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T� Falado: Brazilian Portuguese Pronunciation for Speakers of Spanish

English, Education, 1 seasons, 46 episodes, 8 hours 55 minutes
About
Tá Falado provides Brazilian Portuguese pronunciation lessons for speakers of Spanish. Podcasts illustrate pronunciation differences between Spanish and Portuguese and present scenarios showing cultural differences between the U.S. and Brazil. Tá Falado is part of the Brazilpod project and is produced at the College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas at Austin. Website URL: http://coerll.utexas.edu/brazilpod/tafalado/
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Grammar Lesson 20: This Just Isn't Spanish, Adapting to Handicapped

asset title: Grammar Lesson 20: This Just Isn't Spanish, Adapting to Handicapped filename: tafalado_gra_20.mp3 track number: 46/46 time: 11:03 size: 7.77 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Oh man, where did this word come from? After a whole series of lessons in pronunciation and grammar ... and now we learn a whole bunch of words where Spanish and Portuguese are totally different. If Tá Falado is supposed to show learners the similarities between these two languages, well, this lesson just won't do that. Today Michelle and Valdo give as words like embora, ainda, rapaz, jeito, cedo, and tomara. It is true that Spanish and Portuguese are similar in many ways. However, today we look at the words that are not similar at all.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Rapaz! Você viu aquele cara na cadeira de rodas entr
11/12/200711 minutes 3 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 19: Present Perfect, Naming People

asset title: Grammar Lesson 19: Present Perfect, Naming People filename: tafalado_gra_19.mp3 track number: 45/46 time: 16:09 size: 11.36 MB bitrate: 96 kbps One of life's great mysteries is if a Brazilian marries someone from Venezuela, how do you figure out what their official name will be? We ought to be politicians because we spend the whole lesson talking about last names, middle names, and given names, but we never actually answer the question! In this lesson Michelle talks about what it has been like to explain her daughter's full name. Americans get a little confused. As to the grammar, we discuss the difference between phrases like 'have you been eating lately' and 'have you ever eaten before.'DialogPortugueseValdo: O que você tem percebido de diferente nesses últimos tempos
04/12/200716 minutes 9 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 18: Word Order, Buses and Services

asset title: Grammar Lesson 18: Word Order, Buses and Services filename: tafalado_gra_18.mp3 track number: 44/46 time: 10:56 size: 7.69 MB bitrate: 96 kbps So how weird would it be to be a Brazilian in the United States and see for the first time a bicycle attached to the front of a city bus? Sure enough, that would never happen on a bus in Brazil. These are the kinds of observations that North Americans would never make because, well, we think it's normal. It's all a matter of perspective. This lesson talks about those kind of cultural differences, and we do so while going over a lesson about word order. (We know the title doesn't sound all that exciting, but it really is an interesting grammar topic -- if you are into language learning.) DialogPortugueseMichelle: Eu acho interessante
26/11/200710 minutes 56 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 17: Também x Também não, Online Activities

asset title: Grammar Lesson 17: Também x Também não, Online Activities filename: tafalado_gra_17.mp3 track number: 43/46 time: 9:44 size: 6.85 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Spanish speakers who are used to saying tampoco will now have to learn how to say também não in Portuguese. It just sounds cute somehow. Culturally, Michelle and Valdo talk about all the things that are offered online in the United States, much more than in Brazil. In this lesson we also mention the sensitive subject of toll roads in Austin, Texas. We are still getting used to the idea, so forgive us if we're a little touchy about it. It may be common in other places, but we still don't like it, even if you can make payments online!DialogPortugueseValdo: Esse fim de semana eu tive que renovar os livros q
01/10/20079 minutes 44 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 16: Placement of Indirect Pronouns, Greeting Friends

asset title: Grammar Lesson 16: Placement of Indirect Pronouns, Greeting Friends filename: tafalado_gra_16.mp3 track number: 42/46 time: 12:33 size: 8.82 MB bitrate: 96 kbps In this lesson, Michelle claims that most people give women one kiss on the cheek when greeting and when saying goodbye. Valdo thinks that it is more common to give two kisses, one on each cheek. And there are even places where a third kiss is given. How difficult can it get? As to grammar, years ago Orlando was once caught saying, in Spanish, María quiere me ayudar. To his surprise he found out that Spanish speakers are not supposed to put the indirect pronoun 'me' between the verbs. So, for you who are learning Portuguese, you get to learn the opposite: in Portuguese the pronoun goes between the auxiliary and mai
24/09/200712 minutes 33 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 15: False Cognates, Driver's License

asset title: Grammar Lesson 15: False Cognates, Driver's License filename: tafalado_gra_15.mp3 track number: 41/46 time: 10:50 size: 7.62 MB bitrate: 96 kbps No kidding, Orlando was in Mexico City one time and saw a man in Chapultepec Park who was selling helados esquisitos. Why would anyone want to buy 'weird' ice cream? Turns out, in Spanish esquisito means exquisite, and Mexicans actually like to have their helado esquisito! It's a positive thing. In Portuguese, esquisito means strange or weird. OK, that's what we mean by false cognates. Although many words between Spanish and Portuguese are similar, there are others that trick you because the meaning isn't what you expect.DialogPortugueseValdo: Você tirou sua carteira de motorista aqui no Texas?Miche
18/09/200710 minutes 50 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 14: Absence of Direct Object Pronouns, Mobile Homes

asset title: Grammar Lesson 14: Absence of Direct Object Pronouns, Mobile Homes filename: tafalado_gra_14.mp3 track number: 40/46 time: 10:24 size: 7.32 MB bitrate: 96 kbps OK, so you are driving down the freeway and you see a semi going 70 mph and there is a mobile home being pulled along. Well, yes, I do see why that would seem rather shocking to a Brazilian. Thanks go to Valdo and Michelle for making that observation. Grammar-wise, we are also going to talk about dropping direct object pronouns. Better to drop pronouns than mobile homes from semis!DialogPortugueseMichelle: Você viu aquele caminhão levando aquela casa inteirinha?Valdo: Vi sim. Que coisa, né?Michelle: Pois é, a primeira vez que vi tomei um susto. Você compraria aquela casa pra você?Valdo: Não,
13/09/200710 minutes 24 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 13: Gender in Portuguese and Spanish, Buying Alcohol

asset title: Grammar Lesson 13: Gender in Portuguese and Spanish, Buying Alcohol filename: tafalado_gra_13.mp3 track number: 39/46 time: 11:33 size: 8.12 MB bitrate: 96 kbps To be clear, we are referring to gender agreement. Get ready: although gender is 95% the same between Spanish and Portuguese, there are a few words that change. Is it o leite or a leite? O sal or a sal? O origem or a origem? Valdo and Michelle clarify things for us. Culturally, at what age can you buy alcohol in Brazil?DialogPortugueseValdo: O leite, o mel e o sal que você pediu para eu comprar já estão aqui.Michelle: E o vinho, a cerveja e a água, você não trouxe? E o computador, onde está?Valdo: Eta, esqueci da água e do computador. Mas as bebidas alcoóli
03/08/200711 minutes 33 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 12: Personalized Infinitive, Paying for your Education

asset title: Grammar Lesson 12: Personalized Infinitive, Paying for your Education filename: tafalado_gra_12.mp3 track number: 38/46 time: 13:07 size: 9.22 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Not only are Brazilians thought of as being very friendly, now they even want to personalize their infinitive verbs! Valdo and Michelle lead the way in showing us how to do the same. Culturally, we talk about the price of education in the United States. And take a peek at this picture! Orlando's really into the Texas Pride. Hook 'em Horns!DialogPortugueseMichelle: É bom fazermos as contas porque esse mês vai ser duro pagar a universidade.Valdo: Quando eles mandarem o valor a gente se preocupa com isso.Michelle: Mas é importante não esquecermos que as universidades públicas aqui nos Estados Unido
23/07/200713 minutes 7 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 11: Topic-Comment Patterns, Special Needs Privileges

asset title: Grammar Lesson 11: Topic-Comment Patterns, Special Needs Privileges filename: tafalado_gra_11.mp3 track number: 37/46 time: 12:01 size: 8.46 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Just look at that barriga! Clearly the polite thing to do, at least in Brazil, would be to have a special line at banks, post offices, and supermarkets for those that have 'special' needs. However, the other day, in this condition, with that barriga, Michelle had to wait in line at the U.S. post office just like one of the 'regular' people. Grammatically, Orlando seems to love topic-comment patterns almost too much. Is it possible that grammar is really that interesting?DialogPortugueseMichelle: Você acredita que eu fiquei quase duas horas na fila do correio ontem? Lá no Brasil, as grávidas, el
16/07/200712 minutes 1 second
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Grammar Lesson 10: Word Order of Negative Phrases, Paying for Parties

asset title: Grammar Lesson 10: Word Order of Negative Phrases, Paying for Parties filename: tafalado_gra_10.mp3 track number: 36/46 time: 11:25 size: 8.02 MB bitrate: 96 kbps 'Não, não sei não.' This is the pattern for Brazilians, to say 'no' three times in the sentence. It's not that Valdo and Michelle are negative people, but they sure get their point across. And speaking of their point of view, if YOU invite them to a party, YOU should really pay the tab!DialogPortugueseValdo: Michelle, você não quer ir no aniversário do meu amigo? Vai ser em um restaurante aqui em Austin.Michelle: Não, eu não quero não.Valdo: Por que? Cê não quer comer comida boa não?Michelle: Querer eu quero, mas aqui, mesmo sendo convidado, a gente tem que pagar! Não, isso não está
06/07/200711 minutes 25 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 9: Possessive Pronouns, How to Dress Like an American

asset title: Grammar Lesson 9: Possessive Pronouns, How to Dress Like an American filename: tafalado_gra_09.mp3 track number: 35/46 time: 12:29 size: 8.78 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Who would have ever guessed that Valdo and Michelle think that jeans and flip flops make a strange combination? Looks like we've just seen one more thing that makes Americans stand out. Note that this picture has got three Brazilians trying to dress like North Americans! Oh yes, and grammar-wise, we're talking about possessive pronouns. You might say, OUR comments to YOUR lesson.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Valdo, olha pra aquela menina ... veja a bolsa dela!Valdo: O que é que tem a bolsa dela? É parecida com a sua bolsa.Michelle: Você sabe, no Brasil a gente nunca usaria uma bolsa de paetê como a del
27/06/200712 minutes 29 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 8: Plural of words that end in 'ão', Car Insurance

asset title: Grammar Lesson 8: Plural of words that end in 'ão', Car Insurance filename: tafalado_gra_08.mp3 track number: 34/46 time: 13:22 size: 9.40 MB bitrate: 96 kbps So why is the plural of alemão alemães, but he plural of nação is nações? And why would the plural of mão be mãos? You know what, Valdo and Michelle have some hints to clear it all up. What's amazing is that they can talk about that and still have time to talk about car insurance in Brazil.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Minha situação financeira melhorou e eu quero fazer um montão de coisas.Valdo: Só toma cuidado pra você não ficar acostumada com um padrão de vida que não é o seu.Michelle: Mas os padrões daqui são diferentes do Brasil. As situações
20/06/200713 minutes 22 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 7: Para with Indirect Pronouns, Ice Water at Restaurants

asset title: Grammar Lesson 7: Para with Indirect Pronouns, Ice Water at Restaurants filename: tafalado_gra_07.mp3 track number: 33/46 time: 12:23 size: 8.71 MB bitrate: 96 kbps For all of you who learned how to speak Spanish, we all relive the nightmare experience of learning direct and indirect object pronouns. Lo is direct, le is indirect. When you use both put the indirect first; but you can't say le lo, so change le to se and then say se lo, as in se lo di 'I gave it to him' ... Bad memories for sure, but the good news is that none of that happens in Portuguese. In fact, Brazilians hardly ever use indirect objects. Instead they just say para ele 'to him', para ela 'to her', para eles 'to them'. That's what Orlando, Valdo, Michel
14/06/200712 minutes 23 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 6: The Verb 'Ficar', Studying in Cafés

asset title: Grammar Lesson 6: The Verb 'Ficar', Studying in Cafés filename: tafalado_gra_06.mp3 track number: 32/46 time: 11:11 size: 7.87 MB bitrate: 96 kbps In this lesson Orlando dreams about being able to use the verb 'ficar' when he is talking in Spanish. Ah, if they just had that verb in Spanish, it would make things a lot easier. Of course, for you Spanish speakers, you now have a chance to add 'ficar' to your Portuguese. Whether it means to become, to be, to stay, to remain, to keep on, or any of the other meanings, you are sure to love this fantastic verb. And whoever said that verbs weren't fun? One caution, however, don't study your verbs in a café, at least not in Brazil. Michelle and Valdo have a hard time getting used to the idea of studying in a café.DialogPortugue
07/06/200711 minutes 11 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 5: Disappearing Reflexive Verbs, Use of Coupons

asset title: Grammar Lesson 5: Disappearing Reflexive Verbs, Use of Coupons filename: tafalado_gra_05.mp3 track number: 31/46 time: 9:39 size: 6.79 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Here's a trick question for Spanish speakers: Would it be better in Portuguese to say the equivalent of 'Siéntate' or 'Siéntese'? Answer: Don't worry about the reflexive pronouns. Chances are that Brazilians won't use them either. In this lesson Valdo and Michelle help the rest of us to get a sense of the disappearing reflexive pronouns in Portuguese. Michelle also adds how cool she thinks the use of coupons is here in Texas as well.DialogPortugueseValdo: Você deitou tarde ontem?Michelle: Deitei bem tarde e levantei bem cedinho.Valdo: Por que? Senta aqui e me conta.Michelle: Eu lembrei que tinha um mont
31/05/20079 minutes 39 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 4: Future Subjunctive, Soda Refills at Restaurants

asset title: Grammar Lesson 4: Future Subjunctive, Soda Refills at Restaurants filename: tafalado_gra_04.mp3 track number: 30/46 time: 13:55 size: 9.78 MB bitrate: 96 kbps When you go, you will buy a soda. If you buy a soda, you will get refills. As soon as you get refills, you will sit down with friends to talk. Those who sit and talk with friends, will have a great time. Yes, all of those sentences require the 'future subjunctive' in Portuguese. So, if you listen to Orlando, Valdo, Michelle, and José Luís, you will also learn how to use the future subjunctive. Don't be intimidated, Spanish speaking friends, it's easier than you think!DialogPortugueseMichelle: Não sei, tô me sentindo meio gorda ... se a gente for j
25/05/200713 minutes 55 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 3: Plurals with 'l', Gas Stations

asset title: Grammar Lesson 3: Plurals with 'l', Gas Stations filename: tafalado_gra_03.mp3 track number: 29/46 time: 13:15 size: 9.31 MB bitrate: 96 kbps The plural of Brazil, if there were two of them, would be 'Brasis.' Now that would be a strange word! Spanish speakers aren't sure how to make those words that end in 'l' plural. Orlando, Valdo, Michelle, and José Luís try to tell us that it is as easy as drop the 'l' and add 'is,' but we're sure there is more to it than that. While they are talking about plurals, Valdo and Michelle also tell us about their experience in getting used to self serve gas stations in the U.S. too!DialogPortugueseValdo: Aquele homem está fazendo sinal pra gente baixar o farol do carro?Michelle: Não! Vamos deixar os faróis acesos ... E onde es
21/05/200713 minutes 15 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 2: Contractions, Getting Change From A Machine

asset title: Grammar Lesson 2: Contractions, Getting Change From A Machine filename: tafalado_gra_02.mp3 track number: 28/46 time: 12:20 size: 8.67 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Can you believe how many contractions Portuguese has? : nesse, num, do, naquele, aos, pelo, etc. The list goes on and on. When speakers of Spanish catch on to these contractions, sentences become instantly easier to understand. And that, of course, is what Orlando, Michelle, Valdo, and Jose Luís hope to do with today's lesson on contractions. At the same time, culturally, Valdo and Michelle found it hard to find their change that automatically fell out of a machine at the supermarket. Sure enough, that would be a new experience for visitors from Brazil.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Ficar na fila é duro, né?Valdo:
12/05/200712 minutes 20 seconds
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Grammar Lesson 1: Gostar vs. Gustar, Sitting on the Grass

asset title: Grammar Lesson 1: Gostar vs. Gustar, Sitting on the Grass filename: tafalado_gra_01.mp3 track number: 27/46 time: 10:49 size: 7.61 MB bitrate: 96 kbps We've made a switch. Welcome back to all who have previously listened to Tá Falado. Up to this point, we've always done pronunciation lessons. Today we introduce something new, our first grammar lesson! From here on out we'll look at some of those items that make Spanish speakers shake their heads and say, 'I thought Portuguese and Spanish were more similar than this.' In lesson one, Orlando, Valdo, Michelle, and Jose Luís talk us through the verb 'to like.' We, in fact, hope that you like the lesson too. Culturally, Valdo and Michelle confess that they have never understood why North Americans like to sit on the grass.Dialog
08/05/200710 minutes 49 seconds
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Supplementary Lesson 2: Portuguese Consonant Sounds

asset title: Supplementary Lesson 2: Portuguese Consonant Sounds filename: tafalado_suppl_02.mp3 track number: 26/46 time: 5:33 size: 3.90 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Unlike the regular podcast lessons, we've included some other supplementary lessons. Think of these as a sort of Appendix to the regular lessons. In this second supplementary lesson, we provide an audio sample of all of major consonant sounds for Brazilian Portuguese. This should give you a sense of each of the sounds.
05/04/20075 minutes 33 seconds
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Lesson 24: Intonation

asset title: Lesson 24: Intonation filename: tafalado_24.mp3 track number: 25/46 time: 15:05 size: 10.61 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Today's lesson is totally different. Instead of listening to a dialog and comparing the sounds to Spanish, our team discusses a number of audio clips that illustrate Brazilian Portuguese intonation patterns. Do not worry about understanding what they clips are saying. The objective of today's lesson is to listen to the music, rhythm, and pitch of Brazilian Portuguese. And yes, Brazilians do think of Halls Mentho-Lyptus as candy!Clip #1, from Lesson 13 dialogValdo and VivianPortuguese: Ah, é mesmo. Dentro de alguns cinemas aqui eles servem comida. Gostoso, né?Spanish: Ah, es cierto. Dentro de algunos cines aquí se sirve comida. Qué chévere, ¿no?Eng
28/03/200715 minutes 5 seconds
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Lesson 23: Cool Little Words, Nicknames

asset title: Lesson 23: Cool Little Words, Nicknames filename: tafalado_23.mp3 track number: 24/46 time: 9:11 size: 6.46 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Let's see if we have this right? Michelle's family gave her the nickname 'witch' because of how moody she became when under stress at school, right? Wow, that's a mean nickname, at least from a North American point of view. This lesson is a bit different in that we don't look at pronunciation directly, but we do look at the little extra words that people add to their speech, like, you know, umm, well, like, whatever, you know?DialogPortugueseMichelle: Cê sabe que os americanos acham estranho certos apelidos que a gente coloca nas pessoas.Valdo: Diga aí ... vem cá, eles não usam apelidos?Michelle: Então, veja só ... quando eu digo
23/03/20079 minutes 11 seconds
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Lesson 22: Epenthetic Vowels (wow, fancy word!), Fast Food

asset title: Lesson 22: Epenthetic Vowels (wow, fancy word!), Fast Food filename: tafalado_22.mp3 track number: 23/46 time: 11:50 size: 8.32 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Epenthe ... what? Epenthetic vowels. We know, it sounds like a tropical disease, but it's really the linguistic feature that produces such great Brazilian words as 'piquenique' for picnic. Valdo isn't sure he can bring himself to say 'hoti doggie' for 'hot dog,' but he has no problem with 'fasti foodi.'DialogPortugueseValdo: Você já observou como a comida daqui é diferente da nossa?Michelle: É óbvio que sim! E o mais absurdo é que a gente não tem opção: é fast food todo dia!Valdo: Você está absolutamente certa! No Brasil, nós nunca substituiríamos um prato de arroz e feijão por um pedaço de pizza ou p
19/03/200711 minutes 50 seconds
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Lesson 21: Pronunciation of Syllable-final 'l', Making Prints of Digital Photos

asset title: Lesson 21: Pronunciation of Syllable-final 'l', Making Prints of Digital Photos filename: tafalado_21.mp3 track number: 22/46 time: 13:20 size: 9.38 MB bitrate: 96 kbps If you would like to say the name of their country correctly, Michelle and Valdo are here to show us how to say 'Brasil,' which really comes out more like 'Braziw.' That is the trick in lesson 21. They also share their experience at self-service digital photo machines.DialogPortugueseValdo: No Brasil a gente sempre tem alguém que revela as nossas fotos. E aqui, qual é o procedimento ideal?Michelle: Aqui não falta lugar que tenha essas máquinas de alta tecnologia para imprimir fotos multicoloridas.Valdo: A última vez que revelei as minhas a cor azul ficou muito saltada. Não gostei do resultad
13/03/200713 minutes 20 seconds
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Lesson 20: Pronunciation of 'lh', Automatic Sprinklers

asset title: Lesson 20: Pronunciation of 'lh', Automatic Sprinklers filename: tafalado_20.mp3 track number: 21/46 time: 12:38 size: 4.44 MB bitrate: 48 kbps The 'mulher molhada trabalhava' is rendered in Spanish as 'mujer mojada tabajaba.' That's our basic rule: words spelled with 'j' in Spanish are often spelled with 'lh' in Portuguese. However, you've got to hear the podcast to find out how they are pronounced. Culturally Valdo and Michelle admire the number of automatic sprinklers that are found in residential areas in the United States.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Um dia desses eu vi uma mulher toda molhada enquanto trabalhava.Valdo: É mesmo? Me conta isso melhor. Quero saber os detalhes.Michelle: Ela estava recolhendo uns galhos que estavam espalhados em frente de um cond
07/03/200712 minutes 38 seconds
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Lesson 19: Pronunciation of 'nh', Laundromats, Really?

asset title: Lesson 19: Pronunciation of 'nh', Laundromats, Really? filename: tafalado_19.mp3 track number: 20/46 time: 11:25 size: 4.02 MB bitrate: 48 kbps Valdo and Michelle still can't get used to the idea of taking their clothes to a Laundromat and using the coin-operated machines. Sure enough, in Brazil you either wash clothes at home or pay someone else to do the laundry. As they talk of Laundromats, we'll hear the pronunciation of many words that are spelled with 'nh,' similar to the Spanish 'ñ.'DialogPortugueseMichelle: Amanhã sem falta tenho que voltar aqui para lavar minhas roupas de linho que estão manchadas de vinho.Valdo: Eu não tenho visto você aqui ultimamente.Michelle: Eu vinha geralmente à noite, mas agora eu venho de manhã sempre depois do banho.V
02/03/200711 minutes 25 seconds
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Lesson 18: Pronunciation of 'ch', You Call That a Steak House?

asset title: Lesson 18: Pronunciation of 'ch', You Call That a Steak House? filename: tafalado_18.mp3 track number: 19/46 time: 12:42 size: 4.47 MB bitrate: 48 kbps For the meat lovers of the world, we present the Brazilian-style 'churrascarias' and the 'rodízio' buffets. Get ready for over 30 different cuts of meat that will come by your table, and that doesn't include the salad bar either! Michelle is partial to 'coração de galinha' (chicken hearts). Valdo can't wait for the 'costelinha de carneiro' (rack of lamb). Orlando loves the popular 'picanha,' which he can't even say in English, but he knows it is his favorite.No wonder Valdo and Michelle think of American steak restaurants as snacks. Pronunciation is easy: 'ch' in Portuguese always sounds like 'sh.'DialogPortugueseVal
26/02/200712 minutes 42 seconds
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Lesson 17: Pronunciation of 'j', 'ge', and 'gi', Wearing That Tiny Bikini

asset title: Lesson 17: Pronunciation of 'j', 'ge', and 'gi', Wearing That Tiny Bikini filename: tafalado_17.mp3 track number: 18/46 time: 15:02 size: 5.29 MB bitrate: 48 kbps From a North American perspective, the Brazilians have very skimpy swimming suits. However, from Valdo and Michelle's perspective, North American swimsuits are 'gigantes', 'enormes.' In the end, as Michelle explains, 'não importo, vou continuar com o meu biquini do Brasil' (I don't care, I'm going to keep on using my Brazilian bikini). As to pronunciation, did Orlando really say that he wanted to name his daughter 'Janela' (window)? Good thing he didn't!DialogPortugueseMichelle: Gente! Veja aquele cara com aquela sunga laranja gigantesca e aquela mulher com aquele biquini bege enorme!Valdo: Aquilo não Ã
14/02/200715 minutes 2 seconds
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Lesson 16: Pronunciation of 'b', 'd', and 'g', Adding Tax to Purchased Items

asset title: Lesson 16: Pronunciation of 'b', 'd', and 'g', Adding Tax to Purchased Items filename: tafalado_16.mp3 track number: 17/46 time: 10:28 size: 3.68 MB bitrate: 48 kbps For once, a lesson that is easy for native speakers of English, but tough for the native speakers of Spanish. We're talking about how to pronounce words with 'b', 'd', and 'g.' Just wait to hear Jose Luis say the word 'abogado'! As to the cultural topic, Valdo and Michelle are trying to get used to adding tax to the price of the items that they buy.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Preciso comprar algumas coisas lá pra casa. Tudo o que eu comprei na semana passada já acabou.Valdo: Você não tem mais nada? Eu não agüento mais toda semana ter que te levar cada vez para um lugar diferente.Michelle: Deixa
14/02/200710 minutes 28 seconds
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Lesson 15: Pronunciation of 'r' sounds (alt), Good Tippers

asset title: Lesson 15: Pronunciation of 'r' sounds (alt), Good Tippers filename: tafalado_15.mp3 track number: 16/46 time: 10:12 size: 3.59 MB bitrate: 48 kbps Our carioca is back! Once again Vivian Flanzer joins Michelle and Valdo to help us compare how people from Rio de Janeiro pronounce words the 'r' sounds. So now we can compare Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo. This lesson repeats the dialog from Lesson #14, but is sure doesn't sound the same when Vivian is talking.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Essa carne e esse arroz de forno estão de matar!Valdo: Concordo. Que pena que é tão caro! Estou tão duro que não dá nem pra te chamar pra beber uma cerveja.Michelle: E o pior é que ainda tem a gorjeta do garçom.Valdo: Aqui se dá gorjeta pra tudo. No Brasil, os dez
08/02/200710 minutes 12 seconds
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Lesson 14: Pronunciation of 'r' sounds, Good Tippers

asset title: Lesson 14: Pronunciation of 'r' sounds, Good Tippers filename: tafalado_14.mp3 track number: 15/46 time: 13:07 size: 4.61 MB bitrate: 48 kbps North Americans don't always have the greatest image abroad. However, at least we are known as good tippers. Michelle and Valdo tell about how they have to leave more tips than they do in Brazil, and it has been a tough transition. As to pronunciation, Valdo controlled himself to not call Michelle a 'caipira' (hillbilly), but her 'r' sounds are truly fantastic.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Essa carne e esse arroz de forno estão de matar!Valdo: Concordo. Que pena que é tão caro! Estou tão duro que não dá nem pra te chamar pra beber uma cerveja.Michelle: E o pior é que ainda tem a gorjeta do garçom.Valdo: Aqui se dÃ
08/02/200713 minutes 7 seconds
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Lesson 13: Pronunciation of 's' and 'z' Sounds, Eating At Movie Theaters (alt)

asset title: Lesson 13: Pronunciation of 's' and 'z' Sounds, Eating At Movie Theaters (alt) filename: tafalado_13.mp3 track number: 14/46 time: 11:11 size: 3.93 MB bitrate: 48 kbps This podcast lesson is a repeat of Lesson #12 on the sounds of 's' and 'z.' However, in this lesson we have a special guest. Vivian Flanzer is from Rio de Janeiro. And not just Rio, from Copacabana! In this lesson we get to compare Vivian's pronunciation to that of Valdo and Michelle. Get ready for some wild soundings for 's' and 'z.' DialogPortugueseValdo: Acho que vou te visitar à noite. Não quero ficar em casa.Michelle:Eu estou com dois ingressos para o cinema que tenho que usar antes que o prazo esgote. Valdo: Sabe que seria massa! Saiu um filme que eu queria mesmo ver desde a semana passad
08/02/200711 minutes 11 seconds
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Lesson 12: Pronunciation of 's' and 'z' Sounds, Eating at Movie Theaters

asset title: Lesson 12: Pronunciation of 's' and 'z' Sounds, Eating at Movie Theaters filename: tafalado_12.mp3 track number: 13/46 time: 15:09 size: 10.66 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Our podcast comes to you from Austin, Texas. Valdo and Michelle have noticed that here in Austin there are movie theaters that serve full meals, just like in regular restaurants. What a great idea, and that is our cultural observation for this lesson. As to the sounds of Portuguese and Spanish, we take on a big one today. Valdo and Michelle help us to understand when Portuguese words that are written with an 's' sound like an 's' and when they sound like a 'z.' Get ready for their five rules! Spanish speaking listeners, get ready to say more 'z' sounds. DialogPortugueseValdo: Acho que vou te visitar à noite. NÃ
05/01/200715 minutes 9 seconds
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Lesson 11: Pronunciation of Palatalization (alt), Cell Phones and Driving

asset title: Lesson 11: Pronunciation of Palatalization (alt), Cell Phones and Driving filename: tafalado_11.mp3 track number: 12/46 time: 8:16 size: 5.81 MB bitrate: 96 kbps In the previous lesson we learned all about palatalization, when words spelled with 'ti' sound like 'chee' and words with 'di' sound like 'jee.' This is pretty much true for people in live in the central regions of Brazil. However, in the far north and in the far south of Brazil, it is much less common. Today we introduce everyone to Alfredo Barros who is from Teresinha, Pernambuco. We'll all get a chance to hear his dialect, from a region where people don't have as much palatalization. It makes for a great comparison with the way that Valdo and Michelle talk.DialogPortugueseValdo: Um dia desses minha tia, que jÃ
05/01/20078 minutes 16 seconds
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Lesson 10: Pronunciation of Palatalization, Cell Phones and Driving

asset title: Lesson 10: Pronunciation of Palatalization, Cell Phones and Driving filename: tafalado_10.mp3 track number: 11/46 time: 13:47 size: 9.70 MB bitrate: 96 kbps One of the great differences between Spanish and Portuguese is seen in how Brazilians pronounce words that are spelled with 'ti,' which sounds more like 'chee' and how words spelled with 'di' sound more like 'jee.' The fancy word for this is palatalization. But look out, not all Brazilian dialects do it. So, in this lesson we listen to Valdo and Michelle, who both do it. In the next lesson we'll repeat the same dialog to hear what these words sound like without palatalization. As to the culture part of this lesson, Valdo and Michelle talk about the use of cellular phones while driving.DialogPortugueseValdo: Um dia dess
05/01/200713 minutes 47 seconds
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Lesson 9: Pronunciation of Vowel Raising, Parking Meters

asset title: Lesson 9: Pronunciation of Vowel Raising, Parking Meters filename: tafalado_09.mp3 track number: 10/46 time: 10:59 size: 7.72 MB bitrate: 96 kbps This lesson takes on some pretty advanced stuff. We're going to talk about 'vowel raising.' No, it really doesn't have anything to do with the Future Farmers of America or with the building of a barn. But, do come on out for some good old Texas ... that is Brazilian 'vowel raisin'.' And don't worry about where to park your pick-up because Valdo and Michelle will also talk to you about parking cars in the U.S. and Brazil. I know, a corny intro, but we just couldn't resist!DialogPortugueseValdo: Onde podemos estacionar o carro? Já estou morrendo de fome.Michelle: Menino, como é complicado estacionar aqui nos Estados Un
18/12/200610 minutes 59 seconds
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Lesson 8: Pronunciation of Nasal Diphthongs, Buying Fruits and Vegetables

asset title: Lesson 8: Pronunciation of Nasal Diphthongs, Buying Fruits and Vegetables filename: tafalado_08.mp3 track number: 9/46 time: 13:08 size: 9.24 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Somehow it always seems more difficult to buy food in other countries. We just get used to how everything is done in our home country: park in front of the supermarket, grab the cart, choose your fruits and vegetables, get your packaged meat, find a loaf of bread, pick up a carton of milk. Easy, right? Wrong. Little nuances in how shopping is different can make things more difficult. These shopping challenges are even greater than learning the pronunciation of nasal diphthongs, which is the language topic of this lesson. We're sure that Valdo and Michelle with help us with both.DialogPortugueseValdo: Em que
18/12/200613 minutes 8 seconds
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Lesson 7: Pronunciation of Nasal Vowels, Invitations to Parties

asset title: Lesson 7: Pronunciation of Nasal Vowels, Invitations to Parties filename: tafalado_07.mp3 track number: 8/46 time: 12:47 size: 8.99 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Often people hear, 'I think Portuguese sounds a lot like French and Spanish combined.' Maybe those that say this are hearing the nasalized vowels in Portuguese, and there are a lot of them. Either way, this lesson introduces the nasalized vowels. As to the cultural element, Michelle and Valdo talk about how surprised they were to see that sometimes invitations to parties in the United States not only tell you when the party starts, but also when the party ends. How bizarre is that?DialogPortugueseMichelle: Olha aqui o convite de casamento que a minha irmã me enviou hoje de manhã.Valdo: Mas ela não é muito tua f
18/12/200612 minutes 47 seconds
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Lesson 6: Pronunciation of Oral Diphthongs, Going to the Pharmacy

asset title: Lesson 6: Pronunciation of Oral Diphthongs, Going to the Pharmacy filename: tafalado_06.mp3 track number: 7/46 time: 12:22 size: 8.70 MB bitrate: 96 kbps In this lesson Valdo and Michelle can't figure out why it is so difficult to get medicine from a pharmacy in the United States. This whole idea of going to a doctor first to get a prescription seems to complicate things a lot. It took them a while to get used to it, but it doesn't mean that they have to like it. As to pronunciation, today we look at diphthongs. It's a fancy word, to be sure, but it basically means that we are talking about Portuguese vowel sounds that come one right after another.DialogPortugueseMichelle: Oi Valdo, como vai?Valdo: Vou bem. Já está gastando dinheiro?Michelle: Só um pouquinho
27/11/200612 minutes 22 seconds
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Supplementary Lesson 1: English, Spanish, and Portuguese Vowel Sounds

asset title: Supplementary Lesson 1: English, Spanish, and Portuguese Vowel Sounds filename: tafalado_suppl_01.mp3 track number: 6/46 time: 9:25 size: 6.63 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Unlike the regular podcast lessons, we've included some other supplementary lessons. Think of these as a sort of Appendix to the regular lessons. In this first supplementary lesson we provide an audio sample of all of the vowel sounds in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. We're sure it will help listeners get a feel for each of the sounds.
13/11/20069 minutes 25 seconds
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Lesson 5: Stressed and Unstressed /a/, Self-Checkout at the Supermarket

asset title: Lesson 5: Stressed and Unstressed /a/, Self-Checkout at the Supermarket filename: tafalado_05.mp3 track number: 5/46 time: 9:30 size: 6.52 MB bitrate: 96 kbps There is a tendency for almost every vowel in unstressed syllables in English to turn into what is called a 'schwa'. It is the sound like 'uh'. Listen, for example the 'e' in 'delivery'. When learning Spanish, one of the great challenges is to stop saying 'uh.' 'It's 'nada' not 'naduh'! However, in Portuguese Brazilians also pronounce unstressed /a/ as a schwa. You see, all this time you thought you had bad Spanish and you really just have good Portuguese. As to the cultural situation in this lesson, both Michelle and Valdo had to get used to the self-checkout lines at the supermarket. Dialog Portuguese Valdo
13/11/20069 minutes 30 seconds
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Lesson 4: Pronunciation of Open /ó/ and Closed /ô/, Getting on a City Bus

asset title: Lesson 4: Pronunciation of Open /ó/ and Closed /ô/, Getting on a City Bus filename: tafalado_04.mp3 track number: 4/46 time: 10:21 size: 7.28 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Spanish speakers learn to sing 'a, e, i, o, u, el burro sabe más que tú' and it's a way to show that there are only 5 vowel sounds in Spanish. Portuguese, however, complicates things with what are called 'open' and 'closed' vowel sounds. In this lesson we learn about open /ó/ and closed /ô/. Culturally Michelle and Valdo talk about how different it is to ride a bus in the United States. All we can say is that at least they don't have to cram as tightly into limited space and then wonder the whole time how they are going to get off the bus! Dialog Portuguese Valdo: Lá vem o nosso ônibus! Vamos correr!
13/11/200610 minutes 21 seconds
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Lesson 3: Pronunciation of /é/ and /ê/, Public Health and Health Insurance

asset title: Lesson 3: Pronunciation of /é/ and /ê/, Public Health and Health Insurance filename: tafalado_03.mp3 track number: 3/46 time: 8:45 size: 6.15 MB bitrate: 96 kbps Welcome to one of the great challenges of Brazilian Portuguese pronunciation. Sometimes 'e' sounds similar to the English sound in words like 'get, met, set.' Other times Brazilian 'e' sounds like the Spanish 'e' in words like 'bebe, vive, lleve.' Valdo and Michelle help us out. Culturally they also help us understand how different it is for Brazilians to have to worry about personal health insurance. Dialog Portuguese Valdo: Você já quebrou o pé? Michelle: Quebrei a perna. E você não sabe como pesou no bolso. Valdo: Por quê? Michelle: Porque paguei uma nota pelo gesso. Até mesmo com se
13/11/20068 minutes 45 seconds
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Lesson 2: Pronunciation of /u/, Slamming the Car Door

asset title: Lesson 2: Pronunciation of /u/, Slamming the Car Door filename: tafalado_02.mp3 track number: 2/46 time: 9:27 size: 6.65 MB bitrate: 96 kbps The good news about Lesson #2 is that we're back. It must be that Lesson #1 gave us hope to move on. In this lesson we listen for the sound /u/ in Portuguese. The tricky thing is that many times it is spelled with an 'o.' Culturally, Valdo and Michelle talk to us about not slamming car doors. It's really true, Brazilians are amazed at how hard Americans slam car doors! Dialog Portuguese Valdo: Puxa vida. Você não tem geladeira em casa, não? Seja mais educada. Michelle: Sinto muito eu ter batido a porta do carro. Valdo: Você sabe que no Brasil a gente não faz isso. Michelle: Eu sei. Esqueci. Prometo ficar mais a
13/11/20069 minutes 27 seconds
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Lesson 1: Pronunciation of /i/, Getting the Check at a Restaurant

asset title: Lesson 1: Pronunciation of /i/, Getting the Check at a Restaurant filename: tafalado_01.mp3 track number: 1/46 time: 10:32 size: 7.41 MB bitrate: 96 kbps There's only one Lesson #1. We'll never have a first again. Today we introduce listeners to the team: Orlando, Valdo, Michelle, and José Luis. Pronunciation wise, we'll look at when Brazilians say words with the sound [i] and culturally Michelle and Valdo talk about what it was like to get the bill in restaurants in the United States. Tune in, join our discussion, download the lesson notes, and become part of Brazilpod. Dialog Portuguese Valdo: Que bife gostoso. Acho que vou pedir mais. Michelle: Mas ele já trouxe a conta. E agora? Valdo: Eh, você me disse que aqui era assim. Acho isso uma falta de educa
13/11/200610 minutes 32 seconds