Growing up as a transracial adoptee, Angela Tucker's friends, family, and even strangers would make comments and assumptions about what her life would have been like if she hadn’t been adopted. Angela Tucker is the author of the book "You Should Be Grateful": Stories of Race, Identity, and Transracial Adoption and she is Executive Director of the Adoptee Mentoring Society. Today, we talk about the intricacies of navigating life as a transracial adoptee. For years, adoption stories have been told from the point of view of the adoptive parents. Angela says it’s time to flip the script and let adoptees tell their stories. Later, we hear from an adoption agency and learn about the type of conversations they have with potential transracial adoptive parents. If you have a personal experience with adoption, we want to hear from you. Check out the UConn Health Adoption Assurance Program to find more information about transracial adoption. GUESTS: Angela Tucker: Author of the book, "You Should Be Grateful": Stories of Race, Identity, and Transracial Adoption and Executive Director of the Adoptee Mentoring Society Laura Sullivan: Chief Program Officer at Just Choice, a pro-choice adoption agency Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired December 8, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/9/202448 minutes, 30 seconds
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Opioid settlement dollars flooding Connecticut. What will equity and fairness look like?

No matter where you live, the opioid epidemic has likely touched you or someone you know. Now, a state committee set up to allocate settlement funds from opioid manufacturers and distributors has just issued its first reporting of disbursements at the municipal level. The stakes are high. Connecticut has some of the highest opioid death rates in the country. Each month, more than 100 people die in Connecticut from an opioid overdose. More than 9,000 overdose deaths have been documented since 2015, and the vast majority of these fatal overdoses are linked to opioids or, increasingly, to synthetic opioids or proxies. After years of litigation, major opioid manufacturers and distributors have begun paying $600 million in settlement funds to Connecticut over the next 20 years. Those funds are intended to be allocated in ways that prevent future opioid deaths, a process the state’s 45-member Opioid Settlement Advisory Committee will help oversee. This hour, we’ll hear from Christine Minhee who oversees one of the only national databases tracking opioid settlement spending. Minhee is "astounded" by Connecticut's first round of municipal reporting, and the level of detail as to how and where those dollars are headed. We'll also hear from William Tong, Connecticut Attorney General, and advocates in our region who are working to reframe how we talk about and treat the opioid epidemic. GUESTS: Christine Gagnon: Member, Connecticut Opioid Settlement Advisory Committee Tracie Gardner: Senior Vice President of Policy Advocacy, Legal Action Center; Former Assistant Secretary of Mental Hygiene, New York State Mark Jenkins: Founder and Executive Director, Connecticut Harm Reduction Alliance William Tong: Connecticut Attorney General Christine Minhee: Attorney; Manages OpioidSettlementTracker.com Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/8/202449 minutes
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Talking about suicide is hard, so we asked experts for their advice

A content warning to our listeners: today we will be talking about suicide. United States saw nearly 50,000 deaths by suicide in 2022, and suicide continues to be on the rise.  Talking openly about suicide and mental health can be a critical part of deterring suicide deaths. But having those discussions can be really challenging and experts say there are specific ways to conduct these conversations delicately. Later, we hear from Connecticut Urgent Crisis Centers. If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts, you can go online to 988lifeline.org or dial 9-8-8. GUESTS: Aneri Pattani: Senior Correspondent for KFF Health News Ann Dagle: President and Co-founder of the Brian Dagle Foundation and Tri-chair of Connecticut Suicide Advisory Board Dr Laine Taylor: Medical Director for The Village for Families and Children Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired September 29, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/5/202448 minutes
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Going plant-based: Exploring Veganuary

Whether it's reading more books or eating out less, January is the month of goals and challenges. Veganuary is no exception.   The 30-day plant-based challenge originated nearly a decade ago and has since taken on a life of its own. We’ll hear from three different vegans working in the plant-based space about their journey to becoming vegan and what it means to them. What do you want to know about the lifestyle? GUESTS: Wendy Matthews: U.S. Director, Veganuary Candice Hutchings: Creator, The Edgy Veg Mackenzie Sullivan: Co-Founder, Ellie Mae Farm Sanctuary in Storrs Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired January 20, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/4/202448 minutes, 31 seconds
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An update from Save the Children, plus a conversation with Palestinian American poet Zeina Azzam

There are approximately 2.45 million people who need humanitarian assistance in Gaza. And the entire population is now at risk of famine. That’s according to Save the Children, an international NGO and humanitarian aid organization based in Connecticut. Today, we hear from Janti Soeripto, President & CEO of Save the Children. And later, Where We Live has been covering the Israel-Hamas War, and exploring how the conflict and history of this region has been captured through the arts. We hear from Palestinian American poet and community activist Zeina Azzam. She is the current poet laureate of Alexandria, Virginia and She is also the Author of Some Things Never Leave You. GUESTS: Zeina Azzam: poet laureate of Alexandria, Virginia and author of Some Things Never Leave You Janti Soeripto: President & CEO of Save the Children, an international NGO and humanitarian aid organization based in Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/2/202449 minutes
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Where We Live Best Of 2023: Trauma, mental health and healing

Each year, we broadcast nearly 200 episodes of programming. As 2023 comes to a close, we are highlighting some of our favorite conversations. Today, we’re sharing three important interviews on mental health and trauma. Senior Producer Tess Terrible shares her favorite conversations on these topics. First up, we’re going to listen back to our conversation with Kate Dias: President of Connecticut Education Association. She spoke with us about school shootings, lockdown drills, and how they’re impacting student and teacher mental health. At the start of the Israel-Hamas War, we zoomed in on trauma in that region — and the ripple effects here in the U.S. In our second segment, we hear from Dr. Julian Ford, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut Health Center. We also hear from Steve Sosebee, President and Founder of the Palestine Children’s Relief Fund and Rabbi Debra Cantor from the B’nai Tikvoh-Sholom Synagogue. And later, we hear from Deb Bibbins: Founder and CEO, For All Ages; Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness and local efforts to address the loneliness epidemic. Full episodes: Feeling safe or creating trauma? How lockdown drills are impacting our schools The trauma of witnessing war, near and far 'What's eating at America': Addressing the loneliness and isolation epidemic Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/29/202347 minutes
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Best Of 2023: Musicians who made their mark

As we approach the end of the year we’ve been reflecting on our favorite conversations throughout 2023. Host Catherine Shen chose her most memorable moments, all about music. First, we discuss the power of nostalgia and the memories music can carry, with John Ondrasik, frontman for Five for Fighting. The soft-rock band topped the charts in the early 2000s with songs like "Superman" and "100 Years." Eric George Lopez, or ericdoa, has been described as the "face of hyperpop," a newer music genre born out of 2000s electronic music. But in many ways, the "genre-bending" up-and-coming artist defies categorization. He discusses his upbringing in Connecticut, how he developed his sound and what makes Gen Z uniquely powerful in the arts. Plus, Ashley Hamel discovered her love of music while growing up in Connecticut. The singer-songwriter eventually left New England behind to build her music career in Indonesia. She joined us from Jakarta to talk about her new single, "New England Baby." Full episodes: A conversation with Five for Fighting frontman John Ondrasik CT-based Gen Z trailblazers: Musician ericdoa, K-pop dance crew SEOULAR, and designer MINIPNG Ashley Hamel takes her music to new heights abroad, plus a look at the ticketing industry  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/28/202349 minutes
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Where We Live Best Of 2023: Recontextualizing Connecticut history

As we round out 2023, we’re looking back on some of our favorite conversations on Where We Live, with the voices that moved us. This hour, producer Katie Pellico shares some of her favorite moments, with a focus on history and the efforts to retell or tell a fuller story. First up, we hear from the team of students and scholars at Yale University working to study the history of eugenics, the role the institution played in developing this pseudoscience, and more. Daniel HoSang, Professor of Ethnicity, Race, Migration and American Studies at Yale University, leads the Anti-Eugenics Collective at Yale University. We'll also preview our conversation with Chris Newell, Connecticut-based educator and member of Passamaquoddy Tribe, who recently wrote a book for children about the story of Thanksgiving. If You Lived During the Plimoth Thanksgiving helps to untangle some of the myths and misnomers commonly associated with the Thanksgiving story, titled. Later, we hear from Andy Horowitz, the new Connecticut State Historian, about his hopes for his term. Full episodes: Uncovering the history of eugenics at Yale University, and its 'afterlives' Rewriting the Thanksgiving story, while centering Indigenous voices Andy Horowitz is the new Connecticut State Historian  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/26/202349 minutes, 1 second
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The holidays can be hard for those experiencing family estrangement

We often think of the holidays as a time to gather with family. But the reality might look a little different. It can be a challenging time if you have a strained relationship with your family. It can also be difficult for those estranged from family. Family estrangement can occur for a number of reasons. And there is a lot of stigma around cutting ties with family. But research says it’s more common than we think. Family estrangement is complicated. Today, talk to two people who have experienced this first hand. Have you been effected by family estrangement? GUESTS: Dr. Lucy Blake: Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of the West of England and a leading expert on family estrangement Seth Forbes: Founder & Executive Director of Together Estranged Aimee Palmer: Founder of Parents of Estranged Adult Children Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/22/202349 minutes
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Celebrating the magic of trains

Trains may often be billed as a toy for tots, but there are locomotive-lovers of all ages where we live. This hour, go for a ride on the Naugatuck Railroad at the Railroad Museum of New England, and one holiday train tailored for children on the autism spectrum. Plus, Yale New Haven Children's Hospital is home to a toy train display that sparks joy in children and adults alike. GUESTS: Christine Faressa: Founder and President, Sun, Moon & Stars Orion Newall: Passenger Operations Director, Naugatuck Railroad Ebony Wright: Registered Nurse; Assistant Patient Service Manager, Pediatric Specialty Center at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital Walt Zawalich: Volunteer Trains Curator, Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital and Eli Whitney Museum Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired December 21, 2022.  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/21/202347 minutes, 2 seconds
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Upgrading the capital city: A look at DOT's Greater Hartford Mobility Study

If you’ve ever struggled driving through Hartford, you’re certainly not alone. Today, the Connecticut Department of Transportation joins us to discuss the Greater Hartford Mobility Study. Now that it is complete, stakeholders are working to implement some big projects to make Hartford a better city to live in. But it’s going to take some time, possibly even a few decades to implement. We take a look at a multi-decade plan to improve driving and mobility throughout the greater Hartford area. We learn what could be done to increase walkability, livability and transit throughout this region. If you’re a resident of this area, we want to hear from you! What would you like to see done to upgrade the greater Hartford area? And later, we learn about a klezmer band hailing out of New Haven that will celebrate its 25th anniversary this year. GUESTS: Garret Eucalitto: Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner Matt Hart: Executive Director, Capitol Region Council of Governments(CRCOG) David Chevan: music director and bassist for the Nu Haven Kapelye and producer of their new album, Nu Haven Style Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/19/202349 minutes
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Author Rebecca F. Kuang on 'Babel,' revolution and students as visionaries

"An act of translation is always an act of betrayal." This idea, and the questions it inspires, are central to author Rebecca or RF Kuang’s 2022 novel, Babel: Or the Necessity of Violence: An Arcane History of the Oxford Translators' Revolution. As the title promises, the book also explores the nature of revolution and the "necessity of violence," in addition to those complex questions surrounding the art of translation. This hour, we revisit our conversation with the author, which was focused on the award-winning book, during an event organized by local bookseller RJ Julia. On the importance of student revolutions, Kuang reflects, "The student's weakness is precisely his allure. The fact that the student is so naïve and doesn't have the jadedness of somebody who's been through more; the fact that students are dreamers, that they are romantic idealists; that kind of hope, that kind of ability to imagine an alternate future is beautiful and it matters and I hope we keep seeing that." GUESTS: RF or Rebecca Kuang: Author  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/18/202348 minutes, 30 seconds
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For the Connecticut steampunk fans, this episode is for you!

When it comes to certain fandom and cosplay communities, getting your costume right is key, or you might get called out for not being 100% accurate. But Steampunk is a little different. It’s retro, but it’s futuristic. It’s Victorian, but you can also just go vintage. It's corsets, but also cogs, coils and gadgets. Steampunk, a subgenre of science fiction, is all about retro futuristic technology and being as creative as possible. But Steampunk is not just about fashion!  Today, we dive into the world of Steampunk and hear from the Steampunk Scholar. Later, we hear from the Connecticut Audubon Society on the 2023 State of the Birds. GUESTS: Mike Perschon: Steampunk Scholar and English Professor at MacEwan University in Alberta, Canada Bridgette Rodrigues: Steamposh Admin and Steampunk Event Coordinator Tom Anderson: Director of Communications for the Connecticut Audubon Society and the Editor of Connecticut State of the Birds Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/15/202341 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ralph Nader discusses his new book, 'The Rebellious CEO,' and much more

Ralph Nader doesn’t often praise big business leaders, but his new book, The Rebellious CEO, profiles a dozen who he says "did it right." This hour, we hear from the consumer crusader from Connecticut. In this extended interview, he discusses his new book and the need for visionary business leaders today, as well as his upbringing and recent journalism venture in Winsted. He also touches on the letter he co-authored to President Biden, urging him to pull back support for Israel; his thoughts ahead of the 2024 election, and the role of third-party candidates; the oversights he'd like to see in various industries, including Big Tech and the pharmaceuticals; his concerns about media consumption and fragmentation; and the importance of carving out time for civic duty. Reflecting on his legacy, Nader reinforces the importance of civic duty and the power of the individual, asking, "What are we waiting for? It takes a lot less civic power than we think, to turn our country around." GUESTS: Ralph Nader: Consumer Advocate; Former Presidential Candidate; Host, Ralph Nader Radio Hour; Founder, American Museum of Tort Law Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/14/20231 hour, 10 minutes, 45 seconds
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Creating safer online spaces for children, teens and everyone

Connecticut is one of 41 states that is suing Meta, the parent company of both Facebook and Instagram. The suit is alleging that Meta is knowingly using addictive algorithmic tactics that are harmful to their users. Today, we give an update on social media regulation and we hear from an activist and researchers working to make these spaces safer. We hear from Connecticut Attorney General William Tong. We also hear from Emma Lembke. In February, she testified before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Child Internet Safety. She is the Founder of the Log Off Movement, a youth-led organization committed to helping kids, teens, and young people build healthy relationships with social media and online platforms. GUESTS: Connecticut Attorney General William Tong Emma Lembke: Founder of the Log Off Movement, a youth-led organization committed to helping kids, teens, and young people build healthy relationships with social media and online platforms Dr. Michael Rich: Director, Digital Wellness Lab at Harvard and the Director of the Clinic for Interactive Media and Internet Disorders (CIMAID) Kaylee Kruzan: Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs) in Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/12/202341 minutes, 19 seconds
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Taking a 'holistic approach' to treating congenital heart disease

Heart disease has been the leading cause of death in the United States for decades, putting much of the focus squarely and rightly on cardiovascular disease. But what about congenital heart conditions, something affecting your heart since birth? There are 13 million adults living with congenital heart disease, and that number has grown as treatments advance; survival rates have improved by 75% since the 1940s. But those diagnoses can come later in life, and even with sure signs, the need for specialized, lifelong care is often unmet. This hour, we're joined by the co-authors of Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease. Plus, we hear from one of 50 clinics accredited by the Adult Congenital Heart Association in the U.S., right here in Connecticut. GUESTS: Tracy Livecchi: Social Worker; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease Dr. Liza Morton: Psychologist; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds Dr. Robert Elder: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and Internal Medicine (Cardiology); Director, Adult Congenital Heart Program; Director Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program, Pediatric Cardiology Cat Pastor contributed to this program which originally aired October 11. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/11/202339 minutes, 30 seconds
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Transracial adoptee Angela Tucker talks about centering adoption stories on adoptees

Growing up, as a transracial adoptee, Angela Tucker friends, family and even strangers would make comments and assumptions about what her life would have been like if she hadn’t been adopted. Angela Tucker is the author of the book, You Should Be Grateful": Stories of Race, Identity, and Transracial Adoption and she is Executive Director of the Adoptee Mentoring Society. Today, we talk about the intricacies of navigating life as a transracial adoptee. For years, adoption stories have been told through the point of view of the adoptive parents. Angela says it’s time to flip the script and let adoptees tell their stories. Later, we hear from an adoption agency and learn about the type of conversations they have with potential transracial adoptive parents. If you have a personal experience with adoption, we want to hear from you. To find more information about transracial adoption, check out the UConn Health Adoption Assurance Program. GUESTS: Angela Tucker: author of the book, You Should Be Grateful": Stories of Race, Identity, and Transracial Adoption and Executive Director of the Adoptee Mentoring Society Laura Sullivan: Chief Program Officer at Just Choice, a pro-choice adoption agency Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/8/202349 minutes
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A look at efforts to address Spanish-language mis- and disinformation ahead of the 2024 election

When an error was spotted in the Spanish-language instructions for the capital city’s ballot, just before the November election, officials moved to correct it. Advocates have said the error underscores the language access issues many Connecticut residents face, and the different kinds of Spanish-language mis- and disinformation there are to tackle. Former Rhode Island Secretary of State and Pell Center senior cybersecurity fellow Nellie Gorbea recently hosted a workshop for Latino elected officials in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts, to address mis- dis- and malinformation. This hour, we discuss the layered issue of Spanish-language mis- and disinformation, and the efforts to address it. Nellie Gorbea joins us, along with UConn's Dr. Charles Venator, to discuss the important role state and local governments play, particularly as the 2024 election approaches. Plus, Madeleine Bair is the founding director of El Tímpano, a news outlet that recently trained over 100 Latino immigrants in disinformation defense. GUESTS: Dr. Charles Venator: Faculty Director, UConn's Puerto Rican Studies Initiative; Director, El Instituto: Institute of Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies Madeleine Bair: Founding Director, El Tímpano Nellie Gorbea: Visiting Senior Fellow on Cybersecurity, Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy; Former Secretary of State, Rhode Island Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/7/202349 minutes
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What it takes to save the turtles

Turtles are among one of the oldest reptiles to walk the planet. Although turtles often live long lifespans and are among some of the most resilient animals on the planet, human presence has meant a huge threat to their species.  In her new book Of Time and Turtles, Sy Montgomery says turtles live “slow.” She spent time working with the people who have dedicated their lives to rehabilitating these fascinating creatures, and she joins us to talk about her book. And Matt Patterson, fellow turtle lover, illustrator of this book and their accompanying picture book The Book of Turtles, joins us too. He is also a wildlife artist and sculptor. We'll learn about what’s being done to care for and protect these animals. GUESTS: Sy Montgomery: Author of Of Time and Turtles Matt Patterson: Illustrator of The Book of Turtles and wildlife artist Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired October 3, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/5/202348 minutes
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Mohamad Hafez installs 'Eternal Cities' at the new Yale Peabody Museum

The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History is reopening early next year after four years of renovations. Celebrated Syrian-American artist and architect Mohamad Hafez just installed a new piece, titled “Eternal Cities,” alongside the museum’s Babylonian collection. 3D-printed replicas of ancient Babylonian artifacts are peppered throughout the piece, bridging the millennia between ancient Mesopotamia and present-day Syria. "It's a collaboration between educational archaeological museums, and local artists that come from the region that are working and living in the diaspora," says Hafez, "and at the crux of it, it solves a problem of engaging people in a very short attention span times, getting more interest built into these objects beyond just looking at them in a glass vitrine." This hour, Mohamad joins us along with two of the museum’s curators. The new Peabody aims to position itself as a more community-centered space in New Haven. How can museums include the local communities they serve? GUESTS: Mohamad Hafez: Artist and Architect Kailen Rogers: Associate Director of Exhibitions, Yale Peabody Museum Agnete Lassen: Associate Curator, Yale Babylonian Collection Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/4/202350 minutes
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Finding solutions to reduce holiday waste

The holiday season is a time we all want to enjoy. Maybe that means indulging in more food than usual, buying those special gifts and treats for loved ones, and going all out with decorations in your home. But with all that indulgence, comes a lot of waste. At the end of the holiday season, an additional 1 million tons of trash enter landfills. According to Stanford University's Waste Reduction, Recycling, Composting and Solid Waste Program, household waste increases by more than 25% from Thanksgiving to New Year’s. This comes from various sources including wrapping paper, Christmas trees and even food waste. But experts say there are easy ways to reduce your carbon footprint and have a greener holiday season. Today, we talk about ways to reduce holiday waste. GUESTS: Miriah Kelly: Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, Southern Connecticut State University Brittney Cavalliere: Senior Director of Strategy Connecticut Food Share, a food bank based in Bloomfield and Bridgeport Yasmine Ugurlu: the Founder and Owner of Reboot Eco, a zero waste shop in Middletown Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/1/202349 minutes
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Rewriting the Thanksgiving story, while centering Indigenous voices

From the Mayflower's landing, to the meal shared by English setters and Wampanoag people, much is still widely misunderstood about the Thanksgiving holiday and its history. Connecticut-based educator Chris Newell recently wrote a book for children that helps to untangle some of the myths and misnomers commonly associated with Thanksgiving. For example, the book clarifies that "the holiday we celebrate today does not have any real connection to the Mayflower’s landing. In fact, the story that links them was not created until two hundred years later." As Newell notes in his introduction, "The story of the Mayflower landing is different depending on whether the storyteller viewed the events from the boat or from the shore." This hour, Chris Newell joins us. Plus, how is this topic being reframed in Connecticut classrooms? The Connecticut State Department of Education recently published resources for "Teaching Native American Studies." The materials were developed in a collaboration between the five state-recognized Eastern Woodland tribes: Golden Hill Paugussett, Mashantucket Pequot, Mohegan, Paucatuck Eastern Pequot and Schaghticoke. Becky Gomez, the director of education for the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, and Sam Tondreau, a member of the Mohegan Tribe as well as their director of curriculum and instruction, discuss. GUESTS: Chris Newell: Member of the Passamaquaddy Tribe; Co-Founder and Director of Education, Akowmawt Educational Initiative; Museum Educator; Children's Book Author, If You Lived During Rebecca Gomez: Director of Education and Recreation, Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation Samantha Tondreau: Member of the Mohegan Tribe; Director of Curriculum & Instruction, Mohegan Tribe Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/30/202349 minutes
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Why you should give a hoot about owls

Every winter in Connecticut, the snowy owls will pass through our state and can sometimes be spotted at the Connecticut shoreline. But they are just one of many owl species to look out for where we live. Some cultures see owls as deeply spiritual creatures and as symbols of wisdom. Others see them as bad omens and as signs of impending doom.And that’s definitely impacting their populations. Today, Author Jennifer Ackerman joins us to talk about her new book What the Owl Knows: The new science of the world’s most enigmatic birds and we explore the world of these incredible birds. GUEST: Jennifer Ackerman: author of What the Owl Knows: The new science of the world’s most enigmatic birds Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/28/202338 minutes, 56 seconds
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Examining the history and legacy of 'sundown towns' in Connecticut

For decades, there were cities and towns that were all-white on purpose. These communities are known as "sundown towns." Because this practice was both formal and informal, researchers put together a database of these laws, customs and firsthand accounts, under the leadership of the late sociologist and civil rights champion James Loewen. At the peak of the exclusionary practice in 1970, an estimated 10,000 communities across the U.S. kept out African-Americans through "force, law, or custom." Many sundown suburbs also excluded Jewish and Chinese Americans, and other minority groups. There are 40 towns listed as possible past sundown towns in Connecticut. This hour, we hear about this history and what it can tell us. You can add to this research too. GUESTS: Dr. Stephen Berrey: Assistant Professor of American Culture and History, University of Michigan Logan Jaffe: Reporter, ProPublica Paul Saubestre: Volunteer Researcher, Hamden Historical Society Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/27/202349 minutes
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Addressing misconceptions around food insecurity: 'It's about more than food'

For a Connecticut family of four, it costs over $126,000 just to meet their basic needs, according to a recent United Way report. That’s more than four times the federal poverty level. Food insecurity is a big part of the problem, affecting more than 1 in 10 Connecticut residents, according to Connecticut Foodshare. A new report from the United States Department of Agriculture found the national rate of food insecurity jumped by more than 2% from 2021 to 2022, now 12.8% of U.S. households. This hour, UConn's Dr. Caitlin Caspi joins us to address some of the misconceptions around food insecurity. "Food insecurity isn't happening in a vacuum," she says. "It's really intersecting with a lot of other challenges that people face," including stable housing, health insurance, job security, disability, and other factors. "Food insecurity isn't primarily a story about food," says Dr. Caspi. "It's about many facets of economic instability." Plus, we'll discuss some of Connecticut Foodshare’s efforts to address food insecurity where we live, including an income-based grocery store coming soon to Hartford, where food insecurity rates are highest in the state. Hartford High School just launched the Grub Pub, an in-school pantry. Principal Flora Padro joins us later in the hour, describing the "new normal" she envisions. GUESTS: Dr. Caitlin Caspi: Associate Professor, University of Connecticut's Department of Allied Health Sciences; Director of Food Security Initiatives, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Health Jason Jakubowski: President & CEO, Connecticut Foodshare Ben Dubow: Executive Director, Forge City Works Flora Padro: Principal, Hartford High School Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired October 26, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/21/202348 minutes
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'What's eating at America': Addressing the loneliness and isolation epidemic

Approximately half of U.S. adults reported experiencing loneliness, even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The issue recently moved U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to issue an advisory around the "loneliness epidemic" in America. Soon after, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy introduced a bill that would launch an Office of Social Connection Policy, and fund CDC research to "better understand the epidemic of social isolation and loneliness." While on The Colin McEnroe Show in July, Murphy said the move was "part of a broader exploration for me of what is eating in America... I have come to the conclusion that there's a lot of new and unique things that are hurting Americans and making them feel unhappy today," chief among them loneliness or "aloneness." This hour, we explore how loneliness, isolation and social disconnection are being addressed where we live. Deb Bibbins and Gary Sekorski founded For All Ages, and more recently, the Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness, to help bolster and centralize resources. How does loneliness or isolation affect you? GUESTS: Deb Bibbins: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Gary Sekorski: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Connie Malone: Canton Resident Siri Palreddy: Senior at Amherst College Dr. Sowmya Kurtakoti: Chief of Geriatric Medicine, Hartford Hospital Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired September 18, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/20/202347 minutes, 31 seconds
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A look at college enrollment decline

Declining college enrollment has opened up a bigger conversation about the value of a college degree. From 2010 to 2021, undergraduate enrollment dropped by 15%. This declining trend in college enrollment was magnified by the pandemic, when perceptions of the value of a degree really began to shift. The decision making process for potential college students has become more personalized. Potential students have access to alternative pathways, and the ones that do go to college have needs that aren’t often met by the current model of college education. High costs, conflicting work schedules, and concerns ROI are barriers that affect a person's decision. This shift away from degree requirements, restarting financial aid payments in October 2023, and the social conversations about college undoubtedly cause us to wonder who should go to college. Today, we talk about the college conversation. GUESTS: Steve Schneider: High School Counselor at Sheboygan South High School in Sheboygan, Wisconsin Katharine Meyer: a Fellow in Governance Studies and Higher Education Researcher at the Brookings Institution. Courtney Brown: Vice President of Impact and Planning at Lumina Foundation Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Connecticut Public Talk Show Intern Joey Morgan produced this broadcast.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/17/202348 minutes, 58 seconds
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Healing and humanizing through artifact: Visiting the Museum of Jewish Civilization

How do museums act as places of discovery, dialogue, and healing? These spaces engage with critical, often complex, issues important to the communities they serve. For two weeks, we're spotlighting two museums where we live doing just that, and speaking with Dr. Macushla Robinson about the power of art and curation. Last week, we took a tour of Palestine Museum US in Woodbridge. It’s the first museum in the country centering Palestinian arts and culture, with a mission of humanizing Palestinian people. This hour, we’ll spend time at the Museum of Jewish Civilization at the University of Hartford, a teaching museum where artifacts and photography help center Jewish history and culture. Amy Weiss, the museum's director, explains that personal narratives help tell the complex history of American Jews, a group that is not monolithic. "The overarching message is the importance of democracy and the fight against fascism," she says. What role do museums play in your community? GUESTS: Dr. Macushla Robinson: Assistant Professor in Residence, University of Connecticut; Director, Contemporary Art Galleries at the University of Connecticut Amy Weiss: Director, Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies; Maurice Greenberg Chair for Judaica Studies; Director, Museum of Jewish Civilization; Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and History Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/16/202349 minutes
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Think of it as a tool: Artificial Intelligence in education

There have been a lot of things that have revolutionized how educators teach in the classrooms. Things like Wikipedia, Google and even calculators have caused temporary panic in the education space.  Now that ChatGPT and other artificial intelligence tools are becoming a central part of our everyday lives, some educators are scrambling to rethink their curriculum. If you ask the artificial intelligence app, ChatGPT, to write you a 500 page essay on the themes in Moby Dick, in a matter of seconds, you’ll have a well written paper. Even further, you can even tell ChatGPT “write me a 500 word essay on the themes of Moby Dick, in the voice of a 10th grader” and the essay will reflect the tone and language of the average 15 year old. When ChatGPT was first released, we took a deep dive into AI ethics and learned how it might education. And today, we get an update and we talk to teachers around the state and hear how they are actually utilizing AI in the classroom. GUESTS: Jeff Young: Editor of EdSurge, an education journalism initiative Tom Deans: Professor of English and Director of the University Writing Center at the University of Connecticut Erica Strong: Literacy Coach at Lebanon Middle School John Allen: Social Studies Teacher  at Putnam High School Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired September 15, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/14/202347 minutes
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'Think like a historian': State approves new social studies standards

Social studies education in Connecticut public schools has been getting a major revamp. It’s something we’ve covered on this program. This includes the statute requiring local Indigenous history that rolled out this year, and a statute in 2022 calling for Asian American and Pacific Islander studies, rolling out in the fall of 2025. The state legislature combined many of these mandates in 2021, calling for a "model curriculum." This curriculum should include Native American studies and AAPI studies, the bill stated, in addition to LGBTQ studies, climate change, financial literacy, military service and veterans, civics, media literacy, the principles of social-emotional learning, and racism. It was a long list and a tall order, and prompted the Connecticut State Department of Education to gather a group of experts on all of these fronts, and construct a new set of social studies standards. This hour, we hear from some of them and preview that document. GUESTS: Steve Armstrong: Social Studies Advisor, Connecticut State Department of Education; Past President, National Council for the Social Studies Tony Roy: President, Connecticut Council for the Social Studies; Social Studies Teacher, Bloomfield Public Schools Dr. Brittney Yancy: Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies, Illinois College Dr. Michael Bartone: Assistant Professor, Central Connecticut State University's Department of Literacy, Elementary, and Early Childhood Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/13/202349 minutes
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The trauma of witnessing war, near and far

It has been just over one month since the Israel-Hamas war began, resulting in the deaths of thousands of civilians and a worsening humanitarian crisis in Gaza. The images and reports coming out of this region are dire. Many have been left traumatized from witnessing the atrocities of this war up close and from afar Some experts say this war alone will create a generation in trauma. That’s on top of the trauma that’s already been experienced by children in the region. Children impacted by trauma can experience long term side effects and regression in their development. Humanitarians are not just addressing the physical needs, providing food, water, medical care and shelter, but themental health needs of the children experiencing acute traumatic stress. Experts say addressing the mental health needs in this region will require a long term strategy and the time to address mental health needs is now. When a disaster of this scale happens, it can impact a lot of people — and not just those directly affected. Secondary trauma can occur simply by hearing about someone else’s trauma. People working with these traumatized populations are at high risk for this type of trauma, as are those of us a world away. Doom-scrolling can cause numerous negative mental health outcomes and symptoms of secondary trauma including compassion fatigue. This can be exacerbated for those that have ties to the region. What's happening now in Israel and Gaza can be a constant reminder of atrocities that have impacted generations of peoples. For both Israelis and Palestinians, collective trauma, and in some cases, intergenerational traumamakes breaking the cycles of violence even harder. Trauma has layers. Trauma is complicated. And trauma ripples. In today’s show, we’re examining all the layers of trauma. If you need to talk to someone, you can call SAMHSA’s National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357). It’s free, confidential and available 24/7. GUESTS: Dr. Julian Ford: a clinical psychologist and Professor of Psychiatry and Law at the University of Connecticut Health Center Rabbi Debra Cantor: spiritual leader of the Congresgation B’nai Tikvoh-Sholom Synagogue Steve Sosebee: President and Founder of the Palestine Children’s Relief Fund Dr. Taline Andonian: Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Founder of the Resonance Center for Psychotherapy & Healing Artsin West Hartford Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/10/202349 minutes
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Healing and humanizing through art: Visiting Palestine Museum US in Woodbridge

How do museums act as places of discovery, dialogue, and healing? These spaces engage with critical, often complex, issues important to the communities they serve. This includes, for some, the current war between Israel and Hamas, and the resulting humanitarian crisis in Gaza. This week and next, we’re going to bring you to two museums to explore that question, and speak with Dr. Macushla Robinson about the power of art and curation. Next week, we’ll spend time at the Museum of Jewish Civilization at the University of Hartford, a teaching museum working to tell the stories of Jewish people and how they lived. This hour, we take a tour of Palestine Museum US in Woodbridge. It’s the first museum in the country centering Palestinian arts and culture, with a mission of humanizing Palestinian people. Hear from the museum's founder and executive director, Faisal Saleh. "Art speaks to the heart, politics speak to the mind," says Saleh. "You don't need to translate anything, because it's a universal language of the art." What role do museums play in your community? GUESTS: Dr. Macushla Robinson: Assistant Professor in Residence, University of Connecticut; Director, Contemporary Art Galleries at the University of Connecticut Faisal Saleh: Founder and Executive Director, Palestine Museum US Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/9/202349 minutes
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The influential role of student government, youth voting and Beardsley Zoo's animal mayoral race

This year, we’ve been learning about how educators are getting students engaged in the electoral process. One way to do this: student government. When you think of class elections, a couple things probably come to mind. But our guests says student government is much more than prom committees and candidate speeches in the cafeteria. We'll learn more about the influence student representatives have on their school districts. Later, Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo is holding their forth mayoral race. There are five candidates running this year for mayor. We’ll hear about the animal candidates and how you can vote for your favorite. We'll also hear how students on college campuses throughout our state are organizing to turn out the vote. GUESTS: Christopher H. Tomlin: Executive Director, Connecticut Association of Student Councils Kevin Brown: a Vernon High School civics teacher and Connecticut State Representative for Vernon, Connecticut Jennifer Croughwell: Chief of Staff of Connecticut College Democrats and a student at Eastern Connecticut State University Nick Schettino: student at Southern Connecticut State University and young republican Gregg Dancho: Zoo Director, at Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo in Bridgeport Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/7/202349 minutes
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Examining links between climate distress and climate action

The Yale Program on Climate Change Communication found that the majority of Americans are either "alarmed" or "concerned" about climate change. They also discovered links between distress about climate change and a desire to take action. This hour, Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz digs into this study, and the Six Americas Super Short Survey (SASSY). You can take the SASSY Survey here. Plus, NBC Connecticut meteorologist Rachael Jay and New Haven Climate Movement organizer Adrian Huq will share their perspectives as different kinds of climate communicators. How do you process feelings of alarm or distress around climate change, or even, take action? GUESTS: Rachael Jay: Meteorologist, NBC Connecticut Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz: Founder and Director, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication Adrian Huq: Co-Founder, New Haven Climate Movement Youth Action Team; Youth Coordinator, Climate Health Education Project Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired September 11, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/6/202349 minutes
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Humanitarian aid organizations address the crisis in Gaza and Israel

As the war continues in Israel and Gaza, humanitarians are working to deliver aid across the region. Humanitarian aid starts with addressing the basic necessities; food, water, and emergency medical care. And later, addressing mental health needs and the survived trauma of the millions displaced. This week, some Connecticut lawmakers called for a humanitarian pausewhich could allow more aid into Gaza. Children are nearly half of Gaza’s population. In the past three weeks, more children have been killed there than the total killed in conflicts globally in every year since 2019. That’s according to Save the Children, an international NGO and humanitarian aid organization based in Connecticut. Today, we hear from two aid organizations based in Connecticut. We learn more about addressing this enormous need, and what the work on the ground looks like. GUESTS: Nathaniel Raymond: the Executive Director of the Humanitarian Research Lab at the Yale School of Public Health Christine Squires: Americares President and CEO Janti Soeripto: Save the Children President and CEO Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/3/202349 minutes
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CT-based Gen Z trailblazers: Musician ericdoa, K-pop dance crew SEOULAR, and designer MINIPNG

This hour, we're focusing on Gen Z's impact on arts and culture. Eric George Lopez, or ericdoa, has been described as the "face of hyperpop," a newer music genre born out of 2000s electronic music. But in many ways, the "genre-bending" up-and-coming artist defies categorization. He discusses his upbringing in Connecticut, how he developed his sound and what makes Gen Z uniquely powerful in the arts. Later in the hour, we spotlight SEOULAR, a K-pop dance crew at University of Connecticut, part of KCONN, the campus' K-pop club. KCONN President Gina Tran and Vice President Alan Tran join us. Plus, Eiress Hammond is the owner of MINIPNG, a New Haven business featuring her designs in addition to up-and-coming creators. She joins us to discuss her mission of "sustainability and individuality." How is Gen Z shifting boundaries or influencing arts and culture where you live? GUESTS: ericdoa: Singer, Songwriter and Producer from Connecticut Gina Tran: President, KCONN at the University of Connecticut Alan Tran: Vice-President, KCONN at the University of Connecticut Eiress Hammond: Designer; Owner, MINIPNG in New Haven Connecticut Public intern Lateshia Peters also contributed to this episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/2/202349 minutes
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Witches and Mombies! Happy Halloween from Where We Live

Being a Mom on Halloween can be pretty hectic, but a group of Fairfield Moms are taking the spooky season by storm. They're dressing up as zombies and taking the town in their infamous flash mobs. The “Mombies” is a group of Moms of all ages that have been coordinating to “dance to donate” since 2016. They have raised over $170,000 for breast cancer research to date - and their dance videos have been seen by millions. Throughout October, these Moms are putting on their Zombie finest attire and are participating in epic dance performances across the state. We hear from two of the mombies today. Later, the Connecticut witch trials is one of our favorite topics to dive into here on Where We Live. But did you ever wonder what started all the panic around witches? In the Trinity College Rare Book collection, you can see some of the first illustrations and books about witches.We'll learn more about these texts and how influential they became throughout Connecticut and the rest of New England. GUESTS: Marney White: Mombie and professor at the Yale School of Public Health Sheryl Kraft: Mombie and health writer Eric Johnson-DeBaufre, PhD, MLIS: Rare Books and Special Collections Librarian, Watkinson Library at Trinity College Emma Greig Ph.D: Project FeederWatch at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/31/202349 minutes
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Meet two local educators behind the new AP African American studies course

A new Advanced Placement, or AP, course on African American Studies is in its second pilot year in hundreds of schools, and set to roll out nationally next fall. AP classes offer high school students the opportunity to earn college credit. But the course's pilot rollout has been rocky, after it was rejected by the Department of Education in Florida and, more recently, in Arkansas. This hour, we check in with two Connecticut educators who are helping to author the course, plus College Board executive director of communications Holly Stepp. Stepp reiterates that the changes being made to the course were not prompted or influenced by politics or by "any state." An updated course framework is expected to be released later this year. Plus, the Connecticut State Department of Education recently approved a new set of standards for teaching social studies. We’ll get a sneak preview from advisor Steve Armstrong. Armstrong explains how these standards relate to several new changes to social studies education where we live, including a new Black and Latino Studies elective, and curriculum covering local Indigenous history. Social studies consultant Steve Armstrong says, "I know that in some places, some people think that we should shy away from the difficult history... If you never tackle those difficult problems in the past, you'll never be able to tackle as difficult issues come up in the present and future." GUESTS: Holly Stepp: Executive Director of Communications, College Board Dr. Lisa Beth Hill: History Department Chair, Hamden Hall Country Preparatory Day School Dr. David Embrick: Joint Associate Professor, Sociology Department and Africana Studies Institute, University of Connecticut Steve Armstrong: Social Studies Consultant, Connecticut State Department of Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/30/202348 minutes, 1 second
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Navigating the aftermath of a concussion

There’s a stereotypical depiction of concussions in movies and TV shows: someone - often an athlete, gets hit in the head, falls down, and everyone crowds around them and asks them if they know what day it is. Then, the patient spends the next two weeks lying alone in the dark. But in recent years, we have developed a new understanding about concussions -- how they happen, their severity, and how best to treat them. We hear from Dr. Bulent Omay, the Chief of Neurotrauma at the Yale School of Medicine. We also hear from a practicing physical therapist who specializes in brain injury treatment. And we learn about Concussion Box, a non-profit dedicated to supporting traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. Have you ever had a concussion? How did it affect you then, and is it still impacting you today? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Dr. Bulent Omay: Chief of Neurotrauma at the Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Vanessa Cornwell Chiu: a practicing physical therapist Eliana Bloomfield: Wesleyan undergrad student and founder of ConcussionBox, a non-profit that aims to support people experiencing concussions Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Connecticut’s domestic violence resource and information line is (888) 774-2900 or www.CTSafeConnect.orgSupport the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/27/202348 minutes
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Addressing misconceptions around food insecurity: 'It's about more than food'

For a Connecticut family of four, it costs over $126,000 just to meet their basic needs, according to a recent United Way report. That’s more than four times the federal poverty level. Food insecurity is a big part of the problem, affecting more than 1 in 10 Connecticut residents, according to Connecticut Foodshare. A new report from the United States Department of Agriculture found the national rate of food insecurity jumped by more than 2% from 2021 to 2022, to 12.8%. This hour, UConn's Dr. Caitlin Caspi joins us to address some of the misconceptions around food insecurity. "Food insecurity isn't happening in a vacuum," she says. "It's really intersecting with a lot of other challenges that people face," including stable housing, health insurance, job security, disability, and other factors. "Food insecurity isn't primarily a story about food," says Dr. Caspi. "It's about many facets of economic instability." Plus, we'll discuss some of Connecticut Foodshare’s efforts to address food insecurity where we live, including an income-based grocery store coming soon to Hartford, where food insecurity rates are highest in the state. Hartford High School just launched the Grub Pub, an in-school pantry. Principal Flora Padro joins us later in the hour, describing the "new normal" she envisions. GUESTS: Dr. Caitlin Caspi: Associate Professor, University of Connecticut's Department of Allied Health Sciences; Director of Food Security Initiatives, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Health Jason Jakubowski: President & CEO, Connecticut Foodshare Ben Dubow: Executive Director, Forge City Works Flora Padro: Principal, Hartford High School Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/26/202349 minutes
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Human trafficking happens everywhere, including in Connecticut

A heads up to our listeners that today we will be discussing human trafficking. Content may not be suitable for younger listeners. Human trafficking can happen in any country and any community, including where we live, in Connecticut. Polaris, a non-profit dedicated to fighting human trafficking, gave Connecticut a failing grade when it comes to combating trafficking in our state. When you think of human trafficking, you might think of the various films and documentaries created about the subject. But experts say that trafficking is far more complicated than what we see on screen. Today, we dive into how human trafficking is impacting our state and what is being done to combat it. GUESTS: Amy Hayashida: Program Director at the Underground New England Meghan Scanlon: President and CEO of the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence Tammy Sneed: Director, Office of Human Trafficking Services and Connecticut Human Antitrafficking Response Team (HART) Krystal Rich: Executive Director, Connecticut Children's Alliance Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/24/202349 minutes
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Connecticut was a key player in the 'Baking Powder Wars'

Before baking powder became a kitchen staple, there was a state-level showdown over the rights to produce and sell it, and food historian Linda Civitello says Connecticut played a central role. This hour, she joins us to dig into her book, Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking. Plus, Darien First Selectman Monica McNally previews the town’s $85 million purchase of Great Island, a 63-acre property linked to baking powder tycoon William Ziegler. From Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking by Linda Civitello. © 2017 by Linda Civitello. Used with permission of the University of Illinois Press. GUESTS: Linda Civitello: Food Historian; Author, Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking Monica McNally: First Selectman of Darien Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired September 14, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/23/202348 minutes, 29 seconds
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Andy Horowitz is the new Connecticut State Historian

Walt Woodward held the position of Connecticut State Historian for nearly twenty years. He retired in 2022 to make way for the next Connecticut State Historian.  Although our state is small, it’s got a big history. From the Connecticut Witch Trials of the 1600s to some more recent history, like the Sandy Hook Shootings and even the COVID-19 pandemic, Connecticut is not short on history. Andy Horowitz is the next Connecticut State Historian. He says that history doesn't gain validity depending overtime. Even modern history is still history. Listeners might be surprised to learn that not all of his research and work has been focused on Connecticut. In studying disasters and environmental events, he centered much of his research around Hurricane Katrina. He joins us in studio to talk about his role as the new Connecticut State Historian and how he plans to spend his term serving the state. GUEST: Andy Horowitz: Connecticut State Historian and Associate Professor at the University of ConnecticutSupport the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/20/202349 minutes
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'Before there was Salem, there was Connecticut': State formally pardons accused witches

Before the well-known witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts, Connecticut had its own spate of trials and executions. In mid-1600s colonial Connecticut, dozens of women, and some men connected to them, were accused of witchcraft. Eleven people were executed. Earlier this year, the state moved to clear the names of all those accused of witchcraft in the state, and issued an apology. The resolution followed panel discussions and hearings with state lawmakers, descendants of the accused, and local historians. This hour, we listen back to some of those discussions, and check in with the Connecticut Witch Trial Exoneration Project. Plus, Dr. Katherine Hermes discovered evidence that accusations of witchcraft continued well into the 1700s where we live. GUESTS: Sarah Jack: Co-Founder, Connecticut Witch Trial Exoneration Project; Co-Host, “Thou Shalt Not Suffer: The Witch Trial Podcast" Dr. Katherine Hermes: Publisher and Executive Director, Connecticut Explored Magazine Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/19/202349 minutes
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A conversation with Reverend Dr. Stephen G. Ray Jr. of United Church on the Green

Church attendance is on the decline. And the pandemic might not be to blame. Church attendance was falling even before 2020 among every major religion and subgroup. Coming up this weekend, the United Church on the Green is welcoming Rev. Dr. Stephen G. Ray, Jr. This historic church in New Haven played a key part of the abolitionist movement. Rev. Dr. Stephen G. Ray, Jr. is going to be the church's first black minister. Today, he joins us to talk about his hopes for this historic church, and welcoming a new generation of parishioners. And later, we hear from the Yale Divinity School and learn about their involvement in an exciting project called the Living Village Project which broke ground last week. The Living Village is going to be a net-positive-energy building that will provide affordable housing to students. GUESTS: Reverend Dr. Stephen G. Ray Jr: United Church on the Green in New Haven Dean Gregory Sterling: Dean of Yale Divinity School; The Reverend Henry L. Slack Dean and Lillian Claus Professor of New Testament Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/17/202349 minutes
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Graphic novels, though increasingly popular, are 'prime targets' for book ban lists

Graphic novels and comic books sales in the U.S. have grown in recent years, but the format is still a "prime target" for book ban lists. Maia Kobabe's award-winning graphic memoir Gender Queer was named the top challenged book of 2022 and 2021 by the American Library Association. Jerry Craft, Connecticut native and the author of graphic novel New Kid, also found his book on ban lists. RELATED LISTEN: Earlier this year, Jerry Craft spoke on Connecticut Public's Disrupted. He "talks about his banned, award-winning graphic novel New Kid, in addition to his latest book, School Trip." This hour, we hear from the national and state Library Association about this important and often-undervalued format. Newtown recently saw challenges to two graphic novels. We hear from local librarian and Immediate Past President of the Connecticut Library Association, Douglas Booth. Plus, one youth librarian describes the explosion of interest in graphic novels she’s seeing in Simsbury. GUESTS: Samantha Lee: Chair, Connecticut Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee; Head of Reference Services at Enfield Public Library Douglas Lord: Director, C.H. Booth Library in Newtown; Immediate Past President, Connecticut Library Association Deborah Caldwell Stone: Director, American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom Mary Richardson: Teen Services Librarian, Simsbury Public Library; Co-Host, "The Book Jam"Podcast Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/16/202349 minutes
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Exploring Connecticut Wine Country

Connecticut's winemaking community is vibrant and growing. This hour, we explore the flavors of New England with food journalist Leeanne Griffin, and wine expert and writer Alice Feiring. Some 45 licensed farm wineries comprise Connecticut's very own "Wine Country." We also hear from local vineyards, and discuss the role of "agritourism" in Connecticut. We preview the state's Passport to Wine Country program, putting 30-plus farm wineries on the map. Farm wineries use at least one-quarter Connecticut-grown fruits in their product. GUESTS: Alice Feiring: Journalist and Writer; Author, The Feiring Line Leeanne Griffin: Food and Consumer Reporter, Hearst Connecticut Ryan Winiarski: Owner, Priam Vineyards Patty Rowan: Winery Manager, Hopkins Vineyard Bryan Hurlburt: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Agriculture Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/13/202341 minutes
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Taking a 'holistic approach' to treating congenital heart disease

Heart disease has been the leading cause of death in the United States for decades, putting much of the focus squarely and rightly on cardiovascular disease. But what about congenital heart conditions, something affecting your heart since birth? There are 13 million adults living with congenital heart disease, and that number has grown as treatments advance; survival rates have improved by 75% since the 1940s. But those diagnoses can come later in life, and even with sure signs, the need for specialized, lifelong care is often unmet. This hour, we're joined by the co-authors of Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease. Plus, we hear from one of 50 clinics accredited by the Adult Congenital Heart Association in the U.S., right here in Connecticut. GUESTS: Tracy Livecchi: Social Worker; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease Liza Morton: Psychologist; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds Dr. Robert Elder: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and Internal Medicine (Cardiology); Director, Adult Congenital Heart Program; Director Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program, Pediatric Cardiology Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/12/202340 minutes, 15 seconds
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Creating new communities with cohousing, plus fighting mosquito-borne diseases worldwide

Last week, homelessness was officially declared a public health crisis in Connecticut. And the lack of affordable housing remains a major issue here in Connecticut. Today, we get an update on affordable housing and hear how some towns are addressing it. We hear about a housing model known as cohousing, and hear from a co-housing collective based in Massachusetts. Later, New York Times global health reporter Stephanie Nolen joins us to discuss her year long trip around the globe to investigate how the world’s most vulnerable communities are addressing mosquito -borne diseases.  GUESTS: Ginny Monk: Housing and Children’s Issues for the Connecticut Mirror Yochai Gal: resident at Rocky Hill Cohousing in North Hampton, Massachusetts Stephanie Nolen: Global Health reporter for The New York Times Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/10/202340 minutes, 32 seconds
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Finding solutions to slow the fast-fashion cycle

Where do our clothes come from? According to the Textile Exchange, 52% of our clothes are made from polyester. Fast fashion is an enormous industry, allowing us to purchase low cost clothing quickly and efficiently. But the toll these companies take on the environment is significant, and the workplace conditions for the factories that create these products are questionable at best. Building sustainable, ethical practices into the fashion industry will be a challenge, but it’s not impossible. There are ways to slow down the fast fashion cycle, and build better quality fabrics. Today, we talk about these solutions and what fashion brands can do to build sustainability. We learn ways to slow down the fast fashion cycle. Lucianne Tonti, a fashion consultant and author of the new book Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion joins us. We’ll also hear from Reboot Eco, a zero waste and swap shop in Middletown, Connecticut. What does shopping look like for you? Do you thrift for your clothes, or prefer the convenience of shopping online? GUESTS: Miriah Kelly: Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, Southern Connecticut State University Lucianne Tonti - consultant for sustainable designers and author of Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion Yasemin Ugurlu - Founder and Owner of Reboot Eco Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired March 14, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/9/202341 minutes, 2 seconds
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Fewer Americans are considering careers in the military and branches are looking for solutions to recruiting

During the last fiscal year, the army alone missed their recruiting goal by 25%. All branches of the military are struggling to recruit new cadets. With an all volunteer service, the military relies on recruitment efforts to get more people to serve. But fewer Americans than ever are eligible to do so. And attracting the next generation of cadets has been a challenge. Today, we talk about the military recruiting crisis. We will hear from Captain Benjamin Keffer, Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command. Later, we hear how someextremist groups are working to get veterans and others with tactical experience into their organizations. GUESTS: Dr. Nora Bensahel: Professor of the Practice at theJohns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studiesand a Contributing Editor, War on the Rocks Captain Benjamin Keffer: Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command Sonner Kehrt: Investigative Reporter at the War Horse and Coast Guard Veteran Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/6/202340 minutes, 59 seconds
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Booking your COVID-19 booster appointment? Here's DPH Commissioner Manisha Juthani's advice

New COVID boosters are available and recommended for everyone over six months of age, but pharmacies and providers in the state are slammed. The Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) says that more than 46,000 residents have gotten the latest COVID-19 vaccine. They also acknowledged delays, which the Hartford Courant has attributed to "supply chain disruptions, insurance issues and workforce woes." This hour, DPH Commissioner Manisha Juthani joins us with all the latest guidance, from COVID-19 testing to flu shots. Have you ordered your free COVID-19 tests yet? Or are you eligible for free vaccines through the CDC's Bridge Access Program? Plus, Fran Rabinowitz provides an update on continued staffing shortages in public schools. Paraprofessional support is short thousands of positions, and Rabinowitz stresses the need for support staffers as well. Bus drivers in Meriden and Coventryhave already gone on strike this fall. GUESTS: Manisha Juthani: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health Fran Rabinowitz: Executive Director, Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/5/202339 minutes, 21 seconds
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What it takes to save the turtles

Turtles are among one of the oldest reptiles to walk the planet. Although turtles often live long lifespans and are among some of the most resilient animals on the planet,human presence has meant a huge threat to their species.  In her new book Of Time and Turtles, Sy Montgomery says turtles live “slow.” She spent time working with the people that have dedicated their lives to rehabilitating these fascinating creatures, and she joins us to talk about her book. And Matt Patterson, fellow turtle lover, illustrator of this book and their accompanying picture book The Book of Turtles joins us too. He is also a wildlife artist and sculptor. We'll learn about what’s being done to care and protect these animals. GUESTS: Sy Montgomery: Author of Of Time and Turtles Matt Patterson illustrator of The Book of Turtles and wildlife artist Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/3/202349 minutes
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Uncovering the history of eugenics at Yale University, and its 'afterlives'

Researchers at Yale University are focused on the harrowing history of eugenics, the role the institution played in developing this psuedoscience, and its many lingering "afterlives." Professor Dan HoSang formed the Anti-Eugenics Collective at Yale, and says this history is "integral to the story of the University." HoSang and the Collective also explore how the tenets of eugenics transformed and lived on in some surprising ways. This hour, HoSang joins us, plus we look at how Yale psychiatry programs and public schools in New Haven are building curriculum around this research. For example, Dr. Marco Ramos underscores the legacy of "New Haven as a laboratory," something he asks new psychiatry residents to consider. "Our pedagogy increasingly is asking trainees to be to become critical of that relationship, and say, 'To what extent is my research advancing my interest versus the community that I'm supposed to be serving?'" Dr. Ramos explains, "This history sets up a framework where they can make sense of that and process it emotionally, and they can figure out what they can do to... build trust with the communities they're working with. But that's impossible, I think, unless it's contextualized in this longer history that really starts with eugenics." GUESTS: Daniel HoSang: Professor of Ethnicity Race and Migration and American Studies, Yale University Dr. Marco Ramos: Psychiatrist, Yale School of Medicine; Assistant Professor, Yale History of Science and Medicine Program Meredith Gavrin: Co-Founder, New Haven Academy Elias Theodore: First-Year Student, Yale University Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/2/202349 minutes
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Talking about suicide is hard, so we asked experts for their advice

A content warning to our listeners: today we will be talking about suicide. September is Suicide Prevention Month. United States saw nearly 50,000 deaths by suicide in 2022, and suicide continues to be on the rise. Talking openly about suicide and mental health can be a critical part of deterring suicide deaths. But having those discussions can be really challenging and experts say there are specific ways to conduct these conversations delicately. Later, we hear from Connecticut Urgent Crisis Centers. If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts, you can go online to 988lifeline.orgor dial 9-8-8. GUESTS: Aneri Pattani: Senior Correspondent for KFF Health News Ann Dagle: President and Co-founder of the Brian Dagle Foundation and Tri-chair of Connecticut Suicide Advisory Board Dr Laine Taylor: Medical Director for The Village for Families and Children Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/29/202349 minutes
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Ashley Hamel takes her music to new heights abroad, plus a look at the ticketing industry

Ashley Hamel discovered her love of music while growing up in Connecticut. The singer-songwriter eventually left New England behind to build her music career in Indonesia. This hour, she joins us from Jakarta to talk about her new single, "New England Baby…" Plus, earlier this year, U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal introduced a bill that he hopes will rein in the role of online, third-party ticket sellers. He has the latest on the "Unlock Ticketing Markets Act," and the concerns he has for up-and-coming musicians competing in what he has called a ticket-selling "monopoly." GUESTS: Ashley Hamel: Singer-Songwriter Richard Blumenthal: U.S. Senator for Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired on August 31, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/28/202348 minutes, 1 second
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'Not all in your head': Examining endometriosis

Endometriosis is one of the most common diseases affecting those with uteruses. Despite its prevalence, proper diagnosis can take up to ten years, leaving many suffering without support or treatment. State Representative Jillian Gilchrest recently launched a legislative working group to advocate for better research and education policies across Connecticut. Arleigh Cole is a local public educator, and a member of the endometriosis working group. Plus, we hear from Shannon Cohn, a filmmaker and public advocate for endometriosis awareness. She discusses her new documentary Below the Belt, and her efforts to educate medical and school professionals about the condition through her organization Endo What? GUESTS: Jillian Gilchrest: Connecticut State Representative; Co-Chair, Connecticut Reproductive Rights Caucus; Chair, Endometriosis Working Group Arleigh Cole: Endometriosis Public Educator, via her Instagram @Missendostood Halley Terrell: Licensed Clinical Social Worker; Life Coach Shannon Cohn: Director, Below the Belt and Endo What? Connecticut Public intern Carol Chen contributed to this episode which originally aired July 27, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/26/202348 minutes, 2 seconds
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Esmeralda Santiago's new novel 'Las Madres' explores themes of memory and home

Esmeralda Santiago is out with a new book, Las Madres, following five women as they survive – and are shaped by their experience of – Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. The novel explores themes of memory and home, faith and disaster. This hour, the acclaimed author joins us to discuss. Plus, we take a look at efforts to ready permanent relief resources in Hartford, given the increasing prevalence of extreme weather events in Puerto Rico. Researchers estimate 13,000 people came to Connecticut from Puerto Rico in the year that followed Hurricane Maria. Dr. Charles Venator Santiago has the latest. GUESTS: Esmeralda Santiago: Author, Las Madres Dr. Charles Venator Santiago: Faculty Director, UConn's Puerto Rican Studies Initiative; Director, El Instituto: Institute of Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/25/202349 minutes
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Leave the leaves alone (and other fall gardening tips)

Fall is officially here, and the days are getting shorter, but hopefully you’re still finding some time to be outside. Fall gardening is well on its way. This is a great season to harvest squash and other root vegetables, and prepare your garden for next year.  Whether you are expanding your gardening space or perhaps getting ready to plant bulbs for the first time, there’s a lot of factors to consider; the what, where and when you should plant just to name a few! Many gardeners are choosing native plants which are some of the most sustainable plants to plant. Charlie Nardozzi, horticulturist and host of the Connecticut Garden Journal on Connecticut Public Radio joins us today to answer our gardening questions and yours. What questions do you have about fall gardening? Have you planted or harvested any vegetables yet? GUEST: Charlie Nardozzi: horticulturist and host of the Connecticut Garden Journal on Caonnecticut Public Radio Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/22/202349 minutes
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Untangling the 'predictable calamity' of Connecticut's child care industry to find solutions

Local advocates and experts in early childcare education say funding and staffing shortfalls were only deepened during the pandemic. With federal relief funding set to expire at the end of the month, posing another short-term hurdle, or "cliff," what are the long-term solutions? Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal is pushing Congress for $16 billion in federal funding through the Child Care Stabilization Act. "Childcare was in crisis even before the pandemic," said Senator Blumenthal on Monday. "But the pandemic has brought it to the brink of collapse." He also highlighted the Child Care for Every Community Act, and the Child Care for Working Families Act. At the same press conference on Monday, Merrill Gay, Executive Director at Connecticut Early Childhood Alliance, called the upcoming funding cutoff a “predictable calamity." This hour, we hear from Connecticut Office of Early Childhood Commissioner Beth Bye, and members of the recently-formed Blue Ribbon Panel on Child Care. A new draft of a five-year plan, expected to be finalized by December, outlined possible solutions, including a pay raise. GUESTS: Beth Bye: Commissioner, Connecticut Office of Early Childhood Monette Ferguson: Executive Director, Alliance for Community Empowerment in Bridgeport Karen Lott: Executive Director, Women’s League Child Development Center in Hartford Allyx Schiavone: Executive Director, Friends Center for Children in New Haven Jessica Sager: Executive Director, All Our Kin Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/21/202349 minutes
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"Flawless" Author Elise Hu dives into the world of K-Beauty

In 2015, journalist Elise Hu moved to South Korea to open the NPR Seoul bureau. During her time in South Korea, she witnessed the rise of K-beauty culture or “Korean beauty.” K-beauty encompasses a multitude of beauty treatments. It doesn’t just include luxury skincare lines, and expensive facemasks; there's also LED light therapy, injections, fillers, and a myriad of options for plastic surgery. These procedures are becoming an increasingly normal part of daily life in South Korea, but also in the United States. They are also more accessible than ever to anyone that wants to change the way they look. Although some are starting to question the pursuit of keeping up with today’s beauty standards, this multibillion dollar beauty industry isn't going away. Today, Elise Hu joins us on Where We Live to talk about her book Flawless: Lessons in Looks and Culture from the K-Beauty Capital. We talk about the pursuit and pain of keeping up with today’s beauty standards. GUEST: Elise Hu: host of TED Talks Daily and also a host-at-large for NPR. She is the author of Flawless: Lessons in Looks and Culture from the K-Beauty Capital Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/19/202349 minutes
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'What's eating at America': Addressing the loneliness and isolation epidemic

Approximately half of U.S. adults reported experiencing loneliness, even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The issue recently moved U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to issue an advisory around the "loneliness epidemic" in America. Soon after, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy introduced a bill that would launch an Office of Social Connection Policy, and fund CDC research to "better understand the epidemic of social isolation and loneliness." While on The Colin McEnroe Show in July, Murphy said the move was "part of a broader exploration for me of what is eating in America... I have come to the conclusion that there's a lot of new and unique things that are hurting Americans and making them feel unhappy today," chief among them loneliness or "aloneness." This hour, we explore how loneliness, isolation and social disconnection are being addressed where we live. Deb Bibbins and Gary Sekorski founded For All Ages, and more recently, the Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness, to help bolster and centralize resources. How does loneliness or isolation affect you? GUESTS: Deb Bibbins: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Gary Sekorski: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Connie Malone: Canton Resident Siri Palreddy: Senior at Amherst College Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/18/202349 minutes
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Think of it as a tool: Artificial Intelligence in education

There have been a lot of things that have revolutionized how educators teach in the classrooms. Things like Wikipedia, Google and even calculators have caused temporary panic in the education space.  Now that ChatGPT and other artificial intelligence tools are becoming a central part of our everyday lives, some educators are scrambling to rethink their curriculum. If you ask the artificial intelligence app, ChatGPT, to write you a 500 page essay on the themes in Moby Dick, in a matter of seconds, you’ll have a well written paper. Even further, you can even tell ChatGPT “write me a 500 word essay on the themes of Moby Dick, in the voice of a 10th grader” and the essay will reflect the tone and language of the average 15 year old. When ChatGPT was first released, we took a deep dive into AI ethics and learned how it might education. And today, we get an update and we talk to teachers around the state and hear how they are actually utilizing AI in the classroom. GUESTS: Jeff Young: Editor of EdSurge, an education journalism initiative Tom Deans: Professor of English and Director of the University Writing Center at the University of Connecticut Erica Strong: Literacy Coach at Lebanon Middle School John Allen: Social Studies Teacher  at Putnam High School Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/15/202349 minutes
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Connecticut was a key player in the 'Baking Powder Wars'

Before baking powder became a kitchen staple, there was a state-level showdown over the rights to produce and sell it, and food historian Linda Civitello says Connecticut played a central role. This hour, she joins us to dig into her book, Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking. Plus, Darien First Selectman Monica McNally previews the town’s $85 million purchase of Great Island, a 63-acre property linked to baking powder tycoon William Ziegler. From Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking by Linda Civitello. © 2017 by Linda Civitello. Used with permission of the University of Illinois Press. GUESTS: Linda Civitello: Food Historian; Author, Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking Monica McNally: First Selectman of Darien Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/14/202349 minutes
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How do you see the role of primary elections?

It’s Primary Day here in Connecticut. We have closed primaries here in Connecticut, meaning only voters registered in either political party can participate in this election. Historically, voter turnout tends to be pretty low on Primary Day, especially on years where we don’t have a big presidential election. According to the Associated Press, turnout for the 2019 Democratic mayoral primaries in Bridgeport, Hartford and New Haven all hovered between 13% and 15%. Today, we hear about some of the conversations Connecticut civics teachers are having in their classrooms around elections. And we want to hear from you too. Are you voting in today’s primary election? How do you see the role of primary elections? For all the primary results, listen live to The Wheelhouse with host Frankie Graziano and a panel of reporters from across the state. Wednesday at 9 a.m. and 8 pm. on Connecticut Public. GUESTS: Patricia Crouse: practitioner in residence in Legal Studies and Political Science at the University of New Haven Julia Miller: Civics Teacher at Metropolitan Business Academy inter-district magnet school in new haven Dr. David Bosso: Social studies teacher at Berlin High School and 2012 Connecticut teacher of the year Abigail Brone: Housing Reporter with Connecticut Public Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/12/202349 minutes
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Examining links between climate distress and climate action

The Yale Program on Climate Change Communication found that the majority of Americans are either "alarmed" or "concerned" about climate change. They also discovered links between distress about climate change and a desire to take action. This hour, Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz digs into this study, and the Six Americas Super Short Survey (SASSY). You can take the SASSY Survey here. Plus, NBC Connecticut meteorologist Rachael Jay and New Haven Climate Movement organizer Adrian Huq will share their perspectives as different kinds of climate communicators. How do you process feelings of alarm or distress around climate change, or even, take action? GUESTS: Rachael Jay: Meteorologist, NBC Connecticut Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz: Founder and Director, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication Adrian Huq: Co-Founder, New Haven Climate Movement Youth Action Team; Youth Coordinator, Climate Health Education Project Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/11/202349 minutes
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Navigating the aftermath of a concussion

There’s a stereotypical depiction of concussions in movies and TV shows: someone - often an athlete, gets hit in the head, falls down, and everyone crowds around them and asks them if they know what day it is. Then, the patient, spends the next two weeks lying alone in the dark. But in recent years we have developed a new understanding about concussions -- how they happen, their severity, and how best to treat them. We hear from Dr. Bulent Omay, the Chief of Neurotrauma and Neurosurgery at the Yale School of Medicine. We also hear from a practicing physical therapist who specializes in brain injury treatment. And we learn about Concussion Box, a non-profit dedicated to supporting TBI patients. Have you ever had a concussion? How did it affect you then, and is it still impacting you today? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Dr. Bulent Omay: Chief of Neutrotrauma at the Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Vanessa Cornwell Chiu: a practicing physical therapist Eliana Bloomfield: Wesleyan undergrad student and founder of ConcussionBox, a non-profit that aims to support people experiencing concussions Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/8/202349 minutes
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Lights, camera, Connecticut: The local impact of the writers and actors strike

The writers and actors strike has frozen film and TV productions across the country, and left many creatives to go back to their quote, "civilian jobs," as Mystic-based actress Callie Beaulieu recently shared with Connecticut Public. "We're at a tipping point with the survival of our profession," she says. This hour, local studios, actors and crew members join us. Plus, NPR correspondent Mandalit del Barco has the latest; and Hearst Connecticut reporter Alex Soule explains why Connecticut is at a "crossroads" where it concerns the film and TV tax incentive program. Plus, some 2,000 movie screens have gone dark over the pandemic, according to one recent study by the Cinema Foundation. But there's a bright spot where we live: Connecticut boasts four drive-in theaters. We hear from the owners of one drive-in in Mansfield. RELATED: For family owners of Mansfield Drive-In, business is 'more than a movie' GUESTS: Olivia Nicole Hoffman: Actress Keith Nelson: Costume Designer Andrew Gernhard: Owner, Synthetic Cinema International Mandalit del Barco: NPR entertainment reporter Alexander Soule: Reporter, Hearst CT Naomi Jungden: General Manager, Mansfield Drive-In Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/7/202349 minutes
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Ageism impacts everyone (eventually)

What do you think about getting older? Is it an exciting new chapter, or something you’re dreading? And when you think about seniors or elders, do you see reverence or irrelevance? Eventually, we all get older. But one of the last acceptable forms of discrimination is ageism. Today on Where We Live, we talk about age discrimination. We hear from Jeff Hamaoui. He’s the Co-founder of the Modern Elder Academy and says that midlife is not about the midlife crisis; it’s about finding your "second adulthood.” So, what do you think about getting older? Is it an exciting new chapter, or something you’re dreading? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Jeff Hamaoui: Co-founder of the Modern Elder Academy Robin Clare: Executive Director Seniors Job Bank in West Hartford Kauther Badr: Associate Professor at Southern Connecticut State University Nora Duncan: State Director of the AARP Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/5/202349 minutes
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Ashley Hamel takes her music to new heights abroad, plus a look at the ticketing industry

Ashley Hamel discovered her love of music while growing up in Connecticut. The singer-songwriter eventually left New England behind to build her music career in Indonesia. This hour, she joins us from Jakarta to talk about her new single, "New England Baby…” Plus, earlier this year, U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal introduced a bill that he hopes will rein in the role of online, third-party ticket sellers. He has the latest on the "Unlock Ticketing Markets Act," and the concerns he has for up-and-coming musicians competing in what he has called a ticket-selling "monopoly." GUESTS: Ashley Hamel: Singer-Songwriter Richard Blumenthal: U.S. Senator for Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/1/202348 minutes, 59 seconds
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Grade inflation, grade bias and grade anxiety

Once, receiving an A meant that a student had excelled in their coursework. But now, receiving an A means access to advanced classes, scholarships and of course, college admissions. No two school districts, or even two teachers grade in the exact same way. Which means that grade bias is a real problem. So two students that might have the exact same academic performance, could receive two very different grades. With all this emphasis on grades, are students missing out on learning? Today on Where We Live, we talk about the history of grading, where the A through F system came from and how some educators are rethinking the way we grade students. We hear from one Connecticut school district that’s changing the way they grade their students. And we want to hear from you too, is grade anxiety keeping you or your student up at night? GUESTS:  Ethan Hutt: Associate Professor of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, author of Off the Mark: How Grades, Ratings, and Rankings Undermine Learning (but Don’t Have To) Joe Feldman: author of Grading for Equity: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How It Can Transform Schools and Classrooms and CEO of Crescendo Education Group Dr. Thomas McBryde: Norwalk Deputy Superintendent Edgar Sanchez: Lead Research Scientist at ACT Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9/1/202348 minutes, 57 seconds
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Trust: The public health issue that has fractured the doctor/patient relationship

When you don’t feel well, and don’t know why, the last thing you want to be is dismissed by your doctor. More and more patients are taking it on themselves to research their own symptoms, and looking for answers and diagnoses through online forums. What’s happening at the doctor’s office that is causing a disconnect and distrust between patients and their doctors? Today, we’re talking about the relationship between doctors and their patients, and how that’s impacting diagnostics. We want to hear from you. When was the last time were you at a doctor’s office? Did you feel heard and respected? Did you feel like you could trust your healthcare to provide you with the best healthcare you can get? If you're a doctor, what would you like your patients to know? GUESTS: Shannon Koplitz: Board of Director and treasurer for the Dysautonomia International Dr. Perry Wilson: Associate Professor of Medicine and Public Health at Yale, and author of How Medicine Works and When It Doesn't: Learning Who to Trust to Get and Stay Healthy Dr. Vasanth Kainkaryam: Direct Primary Care Physician in Connecticut. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/29/202349 minutes
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Feeling safe or creating trauma? How lockdown drills are impacting our schools

In 1999 the Columbine shooting shook the country and made everyone aware of the threat of gun violence in schools. As a result, schools made an effort to implement lockdown procedures as a way to keep students and staff safe. But with the rates of shootings only continuing to rise, these threats of mass shootings are feeling too real, and the lockdowns that were meant to keep students safe are instead inflicting trauma. So what is going on in these lockdowns that are causing negative impacts and a decline in mental health? Today we look at what is happening inside the school walls during these lockdowns and what it is doing to our students. A common solution that many schools have turned to is School Resource Officers or SROs. What do you think should be done to protect our schools while minimizing trauma? Mo Canady: Executive Director of National Association of School Resource Officers Kate Dias: President of Connecticut Education Association and High School Math teacher in Manchester School District David J Schonfeld: Director, National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Stacey Addo produced this show that originally aired on July 28, 2023.Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/28/202348 minutes
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New solutions to eliminating homelessness: Moving beyond the shelter model

The number of people who became unhoused in Connecticut increased by 13 percent between 2021 and last year. And in most places around the country, cities rely on shelters to accommodate people who are unhoused. But those who’ve lived there say this model isn’t working. Families are separated. There’s a 90-day stay limit. There’s little to no security for personal belongings. And at dawn, everyone’s asked to leave, rain or shine. Today on Where We Live, we hear from the founder of Rosette Village, a transitional housing community on Rosette Street in New Haven. It's a housing model where people live together with their families and stay for as long as they need to, which can improve health outcomes for unhoused people. Their tents are provided with electricity. Everyone has lockers for personal belongings. And they say their health has improved. Residents are hoping to live in prefabricated tiny homes set up on site so they can live safely.Later, we talk about the health impact on people without housing. GUESTS: Suki Godek: an unhoused activist living at Rosette Mark Colville: the housing activist behind Rosette Village New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker Dr. Caitlin Ryus: Instructor in Emergency Medicine and the Co-Director of the Yale Emergency Scholars Fellowship Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/25/202349 minutes
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The challenges of addressing adult literacy

23% of the adult U.S. population cannot read above a third-grade level. Literacy isn’t limited to reading and writing, it can also refer to basic math, comprehension and critical thinking skills. According to ProLiteracy, bringing reading levels up “would generate an additional $2.2 trillion in annual income. Today, we get a deeper understanding of adult literacy in our country and across our state. There is no part of the U.S. population that isn’t touched by low literacy. And many people suffer from shame around the struggle to read and write. GUESTS: Haleigh Guerrera: Basic Literacy Tutor with Literacy Volunteers of Greater Hartford Aliyya Swaby: Reporter for ProPublica Mark Vineis: President and CEO of ProLiteracy Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Shen contributed to this episode that recently aired April 7, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/24/202348 minutes
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Wheelchair repairs can take months: What local advocates are doing to change that

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have estimated that more than half of wheelchairs break down in a typical six-month period. Many Connecticut residents say those repairs can take months. This hour, we hear from local advocates with the Connecticut Wheelchair Reform Coalition about a recently-formed legislative task force and their goals for next session. In particular, they hope to study and set limits on repair turnaround times. UPitt researcher Dr. Lynn Woroby also shares her findings on the frequency of wheelchair breakdowns. Plus, how does private equity impact health care? Private Equity Stakeholder Project is a nonprofit watchdog organization investigating this question. The business model and priority for private equity investments is to maximize profit, Eileen O'Grady explains. "In order to produce those kinds of returns, it might mean cutting staffing, reducing training hours, or relying on staff or clinicians that have a lower level of licensure. It might also mean financial shenanigans, like adding lots and lots of debt to a company to pay their shareholders... All of these things can have really material impacts on the quality of care and on the quality of jobs." GUESTS: Jonathan Sigworth: Member, CT Wheelchair Reform Coalition; Member, State Independent Living Council; Consumer Spokesperson, Connecticut Wheelchair Task Force; Co-Founder, CEO and President, More Than Walking Farrah Garland: Member, CT Wheelchair Reform Coalition; Member, State Independent Living Council Lynn Woroby: Research Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh Eileen O'Grady: Research and Campaign Director, Private Equity Stakeholder Project Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/22/202348 minutes
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Arts and culture check-in in Connecticut, plus a preview of 'America 250'

Virtually all Connecticut residents engage in the arts, culture and humanities, either formally or informally, a recent survey found. But attendance rates at many cultural organizations haven't quite returned to pre-pandemic levels. This hour, we get the latest from Connecticut Humanities executive director Jason Mancini, and hear about a recent push for a "roadmap" that would better fund and link the arts, culture and tourism in the state. We also check in with the Maritime Aquarium, and the Connecticut Museum of Culture and History, formerly the Connecticut Historical Society. Have you taken advantage of Connecticut's Summer at the Museum? Listeners this hour shouted out locations like the New England Air Museum, the Vintage Radio and Communications Museum, and more. Plus, we preview early plans to highlight the state's revolutionary history in 2026, the 250th anniversary of the country's founding. Former Secretary of State Denise Merrill spoke about the creation of the Connecticut Semiquincentennial Commission in advance of "America 250." We also revisit a recent conversation on Connecticut Public's Disrupted with Maisa Tisdale, CEO and President of the Mary and Eliza Freeman Center for History and Community. The homes in Bridgeport are some of the last remaining structures of Little Liberia, one of the earliest settlements of free people of color in pre-Civil War Connecticut. GUESTS: Dr. Jason Mancini: Executive Director, Connecticut Humanities Cyndi Tolosa: Development Director, Connecticut Humanities Denise Merrill: Former Connecticut Secretary of State Jason Patlis: President and CEO, Maritime Aquarium in Norwalk Robert Kret: CEO, Connecticut Museum of Culture and History Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/21/202347 minutes
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Seeding the next generation of farmers in Connecticut

Across Connecticut's thousands of farms, spanning nearly 400,000 acres, the average age of farmers is 58, just under the national average. Over 90% of senior Connecticut farmers don’t have a younger person tapped to take the reins, according to an American Farmland Trust study. This hour, we dig into local and federal efforts to support new and young farmers with New Connecticut Farmers Alliance President Liz Guerra. Plus, federal policy reporter Lisa Hagen has the latest on the 2023 farm bill. RELATED: Liz Guerra and her husband Héctor Gerardo were recently interviewed for a series about Connecticut's BIPOC farmers, and efforts to diversify the field in the state, which is 98% white. We also spoke with Connecticut Department of Agriculture Commissioner Bryan Hurlburt, who stressed the need for stability and funding "safety nets" for local farmers, particularly during "a year like this year where you had a moderate winter, two pretty dramatic frost events, a drought" and, most recently, flooding. Later, we'll learn more about 4-H, a nonprofit at the heart of harvest festivals where we live. Matthew Syrotiak, a 4-H alum, now works on a family farm. We hear from the "G.O.A.T. of goats," plus program leader Jen Cushman, about 4-H opportunities in Connecticut. GUESTS: Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter, Connecticut Public and the Connecticut Mirror Liz Guerra: President, New Connecticut Farmer Alliance; Owner-Operator, SEAmarron Farmstead in Danbury Mary Claire Whelan: Coordinator, New Connecticut Farmer Alliance Bryan Hurlburt: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Agriculture Matthew Syrotiak: 4-H Alumni; Dairy Farmer Jen Cushman: 4-H Program Leader, UConn Extension  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/18/202349 minutes, 1 second
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'Teaching with truth and complexity': Checking in on the state's Black and Latino Studies elective

Connecticut rolled out a Black and Latino history elective this past school year, the first of several recent curricular updates and mandates to go live statewide. This hour, we hear from social studies teachers Daisha Brabham and Julian Shafer about how they worked with the curriculum offered by the state. Plus, their students share their experiences. Students in Windsor recently led a push to offer the elective to ninth-graders. Brabham and Shafer also discuss an Educators Bill of Rights they helped draft, along with several educator organizations in the state. According to PEN America, there have been 78 different legislative proposals since 2021 that are aimed at K-12 curriculum, referred to by the free speech org as "gag order bills." Connecticut is often seen as a kind of safe haven from these kinds of political or ideological attacks in the classroom, but we’ve seen a rise in debates over curriculum and book ban requests in our state too. The Educators Bill of Rights calls for "learning spaces for students and working spaces for educators that are free from harassment and intimidation," and underscores the need "to teach in accurate and complex ways without censure or punishment." GUESTS: Daisha Brabham: Teacher, Windsor High School Julian Shafer: Teacher, Danbury High School Sarai Pichardo: Student, Danbury High School Damela Seal: Student, Windsor High School Christine Palm: Democratic State Representative Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/17/202348 minutes, 31 seconds
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Connecticut residents work to aid the war effort in Ukraine

Since the start of the war in Ukraine, more than 280,000 Ukrainians have resettled in the United States. According to Integrated Refugee Immigrant Services, there is roughly 1500 Ukrainian refugees settled in Connecticut. Elected officials here in Connecticut have shown their support for Ukraine. Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal has traveled several times since the start of the war to meet with President Zelensky. He has recently introduced a Senate resolution to address the threat Russia poses. And some Connecticut residents have even gone to Ukraine to do what they can to aid the war effort. Today, we talk to Larissa Babij. She is a Ukrainian American that grew up in Manchester, Connecticut. She lives in Kyiv, Ukraine working as a writer and translator. In her newsletter, “A Kind of Refugee” she writes about her life living in a war zone. We also hear from Anna Koblyarz, a resident of Berlin, Connecticut and is raising money for the City of Goodness project, a shelter for women and children in need in Ukraine. GUESTS: Anna Kobylarz: a resident of Berlin, Connecticut and president of the nonprofit Community Help. She is also the Director of the Humanitarian Mission of the Polish American Foundation of Connecticut. Larissa Babij: writer, translator and dancer living in Kyiv, Ukraine. Her newsletter is “A Kind of Refugee.” You can find the Victoria Amelina poem "The Town of Women" here. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/15/202348 minutes
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Forever young: The rise of the 'kidults'

Toys are occasionally marketed to "children of all ages." In recent years, market research has shown the number of toy-buyers over 12 years old is growing. The demographic, sometimes called "kidults," now comprises a quarter of the annual toy retail market, and an impressive 60% of the market’s growth in the last year, according to market research company NPD Group. Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, a professor of psychology at Temple University, discusses why familiar toys might appeal to us today, and the links between how we played as children and how we socialize now. Plus, one California-based slime-maker is raking in millions from children and adults alike. There's even one slime product called "Clay-Doh." What toy from your childhood still sparks joy? Connecticut Public staffers and listeners respond. GUESTS: Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek: Professor of Psychology, Temple University; Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution Olivya Soth: Co-Owner, OG Slimes Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired March 3, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/14/202348 minutes
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Cups, discs, wands and swords: Tarot and 'divination' in Connecticut

A Pew survey from 2018 estimated 13% of adults consult tarot card readers, astrologers or "fortune-tellers." But more recent market research shows sales for tarot card decks and psychic services are growing. This hour, we explore the art of divination and "card-pulling" in Connecticut. Hear from professional tarot reader Afton Jacobs-Williams, AKA Monty's Tarot Child. Plus, Chelsea Granger is a multidisciplinary artist who co-created Dirt Gems, a plant-themed oracle deck. But first, hear more about the origins of tarot or "tarrochi." We preview some of the research going on at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, home to some of the oldest existing tarot cards. GUESTS: Timothy Young: Curator, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library Afton Williams-Jacobs: Monty's Tarot Child; Tarot Reader, Tea & Tarot Chelsea Granger: Multidisciplinary Artist; Co-Creator, Dirt Gems Plant Oracle Card Deck & Guidebook Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired June 1, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/11/202348 minutes, 59 seconds
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Over 1,300 people from Afghanistan have resettled in CT since 2021. What resources are needed now?

Since the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan nearly two years ago, roughly 80,000 refugees have resettled in the country. According to the Connecticut Department of Social Services, "over 1,300 parolees, refugees, and Special Immigrant Visa Holders from Afghanistan have resettled in Connecticut since 2021." The New Haven-based non-profit, Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services, or IRIS, recently opened a satellite office in Hartford to help meet the needs of the roughly 250 clients they serve in the area, many of whom recently left Afghanistan. This hour, we hear from two people making the Hartford area a new home. Plus, IRIS' soon-to-depart executive director Chris George joins us in-studio. For many refugees and immigrants, food is a love language that carries memory and tradition, while connecting people and building community. Chefs with Afghan roots at Sanctuary Kitchen, a New Haven-based non-profit, describe the power of food. GUESTS: Asadullah Jalal: West Hartford Resident Hamid Hemat: Fellow Curator, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art Chris George: Executive Director, Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services (IRIS) Susan Schnitzer, President and CEO of Connecticut Institute for Refugees and Immigrants (CIRI) Caroline Sennett: Director, CIRI's Immigration Legal Services Program Naseema Gilson: Program Director, Sanctuary Kitchen Homa Assadi: Chef, Sanctuary Kitchen Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/10/202349 minutes
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Exploring gardening and farming in the AAPI community

For some, gardening can act as a love letter to our family history. The act of cultivating the same plants and herbs that your grandmother, or great grandmother might have grown, can keep us connected to our roots. It can also serve as a reminder of what people needed to do in order to survive - through history and the present. The act of gardening goes beyond working with the soil in our own backyards. Today, we hear from Phou Vongkhamdy. He is the Rhode Island State Conservationist and he is also a refugee from Laos. He was raised on a family farm growing rice, tobacco, silkworms, sugar cane, and vegetables. And later, we listen back to a Connecticut Museum of Culture and History conversation with gardeners in the AAPI community; a conversation called “Heritage Roots.” Each panelist spoke about what it means to be able to grow plants and seeds from their culture, and learn how they're using their gardens to stay connected to their heritage. GUESTS: Phou Vongkhamdy: Rhode Island State Conservationist Vicheth Im: organic farmer and homesteader in Preston, Mao Yang: member of Hmong Foundation of Connecticut May Choua Yang: member of Hmong Foundation of Connecticut Christine Kim: co-founder of aapiNHV Hien Nguyen: member of APAC Asian Pacific American Coalition of Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired July 7, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/8/202348 minutes, 30 seconds
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Exploring Connecticut Wine Country

Wine country is often associated with California valleys, like Napa or Sonoma. There’s also a lesser-known wine country in Connecticut, made up of some 45 licensed farm wineries. This hour, we explore the flavors of New England with food journalist Leeanne Griffin, and wine expert and writer Anne Feiring. Plus, we hear from local vineyards, and discuss the role of "agritourism" in Connecticut. We preview the state's Passport to Wine Country program, spotlighting the 30-plus wineries in the state using at least one-quarter Connecticut-grown fruits in their product. GUESTS: Anne Feiring: Journalist and Writer; Author, The Feiring Line Leeanne Griffin: Food and Consumer Reporter, Hearst Connecticut Ryan Winiarski: Owner, Priam Vineyards Patty Rowan: Winery Manager, Hopkins Vineyard Bryan Hurlburt: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Agriculture Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/7/202349 minutes
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Exploring sea jellies on Connecticut's coastline and beyond

Jellyfish or simply “jellies” have been around for more than 500 million years. That means, jellies were here before dinosaurs! This resilient species has a simple, but astounding makeup. Jellies don’t have a brain or a heart. They have a single cavity for eating and expelling waste. This hour, we learn about the jellies off Long Island Sound and how climate change affects their population. Have you seen any jellies on the coast of Connecticut? Their population is growing, creating consequences for our ecosystem here at home. With only a handful of species that prey on them, jelly blooms can be a real problem—impacting species around Long Island Sound, including the seafood industry. We’ll also talk about what to do if you come across one of these ethereal creatures and are stung. A spoiler alert for our listeners: don't do what you saw on Friends! What questions do you have about the jellies off our coastline? GUESTS: David Cochran: Director of Fish and Invertebrates, Mystic Aquarium Rachel Stein: Associate Director of Animal Husbandry, Maritime Aquarium  Sarah Battistini: Water Safety Coordinator at the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection Dive into all of the nautical themed stories airing this week on Connecticut Public's original talk shows by visiting ctpublic.org/nautiweek.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/4/202349 minutes
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Endangered sturgeon stage return to the Connecticut River

Sturgeon have existed for millions of years. These prehistoric fish, often described as "hardy" and "charismatic," are largely endangered. Atlantic sturgeon were thought to have disappeared from the Connecticut River. In 2014, local researchers with the state discovered a hatchling Atlantic sturgeon up-river, marking the first time they'd seen this species alongside its river-faring cousin, short-nosed sturgeon. This hour, Jacque Benway and Tom Savoy join us to discuss their sturgeon-focused research. Plus, the Maritime Aquarium recently opened a "touch tank" where the public can interact with Atlantic and lake sturgeon. GUESTS: Jacque Benway: Biologist, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s Fisheries Division Tom Savoy: Sturgeon Monitoring Program, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Tom Naiman: Vice President of Education, Maritime Aquarium Dive into all of the nautical-themed stories airing this week on Connecticut Public's original talk shows by visiting ctpublic.org/nautiweek.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/3/202349 minutes
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Diamondback Terrapins are the gem of all turtles

Diamondback terrapins, a species of small turtle along the coastline and marsh of Long Island Sound were once near extinction, but they’ve made a great comeback in our state. This special species was once hunted to make turtle soup, to the point that there were no terrapins left in Sound. Now that hunting the terrapins has become illegal, they have started to return. This tenacious little guy is the only turtle that lives in brackish waters - a mix of fresh and saltwater. And we are right in the middle of their migratory season. This is the time when they are especially vulnerable to being run over when they cross the road. Preserving their population is no easy task. Nature centers around our state are looking for volunteers and citizen scientists to help track the local terrapin population in our state. Have you seen a terrapin where you live? GUESTS: Jenny Hall: senior aquarist at the Maritime Aquarium in Norwalk Tim Abbott: Manager of High School and Adult Science Education at Soundwaters in Stamford, Connecticut Mike Ravesi: Wildlife Biologist and Herpetologist at the Connecticut Department of Environmental and Energy Protection Dive into all of the nautical themed stories airing this week on Connecticut Public's original talk shows by visiting ctpublic.org/nautiweek.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
8/1/202349 minutes
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Connecticut coral could play a key role in climate resilience

Just off the coast, in Long Island Sound and Narragansett Bay, northern star coral flourishes. Scientists where we live hope this could be good news for its tropical relatives, increasingly threatened by warming waters. Clusters of this native coral, also known as Astrangia poculata, are being studied for their ability to survive winter through dormancy and thrive through what might be considered bleaching in more tropical regions. Researchers along the coast of New England formed the Temperate Coral Research Group to focus on this species and the insights it may offer on climate resilience. This hour, we hear from them. Plus, Long Island Soundkeeper Bill Lucey helps us kick off NautiWeek at Connecticut Public, offering the latest on warming in the Sound, his priorities and concerns. GUESTS: Bill Lucey: Long Island Soundkeeper, Save the Sound Sean Grace: Marine Ecologist; Professor of Biology, Southern Connecticut State University; Co-Director, Werth Center for Coastal and Marine Studies Koty Sharp: Associate Professor of Biology, Marine Biology & Environmental Science at Roger Williams University Amy Apprill: Associate Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Dive into all of the nautical-themed stories airing this week on Connecticut Public's original talk shows by visiting ctpublic.org/nautiweek.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/31/202349 minutes
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Feeling safe or creating trauma? How lockdown drills are impacting our schools

In 1999 the Columbine shooting shook the country and made everyone aware of the threat of gun violence in schools. As a result, schools made the effort to implement lockdown procedures as a way to keep students and staff safe. But with the rates of shootings only continuing to rise, these threats of mass shootings are feeling too real and the lockdowns that were meant to keep students safe, are instead inflicting trauma. So what is going on in these lockdowns that are causing negative impacts and a decline in mental health? Today we look at what is happening inside the school walls during these lockdowns and what it is doing to our students. A common solution that many schools have turned to is School Resource Officers or SROs. What do you think should be done to protect our schools while minimizing trauma? Mo Canady: Executive Director of National Association of School Resource Officers Kate Dias: President of Connecticut Education Association and High School Math teacher in Manchester School District David J Schonfeld: Director, National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/28/202349 minutes
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'Not all in your head': Examining endometriosis

Endometriosis is one of the most common diseases affecting those with uteruses. Despite its prevalence, proper diagnosis can take up to ten years, leaving many suffering without support or treatment. State Representative Jillian Gilchrest recently launched a legislative working group to advocate for better research and education policies across Connecticut. Arleigh Cole is a local public educator, and a member of the endometriosis working group. Plus, we hear from Shannon Cohn, a filmmaker and public advocate for endometriosis awareness. She discusses her new documentary Below the Belt, and her efforts to educate medical and school professionals about the condition through her organization Endo What? GUESTS: Jillian Gilchrest: Connecticut State Representative; Co-Chair, Connecticut Reproductive Rights Caucus; Chair, Endometriosis Working Group Arleigh Cole: Endometriosis Public Educator, via her Instagram @Missendostood Halley Terrell: Licensed Clinical Social Worker; Life Coach Shannon Cohn: Director, Below the Belt and Endo What? Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/27/202349 minutes
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Revisiting author chats with Chasten Buttigieg and Willie Mae Brown

Author and teacher Chasten Buttigieg joins us to discuss his book. He is the husband of 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg in 2018. His book, I Have to Tell You Something, was originally published in 2020 and has since been rewritten and republished as I Have to Tell You Something - For Young Adults. He joins us for a conversation over Zoom to talk about his book and his message to LGBTQ youth. Plus, Tess Terrible guest-hosts a conversation with Willie Mae Brown, the author of a new book My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood at the Height of the Civil Rights Movement. The book, written for young adults, reflects on her time growing up in Alabama and how the civil rights era shaped her coming of age. She shares her message for the next generation of activists. GUEST: Chasten Buttigieg: Author of I Have to Tell You Something, teacher, and advocate Willie Mae Brown: author and visual artist. She recently published her first book, My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood at the Height of the Civil Rights Movement. Cat Pastor contributed to this conversation which originally aired February 2 and June 16.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/25/202349 minutes
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Connecticut author helps to translate the harrowing accounts of a Ukrainian refugee

Connecticut author and lawyer Anne Howard is known for her work writing true crime, but her recent book is a departure from her prior work. Today, we talk about her new book that she worked to translate, entitled Escape from Mariupol: A Survivor's True Story. Anne first met Adoriana Marik through mutual friends. They exchanged letters, and Adoriana sent her hand-drawn cards and other artwork over the years. When the war in Ukraine broke out, Anne was desperate to contact Adoriana to hear that she was safe. What followed was a months-long exchange and a collaborative effort to write a book about her experience. Adoriana suffers from many symptoms of PTSD. Due to this and a language barrier, Adoriana will not be joining us this hour, but here to tell us about her story, is Anne Howard. Plus, Joan Donovan is the Research Director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy and author of the book Meme Wars: The Untold Story of the Online Battles Upending Democracy in America. Donovan discusses talk the evolution of memes as political devices, and how they shaped the far right. GUEST: Anne Howard: co-author and translator of Escape from Mariupol: A Survivor's True Story Askold Melnyczuk: English professor at University of Massachusetts, Boston and author Joan Donovan: Research Director for the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University and author of the book Meme Wars: The Untold Story of the Online Battles Upending Democracy in America Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired on February 13 and March 23.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/24/202349 minutes
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NPR's Aisha Harris on 'Reckonings with the Pop Culture That Shapes Me'

Aisha Harris, co-host for NPR’s Pop Culture Hour, is out with a new book titled Wannabe: Reckonings With The Pop Culture That Shapes Me. Harris explores how early influences and cultural tropes shape her role today as critic, including her upbringing in Connecticut. Today, she joins us for the hour. Plus, we learn ways to slow down the fast fashion cycle. Lucianne Tonti, a fashion consultant and author of the new book Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion joins us. GUESTS: Aisha Harris: Co-Host, NPR's Pop Culture Hour; Author, Wannabe: Reckonings with the Pop Culture That Shapes Me Lucianne Tonti: Fashion Consultant; Author, Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired on June 15, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/21/202346 minutes, 58 seconds
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R.F. Kuang's satirical thriller 'Yellowface' tackles ethics in authorship

R.F. Kuang's works of historical fantasy, including The Poppy War series, have been racking up awards since she began publishing in 2018. Her novel Babel recently won the prestigious Nebula Award for science fiction and fantasy writers. The same day, her latest book Yellowface debuted. It is Kuang's fifth novel, and a shift from fantasy to literary fiction. The satirical thriller takes on the commercial publishing world, and through it, "questions of diversity, racism, and cultural appropriation." Not to mention, "the terrifying alienation of social media." This hour, R.F. Kuang joins us. Minor spoilers lie ahead... GUESTS: R.F. Kuang: Author, Yellowface; Babel; The Poppy War Trilogy Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired May 18, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/20/202347 minutes
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'Our Red Book': Everyone has a period story

After collecting oral histories from generations of women in her family in "My Little Red Book," Rachel Kauder Nalebuff created Our Red Book, an extended project reflecting the experience of people of all races, ages and genders around the world. But there’s so much stigma and misinformation around periods. This hour, three Connecticut-based contributors featured in her book join us, breaking down this bloody topic. GUESTS: Rachel Kauder Nalebuff: Editor, Our Red Book Michelle Memran: Documentary Filmmaker Kica Matos: New Haven-based Immigration Rights Activist and Organizer Axel Gay: Teen Writer Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired March 10, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/18/202348 minutes
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Wheelchair repairs can take months: What local advocates are doing to change that

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have estimated that more than half of wheelchairs break down in a typical six-month period. Many Connecticut residents say those repairs can take months. This hour, we hear from local advocates about a recently-formed legislative task force, and their goals for next session. In particular, they hope to study and set limits on repair turnaround times. UPitt researcher Dr. Lynn Woroby also shares her findings on the frequency of wheelchair breakdowns. Plus, how does private equity impact health care? Private Equity Stakeholder Project is a nonprofit watchdog organization investigating this question. Eileen O'Grady joins us. GUESTS: Jonathan Sigworth: Member, CT Wheelchair Reform Coalition; Member, State Independent Living Council; Consumer Spokesperson, Wheelchair Task Force; Co-Founder, Co-CEO and President, More Than Walking Farrah Garland: Member, CT Wheelchair Reform Coalition; Member, State Independent Living Council Eileen O'Grady: Research and Campaign Manager, Private Equity Stakeholder Project Lynn Woroby: Research Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an epiSupport the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/17/202349 minutes
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A midsummer reading show

Are you finally reading that bestseller that’s been collecting dust on your nightstand? Are you revisiting a dog-eared old favorite? If you're reading poolside, beachside or from your favorite park bench, we want to hear from you because today is Where We Live's Summer Reading Show! If you don't know what to read this summer, we've got you covered. Whether you’re looking for a new fiction to thrill you, or a memoir to inspire you, we have reading recommendations to make the most of these long summer days. And the benefits of summer reading for children are numerous. Studies show that not only does reading help with preventing summer learning loss, but help with social-emotional reading. We'll hear from two children's librarians in our state. Buckle in as we dive into the best books of the summer. Tell us what you're reading! GUESTS: Mary Parmelee: Director of Youth Services at The Westport Library Kym Powe: Children and YA Consultant for the Connecticut State Library Mandy Dorso: Bookstore Manager, Atticus Books in New Haven Khamani Harrison: Owner of Key Bookstore in Hartford Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/14/202349 minutes
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Seeding the next generation of farmers in Connecticut

Across Connecticut's thousands of farms, spanning nearly 400,000 acres, the average age of farmers just under the national average at 58. Over 90% of senior Connecticut farmers don’t have a younger person tapped to take the reins, according to an American Farmland Trust study. This hour, we dig into local and federal efforts to support new and young farmers with New Connecticut Farmers Alliance President Liz Guerra. Plus, federal policy reporter Lisa Hagen has the latest on the 2023 farm bill. We also spoke with Commissioner Bryan Hurlburt, who stressed the need for stability and funding "safety nets" for farmers in the state, particularly during "a year like this year where you had a moderate winter, two pretty dramatic frost events, a drought" and, most recently, a flood. RELATED: Liz Guerra and her husband Héctor Gerardo were recently interviewed for a series about Connecticut's BIPOC farmers and efforts to diversify the state's population of farmers, which is 98% white. Later, we'll learn more about 4-H, a nonprofit at the heart of harvest festivals where we live. Matthew Syrotiak, a 4-H alum, now works on a family farm. We hear from the "G.O.A.T. of goats." GUESTS: Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter, Connecticut Public and the Connecticut Mirror Liz Guerra: President, New Connecticut Farmer Alliance; Owner-Operator, SEAmarron Farmstead in Danbury Mary Claire Whelan: Coordinator, New Connecticut Farmer Alliance Bryan Hurlburt: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Agriculture Matthew Syrotiak: 4-H Alumni; Dairy Farmer Jen Cushman: 4-H Program Leader, UConn Extension Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/13/202349 minutes
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Understanding how climate change is impacting our health and wellbeing (and what you can do about it)

Extreme heat can leave us feeling exhausted after doing the most basic activities of daily living like getting groceries or commuting to work. Low air quality can leave many with sore throats and runny eyes. And researchers say the health side effects can be much more dire, worsening respiratory and cardiac health. Today, we explore the real health impacts of climate change and how you should prepare. New research is showing that climate change isn’t just impacting our physical health, but our mental health as well. Many young people struggle with eco-anxiety or climate anxiety; this is “broadly defined as negative cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses associated with concerns about climate change.” Each community in Connecticut is being impacted by climate change in unique ways. How is climate change impacting you, where you live? GUESTS: Anne Hulick: Connecticut Director, Clean Water Action State Senator Saud Anwar: 3rd State Senate District representing East Hartford, East Windsor, Ellington and South Windsor Dr. Joshua Wortzel: chair of the American Psychiatric Association’s committee on climate change and mental health Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/11/202349 minutes
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Arts and culture check-in in Connecticut, plus a preview of 'America 250'

Virtually all Connecticut residents engage in the arts, culture and humanities, either formally or informally, a recent survey found. But attendance rates at many cultural organizations haven't quite returned to pre-pandemic levels. This hour, we get the latest from Connecticut Humanities executive director Jason Mancini, and hear about a recent push for a "roadmap" that would better fund and link the arts, culture and tourism in the state. We also check in with the Maritime Aquarium, and the Connecticut Museum of Culture and History, formerly the Connecticut Historical Society. Have you taken advantage of Connecticut's Summer at the Museum? Listeners this hour shouted out locations like the New England Air Museum, the Vintage Radio and Communications Museum, and more. Plus, we preview early plans to highlight the state's revolutionary history in 2026, the 250th anniversary of the country's founding. Former Secretary of State Denise Merrill spoke about the creation of the Connecticut Semiquincentennial Commission in advance of "America 250." We also revisit a recent conversation on Connecticut Public Radio's Disrupted with Maisa Tisdale, CEO and President of the Mary and Eliza Freeman Center for History and Community. The homes in Bridgeport are some of the last remaining structures of Little Liberia, one of the earliest settlements of free people of color in pre-Civil War Connecticut. GUESTS: Dr. Jason Mancini: Executive Director, Connecticut Humanities Cyndi Tolosa: Development Director, Connecticut Humanities Denise Merrill: Former Connecticut Secretary of State Jason Patlis: President and CEO, Maritime Aquarium in Norwalk Robert Kret: CEO, Connecticut Museum of Culture and History Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/10/202349 minutes
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Exploring gardening and farming in the AAPI community

For some, gardening can act as a love letter to our family history. The act of cultivating the same plants and herbs that your grandmother, or great grandmother might have grown, can keep us connected to our roots. It can also serve as a reminder of what people needed to do in order to survive - through history and the present. The act of gardening goes beyond working with the soil in our own backyards. Today, we hear from Phou Vongkhamdy. He is the Rhode Island State Conservationist and he is also a refugee from Laos. He was raised on a family farm growing rice, tobacco, silkworms, sugar cane, and vegetables. And later, we listen back to a Connecticut Museum of Culture and History conversation with gardeners in the AAPI community; a conversation called “Heritage Roots.” Each panelist spoke about what it means to be able to grow plants and seeds from their culture, and learn how they're using their gardens to stay connected to their heritage. GUESTS: Phou Vongkhamdy: Rhode Island State Conservationist Vicheth Im: organic farmer and homesteader in Preston, Mao Yang: member of Hmong Foundation of Connecticut May Choua Yang: member of Hmong Foundation of Connecticut Christine Kim: co-founder of aapiNHV Hien Nguyen: member of APAC Asian Pacific American Coalition of Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/7/202348 minutes, 30 seconds
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How SCOTUS affirmative action ruling impacts Connecticut admissions

It has been one week since the Supreme Court struck down affirmative action and “race-conscious” college admissions programs. The decision has roiled Connecticut colleges and universities. Hearst Connecticut reported that every school that replied to their request for comment “expressed frustration with the decisions.” This hour, we hear from current and prospective students where we live, as well as local admissions officers and administrators. Eastern Connecticut State University President Elsa Núñez, who announced her retirement in May, has long championed broadened college access for underrepresented groups. GUESTS: Irene Pham: Student, UCONN Deven Pierre: Student, UCONN Tatiana Watson: Student, CREC Academy of International Studies Samariya Smith: Community Advocate AKA "Community Mama," Greater Hartford Area Elissa Nadworny: Correspondent, NPR Elsa Núñez: President, Eastern Connecticut State University  Vern Granger: Director of Admissions, UCONN Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/6/202349 minutes
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Identifying public health needs after COVID-19 emergency status lifted

The World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently lifted the COVID-19 "emergency," but the pandemic isn't over. The Connecticut Department of Public Health issued guidance in light of the end of the federal Public Health Emergency on May 11, clarifying that "Ending the COVID-19 emergency declarations does not mean the virus has been eradicated." This hour, epidemiologist Dr. Saad Omer joins us to discuss.Plus, we revisit our conversation with scientist and Connecticut native Dr. Peter Hotez. His new book, the third he has written about the COVID-19 pandemic, is due out September 19. The Deadly Rise of Anti-science: A Scientist’s Warning is described as "an eyewitness story of how the anti-vaccine movement grew into a dangerous and prominent anti-science element in American politics." You can listen to the full conversation here. GUESTS: Dr. Saad Omer: Epidemiologist; Inaugural Dean, Peter O’Donnell Jr. School of Public Health at UT Southwestern Medical Center Dr. Peter J. Hotez: Dean, National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine; Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine; Author, The Deadly Rise of Anti-science: A Scientist’s Warning Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
7/3/202349 minutes
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Our state troubadour emphasizes the power of the arts, plus Connecticut's theatres are making a comeback

Connecticut is one of only a few states that has a State Troubadour - an ambassador of music and song. And the state troubadour is also tasked with promoting cultural literacy, creative arts and wellness in the community. Today, we talk to Kala Farnham, Connecticut’s Troubadour and hear about her creative process and the power of healing through music. Later, we touch base with theaters around our state. Most theaters have returned to a full season of in person performances. And many performing arts spaces are taking the time to think critically about equity, diversity and accessibility on and off the stage. We hear from the Ivoryton Playhouse, as well as Wheel Life Theatre Troupe. We want to hear from you. What shows are you seeing this summer? GUESTS: Kala Farnham: Connecticut State Troubadour Laura Sheehan: Actor with Capital Classics Theatre Company Kiera Sheehan: Actor with Capital Classics Theatre Company Keely Baisden Knudsen: Artistic Director, and Co-Founder of Legacy Theatre, and Wheel Life Theatre Troupe Jacqui Hubbard: Artistic Director, Ivoryton Playhouse Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/30/202349 minutes
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Efforts to protect transgender care in Connecticut

Earlier this month, the Human Rights Campaign declared a national state of emergency for LGBTQ people, following "the worst year on record" for the number of anti-LGBTQ legislative proposals and wins. The ACLU mapped and tracked 491 bills this session, including two in Connecticut. Many of those proposals are aimed at gender-affirming health care. There are several protections for trans and nonbinary people in Connecticut, and in some cases, beyond the border. Connecticut's Safe Harbor Law, passed in response to the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade in 2022, includes legal protections for people seeking gender-affirming health care from out-of-state. But advocates say the state is not immune from ideological or political attack. Diana Lombardi, the former executive director of the Connecticut TransAdvocacy Coalition, and a current member of Governor Lamont’s Hate Crimes Advisory Council, notes the favorable political climate and support from "the governor on down." But "my concern here in the state of Connecticut is that pressure would be mounting to do away with our health care," she says. This hour, we hear from the ACLU's Gillian Branstetter, and independent journalist Erin Reed, who has been maintaining a monthly "legislative risk" map of the U.S. Plus, Katy Tierney, the medical director at Middlesex Health Center for Gender Medicine and Wellness, and local reporter Dawn Ennis. GUESTS: William Tong: Connecticut Attorney General Gillian Branstetter: Communications Strategist for the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project and LGBTQ & HIV Project Erin Reed: Independent Journalist; Author, Erin in the Morning on Substack Diana Lombardi: Executive Director of Connecticut TransAdvocacy Coalition and member of Lamont’s Hate Crimes Advisory Council Katy Tierney: Medical Director, Middlesex Health Center for Gender Medicine and Wellness Dawn Ennis: Reporter and Opinion Columnist Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/29/202348 minutes, 25 seconds
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R.F. Kuang's satirical thriller 'Yellowface' tackles ethics in authorship

R.F. Kuang's works of historical fantasy, including The Poppy War series, have been racking up awards since she began publishing in 2018. Her novel Babel won the prestigious Nebula Award for science fiction and fantasy writers this week.The same day, her latest book Yellowface debuted. It is Kuang's fifth novel, and a shift from fantasy to literary fiction. The satirical thriller takes on the commercial publishing world, and through it, "questions of diversity, racism, and cultural appropriation." Not to mention, "the terrifying alienation of social media." This hour, R.F. Kuang joins us. Minor spoilers lie ahead... GUESTS: R.F. Kuang: Author, Yellowface; Babel; The Poppy War Trilogy Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired May 18, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/27/202348 minutes
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'Blackology': How can efforts around inclusivity in STEM fields go farther?

Of the millions of people working in STEM fields in the U.S., only 9% are Black, according to the Pew Research Center. Those numbers are "unchanged" since 2016. How can efforts around “inclusivity” in these fields go farther? Environmental scientist Dr. Nyeema Harris has written about the importance of Blackology. “Blackologists are not simply scholars that are Black but, rather, are scholars who deliberately leverage and intersect Blackness into advancing knowledge production," she writes. Dr. Harris joins us to discuss how this approach is applied to environmental science and so many other disciplines. Plus, public health professor Dr. Ijeoma Opara discusses her work to reduce racial health disparities, and to "strengthen the pipeline of Black youth to the field of public health research." GUESTS: Dr. Ijeoma Opara: Assistant Professor, Yale School of Public Health; Assistant Clinical Professor, Yale School of Nursing Dr. Nyeema Harris: Knobloch Family Associate Professor of Wildlife and Land Conservation, Yale School of the Environment Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/26/202347 minutes, 30 seconds
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'RuPaul’s Drag Race' spotlights Connecticut’s 'thriving' drag scene

While contestants with Connecticut ties have appeared on the reality competition series RuPaul's Drag Race in the past, the Season 15 premiere on MTV marks the first time more than one Connecticut drag queen has been represented. Robin Fierce from Hartford, Loosey LaDuca from Ansonia, Amethyst from West Hartford and Jax from the Bronx, raised in Connecticut, comprised this season's Connecticut contingent. This hour, Loosey and Robin join us to discuss how they discovered drag, developed their artistry, and why they’re determined to confront misunderstanding by showcasing drag as a force for good. GUESTS: Loosey LaDuca: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race Robin Fierce: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired January 27, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/23/202348 minutes, 59 seconds
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'Teaching with truth and complexity': Checking in on the state's Black and Latino Studies elective

Connecticut rolled out a Black and Latino history elective this past school year, the first of several recent curricular updates and mandates to go live statewide. This hour, we hear from social studies teachers Daisha Brabham and Julian Shafer about how they worked with the curriculum offered by the state. Plus, their students share their experiences. Students in Windsor recently led a push to offer the elective to ninth-graders. Brabham and Shafer also discuss an Educators Bill of Rights they helped draft, along with several educator organizations in the state. According to PEN America, there have been 78 different legislative proposals since 2021 that are aimed at K-12 curriculum, referred to by the free speech org as "gag order bills." Connecticut is often seen as a kind of safe haven from these kinds of political or ideological attacks in the classroom, but we’ve seen a rise in debates over curriculum and book ban requests in our state too. The Educators Bill of Rights calls for "learning spaces for students and working spaces for educators that are free from harassment and intimidation," and underscores the need "to teach in accurate and complex ways without censure or punishment." GUESTS: Daisha Brabham: Teacher, Windsor High School Julian Shafer: Teacher, Danbury High School Sarai Pichardo: Student, Danbury High School Damela Seal: Student, Windsor High School Christine Palm: Democratic State Representative Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/22/202349 minutes
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A conversation with Five for Fighting frontman John Ondrasik

John Ondrasik, better known as Five for Fighting, has been performing since childhood. And after several hit singles, he hasn’t slowed down. He’s currently touring with the Barenaked Ladies and Del Amitri. They’ll be performing at the Mohegan Sun in July.  In 2001, Ondrasik became a sensation after his single “Superman” was released and became a token tribute song to those lost in the September 11th attacks. Since then, he’s been known for his emotional chart-topping anthems that defined the early 2000s. He has gone on to do extensive philanthropic work to support the troops. Last year, he recorded a music video in Ukraine. He knows that his music carries a lot of nostalgia for certain generations. Today, we’re talking to John about his musical journey and his advocacy efforts throughout the years. GUEST: John Ondrasik: Singer-songwriter and pianist known as the platinum-selling, Grammy-nominated artist, Five For Fighting. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omny.fm/listener for privacy information.
6/20/202340 minutes, 30 seconds
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Unpacking the debate around LGBTQ studies in secondary and elementary schools

Parents in Granby, Connecticut, are deeply divided over a 45-second video shown to students. The short video featured kids talking about Pride Month. Today, we unpack this conversation and what LGBTQ studies at the secondary and elementary school level might look like. Irene Parisi, Chief Academic Officer at the Connecticut State Department of Education, joins us to talk about this debate. And we hear from the 15 year old organizer of the first ever Granby Pride event. And later, author and teacher Chasten Buttigieg joins us to discuss his book. He is the husband of 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg in 2018. His book, I Have to Tell You Something, was originally published in 2020 and has since been rewritten and republished as I Have to Tell You Something - For Young Adults. He joins us for a conversation over Zoom to talk about his book and his message to LGBTQ youth. GUESTS: James Crocker: 15 year old organizer of Granby Pride and sophomore Granby Memorial High School Irene Parisi: Chief Academic Officer at Connecticut State Department of Education Paul Freeman: Superintendent of Guilford Public Schools Chasten Buttigieg: Author of I Have to Tell You Something, teacher, and advocate Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/16/202340 minutes, 50 seconds
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NPR's Aisha Harris on 'Reckonings with the Pop Culture That Shapes Me'

Aisha Harris is a cultural critic and co-host for NPR’s Pop Culture Hour, and she’s out with a new book, titled Wannabe: Reckonings With The Pop Culture That Shapes Me. Today, she joins us for the hour, discussing the ways early influences shape her role today as critic, including her upbringing in Connecticut. What popular song, movie or TV show marks a moment in your life, or stuck with you? GUESTS: Aisha Harris: Co-Host, NPR's Pop Culture Hour; Author, Wannabe: Reckonings with the Pop Culture That Shapes Me Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/15/202340 minutes, 44 seconds
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Exploring Connecticut's Historic and Public Gardens

Earlier this spring, horticulturist Charlie Nardozzi joined us on Where We Live to answer all your gardening questions and we got this comment from listener on Facebook saying “loving this episode! You should do it weekly or monthly!” We hear you listeners, so we are back with another hour on Connecticut gardening. But today, we’re exploring some of the state’s most remarkable public and historic gardens. Caryn B Davis is an architectural and landscape design photographer, and she is also the author of a new book entitled Connecticut Gardens: A Celebration of the State’s Historic, Public and Private Gardens. Today, she joins us to talk about the gardens around the state you’ll want to explore. Connecticut Historic Gardens Day is coming up on June 25th. Many of Connecticut historic houses will be opening their gardens up to the public. We'll hear about what it takes to maintain the grounds of these places. And later, we hear what it takes to become a master gardener. It’s a gardening hour like no other! GUESTS: Caryn B Davis: architectural, and landscape design photographer and author of Connecticut Gardens: A Celebration of the State’s Historic, Public and Private Gardens Chris Lawrie: Landscape designer, consultant and writer of Connecticut Gardens: A Celebration of the State’s Historic, Public and Private Gardens Jodi Debruine: Beatrice Fox Auerbach Director of Collections, Mark Twain House Jill Hogan: Connecticut Gardens Day Sandi Wilson: Fairfield County Master Gardener Coordinator for the University of Connecticut Extension Master Gardener Program Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/13/202349 minutes
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Birds of prey fall prey to rodenticide

Anticoagulant rodenticide, a quick fix for controlling the rat and mice population, is now having an effect on birds of prey. Today, we talk to A Place Called Hope, a local raptor rehabilitator here in Connecticut, about how it’s impacting birds across our state. After ingesting this poison, there is little that can be done to save the life of these birds. We’ll hear about legislation to limit the use of these poisons and alternatives to rodenticide. The traditional snap traps aren’t the only way to keep out the mice! Later, we hear about efforts to eliminate construction waste, an innovative way to mitigate climate change. GUESTS: Christine Cummings: Executive Director of A Place Called Hope Tom Andersen: Director of Communications, the Connecticut Audubon Society Eve Zuckoff: Climate and Environment Reporter CAI Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/12/202349 minutes
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Forever young: The rise of the 'kidults'

Toys are occasionally marketed to "children of all ages." In recent years, market research has shown the number of toy-buyers over 12 years old is growing. The demographic, sometimes called "kidults," now comprises a quarter of the annual toy retail market, and an impressive 60% of the market’s growth in the last year, according to market research company NPD Group. Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, a professor of psychology at Temple University, discusses why familiar toys might appeal to us today, and the links between how we played as children and how we socialize now. Plus, one California-based slime-maker is raking in millions from children and adults alike. There's even one slime product called "Clay-Doh."What toy from your childhood still sparks joy? Connecticut Public staffers and listeners respond. GUESTS: Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek: Professor of Psychology, Temple University; Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution Olivya Soth: Co-Owner, OG Slimes Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired March 3, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/9/202348 minutes
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Debt, mortgages and taxes: Why teaching all children financial wellness is critical to equity

Connecticut residents have the highest average credit card in the nation. Although personal finance courses are offered in high schools, they aren’t mandated to graduate. And often, these courses don’t address the complex financial challenges of their students. Today, on Where We Live, we talk about giving more students access to financial literacy, and making that curriculum more inclusive. We want to hear from you. Did you learn about credit cards, budgeting or taxes in school? How were you taught to manage your money? GUESTS: Dana Miranda: Founder and Financial Educator of Healthy Rich Dr. Monette Ferguson: Executive Director of the Alliance for Community Empowerment in Bridgeport Nan J. Morrison: President and Chief Executive Officer of the Council for Economic Education Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired May 9, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/8/202348 minutes, 30 seconds
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Libraries rock! Westport Library launches a record label, and a new vinyl album

Danielle Capalbo is the lead singer of Connecticut local band DaniProbably. She recently recorded her song "Cowboy" with Grammy-winning producer Peter Katis. But she didn't lay down tracks at at a recording studio. She recorded at a library. The Westport Library in Connecticut is the first library to record, produce and release a vinyl record. Today, we talk to members of this library and how they are rethinking the changing and emerging role of libraries. We’ll hear how the library has created spaces to nurture and resource local artists. We'll also hear from some of the bands featured on the album join us to talk about this process. We want to hear from you. What do you use your local library for? GUESTS: Travis Bell: Audio Studios Manager at the Verso Studios at the Westport Library Danielle Capalbo: band member of DaniProbably Dylan Hundley: cofounder and lead singer of Lulu Lewis  Dooley O: artist and DJ based out of New Haven Bill Harmer: Executive Director at the Westport Library Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/6/202349 minutes
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'Our Red Book': Everyone has a period story

After collecting oral histories from generations of women in her family in "My Little Red Book," Rachel Kauder Nalebuff created Our Red Book, an extended project reflecting the experience of people of all races, ages and genders around the world. But there’s so much stigma and misinformation around periods. This hour, three Connecticut-based contributors featured in her book join us, breaking down this bloody topic. GUESTS: Rachel Kauder Nalebuff: Editor, Our Red Book Michelle Memran: Documentary Filmmaker Kica Matos: New Haven-based Immigration Rights Activist and Organizer Axel Gay: Teen Writer Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired March 10, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/5/202348 minutes
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Highlights from the region with conductor Eric Jacobsen, the Schaghicoke Tribal Nation and the rise of green burials

We talk to a lot of interesting people on the show. Today, we’re revisiting three memorable conversations we’ve had this year. Eric Jacobsen just completed his final season as the conductor at the Greater Bridgeport Symphony. We spoke with Eric about his work as a conductor and also heard about the search for the next orchestra leader. The State Department of Education and Connecticut’s five sovereign tribal nations are working together to develop Native American curriculum for K-12 social studies classes which will be rolled out next year. We’ll hear from a member of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation about how local tribes worked with the state on this curriculum. For Earth Day 2023, the New England News Collaborative highlighted innovative solutions to mitigating climate change, including a renewed interest in green burials. We talk to a Vermont Public Radio reporter about how they’re having a resurgence in New England. GUESTS: Eric Jacobsen: Former conductor at the Greater Bridgeport Symphony orchestra. He is also a cellist and a member of Yo-Yo Ma's Silk Road Project Darlene Kascak: Education Coordinator, Institute of American Indian Studies; Traditional Native American Storyteller, Schaghticoke Tribal Nation Lexi Krupp: Science and Health Reporter for Vermont Public You can listen back to the full interviews below: Conductor Eric Jacobsen says goodbye to the Greater Bridgeport Symphony Connecticut tribes co-create state social studies curriculum, centering 'our culture and our ways' Small solutions to climate change that make a big impact Check out the NENC 2023 Earth Week coverage here. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6/2/202347 minutes
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What the debt ceiling deal means for Connecticut

For months, Republicans and Democrats have clashed over the national debt limit. But over the weekend, President Joe Biden and House Republicans reached a deal. Now, it goes to both the House and Senate before the June 5th deadline. This hour, we break down what debt negotiations in Washington D.C. mean up here in Connecticut. Plus, according to a new report, Connecticut has aggressive probation practices. We’ll explain what that means for residents of the state. We'll also look at efforts to curtail the state’s Freedom of Information Act. GUESTS: Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter, Connecticut Public and CT Mirror Alex Putterman: Reporter, CT Insider and Hearst Connecticut Media Mark Pazniokas: Capitol Bureau Chief, CT Mirror Seth Stern: Director of Advocacy, Freedom of the Press Foundation Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/31/202349 minutes
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Exploring Connecticut's parks, trails and greenspaces

With so many outdoor spaces to explore in New England, we forget that some of the best hikes, and parks are right here in our backyard. Today, we’re talking about trails and efforts to conserve Connecticut’s state parks. We hear from the couple behind efforts to refurbish Batterson Park and officially make it a state park. We also hear about some efforts to make parks and greenspaces more inclusive for all residents. We want to hear from you. What’s your favorite park, trail or hike here in Connecticut? GUESTS: Neil Connors and Allison Cappuccio: Co-founders of Batterson Park Conservancy Amy Hernandez: Outings Leader at Latino Outdoors Clare Cain: Trails Director, Connecticut Forest & Park Association Phil Birge-Liberman: Associate Professor in Residence with the Urban and Community Studies Program at UConn Hartford Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/31/202349 minutes, 1 second
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A conversation with Congressman Jim Himes

Congressman Jim Himes has been serving in Congress since 2009 when he was elected to represent Connecticut's 4th district. Since then, he’s become a democratic leader focused on national security and intelligence concerns. This hour on Where We Live, he joins us to look ahead to the 2024 election and talk through his priorities. We also talk about what he thinks of the debt limit deal reached this weekend between the White House and GOP house speaker Kevin McCarthy. We’ll reflect back on how things in Washington and across the nation have changed since January 6th and what to expect for the 2024 presidential election. GUESTS: Congressman Jim Himes: Representing Connecticut’s 4th Congressional District Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter, CT Mirror and CT Public Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/30/202348 minutes, 59 seconds
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Cups, discs, wands and swords: Tarot and 'divination' in Connecticut

A Pew survey from 2018 estimated 13% of adults consult tarot card readers, astrologers or "fortune-tellers." But more recent market research shows sales for tarot card decks and psychic services are growing. This hour, we explore the art of divination and "card-pulling" in Connecticut. Hear from professional tarot reader Afton Jacobs-Williams, AKA Monty's Tarot Child. Plus, Chelsea Granger is a multidisciplinary artist who co-created Dirt Gems, a plant-themed oracle deck. RELATED: Seasoned visited Tea & Tarot in Madison. Listen here... But first, hear more about the origins of tarot or "tarrochi." We preview some of the research going on at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, home to some of the oldest existing tarot cards. GUESTS: Timothy Young: Curator, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library Afton Williams-Jacobs: Monty's Tarot Child; Tarot Reader, Tea & Tarot Chelsea Granger: Multidisciplinary Artist; Co-Creator, Dirt Gems Plant Oracle Card Deck & Guidebook Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/26/202348 minutes, 59 seconds
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An irreverent reimagining of US history’s most revered (and reviled) idols

There’s currently a debate in America about what students should be learning about U.S. history. Some say we don’t revere American exceptionalism enough. Others say we're giving ourselves an A+ by excluding the tests we failed. Humorist Alexandra Petri says both sides are wrong. We just don’t know enough about the things we need to know, such as how inventor Nikola Tesla fell in love with his pigeon or about the secret tapes of Nixon yelling at his dog Checkers. This hour, an irreverent look at how we teach, learn and remember U.S. history. GUESTS:  Alexandra Petri is a humorist, a columnist for the Washington Post and the author of Nothing Is Wrong and Here is Why, which was a Thurber Prize finalist. Her new book is Alexandra Petri’s US History: Important American Documents Mike Pesca is host of the podcast The Gist, author of the Substack column Pesca Profundities, and the editor of Upon Further Review: The Greatest What-Ifs In Sports History Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/25/202349 minutes
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In 'Reciprocity Project,' Indigenous voices reframe our relationship to the Earth

In one episode of the docu-series Reciprocity Project, Connecticut-based educator and member of the Passamaquoddy Tribe Chris Newell teaches acclaimed cellist Yo-Yo Ma a pow-wow song. Together, they play at sunrise, "singing up the sun" in the tradition of the Wabanaki or People of the Dawnland, a confederation of four tribes in Maine including Passamaquoddy. This hour, we hear about this film series from Newell and executive producer Tracy Rector, and about the increasing urgency of centering Indigenous perspectives on our planet and the climate. The series is intended to inspire conversation and action on climate; "to create a paradigm shift that reframes our relationships to the Earth, other living beings, and one another." Plus, a conversation on the Native food movement with Navajo journalist and podcaster Andi Murphy. GUESTS: Chris Newell: Co-Founder and Director of Education, Akowmawt Educational Initiative; Member of the Passamaquaddy Tribe; Museum Educator; Children's Book Author Tracy Rector: Managing Director of Storytelling, Nia Tero; Executive Producer, Reciprocity Project Jennifer Kreisberg: Composer; Member of the Tuscarora Nation of North Carolina Andi Murphy: Navajo Journalist; Host, Toasted Sister Podcast Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired February 10, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/24/202348 minutes
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Exploring 'car dependency' in Connecticut

Nearly 92% of American households reported owning at least one vehicle in a recent five-year 2021 census report. Connecticut falls just below that national average. A recent Forbes study found that the average annual cost of full-coverage car insurance in Connecticut is $1,730. Plus, the report ranks Connecticut as the most expensive state for car repairs, averaging around $400 for check engine light-related car fixes. This hour, we talk about car culture in America, and how car dependency can translate into policies that prioritize roads over sidewalks, highways over public transit. Hear from UConn Professor Emeritus Dr. Norman Garrick, a luminary in the field of transportation and civil engineering. Plus, his former student Adam Weber is now a civil engineer working for the city of New Haven, who also shares insights on transportation infrastructure with millions on social media. GUESTS: Adam Weber: Project Manager, City of New Haven; @EverydayEngineering on TikTok Dr. Norman Garrick: Professor Emeritus, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UConn Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired April 6, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/23/202347 minutes, 30 seconds
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The delicate art of obituary-writing

Whether they’ve been written by a loved one or a local newsroom, obituaries are an earnest attempt at the impossible: distilling one person's life into a couple of pages or paragraphs. This hour, we explore the delicate art of obituary-writing with two experts: Tampa Bay Times and Poynter writer Kristen Hare, and Lucy Gellman, an editor with New Haven's Arts Paper. Plus, Epilogg co-founder Mary McGreevy shares "Tips from Dead People" on TikTok. GUESTS: Kristen Hare: Writer, Tampa Bay Times; Local News Faculty and Writer, Poynter Lucy Gellman: Editor, The Arts Paper Mary McGreevy: Co-Founder, Epilogg; Tips from Dead People on TikTok Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired April 27, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/22/202348 minutes, 30 seconds
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The challenges of addressing adult literacy

23% of the adult U.S. population cannot read above a third-grade level. Literacy isn’t limited to reading and writing, it can also refer to basic math, comprehension and critical thinking skills. There is no part of the U.S. population that isn’t touched by low literacy. And many people suffer from shame around the struggle to read and write. According to ProLiteracy, bringing reading levels up “would generate an additional $2.2 trillion in annual income. Today, we get a deeper understanding of adult literacy in our country and across our state.  GUESTS: Haleigh Guerrera: Basic Literacy Tutor with Literacy Volunteers of Greater Hartford Aliyya Swaby: Reporter for ProPublica Mark Vineis: President and CEO of ProLiteracy Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired April 7, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/19/202348 minutes
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R.F. Kuang's satirical thriller 'Yellowface' tackles ethics in authorship

R.F. Kuang's works of historical fantasy, including The Poppy War series, have been racking up awards since she began publishing in 2018. Her novel Babel won the prestigious Nebula Award for science fiction and fantasy writers this week. The same day, her latest book Yellowface debuted. It is Kuang's fifth novel, and a shift from fantasy to literary fiction. The satirical thriller takes on the commercial publishing world, and through it, "questions of diversity, racism, and cultural appropriation." Not to mention, "the terrifying alienation of social media." This hour, R.F. Kuang joins us. Minor spoilers lie ahead... GUESTS: R.F. Kuang: Author, Yellowface; Babel; The Poppy War Trilogy Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/18/202348 minutes
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A foster care mom shares her journey

There are over 4,000 foster children living in Connecticut. May is Foster Care Month. From what's seen on TV and the media, foster care looks like a selfless, philanthropic act; willing foster parents open up their homes to children in need.  But being a foster parent is a complicated job that requires many layers of kindness and sensitivity. Laura is a foster parent based out of California. She received a lot of attention sharing a video about her experience as a foster mom and continues to share her experience and advice on social media. The topics range from navigating relationships between foster parents and biological parents, to preparing your home before you become a foster parent. We talk about this complex system involving caretakers, lawmakers, and of course, the children placed in the state's care. If you have direct experience with the foster care, we want to hear from you. GUESTS: Laura: a foster parent in California and she manages Foster Parent Partner Commissioner Vannessa Dorantes: Connecticut Department of Children and Families Josiah Brown: Executive Director of Connecticut CASA, a statewide network of volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates who work to advance the best interests of children Tricia Goldburn: Court Appointed Special Advocate, Connecticut CASA Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/16/202349 minutes
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Amazon responds to proposed bill aimed at warehouse 'quotas'

A proposed bill would set limits on how warehouses track worker productivity where we live. Amazon – which currently employs more than 15,000 Connecticut residents across its 14 locations – was the focus of a recent hearing on the bill. This hour, an Amazon spokesperson responds to the legislation. Kelly Nantel says they support the "goal of the bill" and look forward to working with state lawmakers, but clarifies that Amazon does not have "set quotas" for workers. "We assess our performance based on what we believe are safe and achievable expectations for all employees." Plus, State Sen. Julie Kushner, Business Insider tech correspondent Katherine Long, and CBIA's Eric Gjede join the conversation. GUESTS: Kelly Nantel: Spokesperson, Amazon Julie Kushner: Democratic State Senator; Chair, Labor and Public Employees Committee Katherine Long: Tech Correspondent, Business Insider Eric Gjede: VP of Public Policy, Connecticut Business and Industry Association Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/15/202349 minutes
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Gardening with Charlie Nardozzi: back to basics

Spring is here and it’s time for our annual spring gardening hour and we are going back to basics. What’s a zone? How do you choose the right kind of soil? How to keep your succulents alive all year round? If you’re a new or inspiring gardener, Charlie Nardozzi is joining us to answer our questions and yours about getting comfortable with the soil. We want to hear from you, what questions do you have about making the most of your garden? GUEST: Charlie Nardozzi: horticulturist and host of the Connecticut Garden Journal Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/12/202349 minutes
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'Aquatic activism': The fight for inclusion at pool clubs and beaches

the ripple, the wave that carried me home is a new play running at the Yale Repertory Theater, following a family of “aquatic activists” across decades, as they push for equity in access to pools.This hour, we hear from playwright Christina Anderson and director Tamilla Woodard, and we learn more about the history of racism at beaches and pool clubs where we live. GUESTS: Christina Anderson: Playwright, the ripple, the wave that carried me home Tamilla Woodard: Director, the ripple, the wave that carried me home; Chair, Acting Program at David Geffen School of Drama at Yale University Andrew Kahrl: History Professor, University of Virginia; Author, Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America's Most Exclusive Shoreline Henry Fernandez: Executive Director, LEAP for Kids Ryan Rooks: Aquatic Director, LEAP for Kids Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/11/202349 minutes, 1 second
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Debt, mortgages and taxes: Why teaching all children financial wellness is critical to equity

Connecticut residents have the highest average credit card in the nation. Although personal finance courses are offered in high schools, they aren’t mandated to graduate. And often, these courses don’t address the complex financial challenges of their students. Today, on Where We Live, we talk about giving more students access to financial literacy, and making that curriculum more inclusive. We want to hear from you. Did you learn about credit cards, budgeting or taxes in school? How were you taught to manage your money? GUESTS: Dana Miranda: Founder and Financial Educator of Healthy Rich Dr. Monette Ferguson: Executive Director of the Alliance for Community Empowerment in Bridgeport Nan J. Morrison: President and Chief Executive Officer of the Council for Economic Education Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/9/202349 minutes
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'Blackology': How can efforts around inclusivity in STEM fields go farther?

Of the millions of people working in STEM fields in the U.S., only 9% are Black, according to the Pew Research Center. Those numbers are "unchanged" since 2016.How can efforts around “inclusivity” in these fields go farther? Environmental scientist Dr. Nyeema Harris has written about the importance of Blackology.“Blackologists are not simply scholars that are Black but, rather, are scholars who deliberately leverage and intersect Blackness into advancing knowledge production," she writes.Dr. Harris joins us to discuss how this approach is applied to environmental science and so many other disciplines.Plus, public health professor Dr. Ijeoma Opara discusses her work to reduce racial health disparities, and to "strengthen the pipeline of Black youth to the field of public health research."GUESTS: Dr. Ijeoma Opara: Assistant Professor, Yale School of Public Health; Assistant Clinical Professor, Yale School of Nursing Dr. Nyeema Harris: Knobloch Family Associate Professor of Wildlife and Land Conservation, Yale School of the Environment Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired February 24.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/8/202348 minutes
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Forever young: The rise of the 'kidults'

Toys are occasionally marketed to "children of all ages." In recent years, market research has shown the number of toy-buyers over 12 years old is growing. The demographic, sometimes called "kidults," now comprises a quarter of the annual toy retail market, and an impressive 60% of the market’s growth in the last year, according to market research company NPD Group. Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, a professor of psychology at Temple University, discusses why familiar toys might appeal to us today, and the links between how we played as children and how we socialize now. Plus, one California-based slime-maker is raking in millions from children and adults alike. There's even one slime product called "Clay-Doh."What toy from your childhood still sparks joy? Connecticut Public staffers and listeners respond. GUESTS: Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek: Professor of Psychology, Temple University; Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution Olivya Soth: Co-Owner, OG Slimes Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired March 3, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/5/202348 minutes
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Connecticut may continue 'incremental' expansion of HUSKY Health coverage

As of January 1, Connecticut children are eligible for Medicaid or HUSKY Health until the age of 12, regardless of their immigration status. A new bill would expand coverage to 15, and possibly to 18.This hour, we get the latest on the legislation from State Sen. Matt Lesser, and hear from organizers with the HUSKY 4 Immigrants campaign. Werner Oyanadel, the Latino and Puerto Rican policy director at the Commission on Women, Children, Seniors, Equity and Opportunity, spoke in favor of expanding HUSKY access during a Human Services Committee hearing back in February. He noted that the Commission supported the "legislature's recent incremental approach to expand eligibility requirements for medical coverage to a broader range of families." Plus, Politico’s Megan Messerly looks into how Connecticut coverage compares to other states. GUESTS: Luis Luna: Coalition Manager, HUSKY 4 Immigrants Rosana Ferraro: Program Lead for Health Justice Policy Advocacy, Universal Health Care Foundation of Connecticut Matt Lesser: Democratic State Senator; Senate Chair, Human Services Committee Constanza Segovia: Founding Member, Hartford Deportation Defense Megan Messerly: Health Care Reporter, Politico Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/4/202349 minutes
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A conversation with Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner Garrett Eucalitto

Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner Garrett Eucalitto is a native of Torrington and a big proponent of transit oriented development. Today, he joins us to answer our questions and yours about Connecticut transportation. From pedestrian safety to lowering the blood alcohol limit, we’ll hear about his office’s efforts to create safer roadways in our state. With transit oriented development and getting more EVs or electric vehicles, on the road, green energy remains part of the larger conversation when it comes to Connecticut transportation. We want to hear from you and learn how you’d like to see our roads improve. GUESTS: Connecticut Department of Transportation Commissioner Garrett Eucalitto Alec Slatky: Managing Director of Public Affairs at AAA Northeast Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/2/202349 minutes
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Checking in on the labor movement momentum in Connecticut

While May Day may draw its roots from a pagan holiday pinned to spring's arrival, it has a more modern incarnation inspired by the fight for the eight-hour work day in Chicago, and later, in Connecticut. This hour, Fairfield University history professor Cecelia Bucki discusses. Plus, we check in on some of the recently-formed unions where we live, including Starbucks and student unions at Yale and Wesleyan Universities. NPR labor and workplace correspondent Andrea Hsu responds. GUESTS: Andrea Hsu: Labor and Workplace Correspondent, NPR Arita Acharya: Organizer, Local 33 at Yale University Travis Glenney-Tegtmeier: Union Member, Starbucks at Corbin's Corner in West Hartford Dr. Cecelia Bucki: Professor of History, Fairfield University Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
5/1/202349 minutes
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Acknowledging gun violence as a public health issue could be part of the solution

Last week, a 12-year old Se'Cret Pierce living in Hartford was killed in a drive-by shooting. Gun violence is one of the leading causes of deaths in America, and the leading cause of death in children. According to the Kaiser Family Foundations, gun-related incidents are common among adults. Despite this, research around this issue remains limited and vastly underfunded. There is several areas of research when it comes to better understanding gun violence including mass shootings, suicide and intimate partner violence. Today, we talk about the intersection of gun violence and public health and the push to view gun violence as a public health issue. We’ll hear from Dr. Jennifer Dineen. Associate Director of the Arms Center for Gun Injury Prevention at UConn. We’ll also talk with Connecticut musician Jimmy Greene. He is the father of Sandy Hook victim Ana Grace Marquez-Greene. How has gun violence impacted your community? GUESTS: Andrew Woods: Chief Executive Officer of Hartford Communities That Care Dr. Jennifer Dineen: Associate Professor in Residence in the School of Public Policy and Associate Director of the Arms Center for Gun Injury Prevention at UConn Jimmy Greene: Professor of Music at Western Connecticut State University Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/28/202348 minutes, 56 seconds
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The delicate art of obituary-writing

Whether they’ve been written by a loved one or a local newsrooms, obituaries are an earnest attempt at the impossible: distilling one person's life into a couple of pages or paragraphs. This hour, we explore the delicate art of obituary-writing with two experts: Tampa Bay Times and Poynter writer Kristen Hare, and Lucy Gellman, an editor with New Haven's Arts Paper. Plus, Epilogg co-founder Mary McGreevy shares "Tips from Dead People" on TikTok. GUESTS: Kristen Hare: Writer, Tampa Bay Times; Local News Writer, Poynter Lucy Gellman: Editor, The Arts Paper Mary McGreevy: Co-Founder, Epilogg; Tips from Dead People on TikTok Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/27/202349 minutes
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'Our Red Book': Everyone has a period story

After collecting oral histories from generations of women in her family in "My Little Red Book," Rachel Kauder Nalebuff created Our Red Book, an extended project reflecting the experience of people of all races, ages and genders around the world. But there’s so much stigma and misinformation around periods. This hour, three Connecticut-based contributors featured in her book join us, breaking down this bloody topic. GUESTS: Rachel Kauder Nalebuff: Editor, Our Red Book Michelle Memran: Documentary Filmmaker Kica Matos: New Haven-based Immigration Rights Activist and Organizer Axel Gay: Teen Writer Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/25/202348 minutes
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PFAS regulations in Connecticut

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently updated its standards around a group of manmade substances called PFAS, promising stricter enforceable limits that would require public water systems to add filtration, or find another source. So what will that mean in Connecticut, where water quality isn't uniformly monitored, and where the advisory limit currently in place under the State Department of Health is double the EPA's updated limit? On Friday, U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal announced 73.5 million dollars in federal funding for Connecticut’s cleanup, stressing that without federal dollars, the EPA’s new enforceable limits were "meaningless." This hour, Connecticut Department of Health Commissioner Manisha Juthani discusses how testing and treatment in Connecticut is likely to change. Plus, investigative reporter Andrew Brown, and Dr. Rainer Lohmann, who heads up a PFAS-focused lab at the University of Rhode Island. GUESTS: Dr. Manisha Juthani: Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Public Health Andrew Brown: Investigative Reporter, The Connecticut Mirror Dr. Rainer Lohmann: Professor of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island; Director, STEEP Superfund Research Center Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/24/202349 minutes
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Going green with your self-care

When you’re searching for personal care products, whether a bar of soap or a bottle of lotion, are you reading the ingredients label? What harmful ingredients should be avoided? A recent study from the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found potential links between the regular use of hair straightening products like relaxers that contained "formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing chemicals," and uterine cancer, prompting a new federal lawsuit. There have been similarly troubling findings and lawsuits around some deodorants containing benzene, and powders containing talc contaminated with asbestos. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame found PFAS, sometimes called "forever chemicals," in 52% of cosmetics. Only a fraction of those products listed PFAS on the label. This hour, we hear from local makers who are focused on safe and natural ingredients. Plus, the Environmental Working Group has been building a searchable database of different products and ingredients for almost two decades, hoping to make it easier for consumers to shop smart. GUESTS: Melanie Benesch: Vice President of Government Affairs, Environmental Working Group Christine Palm: Connecticut Democratic State Representative, 36th District Sami Jo Artus: Founder and Chief Beauty Maker, florapothecarie Mecca Davis-Provite: Owner, Rootuals Natural Hair Care Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired March 9, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/21/202340 minutes, 59 seconds
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Students lead push to observe Muslim holidays in school calendars

Calls to observe Muslim holidays in school calendars are growing in the U.S., along with the population of Muslim students. In 2018, Pew Research Center projected that Islam could be the country’s second-largest religion by 2040. After students and advocates spoke up, Stamford's school board voted to observe Eid al-Fitr in the upcoming school year. Eid al-Fitr is the final, celebratory day of Ramadan, and the culmination of 29 or 30 days of fasting. The Islamic calendar and each of its holy days are linked to the lunar cycle; the ninth lunar month of Ramadan rotates throughout the year, depending on when the new moon falls. The Stamford school calendar will also notate Eid al-Adha, in addition to Diwali and Three Kings Day. While these three holidays will fall on weekends in the next school year, the notations ensure they are a consideration for classrooms. This hour, we discuss the importance of educator awareness around religious holidays with Chaplain Aida Mansoor. Plus, Stamford Superintendent Dr. Tamu Lucero joins. GUESTS: Dr. Tamu Lucero: Superintendent, Stamford Public Schools Aida Mansoor: Chaplain; Director of Field Education, Hartford International University Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/20/202340 minutes, 47 seconds
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Small solutions to climate change that make a big impact

Climate change is presenting so many challenges in our region, but residents around New England are rising to the occasion. Today, we hear from reporters from the New England News Collaborative on new solutions to mitigating climate change. From green burials, to eliminating construction waste and even climate proofing our agriculture, we’ll hear about a variety of innovations that could make a big impact. What is your community doing to fight climate change, where you live? For Earth Day 2023, journalists from the New England News Collaborative worked together to tell stories of people in New England who are finding unexpected and creative ways to act on climate change. Check out more of the NENC Earth Week coverage here. GUESTS: Lexi Krupp: Science and Health Reporter for Vermont Public Eve Zuckoff: Climate and Environment ReporterCAI Patrick Skahill: Reporter and Digital Editor for Connecticut Public Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/18/202341 minutes, 1 second
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A conversation with Connecticut's AAPI youth

Between March 2020 and September 2021, over 10,000 incidents of hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders were reported. That’s according to the advocacy group, Stop AAPI Hate. It was only recently that Connecticut mandated AAPI studies in public schools- by the 2025-26 school year it’ll be a core part of social studies education. How are those directly affected by this change responding? And what is it like to be a young Asian American growing up in the state? Students from UCONN’s AAPI Advisory Board and Curriculum lab join us. GUESTS: Lynna Vo: UCONN Undergraduate Student Eira Parkash: Farmington High Student Max Bonadies: Glastonbury High Student Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/17/202340 minutes, 21 seconds
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Finding solutions to slow the fast-fashion cycle

Where do our clothes come from? According to the Textile Exchange, 52% of our clothes are made from polyester. Fast fashion is an enormous industry, allowing us to purchase low cost clothing quickly and efficiently. But the toll these companies take on the environment is significant, and the workplace conditions for the factories that create these products are questionable at best. Building sustainable, ethical practices into the fashion industry will be a challenge, but it’s not impossible. There are ways to slow down the fast fashion cycle, and build better quality fabrics. Today, we talk about these solutions and what fashion brands can do to build sustainability. We learn ways to slow down the fast fashion cycle. Lucianne Tonti, a fashion consultant and author of the new book Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion joins us. We’ll also hear from Reboot Eco, a zero waste and swap shop in Middletown, Connecticut. What does shopping look like for you? Do you thrift for your clothes, or prefer the convenience of shopping online? GUESTS: Miriah Kelly: Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, Southern Connecticut State University Lucianne Tonti - consultant for sustainable designers and author of Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion Yasemin Ugurlu - Founder and Owner of Reboot Eco Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/14/202341 minutes, 2 seconds
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Author Willie Mae Brown on her new book, 'My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood'

Willie Mae Brown is the author of a new book My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood at the Height of the Civil Rights Movement. The book, written for young adults, reflects on her time growing up in Alabama and how the civil rights era shaped her coming of age. Today, we’ll hear her message for the next generation of activists. Brown lived in Selma, Alabama until she was 17, when she moved to New York City. Growing up in Selma, she experienced the civil rights movement first hand - including meeting Martin Luther King Jr. when she was 12.In the intro, Brown explains, “I write these stories of a Selma that I knew and loved. My own Selma. A Selma that brought me joy, troubled me, and baptized me into racial injustice and into the race for justice.” Where We Live Senior Producer Tess Terrible guest hosts this conversation. GUESTS: Willie Mae Brown: author and visual artist. She recently published her first book, My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood at the Height of the Civil Rights Movement. Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired February 4, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/13/202340 minutes, 49 seconds
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Birds of prey fall prey to rodenticide

Anticoagulant rodenticide, a quick fix for controlling the rat and mice population, is now having an effect on birds of prey. Today, we talk to A Place Called Hope, a local raptor rehabilitator here in Connecticut, about how it’s impacting birds across our state. After ingesting this poison, there is little that can be done to save the life of these birds. We’ll hear about legislation to limit the use of these poisons and alternatives to rodenticide. The traditional snap traps aren’t the only way to keep out the mice! Later, we hear from the Connecticut Audubon Society. They are celebrating their 125th anniversary and have a special birding challenge to mark the occasion. We want to hear. Have you seen falcons, hawks and eagles, where you live? GUESTS: Christine Cummings: Executive Director of A Place Called Hope Tom Andersen: Director of Communications, the Connecticut Audubon Society Kathi Borgmann: Communications Manager, Cornell Lab of Ornithology Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/11/202348 minutes, 59 seconds
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'A Scientist's Warning': Dr. Peter Hotez on the dangers of 'anti-science'

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, acclaimed scientist and Connecticut native Dr. Peter J. Hotez has helped translate what we know about the virus and vaccines, taking countless live "news hits" from his office at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas. Behind-the-scenes, he helped develop a COVID-19 vaccine, which earned him a Nobel Peace Prize nomination. Now, he’s working on a new book, his third about the COVID-19 pandemic, due out September 19. The Deadly Rise of Anti-science: A Scientist’s Warning is described as “an eyewitness story of how the anti-vaccine movement grew into a dangerous and prominent anti-science element in American politics.” This hour, he joins us to discuss this movement, and to issue a "warning." Plus, Connecticut College chemistry professor Marc Zimmer responds. GUESTS: Dr. Peter J. Hotez: Dean, National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine; Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine; Author, The Deadly Rise of Anti-science: A Scientist’s Warning Marc Zimmer: Chemistry Professor, Connecticut College; Author, Science and the Skeptic Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/10/202349 minutes
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The challenges of addressing adult literacy

23% of the adult U.S. population cannot read above a third-grade level. Literacy isn’t limited to reading and writing, it can also refer to basic math, comprehension and critical thinking skills. According to ProLiteracy, bringing reading levels up “would generate an additional $2.2 trillion in annual income. Today, we get a deeper understanding of adult literacy in our country and across our state. There is no part of the U.S. population that isn’t touched by low literacy. And many people suffer from shame around the struggle to read and write. GUESTS: Haleigh Guerrera: Basic Literacy Tutor with Literacy Volunteers of Greater Hartford Aliyya Swaby: Reporter for ProPublica Mark Vineis: President and CEO of ProLiteracy Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/7/202349 minutes
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Exploring 'car dependency' in Connecticut

Nearly 92% of American households reported owning at least one vehicle in a recent five-year 2021 Census report. Connecticut falls just below that national average. A recent Forbes study found the average annual cost of full-coverage car insurance in Connecticut is $1,730. Plus, the report ranks Connecticut as the most expensive state for car repairs, averaging around $400 for check engine light-related car fixes. This hour, we talk about car culture in America, and how car dependency can translate into policies that prioritize roads over sidewalks, highways over public transit. Hear from UConn Professor Emeritus Dr. Norman Garrick, a luminary in the field of transportation and civil engineering. Plus, his former student Adam Weber is now a civil engineer working for the City of New Haven, who also shares insights on transportation infrastructure with millions on social media. GUESTS: Adam Weber: Project Manager, City of New Haven; @EverydayEngineering on TikTok Dr. Norman Garrick: Professor Emeritus, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UConn Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/6/202349 minutes
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TikTok goes to Washington

The recent congressional hearings with TikTok CEO Shou Zi Chew showed a continued disconnect between lawmakers and social media companies, and their users. With lawmakers pushing for tougher restrictions on TikTok and in some cases an outright ban, many are asking, what are the real solutions to protecting our privacy online? Today, we explore ways to regulate social media. Is a TikTok ban the first step to making internet privacy a human right? GUESTS: Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter for the Connecticut Mirror Willmary Escoto: U.S. Policy Analyst for Access Now, an organization that defends and extends the digital rights of people and communities at risk. Joshua Tucker: Professor of Politics and Codirector for the NYU Center for Social Media and Politics Sebastian Zimmeck: Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Wesleyan University Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/4/202349 minutes
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Report finds racial disparities persist in military discharge

Conley Monk Jr. came home to Hamden in 1970 after serving in the Vietnam War. His discharge was prompted by a PTSD-induced altercation in Okinawa, and categorized within the military as "other-than-honorable." Mr. Monk spent decades trying to access basic benefits like disability coverage, until his appeal in 2015 ultimately changed how these kinds of cases are heard by the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims, now formally allowing class-action lawsuits. This hour, Mr. Monk joins us along with his representation at Yale Law School’s Veterans Legal Services Clinic. We’ll discuss the new lawsuit they’ve filed against the VA, alleging racial discrimination. Plus, a new report from the Connecticut Veterans Legal Center (CVLC) shows how racial disparities persist across military discharge status, and how this impedes veterans' access to benefits. Across four out of five military branches and roughly one million separation documents CVLC obtained, Black service members "were approximately 1.5 times as likely as white service members to receive an Other Than Honorable rather than Honorable discharge, and approximately twice as likely as white service members to receive a General discharge." While the VA has not responded to the suit directly, press secretary Terrence Hayes provided a written statement to Connecticut Public, saying that the agency is working to address "institutional racism" and to review policies. What resources are there for veterans who are trying to secure benefits where we live, despite what can be burdensome discharge documentation? GUESTS: Conley Monk Jr.: Vietnam Veteran; Founder, National Veterans Council for Legal Redress Michael Sullivan: Student Intern, Yale Law School’s Veterans Legal Services Clinic Alden Pinkham: Connecticut Bar Association Singer Fellow, Connecticut Veterans Legal Center Chelsea Donaldson: Supervising Attorney of the Veterans Benefits Unit, Connecticut Veterans Legal Center Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/3/202348 minutes, 21 seconds
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'RuPaul’s Drag Race' spotlights Connecticut’s 'thriving' drag scene

While contestants with Connecticut ties have appeared on the reality competition series RuPaul's Drag Race in the past, the Season 15 premiere on MTV marks the first time more than one Connecticut drag queen has been represented. Robin Fierce from Hartford, Loosey LaDuca from Ansonia, Amethyst from West Hartford and Jax from the Bronx, raised in Connecticut, comprised this season's Connecticut contingent. This hour, Loosey and Robin join us to discuss how they discovered drag, developed their artistry, and why they’re determined to confront misunderstanding by showcasing drag as a force for good. GUESTS: Loosey LaDuca: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race Robin Fierce: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired January 27, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/31/202349 minutes, 30 seconds
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Repatriation of Indigenous human remains 'takes time,' despite federal law

How are museums where we live faring in returning sacred Indigenous objects and human remains, more than thirty years after a federal law mandated "repatriation"? The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, or NAGPRA, was passed by Congress in 1990. It called for federal agencies and federally-funded museums to repatriate Native American cultural items, including sacred objects and in many cases human remains. A recent in-depth report from ProPublica found that museums and institutions across the country had failed to "expeditiously" meet that federal law where it concerns human remains. For example, the nearby Harvard Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology has made just 39% of the more than 10,000 Native American remains it reported to the federal government “available for return.” ProPublica reporters Mary Hudetz and Logan Jaffe join us. Kate Seltzer with Connecticut Public’s investigative team, The Accountability Project, shares what she found when she checked in with museums where we live. Plus, Connecticut Humanities executive director Jason Mancini addresses a "trust deficit" among tribes. "Working with tribes takes time. Relationships don't happen automatically because a piece of legislation happens... that takes years, it takes trust-building. And one of the challenges with Connecticut is there's a trust deficit with tribal communities." "Let's not lose sight of the fact that you know, three of the tribes are only state-recognized, and have very little resources to do anything, and don't have deep tribal economies to support this kind of work. So I think we need to consider all of that in the equation." GUESTS: Mary Hudetz: Member, Crow Tribe; Reporter, ProPublica; Former President, Native American Journalists Association Logan Jaffe: Reporter, ProPublica Kate Seltzer: Howard Center for Investigative Reporting Fellow, The Accountability Project Jason Mancini: Executive Director, Connecticut Humanities; Former Director, Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/30/202349 minutes
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A check-in with Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont

Today on Where We Live, Governor Ned Lamont joins us for an in-depth conversation on the 2023 legislative session and what’s happening around our state. We hear about his priorities for his second term in office. We’ll talk about housing, road safety, healthcare, and all the issues that are impacting us where we live. And we want to give you the opportunity to ask our state’s top official your questions. So what are your questions for Governor Lamont? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont Susan Raff, Chief Capitol Reporter, WFSB TV Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/28/202349 minutes
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'Stepping Into the Shade' explores the tobacco industry in Connecticut

A new docuseries called Stepping Into the Shade is in the works, digging into Connecticut's history of shade tobacco farming. A team at Eastern Connecticut State University, along with host and producer June Archer, tell a kind of oral history of the influence of the seasonal workers on these farms, and their influence on diversity where we live as well as the Civil Rights Movement. This hour, we preview the docuseries and go behind-the-scenes. Do you have ties to the shade tobacco industry in our state? Contact the production team. GUESTS: June Archer: Host; Producer; Author; Music Executive Brian Day: Assistant Professor of Filmmaking at Eastern Connecticut State University, Director, Stepping Into the Shade Kristen Morgan: Associate Professor of Theatre and New Media Studies, Eastern Connecticut State University Jason Oliver Chang:  Associate Professor of History, UConn; Director, Asian and Asian American Studies Institute at UConn Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/27/202349 minutes
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Connecticut author helps to translate the harrowing accounts of a Ukrainian refugee

Connecticut author and lawyer Anne Howard is known for her work writing true crime, but her recent book is a departure from her prior work. Today, we talk about her new book that she worked to translate, entitled Escape from Mariupol: A Survivor's True Story. Anne first met Adoriana Marik through mutual friends. They exchanged letters, and Adoriana sent her hand-drawn cards and other artwork over the years. When the war in Ukraine broke out, Anne was desperate to contact Adoriana to hear that she was safe. What followed was a months-long exchange and a collaborative effort to write a book about her experience. Adoriana suffers from many symptoms of PTSD. Due to this and a language barrier, Adoriana will not be joining us this hour, but here to tell us about her story, is Anne Howard. GUEST: Anne Howard: co-author and translator of Escape from Mariupol: A Survivor's True Story Askold Melnyczuk: English professor at University of Massachusetts, Boston and author Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/24/202349 minutes
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Nationwide spike in book challenges continues. How are Connecticut librarians responding?

The American Library Association released their annual tally for book challenges in 2022 on Thursday. There were more than 1200 demands to censor library books and resources last year. That’s the highest number they've reported since they began reporting more than 20 years ago, and nearly double the tally in 2021, when the ALA told us those numbers were "unprecedented." Librarians where we live say they’ve also seen similar spikes in recent years. This hour we’ll dig into the new report. We'll also hear from the Connecticut Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee, and local librarians. GUESTS: Samantha Lee: Chair, Connecticut Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee; Head of Reference Services, Enfield Public Library Deborah Caldwell Stone: Director, American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom Kate Byroade: Library Director, Cragin Memorial Library in Colchester Sarah Warbelow: Legal Director, Human Rights Campaign Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/23/202349 minutes
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Exploring the origins and evolution of the Peace Corps

The Peace Corps has evolved over years, faced controversy and has made an international impact on poverty. Today, we talk to one of the architects of the Peace Corps living in Connecticut. After hearing President John F. Kennedy speak about the Peace Corps, Dan Sharp was inspired to join. He became instrumental in establishing diplomatic relations between other countries and making the Peace Corps the behemoth it is today as well. Training and volunteering for the Peace Corps or any service organization is a rigorous experience. Have you volunteered with a service organization? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Dan Sharp: Peace Corps founding member Khari Brown: President and CEO of Spark the Journey Tasha Prados: Branding & marketing strategist, digital nomad creator & travel writer. She served with the Peace Corps from 2011 to 2013 Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/21/202349 minutes
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Addressing the 'waste crisis': Possible solutions and regional trends

Connecticut’s waste management crisis is already a top-ticket item for lawmakers. Before the latest legislative session began, newly-appointed Environmental Committee Chair State Sen. Rick Lopes told the CT Examiner he was focused on finding solutions. The State Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) has been sounding the alarm since 2020, when Commissioner Katie Dykes said the dwindling options for waste disposal posed a “silent crisis.” In July of last year, one of five of the state’s waste-to-energy plants ground to a halt, offloading up to one-third of Connecticut's waste out-of-state. In recent years, DEEP has offered grants to support pay-as-you-throw programs and food collection services, hoping to help towns and cities stem the tide of trash. Food scrap collection is already bring offered in Middletown, Meriden and West Haven. This hour, we hear from Waste Dive editor Cole Rosengren, as well as the recycling director for the nearby Cambridge, Massachusetts, where citywide food waste collection is now a mainstay. Plus, Alaina Wood is a climate communicator who goes by The Garbage Queen. She takes your questions. GUESTS: Cole Rosengren: Lead Editor, Waste Dive Mike Orr: Recycling Director, Dept. of Public Works for Cambridge, Massachusetts Alaina Wood: Climate Communicator AKA The Garbage Queen Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired January 20, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/20/202347 minutes
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In 'Reciprocity Project,' Indigenous voices reframe our relationship to the Earth

In one episode of the docu-series Reciprocity Project, Connecticut-based educator and member of the Passamaquoddy Tribe Chris Newell teaches acclaimed cellist Yo-Yo Ma a pow-wow song. Together, they play at sunrise, "singing up the sun" in the tradition of the Wabanaki or People of the Dawnland, a confederation of four tribes in Maine including Passamaquoddy. This hour, we hear about this film series from Newell and executive producer Tracy Rector, and about the increasing urgency of centering Indigenous perspectives on our planet and the climate. The series is intended to inspire conversation and action on climate; "to create a paradigm shift that reframes our relationships to the Earth, other living beings, and one another." Plus, a conversation on the Native food movement with Navajo journalist and podcaster Andi Murphy. GUESTS: Chris Newell: Co-Founder and Director of Education, Akowmawt Educational Initiative; Member of the Passamaquaddy Tribe; Museum Educator; Children's Book Author Tracy Rector: Managing Director of Storytelling, Nia Tero; Executive Producer, Reciprocity Project Jennifer Kreisberg: Composer; Member of the Tuscarora Nation of North Carolina Andi Murphy: Navajo Journalist; Host, Toasted Sister Podcast Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired February 10, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/17/202348 minutes
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'Transforming Corrections': Highlighting resources for reentry

Willard Correctional Institution in Enfield will be the third prison in Connecticut to close in two years. Connecticut Mirror's Jaden Edison reports that prison admissions have decreased by more than 11,600 people since 2013. "The most recent increase came in the last fiscal year, when admissions rose by more than 4,300 people," Edison says, "though the numbers are far below pre-pandemic levels." This hour, Edison joins us to discuss the closures, and the resources required to smooth reentry. Plus, Connecticut Public investigative reporter Bria Lloyd previews the latest CPTV "Cutline" all about "transforming corrections" in Connecticut. Luis Luna uses radio and music as a tool in organizing and educating. He’s a WPKN radio producer who co-produces Abolition Transmission, "a radio show produced collectively by incarcerated abolitionists across the country." He joins us to discuss their latest episode, focused on Connecticut prisons. GUESTS: Jaden Edison: Justice Reporter, Connecticut Mirror Bria Lloyd: Investigative Reporter, The Accountability Project at Connecticut Public Luis Luna: Co-Creator, Abolition Transmission; Radio Producer, WPKN; Community Organizer, HUSKY for Immigrants Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/16/202349 minutes
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How are lawmakers addressing Connecticut's housing crisis?

Connecticut is in the midst of a housing crisis. About 34 percent of residents are paying more than a third of their income to housing costs. That’s according to the Connecticut Mirror. From subsidizing construction to studying rent stabilization, lawmakers are currently figuring out how to best address the state’s housing crisis. Rent caps were one of the many housing-related policies being debated at the state capitol this session. But just last week, the state legislature’s Housing Committee decided not to bring the rent cap bill forward for a committee vote. That’s despite a report from affordable housing advocates that says 72 percent of Connecticut voters expressing support for rent caps. This hour, we check in on housing reform in the state. Plus, lawmakers are also taking up the issue of birth control access this session. We get the latest on legislation that would allow pharmacists to prescribe birth control. GUESTS: Ginny Monk: Children's Issues and Housing Reporter, Connecticut Mirror Jacqueline Rabe Thomas: Investigative Reporter, Hearst CT Media Luis Quintero: Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University Christine Stuart: Editor-in-Chief, CT News Junkie Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/15/202349 minutes
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Finding solutions to slow the fast-fashion cycle

Where do our clothes come from? According to the Textile Exchange, 52% of our clothes are made from polyester. Fast fashion is an enormous industry, allowing us to purchase low cost clothing quickly and efficiently. But the toll these companies take on the environment is significant, and the workplace conditions for the factories that create these products are questionable at best. Building sustainable, ethical practices into the fashion industry will be a challenge, but it’s not impossible. There are ways to slow down the fast fashion cycle, and build better quality fabrics. Today, we talk about these solutions and what fashion brands can do to build sustainability. We learn ways to slow down the fast fashion cycle. Lucianne Tonti, a fashion consultant and author of the new book Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion joins us. We’ll also hear from Reboot Eco, a zero waste and swap shop in Middletown, Connecticut. What does shopping look like for you? Do you thrift for your clothes, or prefer the convenience of shopping online? GUESTS: Miriah Kelly: Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, Southern Connecticut State University Lucianne Tonti - consultant for sustainable designers and author of Sundressed: Natural Fibres and the Future of Fashion Yasemin Ugurlu - Founder and Owner of Reboot Eco Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/14/202349 minutes
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A look at the local news landscape, and how to spot 'pink slime' journalism

Some 2,500 local newspapers have closed in the United States since 2005, 55 of which were in Connecticut. Researchers at the Northwestern Medill Local News Initiative have mapped out gaps in local coverage, marking "news deserts" across the country, including our own Tolland County, Connecticut's "quiet corner." Still, there are 20 online news organizations, 13 ethnic media outlets, and five public radio broadcasting stations filling the void where we live, including Connecticut Public. And those researchers say they’re fielding more and more calls from hopeful newcomer newspapers. One new paper recently popped up in Connecticut called the Winsted Citizen, initially linked to longtime consumer advocate Ralph Nader. We’ll hear from their editor and publisher Andy Thibault. But first, journalist Ryan Zickgraf coined the term “pink slime journalism” to refer to low-quality journalism disguised as local news. Ten years later, he says the problem has evolved. Plus, UConn journalism professor Amanda Crawford and FreePress senior counsel Nora Benavidez join us. GUESTS: Ryan Zickgraf: Journalist Amanda J. Crawford: Assistant Professor of Journalism, University of Connecticut Nora Benevidez: Senior Counsel and Director of Digital Justice and Civil Rights, FreePress Andy Thibault: Editor and Publisher, Winsted Citizen Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/13/202349 minutes
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'Our Red Book': Everyone has a period story

After collecting oral histories from generations of women in her family in "My Little Red Book," Rachel Kauder Nalebuff created Our Red Book, an extended project reflecting the experience of people of all races, ages and genders around the world. But there’s so much stigma and misinformation around periods. This hour, three Connecticut-based contributors featured in her book join us, breaking down this bloody topic. GUESTS: Rachel Kauder Nalebuff: Editor, Our Red Book Michelle Memran: Documentary Filmmaker Kica Matos: New Haven-based Immigration Rights Activist and Organizer Axel Gay: Teen Writer Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/10/202349 minutes
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Going green with your self-care

When you’re searching for personal care products, whether a bar of soap or a bottle of lotion, are you reading the ingredients label? What harmful ingredients should be avoided? A recent study from the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found potential links between the regular use of hair straightening products like relaxers that contained "formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasing chemicals," and uterine cancer, prompting a new federal lawsuit. There have been similarly troubling findings and lawsuits around some deodorants containing benzene, and powders containing talc contaminated with asbestos. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame found PFAS, sometimes called "forever chemicals," in 52% of cosmetics. Only a fraction of those products listed PFAS on the label. This hour, we hear from local makers who are focused on safe and natural ingredients. Plus, the Environmental Working Group has been building a searchable database of different products and ingredients for almost two decades, hoping to make it easier for consumers to shop smart. GUESTS: Melanie Benesch: Vice President of Government Affairs, Environmental Working Group Sami Jo Artus: Founder and Chief Beauty Maker, florapothecarie Mecca Davis-Provite: Owner, Rootuals Natural Hair Care Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/9/202349 minutes
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The future of voting rights in Connecticut

After losing the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump made false claims about voter fraud, reigniting efforts from Republicans to restrict voting access across the country. States like Florida, Texas, and Georgia all have passed sweeping voting restrictions. But here in Connecticut, the opposite has been true. There's been a push to expand voting access, after residents voted overwhelmingly in favor of early voting last November. Now, lawmakers in the state Capitol are figuring out what that could look like in Connecticut. This hour, we look at the state of voting rights in Connecticut and at the national level. GUESTS: Jaden Edison: Justice Reporter, The Connecticut Mirror Dr. Bilal Sekou: Hillyer College Associate Professor of Politics and Government, University of Hartford Jonathan Wharton: Associate Professor of Political Science and Urban Affairs, Southern Connecticut State University  Ruth Greenwood: Director of the Election Law Clinic, Harvard Law School Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/8/202349 minutes
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Conductor Eric Jacobsen says goodbye to the Greater Bridgeport Symphony

Eric Jacobsen is completing his final season with the Greater Bridgeport Symphony. Today on Where We Live, we talk to Eric about his work as a conductor and we’ll also hear about the search for the next Greater Bridgeport Symphony conductor. The performing art took a huge financial hit during the pandemic, but the Greater Bridgeport Symphony found a way to gather and perform during this time. We hear about their commitment to serving the Greater Bridgeport community, and their work to get the children interested in classical music. Have questions about what life is like working in an orchestra? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Eric Jacobsen: conductor at the Greater Bridgeport Symphony orchestra. He is also a cellist and a member of Yo-Yo Ma's Silk Road Project Mark Halstead: Executive Director of the Greater Bridgeport Symphony Chelsea Tipton II: Music Director of the Symphony of Southeast Texas, in Beaumont, Texas He also serves as the Principal Pops Director for the New Haven Symphony Orchestra in Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/7/202349 minutes
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What pay transparency could mean for workers

Pay transparency is a growing movement across the United States.Connecticut adopted its own legislation in the form of “An Act Concerning the Disclosure of Salary Ranges,” which went into effect on October 1, 2021.Today we talk about the types of pay transparency, the challenges that come with it, and what companies are doing to lessen the anxiety of talking about pay.We hear from the VP of Compensation Consulting at Salary.com, Garry Straker.What does the salary transparency movement mean for you?GUESTS: Garry Straker: VP of Compensation Consulting at Salary.com Hannah Williams: CEO and Founder of Salary Transparent Street  Mandi Woodruff-Santos: Founder of group coaching community Mandi Money Makers Peter Bamberger: Professor of Management at Coller School of Management at Tel Aviv University and Author of Exposing Pay: Pay Transparency and What It Means for Employees, Employers, and Public Policy This show was pre-taped on December 15th, 2022, and originally aired December 20, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/6/202346 minutes, 31 seconds
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Forever young: The rise of the 'kidults'

Toys are occasionally marketed to "children of all ages." In recent years, market research has shown the number of toy-buyers over 12 years old is growing. The demographic, sometimes called "kidults," now comprises a quarter of the annual toy retail market, and an impressive 60% of the market’s growth in the last year, according to market research company NPD Group. Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, a professor of psychology at Temple University, discusses why familiar toys might appeal to us today, and the links between how we played as children and how we socialize now. Plus, one California-based slime-maker is raking in millions from children and adults alike. There's even one slime product called "Clay-Doh." What toy from your childhood still sparks joy? Connecticut Public staffers and listeners respond. GUESTS: Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek: Professor of Psychology, Temple University; Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution Olivya Soth: Co-Owner, OG Slimes Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/3/202349 minutes
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Domestic violence cases are getting more aggressive, here's how our state is addressing it

he rate of deaths caused by domestic violence in Connecticut hasn't changes much over several decades, averaging 14 intimate partner homicides per year. What has changed is the degree of lethality of these events. When they do occur, they are more aggressive and have an increased risk of being fatal. This hour, we’ll hear from the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence. We’ll learn about statewide efforts to reduce domestic violence, and what teen dating violence looks like. And we'll learn more about a recent law passed in Connecticut on coercive control, allowing individuals experiencing psychological abuse and other non-physical forms of abuse to file a restraining order. GUESTS: Meghan Scanlon: CEO of the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence Barbara Damon: Executive Director, Prudence Crandall Center If you need help or just someone to talk to, please visit CTSafeConnect.org or call or text (888) 774-2900. Advocates are available 24/7. You can also visit the National Domestic Violence Hotline or call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or text "START" to 88788. Learn more about lethality by visiting The Laurel Center's "Lethality Assessment"Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/2/202349 minutes
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The state of gun reform in Connecticut and beyond

There have been more than 80 mass shootings in the U.S. so far this year, according to the Gun Violence Archive. But gun violence isn’t just limited to mass shootings. Every day, hundreds of Americans are shot in murders, suicides, and more. In Connecticut, there are some of the strongest gun laws in the U.S. Yet gun violence continues to rock communities across the state. While Governor Ned Lamont has put forward a comprehensive and ambitious gun safety agenda, Second Amendment groups are already pushing back. This hour, we examine the state of gun reform in Connecticut and at the federal level. Plus, in the coming weeks, thousands of Nutmeggers — especially low income residents — are expected to lose Medicaid coverage if they don’t act soon. GUESTS: Mark Pazniokas: Capitol Bureau Chief, CT Mirror Christine Stuart: Editor-in-Chief, CTNewsJunkie Chip Brownlee: Reporter, The Trace Sujata Srinivasan: Senior Health Reporter, Connecticut Public Radio Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/1/202349 minutes
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A look at environmental justice efforts in Connecticut: 'It's everybody's problem'

The Environmental Protection Agency recently launched a new office dedicated to environmental justice and civil rights. EPA administrator Michael Regan says the 200-person office was needed to elevate the fight for overlooked communities, who are too-often left vulnerable to pollution, contamination, or as one guest notes, "food apartheid." There are plans to distribute $3 billion in grant money to communities in need. This hour, we dig into the issue of environmental justice. What are the environmental injustices where we live, and who is pushing for change? How are EJ advocates feeling? Sharon Lewis is the executive director of the Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice, who says she is experiencing the issue firsthand after her home in Hartford's North End was rendered uninhabitable due to sewage overflow and flooding issues. While the EPA is actively investigating sewage issues in the area alongside the State Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, the Metropolitan District Commission or MDC, the non-profit corporation overseeing sewage and water service in the region, says they believe Lewis is dealing with a "private property issue," versus a failure of infrastructure. There is a GoFundMe raising money to help pay for repairs and Lewis' temporary housing at a hotel, but she says she is hoping for further updates from federal, state or local authorities. Lewis joins us to discuss her recent experience, and how it has informed the work she does. She touches on common misconceptions about environmental justice and its application. "It's everybody's problem," she says. Lewis says the Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice is also working on a water justice campaign in Hartford's North End. Hartford Courant social justice and race reporter Deidre Montague shares her reporting. Plus, we hear from Kat Morris, a local scholar-activist for intersectional environmental justice. GUESTS: Sharon Lewis: Executive Director, Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice Deidre Montague: Social Justice and Race Reporter, Hartford Courant Kat Morris: Scholar-Activist for Intersectional Environmental Justice Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/28/202349 minutes
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One year in, Connecticut's Ukrainian community reflects on the war in Ukraine

We just passed the one marker of the war in Ukraine. President Biden’s recent trip abroad signified the United States’ support of Ukraine, but experts are saying that the end of the war is not in sight. Americans are divided on how involved our country should be in the war effort. Would you like to see the United States increase military aid for Ukraine? Today, we talk to members of the Ukrainian diaspora living in Connecticut, as well as a Ukrainian American, currently living in Ukraine to support the war effort. What should Connecticut residents do to support Ukrainians living in our state? You can learn more about sponsoring a family from Ukraine by visiting Connecticut for Ukraine. GUESTS Alex Kuzma: Chief Development Officer for the Ukrainian Catholic University Foundation Dana Bucin: Immigration Attorney at Murtha Cullina and Honorary Consul of Romania to Connecticut  Larissa Babij: writer, translator and dancer living in Kyiv, Ukraine. Her newsletter is “A Kind of Refugee.” Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/27/202349 minutes
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'Blackology': How can efforts around inclusivity in STEM fields go farther?

Of the millions of people working in STEM fields in the U.S., only 9% are Black, according to the Pew Research Center. Those numbers are "unchanged" since 2016. How can efforts around “inclusivity” in these fields go farther? Environmental scientist Dr. Nyeema Harris has written about the importance of Blackology. “Blackologists are not simply scholars that are Black but, rather, are scholars who deliberately leverage and intersect Blackness into advancing knowledge production," she writes. Dr. Harris joins us to discuss how this approach is applied to environmental science and so many other disciplines. Plus, public health professor Dr. Ijeoma Opara discusses her work to reduce racial health disparities, and to "strengthen the pipeline of Black youth to the field of public health research." GUESTS: Dr. Ijeoma Opara: Assistant Professor, Yale School of Public Health; Assistant Clinical Professor, Yale School of Nursing Dr. Nyeema Harris: Knobloch Family Associate Professor of Wildlife and Land Conservation, Yale School of the Environment Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/24/202349 minutes
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ChatGPT and AI are changing how we think about academic integrity

Artificial intelligence and the academic world is colliding and challenging colleges to develop stronger policies around academic integrity. Today, we talk about how Chatgpt - a new AI app - is taking universities by storm. We’ll also learn about some of the bigger conversations around AI and ethics. Many times, these applications are built with biases, sometimes leading to devastating consequences. Reid Blackman, author of Ethical Machines, says companies need to keep this in mind when using these programs. Have you tested out Chatgpt? GUESTS: Reid Blackman: author of Ethical Machines: Your Concise Guide to Totally Unbiased, Transparent, and Respectful AI Alfred Guy: R.W.B. Lewis Director of Writing and Tutoring at Yale University Jeff Young: Editor of EdSurge, an education journalism initiative Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/23/202349 minutes
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How does the state budget proposal promise to address inequality, as required by a new law?

For the first time under a new law, the state’s budget is required to justify how spending would help reduce socioeconomic and racial inequities where we live. The budget law was passed last spring, calling for a quote "explanation of how provisions further the governor’s efforts to ensure equity in the state," helping to "identify and remedy past and present patterns of discrimination." According to the Economic Policy Institute, "Connecticut ranks #3 of the 50 states in income inequality." The United Way of Connecticut projects the basic "survival budget" for a family of four exceeds $90,000 per year, reports Keith Phaneuf, the Connecticut Mirror's budget reporter. Even prior to the pandemic, the organization projected 38% of Connecticut residents were living paycheck-to-paycheck, or falling behind, Phaneuf writes. So how did Governor Lamont’s $50.5 billion budget meet this new mandate? And what’s missing? This hour, we examine where critical items like housing, health care and higher-education come in. GUESTS: Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter, Connecticut Mirror Dan Haar: Associate Editor, Hearst Connecticut Media Jonathan Wharton: Professor of Political Science at Southern Connecticut State University; Associate Dean at the School of Graduate and Professional Studies Ginny Monk: Children’s Issues and Housing Reporter, Connecticut Mirror Jennifer Ludden: National Correspondent, NPR Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/22/202349 minutes
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Providing healthy and free school lunches for all

Governor Lamont recently signed legislation to extend Connecticut’s free school lunch program through the academic year, with a $60 million price tag. Today, we talk about what free lunches mean for students. How will they benefit, what are the costs? Marlene Schwarts of UConn joins us. She says students should never have to worry about being hungry at school. The USDA recently announced new standards for nutrition in schools, including eliminating trans fats, and lowering sugar and sodium content in school lunches. Healthier lunches means increased costs in a time where we are already seeing food shortages and increased costs in labor. GUESTS: Lonnie Burt: Senior Director of Food & Child Nutrition Services at Hartford Public Schools Marlene Schwartz: Director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Health at UConn Dr. Melissa Santos: Division Chief of Pediatric Psychology and Clinical Director for Pediatric Obesity at Connecticut Children's Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/21/202349 minutes
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How mild winters and sudden cold snaps affect local wildlife

Connecticut joined every other New England state in logging the warmest January on-record this year. Areas like Bridgeport are seeing record-low seasonal snowfall, while still logging more than five inches of rain according to the National Weather Service. You may have already heard unusual bird calls, or noticed your crocuses have cropped up early. Still, there have been two arctic blasts between these unseasonable temperatures, and another "cool-down" expected ahead. So how are these fluctuations affecting the local ecology? Forest ecologist Dr. Susanna Kerio touches on the critical role trees play, and DEEP wildlife biologist Jenny Dickson discusses how a wide variety of animals are affected. Plus, a warning from the state’s main tick-tracking center and an update from the Connecticut Audubon Society. How has the unseasonable warmth affected wildlife where you live? GUESTS: Dr. Susanna Kerio: Forest Ecologist, Dept. of Environmental Science and Forestry at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Jenny Dickson: Wildlife Division Director, Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection Dr. Goudarz Molaei: Research Scientist, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station; Director of the Tick and Tick-borne Diseases Surveillance Program, Center for Vector Biology and Zoonotic Diseases Tom Anderson: Director of Communications and Community Outreach, Connecticut Audubon Society Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/17/202349 minutes
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The power of puppets: New toolkit helps kids process "heavy feelings"

Emily Wicks with UConn's Ballard Institute and Museum of Puppetry noticed the pandemic-era disruptions to kids' social-emotional learning and development, and reached out to Sandy Chafouleas at the university's Neag School of Education.Together they developed Feel Your Best Self, a puppet-centered program aimed at helping "strengthen the emotional well-being of elementary-aged children."This hour, we hear from Wicks and Chafouleas about their hopes for the toolkit's application where we live.Through a series of videos, kid puppets CJ, Nico and Mena help children acknowledge that they have complex emotions, modeling how to express and process them.UntitledThe Feel Your Best Self team is working with the Connecticut's Statewide Family Engagement Center to help bridge the divide between the home and classroom.Veronica Marion with the Center says the program is a "win-win" at a pivotal moment. "We see the numbers currently in regards to social-emotional learning, it’s off the charts. Students are really in the need of something."With puppets in the room, Marion says, "children will talk more, they will open up more, just the fact that there’s a distraction, just the fact that there’s something else that they’re focusing on."Plus, we hear from Ximena Marin, a teacher at Natchaug Elementary School in Windham who piloted the program in her bilingual classroom.GUESTS: Emily Wicks: Co-founder, Feel Your Best Self Collaborative Project; Manager of Operations and Collections, University of Connecticut's Ballard Institute and Museum of Puppetry Sandy Chafouleas: Co-founder, Feel Your Best Self Collaborative Project; Neag Endowed Professor, Department of Educational Psychology at UConn's Neag School of Education; Co-Director, UConn Collaboratory on School and Child Health Ximena Marin: Third-grade Teacher, Natchaug Elementary School Veronica Marion: Manager of Family-School Partnerships, Connecticut's Statewide Family Engagement Center Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired January 6, 2023.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/16/202347 minutes, 34 seconds
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The battle over inclusive curriculum in Connecticut and across the nation

It’s been almost four years since Connecticut lawmakers required schools to offer students a Black and Latino studies class. The requirement was signed into law in June of 2019 and it went into effect last fall. It’s required that every district offer Black and Latino studies, but that doesn’t mean every child in Connecticut takes the course. First, the class is an elective. And second, the Connecticut department of education says that some school districts haven’t introduced the course yet due to there not being enough kids enrolled into the curriculum. And as children in our state have begun to take the class, other states are rejecting curriculum inclusive of people of color. According to Education Week reporter Eesha Pendharkar “Florida is one of 18 states that have passed laws restricting some lessons on race and racism.” She’ll talk to us about how race is being debated in schools across America. Are you concerned about the curriculum where you live? GUESTS: Eesha Pendharkar: Staff Writer for Race and Opportunity Ed Week Dr. Bilal Sekou: Hillyer College Associate Professor of Politics and Government, University of Hartford John Craven: News 12 Connecticut political reporter Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/15/202349 minutes
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The 'hidden history' of Valentine's Day – and how to make it your own

Elizabeth Nelson, a associate professor of history at University of Nevada Las Vegas, has examined the "hidden history of Valentine’s Day." Beyond the pressures of consumer culture, or any outsized emphasis on romantic love, she says there's been a yearning for something more sincere "from the very beginning." This hour, Nelson digs into the history of this holiday, helping distinguish tall tale from true story. Plus, one writer and poetry-lover has meditated on the potential the holiday holds for us today, and the many forms love takes. Lindsey Weishar joins us. GUESTS: Elizabeth Nelson: Associate Professor of History, University of Nevada Las Vegas Lindsey Weishar: Freelance Writer, The Catholic Post, Ploughshares, and Stamford-based Verily; Poet Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/14/202349 minutes
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The evolution of memes and how they've shape political dialogue

Joan Donovan is the Research Director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy and author of the book Meme Wars: The Untold Story of the Online Battles Upending Democracy in America.Today, we talk about the evolution of memes as political devices, and how it shaped the far right. We hear from Joan and learn about her journey to mapping out the darkest corners of the world wide web. What questions do you have about memes, meme culture and how it shapes the internet? GUEST: Joan Donovan: Research Director for the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University and author of the book Meme Wars: The Untold Story of the Online Battles Upending Democracy in America. Dr. Evan Perkoski: Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/13/202349 minutes
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In "Reciprocity Project," Indigenous voices reframe our relationship to the Earth

In one episode of the docu-series Reciprocity Project, Connecticut-based educator and member of the Passamaquoddy Tribe Chris Newell teaches acclaimed cellist Yo-Yo Ma a pow-wow song. Together, they play at sunrise, "singing up the sun" in the tradition of the Wabanaki or People of the Dawnland, a confederation of four tribes in Maine including Passamaquoddy. This hour, we hear about this film series from Newell and executive producer Tracy Rector, and about the increasing urgency of centering Indigenous perspectives on our planet and the climate. The series is intended to inspire conversation and action on climate; "to create a paradigm shift that reframes our relationships to the Earth, other living beings, and one another." Plus, a conversation on the Native food movement with Navajo journalist and podcaster Andi Murphy. GUESTS: Chris Newell: Co-Founder and Director of Education, Akowmawt Educational Initiative; Member of the Passamaquaddy Tribe; Museum Educator; Children's Book Author Tracy Rector: Managing Director of Storytelling, Nia Tero; Executive Producer, Reciprocity Project Jennifer Krausberg: Composer; Member of the Tuscarora Nation of North Carolina Andi Murphy: Navajo Journalist; Host, Toasted Sister Podcast Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/10/202349 minutes
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Unpacking violence, bias and trauma in the AAPI community

We are hearing a lot more about hate crimes against members of the AAPI community - that’s the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. The recent shootings in California are only one of many acts of violence carried out against this population. Acts of physical violence aren’t the only thing we’re seeing. According to a study in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, “one-third of Asian respondents report bias victimization during the pandemic.” Today, we talk about how these incidents are impacting the mental health and collective trauma of this community. We will hear from activists within the AAPI community in Connecticut. And we want to hear from you too. GUESTS: Christine Kim: co-founder of aapiNHV Quan Tran: Senior Lecturer in Ethnicity, Race and Migration, Acting Director of Undergraduate Studies at Yale University, and a member of Asian Pacific American Coalition Mike Keo: Founder of #IAMNOTAVIRUS Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/9/202349 minutes
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Will added restrictions help Connecticut’s new medical aid-in-dying bill pass this time around?

Ten states and Washington D.C. currently support medical aid in dying for terminally-ill patients. Advocates and lawmakers like Public Health Committee Co-Chair and State Sen. Dr. Saud Anwar are hoping Connecticut is closer than ever to becoming the eleventh state to adopt a medical aid-in-dying law. Connecticut Public health reporter Sujata Srinivasan spoke with Sen. Anwar about the plan to include additional restrictions around age limits and physician sign-offs, that he hopes will help the bill pass the Judiciary Committee, where a similar bill stopped last session. Aid-in-dying bills have been proposed in Connecticut more than a dozen times over the last thirty years. Longtime NPR host and journalist Diane Rehm has touched on her mother's death and her late husband's battle with Parkinson's Disease, setting out to explore the issue of patient autonomy in her book, When My Time Comes: Conversations About Whether Those Who Are Dying Should Have the Right to Determine When Life Should End. This hour, Rehm and Srinivasan will join us to discuss the right-to-die movement where we live, along with CT News Junkie editor-in-chief Christine Stuart. Plus, a preview of the biennial state budget with Stuart and News 12 political reporter John Craven. GUESTS: Diane Rehm: Host, On My Mind with Diane Rehm; Author, When My Time Comes: Conversations About Whether Those Who Are Dying Should Have the Right To Determine When Life Should End Sujata Srinivasan: Health Reporter, Connecticut Public Anita Hannig: Cultural Anthropologist; Author, The Day I Die: The Untold Story of Assisted Dying in America Christine Stuart: Editor-in-Chief, CT News Junkie John Craven: Political Reporter, News 12 Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/8/202349 minutes
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Many beach-nesting birds in Connecticut face an ’uncertain future’

The story of the American Oystercatcher in Connecticut is "one of success and hope; however, because of the increasing threat from climate change and habitat loss, its future is uncertain," writes Audubon Connecticut Coastal Program Coordinator Beth Amendola. Whether the Oystercatcher, the Piping Plover or the Semipalmated Sandpiper, beach-nesting birds in Connecticut require "continual vigilance to maintain and increase their populations."This hour, we hear takeaways from the latest "State of the Birds" report from the Connecticut Audubon Society, touching on the similar threats facing wading birds like herons and egrets.Milan Bull, Senior Director of Science and Conservation for the Connecticut Audubon Society, says there are several holdouts of protected egret populations in Connecticut, but those populations are "teetering."Plus, raptor nests are back on the rise in Connecticut. DEEP wildlife biologist Brian Hess joins us to discuss.If you're interested in contributing to these conservation efforts or volunteering, you can find more information with the Connecticut Audubon Society and the Audubon Alliance for Coastal Waterbirds.GUESTS: Patrick Comins: Executive Director, Connecticut Audubon Society Milan Bull: Senior Director of Science and Conservation, Connecticut Audubon Society Elizabeth Amendola: Coastal Program Coordinator, Audubon Connecticut Brian Hess: Wildlife Division Biologist, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired on December 19, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/7/202348 minutes, 31 seconds
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Get to know Where We Live’s new host Catherine Shen

On Monday, February 6, 2023, Where We Live officially welcomed Catherine Shen to the hosting seat of the show. Some of our listeners may be familiar with Catherine’s voice, having heard her guest host several episodes of Where We Live in the past two months or hearing her news reporting on Connecticut Public over the last two years. Where We Live producer Tess Terrible sat down with Catherine to learn more about her background, how journalism became her professional calling and what she’s most excited about in this new role as host.  Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/6/202318 minutes
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Turning the page: A show about journaling with Where We Live's new host

Did you pledge to be more grateful or practice more self care in the New Year? Journaling can help! The benefits of putting your thoughts, goals, and worries on paper cannot be understated. Today, we talk about the power of journaling and how to begin journaling even if you don’t know where to start. Bullet journaling, gratitude journaling, guided journaling! There are so many options and getting started on your journaling journey can be a little overwhelming. Many people worry about their grammar, syntax and handwriting when they start journaling. Our panel of journal lovers says journaling doesn't have to be perfect. Our experts will help you combat the need to journal perfectly, and just start writing. Do you enjoy journaling? What does your journaling routine look like? GUESTS: Amanda Stern: Journaling Coach based in Connecticut Carrie Bulger: Professor of Psychology at Quinnipiac University Johana Gutiérrez-Griffiths - Founder of JJ Paperie and Co, stationary and home goods brand and calligraphy and engraving studio based in Connecticut Shawanna Jefferson - owner of Cairo Stationery in Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/6/202349 minutes
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PROUD Academy, a school for LGBTQ youth, to open in September

A new school for LGBTQ students and allies is set to open this fall in New Haven. This hour, we preview the plans for PROUD Academy with founder and executive director Patty Nicolari, and hear from Maddie and Tiffanie, a prospective student and their parent in Fairfield. Nicolari says this would be the first school for LGBTQ youth in Connecticut, and at least the fifth in the U.S. But first, the U.S Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights (OCR) is investigating a discrimination complaint filed by several Farmington parents, alleging the district didn’t step in to stop LGBTQ bullying. We hear from one of those parents, Melissa Combs. Farmington Public Schools Superintendent Kathy Greider's office confirmed the district is working through the complaint with OCR in a statement, and cited district policies and efforts around equity and inclusion. The statement also notes that “the district has a different perspective on the factual allegations” in the complaint, but that “we respect the process and will be working with OCR to assist them in their review of these issues.” The investigation is "believed to be the first of its kind in New England," per the Courant, focusing on seven of the ten allegations in the complaint. Melissa Combs: Farmington Parent Patty Nicolari: Founder and Executive Director, PROUD Academy Tiffanie Wong: Fairfield Parent Maddie Joyella: Fairfield Student Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/3/202341 minutes, 30 seconds
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Author Willie Mae Brown on her new book, 'My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood'

Willie Mae Brown is the author of a new book My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood at the Height of the Civil Rights Movement. The book, written for young adults, reflects on her time growing up in Alabama and how the civil rights era shaped her coming of age. Today, we’ll hear her message for the next generation of activists. Brown lived in Selma, Alabama until she was 17, when she moved to New York City. Growing up in Selma, she experienced the civil rights movement first hand - including meeting Martin Luther King Jr. when she was 12. In the intro, Brown explains, “I write these stories of a Selma that I knew and loved. My own Selma. A Selma that brought me joy, troubled me, and baptized me into racial injustice and into the race for justice.” Where We Live Senior Producer Tess Terrible guest hosts this conversation. GUEST: Willie Mae Brown: author and visual artist. She recently published her first book, My Selma: True Stories of a Southern Childhood at the Height of the Civil Rights Movement. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/2/202340 minutes, 49 seconds
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What do the national debt ceiling and a state budget surplus mean for you

A U.S. debt default could be detrimental to federal employees, those in the military, and beneficiaries of Social Security and other government programs. Connecticut currently has the largest budget surplus in the state’s history. How the surplus might be utilized is still unknown. Today on Where We Live, we talk about what we might see prioritized in this year’s state budget, and how Congress could respond to the debt ceiling. We’ll also discuss what hitting the debt ceiling could mean for Connecticut residents. GUESTS: Dan Haar: Associate Editor and Columnist, Hearst Connecticut Media Ebong Udoma: Senior Reporter at WSHU Lisa Hagen: Federal Policy Reporter for Connecticut Public and Connecticut Mirror Keith Phaneuf: Budget Reporter, Connecticut Mirror Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/1/202340 minutes, 55 seconds
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Latinx stories are center stage at three Connecticut theaters

At least three area theater companies in Connecticut are showcasing work by Latinx women playwrights this winter: "Water by the Spoonful" by Quiara Alegría Hudes at Capitol Classics from Jan. 25 to Jan. 29 "Queen of Basel" by Hilary Bettis at TheaterWorks Feb. 3 to Feb. 26 "Espejos: Clean" by Christine Quintana at Hartford Stage Jan. 12 to March 5 "Queen of Basel" boasts an all-Latinx cast and crew, while "Espejos: Clean" is a bilingual production with supertitles projected over the stage. This hour, we go behind-the-scenes with playwrights, directors and actors, hearing about each powerful production, and the importance of spotlighting Latinx stories where we live. GUESTS: Hilary Bettis: Playwright, "Queen of Basel" Cristina Angeles: Director, "Queen of Basel" at TheaterWorks Cin Martinez: Playwright; Actor, "Water by the Spoonful" at Capitol Classics Melissa Crespo: Director, "Espejos/Clean" at Hartford Stage; Associate Artistic Director, Syracuse Stage Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/31/202340 minutes, 21 seconds
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'Oyster Haven Lost': Digging into the rich history of oystering in Long Island Sound

Neil Berro, a local amateur historian, is building a massive manuscript on the history of Connecticut oystering titled Oyster Haven Lost. This hour, he previews this trove of information, spotlighting the state's once-booming oyster industry.Plus, the Sound School in New Haven was founded with a mission of centering hands-on curriculum, incorporating the harbor, marine science and oceanography in an “exciting educational alternative to the large comprehensive high schools in the city.”UntitledWe'll hear from Sound School aquaculture coordinators about how students encounter oysters and other filter feeders in the wild, helping to bolster their growth in Long Island Sound by planting "reef balls."GUESTS: Neil Berro: Amateur Historian Tim Visel: Former Aquaculture Coordinator, The Sound School Peter Solomon: Aquaculture Coordinator, The Sound School Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/202340 minutes, 52 seconds
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RuPaul’s Drag Race spotlights Connecticut’s “thriving” drag scene

While contestants with Connecticut ties have appeared on the reality competition series RuPaul's Drag Race in the past, the season 15 premiere on MTV marks the first time more than one Connecticut drag queen has been represented.Robin Fierce from Hartford, Loosey LaDuca from Ansonia, Amethyst from West Hartford and Jax from Brooklyn, raised in Connecticut, comprise this season's Connecticut contingent.This hour, Loosey and Robin join us to discuss how they discovered drag, developed their artistry, and why they’re determined to confront misunderstanding by showcasing drag as a force for good.GUESTS: Loosey LaDuca: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race Robin Fierce: Contestant, RuPaul's Drag Race Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/27/202349 minutes
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Connecticut tribes co-create state social studies curriculum, centering "our culture and our ways

The State Department of Education and five Connecticut tribal nations are working together to meet a legislative mandate calling for Native American curriculum for K-12 social studies classes. Resources with localized information from the tribal nations themselves – Eastern Pequot, Mashantucket Pequot, Mohegan, Schaghticoke and Golden Hill Paugussett – are expected to be available in January 2024. This hour, we preview this collaboration with educators from the Mohegan Tribal Nation and the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation, as well as State Department of Education social studies advisor Steve Armstrong. Darlene Kascak, education coordinator for the Institute of American Indian Studies and a traditional Native American storyteller with the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation, explains the importance of centering, and distinguishing, each tribe's story and voice. Plus, Sam Cholewa Tondreau is the director of curriculum and instruction for the Mohegan Tribal Nation, helping develop the Educators Project, an online portal that provides a "combination of free Native American study resources and tools" to educators and homeschoolers. For those with young learners outside of the classroom who want to learn more, Cholewa Tondreau recommends the American Indian Library Association (ailanet.org) and American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL). Cholewa Tondreau points to one book she recommends for middle-schoolers and adults alike: An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States For Young People by Jean Mendoza, Debbie Reese, and Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. "While United States history isn't 12,000 years old, it does add an additional layer of Indigenous perspective and events," she says. GUESTS: Darlene Kascak: Education Coordinator, Institute of American Indian Studies; Traditional Native American Storyteller, Schaghticoke Tribal Nation Sam Cholewa Tondreau: Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Mohegan Tribal Nation Steve Armstrong: Social Studies Consultant, Connecticut State Department of Education Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired December 6, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/26/202348 minutes
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A year for housing legislation: What we might see in the 2023 session

One of the biggest focuses for the 2023 legislative session is housing. Rent has gone up for many Connecticut residents at a time when inflation limits what they can afford to pay. They face a lack of affordable housing in Connecticut – and eviction. Today, we talk about the housing market in our state, and what legislative action we might see in the future. We hear from those covering housing across our state including Jacqueline Rabe Thomas of Hearst Media and Ginny Monk from the Connecticut Mirror. Advocates are calling for rent caps and better protections against evictions, as well as more low income housing for residents of a variety of economic backgrounds and circumstances. Are you seeing enough affordable housing where you live? GUESTS: Ginny Monk: Children's issues and Housing Reporter for the CT Mirror Jacqui Rabe Thomas: Investigative Reporter for Hearst Media Christine Stuart: Editor-in-Chief of CT News Junkie Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/25/202349 minutes
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Lawmakers call for nurse protections amid "patient care crisis"

State Sen. Dr. Saud Anwar, co-chair of the Public Health Committee, joined Sen. Richard Blumenthal on Monday to announce legislation that would "address unsafe staffing" by establishing "safe patient limits," or nurse-to-patient staffing ratios, among other protections. This hour, we discuss the proposal with Sen. Anwar, the "patient care crisis" in Connecticut, and renewed efforts to address it. AFT, a union representing many health care workers in our state, recently released the Healthcare Staffing Shortage Task Force Report, finding that the "corporatization of healthcare with profit motives has created systematic underinvestment in healthcare workers’ safety and wellbeing." Plus, we'll hear recommendations from the National Nurse Staffing Think Tank with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, and from the Windham Federation of Professional Nurses, AFT Local 5041, after negotiating a ban on mandatory overtime. GUESTS: Saud Anwar: Democratic State Senator; Co-Chair, Public Health Committee Vicki Good: RN; Former President, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses; Member, National Nurse Staffing Think Tank Paul Banach: RN; Member, CT Nurses United Andrea Riley: RN; President, Windham Federation of Professional Nurses, AFT Local 5041 Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/24/202349 minutes
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Refugees fleeing genocide develop culturally fluent models of mental health care

This hour on Where We Live, we hear from two survivors of genocide. Theanvy Kuoch fled Cambodia and the Khmer Rouge in 1981, having lost 19 family members. Reena Aurora left India in 1989 five years after her brother was burned to death in the wave of anti-Sikh violence. Both women struggled to find culturally fluent psychiatric care for themselves and their families, leading Theanvy and Reena to develop new models of mental health care for immigrant communities that straddle dual cultures. We also hear from IRIS in New Haven on how the nonprofit is adding to its wellness team to better serve the mental health needs of recent Afghan and Ukrainian refugees. GUESTS:  Reena Kaur Aurora: Board Member, Congregations Organized for a New Connecticut Theanvy Kuoch: Executive Director, Khamer Health Advocates. Family therapist and community health worker. Ann O’Brien: Director of Sponsorship, Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services  Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/23/202347 minutes, 31 seconds
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Going plant-based: Exploring Veganuary

Whether it's reading more books or eating out less, January is the month of goals and challenges. Veganuary is no exception. The 30-day plant-based challenge originated nearly a decade ago, and has since taken on a life of its own. We’ll hear from three different vegans working in the plant-based space about their journey to becoming vegan, and what it means to them. What do you want to know about the lifestyle? GUESTS: Wendy Matthews: U.S. Director at Veganuary Candice Hutchings: Creator of The Edgy Veg Mackenzie Sullivan: Co-Founder of Ellie Mae Farm Sanctuary in Storrs, CT Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/20/202349 minutes
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Why reckless driving (and wrong-way driving) is on the rise in Connecticut

Wrong way driving is on the rise in Connecticut. Today, we discuss what’s being done to prevent wrong-way collisions in our state. Reckless and aggressive driving has also become more apparent since the start of the pandemic. We’ll hear from the Department of Transportation in Connecticut and learn what can be done to ensure safer Connecticut roads for all its residents. Have you seen more aggressive driving where you live? GUESTS: Richard Retting: Senior Program Officer for the Transportation Research Board at the National Academies of Science Fran Mayko: AAA Northeast Spokeswoman  Bria Lloyd: Investigative Reporter at The Accountability Project at Connecticut Public Josh Morgan: Spokesperson for Connecticut Department of Transportation Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/19/202349 minutes
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Recreational cannabis rollout in Connecticut: Criminal charge erasure, equity and economics

Some 44,000 Connecticut residents have had low-level cannabis possession charges "fully or partially erased" from their records this month, as promised within the state's recreational marijuana legislation. Later this year, after facing delays since its passage in 2021, the Clean Slate Law is set to do the same for five-times as many locals with other low-level offenses. Fox 61 reports lawmakers agree both these laws are a "down payment" on work to be done this legislative session. This hour, we’ll discuss what’s ahead with criminal record expungement, and big-picture with Connecticut’s recreational rollout. How does the rollout compare to other states so far, including nearby Massachusetts? And how are community stakeholders being involved in the process, after promises made through the state’s Social Equity Council? GUESTS: Jaden Edison: Justice Reporter, The Connecticut Mirror John Craven: Politics Reporter, News 12 Connecticut Natalie Fertig: Federal Cannabis Policy Reporter, Politico Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/18/202349 minutes
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Exploring majestic Antarctica

Known as the seventh continent, Antarctica is much more than a home to penguins! Today, we explore the least inhabited continent in the world. We hear about how climate change impacts wildlife in Antarctica and what life looks like for those who live and work there. GUESTS: David W. Brown: contributor to the New Yorker and author to the forthcoming book The Outside Cats Matt Jordan: Project Manager for Antarctica New Zealand and board member for the Antarctician Society Claire Christian: Executive Director of ASOC or the Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition Talbot Andrews: Assistant Professor with the Department of Political Science, studying climate policy at the University of Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired December 8, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/17/202348 minutes, 41 seconds
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Report finds racial disparities persist in military discharge

Conley Monk Jr. came home to Hamden in 1970 after serving in the Vietnam War. His discharge was prompted by a PTSD-induced altercation in Okinawa, and categorized within the military as "other-than-honorable." Mr. Monk spent decades trying to access basic benefits like disability coverage, until his appeal in 2015 ultimately changed how these kinds of cases are heard by the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims, now formally allowing class-action lawsuits. This hour, Mr. Monk joins us along with his representation at Yale Law School’s Veterans Legal Services Clinic. We’ll discuss the new lawsuit they’ve filed against the VA, alleging racial discrimination. Plus, a new report from the Connecticut Veterans Legal Center (CVLC) shows how racial disparities persist across military discharge status, and how this impedes veterans' access to benefits. Across four out of five military branches and roughly one million separation documents CVLC obtained, Black service members "were approximately 1.5 times as likely as white service members to receive an Other Than Honorable rather than Honorable discharge, and approximately twice as likely as white service members to receive a General discharge." While the VA has not responded to the suit directly, press secretary Terrence Hayes provided a written statement to Connecticut Public, saying that the agency is working to address "institutional racism" and to review policies. What resources are there for veterans who are trying to secure benefits where we live, despite what can be burdensome discharge documentation? GUESTS: Conley Monk Jr.: Vietnam Veteran; Founder, National Veterans Council for Legal Redress Michael Sullivan: Student Intern, Yale Law School’s Veterans Legal Services Clinic Alden Pinkham: Connecticut Bar Association Singer Fellow, Connecticut Veterans Legal Center Chelsea Donaldson: Supervising Attorney of the Veterans Benefits Unit, Connecticut Veterans Legal Center Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/13/202349 minutes
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Bill Keller talks about his new book, "What's Prison For?"

The pandemic led to a decline in the incarcerated population, and many states have been re-evaluating the purpose of prisons. In this hour, Bill Keller, Founding Editor-in-Chief of the Marshall Project, joins us to talk about his new book, What’s Prison For? Punishment and Rehabilitation in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Keller details how the United States prison population became so massive and what we can learn from how other countries treat and house people in prison. GUESTS:  Bill Keller - Founding Editor-in-Chief of the Marshall Project and author of What’s Prison For? Punishment and Rehabilitation in the Age of Mass Incarceration Mike Wessler - Communications Director for the Prison Policy Initiative based out of East Hampton, Massachusetts  State Senator Gary Winfield - Democrat representing the tenth district in New Haven and West Haven. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/12/202348 minutes
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Remembering State Representative Quentin “Q” Williams

State Representative Quentin “Q” Williams died last week after a collision with a wrong-way driver. Today, we remember his legacy, his time in office and how he served his constituents. State Representatives Bobby Gibson and Christopher Rosario join us to share their experience working with the late politician. Later, we talk about what can be done to prevent wrong-way driving and how we might see his legacy memorialized at the Capitol. We want to hear your memories of Q Williams. How did he make an impact on your life? GUESTS: State Representative Christopher Rosario: Bridgeport  State Representative Bobby Gibson: Bloomfield and Windsor Ebong Udoma: Senior Reporter at WSHU Mark Pazniokas: Capitol Bureau Chief and a co-founder of CT Mirror Susan Raff: Political Reporter for WFSB Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/11/202350 minutes, 17 seconds
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Addressing the "waste crisis": Possible solutions and regional trends

Connecticut’s waste management crisis is already a top-ticket item for lawmakers. Before the latest legislative session began, newly-appointed Environmental Committee Chair State Sen. Rick Lopes told the CT Examiner he was focused on finding solutions. The State Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) has been sounding the alarm since 2020, when Commissioner Katie Dykes said the dwindling options for waste disposal posed a “silent crisis.” In July, one of five of the state’s waste-to-energy plants ground to a halt, offloading up to one-third of Connecticut's waste out-of-state. In recent years, DEEP has offered grants to support pay-as-you-throw programs and food collection services to help towns and cities stem the tide of trash. Food scrap collection is already offered in Middletown, Meriden and West Haven. This hour, we hear from Waste Dive editor Cole Rosengren, and the recycling director for the nearby Cambridge, Massachusetts, where citywide food waste collection is now a mainstay. Plus, Alaina Wood is a climate communicator who goes by The Garbage Queen. She takes your questions. GUESTS: Cole Rosengren: Lead Editor, Waste Dive Mike Orr: Recycling Director, Dept. of Public Works for Cambridge, Massachusetts Alaina Wood: Climate Communicator AKA The Garbage Queen Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/10/202349 minutes
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Adult use cannabis sales to begin on January 10

Retailers can start selling adult-use cannabis on January 10th. Today, we breakdown what dispensaries might look like in our state and hear what retailers are doing to prepare opening up to the public. We hear from Skyler Frazer of the Hartford Business Journal who has been covering all things cannabis in our state. Have you seen any dispensaries pop up in your town? GUESTS: Jeffrey Marrero: Marrero Consulting LLC based in Stamford, Connecticut  Skyler Frazer: Staff Writer at Hartford Business Journal Benjamin Zachs: COO of Fine Fettle Commissioner Michelle Seagull: Department of Consumer Protection of Connecticut Jim Haddadin: Data Reporter for The Accountability Project at Connecticut Public Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode!Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/9/202349 minutes
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The power of puppets: New toolkit helps kids process "heavy feelings"

Emily Wicks with UConn's Ballard Institute and Museum of Puppetry noticed the pandemic-era disruptions to kids' social-emotional learning and development, and reached out to Sandy Chafouleas at the university's Neag School of Education. Together they developed Feel Your Best Self, a puppet-centered program aimed at helping "strengthen the emotional well-being of elementary-aged children." This hour, we hear from Wicks and Chafouleas about their hopes for the toolkit's application where we live. Through a series of videos, kid puppets CJ, Nico and Mena help children acknowledge that they have complex emotions, modeling how to express and process them. The Feel Your Best Self team is working with the state’s Family Engagement Resource Center to help bridge the divide between the home and classroom. Veronica Marion, the Center’s Manager of Connecticut Family-School Partnerships, says the program is a "win-win" at a pivotal moment. "We see the numbers currently in regards to social-emotional learning, it’s off the charts. Students are really in the need of something." With puppets in the room, Marion says, "children will talk more, they will open up more, just the fact that there’s a distraction, just the fact that there’s something else that they’re focusing on." Plus, we hear from Ximena Marin, a teacher at Natchaug Elementary School in Windham who piloted the program in her bilingual classroom. GUESTS: Emily Wicks: Co-founder, Feel Your Best Self Collaborative Project; Manager of Operations and Collections, University of Connecticut's Ballard Institute and Museum of Puppetry Sandy Chafouleas: Co-founder, Feel Your Best Self Collaborative Project; Neag Endowed Professor, Department of Educational Psychology at UConn's Neag School of Education; Co-Director, UConn Collaboratory on School and Child Health Ximena Marin: Third-grade Teacher, Natchaug Elementary School Veronica Marion: Manager, Connecticut Family-School Partnerships, through the state's Family Engagement Center Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/6/202349 minutes
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Looking ahead to the 2023 WNBA Season

The WNBA kicks off on May 19th. Today, on Where We Live, we’re talking about all things women’s basketball including and hear about what players to watch in 2023. We’ll also discuss how Brittney Griner’s imprisonment and subsequent release has impacted interest in the game and spurred more activism in the league. And later, we talk about the pay gap between men and women’s sports, and what can be done to fix it. Will you be watching the WNBA this year? GUESTS: Morgan Tuck - Director of Franchise Development and Assistant General Manager, she played for the Connecticut Sun for four seasons and Seattle Storm for one season Lyndsey D'Arcangelo - writes about the WNBA for the Athletic and Just Women’s Sports Natalie Heavren - contributing writer for the Next, a women’s basketball newsroom covering women’s basketball past present and future, 24/7, 365. Lindsey Gibbs - author and founder of Power Plays Newsletter, a newsletter about women’s sports Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/5/202349 minutes
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Connecticut's 'long' legislative session begins. Here's what to expect.

With spiking health insurance premiums, energy costs and general "inflation" top-of-mind for many Connecticut residents, what are the top priorities for state lawmakers at the start of this legislative session? And what's most likely to be met with consensus? We'll discuss with a roundtable of experts. Plus, we hear from ACLU of Connecticut about their plan to renew a push for the Connecticut Voting Rights Act. The bill, which only made it through the Government Administration and Elections Committee last session, would codify parts of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965. GUESTS: Jonathan Wharton: Professor of Political Science, Southern Connecticut State University; Associate Dean, SCSU School of Graduate and Professional Studies Colin McEnroe: Host, The Colin McEnroe Show Christine Stuart: Editor-in-Chief, CT News Junkie Claudine Constant: Public Policy and Advocacy Director, ACLU of Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/4/202349 minutes, 1 second
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How short-term rentals (like Airbnb) impact the housing market and how we vacation

What are some issues with homestay services like Airbnb? And what’s being done to address them? This hour, we hear from travelers about their experiences with short-term rentals. We'll hear from an attorney representing clients with complaints about Airbnb. And later, we learn how these short-term rentals impact the housing and rental markets in our state. What questions do you have about the safety and ethics of homestay services? GUESTS: Andrea Sachs - Washington Post Travel Writer and Journalist Christina Conte - Food and Travel Writer at https://www.christinascucina.com/ Jesse Danoff  - Attorney at the Mitchell and Danoff law firm in Hollister, California  Jocelyn Ayer -Director of the Litchfield County Center for Housing Opportunity Anya Grondalski and Mira Raju contributed to this program.Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired July 28, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/3/202348 minutes
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How do dogs "become themselves"? Alexandra Horowitz reflects on her "Year of the Puppy"

Alexandra Horowitz is a dog cognition researcher, professor and the head scientist at Barnard College's Dog Cognition Lab. Her latest book, The Year of the Puppy, follows her first experience raising a puppy. "Instead of following an instruction manual for a puppy, I wanted to follow the puppy," she writes. "By slowing down to observe the changes in our new charge from week to week, I hoped to make new sense of the dog’s behavior in a way that is missed in a focus only on training. I wanted to keep a lens firmly on the puppy’s point of view—how they begin to see and smell the world, make meaning of it, and become themselves." This hour, Horowitz reflects on her year with Quid, and she answers your questions. GUESTS: Alexandra Horowitz: Professor, Barnard College; Head Scientist, Dog Cognition Lab; Author, Year of the Puppy Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired October 28, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/30/202248 minutes, 30 seconds
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A parent and child's perspectives on the need for trans and nonbinary allyship

There are several protections for trans and nonbinary people in our state, including insurance coverage for health care services and, as part of Connecticut's new "safe harbor" law, legal protections for those seeking gender-affirming care from out of state. Still, an increase in anti-trans rhetoric has led to a troubling trend of legislation and litigation nationally. How does this affect trans and nonbinary people where we live? One Connecticut teenager and his mom are sharing their story in the hopes of encouraging understanding. This hour, we hear from Oakley about his experience coming out as trans, and about the importance of allyship and advocacy. Jess shares a parent's perspective. Oakley and Jess are using pseudonyms due to broader concerns about their safety, and in order to speak openly. You can hear more from them in a profile from Health Care Advocates International. We're also joined by The Trevor Project, a national suicide prevention and mental health organization for LGBTQ young people. Its annual survey found that 45% of young LGBTQ people have seriously considered suicide in the last year, and nearly 1 in 5 transgender and nonbinary youth have attempted suicide. Plus, we examine how harmful anti-trans narratives contribute to this crisis with Media Matters for America, a progressive media watchdog. GUESTS: Oakley and Jess: Connecticut teenager and his mom Troy Stevenson: Senior Advocacy Campaign Manager, The Trevor Project Ari Drennen: LGBTQ Director, Media Matters for America Cat Pastor contributed to this report which originally aired November 17, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/29/202248 minutes, 3 seconds
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Author Luke Mogelson explores what happened inside the Capitol Riots

In his new book, The Storm is Here: An American Crucible, longtime war correspondent Luke Mogelson explores the rise of right wing extremism in the U.S. Today, Mogelson joins us to talk about the events leading up to the Jan 6 insurrection and what he saw firsthand at the U.S Capitol that day. The Oath Keepers have been accused of having a large role in the Capitol riots, and are one of the far right extremist groups Mogelson has followed. A recent report by the Anti-Defamation League shows 476 state residents are part of the Oath Keepers membership database, reports Hearst CT. What does their influence look like today, a year and a half after the riots? How influential will these groups become after the midterm elections? GUESTS: Luke Mogelson - author of The Storm is Here: An American Crucible Alex Friedfeld - Investigative Researcher with the Anti-Defamation League Center on Extremism Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/28/202248 minutes, 28 seconds
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University of New Haven Professor Randall Horton on his new memoir "Dead Weight"

Dr. Randall Horton is a Professor of English at the University of New Haven. His new memoir, Dead Weight details the time he was incarcerated more than two decades ago. Today, we talk about his time on the inside, what led him to write, and the challenges he faced establishing a career in academia.  Horton says the “weight of felony convictions never dissipates.”  We want to hear from you. Have you or someone you know been formerly incarcerated?  GUEST: Randall Horton - Ph.D., Professor of English at University of New Haven. Read an excerpt of Dead Weight on the Boston Review.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/27/202247 minutes
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In sci-fi novel about climate collapse in Connecticut, Tochi Onyebuchi locates hope in the local

When we hear about the climate crisis, it can often be framed as a future or somehow distant dilemma. But environmental justice advocates point to the many ways present-day discriminatory practices and policies have resulted in stark instances of environmental racism here in the U.S. One acclaimed Connecticut author is using his latest work of science fiction to reframe the climate crisis as inherently local, all while confronting issues of race, class, and gentrification. Tochi Onyebuchi’s Goliath envisions his home of New Haven in the not-to-distant future, ravaged by climate crisis and abandoned by the mostly-white class of people who can afford it. Like his previous work of fiction, Riot Baby, Goliath carries pressing real-world implications. This hour, he joins us to discuss. GUESTS: Tochi Onyebuchi: Author, Goliath; Winner, New England Book Award; Finalist, Hugo, Nebula, Locus, and NAACP Image Award Cat Pastor contributed to this report which originally aired September 9. 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/23/202247 minutes, 29 seconds
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Difficult relatives, FOMO, and grief: Navigating the holiday blues

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, but the holidays can be a difficult time for a number of reasons. The pressure to buy presents, fear of missing out, and spending time with difficult relatives can make enjoying this time of year challenging. Today, we discuss navigating the holiday blues. Rabbi Debra Cantor and Pastor Shawn Fisher join us to discuss ways to maximize your self care during this time of year and create your own traditions to enjoy this time of year to the fullest. What are you doing to take care of yourself and beat the holiday blues? GUESTS: Rabbi Debra Cantor: B'nai Tikvoh-Sholom Synagogue Pastor Shawn Fisher: Bloomfield Bloomfield Congregational Church Chester Elton: author of Leading with Gratitude and Anxiety at Work Carrie Vargas: psychologist and Regional Director of Ambulatory Services for the Behavioral Health Network at Hartford Healthcare Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/22/202249 minutes
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Celebrating the magic of trains

Trains may often be billed as a toy for tots, but there are locomotive-lovers of all ages where we live. This hour, go for a ride on the Naugatuck Railroad at the Railroad Museum of New England, and one holiday train tailored for children on the autism spectrum. Plus, Yale New Haven Children's Hospital is home to a toy train display that sparks joy in children and adults alike. GUESTS: Christine Faressa: Founder and President, Sun, Moon & Stars Orion Newall: Passenger Operations Director, Naugatuck Railroad Ebony Wright: Registered Nurse; Assistant Patient Service Manager, Pediatric Specialty Center at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital Walt Zawalich: Volunteer Trains Curator, Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital and Eli Whitney Museum Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/21/202248 minutes, 59 seconds
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What pay transparency could mean for workers

Pay transparency is a growing movement across the United States. Connecticut adopted its own legislation in the form of “An Act Concerning the Disclosure of Salary Ranges” which went into effect on October 1st of 2021. Today we talk about the types of pay transparency, the challenges that come with it, and what companies are doing to lessen the anxiety of talking about pay. We hear from VP of Compensation Consulting at Salary.com Garry Straker. What does the salary transparency movement mean for you? GUESTS: Garry Straker: VP of Compensation Consulting at Salary.com Hannah Williams: CEO and Founder of Salary Transparent Street  Mandi Woodruff-Santos: Founder of group coaching community Mandi Money Makers Peter Bamberger: Professor of Management at Coller School of Management at Tel Aviv University and Author of “Exposing Pay” This show is a pre-tape from December 15th, 2022. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/20/202247 minutes
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Many beach-nesting birds in Connecticut face an "uncertain future"

The story of the American Oystercatcher in Connecticut is "one of success and hope; however, because of the increasing threat from climate change and habitat loss, its future is uncertain," writes Audubon Connecticut Coastal Program Coordinator Beth Amendola. Whether the Oystercatcher, the Piping Plover or the Semipalmated Sandpiper, beach-nesting birds in Connecticut require "continual vigilance to maintain and increase their populations." This hour, we hear takeaways from the latest "State of the Birds" report from the Connecticut Audubon Society, touching on the similar threats facing wading birds like herons and egrets. Milan Bull, Senior Director of Science and Conservation for the Connecticut Audubon Society, says there are several holdouts of protected egret populations in Connecticut, but those populations are "teetering." Plus, raptor nests are back on the rise in Connecticut. DEEP wildlife biologist Brian Hess joins us to discuss. If you're interested in contributing to these conservation efforts or volunteering, you can find more information with the Connecticut Audubon Society and the Audubon Alliance for Coastal Waterbirds. GUESTS: Patrick Comins: Executive Director, Connecticut Audubon Society Milan Bull: Senior Director of Science and Conservation, Connecticut Audubon Society Elizabeth Amendola: Coastal Program Coordinator, Audubon Connecticut Brian Hess: Wildlife Division Biologist, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/19/202249 minutes
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Pandemic stress is impacting childhood obesity

Numerous reports have said obesity in adults rose in the pandemic. Childhood obesity has risen starkly too, but for different reasons than you may think. Today, we explore how stress impacts childhood obesity.We hear from Julia A. Snethen, co author of article, “When Pandemics Collide: The Impact of COVID-19 on Childhood Obesity.” And later, we’ll learn how to have sensitive conversations about health and weight. What questions do you have about improving your family’s health? GUESTS: Julia A. Snethen: Professor and Director of the PhD program at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee College of Nursing Dr. Melissa Santos: Chief of Pediatric Psychology and Clinical Director for Pediatric Obesity at Connecticut Children's Medical Center Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired January 13, 2022.Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.Our programming is made possible thanks to listeners like you. Please consider supporting this show and Connecticut Public with a donation today by visiting ctpublic.org/donate. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/16/202240 minutes, 59 seconds
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The science, treatment gaps, and myths of menopause

Half of the world’s population is made up of women. And by 2025, the number of postmenopausal women is expected to rise to 1 billion, according to the North American Menopause Society. Despite the $600 billion global market, menopause is still a taboo topic. But new scientific research on menopause on the heels of previous studies show how and where we must invest in women’s health. This hour on Where We Live, we learn more, and we talk to a “menopause doula” about treatment, gaps in care and myths. We also examine findings from new studies on the impact of trauma, disparities, and workplace policies on women’s bodies in midlife. Find a North American Menopause Society-certified OBGYN, NP, or other practitioners here. My Menoplan is a resource created by doctors and university-based menopause scientists who have worked together for over 25 years. This tool, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was designed so that women have a place to go to get accurate, up-to-date, science-based, unbiased, and personalized information about what treatments work and what treatments don’t work.   GUESTS:  Nathalie Bonafe: Menopause doula. Founder, Cafe Menopause Connecticut. Practitioner accredited by the North American Menopause Society Dr. Melissa Pearlstone: North American Menopause Society-accredited OBGYN, Westwood Women's Health, Waterbury Debbie Dickinson: Founder and CEO, Thermaband Inc., incubated at Yale and currently in the Harvard iLab and Harvard Alumni Accelerator program For more on menopause, listen to Where We Live's show A Frank Discussion About Menopause With Dr. Jen Gunter. Dr. Jen Gunter is an OB/GYN, women’s health advocate, and New York Times columnist. She’s also the author of The Menopause Manifesto. The conversation with Dr. Gunter was broadcast in July 2021.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/15/202240 minutes, 58 seconds
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Reflecting on the Sandy Hook shooting, ten years later

It’s been ten years since the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Twenty students and six educators died. Today, we speak with a student who was a fourth grader at Sandy Hook when the shooting happened. And later, we hear from Elizabeth Williamson, author of Sandy Hook: An American Tragedy and the Battle for Truth. We want to hear your thoughts, reflections, and prayers about this day. Call the show between 9 - 10 a.m., on December 14, 2022. 888-720-9677You can also leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter (@wherewelive) GUESTS: Jordan Gomes: A sophomore at Fordham University and advocate. She was a fourth grader at Sandy Hook Elementary when the shooting took place.  Elizabeth Williamson: Writer at the New York Times and author of Sandy Hook: An American Tragedy and the Battle for Truth Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/14/202249 minutes
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How Connecticut science teachers help in "discerning fact from fiction"

"Maintaining and bolstering trust in science has never been more critical," writes Connecticut College chemistry professor Marc Zimmer .His latest book, Science and the Skeptic: Discerning Fact from Fiction, explores the impact and "origins of fake science." Written to help young readers "distinguish between science and fake science," Zimmer offers tips and tricks to help "detect science misrepresented for political gain and quackery." Read Marc Zimmer's "Twenty Rules" here: Plus, Mark Ruede is Curriculum Supervisor of Science for Tolland Public Schools and Tolland County Director with the Connecticut Science Teachers Association. He discusses how the tricky and the topical are still tackled in the classroom. GUESTS: Marc Zimmer: Chemistry Professor, Connecticut College; Author, Science and the Skeptic Mark Ruede: Curriculum Supervisor of Science, Tolland Public Schools; Tolland County Director, Connecticut Science Teachers Association Connecticut Public intern Michayla Savitt helped to produce this episode. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Our programming is made possible thanks to listeners like you. Please consider supporting this show and Connecticut Public with a donation today by visiting ctpublic.org/donate.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/13/202241 minutes
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A 4-day work week might actually increase productivity

Bloomberg reported that a shorter work week experiment in Iceland found that workers maintained productivity and had improved well-being. Today, Alex Pang, author of Shorter: Work Better, Smarter and Less - Here’s How, about how some companies are navigating a shorter work week, while paying workers the same salaries. And later, we hear from Mike Melillo founder and CEO of the Wanderlust Group. He implemented the four day work week at his company at the start of the pandemic. How would you spend your time if you only had to work four days, instead of five? GUESTS: Alex Pang - author of books “Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less” and “Shorter: Work Better, Smarter and Less - Here’s How” Mike Melillo - Founder and CEO of the Wanderlust Group Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired January 27, 2022. Our programming is made possible thanks to listeners like you. Please consider supporting this show and Connecticut Public with a donation today by visiting ctpublic.org/donate. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/12/202241 minutes
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'Oyster Haven Lost': Digging into the rich history of oystering in Long Island Sound

Neil Berro, a local amateur historian, is building a massive manuscript on the history of Connecticut oystering titled Oyster Haven Lost. This hour, he previews this trove of information, spotlighting the state's once-booming oyster industry. Plus, the Sound School in New Haven was founded with a mission of centering hands-on curriculum, incorporating the harbor, marine science and oceanography in an “exciting educational alternative to the large comprehensive high schools in the city.” We'll hear from Sound School aquaculture coordinators about how students encounter oysters and other filter feeders in the wild, helping to bolster their growth in Long Island Sound by planting "reef balls." GUESTS: Neil Berro: Amateur Historian Tim Visel: Former Aquaculture Coordinator, The Sound School Peter Solomon: Aquaculture Coordinator, The Sound School Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/9/202241 minutes, 29 seconds
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Exploring majestic Antarctica

Known as the seventh continent, Antarctica is much more than home for penguins! Today, we explore the least inhabited continent in the world. We hear about how climate change is impacting wildlife on Antarctica, and what life looks like for those that live and work there. What questions do you have about living in Antarctica? GUESTS: David W. Brown - contributor to the New Yorker and author to the forthcoming book The Outside Cats Matt Jordan - Project Manager for Antarctica New Zealand and board member for the Antarctician Society Claire Christian - Executive Director of ASOC or the Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition Talbot Andrews - Assistant Professor with the Department of Political Science, studying climate policy at the University of Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/8/202249 minutes
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It's all connected: Understanding how our physical and mental health are linked

If you experience headaches, fatigue or gastrointestinal issues during difficult times, you’re not alone. Today, we explore the link between our physical and mental health. Doctors typically treat these areas of health separately, but there is a lot more connecting these two areas of health than you might think. Dr. Julian Ford, clinical psychologist and professor in the department of psychiatry at the UConn School of Medicine joins us to talk about the physical consequences of chronic stress. GUESTS: Dr. Julian Ford - Clinical psychologist and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine Aneri Pattani - National Correspondent with Kaiser Health News Heather Labbe - Director of Trauma Informed Wellness and Education at the YWCA in New Britain, Connecticut Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired May 6, 2022.Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/7/202248 minutes
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Connecticut tribes co-create state social studies curriculum, centering "our culture and our ways"

The State Department of Education and five Connecticut tribal nations are working together to meet a legislative mandate calling for Native American curriculum for K-12 social studies classes. Resources with localized information from the tribal nations themselves – Eastern Pequot, Mashantucket Pequot, Mohegan, Schaghticoke and Golden Hill Paugussett – are expected to be available in January 2024. This hour, we preview this collaboration with educators from the Mohegan Tribal Nation and the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation, as well as State Department of Education social studies advisor Steve Armstrong. Darlene Kascak, education coordinator for the Institute of American Indian Studies and a traditional Native American storyteller with the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation, explains the importance of centering, and distinguishing, each tribe's story and voice. Plus, Sam Cholewa Tondreau is the director of curriculum and instruction for the Mohegan Tribal Nation, helping develop the Educators Project, an online portal that provides a "combination of free Native American study resources and tools" to educators and homeschoolers. GUESTS: Darlene Kascak: Education Coordinator, Institute of American Indian Studies; Traditional Native American Storyteller, Schaghticoke Tribal Nation Sam Cholewa Tondreau: Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Mohegan Tribal Nation Steve Armstrong: Social Studies Consultant, Connecticut State Department of Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/6/202249 minutes
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Unpacking the psychology of obesity

Doctors and scientists are increasingly seeing obesity as a complex disease that needs to be treated as such. Today, we talk about the psychology of obesity, and emotional eating. We learn about binge eating disorder and how stress and trauma can impact our metabolism and how we eat. We hear from Dr. Sherry Pagato, Licensed clinical psychologist and professor at University of Connecticut. She researches weight management. Going into the holidays, and the New Year, are you thinking about health and weight? GUESTS: Dr. Sherry Pagato - Licensed clinical psychologist and professor at University of Connecticut Katie Mittelstaedt - Outreach and Clinical Consultant and licensed psychologist in Florida - National Alliance for Eating Disorder Dr. Jeffrey Hunger- Assistant Professor of Social Psychology Miami University in Ohio Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/5/202249 minutes
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Watching the World Cup, from Qatar and Connecticut

7.2 million Americans watched the FIFA World Cup opener, AP reports. Live viewership on Fox "was up 88% from the 2018 opener." Christine Huber, a sports analyst who organizes local Team USA watch parties in the New Haven area through American Outlaws New Haven, says she's observed an increase in local attention on the games. She and local soccer commentator Shawn Mecchi join us to discuss, and spotlight the teams and players to watch. We also get the very latest on the games, and the geopolitical backdrop, from NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman in Qatar. Plus, Omid Namazi joins us, assistant coach for Connecticut's top pro soccer team, Hartford Athletic, and a former coach for Iran. GUESTS: Christine Huber: Sports Analyst; General Manager, CFC Arena in Hamden and CFC Park in Bethany; President, American Outlaws New Haven Shawn Mecchi: Sports Commentator Tom Goldman: Sports Correspondent, NPR Omid Namazi: Assistant Coach and Director of Scouting, Hartford Athletic Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/2/202249 minutes
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Supporting the mental health needs of college students

Suicide is the leading cause of death in college students, but are universities doing enough to provide mental health resources? Today, on Where We Live, we talk about a growing need for more mental health support on the college campus. We hear from Jennifer Rothman, of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and talk about what colleges can do to better aid students, and where students can go for help. We want to hear from you - what mental health resources does your college offer? Is it enough? GUESTS: Sarah Brown - News Editor at the Chronicle of Higher Ed Dr. Nick Pinkerton - Associate Dean of Counseling Services and Wellbeing at Southern Connecticut State University Jennifer Rothman - Senior Manager of Youth and Young Adult Taskforce, based in North Carolina for NAMI, or the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Alyeska Tilly - UConn Graduate Student Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/1/202249 minutes
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Life with rare, incurable disease is all about quality