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Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

English, Current Events, 1 season, 514 episodes, 9 hours, 43 minutes
About
Under the Radar with Callie Crossley looks to alternative presses and community news for stories that are often overlooked by big media outlets. In our roundtable conversation, we aim to examine the small stories before they become the big headlines with contributors in Boston and New England. For more information, visit our website: wgbhnews.org/utr
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New play 'Toni Stone' tells the story of one of America's forgotten baseball stars

In the days when professional baseball was segregated into white and Black teams, a Black woman named Toni Stone made history. Stone was a sports phenom, and she rose through the ranks to become the first woman to play regularly in the Negro leagues, a series of men's professional baseball leagues. The teams attracted talented players including Satchel Paige, Jackie Robinson and Hank Aaron. But Stone proved to be of the same caliber — when Aaron was picked up by Major League Milwaukee Braves, Stone took his position at second base with the all-male Indianapolis Clowns in 1953.“I had not heard of Toni Stone, and I was shocked and dismayed and then really not surprised at all, because that's what history does to black women,” said Lydia Diamond, author of the play, “Toni Stone.” “That's what history does to Black people. That's what history does to women of all colors. But then it angered me, and I felt like I had to take it on, and that it was my honor to take it on.”Until recently, Stone’s remarkable story had been largely forgotten. Award-winning playwright, Lydia Diamond, takes on Stone's story in a new play featured at The Huntington Theatre.GUESTLydia Diamond, award-winning playwright whose works include “The Gift Horse,” “Smart People,” “Stick Fly” (Broadway) and “The Bluest Eye,” she is an associate professor of playwriting at the University of Illinois in Chicago, and her new play, “Toni Stone,” is running at the Huntington Theatre 
5/19/202424 minutes, 22 seconds
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Worcester found a solution to the lifeguard shortage

This week on Under the Radar's Local News Roundtable — City Hall shifts, ballot questions, lifeguard news and more.Boston’s Environmental Chief is moving on. Rev. Mariama White-Hammond used her three-year cabinet tenure to amplify equity in the city’s environmental policies from expanding the city’s green jobs to reducing heat islands in neighborhoods. She left the position to focus on her role as a pastor at Dorchester’s New Roots AME Church.Plus, advocates for rideshare companies are hyping up their public campaign for a potential November ballot question that would decide whether their drivers would be classified as employees rather than independent contractors.And the city of Worcester’s new partnership with the YMCA of Central Massachusetts could solve their lifeguard shortage — an ongoing problem in the summer for many Bay State communities.Dip your toes in those stories and more on Under the Radar's Local News Roundtable. GUESTSGin Dumcius, reporter at CommonWealth BeaconMike Deehan, reporter at Axios BostonKatie Lannan, State House reporter at GBH News
5/19/202433 minutes, 38 seconds
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'I'm the mother, that's why': Reflecting on the quirkiness and wisdom of motherhood

Mother expressions run the gamut of familiar advice.”If everybody jumps off the bridge, will you do it, too?” “I’m the mother; that’s why.” “We have food at home.”These and other motherly quips have lasting resonance — not always positive.“If you came to my mom and told her you were bored, you got assigned a cleaning task. Can't be bored washing the windows, you know?” Carissa Burk, author of “The Little Green Book of Mothers’ Wisdom” told Under the Radar.This Mother’s Day we reflect on the sayings, quotes and expressions that both nurture and challenge our relationship with mom. Rachel Marie Martin, author of “Mom Enough: Inspiring Letters for the Wonderfully Exhausting but Totally Normal Days of Motherhood,” says that ultimately, motherhood is about doing your best. She said you can find value even in your mistakes.“Learning from it [a mistake] and really learning to embrace the other women that get to walk this journey with you — and walking hand in hand without the judging, but with the loving and knowing that they too are really trying to do their best,” she said.GUESTSCarissa Burk, CEO of Creative Green Living Media Group, author of “The Little Green Book of Mothers' Wisdom”Rachel Marie Martin, founder of findingjoy.net and author of “Mom Enough: Inspiring Letters for the Wonderfully Exhausting but Totally Normal Days of Motherhood”
5/12/202421 minutes, 32 seconds
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70 years after Brown v. Board of Education, work remains to integrate schools

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court overturned legal segregation in America’s public schools in the landmark ruling, Brown v. Board of Education. The decision dissolved the “separate but equal” doctrine, effectively ending legal segregation in American education.The ruling 70 years ago was a defining moment for the country’s racial progress — it also marked the beginning of what turned out to be a slow and arduous process of integrating Black students into majority white schools. In 1974, Boston drew national headlines for the violent response to the busing of Black students. And it wasn’t until 1988, more than 30 years after the Brown decision, before close to half of Black students were in desegregated schools. Since then the numbers have significantly decreased.On this 70th anniversary, Under the Radar considers the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education in Boston and nationwide.GUESTSTomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Harvard Radcliffe Institute, professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School and professor of history at Harvard UniversityMichaele N. Turnage Young, senior counsel and co-manager of the Equal Protection Initiative at the Legal Defense FundAlisa R. Drayton, executive director of the Yawkey Club of Roxbury
5/12/202436 minutes, 28 seconds
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'One Last Word' finds the comedy in what happens when you tell someone how you really feel

Author Suzanne Park's new rom-com, “One Last Word,” is a novel centered around a Korean tech entrepreneur — and what happens when her new app accidentally sends intimate messages to all the important people in her life.“Her goal is just to get from point A to point B. I've been conditioned to work hard and get good grades and work hard at work, and I'll get promoted, and my life will go in this trajectory that's predictable,” said Park. “And then when all of this falls apart and, crumbles around her, she sees that what she had thought in her life, as her life plan, isn't actually turning out the way she thought it was.”The fictional main character Sarah Chae is jobless, estranged from her best friend, and still carrying a torch for a high school buddy who has no idea how she feels. She puts her life on hold to create a new app about death — but then it all blows up.Park said her main character's story is not just figuring out her career and romantic life. “She also has to figure out, is her life outlook even aligned to where it should be? Because she had believed all these things before and now she's seeing that what she had believed is actually not necessarily true,” said Park.The new romantic comedy serves up a life-altering pivot for Sarah that leads to an even sweeter happy ending. “One Last Word” is Park's latest novel and the May selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Listen to the full interview above.GUESTSuzanne Park, author of four romance novels, including her latest, ”One Last Word” 
5/5/202424 minutes, 7 seconds
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A new group wants Mass. to be 'the first state to end hunger, permanently'

Organizations across the Bay State are joining together to take on a bold mission — eliminating hunger in Massachusetts.More than one million people in the state try to make ends meet with federal funds for food; many of those include families with children.The new Make Hunger History Coalition includes leaders of food banks, legislators and other advocates for hungry residents whose stated goal is to make Massachusetts “the first state to end hunger, permanently.”GUESTSJennifer Lemmerman, chief policy officer for Project BreadAndrew Morehouse, executive director of the Food Bank of Western Massachusetts
5/5/202433 minutes, 52 seconds
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A drop of ghost pepper with your clam chowder? A new Cambridge hot sauce festival will bring the heat

America loves hot sauce. A 2021 Instacart survey found 74% of consumers eat hot sauce with their food, and when there was a shortage of the popular Huy Fong Foods' sriracha hot sauce last year, one bottle would go for as much as $52 on Amazon. Right now, they go for $9. But given Greater Boston’s reputation for cuisine that is the opposite of spicy (clam chowda, anyone?) you might be surprised that Massachusetts has a long history with hot sauce — the first bottled cayenne sauces appeared here in 1807.“There is a really, really long history of use of hot and spicy foods in the Americas,” Megan Elias, director of the food studies programs at Boston University, told Under the Radar. “The capsicum comes from the Americas. And it was, then exported out to Europe and to the rest of the world, really crucially. So it ends up in South Asia and ends up in Africa, getting kind of involved ... in the foods there. And then, eventually kind of comes back to the U.S.”The hot sauce market in the U.S. is projected to grow from about $3 billion in 2023 to more than $5 billion by 2030, and there will be plenty of spicy food for local fans to sample at the upcoming, inaugural Rhythm N' Spice festival in Cambridge on Saturday, May 4. It reflects the area's growing desire for spicy flavors, says Nicola Williams, producer of the festival. She plans to highlight the culinary diversity that exists in Greater Boston.“We have a spicy Jamaican vegetarian and beef patty challenge. We have a spicy pizza challenge with a local, Black-owned restaurant right here in Cambridge. We have, wings. And we're going to have three categories of flavors, from African sauces, to jerk, to hot sauce from all over the world,” she said. “And so we want to make sure that we infuse all of this spice throughout the event. We also have dance so you can shake it off after you've blown your mouth or palates.”GUESTSNicola Williams, producer of the Rhythm N' Spice Hot Sauce Fest, president of The Williams AgencyBrian Ruhlmann, founder and owner of Craic Sauce in Lowell, MassachusettsMegan Elias, director of the food studies programs at Boston University
4/28/202425 minutes, 22 seconds
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Over 1 million Americans start menopause every year. Why don’t we talk about it?

Each year more than one million American women begin menopause — an experience many don’t understand and few talk about. Often referred to as “the change,” the most common symptoms include — hot flashes, brain fog and fatigue.“I had insomnia for years,” Dr. Tina Opie, a management professor at Babson College, told Under the Radar. “I was sweating profusely. I would be at work and forget my train of thought.” What’s more, many are still in the dark about how to navigate this natural transition in life, even with new information and medication available. For some people like Marian Themeles, a breast cancer survivor who has experienced hot flashes, the standard hormone replacement therapy treatment is not viable, despite her severe symptoms. She says it feels like, “suffocation from the inside. You get incredibly hot, and you feel like you can't breathe, and that lasts several minutes.”However, there is a newly approved drug, Fezolinetant, designed to treat hot flashes for patients who cannot take the standard hormone replacement therapy. Dr. Jan Shifren, a reproductive endocrinologist and obstetrician/gynecologist said, for the first time, “we are really targeting a place in the brain where hot flashes occur and in very well controlled trials, it reduces the severity and frequency of hot flashes.”This conversation and more this week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. GUESTS Dr. Jan Shifren, a reproductive endocrinologist and obstetrician/gynecologist and director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Midlife Women's Health CenterMarian Themeles, a patient of Massachusetts General Hospital who uses the prescription menopause medicine, Veozah (Fezolinetant)Dr. Tina Opie, an associate professor in management at Babson College
4/28/202432 minutes, 37 seconds
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From ancient art to K-Pop, 'Hallyu! The Korean Wave' celebrates South Korea's global influence

From Oscar-winning movies like “Parasite” and the Oscar-nominated “Past Lives,” to the innovative modern fashion and the thumping beats of K-pop groups like BLACKPINK and BTS, South Korean culture has risen to global prominence. It’s known as the Korean Wave, or Hallyu.The Boston Museum of Fine Arts is highlighting Korean culture with “Hallyu! The Korean Wave” a new 250-piece exhibit which includes ancient art, current music and pop culture trends. The exhibit's curator, Christina Yu Yu, hopes that this exhibit can reach audiences of all ages. “For the younger generation, they can learn more about history... maybe for the parents and grandparents' generation, this exhibition can also help them to learn about this contemporary cultural phenomena,” Yu Yu said on Under the Radar.The exhibit also highlights the influence of fan culture for K-pop through the display of different K-pop groups' light sticks and online activism in the K-pop community. “The fandom has been the vehicle for this new phenomenon and I think it will be the crucial factor to [keep Hallyu] sustainable,” said professor Irhe Sohn, a Korean culture expert.This week Under the Radar discusses the significance of Hallyu, the links between the exhibit's pop culture and ancient pieces, and the fandom culture that continues to popularize South Korean media. GUESTSChristina Yu Yu, chair of Art of Asia at the Museum of Fine Arts, BostonIrhe Sohn, assistant professor of Korean Language and Literature at Smith College
4/21/202423 minutes, 48 seconds
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Maine legislature rallies for gender-affirming care with a new bill

This year 21 anti-transgender laws have passed nationwide with hundreds more under consideration. But Maine’s legislature has gone against the trend, instead approving a new “shield law” protecting health care workers who provide gender-affirming care. It is headed to the desk of Democratic Gov. Janet Mills.It is incredibly important “to protect states where care is legal because providers are worried,” said Polly Crozier, director of family advocacy for GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders. “There's really a lot of disinformation and misinformation out there. And we want to make sure that in states where care is legal, that providers are able to provide best practice medical care.”Plus, Massachusetts U.S Rep. Ayanna Pressley and Sen. Elizabeth Warren successfully fought for $850,000 in federal funds for an LGBTQ+ Senior Housing Development known as The Pryde. This is a big win, says Janson Wu, senior director of state advocacy and government relations at The Trevor Project, but the battle for funding like this shouldn't be so difficult.“$850,000 is a big deal for this project. But when you think about it in the context of an appropriation bill, it's a fraction of a fraction of a percent,” Wu said. “And so the other story here is that it shows the extent that extreme conservatives in Congress have used the budgeting process as a way to attack the LGBTQ community. And that's a disturbing trend to have.”And while the South End once held the crown, many now claim Dorchester to be Boston’s star “gayborhood.” But trends come and go, says Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth.“I'm so old that I could tell you that back in the day, the Fenway was considered the gay neighborhood and Somerville was the lesbian neighborhood. And so, all of it, JP, Dorchester, South End were all up and coming since then,” said Sterling Stowell. “But I think it's important to acknowledge that, certainly historically, before the days of legal protections, and at least a relative greater level of public acceptance, the LGBTQ folks were not economically a group that could afford higher rents. And so historically, we were living in areas where rents were lower.”It's all on Under the Radar's LGBTQ News Roundtable.GUESTSGrace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLYJanson Wu, senior director of state advocacy and government relations at The Trevor ProjectPolly Crozier, director of family advocacy for GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders, or GLAD
4/21/202434 minutes, 10 seconds
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Bay Staters' attitudes on abortion reflect nationwide consensus

When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, abortion rights were pushed into a blazing spotlight. The intense fallout from the 2022 decision resulted in new state-sponsored legal limits to abortion access as well as the successful blocking of would-be abortion bans in states like Kansas. Despite the highly charged ongoing national debate about abortion, national surveys show Americans’ attitudes remain about the same. A new poll of Bay State residents by GBH and Commonwealth Beacon conducted by the MassINC Polling Group echoes the national polling. MaryRose Mazzola from the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts told Under the Radar she has seen an influx of out-of-state patients since the overturning of Roe v. Wade. She said new abortion bans, “force people to travel or they force people to seek other options and figure this out on their own.”Meanwhile, the Supreme Court will soon rule on how Americans can access mifepristone — a major abortion medication and method used by nearly two-thirds of all who seek abortions. Arizona’s highest court ruled earlier this week that an 1864 law banning abortion is now enforceable.Amelia Bonow from Shout Your Abortion argues that the prevalence of abortion is more than what it seems from public opinion polls. “We all know a lot of people who have had abortions,” said Bonow on Under the Radar. “One in three women has at least one abortion in their lifetime and that is a consistent statistic across demographics race, class.”The stigma around abortion is what fuels the national debate says Erin O'Brien, a political science professor from UMass Boston.“The more that Massachusetts and other states can do to talk about how normative of an experience abortion is, that's better for politics and reproductive health for all women, regardless of whether they choose to have an abortion,” said O'Brien.GUESTSErin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston. MaryRose Mazzola, chief external affairs officer for Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts. Amelia Bonow, executive director of Shout Your Abortion, an abortion rights advocacy organization. 
4/14/202431 minutes, 17 seconds
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Rhode Island taxpayers gawk at the $132 million price tag of a new stadium

Rhode Island taxpayers are feeling sticker shock as they may shell out over $130 million in debt payments for a soccer stadium in Pawtucket. One reporter noted it was similar to the amount the government of Pakistan is charged to borrow money.Plus, the bids are in for major offshore wind projects that could bring energy and jobs to Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, where New Bedford and Salem stand to gain big shares of the money pie.And a surprise resignation by New Hampshire Congresswoman Annie Kuster has stirred fierce competition for the seat — including a top Biden aide with local roots.It’s Under the Radar's Regional News Roundtable.
4/14/202426 minutes, 43 seconds
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'Relinquished' aims to challenge our understanding of adoption in America

"Relinquished" is an industry term used to describe the process where parents give up their children for adoption. The term is also the title of author Gretchen Sisson's new book, “Relinquished: The Politics of Adoption and The Privilege of American Motherhood” which profiles the stories of birth mothers and breaks down the myths and misunderstandings about the American adoption process.For many birth mothers, the stigma prevents them from forming healthy relationships with their child and the child's adoptive family said Sisson in an interview on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. “When you only have these two types of stories to tell, the one where the [birth] mother doesn’t care, or the one where her desire to be part of her child's life is a problem, then you're not making space for openness in adoption that is well supported, well understood, and ultimately child-centered.”Listen to the full conversation above.GUESTGretchen Sisson, qualitative sociologist in the department of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at the University of California, San Francisco and author of "Relinquished: The Politics of Adoption and The Privilege of American Motherhood"
4/7/202425 minutes, 48 seconds
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From Billie Eilish to Stevie Wonder, musicians demand creative protections against AI

Billie Eilish, Stevie Wonder and the Jonas Brothers have joined more than 200 U.S. musicians in an open letter demanding protections against artificial intelligence. The group argues the new tech could undermine or replace human artists.Plus, Beyonce’s record-breaking album, “Cowboy Carter” is pushing boundaries in country music highlighting the genre’s Black artists and Black history.And comedian Kevin Hart’s peers tap him for the prestigious Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.Under the Radar talks those stories and more for our Pop Culture News Roundtable.GUESTSMichael Jeffries, dean of academic affairs and professor of American studies at Wellesley CollegeKaren Huang, lecturer on history & literature at Harvard University
4/7/202432 minutes, 11 seconds
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From fadeaways to the runway, 'Fly' documents the world of NBA fashion

March Madness wraps up this week as top college basketball players compete for the coveted NCAA championship. Some of the most talented collegiate players will go on to join the pros in the NBA — and while it's likely they want to play like superstars LeBron James, Jason Tatum and Stephen Curry, to name a few, more and more it appears they also want to dress like them. "There was a lot of resistance at first," Mitchell S. Jackson, author of "Fly: The Big Book of Basketball Fashion" told Under the Radar. "And we're really talking about the youngsters that come in the league at that time, which is Dwayne Wade, LeBron James, Chris Bosh, Chris Paul. Those are the guys that started to embrace the new standards, or mandates, of the NBA Fashion." Under the Radar speaks with Jackson to learn how fashion icons have emerged from an unlikely setting — the NBA. GUEST Mitchell S. Jackson, Distinguished Professor in the Department of English at Arizona State University and author of "Fly: The Big Book of Basketball Fashion."
3/31/202426 minutes, 28 seconds
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How community fridges continue to fight food insecurity across the commonwealth

The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the national hunger crisis across the country. In Massachusetts, the number of households struggling with food insecurity more than doubled, from about 8% pre-COVID to a record high of 19% during the pandemic. Emergency food access programs, food pantries and even targeted pandemic food subsidies did not eliminate the hunger emergency. That inspired some communities across the state to install community refrigerators, filled with food shared by neighbors and local businesses. Maria Ravelli, of Woo Fridge and organizer behind the first-ever Worcester community fridge, shares that she is, "fueled by equal parts love and rage" to continue creating neighborly food-sharing spaces. Since the pandemic, these fridges have continued to serve the high demand of the community. "We do multiple checks a day to make sure that the fridge is clean, that it's as stocked as it can be," Megan Ramette, an organizer of the Allston-Brighton fridge, said. "Things that we see that are stocked in the morning often don't last through the afternoon, and they certainly don't last through the evening." GUESTS Megan Ramette, organizer for the Allston-Brighton community fridges. Maria Ravelli, organizer of Woo Fridge, from Worcester, Mass. Here are some community fridges in Greater Boston to check out: All/Bright Community Fridge Brighton Congregational: 404 Washington St., Brighton Roslindale Community Fridge 1 Firth Road, Boston Jamaica Plain Community Fridge 672 Centre St., Jamaica Plain Somerville Community Fridge (Winter Hill and Union Square) 35 Prospect St. and 36 Sewall St., (Somerville), 33 St Clement Rd (Medford) Fridge in the Square – Harvard Square 45 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge Brookline Community Fridge 7 Station St., Brookline Lynn Community Fridge 16 City Hall Square, Lynn Worcester Community Fridges 16 Brooks St., 44 Portland St., 42 South St., 695 SouthBridge St., 2 Kansas St., Worcester Want us to add another community fridge to this list? Email: [email protected] or [email protected].
3/31/202431 minutes, 31 seconds
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Trump continues to signal he won't accept a loss in November

From immigration to reproductive rights, issues that ignited the country in the last presidential election will be re-litigated in the rematch between President Biden and former President Trump. As the contest heats up, former President Trump’s speeches are reaching new levels of violent rhetoric — at a recent rally he predicted a "blood bath" should he lose. And Gov. Maura Healey opposes a potential ballot question that would eliminate the MCAS test as a requirement for high school graduation, an opposition that puts her at odds with the Massachusetts Teachers Union backing the question. Plus, what are the takeaways from Super Tuesday and recent primary elections that may indicate trouble or triumph for both parties heading to November? That and more during Under the Radar with Callie Crossley's full hour with members of the Mass Politics Profs. GUESTS Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston Jerold Duquette, professor of political science and director of the Public Policy and Management Program at Central Connecticut State University Maurice Cunningham, former associate professor of political science at UMass Boston
3/24/202458 minutes, 1 second
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The 'Queen of Jazz,' Ella Fitzgerald's legacy is celebrated in new book

How did Ella Fitzgerald become the legend she was? That’s the question author Judith Tick asks and answers in her new biography on the famed vocalist, “Becoming Ella Fitzgerald: The Jazz Singer Who Transformed American Song," our March selection for Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club. Jazz and history buffs know about the young Ella Fitzgerald’s first nervous performance at Harlem’s famed Apollo Theater. The new book marks that pivotal moment in the life of the would-be dancer and many new details in the first full-scaled biography since the singer’s death nearly thirty years ago. Tick describes Fitzgerald's legacy as a duality: "She could sing all kinds of songs... she could go on all kinds of television programs and uplift people around her. And yet, at the same time, her humility and her ordinariness shows us the full dimensions of a great personality." From turning a nursery rhyme into a classic jazz tune to perfecting improvisational singing known as scatting, Ella Fitzgerald’s talent led her to become one of America’s cultural icons. GUEST Judith Tick, Professor emeritus of music history at Boston’s Northeastern University. She is the author of “Becoming Ella Fitzgerald: The Jazz Singer Who Transformed American Song.”
3/17/202425 minutes, 16 seconds
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Why some Republicans are aligning with Latin American populists

President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump have officially clinched the required delegates for their Democratic and Republican presidential nominations. With the unofficial general campaign underway, both parties are eager to win the Latino vote. Now, a Republican strategy to shore up Latino support is becoming clear as they are aligning with Latin American politicians — far-right populist President of Argentina, Javier Milei, was a featured speaker at the recent Conservative Political Action Committee, as well as President of El Salvador, Nayib Bukele, who told the crowd to "put up a fight" against the "global elites" to win back the U.S. Plus, accusations of racism are flaring up as temporary shelters are being set up across the state to house migrant families. And Big Papi threw a first pitch at the Red Sox's recent exhibition game in the Dominican Republic — showcasing Dominican players’ dominance in American baseball. We break down those stories and more on our Latinx News Roundtable this week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. GUESTS Julio Ricardo Varela, MSNBC columnist and founder of Latino Rebels Marcela García, opinion columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe
3/17/202432 minutes, 43 seconds
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The island spirit of Puerto Rico is coming to Boston in an inaugural cultural tour

Greater Boston is home to one of the largest populations of Puerto Ricans. It's a local community that expanded by the thousands after World War II, when about six million islanders from the US territory made their way to the mainland looking for better economic opportunities. They enriched the nation’s cultural melting pot with aspects of indigenous customs and traditions. Today, with an even greater appreciation for authentic representation and a ready audience to celebrate it, organizers have created BoriCorridor, an inaugural arts-led tour of the Northeast to celebrate Boricuan, or Puerto Rican, diaspora heritage. Under the Radar gets a preview before it arrives in Boston later this month. GUESTS Elsa Mosquera, Co-Founder and Principal at the Agora Cultural Architects And Creator of BoriCorridor. Melissa Rodriguez, a stand-up comedian of Teatro Breve, the Puerto Rican variety show performing on the first weekend of the BoriCorridor tour.
3/10/202424 minutes, 12 seconds
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A local organization is tracing the lineage of enslaved Americans to their present-day ancestors

From the 1500s through the Civil War, more than 10 million Black men, women and children were enslaved in America. Slavery deemed them property. They were listed on bills of sale; their family members were sold away and their names were changed. After emancipation and the Civil War, the formerly enslaved found many of the familial threads of connection buried or lost. It’s why their African-American descendants have difficulty tracing their lineage. Now, a local organization is leading a national collaborative project to identify each of the 10 million people, stories, and names of those who were enslaved in pre- and post-colonial America. Danyelle White, who has been restoring her personal Black lineage for 6 years, highlights the need for this project: "I'm almost doing this for the sake of justice...I am very interested in uncovering stories and creating a full picture, not just for myself, but [for] the rest of my family, and for everyone else. We all deserve to understand where we come from." Dr. Kendra Taira Field, chief historian of 10 Million Names, says that this is just the beginning of many years of hard work that must go into heritage recovery and restoration: "We're at a really powerful and beautiful moment of great potential and possibility... As we bring together the tools of historians, genealogists, and descendants, I think we have a great, great future ahead." "It's pretty hard to tell the history of slavery without talking about the white folks and their involvement," said Richard Cellini, founding director of 10 Million Names. He emphasizes that this work is necessary for all of America, regardless of whether you are Black or not: "This is not Black history and it's not white history. This is American history." GUESTS Dr. Kendra Taira Field, chief historian of 10 Million Names, associate professor of history and director of the center for the study of race and democracy at Tufts University Richard Cellini, founding director of 10 Million Names, director of the Harvard Slavery Remembrance Program and founder of the Georgetown Memory Project Danyelle White, vice president of strategic initiatives & community engagement at the Salt Lake Tribune, she has been tracing her Black family heritage for 6 years
3/10/202433 minutes, 46 seconds
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A year of 'wins' for Asian American representation in movies and TV

In 1993, "The Joy Luck Club" was a surprise hit. The poignant story featuring an all-Asian cast broke barriers at the box office. Would "The Joy Luck Club" inspire more stories drawn from the Asian American experience? No, as it turned out — it took 25 years before 2018’s “Crazy Rich Asians,” another film featuring an all-Asian cast, became a breakout global hit. Last year, Asian representation got its biggest boost since “Crazy Rich Asians” when the movie “Everything Everywhere All At Once” reaped top box office receipts as well as near-universal acclaim from critics and fans. This year, Asian representation in TV and movies presents us with "the biggest menu yet," says Elena Creef, professor of women’s and gender studies at Wellesley College. "I am so thrilled to see the most diversity across genres of storytelling for Asian-American stories — I think ever." Jenny Korn, research affiliate at Harvard University, celebrates the focus on the intersectional identities of Asians in this year's catalog, including the film "Joy Ride." "I will say this movie has the greatest amount of queer visibility for Asians," she said, adding that "of all the movies that we're discussing today, [it] does the most explicit job of declaring authenticity for Asians and intra-Asian across ethnicities." In this special hourlong discussion, Under the Radar looks at a broad sample of new Asian-American representation in movies and shows like "Past Lives," "BEEF," "The Brothers Sun" and more. GUESTS Jenny Korn, Research Affiliate and Founder and Coordinator of the Race, Tech and Media Working Group at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Elena Creef, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Wellesley College. specializing in Asian American visual history in photography, film and popular culture.
3/3/202458 minutes
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New documentary shows how flight attendants fought to transform workplace, break gender barriers

In the 1950s, most single, white middle-class women were expected to marry and raise a family — much like their mothers before them. But becoming a flight attendant, or a "stewardess" as they were referred to then, offered another kind of life for young women — a life of adventure. From GBH’s "American Experience" program, the new documentary "Fly with Me" showcases the firsthand accounts of the pioneering women, who historians argue, transformed the workplace — both in the air and on the ground. Co-director Sarah Colt describes the stewardesses featured in the film as women filled with "wanderlust," who were "interesting and engaged with pushing boundaries. These young women were drawn to an independent life of travel and glamor. But the airlines also imposed women-only job restrictions like weigh-ins, and deliberately excluded Black women. Under the Radar host Callie Crossley spoke with Sarah Colt, co-director of the film and Julia Cooke, author and historian, about the film and the role flight attendants played in the movement for gender equity in the workplace. GUESTS Sarah Colt, writer and co-director of "Fly With Me," an "American Experience" documentary and GBH production Julia Cooke, author and historian featured in "Fly With Me"
2/25/202423 minutes, 35 seconds
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America has grappled with reparations for centuries. Will it happen in Boston?

Forty acres and a mule. That’s what was promised to thousands of the formerly enslaved in a post-Civil War nation. Since then, America has grappled with the idea of reparations for Black Americans. But in recent years, some cities, towns, and states have begun to consider — and move forward — with reparations as atonement for America’s cruel history of slavery. A new 7-part podcast from GBH News called "What Is Owed?" explores what reparations might look like in Boston, one of the oldest cities in America, and if there is an achievable plan for the rest of the country. GUESTS Saraya Wintersmith, politics reporter for GBH News and host of "What Is Owed?" Jerome Campbell, senior producer for "What Is Owed?" Dr. William Darity, professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics and the director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University
2/25/202434 minutes, 24 seconds
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The Genius Next Door: Harvard's Imani Perry on the history and culture forged by Black Americans

Editor's note: This episode originally broadcast November 24, 2023. When the MacArthur Foundation named its class of 2023 “genius grant" fellows last month, the recipients joined an exclusive group of previous fellows who have demonstrated outstanding talent and leadership in their fields. Interdisciplinary scholar and writer Imani Perry is one of this year's MacArthur fellows. “I describe my work in part as haunting the past,” Perry said. “I'm trying to train my attention on those who were disregarded in the past as a way of shaping our ethics for the present and the future. So it's sort of like trying to catch a hold of freedom, dreams that have existed over the course of generations, train my gaze and shine a light on them.” Perry, who is also a Boston University professor, studies the history and the cultural expressions forged by Black Americans in the face of injustice. There are 20 MacArthur fellows across the country, and Perry is one of four based in the Boston area. We talked with professor Perry for Under the Radar's series, “The Genius Next Door.”
2/18/202425 minutes, 4 seconds
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Why the 'Battle of Versailles' still resonates 50 years later

Editor's note: This episode originally broadcast on November 24, 2023. In 1973, Americans triumphed in a fashion smackdown that earned the country respect and admiration among critics worldwide. On that day 50 years ago, American and French designers went head-to-head in a creative competition dubbed the “Battle of Versailles." The fashion show was held at the historic Palace of Versailles, the former residence of King Louis XIV. The Americans won with cutting-edge ready-to-wear and stunning Black models. A half-century later, the legacy of the once-obscure event continues to shape global fashion. GUESTS Robin Givhan, senior critic-at-large for the Washington Post and author of “The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History” Alva Chinn, actress and model from the 1973 "Battle of Versailles" Jay Calderin, founder and executive director of Boston Fashion Week and co-director of education at the School of Fashion Design in Boston
2/18/202432 minutes, 56 seconds
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GBH President and CEO Susan Goldberg on the importance of 'Reckoning and Repair' initiative

Almost thirty years ago, President Bill Clinton formally declared the “President's Initiative on Race” with the goal of jumpstarting a national discussion about race. Arguably, there ended up being more conversation about the initiative than the actual discussions he’d hoped it would inspire. In 2016, former Boston mayor Marty Walsh ushered in a similar citywide race conversation. Last month, GBH announced a multifaceted program to spark a new public conversation about the nation’s race history. GBH President and CEO Susan Goldberg joins Under the Radar to discuss the importance of the new “Reckoning and Repair” initiative. GUEST Susan Goldberg, president and CEO of GBH
2/11/20248 minutes, 50 seconds
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'Our Hidden Conversations' reveals the poignant discussions that Americans are having about race

The blood-soaked heritage of America’s enslavement of an estimated 10 million Africans is a fact. Yet some Americans refuse to recognize or openly discuss the communal inherited pain, shame and anger linked to that history. But conversations about this fraught history are happening, according to author and journalist Michele Norris' latest book, “Our Hidden Conversations: What Americans Really Think About Race and Identity.” Norris describes the real-life anecdotes from Americans in her book as "like you're just walking through America and hearing people speaking out loud about the things that they only usually only talk about in private." GUEST Michele Norris, author, journalist for The Washington Post, host and executive producer of the podcast, "Your Mama's Kitchen," and former co-host of NPR's "All Things Considered"
2/11/202415 minutes, 6 seconds
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Florida continues its assault on LGBTQ rights with a new driver's license rule

Florida bolsters its reputation as an anti-LGBTQ state with a new rule — trans residents can no longer update their driver’s license with their correct gender identity. Plus, a New Hampshire town manager stepped down after being harassed in an ongoing controversy about an LGBTQ art display. And the Massachusetts State Senate passed a bill to repeal several archaic sodomy and anti-trans laws. Those stories and more on Under the Radar's LGBTQ News Roundtable. GUESTS Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLY E.J. Graff, journalist, author and managing editor of Good Authority, an independent site publishing insights on political science Polly Crozier, Director of Family Advocacy for GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders, or GLAD
2/11/202433 minutes, 48 seconds
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'In the Pines' author confronts family's ties to Mississippi lynching

Grace Elizabeth Hale grew up hearing that the real-life heroism of her grandfather mirrored the fictional courageous confrontation of Atticus Finch, the hero of "To Kill A Mockingbird." While she had been told her grandfather, a county sheriff in Mississippi had protected a Black man from a lynch mob, who then died in his custody the following day trying to escape — the facts showed a different story. "I knew the story that I had been told... but it just made it clear that none of it was true, that this was a big cover up," Hale told Under the Radar. During her research as a historian and scholar, Hale uncovered the shocking details of one lynching that exposed the truth of her family lore. In fact, Hale’s home state of Mississippi holds the record for the most lynchings in the country. “In the Pines: A Lynching, A Lie, A Reckoning” documents Hale's family history, and the bloody vigilante tradition embedded in the nation’s history. GUEST Grace Elizabeth Hale, professor of American Studies and History at the University of Virginia and author of "In the Pines: A Lynching, A Lie, A Reckoning"
2/4/202426 minutes, 51 seconds
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Why one organization is working to highlight New Hampshire's rich Black history

New Hampshire is not generally considered a beacon of Black culture, where the last census documented people of color to be just a fraction of the general population. But the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire is working to prove how generations of Black Americans have informed both the Granite state’s — and the nation’s — history.  Under the Radar explores the trials and triumphs of Harriet Wilson, Amos Fortune and Ona Judge, among other lesser known figures that are all foundational to New Hampshire’s past and present. GUESTS JerriAnne Boggis, executive director of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire Kabria Baumgartner, associate Professor of History and Africana Studies at Northeastern University Courtney Marshall, English teacher at Phillips Exeter Academy
2/4/202431 minutes, 8 seconds
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A new dictionary aims to boost the language and pride of Cabo Verdeans

From the Oxford English to the Merriam-Webster, English language dictionaries are well established in the U.S. But the effort to create dictionaries of indigenous languages is growing, including a new one capturing Cape Verdean Creole. A local publisher is documenting the common tongue of the West African nation — and of many Greater Boston immigrants — in an English to Cape Verdean dictionary to be published later this year. GUESTS Manuel Da Luz Goncalves, founder and owner of Mili Mila Inc. Abel Djassi Amado, associate professor of political science and international relations at Simmons University
1/28/202422 minutes, 49 seconds
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New reforms open up access to disaster funding in Massachusetts and beyond

Climate change has sparked a sharp rise in fires, floods and other natural calamities. Now, the Biden administration has directed the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to speed up victims' ability to get immediate monetary support through benefits including “displacement assistance.” In Massachusetts, Gov. Maura Healey has released the first round of funding for cities impacted by flooding last year. Plus, new research reveals plastic water bottles have up to 100 times more tiny plastic particles than previously estimated — a threat to the environment and health. And bitter cold unplugged electric vehicles across the country as batteries lost their charge. It’s Under the Radar's Environmental News Roundtable. GUESTS Dr. Gaurab Basu, director of education and policy at the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health Beth Daley, executive editor and general manager of The Conversation U.S. Cabell Eames, policy consultant for Vote Solar
1/28/202435 minutes, 10 seconds
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Scottish culture is piping up in Boston

Whether you measure it by its politics, pubs or people, Boston's Irish heritage is unavoidable — but Ireland's northeastern neighbor is beginning to step out of its shadow. From bagpipes to the savory meat pudding known as haggis, local Scottish groups are making a push for more recognition of their distinct culture and history throughout New England. Under the Radar discusses the inaugural "Not Your Usual Burns Night," which will honor Scotland's national poet with traditional poetry, song, dance and Scotch whisky — and how that event just a part of the effort to bring Boston’s Scottish culture alive. GUESTS Dr. Larry Bethune, vice president of Scots in New England Dr. Peter Abbott, British Consul General to New England
1/21/202425 minutes, 36 seconds
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As goes New Hampshire so goes the nation? New voters may change Granite State politics

As goes New Hampshire, so goes the nation? A Granite State mantra will likely be put to the test in this Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary. Former President Donald Trump trounced his competitors in last week’s Iowa caucus with the biggest margin of victory in the history of the state’s Republican caucuses. But has his momentum been slowed in the days leading up to the New Hampshire primary? Meanwhile, after the Granite State refused to accept second place to South Carolina in the Democratic National Committee’s primary cycle, President Joe Biden is not on the ballot. That isn’t stopping local Democrats from leading a write-in campaign for him. Plus, a new study shows New Hampshire’s primary could be impacted by an influx of new voters — potentially as many as 245,000 new voters. Under the Radar's New Hampshire Insiders are back! GUESTS Arnie Arnesen, former New Hampshire democratic legislator, nominee for governor and candidate for U.S. Congress, and host of WNHN’s The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen Paul Steinhauser, national politics reporter for Fox News and campaign columnist for The Concord Monitor
1/21/202432 minutes, 23 seconds
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Two Embrace Boston honorees reflect on their efforts for a more equitable city

Last year, a new memorial was unveiled in Boston Common to honor the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife, Coretta Scott King. Embrace Boston, the organization behind the memorial, also announced the names of civil rights leaders whose names were embedded in the Boston Common plaza where the sculpture sits. Now Embrace Boston is adding to the roster by recognizing the 2024 Embrace Honorees who have, in the organization’s words, worked to build “a more equitable Boston.” GUESTS L. Duane Jackson, former architect and member of the Board of Directors for the Massachusetts Port Authority, managing member of Alinea Capital Partners, LLC and an Embrace Boston 2024 Honoree Deborah Jackson, former president of Cambridge College, CEO of the American Red Cross of Eastern Massachusetts and Vice President of the Boston Foundation, and an Embrace Boston 2024 Honoree
1/14/202425 minutes, 52 seconds
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New documentary features African students at MIT and their journey far from home

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is the only federal holiday that is also designated a National Day of Service. Reverend King spent his life in service leading the campaign for social justice during the civil rights movement — and a new documentary looks at a new generation following in his footsteps. "Brief Tender Light" follows four Black African students from Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Rwanda and Nigeria, as they embark on their education at MIT. They pledge to return to their home countries after graduation and become agents of change, but their years abroad challenge them in unexpected ways. Under the Radar sits down with the director and a student featured in "Brief Tender Light" as the nation marks Martin Luther King Jr.'s 95th birthday. GUESTS Arthur Musah, director and producer of "Brief Tender Light" Philip Abel Adama, CTO and co-founder of Cleva Banking and a student featured in Brief Tender Light
1/14/202432 minutes, 8 seconds
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Two experts unpack Barbra Streisand's long-awaited memoir

Barbra Streisand's life and career has long been the stuff of legend and mystery — until now. The singer, actress, director and activist spent 10 years writing her new memoir, and at nearly 1,000 pages it fills in the behind-the-scenes details fans have long craved. From lifelong insecurities and singular triumphs, to devastating losses and her ongoing fight against the industry sexism which sought to limit how she used her artistic gifts, Under the Radar reviews "My Name is Barbra" with two experts on her talent and life. GUESTS Garrett Stewart, professor of literature and cinema at the University of Iowa, author of “Streisand: The Mirror of Difference” Matt Howe, founder of Barbra Archives, a Barbra Streisand fan website and author of “Barbra Streisand: The Music, the Albums, the Singles”
1/7/202428 minutes, 4 seconds
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Why some grocery stores are rejecting self-checkout and replacing them with humans

Local shoppers at the California-based grocery store chain Trader Joe's and Massachusetts’ own Market Basket know there is no self-checkout in either store. Even as self-service checkouts gained floor space in other American grocery and retail stores, those two bet that their customers preferred the efficiency of trained human staff. And recently, some large retailers — Walmart, Costco and Dollar General — have announced they are rethinking self-checkout by adding more staff, or in some cases, removing the machines altogether. Advocates say self-checkout is convenient and reduces employee costs, while critics argue the system has failed to deliver on those promises as many businesses have been hit with merchandise losses from customer errors and shoplifting. Under the Radar looks to the future of self-checkout to find out if the practice has gone stale. GUESTS Rita McGrath, academic director of executive education at Columbia Business School Phil Lempert, founder and CEO of Supermarket Guru, a food and health news hub
1/7/202429 minutes, 56 seconds
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Mr. Mike's Merry Mix 2023: Our annual review of peculiar holiday music

For many Americans, there can be only one Christmas song to rule them all: Mariah Carey's "All I Want For Christmas Is You." In addition to 772 million views on that single YouTube video alone, it has hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart the past four years in a row and is believed to have raked in nearly $100 million in earnings thus far. But for the rest of us, there is a world of underground, often bizarre holiday music, and Under the Radar's holiday music correspondent has spent decades dredging them up from record stores and and forgotten corners of the internet. This season, for his 34th year of holiday melodies, Mike Wilkins honors his mixtape history with this year’s seasonal compilation, “Mr. Mike's Merry Mix," a Yuletopia recording. GUEST Mike Wilkins, radio engineer for PRX and GBH’s The World Stream or download his full playlist on SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/seenthat/mikemas2023
12/17/202358 minutes
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Frozen food advent calendars and a new French bubbly are popping off this holiday season

This year, the newest versions of a favorite American Christmas tradition are, well, untraditional. Advent Calendars now offer much more than chocolates — frozen food and canned wine anyone? Plus, a lesser-known French bubbly our wine expert says is perfect for toasting in the New Year. And chic new restaurants Jiang Nan and Zhi Wei Cafe are making a splash in Boston’s Chinese food scene. It’s Under the Radar's Food and Wine Roundtable: Holiday Edition. GUESTS Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of Boston Wine School, author of "The Wine Lover's Devotional" Amy Traverso, senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of the GBH series, "Weekends with Yankee," author of "The Apple Lover's Cookbook"
12/10/202323 minutes, 10 seconds
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250 years later, local experts consider the complex legacy of the Boston Tea Party

In the 1760s, Massachusetts colonists began pushing back against the ever-tightening grip of British rule. The boiling tension erupted in violent episodes, few more shocking than the Boston Massacre in 1770 when five colonists were killed by British militia. Three years later, protestors publicly rejected the taxes on tea by dumping crates of tea from the British East India Company in the Boston harbor. This event would later become known as the Boston Tea Party. "The Boston Tea Party doesn't just come out of nowhere, there's weeks of tension as the ships arrive and even before the ships arrive," said Benjamin Carp, Brooklyn College history professor. "The goal is really to send the tea back to London, and this was technically illegal ... And so if someone would just agree to ship it back, then maybe we can not have to have some kind of dramatic protest. But because people keep telling them no, this is what leads to the Tea Party ultimately." On December 16, Boston will observe the 250th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, a momentous event leading up to the American Revolution. "If you lived in Boston at that time, you were reading the letters, you were reading the pamphlets, the newspapers, people were gathered watching the event happen," said Anjelica Oswald, an American Ancestors researcher working on the Boston Tea Party Descendants Program. "If your family member was here in Boston, it's very likely that they had something they witnessed, something they read, something that brought their spirit into it, and maybe that's why they were mustered in for the revolution later." Leading up to the Boston Tea Party's anniversary, museums, schools and historical organizations across the state have come together to celebrate the significance of this historically pivotal event. "We have an amazing opportunity as a city, as a commonwealth and as a nation to mark this 250th anniversary of this iconic moment in American history," said Evan O' Brien, creative manager at the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum. "And I think we have a great opportunity to make sure that we're telling the story in a way that is as accessible to everyone from around the world." GUESTS Benjamin Carp, Brooklyn College history professor and author of “Defiance of the Patriots: The Boston Tea Party and the Making of America” Evan O’Brien, creative manager at the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum Anjelica Oswald, researcher at American Ancestors helping with the Boston Tea Party Descendants Program
12/10/202334 minutes, 42 seconds
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Daniel Mason's 'North Woods' explores a vibrant history of New England

In the middle of a New England forest, a yellow house and the land on which it sits holds 200 years of personal and political history. The home and forest tell stories of family, time, memories, ghosts and the wonders of an evolving landscape. This sweeping saga is author Daniel Mason’s latest novel, “North Woods,” a riveting, imagined story of one New England house from the time of American colonies to the present. Through prose and poetry, Mason traces the intertwined seasons of the people linked to the home, as well as the exciting evolution of plants and animals who share the surrounding land. “North Woods” is the December selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Daniel Mason is the author of five books, including his latest "North Woods." He was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize for his book, "A Registry of My Passage Upon the Earth." Mason is also an assistant professor at the Stanford University Department of Psychiatry.
12/3/202324 minutes, 16 seconds
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It's the season of giving, but what motivates Americans to give?

It’s the season of giving and a time of year when Americans traditionally make charitable donations. With more than 1.5 million nonprofit organizations across the country, there’s plenty of choices for where Americans can donate their dollars. But just last year, total charitable giving dropped by 3.4%, according to the Giving USA Foundation. "Often when people don't give, they say something like, 'how could my $5 possibly help this enormous problem facing the world?'" said Michael Norton, Harvard Business School professor and co-author of “Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending.” "So the feeling that it sort of drops in a bucket can prompt people not to give," he said. "So, when we're thinking about encouraging people to give, we're really trying to think about how do we increase that feeling of connection and increase that feeling of impact." Meanwhile, two Harvard University researchers say they have cracked the code for motivating potential donors to give. Together, they created Giving Multiplier, a research-based matching system that promotes both effective philanthropic and charitable giving and the world’s most effective charities. "In one case, you can spend $50,000 helping one person, or that same amount of money help 100 people, or even closer to 1,000 people with the surgery," said Joshua Greene, Harvard University psychology professor and co-founder of Giving Multiplier. "People in the in the U.S. are much more likely to feel a kind of personal connection for people who are suffering from blindness here, and yet the money can go much farther in other places. And so how do you deal with that?" Could this new method of philanthropy become the future model of giving?
12/3/202333 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Genius Next Door: Harvard's Imani Perry on the history and culture forged by Black Americans

When the MacArthur Foundation named its class of 2023 “genius grant" fellows last month, the recipients joined an exclusive group of previous fellows who have demonstrated outstanding talent and leadership in their fields. Interdisciplinary scholar and writer Imani Perry is one of this year's MacArthur fellows. “I describe my work in part as haunting the past,” Perry said. “I'm trying to train my attention on those who were disregarded in the past as a way of shaping our ethics for the present and the future. So it's sort of like trying to catch a hold of freedom, dreams that have existed over the course of generations, train my gaze and shine a light on them.” Perry, who is also a Boston University professor, studies the history and the cultural expressions forged by Black Americans in the face of injustice. There are 20 MacArthur fellows across the country, and Perry is one of four based in the Boston area. We talked with professor Perry for Under the Radar's series, “The Genius Next Door.”
11/26/202325 minutes
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Why the 'Battle of Versailles' still resonates 50 years later

In 1973, Americans triumphed in a fashion smackdown that earned the country respect and admiration among critics worldwide. On that day 50 years ago, American and French designers went head-to-head in a creative competition dubbed the “Battle of Versailles." The fashion show was held at the historic Palace of Versailles, the former residence of King Louis XIV. The Americans won with cutting-edge ready-to-wear and stunning Black models. A half-century later, the legacy of the once-obscure event continues to shape global fashion. GUESTS Robin Givhan, senior critic-at-large for the Washington Post and author of “The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History” Alva Chinn, actress and model from the 1973 "Battle of Versailles" Jay Calderin, founder and executive director of Boston Fashion Week and co-director of education at the School of Fashion Design in Boston
11/26/202332 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Genius Next Door: BU ecologist breaks down carbon dynamics

The MacArthur Foundation named its class of 2023 “genius grant" fellows last month. The recipients join an exclusive group of fellows who have demonstrated outstanding talent in their fields. Environmental ecologist Lucy Hutyra is one of this year's fellows. “I didn't realize I was breaking all those barriers at the time that I was breaking them,” Hutyra said. “The imposter syndrome can take over very easily, especially when you come from such a different background, and I think that the key is just kind of move past it. You do belong. You're there and you made it. Then you need to find allies and people that you can trust and that you can support, and I have been that for my friends, for my colleagues and for my students, and I'll always try to be that going forward.” Hutyra, who is also a Boston University professor, studies the impacts of urbanization on environmental carbon cycle dynamics. There are 20 MacArthur fellows across the country, and Hutyra is one of four based in the Boston area. We sit down with professor Hutyra for our Under the Radar series, “The Genius Next Door.” Listen now.
11/19/202324 minutes, 10 seconds
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Catch up on your New England news in 30 minutes

This week on Under the Radar's Regional News Roundtable: Gabe Amo was sworn into Congress this week, becoming the first Black person, or person of color, elected to represent Rhode Island in the U.S. Congress. Plus, controversy over a New Hampshire Republican who was forced to resign after an investigation revealed he hadn’t lived in the district that elected him for more than a year. And members of Martha’s Vineyard’s Steamship Authority attempted to cover up details of a ferry boat accident. GUESTS Arnie Arnesen, host of The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen from WNHN Ted Nesi, politics and business editor, investigative reporter for WPRI Steve Junker, managing editor of news at CAI
11/19/202333 minutes, 41 seconds
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The Genius Next Door: Harvard cellular and molecular biologist Jason Buenrostro breaks down gene expression

The MacArthur Foundation named its class of 2023 “genius grant" fellows last month. The recipients join an exclusive group of previous fellows who have demonstrated outstanding talent in their fields. The award acknowledges the fellows’ demonstrated talent and potential as leaders in their fields. Cellular and molecular biologist Jason Buenrostro is one of this year's MacArthur fellows. "For me, [being a scientist] is like I'm living in a dream. Growing up, my parents didn't graduate high school or my extended family, none of them went to college, and the probability that that things would work out in this way are just unfortunately low rate," said Buenrostro. "I like to think that what was once a challenge for me to move through the academic system, to sit down on the desk and to listen to somebody go on and on about about something in a classroom, is now a tool in my tool belt." Buenrostro, who is also a Harvard University associate professor, studies the mechanisms that “turn on” genes, and is the pioneer of a popular method to assess chromatin accessibility across the genome. There are 20 MacArthur fellows across the country, and Buenrostro is one of four based in the Boston area. We talk with professor Buenrostro for Under the Radar's series, “The Genius Next Door.”
11/12/202323 minutes, 59 seconds
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Despite the horror of war, these organizations continue to seek peace between Israelis and Palestinians

Israel’s war against Hamas has marked just over one month. It’s the latest chapter of the decades-long, ongoing strife between the Israeli government and Palestinians. The present day suffering of people in the war zone and its impact on others around the world is incomprehensible. And yet, even during this conflict, the struggle for a peaceful resolution continues. Under the Radar spoke with representatives from two organizations that have spent decades working toward peace in the region about why, despite the violence, they remain committed to their efforts. GUESTS Tim Wilson, advisor to Seeds of Peace and director of the Maine Seeds Programs Aziz Abu Sarah, board member of American Friends of Combatants for Peace Gili Getz, board chair of American Friends of Combatants for Peace
11/12/202333 minutes, 53 seconds
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Author and scholar Julia Lee discusses growing up neither Black nor white in America

What does it mean to be Asian in a country where everything seems Black and white? Growing up, author and scholar Julia Lee says she spent much of her formative years angry about never being seen, ashamed that she felt powerless as a Korean woman, and suffering from generational trauma passed down from her immigrant parents. On Under the Radar with Callie Crossley, Lee said understanding her place in a racial hierarchy constructed around Black and white has been a complicated journey. "It's just that in our society and in our culture, being white means you get to be treated as human, and that is all I and so many people of color want," she said. "Unfortunately, when we look around, the only people who get to be treated as full human beings are white. And so it's not whiteness we want, we just want to be treated with humanity and humaneness." Lee explores this journey in her new memoir, "Biting the Hand: Growing Up Asian in Black and White America."
11/5/202323 minutes, 41 seconds
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Latinx News Roundtable: Boston Schools' English learners advisors resign in protest of 'harmful' plan

A new plan from Boston Public Schools to integrate students who are English language learners into general education classrooms has led to multiple resignations on BPS' English Learners Task Force. Plus, compared to much of the country, Massachusetts has a low poverty rate. But it’s twice as high for Latinos. And a flag mix-up results in a cultural snafu in the new, best-selling Spider-man video game. Those stories and more on Under the Radar's Latinx News Roundtable. GUESTS: Julio Ricardo Varela, MSNBC opinion columnist and founder of Latino Rebels Marcela García, opinion columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe
11/5/202334 minutes, 10 seconds
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Author Marta McDowell explores how gardening inspires mystery writers

It’s Halloween — the season of all things spooky and scary — from horror movies, to haunted mansions and potentially even gardens. It turns out there's an unexpectedly sinister side to gardening, according to writer and gardener, Marta McDowell. She says many mystery writers use gardens in their tales of deception: "I think most gardeners understand this feeling of you're always sort of a detective. Why did this plant die? What is bothering this plant? I mean, you're even sometimes out there with a magnifying glass, trying to figure out what pest is on your petunia," McDowell told Under the Radar. "And there are quite a few crime writers who also dabble in the garden, so they have that at their fingertips for various plot devices." McDowell explores the link between mystery and gardening in her book, "Gardening Can Be Murder: How Poisonous Poppies, Sinister Shovels, and Grim Gardens Have Inspired Mystery Writers." GUEST Marta McDowell, author of "Gardening Can Be Murder: How Poisonous Poppies, Sinister Shovels, and Grim Gardens Have Inspired Mystery Writers."
10/29/202323 minutes, 45 seconds
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A new $4 billion bond bill takes aim at Massachusetts' housing shortage

Gov. Maura Healey unveiled a $4.1 billion bond bill last week targeting the state’s housing shortage. It could create over 8,000 accessory dwelling units, or “in-law suites,” across the state. Plus, a new poll highlights the 2024 election ballot questions at the top of the list for Massachusetts voters. Of those surveyed 52% said they would vote to remove MCAS as a requirement for receiving a high school diploma. And a Boston City Council candidate is stirring up controversy with comments about Black Lives Matter. Those stories and more on Under the Radar's Local News Roundtable. GUESTS Katie Lannan, State House reporter for GBH News Gin Dumcius, reporter for CommonWealth Magazine Mike Deehan, co-writer of the Boston Axios Newsletter
10/29/202334 minutes, 6 seconds
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New restaurants solidify Boston as a big catch for seafood lovers

A myriad of new local restaurants, including 311 Omakase, All That Fish + Oyster and Moëca, are making the Boston area a seafood-lover’s haven. Plus, a significant Portuguese American population in Greater Boston is reflected in new Portuguese restaurants featuring the flavorful cuisine, from crispy cod cakes to tasty egg tarts. And wine lovers are choosing an old favorite — chardonnay — for their fall sipping, driving its expected market value over the next decade upward by hundreds of millions. It's Under the Radar's Food and Wine Roundtable. GUESTS: Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School, author of "The Wine Lover's Devotional" Amy Traverso, senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of the GBH series, "Weekends with Yankee," author of "The Apple Lover’s Cookbook”
10/22/202322 minutes, 54 seconds
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From Arkansas to New Hampshire, states are rolling back child labor laws

A century ago, images of young children working in factories under dangerous working conditions shocked Americans. Since then, numerous child labor protections have been put in place to prevent exploitation and abuse. But in the past two years, child labor laws have entered the crosshairs of some lawmakers. At least 10 states have introduced or passed legislation loosening child labor protections, including New Hampshire. Now, Granite State children as young as 14 can work around alcohol and 16-year-olds can work an almost 40-hour week. "[Nationwide] we're finding kids in automobile factories on the floor of a packing house, or some chicken processing plants and in other manufacturing facilities, in seafood, in lots of industries where we really haven't seen children working in decades," said David Weil, Brandeis University professor and a former administrator for the Wage and Hour Division at the U.S. Department of Labor. "And now we're finding them in significant numbers and in very dangerous conditions, so it's unfortunately a real return to the past." Some lawmakers are saying changing youth labor rules will help address worker shortages, but experts and advocates worry that these measures will negatively impact minors. "We're seeing a coordinated multi-industry push to roll back labor standards, and what that's really reflecting is industry's desire to maintain and expand their access to pools of low wage labor," said Jennifer Sherer, director of the State Worker Power Initiative at the Economic Policy Institute. "And in this case doing that in a really disturbing way that can expose children to hazardous conditions or long, excessive hours that we know based on research, can put kids in a high risk category for their grades slipping." What’s behind the newfound push to relax child labor laws? GUESTS Jennifer Sherer, director of the State Worker Power Initiative at the Economic Policy Institute David Weil, professor at Brandeis University and former administrator of the Wage and Hour Division at the U.S. Department of Labor
10/22/202334 minutes, 57 seconds
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Cricket is the world's second most popular sport. Can it thrive in Boston?

Cricket is a wildly popular sport, second only to soccer as the most-watched sport on the globe. In the United States, football, basketball and baseball still dominate. But evidence shows the bat-and-ball sport is once again gaining traction in Greater Boston and across the country. "I moved into Massachusetts in 2010. When I moved, we had about 30 teams, [and] if you assume 15 to 20 players per team, you have about 600 players back in 2010. Now, as of today, in 2023 October, we have roughly about 72 teams playing," said Kumar Putravu, president of the Massachusetts State Cricket League. "So we've doubled the number of teams and we have a total number of players, roughly around 2,000 to 3,000 players, give or take a few. It has grown exponentially over the last decade." From Major League Cricket premiering in the U.S. this summer, to high stakes rivalries currently playing out in the Cricket World Cup, the so-called Gentleman’s Game of the 17th century is exploding in growth in Greater Boston thanks to local immigrant communities. "There's now opportunities for men, women, kids... people above 40, even people above 50, people above 60, there are opportunities for them to play" said Kartik Shah, founder and director of the Greater Boston Cricket Foundation. "As more opportunities come about, you see more and more people trying to play the game that are immigrants here from all over the world. And cricket is played all over the world. And all of these people now have a chance to play different versions, different styles, different formats." Will the surge in Massachusetts teams help add cricket to Boston’s roster of beloved sports? GUESTS Kartik Shah, founder and director of the Greater Boston Cricket Foundation Phani Kumar Putravu, president of the Massachusetts State Cricket League
10/15/202324 minutes, 12 seconds
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In the wake of the hottest summer ever recorded, climate change action heats up in Massachusetts

Climate change turned up the heat this summer — the sweltering temperatures in August and September were the hottest since global records began in 1880. Meanwhile, two significant efforts to fight climate change are taking root. In a first of its kind agreement, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut are working together to build more offshore wind farms. Plus, an $11 million grant will help Boston expand its tree canopy especially in areas where trees are scarce. That and more on our Environmental News Roundtable. GUESTS Dr. Gaurab Basu, director of education and policy at the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health Beth Daley, executive editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. Sam Payne, digital development manager and communications specialist for Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate action organization
10/15/202333 minutes, 47 seconds
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Is hybrid work now a permanent fixture in America?

You can count on traffic gridlock on most Tuesdays in Greater Boston as thousands of workers make their way into offices in the city. After the pandemic forced many workers to be remote, and then company leaders pushed for a return to the office, many have now seemed to settle on an in-between: hybrid work. Recent research confirms that employees consider hybrid to be the modern workplace, giving both flexibility and job satisfaction. The evidence also shows people care enough about hybrid work policies that some have quit jobs when their employers push for a five-day-a-week traditional work environment. After three years of post-pandemic turmoil, is hybrid work now a permanent fixture in America? GUESTS: Bryan Hancock, global leader of McKinsey & Company’s talent management practice Dena Upton, head of people at Dandy and former chief people officer at Drift, both which have embraced the remote work style
10/8/202333 minutes, 51 seconds
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Cranberry Day celebrates an age-old Wampanoag tradition on Noepe aka Martha's Vineyard

For over 10,000 years, members of the Wampanoag tribe have lived in Aquinnah and throughout the island known as Noepe, also known as Martha’s Vineyard. Traditionally a fishing and agriculture community, tribe members also harvest acres of wild cranberry bogs each year that grow on their land. Cranberry Day — the annual harvesting of the fruit — has been a centuries-long celebration passed down by the elders as part of the Aquinnah Wampanoag’s rich history. "I would say it's probably my favorite holiday, and so I was shaped by that," Jannette Vanderhoop, member of the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah, told GBH's Under the Radar. "If someone came by and there wasn't enough food, everyone just got a little less. And I thought that was really beautiful and indicative of our community and how we take care of each other." The treasured tradition serves as a way to commemorate Indigenous People’s Day, says Jordan Clark, assistant director of Harvard University’s Native American Program. "When you think about Massachusetts, when you think about the areas around Boston and the Cape and the Islands, Native people have been living on it for tens of thousands of years," Clark said. "Oftentimes a lot of the founding ideology, a lot of the founding philosophy that we think of as 'American,' is often directly taken from Native communities. But again, that's not part of our national narrative. And so, Indigenous People's Day plays a role in taking a pause and asking, kind of, the larger community to maybe refocus and recenter and reimagine kind of how they see the world and their relationship to it." GUESTS Jannette Vanderhoop, member of the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah, board member of the Aquinnah Cultural Center and author of "Cranberry Day: A Wampanoag Harvest Celebration" Jordan Clark, assistant director of Harvard University’s Native American Program, and a member of the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah
10/8/202324 minutes, 1 second
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NPR's Aisha Harris argues pop culture is much more than just entertainment

As an observant young girl and a curious tween, Aisha Harris, co-host of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour, was deeply immersed in pop culture. Her early fandom led her to a career as a cultural critic whose hot takes, pithy observations and deep dives into cultural shifts are broadly admired. But Harris says it's not as easy as it looks: "I always feel like I'm not doing enough, but, you know, in part because it's my job and also because even when I'm watching or reading or consuming any sort of art or media, if it's not for work, I'm still in the back of my mind thinking of, okay, perhaps down the line, this could be something that I touch on years later or months later. ... I'm kind of a hoarder when it comes to both books and notes, and I think that's kind of what helps me stay as up and as absorbed as I can, in addition to all the things that I'm doing for my actual job on a day to day basis." Harris has captured her adventures in pop culture in her first book, “Wannabe: Reckonings with the Pop Culture That Shapes Me.” GUEST Aisha Harris, co-host and reporter for NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour, author of “Wannabe: Reckonings with the Pop Culture That Shapes Me”
10/1/202326 minutes, 3 seconds
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Why many Latino nonprofits struggle to make ends meet

Latinos make up one of Massachusetts' largest ethnic groups, and the last few years has seen significant growth in the widely diverse Latino communities with roots in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Guatemala. While Latino workers are considered by many to be the backbone of the local economy, they are disproportionately low wage workers. "There still are very real challenges around poverty rates that are really disturbing," said Dr. Lorna Rivera, director of the Mauricio Gastón Institute. But she said there are signs of improvement: "For second generation Latinos, we are seeing more positive outcomes. So, we do have some hope there for the next generation." For many residents, Latino nonprofits have helped fill in the gaps providing vital services to local Latino communities. And yet, many Latino nonprofits in Massachusetts also struggle to make ends meet — one 2020 report says less than 2% of philanthropic dollars are being directly invested in Latino-based organizations, and nearly 100 new nonprofit organizations would need to be created to fill the current gaps in services to the Latino population. "Our volunteers can only volunteer for so long," Lina Cañon, director of finance operations and development for Chica Project, told Under the Radar. "And so if you're not paying the women that are in the organization equitable wages and being competitive with the market and allowing them to live in Boston, which we all know is expensive, then how are you actually going to sustain that program?" Some experts see solutions in policy, and one thing Tomás Gonzalez, director of community and advocacy for Amplify Latinx, wants passed is a bill that would, "allow for the creation of a micro business development center, which would hope to grant $50,000 grants to folks if they hire individuals from the community, returning citizens, those coming off transition assistance, those that are local to to the establishment, so that you can give that business owner the room that they need. Because typically our small business owners ... typically aren't the places that banks give money to." During this Hispanic Heritage Month, Under the Radar looks at the roadblocks to philanthropic funding and the efforts to increase access. GUESTS Dr. Lorna Rivera, director of the Mauricio Gastón Institute for Latino Community Development & Public Policy at the University of Massachusetts Boston Lina Cañon, director of finance operations and development for Chica Project Tomás Gonzalez, director of community and advocacy for Amplify Latinx
10/1/202331 minutes, 48 seconds
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Is New Hampshire old news? Why many Republican presidential hopefuls are prioritizing Iowa

Traditionally, New Hampshire is the proving ground for presidential hopefuls, with most spending major time and money in the Granite State. But many 2024 Republican presidential candidates — so far — are bypassing New Hampshire on their way to Iowa. "It's more expensive to run in New Hampshire than it is in Iowa. It's definitely a bit of a mistake in terms of trying to capture 2024," Erin O'Brien, associate professor of political science at UMass Boston, told Under the Radar. "But Republicans know, to beat Trump, they're betting down on the idea you have to 'out-Trump' him or 'out-conservative' him, and you're more likely to be able to do that in Iowa." Plus, Republican Senator Mitt Romney announced he will retire at the end of his term, saying it's time for the "next generation" of leaders. The former Massachusetts Governor's remarks re-energized the debate about the age of elected officials. "I don't want to say that any particular individual ... should retire," said Luis Jiménez, director of the international relations major at UMass Boston. "But the question we should be talking about is, why is it that people stay in Congress that long? Why is it that people stay in politics that long? And a big reason why has to do with the way that we're doing politics these days and the power of incumbency, the power of money and so on." And the U.S. Senate has gone “business casual." A change in dress code means one Democratic Senator can officially ditch his suit and tie for a hoodie. Jerold Duquette, professor of political science at Central Connecticut State University, argues "this is sort of a gift in terms of authenticity. These people want conformity. ... Politically, a dress code in the Senate as an issue is to the great advantage of those rebelling against the establishment tie, or whatever the case may be." Those stories and more during our full hour with the Mass Politics Profs. GUESTS Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at UMass Boston Jerold Duquette, professor of political science and director of the Public Policy and Management Program at Central Connecticut State University Luis Jiménez, associate professor of political science and director of the international relations major at UMass Boston
9/24/202357 minutes, 59 seconds
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America has a unique obsession with ice, and it all started in Boston

How did we move from suffering in the heat with room-temperature drinks to ice-harvesting capitalists and fanatical ice consumers? America’s journey to ice obsession started right here in Boston with the enterprising Frederic Tudor, who envisioned something seemingly preposterous: bringing ice to the tropics. The Tudors were one of the wealthiest families in Massachusetts. The family had servants who harvested large blocks of ice out of the lake on their estate, and an ice house to store that ice underground, where it could stay cool year-round. "For about four centuries or so, the planet Earth was a lot colder than it is now ... lakes and rivers froze much deeper than they do now. So people could carve large blocks of ice out of those bodies of water for use in their everyday lives, such as cooking or medicine, what have you," Amy Brady, author of the book “Ice: From Mixed Drinks to Skating Rinks — A Cool History of a Hot Commodity,” explained on GBH's Under the Radar. Frederic Tudor, in his early twenties, decided to try selling those ice blocks to people who lived in warm climates, where ice didn't form naturally. He determined that if he could make it to Cuba, he'd be a made man. But he was eventually successful in convincing people to use ice. Frederic even turned several port cities in the Southern U.S. into what he called "ice cities," and inspired a number of copycat entrepreneurs. "Out West, the natural ice harvesting industry really took off quickly until about the 1860s, when the Civil War cut off the Southern ice supply from the North due to the wartime embargoes," Brady explained. "And so it was shortly after that, that mechanically made ice became popular, with ice-making plants cropping up along the south." Even if the war hadn't occurred, Brady believes the natural ice industry would have met a similar fate. "Lakes and rivers are the homes of many organic beings: the fish, of course, the plants and the microorganisms that live in there. And all of that was true in the 19th century, just as it's true now. And people would ingest that. ... So it wasn't uncommon for people to get very, very sick," she said. GUEST Amy Brady, executive director and publisher of Orion Magazine, coeditor of "The World as We Knew It: Dispatches from a Changing Climate," and author of "Ice: From Mixed Drinks to Skating Rinks—A Cool History of a Hot Commodity”
9/17/202322 minutes, 23 seconds
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Anti-LGBTQ sentiment is reflected in legislatures, and violence, across the country

Across the country, anti-LGBTQ violence is on the rise. Just recently, a California business owner was killed for displaying a Pride flag. "This is a tragic example of where someone was trying to be supportive and send a message of love and safety and then became targeted by the very hate that is used against so many," Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of BAGLY, told Under the Radar. "I think it's a reminder of how dangerous the situation has become with the increased rhetoric. ... And it's emboldening people, and all of us are being threatened in different ways." The current climate is also reflected in at least 142 bills introduced across the U.S. this year that aim to restrict gender-affirming healthcare. But some advocates are pushing back. Janson Wu, executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, said these legal battles are about more than the law: "It's about people's lives. It's about families who now have to consider whether or not they have to uproot their lives and move to another state to provide their child with the health care that they need. And it's about medical providers who are facing the loss of their licenses and criminal penalties for doing their oath, which is to provide and care for their patients." Advocates say an increasing number of LGBTQ+ people are moving to Massachusetts, specifically, in part because of the state's legal protections. "I fled Ohio for the same reason. It just was not comfortable being queer in Ohio," said E.J. Graff, managing editor of Good Authority. "But especially those families that have trans kids, I don't see how they can stay where they are with their children always under threat." It's our LGBTQ News Roundtable. GUESTS Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLY Janson Wu, executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, or GLAD E.J. Graff, journalist, author and managing editor of Good Authority, an independent blog publishing insights from political science
9/17/202335 minutes, 28 seconds
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Despite winning championships, women's sports in Boston don't get the attention they deserve

What Boston sports team won five national championships in the last six years? Hint: it wasn’t the Red Sox, Patriots, Celtics or Bruins. The answer: the Boston Renegades, a women's football team. While the local women’s teams that have been winning championship after championship, they've received much less fanfare than their male counterparts at Fenway or Gillette Stadium. "Sports aren't inherently male, but in so many spaces we've come to accept them as such," said Rev. Laura Everett, author of the blog, Boston Women’s Sports. "We have national and world champions playing locally, but they're not getting the coverage they deserve. Whereas so often women's sports teams are expected to prove that they're worthy, when the men's teams are just presumed that they are." But soccer fans may have reason to rejoice — a bid to bring a new national women’s soccer team to Boston could materialize in coming years. Some experts hope it could be the catalyst for local women's teams to finally get the respect and higher profile they have earned. "It's exciting to think that women's pro soccer will be back, hopefully, in Boston and exciting because it's a sport and a league, the NWSL, that's really on the rise. It will be great to have Boston be part of that women's sports conversation nationally." GUESTS Shira Springer, sports journalist and lecturer in Managerial Communication at MIT Reverend Laura Everett, executive director of the Massachusetts Council of Churches, author of the blog, Boston Women’s Sports
9/10/202323 minutes, 1 second
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From kelp burgers to biofuel, some see a bright future for seaweed

Oceans, rivers and lakes are chockful of thousands of underwater plants and algae collectively described as seaweed. Demand for seaweed — kelp, specifically — has exploded as scientists have confirmed its dietary benefits and its potential as a tool in the fight against climate change. "Seaweeds have a variety of nutrients and minerals and anti-inflammatory properties that you just can't get from typical land plants," Scott Lindell, research specialist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, told Under the Radar. "Food processing companies are finding ways to integrate seaweed, kelp in particular, into products that Americans are familiar with. There are kelp burgers out there which are vegan and some of the best vegetarian burgers I've ever had." There are now seaweed farms from Alaska to Massachusetts, including Duxbury Sugar Kelp of Duxbury, Mass. Owner-operator, John Lovett, said one reason he got into the business was to explore the environmental impacts of kelp: "I really wanted to... be on the forefront of learning about [kelp], to be able to innovate some of the systems that we use to grow it and really to help other farmers understand the impact that they, too, can have on the environment." From food to biofuel and everything in between, some experts believe this billion-year-old algae is the wave of the future. A new exhibit about seaweed aims to capture part of that excitement. "One of the biggest things that I hope people walk away from the exhibition thinking about is that seaweed is a lot more than they may have known," Naomi Slipp, chief curator at the New Bedford Whaling Museum and curator of "A Singularly Marine & Fabulous Produce: the Cultures of Seaweed". "One of the fun things about having the exhibit up has been engaging in these conversations around contemporary applications for seaweed and its potential for the future." GUESTS Scott Lindell, research specialist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution John Lovett, owner-operator of Duxbury Sugar Kelp Naomi Slipp, chief curator at the New Bedford Whaling Museum
9/10/202334 minutes, 50 seconds
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The power of mentorship for at-risk youth

Editor's note: This segment originally broadcast on January 27, 2023. In 1949, a small organization formed in Boston. Ten fatherless boys were paired with adult volunteers to help them navigate their lives. More than 70 years later, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts serves young boys and girls and connects more than 3,600 children with mentors each year. We discuss the importance of strong social webs, how the pandemic frayed them and the power of mentoring with the leader of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts and a tight-knit duo that continues to grow together. GUESTS Mark O’Donnell, president and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts Karen Rodriguez, volunteer mentor for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts Rosela Moreta, Karen’s 10-year-old mentee
9/3/202324 minutes, 16 seconds
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Why more women are freezing their eggs

Editor's note: This segment originally broadcast on April 16, 2021. It’s still too soon to know all the ways the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reshape our decisions about life and family, but one facet is that many women have decided to protect their reproductive future by freezing their eggs. About a decade ago, egg freezing was considered an experimental procedure. Today, it's a relatively common procedure thousands of women choose each year. During the pandemic, the number of women electing to postpone pregnancy by freezing their eggs has surged. Why? And will their choices have a broader impact long term? GUESTS Nina Resetkova, reproductive endocrinologist at Boston IVF John Petrozza, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center Nikki Richardson, former egg freezing patient
9/3/202333 minutes, 35 seconds
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Some Americans are saying no to smart devices and embracing digital minimalism

Americans have intimate relationships with their cellphones. A recent report found 89% of Americans say they check their phones within the first 10 minutes of waking up, and 60% sleep with their phone at night. And during the day, nearly one-third of American adults reported being online "almost constantly" in 2021, up from 21% in 2015. "I remember being attached to [my phone] and when I was texting my girlfriend, I remember the screen just kind of came alive," said Jose Briones, an advocate of digital minimalism. "I get this rush of, 'Wow, like, somebody cares about me.' And I put a lot of my value not on the person necessarily or the notification that I got, but also on the phone, because the phone is the medium through which I receive this amazing, loving text." But its not just phones holding our gaze. Watches, doorbells, even many refrigerators are now "smart." Partly in response to how ubiquitous this technology has become in the fabric of modern life, Joe Hollier co-founded Light, a company that sells minimalist cellphones. "There's no social media, no infinite feed of any kind, clickbait news, and there's no email," Hollier told Under the Radar. "So, really all of the things the phone does — calling, texting, setting an alarm — are just really utilitarian based. And the idea is that you're not pulling out the phone. So, we like to say it's a phone designed to be used as little as possible, because it's about the time and the space that it gives you to not be staring at a screen." Hollier is one of a number of Americans attempting to separate themselves from the seemingly inescapable reach of technology. These digital minimalists are willing to change their habits to go back to a simpler, less technology-centered lifestyle. "We can decide how much technology we embrace, how we embrace it, and how we really find the value in our life," said Andrew Maynard, professor of advanced technology transitions at Arizona State University. "My camera is a fully manual camera and I get joy and pleasure out of that. ... That's a choice I make. And I think a lot of people forget that they can make these decisions for themselves, how much or how little technology they have in their lives. Of course, the difficulty is when we've got tech companies trying to push it down our throats, sometimes it's difficult to pull back from that." GUESTS Joe Hollier, co-founder of Light, a company that sells minimalist cellphones Jose Briones, digital minimalism YouTuber and advocate, moderator of the subreddit, “r/dumbphones” Andrew Maynard, professor of advanced technology transitions at Arizona State University
8/27/202336 minutes, 20 seconds
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Sounds of the city: Boston's first mixtape aims to boost local talent

From hip-hop to folk to jazz, Boston’s musical legacy is alive on a new platform showcasing the talents of local musicians. Mayor Michelle Wu and the city's Tourism, Sports and Entertainment Office debuted "Dear Summer Vol. 1" this July: it's the city's first official mixtape. "I think we did a good job in representing the sound of the city, the cultural diversity of the city, and just really highlighting and boosting up our artists and also our DJs so we can show that there's talent here right in our backyard," Chimel “ReaL P” Idiokitas, co-executive producer and curator of the mixtape, told Under the Radar. Representing a variety of music genres, "Dear Summer Vol. 1" features six DJs and 17 artists from the Greater Boston area for a 1-hour, 39-minute soundscape. The new, annual collaboration aims to “connect residents across neighborhoods through music, and celebrate summer.” "How can we, as the city of Boston, leverage this platform to show artists that they can stay here, that they can make it, that they can bolster their careers?" said John M. Borders IV, Boston's tourism, sports and entertainment director. "I think we have a unique opportunity as the city to champion those folks." GUESTS Chimel “ReaL P” Idiokitas, DJ and co-executive producer and curator of “Dear Summer Vol. 1” John M. Borders IV, tourism, sports and entertainment director for the City of Boston and co-executive producer of “Dear Summer Vol. 1"
8/27/202321 minutes, 31 seconds
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60 years later, the March on Washington continues to shape America's identity

Sixty years ago, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom inspired more than 250,000 people to gather for a public demonstration — at the time, one of the biggest marches in the country's history. The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his now famous speech, “I Have a Dream” at the Lincoln Memorial, just weeks after President John K. Kennedy called civil rights a “moral issue.” "I thought it was a wonderful opportunity to put my feet where my heart was, to speak in support of civil rights, to join all the other thousands of people who wanted to see the United States make some moves toward civil rights," said Jane Bowers, a Boston resident who attended the 1963 March. But the original focus of the March was to be a public stand for jobs and freedom, and a push against a deeply segregated, racist America. "A month after this event, white people blew up a church and killed four children. And so I think it's very important that we make a distinction between the white people," said Byron Rushing, former Massachusetts state Rep. "Never say this [march] had an effect on white people. It had an effect on the moment, it seems. Maybe a majority of white people, but it certainly did not have an effect, except the negative concern by Southern white people." What is the legacy of this seminal event in this moment of continued efforts to roll back civil rights gains, and at a time of increasing violent racial tension? "We now see a determined resistance that's called MAGA, that is trying to go back to where they were again in the sense, which is make America great again for them," Courtland Cox, civil rights activist who helped organize the 1963 march, told Under the Radar. "Making America great depended on racial and economic exploitation of the African American community. ... And the good thing about today is that, while we only could protest in 1960 and '63 and '65, we can now be in power. ... We now have positions of power and we need to be able to really uphold the concepts of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence." GUESTS Jane Bowers, a Boston resident who attended the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Byron Rushing, former Massachusetts state representative and president of the Roxbury Historical Society Courtland Cox, civil rights activist who helped organize the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
8/20/202323 minutes, 18 seconds
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A national Latino museum project gets caught in the culture wars

The National Museum of the American Latino may be years away from officially opening, but it's already caught in America's culture wars. The attack has been led in part by Latino Republican Rep. Mario Díaz-Balart, having proposed legislation to pull funding for the museum. "I'm okay with you criticizing how you view history. But do you have to vote to defund it?" said, Julio Ricardo Varela, president of Futuro Media Group. "Seriously, like, you can't even stand up for our community? You have to go down the 'woke politics' side?" Diaz-Balart has since said funding would not be pulled, but only after a meeting with Smithsonian leadership: “What we did is we cut the funding, and immediately [the Smithsonian] responded, and then we had a very positive meeting." Gov. Maura Healey announced a state of emergency this August due to the surge in migrant families arriving in the state and in need of shelter. A total of 20,000 people, made up of over 5,000 families with children, are currently living in state-funded shelters. And last month the long debated driver's license law for undocumented immigrants went into effect. The state saw roughly 100,000 requests for learner's permit appointments in the first three weeks of July. "They don't want to be in the shadows. They don't want to work under the shadows. They don't want to have to drive without a license," Marcela García, an opinion columnist at the Boston Globe, told Under the Radar. "What I've noticed is that for immigrants, this has been very symbolic, too, because it is giving them a sense of belonging, a sense of inclusion." That and more on our Latinx News Roundtable. GUESTS Julio Ricardo Varela, president of Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, founder of Latino Rebels, and MSNBC opinion columnist Marcela García, an opinion columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe
8/20/202334 minutes, 34 seconds
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Hip-hop turns 50: A look at the past, present and future of the global phenomenon

50 years after its birth, hip-hop has become an integral part of mainstream American culture. With its roots in the voices of marginalized communities, hip-hop is reflected in everything from a rapping Pillsbury Dough Boy to dialogue in movies to speeches on the floor of Congress. "Hip-hop is a culture. It's a far-reaching culture. It's the most dominant youth culture on the planet," said Dart Adams, Boston-based writer and hip-hop expert. "It incorporates DJing, b-boying — or 'breaking,' as it's commonly called — emceeing is one aspect, and of course, you know, there's graffiti art. And all these aspects of the culture come together to form hip-hop. But people's idea of hip-hop is usually relegated just to rap music." What started as Kool Herc’s innovative DJ party groove in 1973 was amplified by new masters of ceremonies, or MCs, spinning and scratching at house and street parties. The new music genre quickly established its signature turntablism, breakbeat deejaying, and scat-style rhyming lyrics. Hip-hop artists would go on to express their tears and triumphs in their songs — they often spoke to political and social oppression. "Hip hop was the way we spread the word. It was the way we let people know that we were in solidarity across time and space," Dawn-Elissa Fischer, co-founder of the Hip Hop Archive and Research Institute at Harvard University, told Under the Radar. "I was actually in a rural area of the United States, the Ozarks in southern Missouri, at the time where there were a lot of various types of lynchings and police killings and other horrible, racist things happening that weren't being covered in the news. And so, to hear 'Public Enemy No. 1' ... and 'Fight The Power' and to see the video, the visual of the parade of people gathered; I felt protected and inspired." In the ’90s, America became the hip-hop nation. And in the ensuing years, hip-hop became the biggest and most influential global music genre in the world. "The hip hop of the '90s really captured the spectrum of Blackness. You go from 'Fight the Power' to 'Juicy,' which is the celebration of the comeuppance, not just of Biggie himself, but of his community who he is able to put on, but also Black people and hip-hop in particular," said Danielle Scott, professor at Berklee College of Music. "And then he says, 'You never thought that hip hop would take it this far.' Now hip-hop is in Harvard. Hip-hop is in Brown [University]. Hip-hop is no longer relegated to the pre-filming of the Grammys, it's on the Grammys' stages. It's in country music. It's all around the world. ... I think what Biggie said in that moment, just in that one little line, was prophetic, you know, in terms of how far hip-hop was going to take it." GUESTS Dart Adams, Boston-based writer and hip-hop expert Danielle Scott, hip-hop MC and professor at Berklee College of Music Dawn-Elissa Fischer, associate director and co-founder of the Hip Hop Archive and Research Institute at Harvard University
8/18/202357 minutes, 51 seconds
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These two humor writers look for comedy in turbulent times

If there ever was a time we all could use a good laugh, it’s now — as, all around us, the world seems to be on fire literally, and figuratively. For this special edition of “Bookmarked: Under the Radar Book Club," we’re delving into the world of humor on the written page — through the musings of contemporary humor essayists — those sharp and witty observers of everyday life who find the funny in the mundane. "I get embarrassed for being a person with basic tastes who does not interrogate things very deeply. A person who needs to be smacked in the face with the subliminal message, because I absolutely will not suss it out for myself," Samantha Irby writes in her book, "Quietly Hostile." "The embarrassment usually leads to my second guessing both myself and my interpretation of whatever it is we're talking about," she continues. "This then devolves into an even more embarrassing apology. I'm so sorry for not understanding what, quote, 'good acting' is. And that continues until I shrivel into a husk and die, vowing with my dying breath to never again publicly express joy or excitement." These authors use their own lived experiences as a lens to deconstruct the serious in service of the silly. "I don't have any original thoughts that are going to break the world open. I really just have my day-to-day life, my own stories," Blythe Roberson, author of "America the Beautiful?" told Under the Radar. "I really just wrote this book to make people laugh. Like, I didn't write it hoping I would change the hearts and minds of America. So, I hope they just enjoy it, really." GUESTS Samantha Irby, author of five books including her latest book of essays, “Quietly Hostile” Blythe Roberson, author of two books of humorous essays, her latest is “America the Beautiful? One Woman in a Borrowed Prius on the Road Most Traveled” Module
8/6/202358 minutes
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The science and popularity of CBD, explained

Editor's note: This episode originally aired on Feb. 4, 2022. CBD — those three small letters have led to a billion-dollar industry. CBD, short for cannabidiol, is a compound from the cannabis plant that does not produce a high. People can consume it, vape it or apply it to their skin. Manufacturers are putting CBD in everything from lattes to lotions. Proponents say that CBD helps manage many health conditions, especially pain and anxiety. "One of the things that we've found that CBD is wonderful for is bringing your body closer to homeostasis, back to alignment. We know that that affects everything from stress to the ability to sleep, etc.," Malaika Jones, co-founder of Brown Girl Jane, said on Under the Radar. "Especially these days, folks are finding themselves, you know, feeling out of whack. So, our consumers really tell us that it [CBD] has been most helpful with anxiety, stress relief and sleep. ... The brand and the products have really resonated with people who need these everyday solutions to their life," she said. But many researchers insist that the substance may not work, let alone be touted as a cure-all. "One particular formulation of [CBD] was FDA approved in 2018 for the treatment of three types of seizure disorders," said Dr. Kevil Hill, an addiction psychiatrist. "But the reality is that probably 95% or greater of the CBD that people are using is not that formulation and it's not regulated by the FDA. And with that come a host of issues and those issues are related to the risk." Guests: Dr. Kevin Hill, addiction psychiatrist, director of the division of addiction psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is also the author of “Marijuana: The Unbiased Truth about the World’s Most Popular Weed” Malaika Jones, co-founder of BROWN GIRL Jane, a Black woman–owned company that offers broad-spectrum CBD products. She was named one of the most powerful women of 2020 by Entrepreneur Magazine
7/30/202327 minutes, 28 seconds
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Can a healthy diet treat disease? Why some argue food is medicine

Editor's note: This episode originally aired on Feb. 3, 2023. From heart disease to diabetes, chronic illness is the leading cause of death in the United States, and chronic disease is a major reason why the nation spends more than $4 trillion on health care every year. But a growing number of researchers believe reexamining our relationship with food is key to both improving our health and saving money. "When you provide medically tailored meals to people who are experiencing food insecurity and chronic illness, you'll see a 16% net cost savings — and that's monthly," said Jean Terranova, senior director of policy and research at Community Servings. "That's 49% fewer in-patient hospital admissions, 70% fewer emergency department visits, and 72% fewer admissions to skilled nursing facilities." Food is medicine, these advocates argue. But changing your relationship with food can be difficult, says Paul Hepfer, CEO of Project Open Hand: "That's part of why it's so important for us to have our education piece that accompanies the meal. So, it's not just 'Here's your meals for six months or a year. Good luck. See you later.' ... We give people the tools to start cooking that way themselves." Eating more whole foods — including fruits, vegetables and grains — and fewer ultra-processed foods is key to a healthier diet. "I think of it as almost a reintroduction," said Olivia Weinstein, director of nutrition innovation and implementation for Boston Medical Center. "So, this was something that once was and then kind of left our daily living, and we're reintroducing it back in." GUESTS Olivia Weinstein, director of nutrition innovation and implementation for Boston Medical Center Jean Terranova, senior director of policy and research at Community Servings Paul Hepfer, CEO of Project Open Hand
7/30/202330 minutes, 23 seconds
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NAACP's annual ACT-SO competition brings youth talent to Boston

Local Black high schoolers will face off in a special competition at the 114th annual NAACP National Convention in Boston. Young scientists, musicians, dancers, and more will compete in one of 32 categories of ACT-SO, or Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics. ACT-SO's categories are wide ranging, from visual and culinary arts to STEM, and business. "If I see all of these, like, white classical musicians, composers, just writing a bunch of music and we're just always playing that, why can't I just write a piece so that everyone else can play too?" said Sadie Caroll, an ACT-SO cellist participant. "I just had so much fun playing it, and it's great to share my work." The students' work will be on display at the NAACP hub at the Boston Convention Center July 28-30. The awards ceremony on July 29 is free and open to the public. Vice President Kamala Harris, as well as many other political and entertainment headliners, are scheduled to speak at the convention. This year's Olympics will draw participants from across the country. These competitors will be mentored in their selective fields and fight for a medal while being surrounded by supportive but competitive excellence. "When you show up at an actual competition, a national competition, you're being exposed to other young people who are just as bright, just as talented as you are," said Tanisha Sullivan, the president of NAACP Boston. "You are put into an environment where young people across all of the categories are committed to excellence. And when you're in an environment ... where there is rigor, you can't help ... but level up recognizing that there's a standard and that standard is excellence." ACT-SO is meant to uplift and applaud Black high school students for their academic and artistic achievements and is a signature event at the NAACP's convention. It's a competition that allows youth to be challenged, and then take those skills learned from the high-intensity environment and continue to develop them. "This is an opportunity to understand kind of your past and your history and the people that came before you in order to pour into everybody that comes after you," said Janay Trench-Lesley, a former ACT-SO poet participant. "[Understand] that this is bigger than yourself," Trench-Lesley said. "Kind of just [trust] your process, [trust] your talent and [trust] what you know, because that's how you got here in the first place." GUESTS Tanisha Sullivan, president of NAACP Boston Janay Trench-Lesley, ACT-SO former participant, poet Sadie Caroll, 2023 ACT-SO participant, cellist
7/23/202323 minutes, 41 seconds
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Hollywood's writers and actors strike together for the first time in over 60 years

Hollywood’s writers and actors are on strike, together. For the first time since 1960, the Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA), is striking alongside the Writers Guild of America (WGA). Without their labor, Hollywood productions have ground to a halt. "This is a moment of reckoning for the industry," said Michael Jeffries, professor of American studies at Wellesley College. "This is a moment where the old system of figuring out what shows were doing well, how much the job and the labor was actually worth, has evaporated. ... If they don't, as an industry, come to some sort of fair agreement, now, I think we're gonna continue to see upheaval. It's going to trickle down to what we, the customers, are able to access. It's going to totally shift the labor dynamics of that industry, and everybody is going to be worse off." Meanwhile, the "Barbie" flick was released this weekend alongside "Oppenheimer," a movie about the making of the atomic bomb. Some experts think the duo — “Barbenheimer,” if you will — could bring the biggest crowds to theaters since before the pandemic. "I think the two movies, even though the people who are making them seem so different in their artistic visions, I think they're actually really complementary to each other," Karen Huang, lecturer on history and literature at Harvard University, told Under the Radar. "To be able to experience these two completely different films in cinema, I think effectively is a really different and really contained form of escape that is completely divergent from how we experience streaming services, for example, because when you're sitting in a movie theater, there's a kind of a shared intimacy among moviegoers that you don't get as much when you're just watching a movie at home." That and more on Under the Radar's Pop Culture Roundtable. GUESTS Michael Jeffries, dean of academic affairs and professor of American studies at Wellesley College Karen Huang, lecturer on history and literature at Harvard University
7/23/202334 minutes, 10 seconds
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‘Barbie’-themed boat party in Boston is the latest burst of excitement over the 64-year-old doll

The nearly years of anticipations for the new "Barbie" movie has sparked widespread enthusiasm for the 64-year-old doll. From Barbie-themed parties to Barbie-styled clothing, to visits to Barbie’s life-sized Malibu DreamHouse, Barbie is everywhere. Barbicore — and the "Barbie" movie itself — has put related items in short supply, like Barbie’s signature hot pink paint color. "We hosted a Barbie boat cruise out of the Boston Harbor on June 30, and we had over 600 Barbie fans come to celebrate the release of the new movie," said Julie Russell, CEO of Fangirl Fantasy, which hosts events themed around fan-favorite artists and other phenomena. "[There were] long time Barbie fans [at the event]. ... And this event in this movie is just giving them an excuse to bring out their fan excitement." More than 60 years ago, Barbie’s creator, Ruth Handler, was inspired to design a 3D-version of a paper doll. It was an immediate bestseller in the 1950s and remains one of the best-selling toys in the world. "Oh, I had many Barbie dolls. ... My sister and I played with them for many years," said Emily Tamkin, who wrote "A Cultural History of Barbie" for Smithsonian Magazine. Handler, who co-founded the Mattel Toy Company with her husband, rejected criticisms of Barbie’s idealized body type. "I totally understand and hear all of those critiques," Tamkin said. "But... Ruth Handler said Barbie has always represented that girls and women have choices. ... We had our Barbies go to college. We had our Barbies take part in feminist protests. ... When I talk about the pull [that] this doll has and how powerful it is to have this plaything that you could project onto, I speak from personal experience." Now a new live-action movie, simply titled "Barbie," has whipped up enthusiasm from adults about all things Barbie. Barbie is an aspect of American culture that has became a global phenomenum. "I was born and raised in Japan, and when I was a little, I didn't have any Barbie dolls," said Azusa Sakamoto, a renowned Barbie collector. "[Now], I don't even know much about other doll brands or anything, but I just love Barbie as a brand. So when I first met her, she was already like a huge American pop-culture icon to me," Sakamoto said. "She always just gave me, like, some positive vibes... just telling me how to have fun being a girl." GUESTS Julie Russell, founder and CEO of Fangirl Fantasy, an event-planning company based in Greater Boston Emily Tamkin, journalist and author of the Smithsonian Magazine article, “A Cultural History of Barbie” Azusa Sakamoto, a renowned Barbie collector and founder of Azusa Barbie Module
7/16/202332 minutes, 17 seconds
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Offering free food and shade, 'food forests' are sprouting up in Boston

Cities across the country are dotted with vacant lots — often overgrown with weeds, full of trash or surrounded by dilapidated buildings. The unused spaces are at best an eyesore. But some community groups see those empty spaces as an opportunity for food forests: vibrant, public spaces that can also feed their community. "They're open to all visitors. Humans and non-humans alike are welcome to the produce," Orion Kriegman, founding executive director of the Boston Food Forest Coalition, told Under the Radar. "So, if you see an apple growing in a food forest, you're welcome to pick it and eat it, unlike in a community garden where that might create some tension. And the gardening really happens collectively." "It's something that happens through community workdays, through volunteer time, and people really have to plan that. And ultimately, it's something that we own together, which is a little bit of a stretch in our culture, to think of ownership as something we can do collectively," said Kriegman. They kick-started the program in 2013, and now Boston has 10 food forests offer everything from fig trees to mushroom logs to shaded park benches. The Boston Food Forest Coalition is aiming to develop a total of 30 by the end of the decade. The coalition edged closer to its goal when the Edgewater Neighborhood Association officially opened a new food forest in Mattapan this May. Vivien Morris, the association's chair, said there was already a community garden in the area, but all the plots were taken. They wanted a space where everyone could have access to food, while also reflecting the diversity of the community and restrictions of cold weather. "Our neighborhood is largely Afro-Latino, Black, Afro-Caribbean, people from southern roots. That makes up the large majority of our neighborhood. And yet we are in New England, right? So, we had to select plants that will grow well here, as well as hoping to grow plants that people would want to see." Morris was pleased to see that there were already several black walnut trees on the plot of land, but it was a learning process to figure out what could grow together. "And as a person who grew up in the south and grew up eating black walnuts, that was great. On the other hand, what we found is that many of us thought, 'Oh, let's plant some apple trees.' And it turns out that apple trees can't grow near black walnut trees," said Morris. "We did plant cherry trees, pear trees, grapevines, raspberries, other things like that. But we listened to what people wanted to see grown as well as what was possible to be grown." GUESTS Orion Kriegman, founding executive director of the Boston Food Forest Coalition Vivien Morris, chair of the Edgewater Neighborhood Association Module
7/16/202325 minutes, 35 seconds
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Is barbecue growing in popularity in New England?

Many hold strong opinions about what barbecue flavor they prefer. Yes barbecue, not grilling. American barbecue hails from four different regions — Memphis, Texas, Carolina and Kansas City — each with their own distinctive style. Callie Crossley, host of Under the Radar, hails from Memphis where, as far as she is concerned, Memphis is the distinctive style. "For me, it's the layering of flavors. You might start with a rub, which could be as simple as salt and pepper as is done in Texas, or a little bit more complex with paprika and chili powder, garlic powder, onion powder, which is done in your hometown of Memphis," said Steven Raichlen, author of "The Barbecue Bible." "A second layer of flavor might be a mop sauce or might be a spray with with vinegar or wine," he said. "Third layer of flavor might be that barbecue sauce that you brush on right at the end of cooking and then caramelize directly over high heat. Fourth layer of flavor might be a salsa that you would serve, or a chutney. So it's the complexity of flavors that really makes great barbecue, in my opinion." Barbecue's origins are in the South, but it has also become a summertime staple in the Northeast. "I took a chance on the Seaport because I knew, when I went down there, what was coming, and it was going to be a vibrant neighborhood that would draw people from all around the world," said Larry Jimerson, owner of Larry J’s BBQ Café. "I believe that barbecue is the quintessential Americana food. It is the number one thing that people really seek out," he said. "They would get in their car and drive 45 minutes to an hour for what they consider good barbecue... [I was not] able to find really good quality barbecue when I moved here way back in the 90s. Now there's quite a few more places around." We talk all things barbecue in the latest edition of our summer fun series. GUESTS Larry Jimerson, owner of Larry J’s BBQ Café in Boston's Seaport neighborhood Steven Raichlen, journalist, host of the PBS series, Planet Barbecue, and prolific author of more than 30 books, including "The Barbecue Bible"
7/9/202324 minutes, 55 seconds
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Democrats want South Carolina to lead 2024 primaries. New Hampshire has other plans

Earlier this year, the Democratic National Committee broke with decades of tradition when they proposed South Carolina, rather than New Hampshire, as the first state to vote in the 2024 presidential primary. But, making those changes official typically requires approval from state legislatures and governors. Considering the New Hampshire Democratic Party chairman just declared the Granite state will still vote first, what happens next? "It's beyond messy," Arnie Arnesen, radio host for WNHN in New Hampshire, told Under the Radar. The Democratic presidential primary "is officially run by the secretary of state in my state. And as a result, we have a law that says we must be first, we must be a week before anybody else. So, when the DNC made this decision to reward South Carolina and make South Carolina first on February 3, and then New Hampshire and Nevada on February 6, that might have been fine for the DNC, but it doesn't work in New Hampshire. And let me also remind you that even if we wanted to change it, the Democrats have no capacity to change it because the Republicans control the executive branch and the legislative branch, and they're not going to change the law because they know they make us miserable." Plus, nitrogen pollution in the ponds and waterways of Cape Cod is leading to algae buildup — and brand new regulations looking to curb it. Towns that don’t comply by designing and implementing solutions could leave homeowners with big septic bills. Module "The Cape has a bathroom problem. Not to be indelicate here, but every time a toilet is flushed, more often than not, that's going into the ground and running through the Cape's sandy soil and impacting a nearby waterway," said Steve Junker, managing editor at CAI. "The state has been on them to try to solve this issue, and the state is finally fed up that it's taken so long. So they came up with these new regulations in part to attempt to push this forward quickly, but also because while a lot of this sounds like the background noise of environmental policy, these new regulations really tie a direct cost to homeowners for the first time... Individual homeowners could be on the hook for $25,000 or $30,000 in mandatory upgrades to their septic systems." A Rhode Island official is also under fire after his casual sexist and racist comments during a business trip to Philadelphia were revealed. Ted Nesi, reporter and editor for WPRI, said, "Just to give one example of the flavor of it, according to this company, when the state properties director got there and saw the woman who was leading their tour from this consulting firm, he said something along the lines of, 'If I'd known your husband was out of town, I would have come last night.' ... So then the governor's office tried to keep the email a secret. ... And since then, it's spun out." It’s our Regional News Roundtable. GUESTS Arnie Arnesen, host of “The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen” on WNHN Ted Nesi, politics and business editor and investigative reporter for WPRI Steve Junker, managing editor of news at CAI, the Cape, Coast and Islands affiliate of GBH
7/9/202332 minutes, 56 seconds
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Brendan Slocumb's latest novel explores the Black experience in classical music

Brendan Slocumb's latest novel, “Symphony of Secrets,” centers the stories of Black characters who are deeply immersed in the world of classical music. The story takes place in two time periods. Dr. Bern Hendrix, an African American man, who uncovers that a famous opera may have been stolen from a young Black, autistic woman named Josephine Reed. "Symphony of Secrets" readers learn what happened then and now as they explore the themes of privilege and appropriation. Through his writing, Slocumb wanted to highlight issues that are still happening today. Slocumb joined Callie Crossley on Under the Radar for a conversation about "Symphony of Secrets," July's selection for Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club. "It's kind of crazy that, you know, this story takes place basically 100+ years ago and these same themes still are relevant," Slocumb said. "You know, what was it, a month or so ago, the case with — I think it was Ed Sheeran and the family of Marvin Gaye. Was it appropriation? Did he steal the tune from a Marvin Gaye song? ... It's a good thing I wasn't on that jury, because it sounded an awful, awful lot like his song." He said it doesn't matter where someone comes from or what they look like, they deserve credit for their work. "It's a shame that people either don't realize that they have a right to their own work and they should fight for it," he said. For Slocumb, the book is also deeply personal. The character of Eboni, a tech-savvy assistant to Dr. Hendrix, represents experiences Slocumb has lived through himself. “I'd like to think that Eboni is a representation of what people like me, basically what people like me have to have had to endure for a very, very, very long time," he said. "You know, it's not just me. I would never be have so much hubris as to think that she's representing me directly. But I've heard so many different stories from people that say, 'You know, that exact same thing happened to me.'”
7/2/202321 minutes, 32 seconds
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Tastes like chicken! Is lab-grown meat an answer to climate change?

For the first time, the USDA has approved lab-grown chicken meat. This could make a significant impact if it leads to shifts in the American diet, as the average consumer is expected to eat 100 pounds of chicken in 2023, about twice the expected amount of beef and pork. Dr. Gaurab Basu, director at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told Under the Radar that lab-cultivated meat's big promise is that it's better for the environment. He said reigning in agricultural emissions, which currently make up 24% of all global emissions, is key to fighting climate change. "Whether it's this one with chicken or, the Impossible beef-based [burger] ... we are going to need to just fundamentally transform the way we eat, not only for our personal health, but also because we are changing the Earth's composition by the way we're using the land," he said. As a former vegetarian, Sam Payne, a communications specialist for Better Future Project, is excited about the prospect of lab-grown meat. "We need to get meat eaters to switch over to cultured meat. Vegetarians are already having a significantly lower carbon footprint," Payne said. "So, I think if they can replicate the way that a steak breaks apart in your mouth, I think that this is a multibillion dollar idea, and I'm excited to see where it goes." But Payne said we're a long way off from lab-grown meat overtaking sales of real meat. Two companies, Upside Foods and Good Meat, are the first to get the go-ahead from the federal government. Still, it may not be available in grocery stores for some time. Upside has reported it be able to produce about 50,000 pounds of meat per year — enough to fully replace chicken in the diets of only 5,000 average Americans. Also, the ocean surrounding swaths of Europe is hotter than it's been since the mid-1800s. The warmer temperatures increase the moisture in the air, and fuel bigger and stronger hurricanes. "Of the global warming that we can attribute to human beings, our oceans hold about 90% of that warming, so our oceans have been protecting us dramatically from greater impacts of climate change," said Dr. Basu. And in Montana, 16 young people filed a lawsuit claiming the state violated their right to a clean and healthful environment. The final ruling in this first-of-its-kind climate lawsuit is expected within weeks. "I sometimes get pessimistic when I see so much effort by young people and not a lot of movement on the legal end. I will say this Montana case made me feel hopeful," said Beth Daley, editor of The Conversation, U.S. "I'm very curious to see how the judge rules. And I think it will also embolden — if they are successful — embolden many other lawsuits just like this across the country. So, hopefully it's a win for the climate." Those stories and more on our Environmental News Roundtable. GUESTS Dr. Gaurab Basu, director of education and policy at the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Beth Daley, editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. Sam Payne, digital development manager and communications specialist of Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate action organization
7/2/202336 minutes, 20 seconds
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Roxbury International Film Festival celebrates 25 years of highlighting Black artists

The Roxbury International Film Festival is back for its 25th year. Rox Fest, as it's commonly known, is the largest New England Film Festival that highlights films by, for, and about people of color. This year's program includes 84 films -- features and documentaries -- with topics ranging from unsung heroes to Boston’s Black Queer representation. Bianca Isaac, director of one of the festival's opening films, The Honeymoon, says she wanted to portray three women of color as main characters that are not dying, or being abused: "Take away rape, take away abuse. We are still three normal human beings, we're three women. And the things that I go through are the same things a person who's not of color goes through. And so, it was important to show the world that Africans aren't different. We're not just bleeding hearts; please save me from a mountain. You know, these things happen in our lives. And I want that to come through." The festival runs from June 20th to July 2nd with both in-person and online events scheduled throughout Boston. "It all starts with the films. It all starts with the filmmakers who are telling these stories and telling them so beautifully," said Lisa Simmons, artistic and executive director of the Festival. "It's these deep, powerful stories. And that's one of the things about our festival that I think people like, as well as the filmmakers and the audiences. It is about those deeper stories that we like to get into that we would like to have conversations about. And in a couple of them we're putting a deeper conversation and a panel discussion around them because we think that that's important." GUESTS Lisa Simmons, artistic and executive director of the Roxbury International Film Festival Bianca Isaac, producer, writer and director of The Honeymoon
6/25/202322 minutes, 40 seconds
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Advocates believe Massachusetts may finally set sex education standards

For 12 years, sex education advocates in Massachusetts have been pushing for a comprehensive bill to become law. But for 12 years, that proposal has floundered. The Healthy Youth Act would standardize sex education in schools that choose to participate. Right now, sex education is “completely unregulated” in Massachusetts, said Jaclyn Friedman, chair of the Healthy Youth Act Coalition. “In some school districts, they have policy on the books. Worcester and Boston provide, for example, great sex education that actually will be perfectly in line with the Healthy Youth Act when it passes,” Friedman told Under the Radar. “But in many communities, there is nothing on the books at all. And so, you might get no sex and relationships education. You might get really harmful propaganda that teaches shame about girls and sexuality, LGBTQ students and sexuality. You might get misinformation, or you might get good sex education. It's completely the luck of the draw.” But now supporters think the bill could pass in coming months — especially with Gov. Maura Healey in office. “We have a strong supporter in Healey's administration,” said Jennifer Hart, vice president of education, learning and engagement at Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts. “Massachusetts is a trailblazer in all of these areas and now in a post-Roe landscape, we really need to double down on making sure that our young people have all the information that they need to be able to delay sex, to decrease unintended pregnancy, to improve their own health overall.” Hart said all the pieces of the puzzle are coming together, and that she is optimistic Massachusetts will soon implement sex ed standards. Even if the bill stalls, change may be on the horizon. Healey has recently proposed new updates to Massachusetts’ health education framework that could bypass the state Legislature. The draft framework will be reviewed by the Massachusetts Board of Elementary and Secondary Education on June 27. If the draft is approved to be sent out for comment, the public will have 60 days to weigh in. GUESTS Jennifer Hart, vice president of education, learning and engagement at Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts Jaclyn Friedman, chair of the Healthy Youth Act Coalition and executive director of Educate Us, a sex education advocacy organization
6/25/202335 minutes, 12 seconds
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How fatherhood has evolved and what it means to be a dad in 2023

Indifferent. Working. Absent. Stereotypes of fathers as disengaged and unloving are common, and generally underscored with longstanding cultural images of dads as incompetent in the role as parent. But a cultural shift in how modern-day fathers interact with their kids is changing the image and role of fatherhood. "What we're seeing today is that these dads are saying, ya know, I'm not perfect but I'm giving myself another shot to be great and I'm going to continue do my job as a father," Dr. Charles Daniels Jr. told Under the Radar. "Grace, I would say, is what's required for fathers to be great parents." "Women still, of course, carry the brunt of the time for childcare and home chores," says Dr. Harvey Karp, CEO of Happiest Baby. Still, he says modern day fatherhood means "more and more we're seeing fathers wanting to be engaged, having the empathic capabilities of being engaged, and we see them increasing, really over the last 50 years, doubling or tripling the amount of time they spend in childcare and in household chores." Alberto Malacarne is the father of a two-year-old and expecting a second child in August. He told Under the Radar responsibilities are shared in his family's household: "I think me and my wife would be really 50/50 in everything, you know, 50/50 in providing both financially in the sense that, you know, we both have a good and stable job and both 50/50 providing care for our child." Research shows younger dads are more involved in their children's lives than ever before. Dr. Raymond Levy, director of The Fatherhood Project, believes this a trend that will only continue to grow: "I'm very optimistic in this way. I'm excited about young fathers who want to be very engaged now. … I think that will continue. I'm excited about the fact that more men and more fathers buy into the idea that self-awareness, psychological sophistication, awareness of parenting, principles of development, and personal capacity for empathy and nurturance. I see all that increasing over time." GUESTS: Alberto Malacarne, father of a 2-year old daughter, expecting a second child in August Dr. Raymond Levy, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, founder and director of The Fatherhood Project Dr. Charles Daniels, Jr., co-founder and CEO of Fathers’ Uplift Dr. Harvey Karp, pediatrician, founder and CEO of Happiest Baby, and author of “The Happiest Baby on the Block" Additional music provided by: Title: Go Tell It On The Molehill Author/Source: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Doctor_Turtle/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
6/18/202323 minutes, 56 seconds
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Juneteenth is shared with a new generation through these children's book authors

June 19th, 1865, marked the first Juneteenth celebrations. Formerly enslaved Americans living in Texas got the official word that they were free men and women that day -- more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Parades, and festivals will mark this year's federal holiday with community observances nationwide sharing the story of Juneteenth. But until relatively recently for many Americans, the holiday was unheard of, including for Kim Taylor author of A Flag for Juneteenth, "In 2014 I went to a party with a friend to celebrate Juneteenth, and at that time I hadn't heard of Juneteenth. My parents didn't know about it, they didn't teach it, and it wasn't a part of my school curriculum." Many schools didn't teach about the holiday, and it's a story that is not necessarily easy to explain to children. But some children’s book authors have managed to talk about the joyful celebration while tackling the uncomfortable reality of the history. "I wanted to sure that people saw themselves. That there was a little girl like me who wanted to know more about Juneteenth, she saw herself in that story," said Dr. Arlisha Norwood, talking about her book, The History of Juneteenth: A History Book for New Readers. "It's soldiers and freedom and slavery; all really complicated issues for children. And so, my approach to writing it was, I was writing for myself, the six-year-old Arlisha Norwood who wanted to know more about Juneteenth." Carole Boston Weatherford, author of Juneteenth Jamboree, told Under the Radar, "What I try to do is just give them details that will paint a picture, but won't provide necessarily the scary parts, or the parts they're not ready to process. In this book, I don't talk at all about what slavery was like, I talk about what finding freedom was like. I have other books that get into more details about slavery. But I think with any children's book you figure out which details you want to include for the story you want to tell and the audience you want to share the story with." GUESTS Kim Taylor, speech-language pathologist at the Lexington School for the Deaf in New York City, textile artist and author of ‘A Flag for Juneteenth’ Dr. Arlisha Norwood, assistant professor at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and author of “The History of Juneteenth: A History Book for New Readers” Carole Boston Weatherford, professor of English at Fayetteville State University, author of “Juneteenth Jamboree,” and 70+ books
6/18/202333 minutes, 56 seconds
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How we can make the language of fine wine more palatable

Is it acidic and astringent? Or bright and brilliant? For many Americans, the world of fine wine can feel exclusionary because of the way we talk about wine. That's why some in the wine business are moving away from describing "earthiness" and whether a wine "has seen wood." "This kind of [language] is not just to alienate normal people. This kind of conversation is really very technical, like the way car lovers would talk about the technical elements of a car," said Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School. "But one of the things that we in the wine business need to change is that communicating is not just talking. Some part of communicating is also the listening part, and letting the other person talk every now and then. And this is something that we're starting to learn in the wine world." Alsop also said there's potential for confusion when someone says a wine "has a lot of grapefruit in it," for example, when there's not actually any grapefruit in the blend. So what should you drink this summer? Alsop recommended vinho verde from Portugal. It's a bargain white wine at about $10 a bottle, and the wine itself is a little bit bubbly and has an interesting flavor because it's a blend of three to five different grapes. And Alsop said it's not a wine you have to spend a lot of time appreciating — just open it and drink. To pair with your wine this summer, Amy Traverso, senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, recommended a few items for the grill: "clambake" grill packets, pull-apart garlic bread, blueberry-gingersnap crumble and s'mores dip. Plus, old-fashioned cottage cheese is making a comeback. "Cottage cheese is the Greek yogurt of cottage cheese," Traverso said. "The flavor is more neutral, it doesn't have the acidity, and it's easier to go in either a savory or a sweet direction with cottage cheese. It's high in protein for people who care about that, it's low in fat for people who care about that. ... If you look on TikTok there are 250 million views for hashtag 'cottage cheese.'" Our food and wine contributors are sipping and savoring those stories and more on our Food and Wine Roundtable. GUESTS Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School, author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional” Amy Traverso, senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, cohost of GBH’sWeekends with Yankee and author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook”
6/11/202324 minutes, 24 seconds
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Boston's Pride celebrations aim to be more inclusive this year

From parades and parties to activism and protests, LGBTQ+ folks in Massachusetts and across the country are in the midst of celebrating Pride month. But Boston’s relationship with Pride has a complicated recent history. The COVID-19 pandemic forced the cancellation of the signature Pride parade and other events in 2020 and 2021. And in July 2021, Boston Pride, the group that organized the city’s parade for decades, was accused of racism and mismanagement. Boston Pride then dismantled. "I think it goes back to when there were certain trans leaders asking to lead the conversation, asking for more representation, we kept being told that we could get to that," Julia Golden, interim president of Trans Resistance MA, said about Boston Pride's dissolution. "I think that there has been harm done to the trans community by leaving us as an afterthought again. To really showcase Pride is to put those who are marginalized first." A new organization, Boston Pride For The People, has now emerged and is promising a more inclusive organization and celebrations. "I wouldn't have it any other way, having Trans Resistance and many other groups hold us accountable for the role that we are aiming to take, which is to organize our city's Pride parade and festival," said Adrianna Boulin, president of Boston Pride For The People. "We don't believe that — with the parade and festival that we've planned this year — that we've reached a point of perfection and have completely fixed everything or healed areas that need to be. We want to move humbly and are aiming to move humbly. We want to present what we feel or what we've aimed to be community informed and to have that continuous feedback loop of information of what we're aiming to do, what our actual outcomes are. ... We want to be able to follow that path and have it be a process that the community is actually a part of. And we've aimed to include community in our planning up to this point for the parade and festival, and that's not going to stop." GUESTS Adrianna Boulin, president of Boston Pride For The People Julia Golden, interim president of Trans Resistance MA
6/11/202333 minutes, 27 seconds
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Three local librarians share their top summer reading picks

Summer 2023 is upon us, and we're ready to bury our faces in a book we can’t wait to read. As bestselling author Stephen King notes, “books are a uniquely portable magic,” and they're often on the move during the summer months: jammed into jean pockets, lining beach towels, and stacked up on vacation bedside tables. For our annual summer reading special, three local librarians return with their curated lists from 2023’s best offerings — from thrillers to young adult novels, to romance and science fiction. “The book opens right here in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1910, where Agnes Carter, a wealthy donor to a university, which is presumably Harvard, hires a naturalist and glassblowing phenom from Bohemia to create a collection of glass botanical models,” said Susannah Borysthen-Tkacz, senior librarian at the Cambridge Public Library, about one of her summer reading favorites, Glassworks by Olivia Wolfgang-Smith. “Meanwhile, Agnes is struggling with her own suffocating marriage and becomes increasingly enmeshed in this glass artist's life. … And the common thread through all of it is glass. And it sort of is a metaphor for the delicate structure of the family. We see their families shatter and sort of rebuild itself over and over again.” Robin Brenner, teen librarian at the Public Library of Brookline, chose Malcolm Kid and the Perfect Song by Austin Paramore in part because it is written for younger teens: “It plays on the idea of making a deal with the Crossroads Devil, for music, which is something I've always enjoyed as a trope and certainly comes from true jazz mythology and jazz history. And in this case, it's a young man who is trying to prove that he wants to be a musician and, specifically, playing piano, but cannot afford his own keyboard and is kind of desperate to prove to his dad, who's very disapproving of the idea of this as a career. And he reconnects with an old friend from the neighborhood and ends up making a deal that he doesn't realize he's making with this very shady store owner who gives him a keyboard for free. Of course, there is a different price for it.” “There's a king, he has three sons, he sends them out on various, completely ridiculous quests," said Veronica Koven-Matasy, reader services librarian at the Boston Public Library, about one of her recommendations, White Cat, Black Dog by Kelly Link. “And the youngest son finds himself at the house of a white cat who mysteriously can talk. And all of her servants are cats, and they mysteriously produce all the things that he needs to succeed in his quest. … He is supposed to bring back a bride. And he says, ‘Oh, I don't really want to bring back a wife.’ And the white cat says, ‘Oh, you bring me.’ And he has to prove his faith in her by cutting off her head when she tells him to. And then immediately a beautiful woman springs out. And, you know, it’s the perfect woman. And obviously he's the superior son who brought back the superior bride. And he gets to be the king. … You enjoy being surprised by stories as well as well as just really enjoying the beautiful prose that's carrying you through. I really recommend [this], I was shocked many times.” GUESTS Susannah Borysthen-Tkacz, senior librarian at the Cambridge Public Library Robin Brenner, teen librarian at the Public Library of Brookline Veronica Koven-Matasy, reader services librarian at the Boston Public Library
6/4/202358 minutes
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Why 37,369 flags will wave in the Boston Common this Memorial Day

For over a decade, hundreds of volunteers have convened on the Boston Common to plant tens of thousands of flags in the leadup to Memorial Day. This year, 37,369 have been placed in the park, each one representing a service member from Massachusetts who gave their life since the Revolutionary War. The Massachusetts Military Heroes Fund created the event in 2010. The group "got together to say, what can we do to have this living memorial where we can demonstrate a very outward facing response to recognizing the service and sacrifice of our fallen heroes," Brig. Gen. Jack Hammond told Under the Radar. "And so this is one of the best ways to do it on Memorial Day weekend ... hundreds of thousands of people will walk through there over the next few days and really see that visual support that we're providing in that commitment to our military families." For surviving family members, the flag-planting is much more than just a symbolic act, it's also a moment of remembrance and celebration. "My husband Brett loved a good ceremony," said Rhonda Garvin Conaway, spouse of a fallen Massachusetts service member. "And now here I am today, saying my husband's name. ... Thinking about that is very powerful and helped me put my pain somewhere to remember that I'm not alone. And for all the pain that I may have, another family also shares in that. And that unites us and bonds us in a way that reminds us of our humanity." GUESTS Jack Hammond, retired Brigadier General and executive director of Home Base, a nonprofit dedicated to veteran care, co-organizer of the Memorial Day Boston Common Flag Garden Rhonda Garvin Conaway, spouse of a fallen Massachusetts service member
5/28/202324 minutes, 3 seconds
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Retirement? As if! Why some aren't saving because of an uncertain future

Why bother saving for retirement when the world is ending? The climate change crisis, sky-high inflation and political turmoil are driving some young people to spend for today instead of saving up for an uncertain future. A recent survey found that nearly 75% of Gen Zers prefer higher quality of life than extra money in savings. Another revealed that 55% of people ages 18-35 have put saving for retirement on the back burner. Gen Z is also amassing credit card debt faster than any other age group. "The younger we are, the more likely we are to be present-focused, versus future-focused, and the more likely we are to have, quite frankly, destructive beliefs around money," Brad Klontz, a financial psychologist, told Under the Radar. Tremendous debt also helps explain this trend, according to local financial consultant, Kimberly Zimmerman Rand. "Here in the Boston area where we have high housing costs and many people are entering the workforce with high student loans, there's more of an orientation towards today and less of an orientation towards tomorrow," she said. Concern over climate change may also be fueling a more carefree relationship with money, and dire reports can validate those fears. Are young people simply responding rationally to turbulent times? Klontz says this apocalyptic anxiety is common through the generations. "I can only imagine what it must have been like to be living through World War II or the Great Depression, World War I, back when the Spanish flu pandemic was happening," he said. "I mean, I feel like there's just been a long history of feeling like the world is going to end during my life. ... You can enjoy today — and you should — but you should also be planning and saving for the future." GUESTS Brad Klontz, financial psychologist and Managing Principal of Your Mental Wealth Advisors Kimberly Zimmerman Rand, principal at Dragonfly Financial Solutions LLC
5/28/202333 minutes, 48 seconds
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'Join or Die' argues the fate of America depends on joining a club

“Join or Die.” It’s the urgent title of a new documentary about “America’s civic unraveling,” as the filmmakers describe it, arguing that the country’s long decline in community connections is undermining America's democracy. The film centers around the research of Robert Putnam, the retired Harvard social scientist, whose book “Bowling Alone: the Collapse and Revival of American Communities,” arguably changed America's understanding of the importance of community. "There are two different kinds of consequences of our social connections, or of the absence of social connections. One set has to do with how being a loner affects us personally," said Robert Putnam. "The title of the film 'Join or Die,' refers to that set of consequences, because it's quite clear. And I made this [point] originally in Bowling Alone while I was writing it 25 years ago. But it's now become even clearer. Your chances of dying over the next year are cut in half by joining one group, cut in three quarters by joining two groups. In other words, there are major physical and many other effects on you personally, if you become isolated." Now, decades since "Bowling Alone" was published filmmakers take another look at the decline in social connections and how a loneliness epidemic has contributed to the decline. "It was an opportunity to zoom out a little bit, and not just cover the symptoms, but really look at what are these root causes," said Rebecca Davis, co-director and co-producer of Join or Die."I also felt in the news we were doing a lot of stories about 'this is bad, this is bad,' but not nearly enough about what can we do and where we can look for hope." GUESTS Robert D. Putnam, former Malkin Research Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University, author of 15 books including Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, and The Upswing: How America Came Together a Century Ago and How We Can Do It Again Rebecca Davis, co-director and co-producer of Join or Die
5/21/202323 minutes, 14 seconds
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Cape Cod's proposed machine gun range in the cross hairs of new EPA report

The long controversial push for a proposed machine gun range on Cape Cod might be struck down by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The range would reduce the amount of time it takes soldiers at Joint Base Cape Cod to complete their training, says the Massachusetts Army National Guard — they currently have to travel hours to perform required small arms training. But the EPA's latest report suggests local resident's drinking water could be jeopardized if the eight-lane, $11.5 million range is built. "The biggest concern by far is for the Cape's water supply," said Steve Junker, managing editor of news at CAI. "It supplies water for more than 200,000 year round residents. And it's already compromised and it's compromised by this very same military base... They'll be firing more than a million bullets per year, which they feel is almost certain to further compromise that aquifer that goes under the base." And Rhode Island officials are texting residents in high risk areas urging them to carry Narcan — also known as naloxone — a medicine that quickly reverses an overdose. There were at least 860 overdose deaths in Rhode Island from 2021-2022, but this April, state officials sent texts offering free Narcan to residents in the Providence area, and they recieved a significant response: "The prior year, they had zero requests for naloxone. As soon as they sent out that text message, within a week, they get 166 requests for naloxone," Tim White, managing editor for WPRI, told Under the Radar. "Of course, they can't count how many lives that may have potentially saved. But, you know, naloxone does just that, it reverses the effects of an opioid overdose... And unfortunately, in Rhode Island, at least, the data from 2022, which is still being put together, is on track to to match the number of overdose deaths that we saw in 2021, which was the deadliest year on record." Plus, Republican opposition forced the take down of a historical marker honoring a New Hampshire labor leader and feminist organizer just weeks after it was unveiled. "She was a feminist who advocated for workers rights, for freedom of speech," said Arnie Arnesen, host of “The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen” on WNHN. "She became a leader in the Communist Party, believing that capitalism was at the root of inequality. I wonder where she got that from. But she loved America. 'It could be paradise on earth if it belonged to the people, but not to a small owning class,' that's a quote from her. No one can take my love of country away from me. But the same GOP is in love, too, with a hater of democracy, a sexual abuser, a liar, a man obsessed with revenge. So thinking about the decision of the Republican governor and his executive councilors to remove the marker, maybe that rebel girl is still a rebel and someone to be feared." It’s our Regional News Roundtable. GUESTS Arnie Arnesen, host of “The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen” on WNHN Tim White, investigative reporter and managing editor for WPRI Steve Junker, managing editor of news at CAI, the Cape, Coast and Islands affiliate of GBH
5/21/202334 minutes, 38 seconds
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Is Gen-Z trading pharmaceuticals for supplements?

Herbs, supplements, yoga, and massage therapy are some of the ways people use home remedies to improve their health instead of the typical doctor’s prescription. But these holistic health practices have become a popular alternative medicine industry with professionals that promote preventative medicine. These practices are not new and have been around, in some form, for hundreds of years. "I think that there are more and more people embracing the need for both sides because the medical system can’t sustain its ability to help people in all ways," said Liz Elia, owner of Whole Minded Health, "it really is a disease care system, and there’s so much chronic disease and chronic pain that this advanced medical care system can't address, so I think there is more and more of a need for us to work together." But the pandemic changed how we all understand healthcare. For some Americans, the last three years have seen an increase in people rethinking traditional medicine, and Gen-Z especially appears to be moving toward holistic health with implications for our entire healthcare system. "A lot of the Gen-Z's that come into our office, they just say 'Hey, I've been to my doctor and they aren't really giving me the answers that I need,' so, they have to start searching at a younger and younger age to even find what's going on with [them]," said Dr. Blake Vickers, a chiropractic doctor and functional neurologist at The Wellness Way in Raleigh, N.C. GUESTS Liz Elia, owner of Whole Minded Health, a holistic health practice in Massacusetts. Dr. Blake Vickers, a chiropractic doctor and functional neurologist at The Wellness Way in Raleigh, N.C., a national holistic health practice.
5/14/202323 minutes, 25 seconds
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New climate report reveals many Massachusetts homes are vulnerable to flooding

A new report finds Massachusetts storms have grown in frequency and severity since the early 1900s. The number of intense, two-day storms has increased by 74% — and that means many homes are becoming more vulnerable to flooding. "The first thing that comes to my mind is the health implication of this," said Dr. Gaurab Basu, co-director of the Center for Health Equity Education and Advocacy at Cambridge Health Alliance. "Concern about water damage in homes that could cause mold, which of course will cause people to have serious allergies. We want our homes to be safe and protected, and so the idea that climate could impact the health of our children within our home is concerning." And across New England, where many of the country’s oldest buildings are located, some cities have begun preparing for the worst of climate change — by picking up historic buildings and moving them. "Look, we're going to make choices. Maybe it's not so important to save a [particular] historic house -- but maybe to save another one," said Beth Daley, editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. "I think the emphasis should really be on changing FEMA and flood insurance laws... These kind of incentives need to be geared toward retreat or relocation." But a United Nations panel says we can still keep the worst effects of climate change at bay, if industrialized countries can cooperate in cutting global greenhouse gasses in half by 2030. Cabell Eames, political director of Better Future Project, told Under the Radar that Massachusetts is making significant progress against climate change: "We have the first Climate Chief in Massachusetts and I know she is working diligently with the state of Massachusetts... There's just so much good will out there and there's so much opportunity to build relationship with one another and build community, and I think that when we do that everything else will just fall into place." A panel of experts discuss these stories and more for our Environmental News Roundtable. GUESTS Dr. Gaurab Basu, physician, co-director of the Center for Health Equity Education and Advocacy at Cambridge Health Alliance, and Health Equity Fellow at the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Beth Daley, editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. Cabell Eames, political director of Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate action organization
5/14/202334 minutes, 25 seconds
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'Welcome to the Circus of Baseball' author pitches the minor leagues as America's true pastime

1994 was a notable year in American sports. The New York Rangers took home the Stanley Cup, Olympic skater Nancy Kerrigan was violently attacked on the ice (the culprit later identified as an associate of competing skater Tonya Harding), and Major League Baseball’s World Series was canceled. But over with the minor league team, the Asheville Tourists in North Carolina, a young Ryan McGee was living his best life. “My dream then was to be a radio play-by-play guy," McGee said. "In the Carolinas, I'm the guy that would go as a teenager and sit in my father's car and twist the AM radio dial, just looking for teams…Unfortunately, my accent is what it is. And in 1994, everyone was supposed to sound like Tom Brokaw. And that's not what I sounded like. But I did land an internship with the Tourists, with the hope of perhaps maybe becoming the voice of the Asheville Tourists.” McGee jumped at the chance to work for $100 a week as an intern for the team. A budding sports journalist, McGee was already an ardent baseball fan, with a special passion for baseball’s minor leagues. Today, he's a well-known writer for ESPN, but his new book recounts his harrowing and hilarious experiences that summer — including some that almost cut his career short. Pulling out the tarp to cover the field on rainy days was especially perilous, he says: “When you go to a game at Wrigley Field or Yankee Stadium and they pull the tarp, they have dozens of people pulling this giant, heavy, rain-proof cover for the entire ballpark infield. And when you have dozens of people, it's beautiful, right? Well, at a minor league ball park, sometimes we had four people to do this while we were in a downpour. And as a result, sometimes the tarp pull turned into more of a tarp drag," McGee said. "There was one time, as I held on to this nylon handle loop of this tarp, the wind got up underneath the tarp. And in my mind, I went about 150 feet up in the air. The reality is that that puff of air probably put me about six or seven feet up in the air, but my feet left the ground… But the good news is I was young and made out of rubber, so when I landed on the ground, I was not hurt very badly. Now I’d go to the hospital.” McGee's new book “Welcome to the Circus of Baseball: A Story of the Perfect Summer at the Perfect Ballpark at the Perfect Time” is our May selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” GUEST Ryan McGee, senior writer for ESPN the Magazine, co-host of the Marty and McGee show for ESPN Radio and the SEC sports network.
5/7/202325 minutes, 3 seconds
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What will the end of the COVID-19 public health emergency mean for the future of COVID care?

The national COVID-19 public health emergency is coming to an end on May 11, and it’s taking with it access to free COVID tests and vaccines. The emergency has been in place since January 2020 and has been renewed several times over the last three years. Its end is not only symbolic; it also might mean a drastically different level of care for COVID patients within hospitals. "I wouldn't say we are in a post-pandemic phase. We are in a much better phase than we were before, but for me the death rate is still far too high," said Abdullah Shihipar, a writer and public health researcher at Brown University School of Public Health. From mandatory mask requirements in care facilities to nationwide data collection, the standards of COVID care with which we have become well-acquainted might be gone by next week. "For many families, COVID-19 is still wreaking havoc in their families," said Dr. Atiya Martin, CEO and founder of All Aces Inc. and former Chief Resilience Officer for the city of Boston. "You still have high infection rates and deaths within working class and communities of color, including undocumented residents or immigrant communities, and so you have this dymanic of the current infection rate being a lot lower than before but still disproportionately impacting these communities." Some medical professionals think this is as good a time as any to end the emergency status while others are worried about what it might mean for their patients, specifically those who are uninsured. "The decision isn't is today the day to stop wearing masks in the hospital, the decision is whether you implement masks forever as the new normal or whether you make them optional... It is a really difficult decision and it really depends on individual values," said Dr. Shira Doron, an infectious disease specialist physician, Chief Infection Control Officer for Tufts Medicine Health System, and the hospital epidemiologist at Tufts Medical Center. GUESTS: Dr. Shira Doron, an infectious disease specialist physician, Chief Infection Control Officer for Tufts Medicine Health System, and the hospital epidemiologist at Tufts Medical Center. Abdullah Shihipar, a writer and public health researcher at Brown University School of Public Health. Dr. Atiya Martin, CEO and founder of All Aces Inc., a Distinguished Senior Fellow at Northeastern University’s Global Resilience Institute, and former Chief Resilience Officer for the city of Boston.
5/7/202332 minutes, 49 seconds
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From slams to sidewalks, poetry is alive in Greater Boston

While April may be the cruelest month, it’s an exciting time for poetry. From Jamaica Plain to Cambridge, the Boston area is flush with open mics and poetry slams — and over the last few years, it seems like poetry has been winning the hearts and minds of young and old alike. A study found the amount of young people reading poetry almost doubled from 2012-2017, traffic to sites such as Poets.org surged 25% during the beginning of the pandemic, and hundreds of new independent bookstores have opened across the country in recent years. Poets like Rupi Kaur have over four and a half million followers on Instagram, and there have been moments where poetry has exploded in pop culture, including when Amanda Gorman read her poem, “The Hill We Climb” at President Biden’s inauguration. "The music of poetry is back. And the performance aspects of poetry are back. And the public aspects of poetry are back," says Elisa New, professor of American Literature at Harvard University. "I think those three things, together, really encapsulate why there's this renewed enthusiasm and excitement about poetry. It's been lifted off the page and out of solitary experience and brought back into the body and back into public." In Cambridge, poetry has been lifted off the page and stamped directly into the ground. Since 2015, the annual Cambridge Sidewalk Poetry Contest has been soliciting poems from residents and choosing five winners — the victorious poems are stamped into fresh concrete throughout the city. This year 336 poems were submitted, although not all the submissions met the guidelines. That's an increase from the 252 submitted last year. The contest was paused in 2021 due to the pandemic. When asked what she hopes happens when someone stumbles across a poem on the sidewalk, Lillian Hsu, director of Public Art for Cambridge Arts, said: "That they pause. Maybe wonder. Read it. Share it. Keep in mind that location in front of that school or library, there's a poem there. And come back again because many people are walking the same route every day. I think the sidewalk is not just a surface, but it's a whole space... it's a social space, an economic space, a cultural space, and so I think the impact is across time." GUESTS Amanda Shea, Boston-based multidisciplinary artist, educator and publicist Lillian Hsu, director of Public Art at Cambridge Arts Elisa New, Powell M. Cabot professor of American Literature at Harvard University, director and host of PBS's Poetry in America, and director of the Center for Public Humanities at Arizona State University
4/30/202327 minutes, 37 seconds
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How American English has borrowed, stolen, and evolved into an imperial language

Language is perhaps our most powerful tool. It has been improved, imposed and modified widely over time. From James Baldwin, to the first settlers in the Plymouth Colony, to beat poets, to hip-hop artists, American English in all its forms has become a global, and imperial language. "Words are never static, they go through changes, and in fact, change is the essential element for any language to thrive," said Ilan Stavans, professor of humanities and Latin American and Latino culture at Amherst College. "We borrow, we steal, that is in American English, from other languages, and also lend words to other languages and that give-and-take is essential." Language is at the forefront of many cultural debates. It both unites and divides us. What language should we use when educating our children? How should we classify cultural dialects or colloquial languages, like Black vernacular English? "There are people who are bringing other languages to English in ways that are not really happening with any other global language, like Chinese for example," said Patrick Cox, host of the popular Subtitle podcast and former editor and reporter for The World. "In that sense, I think it gives English the chance to evolve and transform and take on new, not just words, but phrases and thought patterns in a way that some of those other languages don't." From the ubiquity of English, to understanding how language might help explain our current political moment, we analyze how words both help and hurt our culture on this week's episode of Under the Radar with Callie Crossley guest hosted by Phillip Martin. GUESTS: Ilan Stavans, Professor of Humanities and Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College, and editor of a new book: “The People's Tongue: Americans and the English Language.” Patrick Cox, host of the popular "Subtitle" podcast and former editor and reporter for The World. Patrick is the winner of the Linguistic Society of America’s 2019 Linguistics Journalism Award.
4/30/202330 minutes, 15 seconds
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Boston local and saxophone prodigy, Grace Kelly, is only getting started

As a young girl, Brookline musician Grace Kelly dreamed of being Hollywood actress turned princess of the same name, Grace Kelly. The saxophonist told Under the Radar how movies have long inspired her musically: "Movies have always taken me into this other reality, and I think music is similar in that when you see amazing musicians on stage, working together, creating this amazing moment that gives that emotional release, like 'oh, this is just beautiful,' and I feel that way when I'm making music." The talented musician grew up to make a name for herself as a performer, playing alongside saxophone legend Phil Woods and as a soloist with the Boston Pops Orchestra at just 14. At 16, she performed at President Obama's 2009 inauguration. But professional musicians took note of her skill when she was only in middle school: "Back when I was starting professionally at 13 I didn't even know that could be a job ... I have had such incredible mentors ... starting with my first saxophone teacher who invited me to play at his jam session when I was 12-years-old, and I had never done that before." Now, at 30, the prodigy is showcasing her love for the movies in the East Coast premiere of a special concert: ‘At the Movies: Grace Kelly with Strings' featuring a 15-piece ensemble at the Berklee Performance Center on April 29. GUEST Grace Kelly, saxophonist, singer, songwriter, band leader, co-leader of the band 2saxy and composer of Under the Radar’s theme music
4/23/202323 minutes, 48 seconds
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LGBTQ News Roundtable: A record amount of anti-LGBTQ bills

417 anti-LGBTQ+ bills were introduced in several state legislatures this year alone, according to data published by the ACLU. That is a record amount, and more than twice the amount of anti-LGBTQ+ bills introduced last year. And private companies have become entangled in culture wars, including Bud Light as a transgender TikTok influencer and activist was featured in a social media ad promoting the beer. Plus, some activists continue to take to the streets. One LGBTQ+ group in New Hampshire, Rainbow Reload, is taking up arms for self-protection. Those stories and more on our LGBTQ news roundtable. GUESTS: Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLY. Janson Wu, executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, or GLAD. E.J. Graff, journalist, author and managing editor of The Monkey Cage, an independent, political science–oriented blog at the Washington Post.
4/23/202334 minutes, 3 seconds
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Has the Boston cannabis industry really become more equitable?

When Massachusetts legalized marijuana back in 2016, the new law included a mandate enforcing the industry to offer opportunities to communities disproportionately affected by the war on drugs and consistent over-policing for cannabis. In doing this, Massachusetts became the first state to write social equity for the marijuana industry into law. The state also created the Cannabis Control Commission to help those who were eligible to open a dispensary. There were two programs new dispensary owners could go through: the Economic Empowerment Program and the Social Equity Program. But since these programs were introduced, many have found it difficult to get CCC approval for a distribution license. More recently, state officials announced the creation of the Cannabis Social Equity Advisory Board, a committee tasked with deciding how the state will dispense money to cannabis entrepreneurs. "A lot of people that look like me don't have the opportunity to enter this industry because the barriers are set up from the jump," said Dru Ledbetter, the CEO of cannabis delivery company Flower Xpress and owner and CEO of the Zeb Boutique dispensary. About 68% of the active marijuana establishment agents in Massachusetts are white, according to data collected by the Cannabis Control Commission. Only 8% are Hispanic or Latino and 6% are Black. As for gender, 63% of active establishment owners are men and 36% are women, according to the same data. "I believe that any person that has a marijuana offense, currently or in the past, that should be wiped from their record," said Tito Jackson, a former Boston city councilor and CEO of Apex Noire, "because there are companies who are operating in the state of Massachusetts who are making hundreds of millions of dollars, and I guarantee you none of the people currently locked up sold anywhere near as much as some of those companies." Has the industry actually become more equitable, and have these moves toward a more inclusive cannabis industry been successful? Ledbetter and Jackson joined Under the Radar to share their experiences and perspectives. GUESTS: Dru Ledbetter, CEO of Flower Xpress, a recreational cannabis delivery company, and the owner and CEO of Zeb Boutique, a cannabis retail dispensary in Boston Tito Jackson, former Boston city councilor and CEO of the new cannabis dispensary, Apex Noire
4/16/202324 minutes, 4 seconds
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Processing the Boston Marathon bombings, 10 years later

Ten years ago, tragedy struck Boston. On April 15, 2013, two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three and wounding more than 200. It will forever be remembered as a dark day for the city. But the day will also be remembered for the heroic actions that saved victims. "As Captain Bob 'Sarge' Haley said, 'Everybody ran the right way that day.' Meaning everybody ran towards where people needed help, where the bombs went off," Rich Serino, former chief of Boston EMS, told Under the Radar. "And that, I think, is what people were trained to do. And people made a difference and saved lives." Still, the impact of the explosion was felt far beyond the blast radius. From safety procedures to police surveillance, certain elements of the city will never be the same. And questions about the attack remain. "Who built the bombs? A fundamental question, right? Who built the bombs?" said Bruce Gellerman, former senior correspondent for WBUR. "[The federal prosecutor] said that the bombs were too sophisticated for the Tsarnaevs to have made. They had to have resources they didn't have, they must've had help ... they don't know who made the bombs. To this day they don't know." Ten years later, we are reflecting on this horrific event to understand the full impact of the bombing, how the city has healed, and what scars remain. GUESTS Bruce Gellerman, former senior correspondent for WBUR Rich Serino, Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, former Deputy Administrator for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and former Chief of Boston EMS
4/16/202333 minutes, 47 seconds
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Boston's new director of nightlife looks to change city's after-dark scene

Boston has often been ranked as having a notoriously poor nightlife. Most clubs have a two a.m. curfew and the trains stop running just after midnight. It's even hard to find a bar that closes after one a.m. despite the city being known as a bar-town. Boston was ranked as the thirteenth best city to travel to by several travel blogs and review websites. That's not a terrible rating, but we are nowhere near other cities, like New York City or Miami. What kind of toll does this take on the tourism and entertainment economoy here, and how can the city grow into a more social hub? Corean Reynolds is the newly appointed director of nightlife economy for the city of Boston. Her role is not only to help Boston stay awake later, but also to imrpove the city's nightlife and entertainment econommy. "We have 23 robust, unique, culturally diverse neighborhoods in the city of Boston, and we want to encourage not only fellow Bostonians, but folks who travel here to indulge in those neighborhoods," said Reynolds. "Part of that is looking for new policy and new ways to engage those neighborhoods." Reynolds' role also focuses on the retention rate of Boston residents, and encouraging the thousands of college students and tourists to think of Boston as more than a temporary location. "Folks go home, go to work, and go home, but we want folks to interact with each other and their community, and to build a sense of community. That's what will make people stay," said Reynolds. Mayor Michelle Wu and the Office of Economic Oppurtunity and Inclusion launched the SPACE Grant program last year, a program funded by the American Rescue Plan which aims to promote small business growth in Boston industries most impacted by the pandemic. Companies will be able to recieve three-year grants of up to 200 thousand dollars to help with startup costs. GUESTS: Corean Reynolds, the director of nightlife economy for Boston’s city government, previously the director of economic inclusion at The Boston Foundation.
4/9/202325 minutes, 2 seconds
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Boston has a decorated jazz history, but it's no longer as easy to find jam sessions

Jazz, one of America’s great art forms, has a decorated history in Boston. Charlie Parker performed here in the early '50s. Clubs from the Hi-Hat to Savoy Café lined the streets. And Miles Davis resuscitated his career here in 1981, playing a string of sold-out shows. Sue Auclair helped coordinate Davis' return. She described the moment she broke the news to Eric Jackson, who spearheaded decades of radio programming at GBH: "I said, 'You're not gonna believe this but Miles is coming to Boston.' I told him the details, he cut the music midstream — which no one ever does — and he announces this. ... We sold the thing out four nights." But the prevalence of jazz in Boston is not what it once was. From a change in culture to a lack of clubs and gentrification, Auclair and other Under the Radar guests discussed the past, present and future of jazz in Boston. Tessil Collins, host of the Jazz Gallery at GBH, laments today's lack of dedicated jazz venues. "When you look at these places, though, you're talking about playing jazz at a restaurant ... you're having a meal, people are talking, and there's a band over here in the corner doing background music," he said. "It's unfortunate that we have to settle for that." Gentrification and "nightclub apartheid" has impacted the scene as well, says George "Chip" Greenidge Jr., founder and director of the nonprofit Greatest MINDS. "12 years ago [I told a Boston Globe editor], 'Boston has this feeling where it's called nightclub apartheid.' ... You know, people of color are usually relegated on the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights, and Friday, Saturday, Sundays will be given to, pretty much, white people," he said. "... So, we do have to talk about gentrification, we do have to talk about space and place and where people feel comfortable." Greenidge said there used to be more affordable entertainment options. Now, he says, there are few places to just "sit and enjoy yourself." GUESTS Sue Auclair, longtime jazz promoter and president of Sue Auclair Promotions, a Boston-based PR and marketing firm servicing the arts, entertainment and media industries Tessil Collins, host of The Jazz Gallery & managing producer of Jazz 24/7 online Radio at GBH George “Chip” Greenidge Jr., founder and director of the Greatest MINDS, a nonprofit that works with young students and professionals to become civic leaders
4/9/202332 minutes, 49 seconds
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Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai tells the untold stories of the Vietnam War in new book, "Dust Child"

The legacy of the Vietnam War is on their faces. The children of the American GI’s stationed in Vietnam during the war and the local women who bore them – left behind and overwhelmingly rejected. Author Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai braids together the stories of a young mother hoping for a life in America, an adult son searching for the father he never knew, and an American Vietnam war veteran looking for redemption. “Dust Child” is at once empathetic, devastating, and upbeat burnished with Quế Mai's stunning signature prose. "I think we are blessed with a life on this Earth so that we can uplift each other, and I really think every one of us has so much power inside of us that we can use for a good purpose," said Quế Mai when asked what she wants her readers to take away from her novel. Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai is the author of twelve books of fiction, poetry and non-fiction written in Vietnamese and English. Her work has been translated into twenty languages. Her first novel “The Mountains Sing”, the first written in English, was a runner up for the 2021 Dayton Literary Peace Prize and other awards including the 2021 Pen Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award, and the 2021 International Book Award. “Dust Child” is her second historical novel, and it’s our April selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club".
4/2/202326 minutes, 6 seconds
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50 years after the U.S. exited Vietnam, a new exhibit sheds light on the infamous 'Hanoi Hilton'

50 years ago, direct U.S. involvement in the Vietnam war officially ended as the last remaining combat troops and prisoners of war (POWs) returned to American soil. It was a complex moment for the country as the war was deeply unpopular and ended in defeat. More than 58,000 Americans died in the war, and three million Vietnamese. Fredrik Logevall told Under the Radar that Americans were ready for the war to be over: "I think they felt on some level, many of them, conflicted. They wanted these deaths to be justified, for this to matter." After the Paris Peace Accords were signed on January 27th, 1973, American POWs were sent home in February and March. “The prettiest thing I ever saw was when I looked out the window and saw the golden gate," one POW told KPIX in 1973, shortly after walking off the plane at an Air Force Base in California. "I want you all to remember that we walked out of Hanoi as winners. We’re not walking with our tail between our legs. We return with honor.” But the horrors of war can be hard to forget. Tim Sullivan spent about five years at the "Hanoi Hilton," an infamous Vietnamese prison, and described to Under the Radar what happened soon after his plane was shot down: "I ended up being interrogated right after I got there and went through probably three or four hours of basic interrogation. They were doing the, 'I'll ask you a question, you give me an answer, if I don't like it, I'll smack you until I get the answer I like.'" Now, a half century after [Operation Homecoming](htthttps://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Visit/Museum-Exhibits/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/197496/operation-homecoming/), the prisoner experience at the "Hanoi Hilton" is recreated in a new Massachusetts exhibit. "The cells that we have are actual cells that came from the 'Hanoi Hilton' in Vietnam. So when you walk into them you're getting the feeling of what it was like to be in these cells, and one of the most powerful torture techniques is actually isolation. And the guys will tell you they spent sometimes four or five years in solitary confinement..." Under the Radar gets a first-person account of the POW experience and expert analysis as the country reflects on the 50 years since withdrawing from the Vietnam War. GUESTS Tim Sullivan, Vietnam War veteran and former prisoner of war Rob Collings, president of the American Heritage Museum Fredrik Logevall, professor of International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and professor of History at Harvard University, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam
4/2/202331 minutes, 45 seconds
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Encore: The sugar-filled history and legacy of Necco, the beloved local candy company

Necco, aka the New England Confectionery Company, was the oldest candy company in the United States at the time of its closure in 2018. Based here in Revere, Massachusetts, the company played a historic role in the world of American candy. Necco manufactured national favorites like Clark Bars, Candy Buttons, Sky Bars and Sweethearts. But their bestseller was without a doubt the Necco wafers, dating back to 1847. Interestingly, Necco marketed its wafers in a number of ways. Darlene Lacey, an author and curator of the Candy Wrapper Museum, told Under the Radar that the company wasn't really sure how to position the candy. "In the early times, they focused on them being the perfect treat for hostesses at afternoon teas. They had them described as a 'fairy feast' in a garden of delights. Very delicate, very romantic," she described. "... And then as time went on, they started to skew them a little bit more towards kids, and then later into the nostalgia market." The company was sold a handful of years ago to the Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company. But how did this shift impact the candy manufacturing world? Under the Radar talked with Lacey about everything from favorite sweet treats to the future of the candy production industry.
3/26/202325 minutes, 41 seconds
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Regional News Roundtable: The surprising departure of Rhode Island Rep. Cicilline

In a surprise announcement, U.S. Rep. David Cicilline said he is stepping away from politics. Cicilline has represented Rhode Island in Congress for over a decade. During his time in office, he took on Big Tech and served as the House impeachment manager for former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. He is also openly gay and an advocate for LGBTQ rights. So with all that apparent success, why is Cicilline resigning? "There were a couple factors. One, he was offered a job as CEO of the Rhode Island Foundation, the big nonprofit funder here in Rhode Island. He's going to more than triple his salary to $650,000 compared what he made in Congress," WPRI politics and business editor Ted Nesi told Under the Radar. "And he acknowledged it was just less appealing to stay in Congress, in the U.S. House, as a Democrat who is now in the minority, with a Republican majority who has very little he agrees with them on. And if we're being honest, Cicilline tried and failed to get into senior leadership position when the House leaders were changing over." Nesi said Cicilline's resignation was a shock to "everyone in Rhode Island" given the fact he was only a couple months into his latest term. Cicilline officially steps down on June 1. The special election to replace him will likely happen in November, so there will be several months without Rhode Island's 1st District represented in the U.S. House. Also on Under the Radar's Regional News Roundtable, guests discussed the aging Bourne and Sagamore bridges. Tens of thousands of cars drive across the nearly 100-year-old bridges to Cape Cod each day. Though the bridges are in desperate need of repairs, the federal government has rejected multiple requests for funding — although President Joe Biden's latest budget proposal would include a "down payment." "These bridges apparently have not a great design, and they're very difficult and expensive to repair. And it's that cost of repair — year over year — which is really driving the conversation here that they just have to be replaced entirely," said Steve Junker, managing editor of news at CAI. "Right before the pandemic, they were talking about a price tag to replace both bridges of about $1 billion. And everybody thought 'Oh, that's a lot of money.' Now they're saying it could be as much as $4 billion." Arnesen said now is the time to think big about the bridge reconstruction. "What the 'H' are you building? Because it's not just about a bridge. Because you're talking about also a bridge to the future. And what we know about the future is climate change. What we know about the future is maybe the desire for more public transportation. ... It's not just about a bridge, everyone. It changes the whole course of life." And, lastly, Under the Radar guests discussed how a high school in New Hampshire is training students for the Granite state’s burgeoning outdoor tourism industry. GUESTS Steve Junker, Managing Editor of News at CAI, the Cape, Coast and Islands affiliate of GBH Ted Nesi, politics and business editor and investigative reporter for WPRI Arnie Arnesen, host of “The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen” on WNHN
3/26/202332 minutes, 10 seconds
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Michelle Miller grapples with identity in new book, 'Belonging'

Michelle Miller makes her living telling other people’s stories. But now author Michelle Miller has written her own story, a poignant and captivating heartbreaking chronicle of her quest to find and connect with her mother. “Belonging: A Daughter’s Search for Identity Through Loss and Love” is her first book and our March selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” GUEST Michelle Miller, co-host of CBS Saturday Mornings, national Correspondent for CBS News and author of “Belonging: A Daughter’s Search for Identity Through Loss and Love”
3/19/202328 minutes, 6 seconds
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New Hampshire Insiders set the scene for the 2024 presidential race

For better or worse, the 2024 presidential election season has begun. Candidates from former President Trump to former U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley are already making their case in early voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire. And while long-standing tradition has held the Granite State as the first presidential election primary in the nation, Democrats are pushing to get South Carolina in that coveted spot – much to New Hampshire’s dismay. We also analyze a new local TV series that considers why a certain kind of libertarian is flocking to New Hampshire. It's our ongoing segment, New Hampshire Insiders. GUESTS Arnie Arnesen, former New Hampshire democratic legislator, former nominee for governor and candidate for U.S. Congress, host of WNHN’s The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen Paul Steinhauser, national politics reporter for Fox News and campaign columnist for The Concord Monitor
3/19/202329 minutes, 46 seconds
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Pop Culture Roundtable: Chris Rock slaps back

Almost a year after actor Will Smith jumped onto the stage of the Academy Awards to slap Chris Rock, Rock exacts revenge with a new comedy special. And in the notoriously competitive movie industry, the independent film studio A24 has skyrocketed to success with a multibillion-dollar valuation — and 18 Oscar nominations this year. Plus, did the movement “#OscarsSoWhite” lead to this year’s record number of Oscar-nominated Asian and Asian American performers? It’s our Pop Culture Roundtable. GUESTS Michael Jeffries, dean of academic affairs and professor of American studies at Wellesley College Linda Liu, lecturer of sociology at UMass Boston, who specializes in cinema, media and cultural studies
3/12/202332 minutes, 18 seconds
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Has Asian representation in film improved with ‘Everything, Everywhere, All At Once’?

It's been five years since "Crazy Rich Asians" featuring an all-Asian cast broke global box office records. Its debut kicked off the so-called "Asian August" in 2018, with the release of films like Netflix’s "To All the Boys I've Loved Before" highlighting the work of Asian American and Asian artists, and with that a promise of more opportunities. Now, the movie "Everything, Everywhere, All At Once" is breaking records, and thrusting veteran and new Asian actors into a rarified spotlight. Is this the long hoped-for payoff? GUESTS Jenny Korn, founder and coordinator of the Race, Tech, and Media Working Group at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. Elena Creef, professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Wellesley College. She specializes in Asian American visual history in photography, film and pop culture.
3/12/202325 minutes, 34 seconds
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As federal food benefits decline, Mass. food banks expect a surge

Even before the pandemic ravaged the country, some Americans struggled to keep their families fed. But a boost from pandemic emergency funding helped make access to food possible for many. Now, as those additional benefits have ended, demand at food banks is expected to balloon. And as some people go to food banks for the first time, the need for culturally diverse foods, ingredients and recipes is stronger than ever. GUESTS Kannan Thiruvengadam, director at Eastie Farm, an East Boston farm and community organization Jennifer Johnson, executive director of Gaining Ground, an organic regenerative farm in Concord, Massachusetts Catherine D’amato, president and CEO of The Greater Boston Food Bank
3/5/202321 minutes, 56 seconds
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As streaming services boom, cable TV continues its decline

Remember how we used to complain — there’s nothing to watch on TV? Nowadays, there might be too much to watch. From Abbott Elementary to The Last of Us, new shows seem to be cropping up by the day as streaming services boast tens of millions of subscribers. But with the rise of streaming services comes the fall of cable — a recent report reveals fewer than half of American adults now have a cable subscription. How does this impact not just traditional TV watching, but how consumers enjoy the entire spectrum of entertainment, from Hollywood blockbusters to local news? GUESTS Alissa Wilkinson, Senior Culture reporter and Critic for Vox James K. Willcox, Senior Electronics Editor for Consumer Reports Jana Arbanas, vice chair for telecom, media and entertainment at Deloitte
3/5/202335 minutes, 55 seconds
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Why one cartoonist argues comics are an untapped channel for storytelling

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Superman, Wonder Woman, Black Panther — that's probably what most of us picture when we think about comic books. But a local cartoonist argues that comics are much more than just superheroes or Sunday paper comic strips. In his exhibit, “Comics Is A Medium, Not A Genre,” Joel Christian Gill includes almost 200 works, ranging from Charles M. Schulz’s first Peanuts comic in 1950, to Black cartoonists who have used their drawings to tell stories about race and social justice. We sit down with Gill and discuss his argument why comics are not just for children, but everyone. GUEST Joel Christian Gill, cartoonist, author, chair of the MFA in Visual Narrative at Boston University, and curator of the “Comics Is A Medium, Not A Genre” exhibit at Boston University
2/26/202322 minutes, 30 seconds
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Greater Boston guaranteed income programs provide inspiration for the country

From the 18th century philosopher, Thomas Paine, to 2020 Presidential candidate, Andrew Yang, the concept of guaranteed income — providing people in need with cash to meet basic needs, essentially — has been floating around for centuries. Critics say no strings attached cash payments are not a long-term solution to uplift the economically fragile. But advocates point to successful pilot programs, including some in Greater Boston, are inspiring widespread support across the nation. We sit down with leaders of the movement and a local program participant. GUESTS Sumbul Siddiqui, mayor of Cambridge Saadia McConville, communications director of Mayors for Guaranteed Income Victor, participant in the Cambridge RISE guaranteed income program. GBH is identifying Victor only by his first name to protect his privacy.
2/26/202335 minutes, 21 seconds
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Food and Wine Roundtable: Japanese whisky is going down smooth

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: You may have already sampled sake, perhaps the best-known Japanese alcoholic beverage. But the popularity of Japanese whisky may soon rival Japan's most familiar drink. And, many James Beard Award nominees are restaurants and chefs in Massachusetts featuring Asian cuisine. Plus, from Back Bay to Watertown, local Black-owned restaurants are drawing new attention. Join our food and wine contributors as we sip and savor those stories and more. GUESTS Amy Traverso, senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, cohost of GBH’s Weekends with Yankee and author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook” Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School, author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional”
2/19/202323 minutes, 43 seconds
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Latinx Roundtable: A new startup wants to be 'Fox News in Spanish'

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: East Boston resident Reina Carolina Morales Rojas has been missing for months. Community advocates claim police were too slow to act in the search. Plus, a conservative media startup is hoping to become “Fox News in Spanish” by hiring a swath of Latinx journalists and ramping up a $20 million marketing campaign. And despite ongoing tension about laws governing immigration, Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham joined Democrat Dick Durbin to reintroduce the Dream Act. The proposed legislation would allow immigrants brought to the United States as children to earn residency and, potentially, citizenship. That and more on our Latinx News Roundtable. GUESTS Marcela García, an opinion columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe Julio Ricardo Varela, president of Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, founder of Latino Rebels, and MSNBC opinion columnist
2/19/202334 minutes, 9 seconds
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The integral role of Black artists in Western art history

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Chances are, if you're an art fan and a museum-goer, you’ve seen Western artwork featuring Black people. Their likenesses are tucked in the corners of the canvasses but also boldly staring out from the frames of portraits. Author Zaria Ware has unearthed the life and histories of the men and women who served as models for much of this work, as well as the Black artists who rose to the top of their profession in the early part of the 20th century. We sit down with Ware to discuss who they were and how they came to be there – and why they are often overlooked. GUEST Zaria Ware, author of "BLK ART: The Audacious Legacy of Black Artists and Models in Western Art"
2/12/202327 minutes
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Environmental News Roundtable: Gov. Healey takes aim at climate change

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Governor Maura Healey wants Massachusetts to “lead the world” in its fight against climate change, and she has staked her claim by naming the first-in-the-nation cabinet-level climate chief to her Cabinet. But some advocates want more direct action. And, a new study documents a dramatic 50 year rise of warmer climates during our region's winters. With less snow and fewer frozen ponds — is New England’s very identity melting away? Plus, there's exciting buzz for a new vaccine for honeybees. Will it offer new protection for the indispensable pollinator? That and more on our Environmental News Roundtable. GUESTS Beth Daley, editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. Dr. Aaron Bernstein, interim director of the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School Cabell Eames, political director of Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate action organization
2/12/202330 minutes, 50 seconds
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From Bad Bunny to Rosalía, Spanish-language artists are finally gaining critical acclaim

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Even if you don't know his name, you have probably heard his music. Bad Bunny is a Puerto Rican superstar who has topped Billboard charts for years. For three years in a row he has been Spotify's most streamed artist in the world. While he has won Grammys before, his global appeal hasn’t translated to wins in the Recording Academy's biggest categories. No Spanish-language album had ever been nominated for the the Grammys’ Album of the Year — until Bad Bunny's "Un Verano Sin Ti" was nominated for that honor in November. Two experts examine why a handful of Spanish-language artists were finally able to transcend The Grammys' niche categories, and what this says about the rise and undeniable influence of Latin music in America. GUESTS Leila Cobo, journalist, author, and Billboard’s Chief Content Officer of Latin Berta Rojas, associate professor in Berklee's Guitar department and winner of two 2022 Latin Grammys, Best Classical Album for “Legado,” and Best Classical Contemporary Composition for the song "Anido's Portrait: I. Chacarera”
2/5/202325 minutes, 44 seconds
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Can a healthy diet treat disease? Why some argue food is medicine

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: From heart disease to diabetes, chronic illness is the leading cause of death in the United States, and chronic disease is a major reason why the nation spends more than $4 trillion on health care every year. But a growing movement believes reexamining our relationship with food is key to both improving our health and saving money. Food is medicine, they argue, and access to high quality food is essential to a longer, healthier life. We speak with organizations leading the crusade in Boston and beyond to understand how food can assist, and sometimes even replace medication. GUESTS Olivia Weinstein, culinary nutrition director for Boston Medical Center Jean Terranova, senior director of policy and research at Community Servings Paul Hepfer, CEO of Project Open Hand
2/5/202332 minutes, 8 seconds
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The power of mentorship for at-risk youth

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: In 1949, a small organization formed in Boston. Ten fatherless boys were paired with adult volunteers to help them navigate their lives. More than 70 years later, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts serves young boys and girls and connects more than 3,600 children with mentors each year. We discuss the importance of strong social webs, how the pandemic frayed them and the power of mentoring with the leader of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts and a tight-knit duo that continues to grow together. GUESTS Mark O’Donnell, president and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts Karen Rodriguez, volunteer mentor for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Massachusetts Rosela Moreta, Karen’s 10-year-old mentee
1/30/202324 minutes, 36 seconds
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LGBTQ News: Lawmakers across the nation consider bans on drag shows

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: A federal judge in Springfield rules in favor of protecting students’ gender identities at Ludlow Public Schools. Plus, legislators from Tennessee to Idaho are considering bans on drag shows. And while Pope Francis has expressed support for the LGBTQ community in the past, in perhaps his strongest statement yet, he says homosexuality is not a crime. Those stories and more on our LGBTQ News Roundtable. GUESTS Sue O’Connell, commentator and host at New England Cable News, NBC 10 Boston and NBC LX; co-publisher of Bay Windows and The South End News Janson Wu, executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, or GLAD Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLY
1/29/202333 minutes, 15 seconds
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The long, complicated story behind Roe v. Wade

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: For more than 10 years, author Joshua Prager immersed himself in the story of the woman at the center of the Roe v. Wade case, Norma McCorvey, as well as the lawyers who filed the case and the leaders of the then nascent anti-abortion movement. McCorvey’s life as a plaintiff in the Roe case and the cast of characters around her provide a revealing window into the abortion controversy writ large. Prager’s careful, detailed research and masterful storytelling reveals the contradictions, hypocrisy, righteous fury and gut wrenching pain that helps explain how the landmark legislation became a third rail. GUEST Joshua Prager, journalist, author and 2022 Pulitizer Prize finalist for “The Family Roe: An American Story”
1/22/202326 minutes, 36 seconds
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Women share their abortion experiences before, during and after Roe v. Wade

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: 50 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark decision: Roe v. Wade. It made abortion a constitutionally protected right, and simultaneously gave millions of people greater freedom over decisions they could make about their body. But last year, that ruling was overturned. While anti-abortion activists celebrated, critics of the decision argue women today have fewer rights than their grandmothers. Today, we get perspective from women who have had abortions before, during and after Roe, and explore what’s next for reproductive care in America. GUESTS Rebecca Hart Holder, president of Reproductive Equity Now Sally Benbasset, member of The Bad Old Days Posse, a group that shares their experiences of abortion before Roe v. Wade Sophie, a volunteer with Shout Your Abortion who had an abortion after Roe was overturned
1/22/202331 minutes, 15 seconds
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New documentary illuminates Zora Neale Hurston's work as an anthropologist

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Zora Neale Hurston has long been known as a key figure of the Harlem Renaissance, in particular for her novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God." But what you may not know is that she was also a dedicated anthropologist — ultimately becoming known as the foremost authority on Black folklore in her time. We speak with the writer and director of "Zora Neale Hurston: Claiming a Space," a new in-depth documentary that highlights the significant contributions Hurston made to the world of anthropology. Guest: Tracy Heather Strain, president and co-founder of The Film Posse, Corwin-Fuller professor of film studies at Wesleyan University, and writer and director of "Zora Neale Hurston: Claiming a Space"
1/15/202324 minutes, 25 seconds
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How we teach race and racial justice to children

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Jan. 16 is the 37th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday to acknowledge the legacy of the civil rights leader. The reverend was a key leader in the transformative social justive movement which challenged a racially segregated America, and pushed the coutnry toward a more just future. Understanding the complex history of race and racism in the United States and King's role in the civil rights movement is critical — but how do we explain the concepts to young kids? Two experts who specialize in breaking down difficult concepts for children discuss why it is such crucial work. Guests: Carole Boston Weatherford, award-winning children's book author and English professor at Fayetteville State university Tanya Nixon-Silberg, director and founder of Little Uprisings, an organization in Boston that teaches children and adults about racial justice Note: Bonnie Duncan of The Gottabees voiced Trevor The Elephant in this episode. Tanya Nixon-Silberg is performing at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum on Monday, Jan. 16.
1/15/202333 minutes, 26 seconds
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Mass Politics Profs: How will a new crop of lawmakers reshape Massachusetts?

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Massachusetts inaugurated a historic slate of top leaders with Maura Healey as governor and Kim Driscoll as lieutenant governor. Some believe Driscoll could reshape the traditionally low-key role. Meanwhile, in the U.S. House, days of chaos surrounded Republican Kevin McCarthy’s bid to become speaker — what does this discord mean for governing in the new Congress? And as the state Legislature wrapped up its last session, lawmakers tried to push through a slew of bills, including one aimed at addressing the widespread thefts of catalytic converters. That and more during our full hour with the Mass Politics Profs. Find more of their analysis on their blog. GUESTS Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at UMass Boston Jerold Duquette, associate professor of political science and director of the public administration degree program at Central Connecticut State University Shannon Jenkins, associate dean of the college of arts and sciences at UMass Dartmouth and a professor of political science
1/8/202358 minutes
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Encore: Local residents embrace communal living with a sustainable twist

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: COVID-19 might make all the headlines, but another crisis is afoot: loneliness. Pandemic-times have only exacerbated chronic loneliness by creating a world of isolation and social distancing. Can ecovillages — a unique model fostering community and connection — be one answer? Ecovillage cohousing communities have been popular in Europe for decades, but interest here in the United States is ramping up. These communities are designed to integrate sustainability into all aspects of community living, and to create strong bonds between neighbors who all collaborate in the decision-making for the group. Residents of three local communities share their communal experiences and why, post-pandemic, there is even more interest in this model of living. Plus, even as inflation rises, Americans continue to shop. But what if you could find the goods you need without paying a cent? That's the idea behind the Buy Nothing Project, an app and collection of hyperlocal Facebook groups where users can give away and receive items and services with their neighbors — all for free. Founded in 2013, the Buy Nothing Project has spread internationally, offering an alternative to shopping for items like furniture, clothing and appliances. Here in Massachusetts, active Buy Nothing users are building community and finding an array of unique offerings. GUESTS Dave Shevett, resident and one of the founders of Mosaic Commons, a cohousing neighborhood, part of the Sawyer Hill Ecovillage in Berlin, Massachusetts. Sarah Heile, resident of Camelot Cohousing, also part of the Sawyer Hill Ecovillage in Berlin, Massachusetts. Steve Chiasson, resident of Belfast Cohousing and Ecovillage in Belfast, Maine. Fern Spierer, founding member of the Pioneer Valley Buy Nothing Facebook group. She lives in Western Massachusetts, where she's an active member of Amherst Buy Nothing. David Baker, former administrator of the Halifax/Hanson Buy Nothing Facebook group. He's now active on the Buy Nothing app.
1/1/202357 minutes, 59 seconds
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Mr. Mike's Merry Mix: Our annual review of quirky holiday songs

This week on Under the Radar: It’s our annual spinning of holiday tunes with Mike Wilkins, radio engineer for PRX and GBH’S The World. Wilkins shares his new picks of old songs that are quirky, weird and sometimes way out there — not the traditional carols from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir or even new traditional favorites like Mariah Carey’s “All I Want For Christmas Is You.” Wilkins' compilation of songs-you-never-heard-of include the vinyl one-hit-wonders he rescued from the forgotten bins of overlooked B-sides, and a few newer tunes that might become classics. This season, for his 33rd year of Jingle bell melodies, Mike honors his mixtape history with “Mr. Mike's Merry Mix 2022,” a Yuletopia recording. Stream his full playlist here: https://soundcloud.com/seenthat/mikemas2022 Guests Mike Wilkins, radio engineer for PRX and GBH’S The World.
12/25/202258 minutes, 1 second
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Mr. Mike's Merry Mix: Our annual review of quirky holiday songs

This week on Under the Radar: It’s our annual spinning of holiday tunes with Mike Wilkins, radio engineer for PRX and GBH’S The World. Wilkins shares his new picks of old songs that are quirky, weird and sometimes way out there — not the traditional carols from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir or even new traditional favorites like Mariah Carey’s “All I Want For Christmas Is You.” Wilkins' compilation of songs-you-never-heard-of include the vinyl one-hit-wonders he rescued from the forgotten bins of overlooked B-sides, and a few newer tunes that might become classics. This season, for his 33rd year of Jingle bell melodies, Mike honors his mixtape history with “Mr. Mike's Merry Mix 2022,” a Yuletopia recording. Stream his full playlist here: https://soundcloud.com/seenthat/mikemas2022 Guests Mike Wilkins, radio engineer for PRX and GBH’S The World
12/18/202258 minutes
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Food and Wine Roundtable: From fruitcake to wine bars, what to sample this holiday season

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: It's time to indulge in our favorite holiday comfort foods and toast the season with glasses of good cheer. This year, nostalgia is on the table with a return of the fruitcake, and Boston is finally embracing wine bars. Plus, our food and wine contributors offer gift ideas for the foodies and wine lovers on your list. Guests Amy Traverso, senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, cohost of GBH’s Weekends with Yankee and author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook” Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School, author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional”
12/11/202224 minutes, 38 seconds
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Local News Roundtable: Green Line ready for its big debut, but letting more teens vote may stall

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: After four years of work, the Green Line extension will finally open for service on Monday. Plus, Boston City Council approved a petition to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in local elections, but the state Legislature has the final say. And a local photographer showcases residents in Dorchester. Guests: Sue O’Connell, political commentator and analyst for NECN, NBC10 Boston and co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News Gin Dumcius, managing editor at the Dorchester Reporter Mike Deehan, co-writer of the Boston Axios Newsletter
12/11/202233 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Geniuses Next Door: We chat with the Massachusetts MacArthur Genius awardees

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Last month, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation named its class of 2022 “Genius” grant fellows — 25 recipients across academia, the arts, and sciences all of whom have demonstrated outstanding talent in their fields. In our series, “The Genius Next Door,” we gathered three of the awardees who work and teach here in Massachusetts. And, the daughter of one of New York’s most prominent rabbis has a secret that only her best friend knows. Plus, a successful website designer dreams of her own Jewish food show. Both of them are temporarily stymied by the reappearance of young loves gone wrong. Their stories are the heart of two new romance novels set during Hanukkah, the annual festival of lights. Romance novelists Stacey Agdern and Jean Meltzer are the authors of “Love and Latkes” and “The Matzah Ball” our December selections for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guests:  Danna Freedman is a chemistry professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an associate editor for the Journal of the American Chemical Society.  Melanie Matchett Wood is a mathematics professor at Harvard University studying pure math and number theory. Loretta Ross is a reproductive justice and human rights activist, as well as a professor at Smith College.  Stacey Agdern is the author of four Hannukkah romance novels; her latest is “Love and Latkes.” The former award-winning bookseller has both reviewed and given talks on the romance genre. She also writes a romance/hockey for an anthology series called Connected Stories. And has written for HEA Happily Ever After, USA Today’s online romance blog, and Romantic Times magazine.  Jean Meltzer is the author of two romances; The Matzah Ball is her first. She studied dramatic writing at New York University’s Tisch. The Emmy award-winning former TV writer spent five years in rabbinical school before she started writing romance novels. “The Matzah Ball” will soon be a movie. 
12/4/202258 minutes
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It's a full hour of pop culture cookbooks!

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: We’re bringing you an encore chock-full of fictional-turned-real recipes and the masterminds behind them in honor of the release of the Black Panther sequel. When authors and directors invite audiences into an imagined world, they know that food can’t be left off the table. And fans are feasting on a delicious genre: pop culture cookbooks. Recipes and imaginary narratives combine to bring cuisines from fictional universes to real life. A sprinkling of books from this genre have been around for decades. But in the past few years, demand from fandoms has grown, and publishers are all too willing to satiate their hunger.  Plus, we have another cookbook encore for you, dear Under the Radar listener. First, we dove into the culinary world of Wakanda; now it's time to look back at some other fictional worlds. Ten years ago, we talked with fantasy food blogger Chelsea Monroe-Cassel about creating recipes inspired by the book and HBO series Game of Thrones. We’ll listen back to our original conversation and then reconnect to hear about how she’s turned her fantasy fandom into a full-time career.  Guest: Chelsea Monroe-Cassel is the author of “A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook,” “World of Warcraft: The Official Cookbook,” “Star Wars Galaxy’s Edge: The Official Black Spire Outpost Cookbook” and many more! Her latest, “The Star Trek Cookbook” will hit the shelves in September and is available to order online Nyanyika Banda, Malawian-American chef, writer, entrepreneur, and author of the newly released Marvel’s Black Panther: The Official Wakanda Cookbook. Nyanyika is based in Amherst, Mass.
11/27/202258 minutes
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The Me Too movement five years later

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Five years ago, Harvey Weinstein's alleged sexual assaults kicked off an international movement of survivors called #MeToo. The movement is based on a phrase coined by activist Tarana Burke in 2006. It launched a reckoning for harassment and assault in the workplace and beyond; helping to hold powerful people accountable. Weinstein was convicted in 2020 and is now facing a second trial in Los Angeles. We are reflecting on the Me Too movement and it's impact over the last five years. If you or someone you know has suffered harassment or abuse, you can find resources at Jane Doe Inc. And, Fabiola Mendez graduated from Berklee College of Music IN 2017. Today the singer/songwriter works as a cuatro player, and a composer for animated children’s shows, including Alma’s Way and Work It Out Wombats on PBS Kids and Mecha Builders, a series on HBO Max produced by Sesame Street. Mendez is also an artist in residence with the Boston Landmarks Orchestra. Mendez joined us to share her love of the cuatro and tells us which of her songs is her favorite to perform. Guests: Fabiola Mendez is an afro latino cuatro player, singer.songwriter, and composer for animated kids shows. Stacy Malone is executive director of the Victim Rights Law Center and member of the Massachusetts Governor’s Council to Address Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence. Diana Mancera is director of membership and programs at Jane Doe, Inc..
11/17/202258 minutes
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Mass Politics Profs: Midterm elections reaction

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: The November 8th midterm elections brought some historic victories; Maura Healey became the first LGBTQ person to be elected governor in the history of the United States. But it also brought some surprises; the "red wave" Republicans were predicting was more of a trickle.  We spent a full hour with the Mass Politics Profs to hear what they had to say in the wake of the elections. Find more of their analysis on their blog. Guests: Shannon Jenkins is the interim assistant dean of the college of arts and sciences at UMass Dartmouth and a professor of political science. Erin O’Brien is an associate professor of political science at UMass Boston. Luis Jiménez is an assistant professor of political science at UMass Boston.
11/13/202258 minutes
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The latest LGBTQ news you need

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: For the first time in this country’s history, LGBTQ candidates are on the ballot in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Plus, The Pennsylvania ACLU has filed a federal complaint against a school district in the state, alleging it discriminates against trans and non-binary students. And 20 states across the country have pledged to offer a legal shield against anti-LGBTQ legislation. A move some are referring to as the “rainbow wall.” And for our November pick for Bookmarked: Author Stacy Schiff joins Under the Radar to discuss her newest book, 'The Revolutionary.' She gives a very detailed history of the oft-overlooked founding father, Samuel Adams, and the mark he left on his young country. Guest: Stacy Schiff is the author of six biographies, esayist, and winner of the the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for biography.  Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLY.  Janson Wu, executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, or GLAD.  E.J. Graff, journalist, author and managing editor of The Monkey Cage at the Washington Post.
11/6/202258 minutes
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Mass Politics Profs: Everything you need to know about the Nov. 8 elections

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Massachusetts’ four confusing ballot questions are driving up voter interest for the November 8th elections. Plus, Bristol County’s Controversial sheriff of 25 years is facing a real challenger. And election workers across the nation are leaving their jobs in droves – will their exits greatly impact voting this year? Those stories and more on our full hour with the Mass Politics Profs. Guests: Shannon Jenkins is the interim assistant dean of the college of arts and sciences at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and professor of political science. Erin O’Brien is an associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Luis Jiménez is an associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston.
10/30/202258 minutes
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We explain Massachusetts' ballot question 3

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Massachusetts Ballot Question #3 focuses on alcohol sales across the state. Would a new law give an unfair advantage to grocery and convenience stores or be a boon for big liquor retailers?  We’re breaking down the multiple parts of Ballot question #3 and the meaning of a yes or no vote. Plus, many celebrities have turned their cooking passion into a money-making endeavor. That includes actors Reese Witherspoon, Jessie Tyler Ferguson, Stanley Tucci, Danny Trejo, and even basketball icon Shaquille O’Neal. We discuss which of these authors is a foodie…and who should maybe hang up their apron.  And we have a little something extra for you, dear Under the Radar listeners. This summer our former intern Eli Chavez took a field trip to the Boston Harbor to take a tour on the family owned Cycleboat Boston.  Guests: Saraya Wintersmith, political reporter for the TV, Radio, and Digital GBH Newsroom. Mike Deehan co-writerr of the Boston Axios Newsletter. Amy Traverso, food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of W-G-B-H’s “Weekends with Yankee,” author of updated “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook. Eli Chavez, former WGBH intern.
10/16/202258 minutes
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What is re-wilding? We get to the bottom of it!

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley:  As the threat of climate change looms ever nearer, many are asking: what can I do? For a growing number of people across the world, the answer to that question is re-wilding. So what exactly is re-wilding? It's conservation efforts aimed at restoring and protecting natural processes and wilderness areas. It can look like many things, but for most it looks like introducing plants in your yard that are native to your area.  Not everyone is ready to make the jump, however. Re-wilding re-introduces small animals and predators, who are important for ecosystems but not always a welcome additon, into these areas.  Join us as we examine the pros and cons or urban rewilding. Plus: During the height of the pandemic, medical experts characterized group singing as a potential superspreader EVENT. Choirs and choruses were relegated to a very unsatisfying Zoom experience until some determined musicians –including a local Massachusetts couple–figured out a way for individual singers to sing together– while apart– each from the safety of their cars. These unusual melodic assemblies became so-called “driveway choirs.” Their story is captured in the new documentary, “The Drive to Sing.”  You can find their festival schedule here. Guests: William Lynn is a research scientist in the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University and a research fellow at Knology. He is also the founder of PAN Works, an independent non-partisan think-tank dedicated to the wellbeing of animals. C. Ian Stevenson is Director of Advocacy for Greater Portland Landmarks, a non-profit historic preservation organization in Portland, Maine. Ian holds a PhD in American & New England Studies from Boston University. His research and publications include such topics as historic dams, river rewilding, railroad station architecture, and the creation of national parks.  Bryce Denney is the director of the film. He is a microchip verification engineer, as well as a singer and pianist. He has a degree in physics and piano performance from Oberlin College. Kathryn Denney is the producer of the film. She sings in the Labyrinth Choir a professional choir in Metrowest Boston, has directed choirs and has taught elementary school music for many years. She has a bachelor of music degree in French Horn from Oberlin Conservatory.
10/9/202258 minutes
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Latinx Roundtable: Learning to embrace Hispanic Heritage Month

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Is a rising wave of Latino political power in Massachusetts finally representative of the local population? Plus, Puerto Rico is still without power and water more than two weeks after Hurricane Fiona–frustrating Puerto Ricans still not fully recovered from the devastation of Hurricane Maria 5 years ago. And, our guests are learning to embrace Hispanic Heritage Month.  All this and more on our Latinx roundtable. Plus: Erika Sanchez’s first novel “I’m Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter” was a critically acclaimed bestseller. Now the poet/author has followed up with her memoir. In “Crying in the Bathroom” this proud Mexican- American writer chronicles her circuitous path to claiming her talent, and managing her mental health. We’re celebrating Hispanic Heritage month with our October selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.”  Guests: Julio Ricardo Varela, president of Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, founder of Latino Rebels, and MSNBC opinion columnist. Marcela Garcia, an opinion columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe. Erika Sanchez is a Mexican-American poet, novelist, and essayist.
10/2/202258 minutes
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We examine the new trend sweeping the nation: foraging!

This week on Under the Radar: The days of hunting and gathering are far behind us.... maybe? Foraging, modern-day gathering, has exploded in popularity as of late thanks to people like TikToker Alexis Nikole. It's a way to get in touch with your environment through species native to your area. We explore why this plant based activity has taken off. And author Kevin Ngyuen goes inside the tech world for his novel “New Waves.” The novel offers biting commentary along with a who-done-it plot line which takes the book into an unexpected direction. It’s our September selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guests: David Craft, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital and in his free time, leads foraging expedition into the Boston wilderness. Maria Pinto, a Boston area writer for Grub Street, educator and mushroom enthusiast. Maria can be found leading interactive and educative foraging excursions in Boston. Tyler Akabane, known as "Mushrooms for my friends" on Instagram is the owner of The Mushroom Shop in Somerville. Kevin Nguyen is the features editor at The Verge, the Vox Media technology news website. He was formerly a senior editor at GQ. He’s written for many publications including The New York Times Book Review, the Paris Review, The Atlantic and The New Republic.
9/18/202257 minutes, 59 seconds
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Encore: How will future generations remember 9/11?

For some of us, September 11th, 2001 still rings clear in our minds, even 20 years after the attacks. But newer generations have little to no memory of that tragic day — either having been too young to remember, or not yet born. Under The Radar is marking the upcoming 20th anniversary of 9/11 by reflecting on how Gen-Zers recognize an event that they learn about in history books. How does generational trauma affect those who didn’t even live through the event? And, once it was clear that the 9/11 hijackers were Muslim, American Muslims became targets 20 years ago. The pain and anger of the tragedy drove anti-American sentiment as well as ongoing suspicion and misconception of Islam. Has public perception towards Muslims shifted, as the 20-year marker of 9/11 approaches? Under The Radar is examining the systemic and structural racism against Muslims that has long been embedded in the U.S. Guests: Garrett Graff, journalist and historian, whose latest book “The Only Plane in the Sky,” is the first comprehensive oral history of September 11th. Graff also serves as the director of the Aspen Institute’s cybersecurity and technology program. Sam Sommers, experimental social psychologist, author, and professor at Tufts University. Dana Rose Garfin, trauma scholar and assistant professor at the University of California, Irvine. Amaney Jamal, the Edwards S. Sanford professor of politics at Princeton University, dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and author of "Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11." Journalist Malika Bilal, host of “The Take” podcast by Al Jazeera and former co-host of The Stream, a social-media led talk show on Al Jazeera English. Fatema Ahmad, executive director at Muslim Justice League, here in Boston.
9/11/202258 minutes
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Encore | Celebrate 50 Years Of Philadelphia International Records' Iconic 'Phillysound' Soul Music

This week on Under the Radar we are looking back at one of our favorite episodes. Philadelphia International Records celebrates its 51st anniversary this year and the iconic "Phillysound" that it made famous. But the legacy of Philadelphia International Records is also its influence on other music genres and artists far beyond its birth city. We’re humming some of Philadelphia International’s biggest hits, and asking: What is the sound of Philadelphia?
9/4/202257 minutes, 59 seconds
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Mass Politics Profs: Biden's loan forgiveness and the midterms

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: President Joe Biden announced on Wednesday August 24th that he was enacting a student loan forgiveness plan; erasing $10,000 for borrowers who make under $125,000 a year and an extra $10,000 for Pell Grant recipients. How will this impact the midterms? And will the GOP take control of congress? And for local news, the Mass Politics Profs discuss the T woes, local elections, and the passing of the immigrant drivers license bill. Erin O’Brien is an associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Jerold Duquette is an associate professor of political science at Central Connecticut State University. He and Erin are co-editors of the book, The Politics of Massachusetts Exceptionalism: Reputation Meet Reality. Shannon Jenkins is the interim assistant dean of the college of arts and sciences at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and professor of political science.
8/28/202257 minutes, 53 seconds
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Historical fiction: The genre that makes history come to life

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: We're talking all things historical fiction in this special August edition of “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” We explore the world of books described as historical fiction — imagined stories based on real-life events and people, combining the best of history and novels. GUESTS: Jabari Asim is the author of seven books for adults including his latest, novel, “Yonder” a story of love and friendship set during the time of American enslavement. Asim has also written eleven books for children. He is an associate professor of writing, literature and publishing at Emerson College, and is also a playwright and a poet. The former Book Editor for the Washington Post, he is the winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship in nonfiction and a former member of the nonfiction panel for the National Book Foundation. Jabari Asim lives in Boston. Sabina Murray is the author of four books. Her latest the “The Human Zoo” follows a biracial woman navigating life between America and the Philippines under a President Duterte-like dictator. Murray teaches in the Creative Writing Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and is also a screenwriter. Her second book, "The Caprices,” won the Penn/Faulkner award and was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship. Sabina Murray lives in western Massachusetts. Jenny Tinghui Zhang is the author of “Four Treasures of the Sky,” the story of a young Chinese girl kidnapped and brought to America who ends up caught up in the targeted racism of the Chinese Exclusion Act. This is Zhang’s first novel. Her stories have appeared in multiple literary publications including The Rumpus, and Calyx; her articles and essays have been published in HuffPost, Bustle and The Cut and she is a Kundiman Fiction Fellow. Jenny Tinghui Zhang lives in Austin, Texas.
8/7/202257 minutes, 53 seconds
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Big Papi's legacy, a Latino media transformation, and Mesoamerican influences in Hollywood

Boston Red Sox legend David Ortiz is now a Hall of Famer, cementing the legacy of Latinos in major league baseball. Plus, a new Latino media start-up plans to buy 18 right-leaning Spanish speaking radio stations — a potential media transformation that’s riled up conservative lawmakers. And Black and Latino teachers will collect $835 million through a New York discrimination lawsuit. Those stories and more on our Latinx Roundtable! GUESTS: Julio Ricardo Varela is president of Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, founder of Latino Rebels, and an MSNBC opinion columnist. Tibisay Zea is a public radio reporter at GBH and PRX’s "The World."
7/31/202232 minutes, 24 seconds
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The sugar-filled history and legacy of Necco, the beloved local candy company

This week on Under the Radar: New England Confectionery Company, or Necco, was the oldest continuously running candy company in the country up until its closure in 2018. The company, which was based in Revere, Massachusetts, produced Clark Bars, Mary Janes, Candy Buttons, Sky Bars, Squirrel Nut Zippers, Sweethearts, and — most notably — Necco Wafers. The New England Confectionery Company shaped the candy industry in our region and beyond, and its closure shocked sweettooths across the country. But the historic Necco candies are living on, produced by the Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company. We’re talking all things candy, confections and the future of our region’s sweets industry. GUEST: Darlene Lacey, an author and curator of The Candy Wrapper Museum. Her most recent books are “Necco: An Epic Candy Tale” and “Necco: The Archive Collection.”
7/31/202225 minutes, 28 seconds
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Three experts on tracking extreme heatwaves, wildfires and other worldwide climate crises

This week on Under the Radar: An unprecedented heatwave has swept Europe into a sweltering, deadly public health crisis. Here in the United States, President Joe Biden is soon expected to declare a climate emergency after he's spent months trying — and failing — to push his climate agenda through Capitol Hill. And a new survey shows that extreme weather disasters are taking a toll on Americans' personal finances. Those stories and more on our Environmental News Roundtable. GUESTS: Beth Daley, editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. Sam Payne, strategic communications manager for 350 Mass and Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate-action organization. Dr. Aaron Bernstein, interim director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.
7/25/202232 minutes, 51 seconds
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Puerto Rican Festival of Massachusetts gears up for its 55th annual celebration

This week on Under the Radar: There will be plenty of traditional music, food, dance troupes and parade floats at this weekend’s Puerto Rican Festival of Massachusetts, back for its 55th annual celebration. The three-day event kicks off on Friday, July 29 at Franklin Park. The fourth-largest Puerto Rican festival in the nation honors the history of the largest Latino group in the state. GUESTS: Marilyn Rivera, the Puerto Rican Festival of Massachusetts' board vice president and pageant director. Nimzay Vazquez, the Puerto Rican Festival of Massachusetts' 2022 Pageant Queen. Lorna Rivera, director of UMass Boston’s Mauricio Gastón Institute for Latino Community Development & Public Policy.
7/25/202225 minutes
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Book Club: Geraldine Brooks’ ‘Horse’

This week on Under the Radar: How is it possible that the bones of a champion racehorse were not too long ago consigned to the dusty attic of the Smithsonian? A horse whose stellar career and long pedigree were little known outside some racing circles? These real-life details intrigued bestselling author Geraldine Brooks. leading her to craft a fictional tale based on the documented history of that top racing horse named Lexington. Brooks’ simply titled novel “Horse” is a tale of the twinned histories of both Lexington and the people who admired her. It is a thrilling narrative stretching across centuries and set against a backdrop of racial turbulence, art history and scientific inquiry. “Horse” is our July selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Geraldine Brooks is the author of six novels including her latest, “Horse.” The bestselling author won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize in fiction for her book, “March.” Brooks, who is Australian-born, is also a former journalist and the author of three nonfiction books, including her memoir, “Foreign Correspondence: A Pen Pal’s Journey from Down Under to All Over.”
7/17/202226 minutes, 56 seconds
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LGBTQ News: How does Roe v. Wade reversal affect gay rights?

Immediately after the Supreme Court’s ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade, LGBTQ rights advocates sounded the alarm, saying the conservative court “won’t stop at Roe.” At least one justice — Clarence Thomas — has confirmed their fears, with his statement that the high court “should reconsider” its decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, which legalized same-sex marriage nationwide. Meanwhile, vandals smeared homophobic graffiti on the exterior of The Pryde, the LGBTQ senior housing complex under construction in Boston. And Hollywood’s latest rom-com is set among a group of vacationing gay men. “Fire Island” offers a fresh take on a summer romance which celebrates queerness. Those stories and more on our LGBTQ News Roundtable. GUESTS: Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth, or BAGLY Janson Wu, executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, or GLAD Sue O’Connell, commentator and host at New England Cable News, NBC 10 Boston and NBC LX; co-publisher of Bay Windows and The South End News
7/17/202230 minutes, 56 seconds
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'Quock Walker Day' could soon be a state holiday in Massachusetts

This week on Under the Radar: You might know that Massachusetts was the first state in the nation to abolish slavery, but you probably haven’t heard how a Black man named Quock Walker was instrumental in making that happen. Back in 1754, the state census counted 4,500 enslaved people in Massachusetts. Walker, born to enslaved Black people, was one of them. He self-emancipated at 28 years old. His punishment for leaving was a brutal beating by his former enslaver. Walker took his case to court where he won his freedom. The Walker legal victory became precedent leading to slavery's abolishment in the state. Fast forward to 2022, and Massachusetts is on track to make Quock Walker Day a state holiday, also known as Massachusetts Emancipation Day. Why has it taken so long to learn the story of emancipation in Massachusetts? And will Quock Walker become a household name? GUESTS: State Sen. Cindy Friedman, elected in 2017 to represent the Fourth Middlesex District, which includes Arlington, Billerica, Burlington, Woburn and precincts of Lexington. She filed the Quock Walker Day bill which passed the state senate in February. Sean Osborne, founder of the Association of Black Citizens of Lexington. On Saturday, July 9, 2022, the ABCL is hosting the second annual Quock Walker Day Hike for Freedom. Register here.
7/5/202226 minutes, 33 seconds
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Harvard confronts its historic ties to slavery

This week on Under the Radar: Harvard pubilshed its “Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery” report back in April, which detailed the institution's clear, historical ties to slavery. That included enslaved individuals on campus, funding from enslavers and dozens of faculty — including past Harvard presidents — who were enslavers themselves. This was back in the 18th century, but the commercial aspects of slavery is linked in multiple ways today. To begin redressing the university's past involvement with slavery, Harvard has pledged $100 million to create a “Legacy of Slavery Fund.” Other universities, notably Brown, have also been engaged in the work of identifying ties to slavery and how the university benefited. So how will higher education continue to investigate its slavery linked past? And will Harvard's admission move the conversation about higher education and systemic racism? GUESTS: Ruth Simmons, president of Prairie View A&M University in Texas. Previously, Simmons served as president of Smith College in Massachusetts and of Brown University in Rhode Island, where she was the first Black woman to preside over an Ivy League school. Simmons began Brown's ongoing research and redress related to its ties to slavery. Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of Harvard Radcliffe Institute, professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and professor of history at Harvard University. In 2019, she was appointed chair of the presidential committee on "Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery." Sven Beckert, Laird Bell Professor of History at Harvard University and a Harvard presidential committee member.
7/5/202231 minutes, 19 seconds
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The 24th Roxbury Film Festival celebrates films by, for and about people of color

This week on Under the Radar: The Boston-based Roxbury International Film Festival, or RoxFilm, is back for its 24th annual event. Festival organizers are once again offering a hybrid structure, allowing attendees to view screenings both online and in-person. All of the films spotlighted by the Roxbury Film Festival are curated to display the cinematic excellence of film professionals of color. This year’s schedule is packed with 80 films showcasing everything from documentaries to animation, along with panel discussions and live Q&As. All the fun kicks off next week and will run through July 2nd. GUESTS: Lisa Simmons, executive director of the Roxbury International Film Festival. Soren Sorensen, associate teaching professor of screen studies at Clark University and award-winning filmmaker. His second feature-length documentary, Omar Sosa’s 88 Well-Tuned Drums is showing at this year’s RoxFilm.
6/19/202224 minutes, 58 seconds
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How Juneteenth is commemorated across the Commonwealth

This week on Under the Radar: The country's recent racial reckoning has sparked a renewed interest in Juneteenth — nearly every state in the country recognizes the holiday, and this year many employers gave staffers the day off. But there is alarm that broader embrace of the holiday has sparked the worst kind of exploitive marketing and promotion. Local observances, however, are lifting up the meaning of Juneteenth and connecting the historic event to today’s racial reckoning. GUESTS: Kahina Van Dyke owner of Narragansett House, Dunmere By The Sea, and Inkwell Beach House in Oak Bluffs and creator of the Martha’s Vineyard Juneteenth Jubilee. Skip Finley, author, writer, and one of the organizers of Martha’s Vineyard Juneteenth Jubilee. He is also director of sales and marketing for the Vineyard Gazette Media Group. Nicole McClain, founder and president of the Northshore Juneteenth Association.
6/19/202232 minutes, 54 seconds
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Dishing with the author of Marvel's Black Panther: The Official Wakanda Cookbook

When authors and directors invite audiences into an imagined world, they know that food can’t be left off the table. And fans are feasting on a delicious genre: pop culture cookbooks. Recipes and imaginary narratives combine to bring cuisines from fictional universes to real life. A sprinkling of books from this genre have been around for decades. But in the past few years, demand from fandoms has grown, and publishers are all too willing to satiate their hunger. As part of our Summer Fun Series, we’re bringing you a show chock-full of fictional-turned-real recipes and the masterminds behind them. First up, the culinary delights of Marvel’s Wakanda! Guest: Nyanyika Banda, Malawian-American chef, writer, entrepreneur, and author of the newly released Marvel’s Black Panther: The Official Wakanda Cookbook. Nyanyika is based in Amherst, Mass.
6/13/202227 minutes, 57 seconds
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Pop Culture Cookbooks: Creating a career out of fantasy food

Ten years ago, we talked with fantasy food blogger Chelsea Monroe-Cassel about creating recipes inspired by the book and HBO series Game of Thrones. We’ll listen back to our original conversation and then reconnect to hear about how she’s turned her fantasy fandom into a full-time career. Guest: Chelsea Monroe-Cassel is the author of “A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook,” “World of Warcraft: The Official Cookbook,” “Star Wars Galaxy’s Edge: The Official Black Spire Outpost Cookbook” and many more! Her latest, “The Star Trek Cookbook” will hit the shelves in September and is available for pre-order online.
6/13/202229 minutes, 55 seconds
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Book Club: 2022 summer reading recommendations from three local librarians

It seems we're all ready for a full-on embrace of summer after two years of cautious living because of COVID-19. People are ready to enjoy all the wonders of the season: diving into the ocean, feeling sand under their toes at the beach, taking lazy naps in the hammock, and slowly swinging on the porch — not to mention long, uninterrupted hours of reading. Summer readers, grab your book bags! Three local librarians return with recommendations from 2022’s best books from historical fiction and young adult stories to science fiction and romance. It’s our annual summer reading special. Guests: Susannah Borysthen-Tkacz, senior librarian at the Cambridge Public Library. Robin Brenner, teen librarian at the Public Library of Brookline. Veronica Koven-Matasy, reader services specialist at the Boston Public Library.
6/6/202257 minutes, 54 seconds
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ICA Boston puts ‘the beauty of Black culture’ on full display

Roxbury artist Napoleon Jones-Henderson’s life’s work has been dedicated to ‘’the beauty of Black culture.” More than 50 years ago, he joined with members of the Chicago art collective AfriCOBRA, committed to using their art to empower Black communities. But it was during his decades-long career in Boston where Jones-Henderson flourished, creating his African inspired mixed media pieces. Now his colorful and expressive work is on display at Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art in a new exhibit: “I Am As I Am—A Man.” Guests: Napoleon Jones-Henderson. Roxbury-based artist, educator, and mentor who creates works on pan-Africanism and racial justice. Jeffrey De Blois, assistant curator and publications manager for the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston who organized the “I Am As I Am—A Man” exhibit.
5/29/202223 minutes, 53 seconds
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Summer Food & Wine Trends: Flower syrups add a floral twist to baking and booze

We're kicking off the official start of summer savoring refreshing new food and wine trends. We’re talking flower syrups galore: think violets, roses and lilacs that add a floral twist to drinks. Plus, wine made smoky by California wildfires has been tough to sell. But winemakers are embracing inventive ways to ensure nothing goes to waste. At the same time, wine lovers are drinking less red wine, sipping more white and rosé. And have you heard? Foodies are time-traveling back to the ’80s. They can’t seem to get enough of French onion soup mix, sun-dried tomatoes and other old-school ingredients. Guests: Amy Traverso, senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of GBH’s “Weekends with Yankee," and author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.” Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School, and author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional.”
5/29/202233 minutes, 58 seconds
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Boston pediatrician Mark Vonnegut on the problems plaguing the healthcare industry

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Boston-based pediatrician Mark Vonnegut has seen a lot during his 40 years practicing medicine. His latest book, “The Heart of Caring: A Life in Pediatrics,” is both a love letter to the profession and a critical look at the problems plaguing the healthcare industry. What’s the state of healthcare in America today, and how can it improve?
5/16/202225 minutes, 28 seconds
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Older Americans Month: Local innovators seek to improve the elder care industry

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: The pandemic has accelerated the systemic problems elders face, like caregiver burnout, nursing home shutdowns and worsening isolation. Not to mention the ever-increasing price tag that comes with such care. But inspired by global models and local successes, innovative solutions are on the rise. During May, Older Americans Month, we're giving an up-close look at specific ways to improve the systems and culture that support and sustain elders. GUESTS: Jessica Kim is cofounder of ianacare, a Boston-based startup that provides tech-enabled caregiver support through employers and health plans. Joe Carella is executive director of the Scandinavian Living Center, an assisted-living facility specializing in community-centered living in Newton, Mass. Marlena del Hierro is a gerontologist and VP of partnerships at Seniorly, an online platform providing access and insight to thousands of senior living communities across the country.
5/16/202232 minutes, 25 seconds
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'Too Good To Go' helps consumers in Boston reduce food waste

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Too Good To Go is an app that connects consumers with surplus food from local eateries that would otherwise be tossed, and sells it at a steeply discounted price. The app launched in Boston at the start of the pandemic, with a mission to reduce food waste and improve sustainability. GUESTS: Claire Oliverson, U.S. head of marketing for Too Good To Go. Ben Schafer, project manager of retail initiatives and operations at Peet’s Coffee.
5/9/202219 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ecovillages: Local residents embrace communal living with a sustainable twist

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: COVID-19 might make all the headlines, but another crisis is afoot: loneliness. Pandemic-times have only exacerbated chronic loneliness by creating a world of isolation and social distancing. Can ecovillages — a unique model fostering community and connection — be one answer? Ecovillage cohousing communities have been popular in Europe for decades, but interest here in the United States is ramping up. These communities are designed to integrate sustainability into all aspects of community living, and to create strong bonds between neighbors who all collaborate in the decision-making for the group. Residents of three local communities share their communal experiences and why, post-pandemic, there is even more interest in this model of living. GUESTS: Dave Shevett, resident and one of the founders of Mosaic Commons, a cohousing neighborhood, part of the Sawyer Hill Ecovillage in Berlin, Massachusetts. Sarah Heile, resident of Camelot Cohousing, also part of the Sawyer Hill Ecovillage in Berlin, Massachusetts. Steve Chiasson, resident of Belfast Cohousing and Ecovillage in Belfast, Maine.
5/9/202238 minutes, 19 seconds
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Book Club: Quincy Carroll's 'Unwelcome'

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Cole Chen is the odd duck in a family at a loss to understand him. Friends don’t get him, either. The 23-year-old is searching for connection and success but lacks the tools to achieve either. Author Quincy Carroll’s “Unwelcome" tells the story of the privileged Cole whose world view is shaped by his inability to grasp the reality of his life. GUEST: Quincy Carroll is the author of "Up to the Mountains and Down to the Countryside" and "Unwelcome." Originally from Natick, MA, he studied in the M.F.A. Creative Writing program at Emerson College and holds a B.A. from Yale University. He has lived in China on and off over the years, most recently as an Artist in Residence at the Swatch Art Peace Hotel in Shanghai. He is currently based in Oakland, CA, where he teaches mindfulness and writing at a local middle school.
5/1/202225 minutes, 7 seconds
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Regional News Roundup: Cape Cod townspeople oppose a proposed new machine gun range

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Cape Cod townspeople are united in vocal opposition to a proposed new machine gun range. Plus, do Rhode Islanders care if political candidates are practically brand-new residents in The Ocean State? And a New Hampshire bill would throw away the ballots of voters who fail to provide IDs within 10 days of an election. These stories and more during our Regional News Roundtable. GUESTS: Arnie Arnesen is the host of The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen from WNHN in New Hampshire. Ted Nesi is politics and business editor, and Target 12 investigative reporter for WPRI in Rhode Island. Steve Junker is managing editor of news for CAI in Cape Cod.
5/1/202232 minutes, 44 seconds
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NeighborWoods: How urban forests can improve community health and climate change

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Many of the settlers who headed West in the 1840s ended up in the treeless prairie then known as the Nebraska Territory. They planted trees for shade protection, and to slow crop erosion. Their success inspired Nebraska Territory Secretary and self- proclaimed tree enthusiast J. Sterling Morton to propose a tree-planting holiday. One million trees were planted in April 1872 for America’s first Arbor Day. This year marks the 150th anniversary of the holiday. Massachusetts will observe the day on April 29th with environmental professionals leading mass tree-plantings and educational programming for the community. Three local professionals in forestry, horticulture and ecology joined us to talk about trees’ crucial role in the ecosystem. Guests: Grace Elton, CEO of the New England Botanic Garden at Tower Hill, a nonprofit organization and 171-acre garden in Boylston, Massachusetts. Tom Brady, an arborist and the tree warden and conservation administrator for the city of Brookline, Massachusetts. Lucy Hutyra, scientist and professor in the Department of Earth and Environment at Boston University. Her lab, the Hutyra Research Lab, researches the carbon dynamics in forest systems and urban areas.
4/25/202231 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Huntington's 'Our Daughters, Like Pillars' explores sisterly bonds amid COVID-19

This week on Under the Radar: The new Huntington Theatre Company play “Our Daughters, Like Pillars” has all the signature touches of local playwright Kirsten Greenidge. It’s set in New England, it’s a story about a Black family where issues of race and gender are a part of the main characters’ reality and humor is a part of the storytelling. For “Our Daughters, Like Pillars” Greenidge also adds a twist, setting the compelling drama against the backdrop of the evolving COVID-19 crisis. Guests: Kirsten Greenidge, an award-winning Boston-based playwright whose latest work is “Our Daughters, Like Pillars,” is now in performance at the Huntington Theatre Company through May 8th.
4/25/202226 minutes, 4 seconds
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Environmental Roundtable: Electric school buses are bound for Boston. Will the MBTA follow suit?

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Earth Day is right around the corner. But we’re far from putting Mother Earth first, according to the latest U.N. climate change report. Plus, Boston Mayor Michelle Wu has okayed 20 all-electric public school buses. Will a proposed new state Senate bill guarantee a whole fleet of electric MBTA buses? And environmentalists are getting pumped up over heat pumps! They're touted as a cleaner and more efficient way to heat and cool your home, and a way of reducing reliance on Russian gas or propane. It's our environmental roundtable! Guests: Beth Daley, Editor and General Manager of The Conversation US Cabell Eames, Political Director of Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate-action organization Dr. Aaron Bernstein, Interim Director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School
4/17/202232 minutes, 39 seconds
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Uncovering the truth about slavery in Colonial Lexington

This week on Under the Radar: Lexington, Mass. — the “birthplace of American liberty” — did not guarantee liberty and justice for all. A new initiative by the Lexington Historical Society has uncovered more details about slavery’s presence in colonial Lexington. For the first time, the society will have materials that include the new research this Patriots’ Day. The goal is for visitors to understand that what many call the “cradle of liberty” was indeed home to enslaved Black people. Guests: Carol Ward, executive director of the Lexington Historical Society Sean Osborne, founder and past president of the Association of Black Citizens of Lexington and a Lexington Historical Society board member
4/17/202225 minutes, 12 seconds
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Poetry's growing popularity starts with local youth poets

This week on Under the Radar: We’re marking this National Poetry Month by taking a look at our next generation of local poets. Who are the young writers and lyrical wordsmiths shaping the newest wave of poetry? And what about Massachusetts’ poetry scene, which is rapidly expanding across the state? GUESTS: Anjalequa Leynneyah Verona Birkett, Boston’s 2022 Youth Poet Laureate. Adael Francisco-Mejia, Worcester’s 2022 Youth Poet Laureate. Danielle Jones, poet, educator, and Mass Poetry’s program director.
4/10/202230 minutes, 58 seconds
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Encore: Celebrating National Poetry Month with two poets

This week on Under the Radar: It’s undeniable — poetry is having a moment. So we’re revisiting one of our favorite conversations about the craft from back in 2019. Many attribute the growing popularity to social media, poetry outreach efforts and visibility from superstars like Beyoncé, who read poems by Warsan Shire on her visual album "Lemonade." So what is it about the art of putting motion to measure that is striking a chord these days? To gain insight into the current landscape of poetry, and in celebration of National Poetry Month, we're sitting down with two lyrical extraodinaires. GUESTS: Kwame Alexander, Newbury medal winning author, poet and publisher. He is the author of 36 books including The Undefeated. Rose Hansen, 2019 and 2021 Massachusetts State Poetry Out Loud Competition champion.
4/10/202226 minutes, 54 seconds
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Book Club: Brendan Slocumb's 'The Violin Conspiracy'

This week on Under The Radar: Nobody would have suspected that PopPop’s old, damaged fiddle would turn out to be a $10 million rare instrument. The coveted Stradivarius crafted by Italian masters ended up in America by way of the slave trade. That part of its history is intertwined with Rayquan Millian’s family to make the foundation of the story in “The Violin Conspiracy.” From the moment that violin is stolen from Ray, author Brendan Slocumb propels readers on a journey through classical music performances, American history, current racial tensions and dysfunctional family dynamics. “The Violin Conspiracy” is his first book and it’s our April selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Brendan Slocumb is a violinist who has played in orchestras throughout Northern Virginia, Maryland and Washington, DC. And, the North Carolina native has taught public and private school education for more than twenty years.
4/4/202222 minutes, 52 seconds
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Formerly incarcerated people have become major voices for reforming a broken criminal justice system

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Two million people are in the nation’s prisons and jails. According to The Sentencing Project, a research and advocacy center, that’s a 500% increase over the last 40 years at an annual cost of $80 billion. That reality has helped drive a movement for criminal justice reform which is now front and center in the national conversation. The cause has drawn together a motley group of advocates, from grassroots organizers to celebrities like Kim Kardashian and the conservative Koch brothers, where they are part of a roiling debate about systemic racism, reformative justice, no-knock warrants and sentencing policies. More recently, the formerly incarcerated have become major voices in the reform movement. How can their leadership help shape the effort to fix the broken system? Guests: John Valverde is the president and CEO of the global nonprofit YouthBuild USA. Dehlia Umunna is a clinical professor of law at Harvard Law School and the Faculty Deputy Director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Institute. Reginald Dwayne Betts is a poet, a lawyer, a 2021 MacArthur Fellow, and the founder of Freedom Reads.
4/4/202234 minutes, 59 seconds
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Meet two Berklee College of Music alumni nominated for the 2022 Grammy Awards

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: The 64th Annual Grammy Awards ceremony is nearly here after a winter spike in COVID-19 cases forced the event to be postponed until April 3. The awards regularly recognize alumni of Berklee College of Music, Boston's musical powerhouse. This year, a whopping 34 Berklee alumni hope to hear their names read as Grammy Award winners. Two of those nominees are Arooj Aftab and Charlie Rosen. Guests: Arooj Aftab, Brooklyn-based Pakistani vocalist, music composer and producer. She’s been nominated for the 2022 Grammy Award categories of best new artist and best global music performance. Her latest album is Vulture Prince. Arooj has been described as a “boundary-breaking” artist who draws from jazz, Hindustani classical, folk and reggae to create a one-of-kind sound that’s caught the attention of people worldwide. Charlie Rosen, Tony-award winning composer, arranger, producer and performer. He's been nominated for the 2022 Grammy Award for best arrangement, instrumental or a cappella. He scores visual media and works in a wide variety of band performance settings, including performances in nationally recognized jazz festivals, Broadway and off-Broadway musical theater productions. He’s the band leader of The 8-Bit Big Band, a jazz and pops orchestra that reimagines video game music.
3/27/202225 minutes, 13 seconds
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From Banksy to Boston: How art activism is transforming city walls and public spaces

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Banksy, the British artist who has stayed out of public view since the 1990s, is arguably the most famous and lucrative street artist in the world. A selection of his work is now on display in Cambridge as part of a traveling exhibition called “The Art of Banksy.” Exhibitors independently sourced more than 100 pieces of Banksy's outdoor and indoor artwork to include. Banksy’s artistic activism, or “artivism,” and his global influence got us thinking about Greater Boston’s art activism scene. Who are the street artists transforming our city walls and spaces? And how do they interpret issues through their art? Guests: Abigail Satinsky, curator and head of public engagement at Tufts University Art Galleries and program director of the Collective Futures Fund. Cedric Douglas, street artist and designer who has created artwork around Boston for more than two decades. He is also the founder and creative director of the Up Truck. Sneha Shrestha aka IMAGINE, a Nepali artist, educator and social entrepreneur who meshes the Nepali alphabet with the Boston graffiti scene. She is also the arts program manager at the South Asia Institute at Harvard.
3/27/202232 minutes, 46 seconds
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The Huntington Theatre Company's 'The Bluest Eye' brings Toni Morrison's legacy to life

Toni Morrison — the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature — was the author of 11 novels. Her first was “The Bluest Eye,” published in 1970. Morrison died at the age of 88 in 2019. Her works, which deeply describe and embody the Black experience, have always been met with critical and commercial success. But they’ve taken on a renewed significance during our country’s current look at systemic racism and police brutality. The legacy of Toni Morrison is celebrated by The Huntington Theatre Company’s production of “The Bluest Eye,” which brings her classic debut novel to life. Steeped in the cultural environment of a rural Black community, “The Bluest Eye” is the story of Pecola Breedlove, a young Black girl, who believes blue eyes would make her beautiful. GUESTS: Lydia Diamond, an award-winning, prolific playwright whose own works have been staged in theatres around the country, including here in Boston. Her play, “Stick Fly," enjoyed a Broadway run after debuting here. She is currently on the Faculty of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Awoye Timpo, director of "The Bluest Eye." Timpo’s directing repertoire includes the plays “Ndebele Funeral” at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and “Carnaval” at the National Black Theater, both produced in New York City. She will next direct a reading series of classic plays by Black playwrights. The Huntington Theatre Company's production of "The Bluest Eye" ends on March 26.
3/21/202223 minutes, 45 seconds
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Pop Culture Roundtable: Hollywood feeds into 'burnout culture' with workplace thrillers and series based on real-life CEO flops

Bad entrepreneurs abound on new streaming series like “The Dropout,” “WeCrashed” and “Super Pumped," feeding into our culture's fascination with doomed CEOs. Plus, our stir-crazy age seeks escapism in dark, twisted shows like the workplace thriller “Severance,” the high school drama “Euphoria,” and a slew of horror series. And Pixar’s animated “Turning Red” is led by Oscar winner Domee Shi, the first woman and first Asian woman filmmaker to direct a feature for the studio. Guests: Michael Jeffries, dean of academic affairs and professor of American studies at Wellesley College Linda Liu, lecturer of sociology at UMass Boston, who specializes in cinema, media, and cultural studies
3/21/202234 minutes, 7 seconds
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LGBTQ News Roundtable: A look at the rise of anti-LGBTQ legislation across the country

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Florida’s newly passed “Don’t Say Gay” law is part of the rise of anti-LGBTQ legislation across the country. Plus, Massachusetts was the first state to legally recognize same-sex marriage. But it’s now the only New England state that hasn’t updated a law to give clear legal protections for LGBTQ parents. And Catwoman returns to the big screen in “The Batman," portrayed as bisexual for the first time in film. It’s our LGBTQ News Roundtable! Guests: Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLY. Janson Wu, executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, or GLAD. E.J. Graff, journalist, author and managing editor of The Monkey Cage at the Washington Post.
3/13/202231 minutes, 24 seconds
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Transhealth Northampton provides healthcare by and for the transgender community

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Just 40 percent of transgender people are "out" to all of their healthcare providers, according to the 2015 U.S. Transgender Survey by the National Center for Transgender Equality. Many trans patients delay healthcare out of fear that their medical needs won't be met or respected. In Western Massachusetts, one rural clinic is providing healthcare that’s attracting people from all over New England. Transhealth Northampton wants to change primary care for its trans patients — and reform the healthcare industry for good measure. Not only is it the first standalone trans medical and mental health care organization in the nation but it’s the first to be led by transgender medical professionals for patients who are part of the transgender community. Guests: Dallas Ducar, founding CEO of Transhealth Northampton and a nurse practitioner. Katie Wolf, COO of Transhealth Northampton, who specializes in digital health, informatics and transgender health.
3/13/202226 minutes, 27 seconds
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Regional News Roundtable: American lobsters could soon be 'red-listed'

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: American lobsters could soon be “red-listed,” with consumers and restaurants banned from purchasing the crustacean. Plus, is the multi-billion-dollar sale of Rhode Island’s National Grid dead? And, New Hampshire’s House of Representatives will start to meet in person again this month, despite pleas from immunocompromised Democratic colleagues. These stories and more during our Regional News Roundtable. Guests: Arnie Arnesen, host of The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen from WNHN. Tim White, Target 12 investigative reporter for WPRI. Jennette Barnes, reporter and producer for CAI.
3/7/202232 minutes, 35 seconds
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Under the Radar Book Club: Danielle Friedman's 'Let’s Get Physical: How Women Discovered Exercise and Reshaped the World'

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Few would argue that the multibillion-dollar fitness industry is driven by millions of American women who regularly run, box, climb, swim, cycle or otherwise sweat their way to good health and strength. But most of us would be surprised to know that daily exercise for women was a major cultural shift in the 20th century. Or that it took the persistence of several pioneering women to make it happen. Author Danielle Friedman shares their stories in her book, “Let’s Get Physical: How Women Discovered Exercise and Reshaped the World.” It’s our March selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guest: Danielle Friedman, award-winning journalist and author of “Let’s Get Physical: How Women Discovered Exercise and Reshaped the World.”
3/7/202225 minutes, 16 seconds
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Mass. Politics Profs: A review of Boston Mayor Wu's first 100 days in office

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: President Joe Biden flexes his foreign policy skills, imposing sanctions against Russia for invading Ukraine. Could this boost Biden’s popularity? Plus, a review of Boston Mayor Michelle Wu’s first 100 days in office. And pot dispensary owners are inviting Massachusetts gubernatorial candidates inside for an up-close look at the business. It's a full hour with the Mass Politics Profs! Guests: Erin O’Brien is an associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Jerold Duquette is an associate professor of political science at Central Connecticut State University. He and Erin are co-editors of the upcoming book, **The Politics of Massachusetts Exceptionalism: Reputation Meet Reality. Rob DeLeo is associate professor of public policy at Bentley University.
2/27/202257 minutes, 54 seconds
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How horseshoe crabs became the heroes of modern medicine

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Grateful for COVID-19 vaccines? You should be thanking a creature that has nine eyes and blue blood. No, it’s not a monster — it’s a horseshoe crab. Their special blood has created a multimillion dollar industry in pharmaceuticals. And they’re to thank, in part, for the development of the COVID-19 vaccine. But these “living fossils” are now threatened by overharvesting. What happens if we lose horseshoe crabs as a valuable resource? Guest: William Sargent is a consultant for the NOVA science series, and the author of 27 books, including Crab Wars: A Tale of Horseshoe Crabs, Ecology, and Human Health.
2/20/202222 minutes, 43 seconds
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Environmental Roundtable: Boston's boom in green transportation, climate change and activism

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: You’ve probably heard about the recent federal report estimating up to a foot of sea level rise by 2050, creating dangerous coastal flooding. Too much doom and gloom? Well, there’s a cohort of young activists using social media to inspire climate action. Plus, green transportation gets a boost in Massachusetts, with three free bus lanes in Boston and millions of dollars funding electric vehicle charging stations around the state. Those stories and more on our environmental roundtable. Guests: Dr. Aaron Bernstein is interim director of The Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Beth Daley is the editor and general manager at The Conversation U.S. Sam Payne, is a strategic communications manager at the Better Future Project.
2/20/202235 minutes, 8 seconds
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Boston's bike lane boom experiences some road bumps

This week on our Local News Roundtable of Under the Radar: Massachusetts is ending its school mask mandate after February vacation. Governor Baker's announcement comes after a growing number of Bay State cities have eased their restrictions and was met by anti-vax protestors. Plus, more protests over plans to close Tufts Children’s Hospital. And the City of Boston has expanded its protected bike lane network — but not everyone is happy. That and more on our Local News Roundtable. Guests: Sue O’Connell, political commentator, and analyst for NECN, NBC10 Boston, and co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News. Gin Dumcius, managing editor at the Dorchester Reporter.
2/14/202231 minutes, 32 seconds
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Encore: Rosé all day — what you need to know about the popular type of pink wine

This is a special encore segment of Under the Radar. This originally published on August 6, 2021. Feeling the love? This year, people are toasting their sweethearts not with champagne or beer, but with rosé. Rosé producers are meeting the increased consumer demand with new styles — exciting wine lovers and making enthusiasts out of wine drinkers who declared they’d never go pink. Guest: Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School and author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional.”
2/13/202226 minutes, 19 seconds
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Latinx News: Latinos in office at record high, but still a fraction of all elected officials

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Many more Latinos are running for office and winning. But they still make up less than 2% of all elected officials in the country. Plus, most food delivery workers in New York City are Latino. They’re organizing to demand better wages and working conditions. And fans of Disney’s animated musical "Encanto" are praising the film for its multiracial Latinx cast. That and more on our Latinx Roundtable. Guests: Julio Ricardo Varela, interim co-executive director of Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, and founder of Latino Rebels. Tibisay Zea, senior reporter at El Planeta in Boston.
2/6/202230 minutes, 50 seconds
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The science and popularity of CBD, explained

CBD: three small letters behind a billion-dollar industry. CBD, short for cannabidiol, is a compound from the cannabis plant that does not produce a high. People can consume it, vape it or apply it to their skin. Manufacturers are putting CBD in everything from lattes to lotions. Proponents say that CBD helps manage many health conditions, especially pain and anxiety. But many researchers insist that the substance may not work, let alone be touted as a cure-all. Just what does the science say about CBD? And are CBD consumers right about its effectiveness? Guests: Dr. Kevin Hill, addiction psychiatrist, director of the division of addiction psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is also the author of “Marijuana: The Unbiased Truth about the World’s Most Popular Weed.” Malaika Jones, co-founder of BROWN GIRL Jane, a Black woman–owned company that offers broad-spectrum CBD products. She was named one of the most powerful women of 2020 by Entrepreneur Magazine.
2/6/202227 minutes, 2 seconds
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From 'Shang-Chi' to 'Cowboy Bebop': How Asian representation has changed in film and TV

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Four years ago, a movie called Crazy Rich Asians made waves in Hollywood. The award-winning film was a modern love story featuring an entirely Asian and Asian American cast — the first major Hollywood production with an all-Asian cast since The Joy Luck Club in 1993. The movie signaled a major step forward in the film industry. What originally seemed to be a small pop cultural phenomenon has since produced a movement in entertainment media, from blockbuster hits starring Asian superheroes to record-breaking TV series that embrace Asian customs and languages. The representation is certainly not perfect, but the enthusiastic response from fans has inspired both Asian American and Hollywood communities to demand more diversity in the industry. We’re spending the full hour talking about Asian representation in film and television, plus, what we’re looking forward to watching in 2022. Guests: Elena Creef, professor of women’s and gender studies at Wellesley College. She specializes in Asian American visual history in photography, film and popular culture. Jenny Korn, fellow and the founding coordinator of the Race and Media Working Group at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.
1/30/202257 minutes, 54 seconds
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Mass. Politics Profs: Biden's second year in office begins on a bleak note

This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley: Voters will elect at least three new district attorneys in Massachusetts this year. Whoever wins will determine how nonviolent crimes are handled, and influence long-term criminal justice reform. Plus, the doomed voting rights bills have sunk on President Biden’s watch. Does this set the tone for his second year in office? And Massachusetts’ seven-termed secretary of state will face off against a formidable challenger: Boston NAACP President Tanisha Sullivan. It’s our Mass Politics Profs roundtable! Guests: Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Luis Jiménez, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Jerold Duquette, associate professor of political science at Central Connecticut State University.
1/23/202232 minutes, 27 seconds
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Local artists explore society’s most pressing issues at ICA Boston

Today on Under The Radar: A special exhibit at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston showcases the work of three local artists. They are the 2021 winners of the James and Audrey Foster Prize. The biennial exhibition is key to the ICA’s efforts to support local artists. The Foster Prize, which has been around for more than two decades, helps highlight the winner's artistry with specially commissioned works. The art produced by the three latest winners illustrates different mediums and perspectives, though each of their pieces share similar themes. The 2021 Foster Prize exhibition has been on display since Sept. 1, 2021 and runs through Jan. 30, 2022. Guests: Marlon Forrester, artist and educator, born in Guyana, and raised in Boston. He is a resident artist at the African American Master Artist Residence Program at Northeastern University. Eben Haines, Boston-based artists and co-founder of the Shelter in Place Gallery. Haines uses drawings, paintings and sculptures, and installations to create his art. Dell Marie Hamilton, an artist, writer and curator who works across a variety of mediums including performance, video, painting, photography and installation. She currently works at Harvard's Hutchins Center for African and African American Research.
1/23/202225 minutes, 24 seconds
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Young activists are the past, present and future of the racial justice movement

This week on Under the Radar: On this 39th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a look at the legacy and the future of the ongoing struggle for Black civil rights by the young people who’ve put it all on the line to lead it. Guests: Curtis Bunn, co-author of “Say Their Names: How Black Lives Came to Matter in America." Bunn is an award-winning journalist at NBC NEWS BLK and the bestselling author of 10 novels centering on Black life in America. Patrice Gaines, co-author of “Say Their Names: How Black Lives Came to Matter in America." Gaines is a former Washington Post reporter and Pulitzer Prize finalist, and the author of a memoir. V.P. Franklin, author of “The Young Crusaders: The Untold Story of the Children and Teenagers Who Galvanized the Civil Rights Movement.” He is distinguished professor emeritus of history and education at the University of California, Riverside.
1/16/202231 minutes, 32 seconds
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What your history class didn't teach you about the civil rights movement

This week on Under the Radar: As we approach Martin Luther King Jr. Day, there's new evidence that the civil rights icon’s life and the civil rights movement have been willfully misinterpreted. This is part of what’s become a public battle over teaching the documented history of race in America. What is the impact of this campaign of disinformation on civil rights and race history in America? Guests: Jeanne Theoharris, distinguished professor of political science at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. She has authored or co-authored eleven books, including the award-winning, “The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks.” Her latest book is, “A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History.” Diane McWhorter, 2002 Pulitzer Prizewinner for General Nonfiction for her book, “Carry Me Home, Birmingham Alabama, the Climatic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution.” A long-time contributor to the New York Times, she is also the author of the 2004 children’s book, “A Dream of Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement From 1954-1965,” a young adult history of the civil rights movement.
1/16/202226 minutes, 19 seconds
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Food and wine trends in 2022: vegan lobster rolls, Haitian hot chocolate, best budget wine

Ready to sip and savor? We hope you’ve brought your appetite! It’s a new year, and there’s an abundance of new food and wine trends that will be served up in 2022. It’s our food and wine roundtable! Guests: Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School and author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional.” Amy Traverso, food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of GBH’s “Weekends With Yankee” and author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.” Products discussed during the show: Plant-based pastas: ZENB, chickpea pasta Winter Raclette Haitian hot chocolate made here in Boston Mochi donuts 2017 Fior di Vino Chianti Classico Riserva ($6.99 at Trader Joe’s)
1/9/202225 minutes, 34 seconds
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The plant-based food movement is having a moment

A booming variety of plant-based options are now available at grocery stores, restaurants and even fast-food chains. Bloggers, celebrities and chefs are reinventing their menus and recipes to make veggies the delicious stars of the meal. And the plant-based movement is no longer just for the privileged as affordable products have helped attract people with modest incomes. What's more, ordinary Americans are also touting other reasons to go plant-based: health, animal welfare and sustainability. Guests: Bryan Timko, CEO of Life Alive Cafe, which have served organic and plant-based meals in the Boston area since the early 2000s. Alicia Romano, a registered dietitian at Tufts Medical Center, author, nutrition consultant and fitness instructor.
1/9/202232 minutes, 17 seconds
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Sack O' Songs: Our annual review of quirky holiday songs

This week on Under the Radar: It’s our annual spinning of holiday tunes with our own Mike Wilkins, radio engineer for PRX and GBH’s The World. All this hour, GBH’s intrepid holiday music collector shares his new finds of old songs that are quirky, weird and sometimes way out there. These are not the traditional carols you'll hear from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir or even new favorites like Mariah Carey’s “All I Want For Christmas Is You.” Nope, for his annual collection of songs you never heard, Mike has once again rescued vinyl one-hit wonders from the forgotten bins of overlooked B-sides, and highlighted a few new tunes that might become classics. This season, for his 32nd year of jinglebell melodies, Mike’s collection goes back to basics — sort of. This is Mike’s musical holiday gift bag, “Sack O' Songs,” a Yuletopia recording. Stream the full "Sack O' Songs" playlist here: https://soundcloud.com/seenthat/sackosongs2021
12/19/202157 minutes, 53 seconds
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With a business model centered on diversity, Boston’s biggest hotel in decades is now open

This week on Under The Radar: Seven years ago, the Massachusetts Port Authority shook up the local real estate world. Plans for a new hotel on public land, overseen by the agency, would be the biggest to open in Boston since the mid-80s. But the agency's thumbs up for developers hinged on the inclusion of companies owned by women and people of color working as leaders on the project. Dubbed the “Massport Model," the inclusion clause helped forge new relationships beyond the project. The Omni Boston Hotel at the Seaport opened in September to rave reviews. The $550 million complex has 1,054 rooms, seven dining options and glorious views of the Boston city skyline. The gleaming luxury hotel marks something bigger than just a building: a lucrative business model that centers diversity. GUESTS: Duane Jackson, managing member of Alinea Capital Partners and former member of Massachusetts Port Authority’s Board of Directors, who pushed for the “Massport Model” policy. Richard Taylor, chairman of the Taylor-Smith Companies, where he manages multiple real estate business entities, and director of the Center for Real Estate at Suffolk University. Mikyoung Kim, landscape architect and owner of the firm Mikyoung Kim Design in Boston.
12/13/202134 minutes, 21 seconds
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The Genius Next Door: Historian and professor Dr. Ibram X. Kendi on anti-racism

This week on Under The Radar: The MacArthur Foundation released the names of its Class of 2021 “Genius” Fellows this October. They join an exclusive group of previous Fellows who have demonstrated outstanding talent in their fields. American historian, professor and author Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is one of three local awardees, part of our series, “The Genius Next Door.” Dr. Kendi is America’s leading anti-racist scholar. A best-selling author and founder of Boston University’s Center for Anti-Racist Research, Dr. Kendi has helped push forward discussion about anti-Black racism.
12/13/202123 minutes, 33 seconds
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The legacy of Occupy Boston, ten years later

The 1% and a billionaire tax are mainstream concepts today — but they weren't always so well-known. Back in 2011, Occupy protesters promoted these fringe ideas. The populist socio-political movement sprang up from the streets in Boston and elsewhere before becoming a massive international happening. Occupy’s message about social and economic inequality changed how many Americans think and talk about economic inequality today. Ten years ago, the protestors who flocked to Occupy Boston were considered a threat when they took over Dewey Square. Hundreds gathered to become a part of the activist community which included functioning space with clothing and kitchen tents, media and even a library. But just two and half months later after it opened, it was gone. Still, many argue Occupy Boston’s short-lived existence has had long-term impact. On this tenth anniversary, local Occupy participants assess the movement’s successes and shortcomings. GUESTS: Jimi Two Feathers is a community organizer and founding member of Dance New England, Earth Drum Council and Concord Neighborhood Network. He was involved in the People of Color Working Group in Dewey Square. Myrna Morales is a librarian and director of leadership development and partnerships for the Massachusetts Coalition of Domestic Workers. She was involved in the Audre Lorde to Howard Zinn Library in Dewey Square.
12/6/202133 minutes, 3 seconds
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Under the Radar Book Club: Alex Bernstein's 'Miserable Holiday Stories'

“Bah humbug!” Scrooge’s familiar retort to Christmas enthusiasts doesn’t begin to describe Alex Bernstein’s take on the holidays. In his new book, “Miserable Holiday Stories: 20 Festive Failures That Are Worse than Yours!” the author and humorist envisions a fictional world of offbeat characters caught up in the hurly-burly of a holiday season gone off the rails. In Bernstein’s homage to the scrooges and grinches among us, all is not merry and bright. “Miserable Holiday Stories” is the latest in his series of 'Miserable' books. The series also includes "Miserable Adventure Stories," which won the 2018 Best Indie Book Award, and "Miserable Love Stories." His work has appeared in McSweeney’s NewPopLit, The Rumpus and numerous other publications.
12/6/202124 minutes, 48 seconds
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The Genius Next Door: Physician-economist Marcella Alsan on racial discrimination in medicine

This week on Under the Radar: Harvard professor Dr. Marcella Alsan is a physician-economist and a member of the 2021 MacArthur “Genius Fellows” — one of three who are local. We talk with Dr. Alsan for our series, “The Genius Next Door.” She researches the effects of racial discrimination and the resulting mistrust of the medical field for historically marginalized populations. GUEST: Dr. Marcella Alsan is a member of the 2021 MacArthur Genius Fellows, and a professor of public policy at the Kennedy School at Harvard University. Her research focuses on health disparities as a result of racial discrimination and mistrust.
11/29/202125 minutes, 1 second
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The Father of Music Festivals: The life and legacy of pioneer George Wein

This week on Under the Radar: George Wein, jazz promoter, musician and producer, died in September at the age of 95. The music impresario with local roots is best known for founding the annual summer Newport Jazz Festival. Born and raised in Massachusetts, Wein played piano and jazz as a child. Early on in his producer career, he opened the Storyville jazz club in Boston and in 1954 founded the Newport Jazz Festival, creating a blueprint for all subsequent music festivals around the world. Wein used the festival as a platform to boost careers and industry respect for musicians, such as Miles Davis and Duke Ellington, as well as a tool for social justice, promoting a diverse lineup of artists and appealing to racially mixed audiences. GUESTS: Eric Jackson, jazz radio personality and host of "Eric in the Evening" on GBH Radio. Jay Sweet, executive producer of the Newport Folk Festival and Newport Jazz Festival. Sue Auclair, president of Sue Auclair Promotions, a Boston-based PR and marketing firm servicing the arts, entertainment, and media industries.
11/29/202132 minutes, 50 seconds
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Environmental Roundtable: Mass. residents inhaled polluted air for 50 days in 2020

Today on Under The Radar: Breathe in… and out… Easy? Not so much for Massachusetts residents, who inhaled 50 days of polluted air in 2020. Plus, with fall foliage comes piles of dead leaves and the ubiquitous leaf-blowers — environmentally conscientious consumers may want to rethink their use. And, we’re zeroing in on important takeaways from the UN Climate Change Conference this month. It’s our Environmental Roundtable! GUESTS: Beth Daley, editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. Cabell Eames, political director of Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate-action organization. Dr. Aaron Bernstein, Interim director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.
11/22/202130 minutes, 47 seconds
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Under The Radar Book Club: Douglas Wolk's 'All of the Marvels: A Journey to the Ends of The Biggest Story Ever Told'

This week on Under the Radar: Mutants, monsters, monarchs — and the beloved superheroes who battle them — populate the Marvel universe. These days, that fictional comic book universe draws fans beyond the faithful comic book nerds. Millions of enthusiasts eagerly follow the creative storytelling, which often inspires more questions than answers. How did it all come to be? In his new book, “All of the Marvels: A Journey to the Ends of The Biggest Story Ever Told,” author Douglas Wolk unravels the hydra-headed history of the archival storylines and creator squabbles that have continued to shape the contemporary Marvel universe. GUEST: Douglas Wolk has written about comic books, graphic novels, pop music and technology for publications including The New York Times, Rolling Stone, The Washington Post, and Slate. He’s also the author of the Eisner Award-winning book, “Reading Comics.”
11/22/202127 minutes, 4 seconds
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Transgender authors and allies are making children's literature more inclusive

This week on Under the Radar: It’s Transgender Awareness Week, which is a time to reflect on issues facing the trans community, including representation in media. One space that is becoming more inclusive? Children’s literature. There is a growing catalog of books that center trans kids as main characters, and more stories that portray a range of experiences. Advocates want more trans authors and characters to be seen and heard. Guests: Kyle Lukoff, Stonewall-winning author of “When Aidan Became a Brother” and 2021 National Book Award finalist for the novel “Too Bright To See.” Vanessa Ford, co-author of "CALVIN," a children's book centered around a transgender boy, inspired in part by Ford's child. Ford is also a nationally known advocate for transgender youth rights. Katy Kania, head of teen services at Robbins Library in Arlington, Massachusetts.
11/14/202126 minutes, 28 seconds
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Will Maine's innovative packaging law help fix America's recycling problem?

This week on Under the Radar: America has a recycling problem. Ever since China banned the United States' recyclables back in 2018, recycling centers in American towns and cities have struggled to manage the massive amount of waste. Not to mention paying for the infrastructure and processing costs of recycling. But a new law in Maine relieves municipalities’ financial burden by shifting the responsibility for the recycling costs. The law requires that producers of packaging waste, like Amazon and Maine businesses, pick up the tab for recycling costs. The move could encourage more use of reusable materials and reduce waste overall. Maine is the first state in the nation to pass this kind of law, and advocates say it will likely be a model for the rest of the county. Guests: Maine state Rep. Nicole Grohoski, who sponsored the bill Sarah Nichols, sustainable Maine director at Natural Resources Council of Maine
11/14/202131 minutes, 24 seconds
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Mass Politics Profs: Candidates Of Color Made History In Elections Nationwide

This week on Under the Radar: Candidates of color made history nationwide this month, including right here in Boston where Michelle Wu became the first woman and person of color elected as the city's mayor. Voters also gave Boston City Council new powers to override some of the mayor’s decisions. Plus, Republicans took home some big election wins nationwide, including governor of Virginia; is that a bad omen for Democrats in 2022? Listen to a full hour with the Mass Politics Profs! Guests: Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Luis Jimenez, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Rob DeLeo, associate professor of public policy at Bentley University.
11/8/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Local TikTokers Find Fame By Posting About All-Things Massachusetts

This week on Under the Radar: TikTok, the Chinese-owned app known for popular dance videos and creative tips for everyday tasks, has changed the way people go viral on social media. The video-sharing platform exploded in popularity during COVID becoming the world’s most downloaded app in 2020. With school buildings shut down, a generation of young people looking for connection and entertainment found it on TikTok, as did others captivated by the clever and amusing short films. Just this month, TikTok announced that more than one billion people use the app globally. TikTok has produced thousands of social media influencers — content creators who attract large numbers of followers and views. Some of them have now joined forces to establish TikTok Houses with members living and posting content together full time. And one local Tik Tok House is getting a taste of fame by posting about all-things Massachusetts. The ultimate goal: lucrative brand deals and celebrity. Is this trend the next wave of social media? And what does it mean to be TikTok famous? Kyle Gove, the owner and manager of “The Mass House” says his collaboration started a year ago and has grown to almost 100,000 followers in just one year. "We just enjoyed making content with each other under one collective page, it’s bigger than us individually," he says. "It represents something more than our individual selves, we want to represent the state on that platform." Guests: Rebecca Jennings, senior reporter covering internet culture at The Goods by Vox. Kyle Gove, owner and manager of local TikTok group “The Mass House.” Kyle is a freshman at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.
10/31/202133 minutes, 25 seconds
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Is Digital Art A New Frontier For Underrepresented Artists?

This week on Under the Radar: The art world has been turned on its head this year. Visitor numbers to galleries plummeted as the pandemic forced shops to close their doors. The art world had to shift, kicking off a digital art craze. Back in March, a new record was set when a piece of digital artwork, by the artist Beeple, sold for $69 million dollars. The art was sold as a digital file, called an NFT, which stands for “nonfungible token” — a term that can apply to any digital collectible. Many underrepresented artists who haven’t been given broad access to mainstream galleries think that crypto-traded art could be a viable avenue to sell their work. But will this new frontier offer more opportunities than obstacles? Guest: Nettrice Gaskins, Afrofuturist digital artist, assistant director of the Lesley University STEAM Learning Lab, and the author of “Techno-Vernacular Creativity and Innovation: Culturally Relevant Making Inside and Outside of the Classroom.” Her artwork is part of the forthcoming “FUTURES” exhibit at the Smithsonian in November.
10/31/202124 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Genius Next Door: MIT Geomorphologist Taylor Perron Discusses Landscape Evolution

This week on Under the Radar: The MacArthur Foundation named its Class of 2021 “Genius Fellows" earlier this month. The recipients join an exclusive group of previous Fellows who have demonstrated outstanding talent in their fields. The award acknowledges the Fellows’ demonstrated talent and potential as leaders in their fields. MIT professor Taylor Perron is a geomorphologist who studies the evolution of landscapes on Earth and other planets. He is one of the 2021 MacArthur Fellows, and one of three based in the Boston area. We talk with professor Perron for our series, “The Genius Next Door.”
10/24/202125 minutes, 23 seconds
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Pop Culture Roundtable: Protest Over Comedian Dave Chappelle's 'Transphobic' Netflix Special

This week on Under the Radar: Netflix is reeling from backlash against comedian Dave Chappelle’s latest special, which critics say contains transphobic material. Plus, Hollywood celebrities from Adele to Jonah Hill speak up against fan obsession over their weight loss. And The Rolling Stones remove one of the most popular songs from their tour setlist over lyrics referencing slavery. Those stories and more on our Pop Culture Roundtable! GUESTS: Michael Jeffries is the dean of academic affairs and professor of American studies at Wellesley College. Rachel Rubin is a professor of American studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.
10/24/202132 minutes, 28 seconds
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Is Your Diamond Jewelry 'Ethical?'

This week on Under The Radar: Pop the champagne! October is the most popular month to get married, according to The Knot, the nation’s leading wedding marketplace. And the wedding industry sure is on the rebound after more than a year of postponed pandemic weddings. That includes increased consumer demand for diamond engagement rings. Diamond sales shot up 30 percent from last year. Consumer demand coupled with COVID-19 restrictions led to global diamond shortages, and something else: a more vocal movement calling for a move away from mined diamonds toward so-called ethical or conflict-free diamonds. But... it’s complicated. For example, where do lab-grown diamonds fit into the picture? And how do millennials who support sustainability navigate potential "greenwashing" in the jewelry industry? GUESTS: Raquel Alonso-Perez, curator of Harvard University’s Mineralogical and Geological Museum. Craig Rottenberg, president of Long’s Jewelers in Boston and vice chair of Jewelers of Americas Board of Directors.
10/17/202132 minutes, 57 seconds
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What We Can All Learn From Wedding Announcements

This week on Under The Radar: Few would dispute that The New York Times has elevated the age-old tradition of the wedding announcement to an important status symbol. Why, in these times, when many other social traditions have gone the way of the polar ice cap, do the announcements still draw enthusiastic readers? Author Cate Doty shares her insider’s view in her book, “Mergers and Acquisitions: Or Everything I Know About Love I Learned from the Wedding Pages.” Guest: Cate Doty is a writer and a former editor at The New York Times, where she worked for nearly 15 years, including as a wedding announcements writer, presidential campaign reporter and a senior staff editor on the Food desk. She teaches journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, from which she graduated, and lives in North Carolina with her family.
10/17/202124 minutes, 54 seconds
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Fabric Of A Nation: Quilting Is Finally Being Recognized As Fine Art

When thinking about “fine art,” many minds immediately envision paintings by the likes of Monet or Van Gogh. But one artform – quilting – is finally being recognized as fine art, rather than just craft. African American quilters, in particular, are reclaiming the artform's history, after having been mischaracterized by scholars for decades. A new Museum of Fine Arts, Boston exhibition, “Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories” features over 300 years of American quilts, and other visual and tactile artworks. It especially focuses on works by an underrecognized diversity of artistic hands and minds from the 17th century to today. The exhibition opened on October 10th and runs through January 17th, 2022. GUESTS: Jennifer Swope, associate curator of textile and fashion arts at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and exhibition curator of the MFA’s “Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories.” Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi, author, curator, quilter, and founder of African American Quilt Guild of Los Angeles and Women of Color Quilters Network. Dr. Mazloomi’s work “Strange Fruit II” is featured in the MFA’s “Fabric of a Nation” exhibition. Gio Swaby, a Bahamian visual artist whose work centers on Black joy as a radical act of resistance. Her work “Love Letter 5” is featured in the MFA’s “Fabric of a Nation” exhibition.
10/10/202123 minutes, 59 seconds
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Inclusive Fitness: Neurodiverse People Find A Place In The Exercise Industry

The Tokyo Paralympics were held this summer and American elite athletes, who have physical and neurological disabilities, medaled in competitions from archery to swimming. Paralympians like Breanna Clark who is autistic, the first female U.S. athlete to win gold for 400m track in 2016 and who broke a world record this summer in Tokyo. But had Breanna not been an athlete with access to custom training, she would likely not have been able to work out in a gym. Typical gyms normally don't accommodate people like her with autism, Down syndrome, or cerebral palsy, conditions known as neurodiverse. Not only are the flashing lights and sounds in typical gyms often disorienting, but also many physical trainers haven’t worked with neurodiverse people. But one local gym is changing that – Greater Boston’s Inclusive Fitness is creating both a workout space and a community. GUESTS: Greg Austin, founder, president, and coach at Inclusive Fitness, a Boston-based gym that specializes in training neurodiverse people. Kristin Abendroth, director of client experience and head neurotypical coach at Inclusive Ftiness. Barbara Baker, parent of Mary Gwen, an Inclusive Fitness athlete.
10/10/202133 minutes, 52 seconds
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Under The Radar Book Club: Wil Haygood's 'Colorization: One Hundred Years Of Black Films In A White World'

This week on Under the Radar: From the moment D.W. Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation” became a film sensation, racist portrayals of African Americans have been embedded in film history. Author Wil Haygood begins his history of Black films with white filmmaker Griffith’s movie, documenting the setbacks and triumphs within the context of American Black history. His new book,“Colorization: One Hundred Years of Black Films in a White World” reveals surprising and shocking details left out of most film histories. Haygood is currently the Boadway Visiting Distinguished Scholar at Ohio’s Miami University, following a 3-decade career as a correspondent both at the Washington Post and the Boston Globe. The Pulitzer Prize finalist has written eight other books including, “The Butler: A Witness to History” made into a feature film. “Colorization: One Hundred Years of Black Films in a White World” is our October selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.”
10/3/202122 minutes, 52 seconds
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LGBTQ News Roundtable: Is The State's Child Welfare System Putting LGBTQ Youth At Risk?

This week on Under The Radar: We kick off LGBTQ History Month with our LGBTQ News Roundtable. A local school committee member is under fire for her transphobic TikTok posts. Plus, is the state's child welfare system putting LGBTQ youth at risk? And, Rep. Liz Cheney admits she was "wrong" to oppose gay marriage. Guests: Grace Sterling Stowell is the executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth, or BAGLY. Janson Wu is the executive director of GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders, or GLAD. Sue O’Connell is a political commentator at New England Cable News, and a co-publisher of Bay Windows and The South End News.
10/3/202135 minutes
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Podcast Extra: Bonus Questions With Author Wil Haygood

Two bonus questions with author Wil Haygood!
10/3/20216 minutes, 29 seconds
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How Companies Are Rethinking Future-Of-Work Plans

This week on Under the Radar: Up until 18 months ago, "9 to 5," with its traditional customs, was how millions of Americans went to work. But COVID-19 upended tradition, forcing many of us out of the office and back home working remotely. That’s been enough time for companies to see the pros and cons of remote work, and to start crafting future-of-work plans. Many workers expected to return to the office this fall, but both the Delta variant and rising demand for remote jobs have made employers reconsider. How will employers and employees find a balance? And, just what does the future of work look like locally and beyond? GUESTS: Bryan Hancock, global leader of McKinsey & Company’s talent management practice. Debbie Lovich, managing director and senior partner of Boston Consulting Group. Dena Upton, chief people officer at Drift, a software company with Boston headquarters, that is fully embracing the remote work lifestyle.
9/26/202132 minutes, 50 seconds
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Some Employees Never Want To Give Up Remote Work

This week on Under the Radar: If the pandemic taught us anything, it’s that a lot of people love working remotely. Sure, many people might miss in-person meetings, and look forward to hallway chats again. But others who’ve experienced the flexibility that remote work provides don’t want to give it up. Major companies, like Facebook, Twitter and Spotify, have embraced this — now allowing employees to work remotely, permanently. But as we enter fall, other businesses are calling their employees back into the office. How many are willing to quit their jobs — maybe even move out of town or state — to find permanent remote work? GUESTS: Brie Reynolds, career development manager and career coach at Flexjobs, a search site for flexible and remote jobs. Matthew Moll, teacher at Peabody PREP, a single-district virtual school system within the Peabody Public Schools system.
9/26/202125 minutes, 1 second
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Under The Radar Book Club: Beck Dorey-Stein's 'Rock the Boat'

A humiliating breakup knocked Kate Campbell off her trajectory of a successful career and an enviable personal life. But it’s only after she returns to her hometown roots that she is able to find solace and a new direction for her life. "Rock the Boat" is author Beck Dorey-Stein’s first novel and our September selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” "Rock the Boat" is Dorey-Stein’s second book following her New York times bestselling memoir, “From the Corner of the Oval.”
9/20/202122 minutes, 50 seconds
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Latinx Roundtable: How Did Latino Voters Impact Local Elections? And, Does Hispanic Heritage Month Need A Rebrand?

This week on Under the Radar: At-large city councilors Michelle Wu and Anissa Essaibi George topped the field in Tuesday's preliminary Boston mayoral race. How did Greater Boston's Latino voters impact the election results? And, as the COVID-19 delta variant spreads, so too does disinformation about COVID among Spanish-language sites. Plus, National Hispanic Heritage Month kicked off last week, but critics say it needs a rebrand. That and more on our Latinx roundtable. Guests: Julio Ricardo Varela, interim co-executive director of Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, and founder of Latino Rebels. Tibisay Zea, senior reporter at El Planeta in Boston.
9/19/202135 minutes, 1 second
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Encore: Eric Nguyen's 'Things We Lost To The Water'

This is a special encore edition of Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. This segment originally aired on May 2nd, 2021. New Orleans natives are typically thought of as descendents of the Africans, French and Spanish who arrived on the Gulf Coast in the 17th century. But for nearly 50 years, the city has also been home to a community of Vietnamese immigrants. Eric Nguyen gives us an intimate look at that community through the fictionalized lives of a mother and her sons in his debut novel ”Things We Lost to the Water.” It was our May selection for Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club. Guest: Eric Nguyen — editor-in-chief of diaCRITICS
9/12/202124 minutes, 24 seconds
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Encore: Will Consumers Cut The Cord On Streaming Services?

This is a special encore edition of Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. This segment originally aired on May 2nd, 2021. First, it was the cable and satellite TV subscribers who started a movement by turning to the internet for entertainment. Streaming services got a big boost during the height of the COVID-19 lockdown as millions more Americans — desperate for distraction — willingly ponied up for paid subscriptions. Now, cable cord cutters find the streaming cord wrapped around their necks as they are strangled with rising subscription rates and extra fees. Will consumers walk away again? Guests: Alissa Wilkinson — film and culture reporter for Vox Kevin Westcott — vice chairman of Deloitte James “Jim” Willcox — senior electronics editor of Consumer Reports
9/12/202133 minutes, 30 seconds
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20th Anniversary Of 9/11: How Bias Against Muslims Is Changing In America

Once it was clear that the 9/11 hijackers were Muslim, American Muslims became targets. The pain and anger of September 11th tragedy drove anti-American sentiment as well as ongoing suspicion and misconception of Islam. Has public perception towards Muslims shifted, as the 20-year marker of 9/11 approaches? We're examining the systemic and structural racism against Muslims that has long been embedded in this country. Guests: Amaney Jamal, the Edwards S. Sanford professor of politics at Princeton University, dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and author of "Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11." Journalist Malika Bilal, host of “The Take” podcast by Al Jazeera and former co-host of The Stream, a social-media led talk show on Al Jazeera English. Fatema Ahmad, executive director at Muslim Justice League, here in Boston.
9/5/202127 minutes, 54 seconds
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20th Anniversary Of 9/11: How Will Younger Generations Remember The Attacks?

For some of us, September 11th, 2001 still rings clear in our minds, even 20 years now after the attacks. But newer generations have little to no memory of that tragic day – either having been too young to remember, or not yet born. We’re marking the upcoming 20th anniversary of 9/11 by reflecting on how Gen-Zers recognize an event that they learn about in history books. How does generational trauma affect those who didn’t even live through the event? Guests: Garrett Graff, journalist and historian, whose latest book “The Only Plane in the Sky,” is the first comprehensive oral history of September 11th. Graff also serves as the director of the Aspen Institute’s cybersecurity and technology program. Sam Sommers, experimental social psychologist, author, and professor at Tufts University. Dana Rose Garfin, trauma scholar and assistant professor at the University of California, Irvine.
9/5/202129 minutes, 58 seconds
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Henry David Thoreau - The Original "Social Distancer" - Has Newfound Relevancy During The Pandemic

You might not think you have too much in common with Henry David Thoreau – an American naturalist, author, and philosopher from the 1800s. Thoreau is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon his two-years living in the woods around Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts. Suddenly his experience as the original “social-distancer” seems quite relevant. The famous New Englander had a poignant appreciation for nature – something many of us rediscovered this year as the world closed in and people went outside to smell the flowers and to admire the wildlife that reclaimed parts of our towns and cities as human traffic decreased. Author David Gessner is inspired by Thoreau. In Gessner’s latest book, “Quiet Desperation, Savage Delight: Sheltering with Thoreau in the Age of Crisis,” he finds insight about how to live through a pandemic from the man who iconically self-isolated in a hut in the woods. Gessner is the author of 12 books and a professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington.
8/29/202123 minutes, 58 seconds
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How Gen-Z Is Turning Into The Zero Waste Generation

“Code Red" -- that's the alarming state of our planet's health, according to a United Nations climate change report, published this month. Our catchy slogan “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” doesn’t hold-up to such dire news. And it’s recently become clear that recycling is a glaringly broken system in our country. Only 8 percent of plastic waste gets recycled in the United States, according to 2017 EPA report. So, what are we to do? Maybe it’s time to start practicing ‘reducing’ and ‘reusing’ instead of ‘recycling’? If anyone’s going to, it’ll be Gen-Zers, whose generation could come to become known as Gen-ZeroWaste, since so many are adopting zero waste practices. From viral zero-waste themed TikToks to internet-famous zero-waste bloggers, millennials and Gen-Zers are popularizing the waste-free lifestyle movement. And local efforts here in Massachusetts are leading the way. Guests: Maria Vasco, founder and CEO of Uvida, Boston’s first zero-waste store. Simon Metcalf, a member of the Sunrise Boston hub and a high school teacher. Hayley Gambone, account manager at Divert, a Concord-based company working to eliminate waste from the retail industry. Hayley is also a former Boston University Zero Waste intern, who was part of the university’s Zero Waste Task Force.
8/29/202133 minutes, 52 seconds
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Celebrate 50 Years Of Philadelphia International Records' Iconic 'Phillysound' Soul Music

Philadelphia International Records celebrates its 50th anniversary this year and the iconic "Phillysound" that it made famous. But the legacy of Philadelphia International Records is also its influence on other music genres and artists far beyond its birth city. As part of Under The Radar's ongoing summer series, we’re humming some of Philadelphia International’s biggest hits, and asking: Exactly what is the sound of Philadelphia? Guests: Max Ochester, musical historian and owner of record store Brewerytown Beats in Philadelphia. Jack McCarthy, Philadelphia music archivist and historian.
8/22/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Booze-Free Beverage Industry Is Booming

This week on Under The Radar: Booze-free beverages are having a moment — and no, we’re not talking about your grandfather’s O’Doul’s or sugary sweet mocktails. A wide variety of non-alcoholic craft beers are popping up on liquor store shelves near you, while bar menus are expanding to make space for spirit-free cocktails. Alcohol sales did spike last year, as Americans drank more during the pandemic. But millennials are driving a boom in the non-alcoholic beverage business, and industry leaders say these drinks aren’t just for the sober or sober-curious. But will the general public make a full culture shift to non-alcoholic drinks? Guests: Bill Shufelt is co-founder and CEO of Athletic Brewing Co., a Connecticut-based non-alcoholic brewery. Julia Bainbridge is the author of “Good Drinks: Alcohol-Free Recipes for When You’re Not Drinking for Whatever Reason,” and a 2021 Food & Wine “Game Changer.” Pauline Idogho is founder and CEO of Mocktail Club, a Black-owned non-alcoholic cocktail company based in Washington D.C.
8/15/202132 minutes, 22 seconds
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Chew On This: Cookbook Sales Are Rising As Home Cooks Look To Spice Up Everyday Meals

The pandemic sparked a return to cooking at home, and with that, sales of cookbooks spiked. As home cooks search for new ways to spice up everyday meals, what are the new trends emerging? Cookbook fans unite! In this segment from Under The Radar, Callie Crossley and our food contributor Amy Traverso each pick three of their current favorite cookbooks — and dish on why they love them! Guest: Amy Traverso, food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of GBH’s “Weekends with Yankee,” and the author of recently updated “The Apple Lovers Cookbook." Featured Cookbooks: "Super Natural Simple: Whole-food, Vegetarian Recipes for Real Life" by Heidi Swanson "Cook, Eat, Repeat: Ingredients, Recipes, and Stories" by Nigella Lawson "See You on Sunday: A Cookbook for Family and Friends" "How To Grill Vegetables: The New Bible for Barbecuing Vegetable Over Live Fire" by Steven Raichlen "Vegetable Kingdom: The Abundant World of Vegan Recipes" by Bryant Terry "The Arabesque Table: Contemporary Recipes from the Arab World" by Reem Kassis
8/15/202125 minutes, 29 seconds
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Under The Radar: New Hampshire Pushes Back On Vaccine Mandates With New 'Medical Freedom' Law

This week on Under The Radar: While Massachusetts debates vaccine and mask mandates, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu signed a bill into law last week that supporters say establishes "medical freedom." Residents in the state who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 can still access public facilities and services, under the new law. The law states that all residents have the “natural, essential and inherent right to bodily integrity, free from any threat or compulsion by government to accept an immunization.” But our guest Arnie Arnesen thinks that it will create greater levels of vulnerability, based on the politics of the legislature and the governor. "It is not about science, it is not about health, it is all about politics." Other topics on our Regional Roundtable this week include a potential hate crime on Martha's Vineyard and regional home-seekers buying up Rhode Island property. Guests: Arnie Arnesen, host of The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen from WNHN in New Hampshire. Ted Nesi, politics and business editor and investigative reporter for WPRI in Rhode Island. George Brennan, news editor of the Martha’s Vineyard Times.
8/8/202131 minutes, 3 seconds
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Rosé All Day: All You Need To Know About The Popular Type Of Wine

Rosé wine sales have been climbing year over year worldwide, as wine lovers and others discover that it’s delicious and versatile. Now rosé fans will have even more to sample as wine producers are introducing new styles of the pink wine. We are continuing our summer fun series by answering the age-old question, 'Why rosé all day?' Guest: Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School and author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional.”
8/8/202126 minutes, 49 seconds
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Young Adult Fiction: The Expanding Genre Attracts More Than Just Teens To Its Pages

On Under The Radar, we're diving into the popular genre of young adult (YA) fiction in this special August edition of “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” YA fiction and nonfiction is targeted at older teens, positioned in the editorial space between books for children and adults. But half of the readers are adults drawn to the common themes of family dynamics, friendship, first love and coming of age. YA authors tell their stories through multiple literary genres, including science fiction, romance, memoir, horror, fantasy, graphic novel, mystery and historical fiction. Guests: Crystal Maldonado is a writer by night and a marketer and social media manager by day. Her debut novel, “Fat Chance Charlie Vega” is a coming of age story featuring a biracial teen. The book earned a featured review on the list, Best Fiction for Young Adults. Maldonado is the co-founder of the online website Positively Smitten. She has been published in Latina magazine, the Hartford Courant, and Dogster. The University of Connecticut graduate lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and baby daughter. Brittney Morris is the author of the YA novel “Slay” and Marvel’s “Spider Man: Miles Morales-Wings of Fury.” Her latest YA book is “The Cost of Knowing,” a gripping family story featuring two Black male teens, which has received starred reviews from Kirkus and Publishers Weekly. Morris, who graduated from Boston University with a degree in economics, is also the founder and former president of the Boston University Creative Writing Club. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband and son. Malinda Lo is the author of six YA novels including her latest, “Last Night at the Telegraph Club,” set in San Francisco’s Chinatown during the 1950’s Red Scare. “Last Night at the Telegraph Club,” which has received eight starred reviews, was also named by Oprah Magazine, one of 50 LGBTQ Books That Will Heat Up the Literary Landscape in 2021. The three time finalist for the Lambda Literary Award also writes a biweekly newsletter, Lo & Behold. She graduated from Wellesley College and earned master’s degrees from both Harvard and Stanford. She lives in Massachusetts with her wife Amy Lovell.
8/5/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Environmental Roundtable: Climate Change Fuels Extreme Weather, Shutting Down Oil Pipelines, And The Country's First Black Chief Of US Forest Service

Climate deniers are on the hot seat, as temperatures soar and extreme weather blows through communities across the country. Plus, oil pipelines are on pause — or shut down completely — including the infamous Keystone XL pipeline. And a history-making appointment, as the first African American is named to lead the U.S. Forest Service. Those stories and more on our environmental roundtable. Guests: Dr. Aaron Bernstein, interim director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Bernstein is a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Heather Goldstone, chief communications officer at Woodwell Climate Research Center and former host GBH’s weekly science-focused radio show, Living Lab Radio. Sam Payne, digital organizer and communications specialist at the Better Future Project. Editor's note: This segment was recorded one week ago. In the time since taping, floods swept Europe and China, the Bootleg Fire in Oregon expanded and another heat wave hit the American West. Smoke from wildfires on the West Coast reached the East Coast and British Columbia declared a state of emergency over wildfires.
7/26/202131 minutes, 55 seconds
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Local Blind And Visually Impaired Students Navigate Challenges Of Remote Learning

Students and teachers had their worlds flipped upside down last year when the pandemic forced most to swap chalkboards for Zoom screens. A large part of teaching online, for many, became visual. But what about the challenges of online learning for those who are visually impaired or blind? Our neighbors at Perkins School for the Blind, in Watertown, had to think quickly about ensuring their students still received a quality education and maintained community when they went remote. A sense of touch is fundamental to those without a sense of sight. So how did Perkins students, teachers and parents manage in a world that was suddenly socially distant? Guests: Rachel Antonino, lower school teacher at Perkins School for the Blind. Matteo Faso, a senior at Perkins. Michelle Contey, Matteo's mother.
7/26/202125 minutes, 57 seconds
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How Amelia Earhart's Boston Connection Helped Her Soar To Fame

You may know Amelia Earhart as the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. But it's likely you don't know that she lived and worked right here in Boston. Her time spent here was brief, yet critical: This was the place that kicked off her worldwide stardom when she became the first female passenger to fly across the Atlantic in 1928. To mark her birthday this Saturday, which is celebrated as National Amelia Earhart Day, we're taking a look at who she was before she became a famous pilot, and how her life in Boston helped her become a pioneering female aviator. Guests: Susan Ware, author of “Still Missing: Amelia Earhart and the Search for Modern Feminism,” and the Honorary Women’s Suffrage Centennial Historian for the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Keith O’Brein, author of “Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds And Made Aviation History,” and a former staff writer for the Boston Globe.
7/19/202125 minutes, 39 seconds
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Women In Comedy: How Local Comics Kept Up During COVID

What is the state of comedy like now in the state of Massachusetts as we emerge from the pandemic? In a year of such loss, increased violence against Asian Americans, and police brutality against Black lives, is it even okay to be funny? Well, if we ever needed a laugh it’s now, so we’re yukking it up with some local women comedians to kick off our summer fun series. Guests: Bethany Van Delft, founder of the “Artisanal Comedy” show, host of iHeart Radio’s “The Ten News” podcast, and co-host of NOVA and PBS’s Parentalogic digital series. She is a regular performer and producer at the Women in Comedy Festival in Boston and her debut comedy album “I’m Not a Llama” landed in 2019. She was named Boston Magazine’s “Best Comedian” in both 2019 and 2020. Kelly MacFarland, a featured headliner for the Women in Comedy Festival in Boston for over a decade, and first runner up in the Boston Comedy Festival. Kelly has appeared on The Today Show, The View, Comedy Central, and NBC’s Last Comic Standing,  just to name a few. She has two comedy albums out, “Bombshell” and “You Woke up Today.”
7/19/202132 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Future Of Farming: From Crops You Can Control In A Container To Sustainable Kelp Farms That Fight Climate Change

Digging in the dirt and pulling up weeds is so last century. Whatever you thought about farming is being reimagined, with a new generation plowing the industry into the future. The tools and rural open spaces — which have so long defined traditional farming — are being left behind. More and more, today's farms are in urban areas — with vertical farming taking agriculture to new heights, while ocean farming expands the industry’s depths — all in a sustainable manner. Guests: Bren Smith — executive director and co-founder of GreenWave, a nonprofit that supports ocean farmers. Bren is also the owner of Thimble Island Ocean Farm and author of “Eat Like A Fish: My Adventures Farming the Ocean to Fight Climate Change." Jon Friedman — chief operating officer and co-founder of Freight Farms, a Boston-based AgTech company that has spearheaded "container farming."
7/12/202133 minutes, 33 seconds
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Book Club: Zakiya Dalila Harris’ 'The Other Black Girl'

At first it seems like a familiar story of office politics, but very soon “The Other Black Girl” unfolds into a tension-filled tale exploring performative diversity policies, unconscious bias, microaggressions and old-fashioned backstabbing. Author Zakiya Dalila Harris’ pitch perfect dialogue, pop culture witticisms, and sharp-edged satire frames the plot of one Black woman’s path to success disrupted by the hiring of another Black woman. This twisty thriller of office intrigue may offer some of the most biting social commentary of 2021. “The Other Black Girl” is Zakiya Dalila Harris’ debut novel and our July selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guest: Zakiya Dalila Harris, author of "The Other Black Girl."
7/12/202124 minutes, 19 seconds
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Encore: Bicycling Boom - Keeping Up With Pandemic-Fueled Demand

This is an encore edition of Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. This segment originally aired June 19th, 2020. A bicycling boom that emerged during the height of pandemic is still going strong, as people search for a socially distanced outlet for recreation and a safer mode of transportation. Most bike stores are besieged by the demand from would-be bike buyers for just about anything on two wheels. Mechanics, too, are overwhelmed by massive waitlists of customers’ requests for a tune-up on their old bikes -- some of which have been dragged out from the basement for the first time in years. Three local cycling experts gave us the low-down on how a 19th century wheeled invention is leaving a lot of modern-day Teslas in the dust. Guests: Marty Miserandino, owner, manager, and buyer of Fit Werx, a top rated bicycle store and bike fitting studio in Peabody, Massachusetts. Tom Rodi, marketing director for Parlee Cycles, a bicycle manufacturer based in Beverly, Massachusetts. Becca Wolfson, executive director of the Boston Cyclists Union.
7/6/202133 minutes, 31 seconds
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Encore: Not Your Average Guidebook - 'A People's Guide' Sheds Light On Greater Boston's Untold Histories

This is an encore edition of Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. This segment originally aired November 20, 2020. Boston sure is known for its history – but the people most well known about the city are largely white and male - think Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, and Henry David Thoreau. Some of that has changed during recent decades as Boston's all Black 54th regiment, for example, has helped highlight Boston's African American history. Still, most Boston guidebooks will lead you to the Freedom Trail, and past sites where events like the Boston Tea Party occurred. But is there more to know beyond the facts of these well-told narratives? Three local co-authors present a new guidebook, one that offers an expanded history to the region. ‘A People’s Guide to Greater Boston,’ features sites associated with oppression and resistance, focusing on the overlooked stories of underrepresented communities. Guests: Joseph Nevins is a professor of geography at Vassar College. Suren Moodliar is a coordinator of encuentro5, a movement-building space in downtown Boston, and managing editor of Socialism and Democracy, a journal of strategy. Eleni Macrakis is a project manager at Homeowners Rehab Inc. (HRI), a non-profit affordable housing developer in Cambridge, MA.
7/6/202124 minutes, 21 seconds
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Mass Politics Profs: Local Elections Teem With Candidates, Baker's Billions Of Stimulus Bucks, And Hope For A Boston Bullet Train

State lawmakers blocked Gov. Charlie Baker’s attempt to dole out billions in stimulus funds immediately, insisting the spending priorities should be determined jointly with legislative and community input. Sixteen candidates are eyeing one of four at-large seats for the Boston City Council — that's four candidates for each seat. And, state legislators are lobbying for a specific addition to the president's infrastructure bill: a high-speed bullet train from Boston to New York. We’re spending the full hour with the Massachusetts Politics Profs. Guests: Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston Jerold Duquette, associate professor of political science at Central Connecticut State University Luis Jiménez, assistant professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston
6/28/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Buzz Around Massachusetts Pollinator Week

Have you heard the buzz? It’s the start of Massachusetts Pollinator Week – a time when advocates seek to raise awareness about the vital role that bees and other pollinators play in our lives. Yet we're all feeling the sting as pollinators — and bees in particular — continue to rapidly decline. In Massachusetts alone, colonies of bees dropped by 47% last winter, according to Bee Informed Partnership. But earlier this year, Massachusetts took steps to protect pollinators, becoming the first state in the country to regulate a specific harmful pesticide. Meanwhile, local beekeepers have become a political force in the state, teaming up with scientists, policymakers and everyday people to save the bees. They say if their effort fails, we just might be the ones who need saving. Guests: Rep. Carolyn Dykema - state representative of the 8thMiddlesex District in Massachusetts. She has been working on pollinator protection legislative for years. Mary Duane - president of the Massachusetts Beekeepers Association, who has been beekeeping for over 20 years. Noah Wilson-Rich – CEO and co-founder of The Best Bees Company, a Boston-based company that installs and maintains honeybee hives in urban centers across the country.
6/21/202134 minutes, 47 seconds
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23rd Roxbury Film Festival Celebrates Black Voices In Film

The Boston-based Roxbury International Film Festival, or RoxFilm, is back for its 23rd annual event. After last year's fully virtual festival, organizers are offering both outside and online screenings to make the films accessible to all attendees. The Roxbury Film Festival, New England’s biggest film fest dedicated to films by, for and about people of color, kicked off Thursday with a roster of 80 films — along with panel discussions and live Q&As. And this year, more than ever, the festival is aiming to take a celebratory look at Black folks in film. Guests: Lisa Simmons — director of the Roxbury International Film Festival Thato Mwosa — director of “Memoirs of a Black Girl" Kavery Kaul — director of “The Bengali"; panelist for the festival
6/21/202123 minutes, 4 seconds
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LGBTQ News: Corporate America Turns Rainbow for Pride Month, Social Media Platforms Now Letting Users Display Pronouns

Corporate logos turned rainbow during this year's Pride Month, even as some of those same companies made hefty donations to anti-LQBTQ politicians. Instagram and LinkedIn now offer a profile section displaying users’ pronouns — will other platforms soon follow? Those stories and more on today's LGBTQ Roundtable. Guests: Grace Sterling Stowell — executive director of the Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth Janson Wu — executive director of GLAD - GLBTQ Legal Advocates and Defenders Sue O’Connell — political commentator at New England Cable News; co-publisher of Bay Windows and The South End News
6/14/202137 minutes, 14 seconds
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Encore: Celebrating Juneteenth In Boston

On Saturday, millions of people across America, including right here in Boston, will celebrate Juneteenth, first celebrated on June 19th, 1865. 156 years ago, the enslaved people in Texas found out they were free — two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. The event, which first had the most meaning for the people of Texas, has now become an observance that recognizes the history but also embraces the broader issue of the meaning of freedom today. Nearly every state in the country now recognizes the holiday, and this year, many employers gave staffers the day off. Guests: Barry Gaither — director and curator of the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists; special consultant for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Malia Lazu — lecturer at The MIT Sloan School of Management; former president of Epicenter Community Napoleon Jones-Henderson — visual artist; early member of historic African-American artist collective AfriCOBRA
6/13/202120 minutes, 38 seconds
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Book Club: 2021 Summer Reading Recommendations From Three Local Librarians

Flowers in full bloom, warm breezes, brilliant sunlight — nature offers us the flawless qualities of summer. And this summer, especially, we are eager to leave behind the ever-present blue light of our computer screens for the blue skies of New England’s shortest season. With vaccinations up and pandemic restrictions easing, we summer readers are ready to take our novels out for a day on the beach, explore literary adventures under the shade of a tree, or venture back into the nearest public library. And three of our local librarians are here with 2021’s best stories — from fantasy worlds to real-life social dilemmas — it’s our annual summer reading special. Guests: Susannah Borysthen-Tkacz — senior librarian at the Cambridge Public Library Robin Brenner — teen librarian at the Public Library of Brookline Veronica Koven-Matasy — reader services specialist at the Boston Public Library
6/8/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Pop Culture: Celebrity Cancel Culture, Pulling The Plug On Internet Explorer, And The Linda Lindas Challenge Racism Through Punk Rock

Hollywood celebrities are bouncing back from cancel culture with big film and TV offers. Plus, the plug is getting pulled on Internet Explorer, the internet browser we all loved to hate. And, teenage punk rock band The Linda Lindas hit back against anti-Asian racism with their viral song. Our experts discuss what’s happening in the world of pop culture. Guests: Michael Jeffries, dean of academic affairs and professor of American studies at Wellesley College Rachel Rubin, professor of American studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.
6/1/202133 minutes, 33 seconds
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Food and Wine: Home Bakeries, Non-Alcoholic Wines And A $5 Strawberry From Japan

Creamy, airy and aromatic — the $5 strawberry from Japan is doubly sweet. Home bakers made sourdough bread the "it" food during the pandemic. Now those homebound hobbyists have turned their doughy devotion into cupcakes for cash — with microbakeries popping up all over social media. And welcome to the world of wine proxies — beverages that look, feel and taste like wine, except they're not. Plus, California may have the nation's most storied wine trails, but Massachusetts is home to a variety of vineyards and wineries producing everything from heirloom New England apple cider to Champagne-like sparklers. Our food and wine experts are here with the latest trends. Guests: Jonathon Alsop — founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School, author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional” Amy Traverso — senior food editor at Yankee Magazine, cohost of GBH’s “Weekends with Yankee,” author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook”
6/1/202124 minutes, 18 seconds
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Environmental News: Super Pollutants Lurking In Your AC, Biden's Support For Electric Cars And Cape Cod Residents' Climate Dilemma

From its basketball team to its signature sunshine, Miami always brings the heat. But now that extreme heat is the norm, the city has hired a first of its kind, a 'Chief Heat Officer.' Millions rely on air conditioners to help beat the heat, but both air conditioners and refrigerators chill with the use of a super pollutant. Plus, will rising tides force the coastal residents of Cape Cod to move inland? Guests on our environmental roundtable: Beth Daley — editor and general manager of The Conversation, U.S. Cabell Eames — legislative manager at the Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate-action organization. Dr. Aaron Bernstein — interim director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.
5/24/202130 minutes, 56 seconds
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What's Behind The Rise In Suicides Among Black Youth?

This week will mark the one-year anniversary of George Floyd's murder by the recently convicted former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. And, Floyd’s death was followed by several high-profile acts of racism linked to trauma and measurable PTSD in communities of color. What role has the seemingly never-ending racial trauma played in the uptick of suicidal deaths among young African Americans? And shockingly, why are some mental health specialists surprised the rate of suicides isn’t higher? Guests: Dahyana Schlosser — Boston-based child and family therapist Dr. Rheeda Walker — professor at the University of Houston Department of Psychology, author of “The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health” Joseph Feaster Jr. — suicide loss survivor, council member at Samaritans, executive committee member at the National Association of Mental Health Boston If you or a loved one is considering suicide, please call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255.
5/24/202126 minutes, 55 seconds
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Mass Politics Profs: Biden Praises Baker For Pandemic Leadership

Critics complain about Gov. Baker’s handling of the COVID-19 crisis, but the Biden administration gives him high marks. Boston’s mayor’s race — the most diverse field ever — guarantees the city’s first nonwhite mayor. And Republican governors slash unemployment benefits, saying forcing people off the rolls will combat a labor shortage. We’re spending the full hour with the Mass Politics Profs. Guests: Erin O’Brien — associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston Rob DeLeo — associate professor of public policy at Bentley University Peter Ubertaccio — founding dean of the Thomas and Donna May School of Arts and Sciences, and associate professor of political science at Stonehill College SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and Angela Yang, and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
5/16/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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How To Celebrate Mother's Day During A Year Of Loss

This Mother's Day, Americans are predicted to spend about $28 billion to celebrate their mothers. But for those who've lost their mothers, this is a tough time emotionally, made worse by a season of grief from COVID-19 deaths. This is the second Mother's Day during the pandemic, but the first time many will be without Mom. In a year of so much loss — including of community, jobs and normalcy — the grief over losing a mother can be overwhelming. Guests: Hope Edelman — author of "Motherless Daughters: The Legacy of Loss" Lori Churchill — clinical social worker and therapist Later in the Show: Professional and amateur sports teams across the country have long adopted Native American imagery to represent their teams. That’s despite decades of objections by Native Americans and others claiming the mascots were offensive. As the ongoing debate heated up, many schools also removed or replaced their mascots. But, as two recent votes in Massachusetts demonstrate, not everybody supports the change. Guest: Jean-Luc Pierite — president of the North American Indian Center of Boston, member of the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Angela Yang and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
5/9/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Will Consumers Cut The Cord On Streaming Services?

First, it was the cable and satellite TV subscribers who started a movement by turning to the internet for entertainment. Streaming services got a big boost during the height of the COVID-19 lockdown as millions more Americans — desperate for distraction — willingly ponied up for paid subscriptions. Now, cable cord cutters find the streaming cord wrapped around their necks as they are strangled with rising subscription rates and extra fees. Will consumers walk away again? Guests: Alissa Wilkinson — film and culture reporter for Vox Kevin Westcott — vice chairman of Deloitte James “Jim” Willcox — senior electronics editor of Consumer Reports New Orleans natives are typically thought of as descendents of the Africans, French and Spanish who arrived on the Gulf Coast in the 17th century. But for nearly 50 years, the city has also been home to a community of Vietnamese immigrants who have added to its ethnic gumbo. Eric Nguyen gives us an intimate look at that community through the fictionalized lives of a mother and her sons in his debut novel, ”Things We Lost In the Water.” It's our May selection for Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club. Guest: Eric Nguyen — editor-in-chief of diaCRITICS Web Extra: Eric Nguyen On How His Novel Fits Into Context Of Anti-Asian Hate SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
5/2/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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LGBTQ News: Republican Legislatures, Religious Support, and Biden's CBP Nominee

More than a dozen Republican-controlled state legislatures have passed or are promoting bills targeting transgender youth, a new poll reveals that 75 percent of people of faith support protections against LGBTQ discrimination, and President Biden nominates the first openly-gay head of Customs and Border Protection. Those stories and more, on our LGBTQ news roundtable. Guests: Grace Sterling Stowell — executive director of the Boston Alliance of Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Youth, or BAGLY. E.J. Graff — journalist, author and managing editor of the "The Monkey Cage" at the Washington Post. Janson Wu — executive director of GLAD - GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders. Later in the Show: It’s been five years since April Reign kicked off the #OscarsSoWhite campaign, calling out the Academy Awards about overlooking top professionals of color in the entertainment industry. But tonight’s awards ceremony may turn out to be a banner year for long hoped for representation, including Steven Yeun the first ever Asian American nominated for best actor, and Chloe Zhao, the first Asian woman nominated for Best Director. And they are two among other nominees of color. Guests: Jenny Korn - research affiliate and founder and coordinator of the race, tech and media working group at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Elena Creef - professor of women’s and gender studies at Wellesley College. She specializes in Asian American visual history in photography, film and popular culture. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
4/25/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Why More Women Are Freezing Their Eggs

It’s too soon to know all the ways the COVID-19 pandemic reshaped our decisions about life and family, but, during the year of uncertainty, many women decided to protect their reproductive future by freezing their eggs. Just a little over a decade ago, egg freezing was considered an experimental procedure. Today, it's a common procedure millions of women choose each year. During the pandemic, the numbers of women electing to postpone pregnancy by freezing their eggs nearly doubled. Why? And will their choice have a broader impact long term? Guests: Nina Resetkova - reproductive endocrinologist at Boston IVF. John Petrozza - director of Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center. Nikki Richardson - former egg freezing patient. Later in the Show: During the early part of the pandemic, exercisers hiked and biked as an outdoor escape from the COVID lockdown. Bicycles—new and used—were in limited supply. Sales of the pricey and popular Peloton stationary bikes skyrocketed, and exercise consumers looking for less expensive options kept moving attending internet classes on body building, yoga and old-fashioned aerobics. Now, many are looking to expand their options with a different kind of digital exercise—virtual reality. Guests: Eric Malafeew - co-founder of VirZoom, the makers of VZfit a virtual reality exercise software. Andrea Cirelli - CEO and owner of 4XVR, a virtual reality gaming arcade. Amir Madmoune - Wheaton College student, who has used virtual reality games to lose weight. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
4/18/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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After Atlanta, Allyship And Community Are How We Move Forward

The advocacy group Stop AAPI Hate had already documented more than 3,000 anti-Asian incidents of racism before the Atlanta murders. Worse, the March 16 murders of eight spa workers - six of them Asian women - did not stem the tide of anti-Asian racist animus. Instead, the reported episodes of physical and verbal assaults spiked. Now, Asian Americans and allies are pushing for increased awareness and demanding legal protections. Is this recent spate of racist attacks against Asians, history repeating itself? And after years of xenophobia amplified by COVID 19, which way forward? Guests: Cecilia Lei – associate producer for Vox’s “Today, Explained,” and board president of the Asian American Journalists Association's San Francisco chapter. Janelle Wong – professor of American Studies and core faculty member in the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Maryland. Rev. Young Ghil Lee – senior pastor at The Korean Church of Boston. Later in the Show: How do the Americans who live in small towns and cities see the places they live? Thousands of residents eagerly answered that question, posed by award-winning Atlantic magazine journalist James Fallows. Fallows and his wife Deborah traveled across the country for five years, visiting with local residents. What the Fallows documented in their travels resulted in a 2019 book, “Our Towns: A 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America.” Eight of the towns and cities they highlighted in their book are featured in a new HBO documentary, called “Our Towns,” which premieres on HBO and HBO Max, on Tuesday, April 13, at 9 p.m. Guests: Steven Ascher and Jeanne Jordan - Academy Award-nominated filmmakers, who directed, produced, shot and edited Our Towns. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
4/11/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Regional News Roundtable: RI Insurer Backtracks, NH Bars Out-Of-State Student Vaccines, Vineyard Lighthouse Contaminates Park

This week, on our regional roundtable: In Rhode Island, public outrage over Blue Cross Blue Shield’s plan to charge patients for COVID-19 treatment; New Hampshire boots out of state college students from its vaccine program; and lead contamination revealed at the historic East Chop Lighthouse on Martha’s Vineyard stirs debate about clean up and pollution. Guests: Arnie Arnesen — host of The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen from WNHN. Ted Nesi — politics and business editor and investigative reporter for WPRI. George Brennan — news editor for The Martha’s Vineyard Times. Later in the Show: Danielle Geller’s mother was absent for most of her life; She didn’t really understand who she was until after her death. In her new memoir, Geller chronicles how her journey to know her mother led her to find herself. “Dog Flowers” is our April selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guest: Danielle Geller - author of “Dog Flowers,” her first book, which is available in bookstores and online now. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
4/4/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Latinx News: Border 'Crisis,' Chelsea Shortchanged, Few Latinos At Oscars

The situation at the southern border worsens, but the Biden administration resists calling it a crisis; Chelsea — one of the Massachusetts communities hit hardest by COVID — gets short-changed in the new COVID relief bill; and Latino entertainers are overlooked in this year’s Oscar nominations, again. It's our Latinx roundtable. Guests: Marcela Garcia – columnist for the Boston Globe Julio Ricardo Varela - editorial director at Futuro Media, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, and founder of Latino Rebels Update: After this segment was taped, Gov. Baker's administration announced it will direct $100 million to Chelsea, Randolph, Everett and Methuen. Later in the Show: It’s a difficult time for the restaurant industry. One estimate predicts a third of all restaurants will close due to the pandemic. But some businesses are changing their models and finding financial success. Plus, huge fast-food retailers are fighting, sometimes for scraps, over fried chicken. And some of the more innocuous but frightening side effects of COVID-19 are the loss of taste and smell. What does one have to do with the other? And how does it change our perception of food? Our food and wine experts weigh in on these stories and more, including Jonathon's wine recommendation. Guests: Jonathon Alsop - founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School and author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional.” Amy Traverso - food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of GBH’s “Weekends With Yankee” and author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.” SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
3/28/202157 minutes, 55 seconds
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How The Pandemic Is Challenging Our Understanding Of Poverty

The COVID-19 Pandemic pulled an estimated 8 million Americans into poverty. Millions lost jobs that kept them one paycheck away from becoming destitute, and many, like those who were formerly considered middle income, now patronize the food banks where they used to donate. There have always been poor people, but the pandemic has exposed some of the realities and conditions of poverty which are little seen and often misunderstood. In the wake of the pandemic, who is poor now? And what are the persistent myths about impoverished Americans that shape public attitudes and undermine potential policy solutions? Guests: Mark Rank - professor at Washington University in St. Louis, and lead-author of Poorly Understood: What America Gets Wrong About Poverty. Peter Edelman - faculty director of Georgetown University's Center on Poverty and Inequality and author of Not a Crime to Be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America. Caroline Koty - licensed clinical social worker and family mobility mentor at Economic Mobility Pathways – EMPath, in Boston. Later in the show: The Cambridge Women’s Center is marking its 50th anniversary, kicking off a yearlong celebration with 10 days of activities symbolizing the 10-day building takeover, back in 1971. The ten-day occupation, chronicled in the documentary Left on Pearl, led to the creation of the center and a legacy of advocacy for women. Guests: Rochelle Ruthchild - One of the founders of the Cambridge Women’s Center, its second president, and a producer of Left on Pearl. Judy Norris - full-time volunteer and chair of the Cambridge Women’s Center’s board of trustees. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
3/21/202157 minutes, 55 seconds
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Life After COVID? Futurists Discuss A Post-Pandemic World

It's been one year since Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker declared a state of emergency, sending most of us inside, and upending our lives in ways we couldn’t have imagined. On this sobering anniversary, Bay Staters are pausing to reflect on how living with COVID changed them. Universities and archivists are already curating last year’s memories and memorabilia for history, but how do experts who study the future assess how our lives have been changed? What will our world look like in the days and years post pandemic? The experts who study what’s to come are called futurists. These professionals look forward, weighing the immediate and long term impact of everyday events and huge crises, like COVID 19. Guests: Erica Orange - executive vice president and chief operating officer of The Future Hunters – based in New York. Alison Sander - director of Boston Consulting Group’s Center for Sensing & Mining the Future. Later in the show: Millions of Americans are documenting this past year of pandemic life in journals, diaries, and songs. In Cambridge, some residents gave voice to their experiences in a unique way - capturing this period in their lives in a play produced by the Multicultural Arts Center, “Cambridge: Our Town Our Stories.” Created in the style of Thornton Wilder’s 1938 classic drama, “Our Town,” which explores the fictional experiences of everyday small town living, Cambridge's version is based on the experiences of residents during a year of global pandemic. No fiction here, theirs are authentic reflections of a scary and uncertain time. Guests: Ken Field - Cambridge-based saxophonist Theodora Skeadas - director of small business advocacy for the nonprofit Cambridge Local First Jeff Robinson - musician and web developer. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
3/14/202157 minutes, 52 seconds
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Pop Culture: Streaming Premieres, Allen V. Farrow, And Dolly Parton

Will one studio’s decision to stream all of its movies right away be a final blow for struggling movie theaters? Plus, HBO’s Allen vs. Farrow the dramatic telling of the sexual abuse charges against famed Hollywood director Woody Allen brought by his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow. And Dolly Parton’s new role as vaccine ambassador. Those stories and more in our Pop Culture Roundtable. Guests: Michael Jeffries - Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of American Studies at Wellesley College. Rachel Rubin - Professor of American Studies at University of Massachusetts Boston. Later in the show: Just in time for Women’s History Month, a new book tracing the history of feminism. Author Koa Beck argues that feminism, as many may think of it, is not a grassroots movement working for societal change as it is as much as it is a brand with a corporate focus. In “White Feminism: From the Suffragettes to Influencers and Who They Leave Behind,” Beck deconstructs the most well-known American movement for gender parity. “White Feminism” is our March selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guests: Koa Beck - Former editor-in-chief of Jezebel, executive editor of Vogue.com, senior features editor at MarieClaire.com and co-host of “The #MeToo Memos” on WNYC’s The Takeaway. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our Intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
3/7/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Local News: Boston City Council Race, Subletters' Legal Limbo And Work After The Pandemic

With several Boston city councilors eyeing the mayor’s office, contenders are gathering support to fill their soon-to-be-empty seats. Plus, as the April deadline of the CDC’s eviction moratorium closes in, subletters find themselves stuck in the legal margins. And Gov. Baker’s administration plans a study to re-imagine work after the pandemic. Those stories and more in our Local News Roundtable. Guests: Gin Dumcius - digital editor for the Boston Business Journal. Seth Daniel - senior reporter with the Independent News Group, which includes the Chelsea Record and Revere Journal. Sue O'Connell - political commentator for NECN and co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News. Later in the show: Across pop culture and sports, there’s a resurgence of posthumus recognition for Jean-Michel Basquiat, the graffiti artist turned Manhattan art scene sensation. The work of the Afro-Latino artist and his influence on today’s hip hop culture is highlighted in a new exhibition at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts called “Writing the Future: Jean-Michel Basquiat and the Hip Hop Generation.” Guests: Greg Tate- writer, musician, and co-curator of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston’s exhibition. Jordana Moore Saggese- associate professor of American art at the University of Maryland, College Park and author of ‘Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art.’ Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman and Gary Mott. Angela Yang is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
2/28/202157 minutes, 52 seconds
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An Experimental Food Program Struggles To Help Boston's Hardest Hit Community

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to illuminate the glaring inequalities that already existed in Massachusetts. Rising unemployment has made things worse for families already stretched thin. Especially in Chelsea, one of the state’s poorest cities, where the COVID-19 rate of spread is the highest in the state. Since the pandemic began, families have especially struggled to have enough food. But, for some Chelsea residents – participants in an experimental program – the last couple months have been easier. Could it be a long-term solution for food insecurity? Guests: Gladys Vega, Executive Director of La Colaborativa food pantry and community center, in Chelsea. Laura Gee, Associate Professor of Economics at Tufts University. Later in the show: They are in the parks, or going door-to-door – at a safe distance – distributing information about counteracting the spread of COVID-19. They are members of the Cambridge Community Corps – part of a new pilot program based on Clinton’s AmeriCorps. Guests: Claude Jacob, Chief Public Health Officer for the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Antonio Horatius, Cambridge Corps member. Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Wes Martin and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
2/21/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Environmental News: The Next Pandemic, Boston Subways And Rejoining The Paris Agreement

Even as the national vaccine rollout inoculates Americans against COVID-19, climate change is already fueling the next wave of global pandemics. A new study raises concerns over the air quality of Boston subways. Plus, the Biden administration rejoins the Paris Climate Agreement. Those stories and more in our environmental roundtable. Guests: Beth Daley - Editor and General Manager at The Conversation, U.S. Dr. Aaron Bernstein - Interim Director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School Cabell Eames - Legislative Manager at the Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate-action organization Later in the show: Harriet Tubman never lost a passenger on the Underground Railroad, the secret network of people and places that helped enslaved people escape to freedom. She spent time in New England and Boston, specifically, where several Underground Railroad stations were located. There are 650 Underground Railroad sites across the country, and 12 newly designated by the National Park Service. One of the new stations is right here in Edgartown, Massachusetts, the first and only on Martha’s Vineyard. Guests: Elaine Weintraub, Historian and Co-Founder of the Martha's Vineyard African American Heritage Trail L’Merchie Frazier — Director of Education and Interpretation at the Museum of African American History, Boston SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and Wes Martin, and engineered by Dave Goodman. Angela Yang is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
2/21/202157 minutes, 52 seconds
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LGBTQ News: Biden's Executive Order, Buttigieg's Confirmation, Companies Improve Workplace Equality

President Biden makes good on a campaign promise, issuing an executive order banning discrimination of sexual orientation and gender identity. Correcting the record on the historic importance of newly confirmed and openly gay Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. Plus, the Human Rights Campaign highlights recent dramatic strides towards workplace equality. Those stories and more on our LGBTQ News Round Table. Guests: Grace Sterling Stowell — executive director of the Boston Alliance of Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Youth, or BAGLY. E.J. Graff — Journalist, author and managing editor of the "The Monkey Cage" at the Washington Post. Janson Wu — executive director of GLAD GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders. Later in the show: At first glance, Mama, Ella and Kevin seem to live in a here and now achingly familiar to a number of Black families. But very quickly, "Riot Baby" reveals itself to be a time-traversing tale of the future infused with the frustration and rage linked to incidents of the recent past. Author Tochi Onybuchi takes readers on the journey of siblings navigating their past, current and future worlds. "Riot Baby" is our February selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club." Guest: Tochi Onyebuchi — author of Riot Baby, his first adult novel, which is available in bookstores and online now.
2/9/202157 minutes, 53 seconds
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Latinx News: Presidential Inauguration Spotlights Latinas, Prioritizing COVID-19 Vaccines For Immigrant Communities, And Rising Latino Leaders

Latinas shared the spotlight at last week's presidential inauguration - with Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor swearing in Vice President Kamala Harris followed by Jennifer Lopez’s bilingual medley of patriotic songs. Here in Massachusetts, demands for Governor Charlie Baker to prioritize COVID-19 vaccinations for Latino communities, where the virus is widespread. And local Latinx leaders see opportunities in open positions for state rep and Boston mayor. That and more on our Latinx roundtable. Guests: Julio Ricardo Varela, digital editor for the Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, and founder of Latino Rebels. And Marcela Garcia, editorial writer, columnist, and board member at the Boston Globe. Later in the show: Glory, a word that radiates magnificence, is exactly what photographers Kahran and Regis Bethencourt wanted to depict in their new book, "GLORY: Magical Visions of Black Beauty." The book, a collection of more than 100 photos of Black children from around the world, shatters traditional standards of beauty and showcases multiple expressions of Black hair and Black beauty. It comes at a time when the nation is grappling with issues of race and racism. The husband and wife duo behind "GLORY" say they hope the images and essays in the book will help Black children to celebrate themselves and other non-Black readers to see the versatility and power of Black beauty. Guests: Kahran and Regis Bethencourt, photographers and the owners of CreativeSoul Photography, in Atlanta, Georgia, and authors of "GLORY: Magical Visions of Black Beauty." Shanna Thomasson, owner and hairstylist at Red Mystique Art in Atlanta, who styled the cover and other work in “GLORY.” SHOW OUTRO Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
1/24/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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How Boston Set The Stage For A 'Legacy Of Love' Between Martin Luther King Jr. And Coretta Scott King

They were just two of the thousands of students who each year arrive in Boston for college. He, the heir to a historic ministry, she the poor small-town girl with big music dreams. In 1950s Boston, Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott met and fell in love in what became the early stages of a lifelong commitment to each other and to the civil rights movement. Their Boston story is captured in the documentary film, "Legacy of Love.” Guests: Roberto Mighty, writer, producer, and director of "Legacy of Love." Reverend Walter Fluker, the Martin Luther King Jr. Professor Emeritus at Boston University. "Legacy of Love" will re-broadcast on Thursday, January 21st at 10:30pm on GBH 2. LATER IN THE SHOW: The Montgomery Bus Boycott catapulted the young Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to leadership in the civil rights movement. History and fate linked him to Rosa Parks and to local civil rights advocates the Gray brothers — attorney Fred Gray and activist Thomas Gray. Now, niece and daughter Karen Gray Houston profiles her family’s involvement in the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the movement that changed America. “Daughter of the Boycott: Carrying on a Montgomery Family's Civil Rights Legacy” is our January selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” This was a labor of love for author Karen Gray Houston, a retired Washington, D.C. WTTG-TV reporter, who got her start in Boston working for United Press International. SHOW OUTRO Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
1/18/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Politics: Georgia's Historic Election, Aftermath Of Pro-Trump Insurrection, And Boston Mayor Tapped By Biden

A note to our listeners: We taped this segment hours before Boston Mayor Marty Walsh was tapped by President-elect Joe Biden to lead the U.S. Department of Labor. There are just days to go before President-elect Joe Biden takes the oath of office, as the country continues to navigate political upheavals from Georgia to Washington, D.C. What's the fallout from a historic Senate election and a sitting president's overt campaign to overthrow certified election results? And locally, state lawmakers are calling a Massachusetts climate bill the strongest measure of its kind in the country. We discuss these stories and more in our politics roundtable. Guests: Erin O’Brien is an associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Luis Jiménez is an assistant professor of political science at University of Massachusetts, Boston. Shannon Jenkins is the interim assistant dean of the college of arts and sciences at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and professor of political science. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
1/11/202157 minutes, 54 seconds
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Encore: Kimberlé Crenshaw On The Importance Of Intersectionality

This is a special encore edition of Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. This segment originally aired on October 15, 2017. Intersectionality may be a buzz word in the news, personal essays and protest marches now, but it wasn’t a well-known concept until scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw developed and presented the theory in the 1980s. Crenshaw is a leading scholar in the fields of critical race theory and women’s studies, and a law professor at UCLA and Columbia University. As a result of the excellence of her work, Crenshaw was awarded the 2017 Gittler Prize from Brandeis University, which is granted to scholars whose work makes a lasting contribution to racial, ethnic or religious relations. This is the latest of Crenshaw's awards and honors which include a fellowship at Stanford, two professor of the year awards at UCLA, a spot on Ebony's Power 100 and the number one spot on Ms. magazine's feminist heroes of 2015. In our conversation 3 years ago Crenshaw explained her theory of intersectionality, and how has it evolved and grown outside of the scholastic world. Later in the show: This is a special encore edition of Under the Radar with Callie Crossley. This segment originally aired on June 19, 2020. In Black families, it’s known as “The Talk” — the discussion Black parents have with their kids about what to do should they end up in an interaction with a police officer. "The Talk" took on a new poignancy in 2020 on Father’s Day as the nation mourned George Floyd, killed at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, and demonstrators protested the police killings of unarmed black men. Guests: Emmett G. Price III, professor of worship, church and culture, and founding executive director of the Institute for the Study of the Black Christian Experience at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Matt Prestbury, founder of the Black Fathers Foundation, creator of the Black Fathers Facebook group, and educator in the Howard County public school system. Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
12/30/202057 minutes, 53 seconds
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Calamity Claus: Our Annual Review Of Quirky Holiday Songs

It's our annual spinning of holiday tunes with our own Mike Wilkins, radio engineer for PRX's and GBH's "The World." All this hour, GBH’s intrepid holiday music collector shares his new finds of old songs that are quirky, weird, and just a little bit extra. These are not the traditional carols from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, or even new traditional favorites like Mariah Carey’s "All I Want For Christmas Is You." Nope, for his annual collection of songs you never heard of, Wilkins has once again rescued vinyl one-hit-wonders from the forgotten bins of overlooked B-sides, and highlighted a few new tunes that might become classics. And this season — his 31st year of Jinglebell melodies — Wilkins' collection gives a nod to 2020’s overwhelming impact. Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
12/21/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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Successes And Shortcomings: 30 Years Of The Americans With Disabilities Act

Thirty years ago, East and West Germany reunited after the fall of the Soviet Union. It was 1990, the same year The World Wide Web debuted, plus singer Mariah Carey’s blockbuster hit, "Vision of Love," kicked off her career. And President George H.W. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) banning discrimination against millions of Americans in education, transportation, and public accommodations. Three decades later, the 1 in 4 adult Americans with disabilities have benefitted from the ADA’s protections. But the benefits are being threatened by the wide-ranging impact of COVID-19, and by the ever-widening inequities in health care and employment. In this 30th anniversary year of the passage of the ADA, the disability rights movement looks back to the bill’s legacy and ahead to new challenges. Guests: Kristen McCosh, commissioner of the Disabilities Commission for the City of Boston. Michael Stein, executive director of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability and visiting professor at Harvard Law School. Jeffrey Yasuo Mansfield, design director at MASS Design Group and a Disability Futures Fellow. Plus, American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter, Aaron Wegehaupt, joined to facilitate communication between everyone. Later in the show: This is the time of good cheer and goodwill towards all — the season of giving. 75 percent of Americans say they give to charities during December, but more of them are choosing to give directly to individuals. And the pandemic has disrupted the way charities connect with donors. Blame COVID-19 for this year’s smaller number of Salvation Army red kettle bell ringers. Now, at a time when the need is at historic levels, charities are at risk of losing the nearly one third of their annual donations, traditionally collected this month. What’s more, 2020 has changed how giving happens, who donors give to, and reshaped the reasons why they give. Guests: Bobby Whithorne, director of North America Communications for GoFundMe, an American for-profit crowdfunding platform. Laura Gee, behavioral economist and associate professor of economics at Tufts University. Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
12/21/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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Saving Bookstores: How Independent Shops Cope Against COVID And E-Commerce Giants

A special one-hour edition of Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club. Today, 'Saving Bookstores.' When COVID-19 forced shutdowns in March, independent bookstores saw an immediate 8 percent overall drop in book sales from last year. But soon Americans returned to reading and buying books. However, some bookstores were forced to close before they could benefit from the uptick in sales. Others are still struggling to recover - scrambling to adapt so they can live to fight another day. Hundreds of independent bookstores have closed their doors for good - one a week according to a recent survey by the American Booksellers Association. But some local bookstores are making it work. We talk to three local independent bookstore owners, during Part One of the show. Guests: Christina Ciampa, owner of the All She Wrote Books in Somerville, Mass. Kate Layte, owner of Papercuts Bookshop in Boston, Mass. Matt Tannenbaum, owner of The Bookstore in Lenox, Mass. And featuring Leonard and Clarrissa Egerton, the husband and wife owners of Roxbury’s Frugal Bookstore, the only Black-owned bookstore in Boston, Mass. Later in the show: Maybe you’ve seen the national ad campaign called “Don’t Box Out Bookstores.” It’s an effort by the American Booksellers Association to encourage book lovers and bookstore supporters to buy independent, especially this holiday season. Earlier in the show, we heard from three local bookstore owners about how they are managing to survive. Now two guests who are working toward the long-term existence of independent bookstores. Guests: Alex Meriweather, general manager of the Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, Mass. Sarah High, partnerships manager of Bookshop.org, a new national organization a bringing together bookstores across the country. Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
12/21/202057 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Legacy Of Tunney Lee: Preserving The History Of Boston's Chinatown

Boston’s Chinatown lost a pillar of its community this summer. MIT professor emeritus Tunney Lee, an urban planner, architect, and historian died in July of complications from cancer. Lee immigrated from China in 1938 at the age of seven. He spent his life shaping the growth of his Boston neighborhood, always working to preserve its history with an eye toward the future. Tunney Lee's research focused on community-based design and engagement. His Boston Chinatown Atlas, an interactive online platform, documents the history of Boston's Chinatown. Urban planners and historians say the Atlas is a one-of-a-kind project which will teach new generations about their city’s history. Guests: Angie Liou, executive director of the Asian Community Development Corporation. Brent D. Ryan, head of the City Design and Development Group, and associate professor of Urban Design and Public Policy in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Stephanie Fan, founding board member of the Chinese Historical Society of New England. Later in the show: As the cold weather sets in, we’re welcoming a winter wonderland of wines. But the wine world has also turned sour, as master sommeliers face their own "Me Too" movement. Plus, fall food trends are abundant for foodies this season, everything from avocado milk to a recent spice boom. Our food and wine experts weigh in on these stories and more. Guests: Jonathon Alsop, founder and executive director of the Boston Wine School and author of “The Wine Lover’s Devotional.” Amy Traverso, food editor at Yankee Magazine, co-host of GBH’s “Weekends With Yankee” and author of “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.” Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
12/21/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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Local News: Adapting To All-Remote Learning, COVID Cases Spike In State, And Massachusetts' Most Diverse High Court

Schools shift back to fully-remote learning in Boston, while parents and teachers seek innovative solutions. Plus, COVID-19 cases continue to spike in the state, further straining healthcare staffing levels. And for the first time ever, three jurists of color will soon serve on the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. These stories and more in our Local News Roundtable. Guests: Gin Dumcius, digital editor for the Boston Business Journal. Seth Daniel, senior reporter with the Independent News Group, which includes the Chelsea Record and Revere Journal. Sue O’Connell, political commentator for NECN and co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News. Later in the show: Boston is known for its history, but the people most well-known froim that history are largely white and male — think Samuel Adams, Paul Revere and Henry David Thoreau. Some of that has changed during recent decades as Boston's all Black 54th regiment, for example, has helped highlight the area's African American history. Still, most Boston guidebooks will lead you to the Freedom Trail, and past sites where events like the Boston Tea Party occurred. But is there more to know beyond these well-told narratives? Three local co-authors present a new guidebook, one that offers an expanded history to the region. ‘A People’s Guide to Greater Boston,’ features sites associated with oppression and resistance, focusing on the overlooked stories of underrepresented communities. Guests: Joseph Nevins is a professor of geography at Vassar College. Suren Moodliar is a coordinator of encuentro5, a movement-building space in downtown Boston, and managing editor of Socialism and Democracy, a journal of strategy. Eleni Macrakis is a project manager at Homeowners Rehab Inc. (HRI), a non-profit affordable housing developer in Cambridge, MA. Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
12/21/202057 minutes, 53 seconds
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Local Food Groups Confront Heightened Hunger Crisis Amid Coronavirus

One million people now face hunger in Massachusetts. Coronavirus has forced a huge increase across the state of residents who don't know where or how they will get their next meal. Worse, the non-profit Feeding America reports that the increased percentage of hungry Bay Staters is greater than any other in the nation. While the pandemic fuels unemployment, more people than ever join lengthening food pantry lines, many for the first time. Children and people of color are affected disproportionally. Meanwhile, a federal response remains stalled. How have hunger organizations coped with the challenge of increased demand for food? Three groups from the region talk to us about how they’ve multiplied their efforts. Guests: Erin McAleer, president of Project Bread in Massachusetts, the state's only anti-hunger organization. Andrew Schiff, chief executive officer of the Rhode Island Community Food Bank. Ashley Stanley, founder and executive director of Lovin’ Spoonfuls, the largest food rescue agency in New England. Later in the show: Dogs have been used for decades to detect disease in humans. Their notable noses — which can sense cancer, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, seizures, and more — have long impressed scientists and medical experts around the world. And now these super sniffers are being trained to smell COVID-19, even in asymptomatic carriers. Can man’s best friend help sniff our way out of the pandemic? Guest: Maria Goodavage, journalist and bestselling author, most recently of “Doctor Dogs: How Our Best Friends Are Becoming Our Best Medicine.” Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
12/21/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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Politics: 2020 Election Outcomes, Youth And Minority Voter Power, And Problems With Polling

We still don’t know who will be the next president of the United States. And it appears the outcome will remain uncertain as ballot counters in battleground states continue to work through counting the votes. Meanwhile Americans on opposing sides are issuing clarion calls from the street demanding that every vote be counted or that the vote counting stop entirely. President Donald Trump is suing states with slim margins and has demanded a recount in Wisconsin. Americans wait as the world watches. When will we know for sure who the winner is? It’s a full hour of insight and analysis from the Mass Politics Profs. Guests: Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Luis Jimenez, assistant professor of political science at University of Massachusetts, Boston. Jerold Duquette, associate professor of political science at Central Connecticut State University. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Kate Dario is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
11/13/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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Vandalized Signs Don't Stop BLM Supporters From Taking A Public Stance On Private Property

By now you've probably seen them, the signs — large, small, colorful or simply black and white — with the words "Black Lives Matter." They've become a familiar sight since the wave of Black Lives Matter street protests after George Floyd was killed by a now-former Minneapolis police officer. Since then, Americans, some who never protested before, have signaled their support for antiracism efforts by displaying Black Lives Matter signs on their lawn, in store windows, and as banners on churches and community buildings. But there's also been an angry response to the displays, with many incidents of stolen or vandalized Black Lives Matter yard signs and banners, often accompanied with sinister messages. What has inspired white people, particularly, to post ‘Black Lives Matter’ signs on their property in the first place? And how have some of these local residents responded to the vandalism? Guests: Emma Hollander, managing partner of Trina’s Starlite Lounge in Somerville. Andrea Markarian Jones, World language teacher at Malden Public Schools. Melanie Brown, software developer and member of the Arlington Human Rights Commission. Later in the show - Book Club: 'Leave It As It Is: A Journey Through Theodore Roosevelt’s American Wilderness' For the last eight months, Americans have found solace from the limitations of COVID-19 in the outdoors. Many of them enjoy a new appreciation for the country’s variety of national parks and monuments. But, it’s fair to say that most may not know they owe a great debt to the nature loving American President Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt. Or that his life’s work to preserve public lands is the foundation of today’s environmental movement. Author David Gessner details this legacy in his book, “Leave It As It Is: A Journey Through Theodore Roosevelt’s American Wilderness.” It’s our November selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club.” Guest: David Gessner — professor and department chair at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He’s written eleven books, including the New York Times bestselling “All the Wild That Remains” and “My Green Manifesto: Down the Charles River in Pursuit of a New Environmentalism.” SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Kate Dario is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
11/13/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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LGBTQ News: Activists Alarmed By Supreme Court Nominee, Pope Francis' Civil Union Support, And Bisexuality Redefined

LGBTQ rights advocates protest ultraconservative Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett. Plus, Pope Francis’ vocal support for civil union laws for same-sex couples sparks an international reaction. And the Merriam Webster dictionary updates the definition of bisexuality. Those stories and more on our LGBTQ News Roundtable. Guests: Grace Sterling Stowell, executive director of the Boston Alliance of Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Youth, or BAGLY. E.J. Graff, journalist, author, and managing editor of ‘The Monkey Cage’ at the Washington Post. Janson Wu, executive director of GLAD, G-L-B-T-Q Legal Advocates & Defenders.  LATER IN THE SHOW: More than six months into the pandemic, the U.S. is still in a coronavirus-induced recession. But one industry, the alcoholic beverage market, has been toasting its recent record-breaking sales. Numbers show that people are cracking open lighter, more affordable beers during this time — those easily bought in cases. Light beers are brewed in the world’s most popular beer style, pilsner, called the 'beer of kings'. But why is this pale lager the best-selling alcoholic beverage of all time? And is there another beer or alcoholic beverage which can usurp pilsner’s throne? Guest: Tom Acitelli, author of "The Audacity of Hops," "American Wine," "Whiskey Business," and most recently, "Pilsner: How the Beer of Kings Changed the World." SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Kate Dario is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
10/26/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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Preserving The Present: Efforts To Archive Ongoing BLM Protests

Historians call it ephemera: the ticket stubs and posters that often are just thrown away or put in scrapbooks. But there are times when the humble handmade sign becomes more than a personal memory — it becomes documentary evidence of a special moment in time. That’s why Smithsonian archivists started collecting the handmade posters and other materials especially created for the street protests following the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd. Why is it important to collect this protest art? And what is its historic meaning? Guests: Aaron Bryant, museum curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Steven Booth, archivist with the U.S. National Archives, and member of ‘The Blackivists’ a collective of trained Black archivists who prioritize Black cultural heritage preservation. Alessandra Renzi, associate professor of communication studies at Concordia University, who spearheaded ‘The Art of the March’ initiative at Northeastern University - a digital archive of the 2017 Boston Women’s March. LATER IN THE SHOW: “See Yourself in STEM” — That’s the theme of the Massachusetts third annual STEM Week, which kicks off Oct. 19. The theme zeroes in on the need to reach out to women of color. Just 4 percent of scientists and engineers in the U.S. are Black or Hispanic women, according to a 2015 report by the National Science Foundation. For 25 years, the Science Club for Girls has aimed to expose and engage young women of color by providing free experiential science programming in Cambridge. They’ve had great success: 100% of the girls, who mostly come from underrepresented communities, have gone on to college. In addition to the Science Club, 26 Boston public high school seniors have won the inaugural Paula S. Apsell Scholarship, which is co-sponsored by GBH. These scholarship winners plan to study in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Both efforts hope to empower young women, especially, who still represent a tiny percentage of the 600,000 Massachusetts residents who work in STEM. Guests: Christina Exilhomme, Freshman at Northeastern University on the pre-med track, and one of the winners of The Paula S. Apsell | GBH STEM Boston Public School Scholarship. Kaelyn Brown, Co-director of the Science Club for Girls Harvard Mentor chapter, and senior at Harvard majoring in neuroscience. Alejandra Carvajal, Science Club for Girls’ Governance Chair on the Board of Directors and Chief Legal Officer forMomenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in Cambridge. SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Kate Dario is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
10/26/202057 minutes, 53 seconds
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Environmental News: Boston Scores High Marks For Clean Energy, Roxbury Fights For Its Trees, And New England's Wildfire Risk

New York City and Boston get gold stars for topping this year’s City Clean Energy Scorecard. But even their high marks show great room for improvement. Plus, fires in California are devastating the state, and officials say there’s also a risk for fires here in New England. And, a Boston neighborhood fights for its trees: how a boulevard redesign threatens to intensify the damaging environmental impact. Guests: Beth Daley - Editor and general manager at The Conversation, U.S. Dr. Aaron Bernstein - Interim director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School Cabell Eames - Legislative manager at the Better Future Project, a Massachusetts-based grassroots climate-action organization Later in the show: Cars are getting political this year, and what's under the hood is at the center of a contentious debate about Question 1 on the Massachusetts ballot. The proposal would update the commonwealth's original "Right to Repair" law, which was passed by a voter referendum in 2012. It would mandate that independent vehicle repair shops have the same access to wirelessly transmitted vehicle data that automakers have. Supporters say a "Yes" vote on Question 1 guarantees that independent auto repair shops will not be cut off from the new wireless technology known as 'telematics' and shut out of the market. Supporters of a 'No' vote on Question 1 say greater access to this data could pave the way for malicious cyberattacks and tampering of personal data. Guests: Conor Yunits is a spokesperson for the “No on 1” campaign and Coalition for Safe and Secure Data. Tommy Hickey is the director of the “Yes on 1” campaign and Right to Repair Committee.  Show Credits: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of WGBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Kate Dario is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
10/12/202057 minutes, 54 seconds
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Latinx News: How To Win The Hispanic Vote, The Debate Around Ethnic ID 'Latinx,' And Growing Latino Representation In Children's Books

The first presidential debate is over, but not the determined battle to win the Latino vote. Or is it the Hispanic vote? Or the Latinx vote, the ethnic identification used by most media? Our Latinx Roundtable guests weigh in on the identity label debate. Plus, from "The Land of the Cranes" to "My Papi Rides a Motorcyle", Latino representation in children's books is expanding because of the focused efforts of several artist and writer groups. Guests: Julio Ricardo Varela, digital editor for the Futuro Media Group, co-host of the “In The Thick” podcast, and founder of Latino Rebels. Adriana Maestas, a Southern California-based freelance writer covering Latino politics. LATER IN THE SHOW: Natasha Trethewey’s mother was murdered by her former stepfather, a tragedy that upended her world at the age of 19. For years she had no words to express the depth of her loss and grief. Until she decided to write the story that had long haunted her. 'Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir', her memoir, is our October selection for “Bookmarked: The Under the Radar Book Club” and the kickoff conversation for this year’s virtual Boston Book Festival. Guest: Author and poet Natasha Trethewey is a former U.S. Poet Laurate. She’s written 5 collections of poetry including, “Native Guard,” which won the Pultizer Prize. She is also the author of the nonfiction book, “Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf.” SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and engineered by Dave Goodman. Kate Dario is our intern. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys’, Grace Kelly and Leo P.
10/4/202057 minutes, 53 seconds
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A 2020 Roundup Of Asian Representation In Film And TV

The animated 1998 film Mulan remains one of Disney's all time greatest hits. Fans greeted Disney’s announcement of a live-action reboot starring an all Asian cast with great excitement. But COVID-19 forced the film from the big screen to Disney streaming, and the film’s recent debut sparked controversy both here and in China. At a time when Asian Americans are being attacked publicly — and being erroneously blamed for the coronavirus — 2020 has been fertile ground for significant growth in Asian themed feature films and TV programs, with independent films helmed by Asian directors and Asian actors in lead roles. What is the power of this expansion of representation? And does it especially matter in this moment? Guests: Elena Creef, professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Wellesley College. She specializes in Asian American visual history in photography, film and popular culture. Jenny Korn