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True Crime New Zealand (NZ)

English, Social, 1 season, 68 episodes, 1 day, 7 hours, 57 minutes
About
True Crime New Zealand is a kiwi based true crime podcast. It is storytelling based with no opinion, just facts. We are trying to give the big picture of these crimes with context as well as investigating what happened subsequently and how the crime affected the wider community of NZ. www.truecrimenz.com
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Case 35: The RSA Murders

The Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association, better known simply as the RSA was first established in New Zealand on the 28th of April 1916 by veteran of the First World War Donald Simson. The RSA is a registered charity that raises money to “provide support and comfort for service men and women and their families”. In 1921, the RSA successfully campaigned for ANZAC Day (the 25th of April) to become a public holiday. However, there is one dark, horrifying moment in the history of the RSA, that would see the organisation the victim of one of the most cruel and depraved acts of violence in NZ’s history. This savage, vicious crime took place only seventeen days before Christmas in December 2001 and resulted in the longest prison sentence in the annals of New Zealand. The events of that day went down in history as The RSA Murders. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
1/18/202441 minutes, 17 seconds
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TALES II: Bloody Friday

On the 9th of June 1978, natives of the Southland city of Invercargill in the South Island of New Zealand were treated to a curious sight, 1,300 ewes (female sheep) wandering confused around Invercargill’s main shopping district. The confused sheep created chaos as they dashed across roads making traffic come to a standstill, chewed on the local shrubbery and ran into shops looking for safety. But why was this happening? Who set these poor critters loose? Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
10/10/202319 minutes, 8 seconds
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INVESTIGATES III: Psychopathy

Psychopathy is no longer a diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as of the third edition. Rather the diagnosis would be antisocial personality disorder with psychopathic traits. These psychopathic traits are characterised by “a lack of anxiety or fear and by a bold interpersonal style that may mask maladaptive behaviours”, e.g. not adjusting adequately or appropriately to certain environments or situations. Psychopathic traits are assessed using a variety of measurement tools, most famously Robert D. Hare’s Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R), brought to the mainstream by author Jon Ronson in his book The Psychopath Test. Dr Hare’s checklist is a list of 20 traits which the assessed is scored on a three-point scale, for example, item 6 is lack of remorse or guilt and the recipient is assessed, giving a grade of 0 for no match, 1 for a partial match or 2 for a good match. If someone scores above 30 on the checklist, they are considered to have psychopathic traits, for instance, serial killer/serial rapist Ted Bundy was evaluated at 39/40. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
7/15/202334 minutes, 37 seconds
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Case 34: Phyllis Symons

HATAITAI. WELLINGTON. Construction on, what would become, Mount Victoria Tunnel began in December 1929 and was estimated to take 15 months and cost around £132,000 (approximately $16,000,000 today). Two teams of diggers began on each side of the mountain and began tunnelling through. The initial breakthrough occurred on the 31st of May 1930, six months into construction. Construction of the tunnel continued into the next year. However, sometime in early July 1931, construction on the tunnel was halted. The workers were contacted by police to cease work on the project.  Over the next three days, over 100 police and relief workers sifted through over 2,000 tons of rock and soil from the excavation. They were searching for something, but what were they searching for, who were they searching for? Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
6/2/202328 minutes, 8 seconds
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Case 33: Waikino School Shooting

WAIKINO. WAIKATO. 19th of October 1923. 10 am. The Headmaster of Waikino School Robert Theodore Reid was in the teacher's room, perhaps going over some reports, perhaps grading some papers. The classrooms were full of children, maybe learning English, a bit of maths, or even history and undoubtedly looking forward to the morning break only half an hour away.  The Headmaster Robert Reid had brought his dog Pax (a brown and white setter) with him to work, as he had done many times before. Pax spent the day in the school’s front yard, presumably sleeping most of the daylight away, as Pax seldom made a fuss. However, as the clock ticked over to 10.10 am, Pax began barking loudly. Curious about what had caught the canine’s attention, Robert arose from his desk and wandered through the entrance to the front door. He opened the door to see a man in his 50s, 6 feet tall, tanned and sporting a small moustache approaching the school. As the man got closer to the entrance he announced his hideous intentions to Headmaster Robert Reid, “I’m here for revenge!”. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
3/3/202332 minutes, 2 seconds
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Case 32: The Newlands Baby Farmer (PART II)

NEWLANDS. WELLINGTON. Hugo Lupi was born sometime in the late 1800s possibly in Cairo, Egypt, to an Italian family. Hugo immigrated to New Zealand in 1912 and eventually settled in the South Island city of Dunedin. While in the Land of the Long White Cloud, Hugo became a sailor, before giving up the sea life to become a pie-shop proprietor. Hugo Lupi was married, it is unclear when exactly he ‘tied the knot’ but it is probable it was sometime after he arrived in New Zealand in 1912 as it would seem he had his first child to his wife in the late 1910s. However, Hugo began employing a woman by the name of Lily Lister sometime around Christmas 1921. The twosome began an affair.  In April 1922, Hugo Lupi left Dunedin and moved to the Wellington suburb of Island Bay with his wife and children, leaving his mistress behind. It would seem that Hugo found employment as a fisherman in the new location but also did some carpentry work on the side. This is where he met a man who would become important to his life. Hugo had helped the man build a house in Island Bay sometime between April and June of 1922. Hugo received no payment for his help as it was understood that the man would help him build his own home at a later date as compensation. This is where Hugo got to know the man a little bit, including that he ran a specialist health business that ‘helped’ women ‘in the family way’. In June 1922, Lily Lister joined Hugo in Wellington where he found her a job at a cafe on Willis Street in central Wellington. Although, Hugo was surprised to find out she was also approximately four months pregnant with his child. This is when Hugo Lupi remembered the man he helped build the house with earlier in the year, the man with the specialist business in helping women ‘up the duff’, Daniel Richard Cooper. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
1/11/202336 minutes, 8 seconds
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Case 32: The Newlands Baby Farmer (PART I)

NEWLANDS. WELLINGTON. In the 1800s to early 1920s, there was another, more controversial, type of farming going on, baby farming. Baby farming is the historical practice of accepting custody of an infant or child in exchange for payment. This was usually due to the child being born ‘illegitimate’ (meaning the child was born outside of a marriage, also known as bastardy) and the social stigma that it carried on the mother.  Some baby farmers ‘adopted’ children for lump-sum payments, while others cared for infants for periodic payments. However, in the case of a lump-sum adoption, it was more profitable for the baby farmers if the child was no longer around, as the sum would not cover the care for the child for long. In these cases, the child was sometimes adopted out to other families, and in other cases, the child simply died due to unsanitary and subpar living conditions. However, finally and most sinister, occasionally the baby farmer would commit the most heinous of acts and murder the child; pocketing the adoption fee. These acts came to light most infamously when English serial killer and baby farmer Amelia Dyer dubbed the Ogress of Reading was officially tried and hanged in 1896 for intentionally killing six children for profit but it is estimated the real number of child deaths she was responsible for was closer to 400. New Zealand had its own baby farmer scandal late in the 1800s when Minnie Dean was tried and hanged for the murder of three children in 1895. However, in the early 1920s, baby farming became a topic of controversy once more within NZ as a new scandal gripped the public. With headlines splattered over the NZ Truth newspaper such as “The Newlands Horror”, “A Gruesome Discovery” and “The Massacre of the Innocents”, the public was enraptured yet horrified with what was being uncovered. The case would go on to become one of NZ’s most discussed and pondered tragedies of the 1920s. This is the story of The Newlands Baby Farmer. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
11/25/202230 minutes, 46 seconds
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TCNZ PODCAST UPDATE V

Hello friends, Jessica here from True Crime NZ. This is a bit of a different podcast today, just to update you on some changes that have been happening in our lives and the future of the podcast.
11/8/20226 minutes, 17 seconds
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Case 31: Christchurch House of Horrors (PART II)

CHRISTCHURCH. CANTERBURY. Thursday. 25th of September 2008. Some time between 11 am and 12.30 pm. 32-year-old Jason Somerville is home alone at his house, 312 Wainoni Road, on the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road in the Christchurch suburb of Aranui, his wife Rebecca Chamberlain was out and about. “I was outside [chopping] some wood, came in to get a drink, someone was knocking at the front door. It was her…”. ‘Her’ was 28-year-old Tisha Lowry wearing a Chicago Bulls jacket and jeans who had just walked home from the nearby Bower Tavern. It would seem that Tisha had been to Jason’s house previously (she lived only two doors away with her grandfather), what she had come over for this day is unknown. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
9/29/202234 minutes, 52 seconds
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Case 31: Christchurch House of Horrors (PART I)

CHRISTCHURCH. CANTERBURY. Within the eastern suburbs of Christchurch, on the South Island of New Zealand, you will find Aranui. Originally called Flemington (after one time resident of the area Jubal Fleming), Aranui (a Māori word meaning great path) was officially established in 1912. Found in the middle of Aranui is Hampshire Street, dubbed by many “the worst street in Christchurch”. During the 1990s, Hampshire Street was infamous for many instances of violent crime including a 13-year-old boy who was shot by his best friend, a fish and chips shop being firebombed and many occurrences of teenagers being stabbed. In the 2000s, Hampshire Street improved its standing in Aranui, mostly with the help of the Aranui Community Trust and a Labour government that helped revitalise state housing areas. However, Hampshire Street still saw its fair share of violent crime.  Of those crimes, none are more infamous than the depravity that took place in the house on the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road, between the years 2008 and 2009. The debaucherous, degenerate and depraved crimes shocked, not only the residents of Aranui, or the citizens of New Zealand but the world at large.  This is the tale of that wickedness, an account of the folk that frequented the house at the corner of Hampshire Street and Wainoni Road, the story of the building that forever became known as The Christchurch House of Horrors. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
8/28/202228 minutes, 55 seconds
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HISTORY IV: 1981 Springbok Rugby Tour (PART II)

22nd July 1981. The Springboks began the journey down the east coast of New Zealand and found their way to Gisborne. The Springboks were to play Poverty Bay (a small bay near Gisborne) for their first game in NZ. To enter Rugby Park (where the game was being played), spectators had to agree to be searched upon entry. Items such as banners, placards, flags, poles, fireworks, or “any article that might impede the match” were banned. As the game kicked off, over 300 anti-apartheid protesters marched across the neighbouring golf course to reach Rugby Park. A wire fence separated folk watching the game with barbed wire topping it and a line of police officers attempting to keep the peace. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
7/23/202248 minutes, 52 seconds
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HISTORY IV: 1981 Springbok Rugby Tour (PART I)

Apartheid even extended to sport. Leagues were established in all sports, separated by race. For instance, football (soccer) was divided into the white South African Football Association, the African Indian Football Association, the South African African Football Association, the South African Bantu Football Association, and the South African Coloured Football Association.  This led to many countries boycotting international play of various sports with South Africa. The International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) banned South Africa from international games. However, the world governing body for the sport of rugby union, the International Rugby Board (now called World Rugby) did not suspend South Africa from international games, and South Africa remained a member throughout the apartheid era. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
6/1/202229 minutes, 14 seconds
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ANZAC III: The (Other) Great Escape

In 1937, Nazi Germany began work on building the first and the largest concentration camp in Germany. Found eight kilometres north of the city of Weimar, the camp was able to incarcerate over 60,000 people. Opened in July 1938, the camp was dubbed Buchenwald. Buchenwald Concentration Camp was comprised of three distinct areas, the first area was dubbed the Special Compound, this included the administration offices, the Commandant’s Villa, and finally the Schutzstaffel (or, SS) Quarters. The SS was a major paramilitary organization under Adolf Hitler and the foremost agency of security, surveillance, and terror in Nazi Germany. Prisoners of the camp included Jewish people, political prisoners, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Gypsies, German military deserters, asocials (which included the homeless, alcoholics, drug addicts, prostitutes, the unemployable and pacifists) and finally, prisoners of war. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
4/24/202226 minutes, 10 seconds
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TCNZ PODCAST UPDATE IV

Kia ora koutou, Jessica here to give a quick update on the state of the podcast right now and upcoming releases. And where our heads are at right now.
4/23/20224 minutes
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Case 30: The Foxton Tragedy

FOXTON. MANAWATU-WHANGANUI. In 1866, Te Awahou was renamed Foxton; named after Sir William Fox the second premier of New Zealand (Premier meaning head of government). Over the next century, Foxton established itself as a small industrial town. Its primary exports were flax, wool and timber; as well as its famous soft drink – Foxton Fizz.  However, as of the early 21st century, Foxton’s identity is in a state of flux. The once a bustling industry town has been forced to rebrand to something new. Many of the flax mills have been shut down; along with the Feltex carpet factory – forcing many Foxton residents into redundancy.  The town has attempted to rebrand as a tourist attraction. Cafes populate Foxton’s Main Street; and the town plays host to a Maori carving workshop, the Flax Stripper Museum, a Dutch windmill and Foxton Beach. As of 2021, Foxton is home to 3,330 people. However, even with its small population, Foxton has events she is ashamed of.  Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
3/14/202226 minutes, 45 seconds
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Case 29: Elizabeth Battersea

PAKIRI. AUCKLAND. By the mid-1800s, conversations were being had surrounding further expansion of women’s rights within marriage, and their access to education and employment. Due to the women’s rights movements, women had more opportunities in life. They received greater access to education. Also, for the first time, they could take on work outside of the home. Women became accepted in certain occupations in society, they were finding work as cooks, teachers, nurses and secretaries.  The first major victory for the movement came in 1860 with the ‘Married Women’s Property Protection Act’, which allowed women to keep any money they earned if they were deserted by their husbands. Women were given the right to divorce their husbands in 1867 under the Divorce and Matrimonial Causes Act. For men to obtain a divorce they had to prove their wife had committed adultery. However, for women to obtain a divorce they had to prove their husband had committed adultery plus an act of either: incest, bigamy, rape, sodomy, bestiality, desertion of at least two years or extreme, brutal cruelty. By 1874, women’s rights had come a long way since the turn of the century, but there was still a long road ahead. The long road to equality had only just begun. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
2/11/202244 minutes, 26 seconds
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CHRISTMAS II: The Tangiwai Disaster

At 3 pm on Christmas Eve 1953, a Thursday, the daily Express train No. 626, a KA 949 class steam locomotive, left the Wellington railway station en route to Auckland carrying 285 souls, some men, some women, some children, many families visiting relatives, or even folk returning home for the holidays armed with presents for their loved ones.  As the evening progressed, the train passed through Levin, Palmerston North, Feilding and Taihape. Nearing 10 pm, train No. 626 passed through the small military town of Waiouru, perhaps passengers looked out and observed the famous Waiouru Military Camp, home to many of NZ’s armed forces at the time. At 10.20 pm, train No. 626 passed the Tangiwai Railway Station, it was clocked at 64 kilometres per hour (or 40 miles per hour), below the maximum track speed of 80km/h (or 50mph). The train continued chugging along and began approaching the rail bridge that crosses the Whangaehu River. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
12/23/202142 minutes, 36 seconds
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TCNZ visits Canada: Greyhound Bus 1170 (PART II)

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, CANADA. Schizophrenia is a mental disorder in which sufferers interpret reality abnormally. This can manifest with disordered thinking, delusions and hallucinations. During a psychotic episode of schizophrenia, the sufferer may be hearing and seeing things that aren’t really there, or believe that something is controlling their thoughts. Sometimes a combination of these symptoms, this ‘disordered thinking’ can also lead to dysfunctional impulsivity and impulsive aggression. And sometimes, innocent people get hurt. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
11/26/202125 minutes, 44 seconds
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TCNZ visits Canada: Greyhound Bus 1170 (PART I)

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, CANADA. A place distinguished for its politeness, Canada is a land with low crime rates and is considered to be one of the safest destinations in the world to live. However, as with all countries, Canada has its darkness, tales you wouldn’t want to put in a tourist pamphlet, events she is ashamed of. Today, as we touch down 13,000km northeast of Aotearoa in the great nation of Canada, we will investigate one such abhorrent tale. A story of a young man travelling on a bus, the routine trip that became a haunting nightmare, the tale of ‘Greyhound Bus 1170’. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
10/30/202123 minutes, 16 seconds
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TALES I: Opo the Friendly Dolphin

In June 1955, three bottlenose dolphins were observed by a local fisherman on the shores of Opononi. Spotting the dolphins by their dorsal fin, he believed the sea creatures to be sharks, so he pulled out his rifle and shot at them.  Two of the three dolphins were never seen again, believed to have died by the gunfire but one remained. It is believed that of the three dolphins in the pod, the two that died were the mother and sibling of the now only remaining bottlenose. The surviving dolphin was a friendly sort, and became a regular visitor to the bay, warming the hearts of all who met him. As months passed, the dolphin stuck around the harbour. At first the bottlenose was, understandably, a little hesitant to get too close to the locals, in particular the fisherman. But slowly, the townsfolk won the trust of the bottlenose and he gradually ventured closer and closer to shore. Locals became enamored with the ocean mammal, and they decided to name the dolphin, ‘Opononi Jack’, in reference to another famous NZ dolphin ‘Pelorus Jack’, but, as time went on, the gay dolphin at Opononi became more widely refered to as ‘Opo the friendly dolphin’. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
9/24/202117 minutes, 31 seconds
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Case 28: The Bunker in the Bush

On the 10th of July 2002, a team of five Wellington council workers were wandering through the Rimutaka forest, near Upper Hutt, laying 1080 poison bait for possums. The team eventually got around to the Tunnel Gully Recreation Area, a place named after its proximity to the historic Mangaroa Tunnel, a part of the Wairarapa Rail Line, that connected Wellington to Woodville, a small town of 1,600 found 25km east of Palmerston North. The team wandered off the bush track, laying more bait, when one of the workers came across something that caught his attention. The council worker noticed a disturbed patch of dirt about 10-20m off the track. At first glance, he believed it could be a grave. The worker crept in closer to get a better look, as he got closer, he observed the ‘disturbed’ dirt was a piece of wood with a small ponga fern on top. The worker told the NZ Herald on the 1st of May 2003, “It wasn't right. Why would a ponga tree be growing on top of a board?” The city council worker then called over one of his colleagues and together they cleared the debris off the wood. Hmmm, what is this? They thought. The two workers crouched down and lifted the wood. To their shock and amazement, the piece of wood was actually a trap door, when they peered inside they discovered a plywood bunker. The bunker was two metres long, one metre high and just over a metre wide and contained a bevy of supplies. These included a blanket, thirty three cans of drinks, fifty nine small chocolate bars, two bottles of Lindauer Special Reserve wine, Griffin's Krispie biscuits, cheese, mineral water, juice, nine bananas, twenty nine apples, and one, reportedly soggy toilet paper roll. The bunker also had a ‘primitive toilet’, which apparently amounted to a hole in the corner and a tube of supplied air which ventilated the structure, with instructions written on the wall, “OPERATE FAN… 10 MINUITES… EVERY HOUR… FOR CIRCULATION”. Most curious and disturbing, the plywood bunker contained a welcome message for a possible unwilling tenant. Scrawled on the wall to the right of the fan were the words: “WELCOME TO YOUR NEW HOME… MAX STAY 6 DAYS… WE WILL NOT HURT YOU”. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits. Visit https://www.facebook.com/TrueCrimeNewZealand/ and tell us what cold case you would solve to enter the draw to win a copy of Unsolved Case Files courtesy of Disney+.
8/30/202126 minutes, 36 seconds
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Case 27: The Naenae Bank Robbery

Robbery is different from theft, while both are the act of taking someone else's property unlawfully, robbery differentiates itself by its use of either force or fear which carries a maximum prison sentence of 10 years. An aggravated robbery is the crime of robbery committed by more than one person, or with a weapon, or where a victim is grievously injured. Robberies began to fall out of popularity in the 1990s due to the increased use of EFTPOS and other cashless methods of paying for goods. Bank robberies also became less attractive to potential criminals due to increased security such as guards, silent alarms and CCTV cameras. Making the likelihood of getting away with a robbery much more improbable. However, there will always be the criminally minded who believe they can beat the odds and walk out with bags of cash, jump in their getaway vehicle and drive off into the sunset. This is a tale of such folk, the day the Mighty Mongrel Mob robbed the Naenae Westpac Trust Bank. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
7/15/202128 minutes, 31 seconds
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HISTORY III: The Mighty Mongrel Mob

The legend goes, sometime in the 1960s, a group of criminal youth appeared in front of a judge in Hastings, a city of 49,000 in the Hawke’s Bay region. The youth stood in front of the judge who berated them for their misdeeds, eventually calling them “nothing but a pack of mongrels”.  The term ‘mongrel’ originated to define a dog of unidentifiable mixed breed, but overtime the term had taken on different meanings. The term evolved to be used by some in a derogatory sense to refer to a person of mixed racial origin and finally ‘mongrel’ became a term used by some to refer to ‘mischievous delinquents’. This was the manner in which the judge delivered his ‘mongrel’ comments to the youth present. Far from rejecting the term, the men embraced the word and began to refer to their group as the Mongrels. By 1970, the Mongrels evolved into the Mongrel Mob gang. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
6/17/202128 minutes, 27 seconds
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TCNZ PODCAST UPDATE III

Tēnā koutou friends, Jessica here with a quick update on some things happening around the podcast. Just an unscripted update on the state of the podcast right now with information on when new episodes are coming. Plus we update you all on some new information sent to us on an old case. Follow the Facebook page for the latest updates: https://www.facebook.com/TrueCrimeNewZealand/Or the Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/truecrimenewzealand/ Visit www.truecrimenz.com for the latest information and episodes. Music sourced from: Punch Deckhttps://soundcloud.com/punch-deck/omni/"Omni" Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
5/10/202111 minutes, 36 seconds
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ANZAC II: Private Victor Spencer

Victor Spencer first signed up to fight on the 16th of April 1915. Still only 18 years and 5 months old, he lied about his age, saying he was born two years earlier so he would meet the minimum age of 20. Private Victor Spencer set sail to Suez, Egypt with the 1st Battalion Otago regiment. After landing in Egypt, the battalion was quickly sent off to Gallipoli, Turkey in early November 1915, Victor would have just had his 19th birthday. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits. Music sourced from: Long Note Two by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3994-long-note-twoLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Despair and Triumph by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3641-despair-and-triumphLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Sad Trio by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4314-sad-trioLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license
4/29/202117 minutes, 19 seconds
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Case 26: Shayne Sime

CHRISTCHURCH, CANTERBURY. POLICE"Is there any way that, is there any way... Is there any way we could change your mind on what you’re doing?" SHAYNE"Nah, I’ve made my ... I’ve made my mind up, I’ve had enough." POLICE"So there’s ... so there’s no ... there’s no coming back. Are you saying there’s no coming back?" SHAYNE"Nah." POLICE"So there’s nothing that you want to live for?" SHAYNE"No." Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits. Music sourced from: Divider Linehttps://archive.org/details/divider-lines-music-for-films"A Love Song For Someone I Once Knew", "Why Has the Radio Stopped Playing" Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Day of Chaos by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3620-day-of-chaosLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Mesmerize by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4994-mesmerizeLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Man Down by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4016-man-downLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Dreams Become Real by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3678-dreams-become-realLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license
4/6/202132 minutes, 57 seconds
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INVESTIGATES II: Suicide Prevention

Friends, suicide and depression are destressing topics. However, it is also for some; a bleak reality. Within our own lives, in the past couple of weeks, we’ve known of two people who took their own lives.  As you may be aware, NZ has one of the highest rates for sucide in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), in particular youth suicide.  For these reasons, as well as feeling extremely troubled and saddened by these numbers, we are going to do the only thing a podcast can do, talk about it. As such, True Crime NZ has decided to investigate the growing problem and see what we as a collective can do, if anything, to prevent further suicide attempts.  If you are suffering from depression, suicidal ideation or just need someone to talk to; resources are available: FOR NZ: Free call or text 1737 any time for support from a trained counsellor Lifeline 0800 543 354 or 09 522 2999 or free text 4357 (HELP) Suicide Prevention Helpline 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOK0) Youthline 0800 376 633 or free text 234 Samaritans 0800 726 666. IF ELSEWHERE: Visit https://yourlifecounts.org/find-help/ to find your country.
3/16/202116 minutes, 36 seconds
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Case 25: Alice May Parkinson

NAPIER, HAWKE'S BAY. The tiny township of Hampden is found approximately 62km southwest of Hastings in the Hawke’s Bay region. Settled in 1863, the town was an industrial town, primarily sawmilling and farming. In 1900, the town changed its name to Tikokino due to there already being a location called Hampden in the South Island. With a population of less than a thousand, Tikokino has a mostly quiescent history. A few bush fires ravaged the town from 1889 to 1908, razing some houses and sawmills. Other than the looming threat of fires, the town that consisted of a general store, a bootmaker, a bakery, a blacksmith’s forge, a butchery and a post office was a quiet and peaceful place. However, Tikokino in the late 19th century would become the birthplace of one of New Zealand’s most curious and divisive characters. This is the tale of Alice May Parkinson. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
2/27/202130 minutes, 1 second
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Case 24: The Invercargill Tragedy

INVERCARGILL, SOUTHLAND. Wednesday, 8th of April 1908. 10.45am. Archibald McLean, a city missionary, left his house on Crinan Street in Invercargill, Southland to start the day. His eyes wandered toward his neighbours property, the Baxters. Something caught his interest, the Baxter property, occupied by husband and wife James and Elizabeth Baxter and their five children, was eerily quiet. Something odd for the usually bustling household. Archibald, out of curiosity, crept over to the Baxter residence and peeked through the front window. It was the bedroom of two of the Baxter boys. The two young boys lay seemingly peacefully in their double bed. However, a sinking feeling came over Archibald when he peered up at the pillows and saw an abundance of blood. Archibald ran for the nearest telephone to call for police. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
2/5/202117 minutes, 5 seconds
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Case 23: The Aramoana Massacre (PART III)

ARAMOANA, OTAGO. By 8pm on the 13th of November 1990, Police were informed that there was an active shooting situation in Aramoana. The first to respond to the calls was Sergeant Stewart Guthrie of the Port Chalmers Police Station, who was the only officer on duty that day. As Stewart sped out to Aramoana he came across another officer, he collected Constable Russell Anderson before continuing the journey out to Aramoana. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
12/17/202026 minutes, 46 seconds
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Case 23: The Aramoana Massacre (PART II)

ARAMOANA, OTAGO. 1990 was a special year for the citizens of New Zealand. It was Aotearoa’s sesquicentenary, NZ’s 150th year and local governments had put on events and activities to celebrate the occasion. By the 13th of November 1990, the Sesqui celebrations were wrapping up and many of the Aramoana residents were in the nearby town of Port Chalmers enjoying what remained of the Sesqui. Those who remained in the tiny seaside village of Aramoana on the 13th of November were not prepared for what was to unfold. No one could have predicted that such a lovely, warm Spring day would become Aramoana’s darkest day, the day David Gray went on his rampage, the day of the dawn of ‘The Aramoana Massacre’. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
11/15/202018 minutes, 16 seconds
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Case 23: The Aramoana Massacre (PART I)

ARAMOANA, OTAGO. Located 27km north of Dunedin, tucked away at the mouth of the Otago Harbour in the South Island of New Zealand, you will find the small seaside village of Aramoana. The village which translates to ‘pathway to the sea’ is made up of approximately 260 residents who affectionately refer to it as ‘The Spit’. The village is truly remote with no street lights, shops, hotels or a police station. A vast array of wildlife also populate the area as Aramoana and its beach provide an important feeding ground for black swans, spur-winged plovers, banded dotterels, white-faced herons, kingfishers, and yellow eyed penguins. By the late 20th century, Aramoana was home to all kinds of people, many were ‘townies’ just trying to get away from ‘the big smoke’, some were families just looking for a quiet, peaceful place to raise their children, and others were folk just looking for that ‘small, country town’ feeling.  Nevertheless the ‘pathway to the sea’ will be forever synonymous with one man who is more complicated to categorize, an enigma who carried out one of New Zealand’s most grotesque and calamitous massacres. The crimes committed those Spring days in November 1990 are forever remembered as ‘The Aramoana Massacre’. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for more information on this case including sources and credits.
11/4/202026 minutes, 20 seconds
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Case 22: Bristol Family Murders (WHANGANUI CHRONICLES – PART III)

WHANGANUI, MANAWATU. In the decades subsequent to 1920, Wanganui did much growing. The town of Wanganui was officially upgraded to a city in 1924. Many of Wanganui’s most well known monuments were erected during this time, including the Durie Hill War Memorial Tower in 1926, the Whanganui Regional Museum in 1928 and the famous War Memorial Hall in 1960. By the early 1980s, the city of Wanganui had grown so much, it was housing a population of almost 40,000 citizens. Making up a handful of those citizens were the well known business family -- The Bristols. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits. If you would like to donate to Little Critters Rescue's Give a Little campaign you can click here for more information. The campaign ends on the 23rd of October 2020.
10/2/202033 minutes, 57 seconds
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Case 21: ‘The Wanganui Affair’ (WHANGANUI CHRONICLES – PART II)

WHANGANUI, MANAWATU. On the 15th of May 1920, Wanganui citizens were shocked by a crime that involved their elected Mayor. The crime was reported on later in the New Zealand Truth newspaper, “The evidence which was adduced makes the case one of the most sensational in the annals of the New Zealand courts. Indeed, it would be hard to imagine a more extraordinary sequence of happenings. Charles Mackay, in his public business life, was a popular and successful man, but there was another and hideous side to his nature -- a Jekyll as well as a Hyde to his character, and [Walter D’Arcy] Cresswell, a returned soldier, unmasked the debonair Mayor and discovered him to be another Oscar Wilde, morally unclean; a pursuer of perverted and putrid ‘pleasures’”. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
9/14/202030 minutes, 4 seconds
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Case 20: Phoebe Veitch (WHANGANUI CHRONICLES – PART I)

WHANGANUI, MANAWATU. On the 27th of February 1883 something was found on the beach near the Whanganui river mouth that wasn’t the usual river byproducts. A telegraph linesperson, Arthur Fitchett was working along the beach when he discovered something that would shock and horrify the small township -- the deceased corpse of a four-year-old girl.  The story that unfolded became one of the darkest and most complicated crimes in the annals of Whanganui’s short history. This is the tale of the strange case of child slaughter. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
8/17/202027 minutes, 27 seconds
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Case 19: Gordon McKay

PIHA, AUCKLAND. In 1939 Piha was in the news for something completely unrelated to its beach; it was in the headlines for a house fire claiming the life of one person. As the events unfolded, more information rose to the surface and ultimately the story of the ‘Piha Fire’ of 1939 became one of the most curious crimes in the archives of NZ’s history. This is the tale of Gordon McKay and The Duplicitous Inferno.  Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
6/5/202018 minutes, 3 seconds
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Case 18: The Raurimu Rampage

RAURIMU, MANAWATU. Saturday the 8th of February 1997. 9.05am. Stephen Anderson walks into the kitchen holding a 12 gauge sawn-off shotgun and carrying a shotgun cartridge in his mouth. His father Neville immediately sprang from his seat and approached the gunman “What are you doing… Give it to me Stephen”. Neville grabbed hold of the barrel of the shotgun, attempting to wrestle it out of his son’s hands when Stephen accused his father of being wicked, “You're the devil incarnate." BANG! The shotgun fired, fatally injuring Neville Anderson. Stephen’s rampage had begun. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
5/11/202042 minutes, 26 seconds
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ANZAC I: Caesar the Anzac Dog

In early 1916, the 4th Battalion of the NZ Rifle Brigade took part in a parade down Queen Street, Auckland before they embarked overseas to Egypt to fight in World War I. ‘A’ company marched down the street waving to the cheering crowd, they were joined by their mascot, an American bulldog called Caesar.  Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
5/4/202016 minutes, 48 seconds
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Case 17: Baby Kahurautete

LOWER HUTT. WELLINGTON. Saturday. 13th of April 2002. 11.20am. Donna Hall gathered her two nieces, Manumea and Erena Durie to take a morning stroll along the Hutt River with ‘baby Kahu’ and the family dog. The fivesome left their house and wandered through the suburbs of Woburn. The two nieces pushed Kahu in the pushchair a few metres ahead of Donna who walked the dog behind. Eventually the quintet walked southwest onto Saint Albans Grove. As they made their way down the road towards the riverbank a Mitsubishi Magna passed them and parked ahead at the end of the grove, near the stairs to Strand Park.  As the quintet approached the stairs leading up to the riverbank, a man wearing a balaclava, gloves and weilding a .22 Ruger semi automatic rifle burst out of the Mitsubishi and quickly approached the group. The attacker pointed the rifle at the head of Erena Durie and threatened to kill her along with her sister Manumea if they didn’t leave baby Kahu. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
4/18/202029 minutes, 8 seconds
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History II: Featherston Military Camp

In 1915, the area between Featherston and the Tauherenikau River was acquired by the Ministry of Defence. The area was chosen as the site to train the New Zealand soldiers heading to Europe to serve in World War I. Development began on the site with over 1,000 workmen constructing what would become NZ’s largest military training camp; Featherston Military Camp. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
3/29/202020 minutes, 59 seconds
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Case 16: The Lundy Murders (EPILOGUE)

PALMERSTON NORTH. MANAWATU. Four months into his sentence, in August of 2002, Mark Lundy took his case to the Court of Appeal based on the belief that he was convicted on “bad science”.  Upon upholding the conviction, the Court added an additional three years to Mark’s non-parole period; bringing the total non-parole term to 20 years. The reason for the increase was due to the Court of Appeal believing the original trial judge was too lenient and didn’t fully take into account the horrific circumstances of Amber Lundy’s murder, “She must have died with the awful injuries to her mother as her last living memory ... we have to say that Mr Lundy's murder of his daughter in these circumstances, coming on top of the murder of his wife, requires denunciation and demonstration of society's abhorrence at a very high level". While Mark continued to maintain his innocence. The legal avenues to express that innocence were running out. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
3/8/202032 minutes, 6 seconds
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Case 16: The Lundy Murders (INVESTIGATION)

PALMERSTON NORTH. MANAWATU. 30th of August 2000. 11.59am. Mark Lundy took a call from a client who wanted to place an order; Mark emotionally communicated through tears that he couldn’t right now as he was on his way home because “something happened to his wife and child”. Mark arrived home to ‘Palmy’ about an hour and 16 minutes later at 1.15pm, police stopped Mark Lundy at the cordon about a block from 30 Karamea Crescent -- they had something to tell him. Police broke the news that both his wife Christine and daughter Amber were found dead that morning. Furthermore, all signs pointed to murder.  Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
2/18/202030 minutes, 12 seconds
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Case 16: The Lundy Murders (PROLOGUE)

PALMERSTON NORTH. MANAWATU. 30th of August 2000. 9.30am. Christine’s brother James Weggery arrived at 30 Karamea Crescent in the suburb of Kelvin Grove in Palmerston North. James knew Christine’s routine well, he knew she would be home after taking her 7-year-old daughter Amber to school. Although, James had been having difficulty getting Christine on the phone; he decided to just head over to her house. Christine had been working on the accounting for James’ trucking business and his taxes were due at the end of the month; today.  James Weggery approached the Lundy residence. He knocked on the front door. No answer. James already knew Christine’s husband Mark would not be home as he was in Wellington on business but Christine was always home at this time. Furthermore, the curtains were still pulled and her car occupied the car port. James wandered the property looking for signs of life. Something’s wrong, something’s off; James thought.  Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
2/1/202018 minutes, 28 seconds
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Case 15: Beverly Bouma

REPOROA. WAIKATO. 30th of November 1998. Highschool sweethearts and husband and wife, Henk and Beverly Bouma are alone in their farmhouse property located on Plateau Road in Reporoa, a small rural community 40km outside of Rotorua. The couple's three children were not home, their son 22-year-old Russell was working on another farm; their two daughters, 17-year-old Sandra and 15-year-old Cherie were away for school in Hamilton. Henk and Beverly Bouma are awoken to four men wearing ski masks and gloves, one pointing a .22 rifle at them. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
1/16/202023 minutes, 54 seconds
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CHRISTMAS I: THE FIRST NZ XMAS

On the 17th of December 1642. Abel and his crew saw land in the far distance; it was Te Tai Poutini -- the west coast of the South Island of NZ. As the Dutch mariner approached the unknown land, he saw a succession of fires burning upon the coastline.  The days that followed saw the first meeting of European and Maori people. It was not a peaceful encounter.
12/31/201919 minutes, 36 seconds
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Case 14: Sophie Elliott (PART II)

DUNEDIN. OTAGO. The day after stabbing 22 year old Sophie Elliott to death, the 10th of January 2008, Clayton Weatherston appeared in court in Dunedin -- he pled not guilty to the charge of murder. This began long and lengthy court proceedings. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits. If you are a victim of family violence or in a relationship that makes you fearful about your own or anyone else's safety, seek help as soon as possible. We have linked some resources in the show notes. You have the right to be safe. Women’s Refuge crisis | 0800 733 843 - 24 hoursFamily violence information line | 0800 456 450Shine National Helpline | 0508 744 633 - 9am to 11pmShakti - for migrant and refugee women | 0800 742 584 - 24 hoursNational network of stopping violence | 03 391 0048Elder Abuse Helpline | 0800 32 668 65 - 24 hoursGandhi Nivas - supporting men to be free from violence | 0800 426 344Hey Bro helpline - supporting men to be free from violence | 0800 HeyBro (439 276)Hohou te rongo kahukura - outing violence - building rainbow communities free from violenceYou, me, us - promoting healthy queer, trans and takatäpui relationshipsSensitive Claims ACC | 0800 735 566
12/16/201945 minutes, 29 seconds
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Case 14: Sophie Elliott (PART I)

EDITOR'S NOTE: This episode was recorded on new equipment and we did not get an ideal recording. We learnt a lot of lessons though. We hope the quality isn't too distracting from the information for all you audiophiles out there. Much love, TCNZ. DUNEDIN. OTAGO. “I then heard the door being unlocked so I opened it and stepped into a small bedroom. In front of me, to my left, was the body of a young Caucasian female on the floor. She was covered in blood around her neck and upper torso. A male was standing with his hands by his sides at the end of the bed next to the body. I said to this person, ‘What have you done?’ To which he replied, ‘I killed her.’ Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits. If any of this is sounding familiar, or you are a victim of domestic abuse -- please know that help is available: Women’s Refuge crisis | 0800 733 843 - 24 hoursFamily violence information line | 0800 456 450Shine National Helpline | 0508 744 633 - 9am to 11pmShakti – for women from migrant and refugee communities | 0800 742 584 - 24 hoursNational network of stopping violence | 03 391 0048Elder Abuse Helpline | 0800 32 668 65 - 24 hoursGandhi Nivas | 0800 426 344
11/27/201931 minutes, 10 seconds
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Case 13: Hayden Poulter

AUCKLAND CITY. AUCKLAND. 19th of October 1996. 9.40am. Sister Janet Swindle, a nun, was walking her dog along Karangahape Road. Sister Swindle and her canine companion entered Pigeon Park, an area of the Symonds Street Cemetery. Among the many corpses laid peacefully to rest, to her horror, Sister Swindle discovered one unpeaceful and unburied; the mutilated corpse of Natacha Hogan. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
11/13/201943 minutes, 22 seconds
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TCNZ PODCAST UPDATE II

Tēnā koutou friends, Jessica here, with a quick update on some new things happening around our way. With the completion of the Rainbow Warrior story, that was our 12th case and 21st episode. Which was kind of like a season for us. We have a couple of announcements to make regarding the future of True Crime NZ. Please follow our social media pages to keep updated about any updates. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TrueCrimeNewZealand Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/truecrimenewzealand/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TrueCrimeNZ Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/TrueCrimeNewZealand
11/2/20193 minutes, 56 seconds
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Case 12: The Rainbow Warrior (PART II)

AUCKLAND CITY. AUCKLAND. French Defence Minister Charles Hernu caught wind of Greenpeace’s plan to protest upcoming French tests in late 1984. After reportedly ‘exploding with fury’, Hernu ordered the French security service, the General Directorate for External Security or in French, Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure (DGSE) to investigate the rumours. To ensure the security of France, discussions surrounding ‘neutralising’ the Greenpeace mission commenced. Ideas in the form of reports began coming across Charles Hernu’s desk. In late March 1985, the DGSE was given the green light to go ahead with the plan. They codenamed the mission, “Operation Satanique”. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for information on how to vote for the next episode or click here to take you directly to the page. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits. Link to video mentioned at the end of the podcast: The Rainbow Warrior Bomber Breaks His Silence 
10/27/201936 minutes, 54 seconds
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Case 12: The Rainbow Warrior (PART I)

AUCKLAND CITY, AUCKLAND. In April 1985, Fernando Pereira said goodbye to his children in the Netherlands, his departing words were, “Just take care of your mom, I’ll do my trip and I’ll be home soon”. With goodbyes said to his loved ones, Fernando travelled to Hawaii and reported for duty.  Fernando boarded the ship that would be his home for the next six months as he travelled around the globe - the Rainbow Warrior. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for information on how to vote for the next episode or click here to take you directly to the page. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
10/19/201935 minutes, 26 seconds
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History I: Mount Eden Prison

In 1856, on the lower slopes of Mt Eden - a wooden stockade was built to house the overflowing at the Queen Street Goal. Sixteen of the most troublesome prisoners were transferred to the stockade in September 1856. Three of these men were serving a life sentence, one for stabbing a ship captain in the Bay of Islands, one for rape in the Auckland suburb of Newmarket, and one for killing a Maori with a piece of wood in Chancery Lane, a street in Auckland. In 1865, completion of a new building on the site allowed the now decrepit Queen Street Goal to be demolished. Using mostly prison labour, construction continued, expanding the facilities further. By the mid 1870s, prisoners had completed the outer stone wall, the wall that still stands today. In 1882, prisoners began excavation work on a building; Mount Eden Prison was officially opened in 1888. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
10/13/201925 minutes, 14 seconds
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Case 11: Harvey and Jeannette Crewe (EPILOGUE)

PUKEKAWA. WAIKATO. On the 2nd of March 1971, Arthur Allan Thomas, having been found guilty of double murder, was driven from the Auckland District Court, 30km north, over the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Exiting at Albany, the police van eventually got onto Paremoremo Road. The ‘paddy wagon’ drove another 5km before taking a left, soon after the van pulled over. When Arthur exited the vehicle he was greeted by, what would be his home for the foreseeable future, Paremoremo Maximum Security Prison. The song that ends the podcast today is courtsey of Folksong NZ: Mist on the Waitako Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
10/5/201941 minutes, 15 seconds
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Case 11: Harvey and Jeannette Crewe (INVESTIGATION)

PUKEKAWA. WAIKATO. 22nd of June 1970. 2.20pm. Tuakau police constable Gerald Wyllie answered a call from Owen Priest. Owen explained that Harvey and Jeannette Crewe, farmers in Pukekawa were missing. There were bloodstains in the kitchen and lounge.  Furthermore, Rochelle; the Crewe’s 18 month old daughter was found to be without her parents in the house for five days. Although, most peculiar, it appeared Rochelle had been fed and looked after for those five days.  Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
9/23/201937 minutes, 51 seconds
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Case 11: Harvey and Jeannette Crewe (PROLOGUE)

PUKEKAWA. WAIKATO. Pukekawa is a small district in the Waikato, approx. 66km from central Auckland. In the early years of NZ, Pukekawa was used as a battleground for the early NZ wars. By the early 1900s, Pukekawa was known as a ‘rural Pakeha settlement’. The area was known to have fertile soil; over time it became a popular farming spot.  By 1970, Pukekawa was a small, albeit affluent farming community. On the 22 June 1970, the small community of Pukekawa was shattered by one of New Zealand’s most infamous crimes. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
9/15/201925 minutes, 17 seconds
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Case 10: Brent Garner

PALMERSTON NORTH, MANAWATU. On the 25 August 1996, a letter came across the desk of Detective Constable Brent Garner. Brent opened the letter and began reading, “COP, you drew the straw. Chapter 1 starts. You will die, I guarantee. The Executioner.” Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
9/3/201934 minutes, 25 seconds
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True Crime NZ Investigates: INCESTUOUS CHILD ABUSE

When we stummbled upon the alarming high number of victims of sexual abuse by the time of adulthood - True Crime NZ decided to look into this subject matter a little closer.  Opening a dialogue into taboo topics is never easy, but we must examine our own reluctance and courageously wade into this unconscious quagmire if we’re going to help.  This episode will be slightly different from our usual content. Instead of investigating a case, we will be investigating a subject, a difficult topic to discuss, with the goal of trying to understand and ultimately, equip us better to help victims of incestuous child abuse in NZ. If you need help for any of the topics discussed in the episode. Resources and support are availble. You are not alone. Child Abuse PREVENTION Resources:Oranga Tamariki—Ministry for ChildrenHelp AucklandAre you OKChild Abuse Prevention Parent Helpline - 0800 568 856 Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
8/25/201923 minutes, 29 seconds
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TCNZ PODCAST UPDATE I

Here we are, 13 episodes in. Since launch of True Crime NZ June 17th 2019, it has been a rollercoaster of an emotion so far, lots of highs and excitement; as well as having some really tough days - as is life.  As the podcast has grown and evolved since the last time we did this. For anyone unaware, TCNZ is comprised of two people; my husband, Sirius; and me, Jessica. The podcast is independently produced, funded by passion for journalism and storytelling. The podcast is recorded in an emptied out cupboard in our spare room; in our spare time from our full time jobs. CONTACT USEmail us directly at: [email protected] contact page: truecrimenz.com/contactReddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/TrueCrimeNewZealandFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TrueCrimeNewZealand/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/truecrimenewzealand/Twitter: https://twitter.com/TrueCrimeNZ
8/23/20193 minutes, 56 seconds
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Case 9: Joe Kum Young

WELLINGTON CITY, WELLINGTON. 24th of September 1905, 7.45pm. The now 68 year old Joe Kum Young, still recovering from his mining injury, was limping down Haining Street. Footsteps quickly approached him from behind. Young may have sensed a wisp of dread when he heard a revolver being cocked from the same direction. A loud gunshot quickly followed, followed by a quicker bullet. Joe Kum Young was shot in the back of the head. He fought his injuries in hospital for the next two hours, but later died at 10pm that night. The unknown gunman slipped back into the nearby crowds. Escaping in the chaos. Police were lost. It was a random killing, they had no leads. The next day, a man walked calmly into the Lambton Quay Police Station; he placed a revolver on the front desk, then proclaimed proudly, “I have come to tell you that I am the man who shot the Chinaman in the Chinese quarters of the city last evening. I take an interest in alien immigration and I took this means of bringing it under the public notice." Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
8/18/201928 minutes, 16 seconds
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Case 8: Graeme Burton (PART II)

WAINUIOMATA, WELLINGTON. On the afternoon of January the 6th 2007. Karl Kuchenbecker was riding his quad bike in the hills that connect Lower Hutt to Wainuiomata. Karl was riding through a firebreak on his way home. When he was confronted by a drug frenzied, overly aggressive man wielding a shotgun. The man fired. Karl was hit and he fell to the ground. The man fired the shotgun two more times hitting Kuchenbecker.  Karl, with what strength he had left made a run for it. He was then grabbed and stabbed repeatedly. Puncturing his lung. Kuchenbecker lay dying, alone. As the man looked for more victims. This random act of killing has chilling similarities to the 1992 murder of Paul Anderson. Both were a victim seemingly chosen at random, both were completely unprovoked, and both were committed by Graeme Burton. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
8/11/201943 minutes, 17 seconds
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Case 8: Graeme Burton (PART I)

LOWER HUTT, WELLINGTON. In 1992, Paul Anderson was a lighting technician at Wellington nightclub, The Carpark. After hearing some commotion with a man and the club’s security. Anderson found himself confronted by a large, enraged and intoxicated man. The man was also weilding a knife. The man asked Anderson if he worked at the club. Anderson supposedly confirmed this and the knife was put to use, Paul was viciously stabbed and he collapsed. Later bleeding out. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
8/4/201925 minutes, 22 seconds
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Case 7: Walter James Bolton (DEATH PENALTY – PART III)

WANGANUI, MANAWATU. On the 18th of February 1957, the eighty fifth, and last person was executed in NZ. A man, a farmer from the district of Wanganui in the Manawatu. One newspaper described the events that unfolded. On the scaffold, a rope was placed around his neck. When the trap door snapped open beneath him. He dropped, surviving the fall. Sickening the small audience of reporters, clergy and prison warders, many vomited. The man continued to hang, writhing while he slowly strangled to death. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
8/3/201932 minutes, 43 seconds
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Case 6: Minnie Dean (DEATH PENALTY – PART II)

WINTON, SOUTHLAND. On August the 12th 1895 ‘Southland baby farmer’ Williamina Dean became the first and only woman to be sentenced to death in New Zealand. The name of Minnie Dean lives on, and around that name has grown a legend. Southland children who misbehave are threatened, not with boogeymen, but with being sent to Minnie Dean. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
7/29/201936 minutes, 44 seconds
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Case 5: Maketū Wharetōtara (DEATH PENALTY – PART I)

RUSSELL, BAY OF ISLANDS. In the Bay of Islands, about four kilometres northeast of Russell, you will find Motuarohia Island. A small island of only two kilometres in length. Today, the island exists mostly as a tourist attraction, selling itself with promises of crystal clear waters, sandy beaches and stunning walking tracks.  Although in 1841, when Aoeteroa was still in its infancy, the island which directly translates to ‘beloved island’ was more infamous than famous. Infamous, for it was the island at the centre of an incident, an event that one newspaper of the time described as a ‘most shocking and inhuman atrocity’. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
7/25/201928 minutes, 25 seconds
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Case 4: Delcelia Witika

MANGERE, AUCKLAND. On the 21st of March 1991, Martin Smith, an ambulance officer was responding to a call about a dead child at an address in Mangere. When he entered the property he found an emaciated two year old girl in the fetal position. She was lying on a filthy, blood covered mattress. The child had extreme scarring on her body appearing to be burns. Similar burns were on her hands and feet with deep bruising covering the remainder of her body. The girl was unresponsive, when Smith knelt down to check her pulse, he discovered she was dead.  Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
7/21/201928 minutes, 25 seconds
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Case 3: Schlaepfer Family Murders

PAERATA, AUCKLAND. May 19 1992, 7.40am. Police Constable Jeff Stuck answers a 111 emergency call from a hysterical woman. Stuck was unable to extract much information from the woman. She was screaming into the receiver, when suddenly the conversation ended. The phone fell to the ground. Constable Stuck, still listening heard in the background, raised voices of a woman and a man; yelling. Accompanied by a pair of loud gunshots. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
7/14/201920 minutes, 46 seconds
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Case 1: Parker-Hulme Murder (Part 2)

CHRISTCHURCH, CANTERBURY. June 22, 1954 "The Day of The Happy Event. I am writing a little of this up in the morning before the death. I felt very excited and 'The night before Christmas-ish' last night. I did not have pleasant dreams though. I am about to rise" Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
6/21/201933 minutes, 32 seconds
Episode Artwork

Case 1: Parker-Hulme Murder (Part 1)

CHRISTCHURCH, CANTERBURY. 22 June 1954. The body of forty-five year old Honora Parker was discovered in Victoria Park, in Christchurch, New Zealand. That morning Honora had gone for a walk through Victoria Park with her daughter Pauline Parker, and Pauline's best friend, Juliet Hulme. Approximately 130m down the path, in a wooded area of the park near a small wooden bridge, Juliet and Pauline bludgeoned Honora Parker to death with half a brick enclosed in an old stocking. Visit www.truecrimenz.com for additional information on this case. Including a transcript of this episode, with supporting pictures, sources, and credits.
6/15/201948 minutes, 17 seconds