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The Women's Podcast

English, Social, 1 season, 483 episodes, 1 day, 18 hours, 16 minutes
About
The Women's Podcast, hosted by Kathy Sheridan & Róisín Ingle.
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Women in Politics: Battling the rising tide of abuse

The local and European elections are taking place in just over two weeks time, on Friday June 7th. Since the beginning of the campaign, there have been a number of worrying incidents where election candidates have faced intimidation, harassment and abuse while out canvassing or hanging up party posters. Green Party Councillor Janet Horner and Social Democrats election candidate Ellen O’Doherty have both experienced this type of intimidating behaviour in their constituency. They talk to Kathy Sheridan about what happened, how it has impacted their campaigns and how abuse in political life is widespread, problematic and targeted disproportionately at women and minority groups. We also hear from Lisa Keenan, Assistant Professor in Political Science at Trinity College, who recently contributed to the Taskforce report on Safe Participation in Political Life. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/23/20241 hour, 9 seconds
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Marian Keyes: My Favourite Mistake

Author, podcaster and fond friend of the show, Marian Keyes is back with her sixteenth novel ‘My Favourite Mistake’. It follows Anna Walsh, as she ditches her high-flying PR job and makes the move from the Big Apple to the wilds of Connemara. In this episode, Keyes talks to Róisín Ingle about abandoning the original idea for the book, in favour of writing a love story instead. She also reflects on some recent personal milestones; moving house, celebrating 30 years of sobriety and having her portrait unveiled at the National Gallery of Ireland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/16/20241 hour, 1 minute, 8 seconds
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Childfree by choice: The women who choose not to have kids

In this episode, author Caroline Magennis talks to Róisín Ingle about her new book Harpy: A Manifesto for Childfree Women. It’s a look beyond the often divisive conversation around choosing not to have children, and offers an alternative message of hope and celebration. We also hear from Margaret O’Connor, a Limerick-based psychotherapist and presenter of the ‘Are Kids For Me’ Podcast. Through her work as a therapist, O’Connor supports people wondering if parenthood is for them. Writer Laura Kennedy, is also here to discuss the pressures faced by women as they approach the end of their fertility window and her own feelings of  ambivalence around motherhood. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/9/20241 hour, 5 seconds
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Wallis Bird: 1000 years of female composers

It’s hard to believe the last time Wallis Bird was on the podcast was nearly five years ago in 2019. Since then, the Berlin-based musician has released two more albums, the latest of which, Visions of Venus, was released last month. It’s a creative collaboration with the German classical quintet Spark, and together they are showcasing 1000 years of female composers from Clara Schumann to Kate Bush, Enya to Hildegard von Bingen. In this wide-ranging conversation with Róisín Ingle, Bird talks about the women at the centre of this ambitious album and what their music means to her. She also shares the details of her ongoing renovation project, turning a derelict farmhouse in rural Germany into a house for herself and five others, and she talks about the grief and shock at losing her best friend suddenly last December. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/2/202459 minutes, 51 seconds
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Fertility on Ice: why more women are choosing to freeze their eggs

Last November, Pastiche, a pop singer-songwriter from Malahide in Co Dublin was diagnosed with endometriosis, more than a decade after her first symptoms of the condition developed. While the diagnosis itself came as a relief, the 26-year-old was told she may face difficulties when trying to conceive later on. This ultimately led to her decision to freeze her eggs, as a sort of "insurance policy” for her fertility. In this conversation with Kathy Sheridan, Pastiche talks about the egg freezing process, what she wishes she knew going into it and how she’s used her music to share her personal story. We also hear from Edwina Oakes, chairperson of the Irish Fertility Counsellors Association, who discusses the reasons behind the rising numbers of women freezing their eggs and explains who she typically sees going forward for the procedure.Pastiche’s new song Forfeit Control is out now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/25/202445 minutes, 23 seconds
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Narcissistic mothers: How to handle one and how to heal

What does narcissism in mothers look like? According to psychotherapists Helen Villiers and Katie McKenna, the narcissistic mother can be “extremely critical, condescending, oppressive and very judgmental”, with devastating impacts for the entire family. They can also use covert or insidious tactics: taking on a victim role or using guilt tripping or stonewalling to get their way. In this episode, Villiers and McKenna join Róisín Ingle to discuss the main traits of maternal narcissism, how it can impact families and how to heal the emotional scars that come with being a child of narcissistic parents.Their new book You’re Not the Problem: The impact of narcissism and emotional abuse and how to heal is out now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/18/202452 minutes, 14 seconds
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Rebecca Ivory: Free Therapy

In this episode, Róisín Ingle talks to debut author Rebecca Ivory about her new collection of short stories Free Therapy. The book takes its name from the second story in the collection, but the theme of therapy is there throughout; Ivory’s own therapist even gets a mention in the acknowledgements. The collection takes us into the lives of people who “keep making the same mistakes over and over again”, but for a variety of reasons are unable to change. It’s about unfulfilling jobs, unfulfilling men, desire and connection and has also been endorsed by Sally Rooney. In this conversation, Ivory talks about finding the confidence to pursue her creative dreams, how her family and working-class background shaped her and how she juggles working full time and writing her first novel.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/11/202442 minutes, 40 seconds
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Simone Gannon: Beauty through the ages

Simone Gannon is a content creator, digital marketing expert and the new beauty writer at the Irish Times. Since the beginning of the new year, she’s been entertaining us with her weekly beauty column, where she experiments with the latest trends, imparts her wisdom on all things skincare and makeup and shares her favourite beauty buys. In this episode, Gannon speaks to Róisín Ingle about how to look after your skin at any age, the must have items for the ultimate skin care routine and the beauty products she purchases time and time again. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/4/202452 minutes, 33 seconds
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Living with Endometriosis

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month, so in this episode, we want to highlight the experience of two women living with the condition. Dearbhail Ormond is an entrepreneur and mother of one, with stage four endometriosis, who waited a staggering 18 years to get a diagnosis after seeing more than 20 doctors. Ormond tells Aideen Finnegan about her struggle to find answers to her pain and how it ultimately led her to found ‘frendo app’, a platform for tracking symptoms and to provide support to others navigating the condition. We also hear from Johanna Huber, a physiotherapist and yoga teacher based in Co Cork, who also spent many years being misdiagnosed. Huber discusses the surgeries she underwent to treat her pain, how she helps other women ease their symptoms through movement and relaxation and why she eventually sought medical treatment abroad. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/28/202453 minutes, 53 seconds
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Jan Brierton: Everybody Is A Poem

It’s World Poetry Day today, so what better way to celebrate it than with one of our favourite poets and friend of the show, Jan Brierton. In this episode, Brierton, a self-described ‘accidental’ poet, joins Róisín Ingle to talk about her new book, Everybody Is A Poem. It’s s beautiful collection covering themes of love, loss, menopause, midlife, the mental load, self-acceptance, and much more. Brierton talks about the real-life events which inspired her latest batch of poetry and recites a couple of her favourites. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/21/202433 minutes, 9 seconds
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Leave Molly mAlone / Protecting maternity leave for cancer patients

Tilly Cripwell, a 22 year-old musician, who regularly performs beside the Molly Malone statue in Dublin, is on a mission to stop people from inappropriately touching the sculpture’s breasts. In this episode, Cripwell tells Róisín Ingle how she’s launched the ‘Leave Molly mAlone’ campaign with the aim of stopping this “misogynistic” tradition and to protest against the mockery and objectification of the city’s beloved statue.Later on, we’ll also be hearing about another worthy campaign, called ‘Leave our Leave’, run by the Irish Cancer Society. It focuses on the 60 women each year in Ireland, who receive a cancer diagnosis during or just after their pregnancy, who are not able to defer their maternity leave during this period. That’s despite men being able to defer their paternity leave following a diagnosis. To understand why this is the case and how it directly impacts women, Kathy Sheridan speaks to cancer survivor Emma McGuinness and CEO of the Irish cancer society Averil Power. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/14/202459 minutes, 5 seconds
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International Women’s Day: The war on women in Palestine

This International Women’s Day, we are turning our attention to the plight of Palestinian women and children. So far, more than 30,000 people have been killed in the ongoing conflict in Gaza, the majority of which have been women and children. The UN and Human Rights Watch have called it a “war on women”, with an average of 63 women killed every single day, mostly in their own homes. There are also around 50,000 pregnant women in Gaza, with 180 per day giving birth in unimaginable conditions. To talk about the current situation in Palestine and the difficulties of getting aid to those who need it most, Róisín Ingle is joined by Fikr Shalltoot, a Gazan woman and director with Medical Aid for Palestinians (MAP). We also hear from MayKay Geraghty, musician and member of the Irish Artists for Palestine collective, who, on March 15th, will release a stunning cover of Sinead O’Connors ‘Black Boys on Mopeds’, to raise much needed funds for the Lajee Centre in the Aida refugee camp in the West Bank. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/7/202444 minutes
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The Referendum Special: Women, Home, Duties, Common Good, Care & Family

On International Women’s Day this year, March 8th, the Irish public will be asked to vote in two upcoming referendums. The first referendum concerns the definition of family as outlined in the Irish Constitution and proposes expanding the definition to recognise durable relationships. The second referendum proposes the removal of the reference to women’s duties in the home, instead replacing it with language recognising care within the family. To explore all sides of the arguments on the yes and no side, Róisín Ingle is joined by former barrister and journalist Laura Perrins and visual artist Aideen Barry. Irish Times political correspondent Jennifer Bray is also here to set out what voters are being asked, what the changes will mean and what concerns have been raised regarding the amendments. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/29/20241 hour, 4 minutes, 1 second
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Secret Voices: A Year of Women’s Diaries

In this episode, Kathy Sheridan is joined by British author and journalist Sarah Gristwood, who has just released her new book, Secret Voices: A Year of Women’s Diaries. It’s a captivating collection of diary entries from women, looking back over four centuries, to discover how their experience of everyday life has changed down the years and also how it hasn’t. It includes entries from some remarkable women like Virginia Woolf, Oprah Winfrey, Anne Frank, Louisa May Alcott and even Queen Victoria. In this conversation, Gristwood talks about the inspiration behind the collection, the common themes that pop up throughout like anger, frustration and lust and what these intimate musings have taught her about the variety and richness of the female experience. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/22/202444 minutes, 4 seconds
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Overcoming perfectionism: Fiona Brennan and Edel Coffey

Being a perfectionist may sound like a good thing, but don’t let the name fool you. A perfectionist’s life is far from perfect. If you are one, or you know one well, you’ll likely know of the debilitating effects that can come with a perfectionist’s constant quest for excellence. So why does it manifest and who is more likely to struggle with it? To explore this world of impossibly high standards. Kathy Sheridan is joined by clinical hypnotherapist Fiona Brennan and author and writer Edel Coffey. Brennan explains what causes perfectionism, why more women than men are likely to suffer from it and the ways we can overcome it, while Coffey shares her personal experience of being a perfectionist, how it has affected different aspects of her life and the joy of finally letting go. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/15/202453 minutes, 20 seconds
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Make Gaeilge Great Again: Áine Gallagher and Mollie Guidera

In today’s episode, we’re dusting off our ‘cúpla focal’ and talking about the joys of Gaeilge with two Irish language innovators, Mollie Guidera, aka Múinteoir Mollie and comedian Áine Gallagher. But, don’t worry, you don’t need to have any Irish to enjoy this conversation. Guidera, an online Irish teacher tells Róisin Ingle how she discovered her passion for teaching at the age of seven, showing her American cousins how to speak a few Irish words over Thanksgiving dinner. We also hear how despite getting kicked out of Irish college in her very first year, her love for the language never faltered. Gallagher, who brings Irish into her comedy routines explains how a new year's resolution to speak it everyday set her on path to become ‘Ireland’s only guerrilla Irish language enthusiast’. The pair talk about their passion for our native tongue, what can be done to improve the way it’s taught in schools and why they're on a mission to make Gaeilge great again. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/8/202440 minutes, 51 seconds
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Missing Persons: Clair Wills on the search for her secret cousin

In this episode, Kathy Sheridan is joined by British academic and author Clair Wills. In her new book  Missing Persons, Or My Grandmother’s Secrets, Wills brings the reader on an intimate journey through her family history and lays bare the brutal treatment of Ireland’s unmarried mothers. The wheels were set in motion for this book in the early 90s, when Wills learned of her long lost cousin Mary, born in Bessborough mother and baby home in Cork in the 1950s. Bessborough was only a few miles down the road from where Wills had spent idyllic childhood summers on her grandmother Molly’s farm. In this episode, she talks to Kathy Sheridan about the inherent shame and guilt that reinforced this culture of secret keeping in Ireland, the challenges of piecing together her family history and why, despite initial reservations, she felt compelled to tell their story. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/1/202446 minutes, 2 seconds
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Breakdown: Cathy Sweeney

Breakdown is the debut novel from author and former English teacher Cathy Sweeney. It tells the story of a disillusioned mother, living in a leafy suburb in Dublin, who leaves her house one morning and never returns. In this episode, Sweeney tells Róisín Ingle how she came to write Breakdown and reflects on the stories women still don’t openly tell about themselves even in modern liberal Ireland. In this wide ranging conversation, Sweeney also talks about her childhood spent moving from place to place, how becoming a mother at 18 shaped her life and why she’s turning her attention to Oscar Wilde for her next writing project. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/25/202453 minutes, 35 seconds
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Breaking barriers: Inny Ekeolu and Aghogho Okpara

In this episode, we are joined by two young black-Irish women who have excelled in their respective fields of law and medicine, despite plenty of obstacles along the way. Trainee solicitor Inny Ekeolu and second year medical student Aghogho Okpara talk to Róisín Ingle about their career ambitions, tackling imposter syndrome and the importance of representation. They also speak about changes they’d like to see in their industries and how they ignored those who told them to “aim lower”. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/18/202457 minutes, 5 seconds
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Double Act: Millie Daniel-Dempsey and Amy Robyn Lyster

All singing, all dancing duo Honey and Lemon are bringing their new show Double Act to the Project Arts Theatre on January 18th. It’s a whistle-stop tour of the history of women in entertainment. Think French & Saunders, The Cheeky Girls and Thelma & Louise. Honey and Lemon consists of Millie Daniel-Dempsey and Amy Robyn Lyster, two multidisciplinary entertainers who experiment with dance, voice and film to blur the boundaries of contemporary dance. In this episode, the pair speak to Róisín Ingle about the inspiration behind the show, their work as artists in residence at the Civic Theatre Tallaght and how movement can do wonders for the mind and body. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/11/202435 minutes, 2 seconds
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Your favourite episodes of 2023

This week, as we ease into the rhythm of a brand new year, we are taking the opportunity to bring you some highlights from your favourite episodes of The Women’s Podcast in 2023. You’ll hear Marian Keyes sharing some learnings on life as she celebrated her 60th birthday, author and academic Katriona O’Sullivan on how a chance encounter transformed her life, plus columnist Caitlin Moran on the worrying rise of Andrew Tate. There’s also a snippet from our interview with Sinéad O’Connor recorded during the promotion of her memoir Rememberings, plus a lesson on botox from journalist and broadcaster Sali Hughes.If there is a subject you’d like us to cover on the podcast in 2024, please get in touch with us [email protected] or DM us on Twitter or Instagram at @itwomenspodcast Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/4/202431 minutes, 48 seconds
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The Women's Podcast 2023 Review

2023: It was a year that broke global temperature records, riots took over the streets of Dublin and the world looked on in horror as more than 20,000 people were killed in the Gaza Strip, around 70% of which were women and children.  HSE-funded fertility treatment became available to couples and the Irish football team did us proud at the Women’s World Cup. Josef Puska was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Aisling Murphy, singer and activist Sinead O’Connor died at the age of 56 and the Irish Government brought in paid leave for victims of domestic abuse. To talk through the pivotal moments of 2023 and how they impacted women in Ireland and around the world, Róisín Ingle is joined by author and academic Katriona O’Sullivan and journalist and broadcaster Alison O’Connor. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/28/202350 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Book Club: Christmas gift recommendations

If you’re looking for a last minute gift idea, you can never go wrong with a good book. So that’s why we’ve gathered our book clubbers, Niamh Towey, Bernice Harrison, Róisín and Ann Ingle in studio to share their favourite reads of 2023. Their recommendations include a collection of feminist essays, an unforgettable memoir and a best-selling novel on time travel. Whether it's a gift for family, friends or even for yourself, we hope there's something for everyone here. Here's the list of books mentioned in this episode:Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver Bad Feminist by Roxane GayBefore the Coffee gets Cold by Toshikaz KawaguchBirnam Wood by Eleanor CattonTom Lake by Ann Patchett Western Lane by Chetna Maroo  Past Lying by Val McDermid An Eye on Ireland: A Journey Through Social Change by Justine McCarthy Poor by Katriona O’Sullivan So Late in the Day, Foster and Small Things Like These, all three by Claire Keegan. All the Little Bird-Hearts by Viktoria Lloyd-Barlow Good Material by Dolly Alderton Dear Gay by Suzy Byrne The Bee Sting by Paul Murray Be Useful: Seven Tools for Life by Arnold Schwarzenegger Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/21/202341 minutes, 8 seconds
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Remembering Rosemary Smith

Irish motorsport legend Rosemary Smith died last week at the age of 86. To pay tribute to the trailblazing rally driver, we want to bring you this interview with Smith from 2018. Following the release of ‘Driven’, her memoir ghostwritten by none other than Ann Ingle, Smith joined Róisín Ingle in studio to discuss her colourful racing career, her love affairs with the likes of Oliver Reed and Adam Faith and how she overcame the odd bump in the road along the way. Rest easy Rosemary. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/14/202345 minutes, 14 seconds
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Taking Back My Power: ‘Revenge porn’ campaigner Georgia Harrison

In 2020, author and reality television star Georgia Harrison became a victim of so called ‘revenge porn’ when she was secretly recorded having sex with her ex partner, Stephen Bear and the footage then put online without her consent. The intimate moment between the two was captured on the CCTV system at Bear’s house and despite pleas from Harrison to delete the footage, her ex uploaded it to the internet, for the entire world to see. In March this year, Bear was sentenced to 21 months in prison for sharing the sexual content. In this episode, Harrison tells Róisín Ingle about the trauma of her most personal moment becoming public, why she didn’t think twice before going to the police and how she campaigned to change a major loophole in the UK law on image based sexual abuse. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/7/202358 minutes, 10 seconds
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Emma Dabiri: Claiming your unruly beauty

Irish-Nigerian author and broadcaster Emma Dabiri is giving the middle finger to modern beauty standards. Growing up, Dabiri felt pressured to conform to “oppressive” beauty ideals, to shrink herself to fit in and to straighten her afro hair. Now, as she explains in her new essay ‘Disobedient Bodies’, it’s time to rebel against those suffocating beauty constructs. From going makeup free to embracing her natural hair, Dabiri tells Róisín Ingle about the power that comes with reclaiming your unruly beauty. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/30/202339 minutes, 54 seconds
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Justine McCarthy: An Eye on Ireland

In her new book, An Eye on Ireland, award-winning journalist and Irish Times columnist Justine McCarthy shares new and selected pieces of work from her long-spanning career in journalism. For four decades, McCarthy’s writing has challenged stereotypes, held power to account and helped amplify the voices of women in Ireland. In this wide ranging conversation with Róisín Ingle, McCarthy reflects on her entry into journalism, how the death of her father as a young girl shaped the woman she would become, and she shares some of the stories and subjects that left a lasting impression. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/23/20231 hour, 15 minutes, 42 seconds
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Cat Bohannon: How the female body drove evolution

In her new book Eve: How The Female Body Drove 200 Million Years of Human Evolution, author Cat Bohannon explores the history and science behind the development of the female sex. In this episode, Bohannon explains to Róisín Ingle why the frequent omission of female bodies from scientific research inspired her to write the book, the ‘superpowers’ that she says only females are born with and how the advancement of gynaecology and midwifery helped drive civilisation forward. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/16/20231 hour, 8 seconds
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The Book Club: So Late in the Day by Claire Keegan

At just 64-pages long, you could get through So Late in the Day by Claire Keegan in just one sitting. So if you haven’t read it yet, you’ve no excuse. The story follows Cathal, a civil servant working in Dublin, as he clock watches his way through his office job on a sunny Friday afternoon. When the working day is finally over, he makes the journey home, all the while ruminating on the failed relationship between himself and his ex-fiancé Sabine. It’s a miniature tale that packs plenty of punch, but what did our book clubbers Niamh Towey, Bernice Harrison, Ann and Róisín Ingle make of it? We’d love to hear your thoughts on the book. Why not send us a voice note on Instagram @ITWomensPodcast or email us [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/13/202335 minutes, 46 seconds
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Invisible woman syndrome: Why does it happen and what to do about it

Six years ago, when writer and psychotherapist Lucy Cavendish turned 50 , she began to feel like she didn’t fit in anymore. With her four children reared, Cavendish’s identity as a working mother was gone, leaving her feeling as though she was fading into invisibility; a feeling that some other women in their fifties also experience. After numerous ‘moments’ where she felt a profound ‘loss of self’, she was left wondering, ‘who am I?’ It is this question that the writer tackles in her latest piece for The Guardian, which explores how women in their 50s can begin to step out of the shadows. In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, Cavendish speaks about her feelings of irrelevance and being ‘othered’, what she’s been hearing from those of a similar vintage, and the positive ways in which women can reclaim a sense of purpose and identity. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/9/202343 minutes, 56 seconds
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Catherine Cleary: How to grow your own forest

Three years ago, Irish Times contributor Catherine Cleary decided to buy the cheapest land she could find in Ireland, with the dream of planting her own native forest. Following a long search, Cleary and her husband Liam, eventually came across 40 acres of land for sale in Co Roscommon. This year, with the help of family, friends and paid contractors, they planted 24,000 trees over 27 acres and have watched their slice of Irish countryside burst back into life. In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, Cleary talks about why she took on a project of this size, the inspiration behind her social enterprise Pocket Forests, which aims to bring mini-forests to urban spaces and how she’s trying to make the world a better place one tree at a time. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/2/202350 minutes, 1 second
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Best of The Women's Podcast: Elizabeth Day

Romantic love, widely elevated as a subject worth interrogating, tends to get a lot of attention while platonic friendship is woefully neglected in the public discourse. Enter, self-described “friendaholic” Elizabeth Day who is attempting to redress the balance. The author and woman behind the hit How to Fail podcast spoke to Roisin Ingle about why the complex bonds of friendship need more attention and how during the pandemic she was forced to reassess her own friendship circle. Her new book Friendaholic: Confessions of a friendship addict prompted her to look back at her experience of being bullied at school while growing up in Belfast where she struggled to fit in and make friends. Day spent many years using friendship - the more friends the better - as a form of self-validation. For Day, having lots of friends meant you were loved, popular and safe. But this quantity over quality approach was often to the detriment of her own boundaries and mental health. Day talked to Ingle about the great friendships of her life, what it feels like to be ghosted, dealing with frenemies, how friendships were affected by her fertility journey and the lessons she learned while writing the book. Friendaholic: Confessions of a friendship addict is out now.This episode was originally published in May 2023. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/26/202356 minutes, 59 seconds
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Menopause: Claire Dinsmore on ‘the power years’

This week, marked World Menopause Day, a day to raise awareness and break the stigma around perimenopause and menopause. To celebrate this transitional period in life, we’re joined today by Claire Dinsmore, a certified perimenopause coach and fitness fanatic based in San Francisco. In this episode, Dinsmore, who originally comes from Co Down in Northern Ireland, speaks to Róisín Ingle about why perimenopause should be viewed as ‘the power years’ and how she helps women navigate the journey through her online course ‘The Whole Woman Approach’. You can find her on @clairedinsmorecoaching on Instagram. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/19/202338 minutes, 35 seconds
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Agnes O’Casey: Lies We Tell

A graduate of Dublin’s Lir Academy, English actress Agnes O’Casey made her big break in the highly acclaimed BBC series Ridley Road in 2021. Now the rising acting star is playing the lead in her first feature film, Lies We Tell, a psychological thriller set in 1800s Ireland, which hits cinemas this Friday October 13th. In this episode, O’Casey speaks to Róisín Ingle about her excitement ahead of the film’s release, her upcoming projects including the film adaptation of Claire Keegan’s ‘Small Things Like These’ and her famous great-grandfather, the Irish playwright Seán O’Casey. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/12/202343 minutes, 12 seconds
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Máiría Cahill: Rough Beast

Rough Beast: My Story and the Reality of Sinn Féin is the highly anticipated memoir from former Irish Senator Máiría Cahill. Growing up in west Belfast, steeped in the traditions of Irish republicanism, Cahill seemed destined for a political career within Sinn Féin, but at the age of 16, she was sexually abused by a prominent member of the IRA and life as she knew it changed forever. In this episode, Cahill speaks to Kathy Sheridan about the lasting impact of the abuse, the trauma of the subsequent IRA “investigation” and why, in 2014 she decided to wave her anonymity and share her story. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/5/202346 minutes
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Marian Keyes at 60: what the beloved, best-selling author has learned about life

Today we’re delighted to be joined by best-selling author and friend of the podcast Marian Keyes, who celebrated her 60th birthday earlier this month. In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, Keyes shares the nuggets of wisdom she has gleaned from her six decades on earth: from learning how to apologise properly, the benefits of making a gratitude list and the joys of staying in your lane and within your comfort zone. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/28/202353 minutes, 25 seconds
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Sinéad Kennedy on the joys of solo travel

In this episode, author, travel writer and wellbeing coach Sinéad Kennedy joins Róisín Ingle to discuss her new book Life is a Cycle. It’s an honest and lighthearted memoir, detailing Kennedy’s commitment to living a life filled with excitement and adventure. From finding her tribe with her local cycling group, to solo holidays in exotic locations, Kennedy reveals the joys of carving her own path, bucking expectations of her gender and taking responsibility for her own happiness. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/21/202341 minutes, 36 seconds
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There’s something about Mary McKenna / The Coil’s Lament

Mary McKenna is the CEO & Founder of Tour America & Cruise Holidays / The Travel Suite, one of Ireland’s most successful travel agencies. Founded in her sitting room almost three decades ago, the company has gone from strength to strength, despite a number of setbacks through the years, including the 9/11 attacks, the recession and most recently, the pandemic. In this wide-ranging interview with Róisín Ingle, McKenna reflects on her career journey, her life outside of business and why, nearing 60, she’s feeling stronger and happier than ever.In this episode, we also hear from comedian, singer and actor Síomha Hennessy who is performing at this year’s Dublin Fringe Festival, with her show The Coil’s Lament. It’s an hilarious exploration into online dating, isolation and celibacy, told through stand-up and song. Hennessy talks to Ingle about the inspiration behind the show and performs an exclusive song for us: 'It’s not love'. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/14/20231 hour, 10 minutes, 35 seconds
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Anne Enright: The Wren, The Wren

Following on from the success of her 2020 novel Actress, Anne Enright is back with her latest book The Wren, The Wren. It’s a multi-generational story, exploring family trauma and the love between mother and daughter, told through three members of the same family: Nell, Carmel and Phil. In this episode, Enright speaks to Róisín Ingle about the inspiration behind the story, her foray into poetry and the novel’s omission from this year’s Booker long list. They also reflect on Enright's time as the inaugural Laureate for Irish Fiction, her childhood growing up the youngest of five and her “stormy” teenage years. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/7/20231 hour, 13 minutes, 48 seconds
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Dublin Fringe Festival Friends: Sadhbh Malin and Sinéad Gallagher

The Dublin Fringe Festival kicks off next month on Saturday, the 9th of September. Once again, the festival features a stellar line up of women-led productions, ranging from comedy, theatre and performance art. Making their debut at this year’s Fringe, is Philomena P, a new female-led theatre company with their play ‘in heat’. Philomena P is made up of best friends Sadhbh Malin and Sinéad Gallagher who both come from Dublin. The play, written by Malin and produced by Gallagher, tells the story of Conor and Helen, a couple in their 20s, living together and navigating a rocky relationship. In this episode, they tell Róisín Ingle about the inspiration behind the story, how their friendship has evolved into a creative working relationship and what it’s like being a young woman living and working in Ireland today.For the full line up of events at the Fringe, check out https://www.fringefest.com/festival/whats-on Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/31/202342 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Book Club: Old Babes in the Wood by Margaret Atwood

This month our booker clubbers have been reading Old Babes in the Wood, a collection of short stories from award-winning author Margaret Atwood. The book explores themes like love and relationships, what it means to be human, the ageing process and dealing with loss. Seven stories within the book follow the lives of married couple Nell and Tig and the moments big and small that encapsulate their life together. Listen in to find out what Bernice Harrison, Niamh Towey, Ann and Róisín Ingle thought of this new collection from the 83 year-old author. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/27/202326 minutes, 18 seconds
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Rosemary Murphy: The 40 year-old medical student (and mother of 12)

Rosemary Murphy, a dynamic 40-year-old woman from Dolphin’s Barn in Dublin, had two major goals from childhood. The first was to have a large family. The second was to study medicine and become a doctor. As a mother of 12 children, ranging from 20 to 19 months, the first goal has been well and truly achieved. This September, she will start the journey to achieving her second, when she begins a six year medical degree at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, Murphy speaks about the joy of being accepted into the RCSI, the long road to get there and why "there’s no such thing as being too old, you can do anything at any age”. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/24/202350 minutes, 37 seconds
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Elaine Feeney: Booker Prize Nominee

Irish author Elaine Feeney is nominated for the 2023 Booker Prize for her novel How to Build a Boat. The writer from Galway is one of four Irish authors and the only Irish woman to make the long list this year. Ahead of the shortlist announcement next month, Feeney joined Róisín Ingle to discuss her nomination, the inspiration behind the book and how a severe illness in 2014 spurred her on to writing fiction. The pair also discuss Feeney’s life growing up in the west of Ireland, falling in love with poetry in her teens and her new poetry collection due out next year. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/17/20231 hour, 2 minutes, 10 seconds
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Clit Bait: Everything you need to know about your clitoris

In this episode, we have two experts on hand to share their extensive knowledge of the clitoris, a much ignored and often overlooked part of the female body. Urologist Dr Rachel Rubin and author of ‘Vagina Obscura’ Rachel E Gross join Róisín Ingle to explain history’s complicated understanding of the clitoris, how it’s treated in medical study and why popular culture instead zoned in on the ‘G Spot’ as the holy grail of orgasms. They also discuss the rise in cosmetic procedures like labiaplasty and why we need a better word for masturbation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/10/202355 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ejaculate Responsibly: A whole new way to think about abortion

American blogger and author Gabrielle Stanley Blair is on a mission to change the conversation around abortion. Rather than centering the debate around women and their bodies, Stanley Blair suggests a crucial refocus: MEN. In her new book ‘Ejaculate Responsibly’, the author argues that men are responsible for 100% of unwanted pregnancies and therefore should be more cautious of where they leave their sperm. In this episode, she talks to Róisín Ingle about the main arguments in her ‘thesis’, the reaction she’s been met with by both men and women and why if the attention was put on preventing unwanted pregnancies, there would be no need to argue about abortion at all. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/3/202358 minutes, 39 seconds
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Remembering Sinéad O’Connor

Irish singer Sinéad O’Connor died this week at the age of 56. A trailblazer, feminist and advocate for social change, O’Connor will be remembered for her outstanding contribution to music and her courage in speaking out against the status quo. A fond friend of The Women’s Podcast, O’Connor last joined podcast presenter Róisín Ingle for an extended interview in 2021, while promoting her memoir Rememberings. Today, to celebrate her life and her achievements, we bring you that conversation again, recorded in the conservatory of her home in the Wicklow countryside. Rest easy, Sinead. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/27/20231 hour, 47 minutes, 25 seconds
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Caitlin Moran: What About Men?

A regular on The Women's Podcast, journalist and author Caitlin Moran was in Dublin recently as part of her latest book tour. As someone who regularly discusses the problems of girls and women in public, Moran has often been confronted with the question: “But what about men?”. Indeed, the statistics on male misery are grim: boys are falling behind in school, are at greater risk of addiction, depression, suicide, and increasingly at risk from online misogynist radicalisation thanks to the likes of Andrew Tate and Jordan B Peterson. Moran explains what led her to write her new book What About Men? and discusses the issues affecting men and boys that she says if tackled will also help women and girls. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/20/202354 minutes, 46 seconds
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Dina Kraft: My Friend Anne Frank

In this episode, writer and journalist Dina Kraft tells the story of Holocaust survivor Hannah Pick-Goslar and her childhood best friend, Anne Frank. Hannah and Anne met in Amsterdam as young girls and spent many happy years playing together, before the ravages of war tore their lives apart. ‘My Friend Anne Frank’ is the memoir by Pick-Goslar, detailing the special bond shared by the pair, their final meeting on opposite sides of a barbed-wire fence in a Nazi concentration camp in 1945 and her own incredible story of survival. The book was co-written by Kraft, who spent hours interviewing the 93 year-old at her home in Jerusalem, before her death in October last year. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/13/202347 minutes, 9 seconds
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I Will Be Good: Peig McManus

I Will Be Good is the new memoir from Peig McManus, an unforgettable Dublin character, who grew up in 1940s Ireland, under the shadow of the Second World War. Now in her 80s, Peig reflects on a life lived boldly even in the face of challenges. In this episode, she tells Róisín Ingle about life growing up in the last of Dublin’s tenements, the trauma of becoming an unmarried mother at the age of 21 and how she finally discovered peace and healing through her work as a counsellor (and a late in life discovery of the ukulele). Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/6/202350 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Book Club: Holiday reads

In this episode, book clubbers Niamh Towey, Bernice Harrison, Róisín and Ann Ingle share their summer reading recommendations. Amongst their favourites are The Guest by Emma Cline, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid and The Rachel Incident by Caroline O’Donoghue. They’ll also be discussing a novel described by one book clubber as “one of the best books I’ve ever read in my life”.Our next pick for the book club will be Margaret Atwood's collection of short stories 'Old Babes in the Wood'. We'll be reviewing it at the end of August, so why not grab a copy and read it with us. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/2/202344 minutes, 39 seconds
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Cecelia Ahern on empathy, rage and menopause

It’s almost twenty years since Cecelia Ahern released her debut book P.S I Love You. Now the author is back with her nineteenth novel, In a Thousand Different Ways. It tells the story of Alice, a highly empathetic person who can see and feel people’s emotions through colours around their bodies. In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, Ahern explains how her own experiences as an empath inspired the story and how she wrote it while navigating the ‘three Ps’: perimenopause (and the brain fog and rage that comes with it), the pandemic and the postnatal period, following the birth of her third child, Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/29/202347 minutes, 54 seconds
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Grand: Noelle McCarthy

Broadcaster and writer Noelle McCarthy was born and raised in Cork, but now lives in New Zealand with her husband and young daughter Eve. Her new memoir ‘Grand: Becoming my Mother’s Daughter’, examines the tumultuous relationship she had with mother Carol, who struggled with alcoholism throughout her life. The book also tracks McCarthy’s life as a promising young student, who in a bid to escape her troubles at home, made the move from Cork city to New Zealand and established a name for herself in the media industry. In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, she reflects on the enduring bonds between mother and daughter, her own transition into motherhood and her relationship with alcohol and addiction. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/22/20231 hour, 11 minutes, 11 seconds
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Naoise Dolan: The Happy Couple

Best-selling author Naoise Dolan is here to talk about her highly-anticipated second novel The Happy Couple. It tells the story of Celine and Luke, their upcoming wedding and the three friends who may draw them apart. In this episode, Dolan speaks to Róisín Ingle about swapping London for Berlin, how she almost took up a career in law and dealing with feelings of self-doubt. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/15/202359 minutes, 29 seconds
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COYGIG: Vera Pauw on Ireland’s FIFA World Cup dreams

The countdown is on for next month’s FIFA Women’s World Cup in Australia. In this episode, Vera Pauw, manager of the Irish women’s national football team, talks to Róisín Ingle about the mood in camp, her hopes for her players and the evolution of the women’s sport over the last five decades. She opens up about her experiences of being raped and sexually abused by prominent Dutch officials and about lessons learnt from the controversy that marred the team’s victory over Scotland to qualify for the World Cup. This is the first time an Irish women’s team have qualified for the tournament. COYGIG! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/8/202355 minutes, 1 second
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The magic of biodiversity: Aoibhinn Ní Shúilleabháin

In May 2019, the Irish government declared a climate and biodiversity emergency. To guide us through everything we need to know about biodiversity loss and the impact it has on the natural environment, we’re joined by activist, educator and former Rose of Tralee Aoibhinn Ní Shúilleabháin, who recently chaired the Citizens Assembly on the subject. From hedgerows to bogs and from forests to lakes Ni Shuilleabhain tells Roisin Ingle why we all need to be on board when it comes to protecting and supporting biodiversity. This episode explores what we can do as individuals to make a positive difference and become good ancestors to future generations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/1/202352 minutes, 22 seconds
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Poor: Dr Katriona O’Sullivan

In this episode, Dr Katriona O’Sullivan talks about her powerful, inspiring and affecting memoir Poor. O’Sullivan grew up in England with Irish parents, both heroin addicts, in a home environment riven with dysfunction, abuse and poverty. She became pregnant at 15, experienced homelessness and substance abuse as a young mother before moving to Dublin at the age of 20. Now an award-winning lecturer whose work challenges barriers to education, she tells Róisín Ingle the extraordinary story of how she turned her life around. And about her hopes for transforming attitudes towards girls and women like her. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/25/20231 hour, 27 minutes, 39 seconds
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Bonnie Garmus: Lessons in Chemistry

In this episode, we revisit a conversation we had last year with Bonnie Garmus, author of the best selling book Lessons in Chemistry. The novel follows the life of Elizabeth Zott, a chemist in 1960s America, who leaves her career in science to present a TV cooking show. Garmus talks to Róisín Ingle about her long road to writing success, the excitement of her book becoming an instant bestseller and how her main character Zott came to her one evening after a bad day at the office. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/18/202352 minutes, 12 seconds
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Annie MacManus: Home, Irishness & Changes

Our guest this week is DJ, podcaster and author Annie MacManus - more widely known as Annie Mac - who came on to talk about her second book The Mess We’re In. The London-based Dubliner’s debut novel Mother, Mother was set in Belfast but her latest is about Orla, a young woman who moves to London at the turn of the millennium and her chaotic adventures as she tries to make it in the music industry and find home in a brand new place. MacManus talked to podcast host Roisin Ingle about the concept of home, her life and work in London, leaving BBC Radio 1 after 17 years and “politely” turning down an MBE last summer.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/11/202355 minutes, 55 seconds
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Elizabeth Day: Confessions of a friendship addict

Romantic love, widely elevated as a subject worth interrogating, tends to get a lot of attention while platonic friendship is woefully neglected in the public discourse. Enter, self-described “friendaholic” Elizabeth Day who is attempting to redress the balance. The author and woman behind the hit How to Fail podcast spoke to Roisin Ingle about why the complex bonds of friendship need more attention and how during the pandemic she was forced to reassess her own friendship circle. Her new book Friendaholic: Confessions of a friendship addict prompted her to look back at her experience of being bullied at school while growing up in Belfast where she struggled to fit in and make friends. Day spent many years using friendship - the more friends the better - as a form of self-validation. For Day, having lots of friends meant you were loved, popular and safe. But this quantity over quality approach was often to the detriment of her own boundaries and mental health. Day talked to Ingle about the great friendships of her life, what it feels like to be ghosted, dealing with frenemies, how friendships were affected by her fertility journey and the lessons she learned while writing the book. Friendaholic: Confessions of a friendship addict is out now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/4/202356 minutes, 59 seconds
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The Book Club: Go as a River by Shelley Read

This month on the Women’s Podcast book club, we’ve been reading Go as a River, the debut novel from Shelley Read. Set in the beautiful wilderness of Colorado, it tells the story of Victoria, a resilient young woman whose life is forever changed by one chance encounter. It’s a story of love, loss and female bonds. So what did our book clubbers Bernice Harrison, Niamh Towey, Ann and Róisín Ingle make of this debut, tipped to be the next ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’? Share your thoughts on the book with us at [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/30/202327 minutes, 9 seconds
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Abortion services review: Is the law failing women?

This week, the long awaited independent review of the Irish abortion system was published by the Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly. The review examined the experience of women in Ireland using abortion services and assessed how providers are operating across the country. It also included a list of recommendations, including the removal of the three day waiting period and a direction for all 19 maternity hospitals to be involved in service provision. In this episode, Irish Times Political Correspondent Jennifer Bray talks to Róisín Ingle about the key findings from the report, while People Before Profit TD Bríd Smith shares her views on the recommendations. They also discuss the response within the Government to the review, the appetite for action and why “men need to stop thinking about themselves and their own backyard, and to think about the health needs of women”. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/27/202349 minutes, 36 seconds
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Pray for Our Sinners: Sinéad O’Shea and Dr Mary Randles

Pray for Our Sinners, the new documentary from filmmaker and journalist Sinéad O’Shea, opens in Irish cinemas this week. It follows O’Shea as she returns to her hometown of Navan, to explore the impact of the Catholic church on the community in decades past. The film shines a light on the horror of mother and baby homes and the use of corporal punishment in schools. In this episode, Kathy Sheridan is joined by O’Shea and by Dr Mary Randles, who also features prominently in the film. In the 1960s Randles provided a refuge to unmarried mothers in her own home, while her husband Paddy fought tirelessly to end violence against children in local schools. Together they discuss how the project came about, the people they met along the way and the importance of standing up and speaking out. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/20/202342 minutes, 26 seconds
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Caoilfhionn Gallagher on life, law and learning to fly

Caoilfhionn Gallagher is a prominent human rights lawyer, who was recently appointed the Irish government’s Special Rapporteur on Child Protection. A proud Dub and Northsider, Gallagher now works with Doughty Street Chambers in London, where she acts in cases before various tribunals, such as the European Court of Human Rights, UN Special Procedures and the international courts. She has also acted for bereaved families and survivors of the 7/7 London bombings and has worked on the Hillsborough inquests into the deaths of 96 Liverpool FC fans in 1989. In this episode, Gallagher tells Kathy Sheridan about her journey into the legal profession and how a road-traffic accident as a young woman, inspired her to stand up to injustice in the world. We also hear about her work protecting journalists across the globe, what expertise she hopes to bring to this new role in child protection and the peace she finds taking flying lessons. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/13/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 10 seconds
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Aoife Dooley: Me, myself and autism

An award winning illustrator, author and comedian, Aoife Dooley is a woman of many talents. She has just released her sixth book, a graphic novel called Finding My Voice: Frankie’s World 2. It follows the story of Frankie, a young girl who feels a little different to everyone else and is navigating the world as best she can. The inspiration for the book was based on Aoife’s own diagnosis of autism at the age of 27. In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, Aoife explains how aspects of her life began to make sense following her diagnosis and why she decided to speak out about her autism. We also hear about her life growing up in Dublin, how she uses art to promote positive messages around the condition and the joy she’s finding in new friendships. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/6/202347 minutes, 9 seconds
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Sherine Tadros on love, war and changing the world

Sherine Tadros is an Emmy nominated journalist turned human rights activist, who has just released her powerful new memoir Taking Sides. The book follows her journey through journalism, reporting for Al Jazeera English and Sky News as their Middle East correspondent. In this conversation with Kathy Sheridan, Tadros reflects on a gruelling 79 days spent trapped inside the Gaza strip and a terrifying sexual assault she experienced while reporting on the downfall of the Egyptian regime. She also explains why she eventually left broadcast journalism to take up a job with Amnesty International, in an effort to not only expose injustice, but to fight it. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/30/20231 hour, 12 minutes, 25 seconds
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No Choke: The ‘sex misinformation crisis’

Rachel Thompson is the author of ‘Rough: How violence has found its way into the bedroom and what we can do about it.’ It explores the phenomenon of harmful sexual experiences that women often discount as ‘just bad sex.’ In this episode, host Róisín Ingle, delves into themes like how non-consensual choking has become mainstream, the limits of consent culture and what Thomspon calls a sex misinformation crisis fuelled by TikTok.*This episode contains references to sexual violence and assault which some listeners may find distressing.* Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/23/202347 minutes, 4 seconds
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Unraveling Motherhood with Geraldine Walsh

With Mother’s Day coming up this weekend, we’re exploring the wonderful, fraught and transformative experience of becoming a mother. When it comes to motherhood, often the expectations of what it will be like do not align with reality. Writer Geraldine Walsh describes being “knocked” by the experience. In her new book, Unraveling Motherhood, the mother of two shares her personal journey with postnatal depression and anxiety and offers a motivational toolkit for anyone struggling with overwhelm, feelings of inadequacy and burnout. In this episode she tells Aideen Finnegan how she began to imagine her struggles as knots to unravel, how she eventually untangled her new identity as a parent and how a break from social media can do wonders for any struggling mother. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/16/202337 minutes, 52 seconds
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International Women’s Day: Celebrating 50 years of Irish Feminism

Today we are bringing you a special episode of The Women’s Podcast, recorded live from The Oak Room of the Mansion House, as part of our celebrations for International Women’s Day. For this live recording, we teamed up with The National Women’s Council, who are turning 50 this year. To mark this milestone, our hosts for the evening Kathy Sheridan and Róisín Ingle were joined by guests Sonya Lennon, Tara Flynn, Dr Salome Mbugua, Suzy Byrne and Orla O’Connor, with music from Sharyn Ward. Together the panel reflected on the struggles and triumphs of Irish women over the last five decades, and the challenges and inequalities that still remain. Here are the highlights from the evening. Happy International Women’s Day. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/8/202355 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Dry: staying sober in a drinking world

The Dry is a new comedy-drama which has just landed on RTE One. It tells the story of Shiv Sheridan, who returns to Dublin after years spent partying in London. Sober and full of good intentions, the 35 year-old struggles to stay on ‘the dry’, while living back home with her parents and brother. In this episode, the show’s creator Nancy Harris speaks to Róisín Ingle about the inspiration behind the story, why she used comedy to tackle the subject of addiction and her own experience giving up alcohol for a year.The Dry airs every Wednesday at 9:35pm on RTÉ One, or you can watch all eight episodes on the RTÉ player now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/2/202347 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Book Club: The Light We Carry by Michelle Obama

This month on The Women’s Podcast book club, we’ve been reading The Light We Carry by Michelle Obama. It’s the second book from the former First Lady, which promises the reader ‘practical wisdom and powerful strategies for staying hopeful and balanced in today’s uncertain world’. It seemed like the perfect book to start the new year with, but didl it live up to our book clubbers expectations? Bernice Harrison, Niamh Towey, Róisín and Ann Ingle share their thoughts in the latest episode. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/26/202324 minutes, 10 seconds
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Tinder Translator: An A - Z of Modern Misogyny

If you’re familiar with the world of online dating apps, you’ve likely come across profiles with phrases such as ‘swipe right for kinky’, ‘just looking for fun’ or ‘NO DRAMA’ written in their bios. Scrolling through profile after profile, you’ll see the same stock phrases again and again, but what do they actually mean? According to Aileen Barratt, who runs the @TinderTranslators Instagram page, these go-to phrases show not just a lack of imagination on the writer’s behalf, but are very often laced in misogyny and offer a unique insight into the person writing them. In this episode, Aileen joins Róisín Ingle to talk about the highs and lows of modern dating, who to avoid when swiping and how the success of her Instagram page led to the release of her new book Tinder Translator: An A-Z of Modern Misogyny. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/23/202345 minutes, 20 seconds
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Menopause: The Good, The Bad & The Summit

The National Menopause Summit is taking place in the Mansion House in Dublin on March 23rd. This “masterclass” in menopause will feature a keynote address from television presenter Davina McCall and will host a wide array of experts who will be debunking myths and taboos and providing inclusive fact based information. In this episode, Kathy Sheridan is joined by the summit’s founder Sinead McNamara, who explains how her own experience with perimenopause inspired her to create the event. We also hear from Sallyanne Brady, founder of The Irish Menopause and Dr Caoimhe Hartley who runs the Menopause Health Clinic in Dublin. Both women will also be speaking at the summit next month. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/16/20231 hour, 25 seconds
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Mother & Baby Home Redress Scheme: An insult to survivors?

In the coming weeks, the Government is expected to pass the Mother and Baby Institutions Payment Scheme Bill 2022. However, the proposed redress scheme has faced enormous scrutiny due to its narrow eligibility requirements, which exclude around 40% of survivors. In this episode, human rights lawyer Maeve O’Rourke speaks to Róisín Ingle about the flaws within the scheme, while Noelle Brown who was born into Bessborough mother and baby home, explains how it’s yet another slap in the face for survivors.For more information see http://clannproject.org/redress_scheme/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/9/202341 minutes, 9 seconds
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Bad Bridget: Exploring the hidden lives of Irish emigrant women

Bad Bridget is the new book from historians Elaine Farrell and Leanne McCormick. It tells the unheard stories of Irish girls and women who emigrated to North America in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The book which follows the successful podcast series of the same name, is a culmination of over five years worth of research into the lives of these women who travelled across the Atlantic and didn’t quite find the American dream. The pair’s extensive research into police, court and prison records uncovers the types of criminal activity in which Irish women were involved, including drunkenness, sex work and murder. In this episode, Farrell and McCormick speak to Róisín Ingle about the Bad Bridget podcast series and the Irish women that history chose to forget. This episode was originally published in February 2021. The Bad Bridget book is out now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/2/202346 minutes, 42 seconds
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Bloody Hell: Mona Eltahawy on menopause myths and taboos

Feminist author, Mona Eltahaway, joins host, Róisín Ingle, to discuss her fascinating journey through the menopause. The dynamic disruptor of the patriarchy is railing against the societal norms traditionally associated with this clandestine transition, and demanding more people are educated on its impacts (and the importance of moisturising your vulva)  before having to deal with them. The Egyptian-American writer also gives her reaction to the uprising led by women in Iran, as well as Jacinda Ardern’s resignation as New Zealand prime minister. With any subscription you'll get unlimited access to the very best in unique quality journalism from The Irish Times. Subscribe today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/26/202350 minutes, 57 seconds
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Endometriosis: 'We're treated like hysterical drama queens.'

Aimee Brown is the first known person in Ireland to be given a ministerial license for legal cannabis to treat the chronic pain she endures as a result of endometriosis. But her battle to get to this point is the most maddening and incredible story. Endometriosis is a whole-body disease but is often characterised in relation to the menstrual cycle. Typical symptoms include painful periods, painful sex, urination and bowel movements but can encompass a wide range of symptoms from chronic fatigue to nausea. 30 year-old Aimee was first hospitalised with symptoms at the age of eight, three years before she started her period. Medical gaslighting underscores her struggle to get treatment for the condition, which affects one in ten women and people assigned female at birth. In this episode, host Róisín Ingle is also joined by medical scientist and advocate Kathleen King, who explains the condition and the unnecessary suffering of women due to lack of awareness surrounding it. With any subscription you'll get unlimited access to the very best in unique quality journalism from The Irish Times. Subscribe today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/19/202347 minutes, 21 seconds
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Sali Hughes: "I just think people need to get over themselves about botox"

Journalist, beauty editor and author Sali Hughes joins us on the podcast to talk about her new book, Everything is Washable. Having run away from home at the age of 14, she had to do a lot of growing up very early and very fast. Now, she's keen to share everything she's learned about life, domesticity, relationships and everything in between. From espousing the benefits of always having WD40 nearby, to choosing clothes to talking to your kids about porn, this book is an essential companion. Sali Hughes speaks to podcast host, Róisín Ingle, about why she wanted to write the book, why white wine is the devil and why Irish and Welsh women are are so similar when it comes to botox. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/12/202352 minutes, 38 seconds
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Sheila Liming on the benefits of hanging out

In today’s episode we’re talking all about the joys and benefits of hanging out. Whether it’s with your friends, strangers or acquaintances, there is a lot to be gained from the simple act of spending time together. In her new book Hanging Out: The Radical Power of Killing Time, Sheila Liming highlights these benefits and reflects on her own experiences of hanging out, from parties, to conferences, to hanging out on reality TV. She also shares her five simple guidelines that will help you make hanging out a priority this new year. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/5/202328 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Women’s Podcast 2022 Review

2022: It was the year that Russia launched their attack on Ukraine, the women of Iran and Afghanistan continued their fight for freedom and the entire country mourned the death of 24-year old Aisling Murphy in Tullamore. The Irish women’s football team won their place in the upcoming World Cup, Roe V Wade was overturned and the Wagatha Christy trial finally made it to court. To review the very best and worst bits of the last twelve months, Róisín Ingle is joined by Irish Times columnist Jennifer O’Connell, journalist Alison O’Connor and Iranian academic Mahya Ostovar. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/29/202247 minutes, 17 seconds
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The shite before Christmas

The build up to Christmas can leave many of us feeling frazzled and fried. What should really be a time of festive cheer and fun, often turns into a whirlwind of frantic shopping, decorating, cleaning and cooking. So what is the best way to navigate the shite before Christmas? Róisín Ingle talks to psychologist Allison Keating and comedian Deirdre O’Kane to find out. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/22/202236 minutes, 16 seconds
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Harry and Meghan: ‘It’s like a Shakespearean drama for 2022’

The final three episodes of Harry and Meghan’s tell-all documentary series on Netflix have finally been released. With new revelations about the couple’s life together and shocking accusations against the British press and the ‘institution’, the series has remained top of the most-watched list over the last seven days. To dissect the royal drama and the many twists and turns along the way, Róisín Ingle is joined by Irish Times columnist Jennifer O’Connell and broadcaster and host of The Bellissimo Files podcast, Sarina Bellissimo.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/15/202241 minutes, 13 seconds
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Christmas Book Club: Gifts for Readers / Maggie O’Farrell

To help you out with the books you’re going to buy as gifts this Christmas, we’ve asked our book clubbers Bernice Harrison, Niamh Towey, Ann and Róisín Ingle to tell us about the books they’ve loved reading this year. Later on, author Maggie O’Farrell talks to us about her ninth novel, A Marriage Portrait, which is set in Renaissance Italy and inspired by the real and tragic tale of Lucrezia di Cosimo de’Medici. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/11/20221 hour, 12 minutes, 33 seconds
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Have yourself a conscious little Christmas

Having a thoughtful, sustainable and more mindful Christmas does not have to be a buzzkill. With that in mind, this episode is full of tips for a more joyful and less wasteful festive season, that doesn’t banish the fun. Irish Times contributor and author of the Game Changers column Catherine Cleary came on to talk to us about some sustainable gift ideas, while author of soon-to-be-published book The Money Mentor Santis O’Garro gives us ideas for how to spend less this month including No Spend days out with the family. It’s not about being a Grinch, more about being thoughtful about the excessive splurging that can sometimes come with this time of year. So have yourselves a conscious little Christmas with The Women’s Podcast why don’t you? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/8/202249 minutes, 54 seconds
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Women’s struggle in Iran and Afghanistan: Mahya Ostovar and Mahbooba Faiz

With the courageous shows of defiance against the misogynistic Islamic Republic in Iran and the rights of women and girls continuing to be eroded by the Taliban in Afghanistan, two women discuss the devastating, unjust situation in their countries. Mahya Ostovar, a lecturer at University of Galway left Iran ten years ago and Mahbooba Faiz, arrived in Ireland a few months ago from Afghanistan with her husband and young son. They spoke to Roisin Ingle about the wave of protest against the Islamic Republic in Iran since the death of Mahsa Amini while in custody of the ‘morality police’ and about the harsh Taliban regime in Afghanistan where women and girls are fighting for the right to an education and are now banned from parks, swimming pools and gyms. The women called for more support from the international community and solidarity from men and women everywhere in this feminist struggle for universal human rights. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/1/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Light on the Horizon: ‘No woman should spend her life hostage to an abusive partner’

It was a chance meeting in 1992 which brought Ennis women Colette Reddington and Mary Fitzgerald together. When their paths crossed, both were seeking shelter for victims of domestic abuse, but were struggling to find local services. After realising there were no refuges available, not only in their hometown of Ennis, but in the entire county of Clare, the women decided to take action. Now, their incredible thirty year journey helping those fleeing abusive homes, is the subject of a new book Light On The Horizon, which details the establishment of Clare Haven refuge services and the charity Haven Horizons. In this episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by co-founder Colette and by Madeline McAleer, who is director of research, training and development. They speak about the humble beginnings of the refuge, the expansion in services over the years and why education is key to breaking the cycle of domestic abuse. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/28/202245 minutes, 29 seconds
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Rosie Holt: Queen of social media satire

When her career stalled during the Covid lockdown, actor and writer Roise Holt moved back to her parents house in Somerset and began creating comedy videos from her old bedroom. The videos skewering British politicians went viral propelling her into newfound stardom as a parody MP. In this episode, Rosie talks to Róisín Ingle about the success of her satirical videos and why they resonated so well with her fans. They also talk about her new comedy show ‘The Woman’s Hour’ and the ever-entertaining state of British politics. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/24/202234 minutes, 58 seconds
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In her own words: A tribute to Vicky Phelan

CervicalCheck campaigner Vicky Phelan died this week, at the age of 48. Over the years, Vicky has joined us on a number of occasions as a guest on the podcast, sharing her story and her journey through treatment. Today we celebrate the life of an extraordinary Limerick woman who fought for justice for so many. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/17/202258 minutes, 46 seconds
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Teresa Deevy: The life and legacy of an extraordinary Irish playwright

Teresa Deevy may not be a familiar name to most people, but it should be. Born in 1894, the Waterford woman, who was deaf from the age of nineteen, was a successful dramatist and playwright. In the 1930s, six of her plays were performed on stage in the Abbey Theatre and her reputation as a brilliant and talented writer had critics referring to her as next Sean O'Casey and the ‘Irish Chekhov’. That was until, Ernest Blythe became artistic director of the Abbey in 1941 and declared his vision for the theatre to be incompatible with Deevy’s work, putting an abrupt end to her growing career. The story of this forgotten playwright will be told in a new RTE documentary, created by performance artist Amanda Coogan. In this episode, Coogan speaks to Róisín Ingle about Deevy's life and legacy and why she should be celebrated. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/10/202243 minutes
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Aimée Foley: ‘I was never a daughter in his eyes, I was an object’

Last month, Aimée Foley emerged from the Central Criminal Courts of Justice with a smile on her face. The 21 year-old had been fighting to get her father’s prison sentence increased, after he had received just five years for raping and sexually abusing her as a child. Following an appeal by the DPP, Michael O’Donoghue of Colmanstown, Ballinasloe, Co Galway had his jail term almost doubled, meaning he will be in prison for the next nine years. In this episode Aimée explains how the sexual abuse began when she was just 12 years-old and often took place during access visits to her father’s home. It lasted for five years. She tells Róisín Ingle about the reason she waived her right to anonymity and why Ireland’s sentencing laws need to be changed to avoid retraumatising victims all over again.  Please be warned that this episode does contain descriptions of serious sexual assault and might not be suitable for all listeners. For further support please see https://www.rapecrisishelp.ie/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/3/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Book Club: Lucy by the Sea by Elizabeth Strout

This month on The Women’s Podcast book club, we’ve been reading Lucy by the Sea by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Elizabeth Strout. Set in the early days of the pandemic, it tells the story of Lucy Barton who moves to Maine during lockdown, to live with her ex-husband William in a small house by the sea. Leaving her life in New York behind, Lucy must now spend the next several months in the company of the man she once loved and their complex past. So what did our book clubbers Bernice Harrison, Niamh Towey, Ann and Róisín Ingle make of this pandemic love story and all that it brings? If you’ve read the book too, please share your thoughts with us at [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/30/202232 minutes, 53 seconds
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Ep 580 Ten Years On: The legacy of Savita Halappanavar

This week marks ten years since the death of Savita Halappanavar, who died on the 28th October 2012. The young Indian woman was seventeen weeks pregnant when she presented to University Hospital Galway complaining of severe back pain. Although informed by doctors that she was actively miscarrying, she was denied access to an abortion, despite multiple requests. One week later, she was dead. What followed was a public outpouring of grief and calls for a change to Ireland’s strict abortion laws. People took to the streets calling for reproductive rights for all Irish women, which later culminated in the repealing of the 8th Amendment more than five years later. In this episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by Kitty Holland, the Irish Times journalist who broke the story of Savita’s death, Ailbhe Smyth Co-director of Together for Yes, Ireland’s campaign to repeal the 8th and Anna Cosgrave, the abortion rights activist who created the famous Repeal jumpers. Together, they reflect on Savita’s life, the legacy she left behind and why her name will never be forgotten. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/27/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ep 579 Storyland: Three winning dramas from women coming to RTE

Last year, as part of their ‘Storyland’ initiative, RTE invited budding writers and creative talent to submit their ideas for original and new local drama.From the hundreds of submissions, three dramas were eventually chosen to go into production, all written by women. The first of which airs tonight on RTE2 at 9:30pm. It’s called Mustard and was created by actress and playwright Eva O’Connor. Originally a theatre show, Mustard tells the story of Eilis and her addiction to the spicy yellow condiment. The following week, we’ll see Every Five Miles by Sinéad Collopy make its debut on screen. It’s a harrowing story of human trafficking and modern day slavery, inspired by Collopy’s years spent working in child protection services. Finally, on November 3rd, Balor Hall written and directed by Rioghnach Ni Grioghair will be aired. This contemporary ‘whodunnit’ sees the greedy members of the Devereux family return to the patriarch’s vast agricultural estate for a brutal land grab. The three writers talk to Róisín Ingle about the inspiration and meaning behind their projects, the joy of bringing their ideas to life and what they will be working on next. All dramas will also be available to watch back on the RTE Player. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/20/202240 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ep 578 Women of Iran: 'We just want to be free'

When Maryam Mohitmafi arrived in Ireland with her husband two years ago, she was seeking a better life. A life where she could be free to choose what to wear, where to work and what religion to practice. A life with “basic freedoms” that are not available to women in her home country of Iran. From her new home in Dublin, the 31 year-old watches on as the women of Iran fight for those freedoms. Over the past month, thousands have taken to the streets to protest over the death of Mahsa Amini, a young woman who died while in the custody of the country’s ‘morality police’. In this episode, the Persian-Iranian speaks to Róisín Ingle about her own personal run-ins with the morality police and why she made the tough decision to leave her homeland. We also hear from Iranian journalist Yeganeh Rezaian, who lives in Washington DC with her husband and son. She explains that the protests come as a result of pent up frustration and anger towards the strict regime which rules the Iranian people. Both women talk about their hopes for peace and equality and why they believe that change is finally on the way. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/13/202250 minutes
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Ep 577 Rebecca Miller

Total is the brand new book from author and filmmaker Rebecca Miller. It has just been released, but the wheels were set in motion for this collection of short stories, almost two decades ago. It was during the pandemic, when Miller, the daughter of playwright Arthur Miller and acclaimed photographer Inge Morath, finally found the time and space needed to flesh out and expand her ideas. In Total, there are seven short stories, many exploring themes of motherhood, family and creativity, often with women at their core. In this episode, the pair discuss Miller’s connection to Ireland through her marriage to actor Daniel Day-Lewis, her own journey through motherhood and what she plans to do next. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/6/202239 minutes, 29 seconds
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Ep 576 Kate Ewart-Biggs on life, loss and the power of connection

Kate Ewart-Biggs was just eight years-old, when her father, Christopher Ewart-Biggs, the former British Ambassador to Ireland was assassinated by the IRA, just two weeks after the family arrived into the country. Looking back on that day in 1976, Ewart-Biggs says she spent “a lovely morning” with her father, before he left their home to attend an official meeting. Minutes later, the explosion from a bomb which detonated underneath her father’s car could be heard as she played in their front garden. Following the death of her mother to cancer more than a decade later, Kate left Britain and took off to Africa, where she lived and worked for many years. She also spent time in Brazil working with street children and disadvantaged groups. It was these experiences which ultimately reshaped her view of the world and paved the way for her current role as Deputy Chief Executive of the British Council. In this episode, she tells Kathy Sheridan about the work and global reach of the British Council, her life growing up in a diplomatic family and the brief time she spent in Ireland before her father was murdered.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/29/202245 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ep 575 Alice Ryan: There's Been A Little Incident

When Alice Ryan began writing her first novel There's Been A Little Incident, a debut about familial love and lifelong friendship, it was an "act of hope" in the face of terrible loss. 11 years ago, her mother, former literary editor of The Irish Times Caroline Walsh, died by suicide while suffering from a debilitating illness. Ryan, a grand-daughter of the late writer Mary Lavin, was initially rejected by publishers but persevered until her book "a novel about grief, that is hopeful" won her a book deal. It was written, she told Roisin Ingle, almost entirely on her phone in the early hours of the morning or while "the fish fingers were burning." The mother of one also spoke about suffering from post-natal anxiety, finding solace in her late mother's book collection and the support of family and friends at the worst times in her life. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/22/202244 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ep 574 Edwina Dunn: From the Tesco Clubcard to The Female Lead

When Edwina Dunn was a young girl, she dreamed of becoming a long distance truck driver and living a very glamorous life on the road. While she didn’t quite achieve that goal, she did go on to become a very successful business woman and the brains behind the Tesco Clubcard. In the early 1990s, she and her husband Clive brought their expertise in data science to the boardroom of Tesco and helped them become one of the most successful retailers in the world. After selling their stake in Tesco for a cool 93 million pounds and taking a bit of time out to enjoy the payout, the pair set up their next company Starcount. In that time, Edwina also created The Female Lead, a non-profit organisation dedicated to offering women alternative role models to those presented by popular culture. In this episode, she tells Róisín Ingle about her career journey and what it’s been like working alongside her husband through the years. They also discuss the great work being done by the Female Lead and why it’s time for women to shake the ‘unentitled mindset’. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/15/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 573 Florence Given: Girlcrush

Girlcrush is the brand new novel from writer and illustrator Florence Given. It follows the journey of Eartha, a young woman fresh out of a relationship, coming to terms with her sexuality and dealing with her growing online fame. It’s the second book from the writer who brought us Women Don’t Owe You Pretty which explores all corners of the feminist conversation. Given speaks to Róisín Ingle about her move to fiction, how she deals with her own success, creating online boundaries for herself and what she’d like to do next. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/8/202251 minutes, 29 seconds
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Ep 572 Women of Dublin Fringe: From Hot Brown Honey to Hive City Legacy

It’s Fringe time again and as usual, the Dublin Fringe Festival has a host of female-led art and showomanship to discover. In today’s episode we highlight some of the brilliant events by women taking place in venues across the capital from the 10th to the 25th of September. (You won't want to miss Growler, the story of an 82-year-old inner-city vulva for just one brilliant example). Róisín Ingle is joined in this episode by the women of Hive City Legacy: Dublin Chapter, a project from the Hot Brown Honey collective, a group of women of colour disrupting the arts industry. The show was created by director  Lisa Fa'alafi and music maestro “Busty Beatz” aka Kim Bowers and they talked to Róisín about the joy of being disruptive and exploring gender, class and identity through art. Also on the podcast is dancer and stylist Andrea Williams, who features in the show in collaboration with seven other Irish women of colour reclaiming their narrative through dance, song, poetry and performance. For more see fringefest.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/1/202227 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ep 571 The Book Club: Factory Girls by Michelle Gallen

Factory Girls by Michelle Gallen is the latest book up for discussion on the book club. Set in the summer of 1994, the story follows the lives of Maeve and her two friends, who begin working in the local shirt factory in a small border town in Northern Ireland, while awaiting their A-Level results. As the summer unfolds, tensions rise in the factory between the Catholic and Protestant workers and the young women dream of lives elsewhere. Our book clubbers Bernice Harrison, Róisín and Ann Ingle all loved Michelle Gallen’s debut ‘Big Girl, Small Town’, so will her second book live up to expectations? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/28/202224 minutes, 13 seconds
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Best of The Women’s Podcast: How women can save the planet (and why they shouldn’t have to)

We cannot resolve the climate emergency without fighting for gender equality. Women, especially poor women of colour, are suffering most as a result of the climate crisis, our highest-profile climate activists are women and girls and yet, at the top table it is men who are deciding the earth’s future. In her latest book, How Women Can Save the Planet, award-winning journalist Anne Karpf argues that when it comes to fighting climate change we are not all in it together, but we could be. In today’s podcast she joins Róisín Ingle, Sadhbh O’Neill, policy coordinator with Stop Climate Chaos, and Catherine Cleary, writer and founder of the Pocket Forests initiative, to talk about many of the issues raised in the book, the debate about women and climate change and what we can all do to help. This episode was originally published in September 2021. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/25/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 31 seconds
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Ep 570 I, Karen: Two women discuss life in an anti-Karen world

In the 1960s and 70s, the name Karen was one of the most popular baby names for girls. Now, not so much. With the rise of the Karen meme, the name has gradually become associated with obnoxious and entitled behaviour, usually demonstrated by a white, angry, middle-class woman. In this episode, Róisín Ingle speaks to two Irish Karens, Karen O’Donoghue and Karen Hand, about how their once loved name evolved into a meme and an insult. They also examine which particular qualities of the stereotypical Karen, might actually be used for good. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/18/202231 minutes, 16 seconds
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Best of The Women’s Podcast: Evanna Lynch

Harry Potter star Evanna Lynch was just 11 when her eating disorder began to manifest. She struggled for several years with anorexia, with spells in and out of hospital including a three month stay in a facility in England. In her memoir, The Opposite of Butterfly Hunting, she explores with breathtaking clarity, her path to recovery and her struggle to deal with the complexities and contradictions within herself. Now 30 and living in London, she talked to Roisin Ingle about navigating all of this while also coming to terms with the international fame which came when she won the part of Luna Lovegood in the Harry Potter movie franchise. It's a story about the tragedy and glory of growing up, one Lynch hopes will help anyone touched by this devastating, often misunderstood illness. This episode was originally published in October 2021.  If you’re affected by any of the issues discussed in this episode, contact BodyWhys.ie or [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/11/202256 minutes, 32 seconds
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Best Of The Women's Podcast: Elizabeth Day

In this podcast recorded in September 2021, Róisín talks to the journalist, author and presenter of the brilliant How To Fail podcast Elizabeth Day. She has just published her latest novel, Magpie, a thrilling, stylish and psychologically astute story of jealousy, motherhood and power. In this funny, moving and revealing conversation, Day explains how some of the book’s themes relate to her own life, why it was important to her to write about mental illness with sensitivity and why she is a Derry girl at heart. She also tells Róisín about her lockdown wedding to husband Justin Basini, some of her favourite How To Fail guests and her friendship with Fleabag creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/4/202251 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ep 569 Abuse survivor Aoife Farrelly

Aoife Farrelly was just six years-old, when her older brother Cian began sexually abusing her. The abuse lasted two years and stopped when she told her parents what was happening. Last month, he was jailed for three years after pleading guilty to rape and sexual assault. Now aged twenty-one, Aoife plans to rebuild her life, ‘heal her inner child’ and not let the abuse define her. In this episode, she speaks to Roisin Ingle about her decision to waive her anonymity, the road to recovery and her new life in Aberdeen, Scotland. If you’ve been affected by any of the issues raised in this podcast, you can call the national 24 hour rape crisis help line on 1800 778888 or www.drcc.ie Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/28/202248 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 568 Love Island: It is what it is. (Until it isn’t)

Launched in 2015, Love Island is one of the most successful reality dating shows on TV. Despite a number of controversies through the years, the show still attracts millions of viewers every night. So why is it so compelling to watch and what keeps us coming back for more? In this episode Róisín Ingle is joined by three avid Love Island viewers, writer and philosopher Laura Kennedy, baker Gerry Godley and his thirteen year-old daughter Amalia Godley. Together they discuss the highs and lows of the latest season, the islander lingo and which loved-up couple might triumph this year. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/21/202244 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ep 567 Cost of Living Crisis: Three wise women on how to cut costs, budget & save

The price of everything is on the rise. From petrol, groceries, energy and gas, every facet of our lives has been affected. So why is everything so expensive and how can we make our money stretch further? In this episode, Róisín Ingle speaks to two budgeting experts Caz Mooney and Kel Galavan, who both share their money and saving tips through their Instagram profiles @Irishbudegting and @MrssmartmoneyhqWe also hear from Irish Times political correspondent Jennifer Bray, who explains why inflation is soaring and how the government plans to tackle it. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/14/202251 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ep 566 Aingeala Flannery: The Amusements

Set in the seaside town of Tramore, Co Waterford, The Amusements by Aingeala Flannery follows the lives of the Grant and Swaine families and their neighbours, over three decades. The story is woven together by this diverse cast of characters who capture the joy, frustration and limitations of small town life. In this episode, the author speaks to Róisín Ingle about her own childhood summers spent on the beach in Tramore, her decision to leave radio journalism to pursue writing full time and why loving what you do will always matter most.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/7/202238 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ep 565 After Roe v Wade: Katha Pollitt & Erica Goldblatt

Following on from the landmark decision by the US Supreme Court last week to overturn Roe v Wade, abortion is now restricted in at least seven states, with trigger bans set to take effect in several more. In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by women’s rights advocate Dr Erica Goldblatt Hyatt and American journalist, poet and essayist Katha Pollitt to discuss this “assault on human rights” and the impact it will have on the millions of American women who now face restricted access to reproductive healthcare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/30/202245 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 564 The Book Club: Trespasses - Louise Kennedy

In this book club episode, Niamh Towey, Bernice Harrison, Róisín and Ann Ingle discuss Trespasses by Derry writer Louise Kennedy. Set in Belfast, during the Troubles, it explores the relationship between a young Catholic woman and a married Protestant barrister. The group also share their summer reading recommendations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/26/202238 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 563 Louise O’Neill: ‘I’ve been into wellness and new age spirituality since I was a teenager’

Cork writer Louise O’Neill’s latest book Idol delves into the heart and mind of a super influencer in the wellness world.In this episode she talks to Róisín Ingle about the book, her third novel for adults, and the thorny topics it throws up like consent, eating disorders, cancel culture and the authenticity of influencers. We also hear from Alice Kelly, a Leaving Cert student who is planning a pop-up bakery run out of a vintage pony box, in today’s episode. Alice has taken it upon herself to renovate the box, which she got as an 18th-birthday present from her family, and tells Róisín about her lifelong ambition to start her own bakery. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/23/202252 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ep 562 Naomi Long: “You need a hide like a rhinoceros to be a politician here”

Naomi Long grew up in a staunchly unionist, east Belfast community. But as a centrist politician she has led the Alliance Party to become the third largest in Northern Ireland.  In this episode, she speaks to Kathy Sheridan about her matriarchal upbringing, her struggle with endometriosis, misogyny in politics, her faith and her primary school teacher’s appearance in Derry Girls.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/16/20221 hour, 5 seconds
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Ep 561 Katherine May: “Wintering is… those times when we feel cut off from the rest of the world”

The writer Katherine May believes we should all embrace our personal winters.She isn’t talking about the coldest season of the year though. For her, wintering is "a fallow period in life when you're cut off from the world, feeling rejected, sidelined, blocked from progress, or cast into the role of an outsider."In her book, Wintering, May recounts her own year-long journey through winter, sparked by a sudden illness in her family that plunged her into a time of uncertainty and seclusion. When life felt at its most frozen, she managed to find strength and inspiration from the incredible wintering experiences of others as well as from the remarkable transformations that nature makes to survive the cold.In the latest episode of The Women’s Podcast, May talks to Róisín Ingle about why wintering is so important, the events around her 40th birthday which led to her wintering with her husband and son, and her diagnosis of autism as an adult. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/9/202240 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 560 Marguerite Penrose: Yeah, But Where Are You Really From?

Yeah, But Where Are You Really From? is the new memoir from Irish-Zambian writer Marguerite Penrose. It’s a perfectly apt title for a book that explores the author’s experience of life, which began in St Patrick’s Mother and Baby Home in Dublin in 1974. In the book, Marguerite writes about coming to terms with the circumstances of her early childhood, about navigating the world with a disability and what it means to be both Black and Irish. In today’s episode of The Women’s Podcast, she tells Roisin Ingle about the search for her biological family, about the Instagram post which inspired the book and how she’s embracing life with openness and positivity. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/2/202253 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ep 559 Repealiversary: The Unfinished Business of abortion at home and abroad

In today’s episode of the Women’s Podcast we are talking about abortion, exactly four years on from the referendum to repeal the Eighth. The anniversary falls at a time when abortion access is being restricted in many parts of the world and with the news that the US Supreme Court is planning to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling.In Northern Ireland, access to abortion has been available since April 2020 after new laws came into force. However the UK Government was forced to intervene recently to ensure those services are fully delivered, following Stormont’s “failure” to do so.In the Republic, activists like Ailbhe Smyth are calling for a full decriminalisation of abortion, in advance of a review of Ireland’s legislation on abortion. Smyth talks to Róisín Ingle about the “unfinished business” of the repeal movement and her worries about the global impact of the overturning of Roe v. Wade in the US.They’re joined by feminist activist, Green Party Northern Ireland member and PhD researcher, Kellie Turtle. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/26/202250 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ep 558 Amy Dunne: I Am (Miss D) Amy Dunne

In 2007, aged just 17, Amy Dunne was forced to go to the High Court to fight for her right to travel for an abortion, after a scan revealed that the baby she was carrying had a lethal abnormality and would not survive. From then on Amy became known as ‘Miss D’ and found herself at the centre of Ireland’s bitter abortion debate. Now in her 30s, Amy has written a memoir I Am Amy Dunne, reflecting on the culture of shame that she and many other Irish women have lived through. She talks to Róisín about the trauma she endured as ‘Miss D’, what she has learned from it and why no-one should ever have to experience what she went through. I AM (MISS D) AMY DUNNE, written by Amy Dunne, with Orla O’Donnell, is on sale now Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/19/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 557 Women Under The Taliban: Afghanistan’s former Minister for Women’s Affairs Hasina Safi

Following the Taliban takeover in August 2021, life for women and girls in Afghanistan has never been the same. Under their rule, access to education is limited, women are forced to cover their faces in public and there is a ban on nearly all paid employment. In this episode, Kathy Sheridan is joined by a woman who has sat opposite the Taliban in negotiations, former Minister for Women’s Affairs Hasina Safi. She tells Kathy about her evacuation from the country last year and her previous experience dealing with the group. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/12/202241 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ep 556 Bonnie Garmus: Lessons in Chemistry

Lessons in Chemistry by American author Bonnie Garmus was our latest pick for the podcast book club. In a rare turn of events, our book clubbers found themselves in agreement, collectively singing the praises of this debut novel. That’s why we’re delighted to be joined by the author today, as she tells Róisín Ingle about her long road to writing success, the excitement of her book becoming an instant bestseller and how her main character Elizabeth Zott came to her one evening after a bad day at the office. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/5/202255 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ep 555 Sally Hayden: My Fourth Time, We Drowned

In 2018, while at home in her London apartment, journalist Sally Hayden received a Facebook message from a young African refugee, pleading for her help. He was one of thousands of migrants who had tried to reach Europe, only to end up trapped in a Libyan detention camp, with no way out. In her new book, My Fourth Time, We Drowned, Hayden pieces together the stories of these refugees and details the harsh conditions they are forced to live through. In today’s episode, she speaks to Kathy Sheridan about her four year investigation into this human rights disaster and explains why it’s a result of European policy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/28/202258 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ep 554 Catherine Prasifka / Richie Sadlier

In her brilliant debut novel, None of This is Serious, Catherine Prasifka writes about life in the era of social media. She talks to Róisín about the consequences of living online and in the real world. They also discuss her love of fantasy writing, the inevitable comparisons to her sister in-law Sally Rooney and her plans for her next book.Plus: Richie Sadlier on his book, Let's Talk, a modern guide to sex, porn, relationships, consent and intimacy, written especially for boys in secondary school. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/21/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ep 553 The Book Club: Lessons in Chemistry - Bonnie Garmus

Set in the early 1960’s, Lessons in Chemistry follows the life of Elizabeth Zott, a scientist whose career takes a detour when she becomes the unlikely star of a TV cooking show. In this episode, our book clubbers Bernice Harrison, Niamh Towey, Róisín and Ann Ingle share their thoughts on this vibrant and original story from debut author Bonnie Garmus.Keep an ear out for our upcoming interview with the author, which will be out in a couple of weeks. If you’d like to share your thoughts on the book, email us on [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/17/202230 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 552 What it’s really like to have ADHD

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic condition which affects millions of people around the world. It is often associated with hyperactive or disruptive children and as a result ADHD in women often goes undiagnosed. In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle speaks to two women who received a diagnosis of ADHD in their late twenties, broadcaster and journalist Brianna Parkins and barrister and coach Mairéad Deevy. Both were repeatedly misdiagnosed as they searched for answers to their symptoms. Here, they share their personal experiences of living with ADHD and the ways they’ve learned to manage it. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/14/202233 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 551 Twitter for Good & Fitwaffle’s Baking it Easy

In today’s episode, we’re delighted to reveal that Women’s Aid has been chosen as Twitter’s main charity partner for 2022. To speak about the initiative and how it will help women across the country, Róisín Ingle is joined by Managing Director of Twitter Ireland Sinead McSweeney and CEO of Women’s Aid, Sarah Benson join Róisín Ingle.Also, Eloise Head, aka Fitwaffle speaks to Róisín about her brand new book Baking It Easy. Filled with simple and delicious bakes, the book has already become a Sunday Times Bestseller. The influencer and baker speaks about her move from fitness into food, her love of all things sweet and what’s next for the Fitwaffle empire. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/7/202247 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ep 550 BITCH: A Revolutionary Guide to Sex, Evolution & the Female Animal

What does it mean to be female? Mother, carer, the weaker sex? Think again.Lucy Cooke says a revolution has been brewing in zoology and evolutionary biology in the past few decades, demonstrating how the female of the species has been marginalised and misunderstood by the scientific patriarchy. In this episode, the zoologist and broadcaster joins Róisín and biologist, environmental consultant and broadcaster, Éanna Ní Lamhna, to discuss her brilliant new book BITCH: A Revolutionary Guide to Sex, Evolution & the Female Animal.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/31/20221 hour, 1 minute, 31 seconds
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Ep 549 Matrescence: what happens to a woman when she becomes a mother?

In this week's episode, we're talking about matrescence. That's the word used to describe the physical, emotional, hormonal and social transition to becoming a mother. Everyone understands that adolescence is an awkward phase, but during matrescence mothers are expected to be deliriously happy, while simultaneously losing control over the way they look and feel. With Mother’s Day this weekend, we thought it would be the perfect time to find out more about this transformative time in many women’s lives. Layla O’Mara, a post partum doula, acupuncturist and mum of three, and Caroline Foran, the author of 3 bestselling books on the topics of anxiety, confidence and vulnerability, talk to Róisín about what the matrescence is and why it deserves more attention.Produced by Jennifer Ryan and Suzanne Brennanwww.irishtimes.com/podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/24/202243 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ep 548 Marian Keyes: “Young Irish women are better at knowing what they’re entitled to”

Marian Keyes talks to Róisín about her latest ‘selling-like-hotcakes’ book, ‘Again, Rachel’, the sequel to her much-loved novel 'Rachel’s Holiday', which was published 25 years ago.For the day that’s in it, they also talk about what it means to be an Irish woman in 2022 and Marian tells us why she’s inspired by younger Irish women and their determination not to take any bulls**t.www.irishtimes.com/podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/17/202255 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 547 The Change: Tales of transformation for International Women's Day

On Tuesday evening, The Women’s Podcast gathered together a group of women to take part in 'The Change', a special storytelling evening to mark International Women’s Day 2022. Hosted on Zoom by Róisín Ingle and Kathy Sheridan, our guests told their personal tales of transformation. The panel included Irish Times contributor and author Hilary Fannin, Miss Ireland Pamela Uba, activist Lavinia Kerwick, actor Philippa Dunne, journalist Brianna Parkins, recently arrived Ukrainian political researcher Angelika Sharygina and transition year students Meabh Jevens and Anita Sibi. In this episode you’ll hear a selection of those stories, but you can watch the entire event back on https://www.facebook.com/ITWomensPodcast But first, Róisín is joined again by activist and human rights worker Nadia Dobrianska, who has crossed the border into Poland and will be travelling on to Ireland later this week. She tells Róisín Ingle about a very rough few days and her decision to flee the Ukrainian countryside. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/10/202254 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 546 Ukraine Woman: Nadia Dobrianksa in a country under siege

Kyiv native Nadia Dobrianska fled her hometown early last Thursday morning, as Russia launched their first attacks on Ukraine. The human rights worker and lawyer is now in hiding with her family in the Ukrainian countryside, a few hours outside of the city. In this episode, Dobrianska describes life in a time of war. She tells Róisín Ingle why she decided to evacuate immediately, how the family have prepared for the worst, and the outlook for the days ahead. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/3/202252 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 545 The Book Club: The Herd - Emily Edwards

In the first book club episode of 2022, Bernice Harrison, Niamh Towey, Róisín and Ann Ingle are discussing The Herd by Emily Edwards. The Herd tells the story of a parent grappling with the decision whether or not to vaccinate their child, but it’s also an exploration of the trials and tribulations of modern motherhood. So what did our book clubbers make of this very topical story and would they recommend the book? Our next pick is Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus and we'll be discussing it at the end of April. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/28/202236 minutes, 1 second
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Ep 544 Summer 1976: The murders of Elizabeth Plunkett and Mary Duffy

In the Summer of 1976, two young Irish women, Elizabeth Plunkett and Mary Duffy were abducted and murdered by Ireland’s first serial killers Geoffrey Evans and John Shaw. Having met in a UK prison a few years beforehand, the two men travelled to Ireland with a plan to rape and murder as many women as possible. In today’s episode, Irish Times Senior Features Writer Rosita Boland tells the story of the short lives and brutal murders of these two young women.Warning: this episode includes content that some may find disturbing Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/24/202241 minutes, 53 seconds
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Ep 543 Worrier Queens: Yasmine Akram and Phillipa Dunne

We Heart Worry is a brilliant podcast from Irish actors and writers Phillipa Dunne and Yasmine Akram. From worrying about the hidden meaning of a dream about Jared Leto, to fretting about accidentally putting your child’s birth cert in the clothes bank, Phillipa and Yasmine run the gamut of all our worries, niche to normal, in their podcast. They talk to Róisín about the show and the many worries that have gone into it. They also talk about Phillipa’s starring roles in Derry Girls and Motherland, Yasmine’s turn opposite Benedict Cumberbatch in Sherlock, and lots more.Presenter: Róisín IngleProducers: Jennifer Ryan and Suzanne Brennanwww.irishtimes.com/podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/17/202250 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ep 542 Public Shaming & Period Poverty with Sacha Dekker & Nadine Reid

In a recent article in The Irish Times, Sacha Dekker described an incident during which she was mocked by strangers in a restaurant who found her disability funny. Sacha tells Róisín why, even though she is a warrior who has overcome enormous obstacles in her life, she was hurt by this experience and how writing about it helped her get past it.Róisín also talks to cosmetics guru, TV presenter and model Nadine Reid about the battle to end period poverty and how the supermarket Lidl is helping. They also talk about the medical bias she has encountered seeking fertility treatment, as someone with a BMI higher than 35, and why she’s loving life in the wilds of Donegal.Presenter: Róisín IngleProducers: Jennifer Ryan and Suzanne BrennanSacha Dekker's article: https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/health-family/the-family-are-pointing-and-laughing-at-me-one-mimics-my-spasm-1.4781409 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/10/202250 minutes, 18 seconds
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Ep 541 Women of Honour

Last year, the Women of Honour (WOH) documentary by journalist Katie Hannon was broadcast on RTE, revealing allegations of sexual abuse, harassment and rape within the Irish Defence Forces. In this episode, Róisín Ingle meets two members of the WOH group, retired company quartermaster Sgt Karina Molloy and retired army captain Diane Byrne. They speak about their own experiences of bullying and abuse within the military and their disappointment with the independent review announced on Tuesday by Minister Simon Coveney. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/4/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 540 Lord Mayor of Dublin Alison Gilliland

Halfway through her term as Lord Mayor of Dublin, Alison Gilliland talks to Róisín about being only the 10th woman to hold the office and her ambitions while she’s there, including Brigit 2022: Dublin City Celebrating Women, a festival marking St Brigid’s Day this year. They also talk about feminism, her quest to make Dublin a safer city for everyone and her personal experience of sexual assault while going for a run when she lived in Spain. Presenter: Róisín IngleProducers: Jennifer Ryan and Suzanne Brennanwww.irishtimes.com/podcastsPublic consultation on Review of the operation of the Health (Regulation of Termination of Pregnancy) Act 2018  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/27/202245 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ep 539 Watershed Moment? Reflections on men’s violence against women

25 years ago a comprehensive government task-force report on violence against women was published. Since then, nearly 250 women have been murdered in Ireland, including Ashling Murphy, laid to rest this week by her family. In today’s podcast, Róisín talks to columnist with the Irish Examiner, Alison O’Connor, final year law student, Inny Ekeolu, professor of psychology at the University of Limerick, Orla Muldoon, and author of the 'An Fear Eile: Manhood in Ireland' research project, Finian Murphy, about why doing nothing is not an option when it comes to ending gender based violence.Presenter: Róisín IngleProducers: Jennifer Ryan and Suzanne BrennanSound engineer: JJ Vernonwww.irishtimes.com/podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/20/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Great Pivot: What would it take for you to change everything?

Have you ever questioned the path you’ve found yourself on? Ever fantasised about quitting your job and making a career change? Or maybe life just intervened and forced you to change lanes. For many or us, the pandemic has had a huge impact on our attitudes to work. It’s been a time of soul searching and reflection on what makes us happy and keeps us motivated. Today we speak to two women about the art of pivoting and why everyone should be encouraged to tune in to their inner voice. Guests: Aideen Finnegan, broadcaster and host of How to Pivot Podcast and Sarah Shannon, yoga and meditation teacher who runs the Wild & Free Retreats in the Algarve, Portugal.Presenter: Róisín IngleProducers: Jennifer Ryan and Suzanne Brennanwww.irishtimes.com/podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/13/202240 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ep 537 The Invisible Job: How sharing home and parental responsibilities makes everyone happier

Today, we celebrate Women’s Christmas or as it’s known in Ireland Nollaig na mBan. Traditionally this was the day when women got a day off after all the emotional and physical labour of making Christmas happen. But have we really moved on very much from the days when women did the majority of work in the home? And how much is this clear imbalance holding us back? In The Invisible Job: Parenting, Running a Home and Dividing Responsibility, Paula Fyans examines how this enduring inequality negatively impacts the lives of women, in terms of their career progression, financial security and their physical and mental health. In today’s episode, she speaks to Róisín Ingle about what this invisible, unpaid role entails and what we can do about changing the way we divide our daily tasks. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/6/202254 minutes, 24 seconds
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Ep 536 The Women's Podcast 2021 Review

In this episode presenters Kathy and Róisín are joined by producers Jennifer and Suzanne to look back at 2021. We share our favourite episodes, name our women of the year and talk about some of the highs and lows of the past 12 months.**This episode was recorded in mid-December 2021. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/30/20211 hour, 12 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 535 Jan Brierton: What day is it? Who gives a f*ck

Earlier this year, in the bleakness of lockdown three, Jan Brierton became a viral sensation with her pandemic poem What day is it? Who gives a f*ck. Sharing her thoughts on the monotony of lockdown life, her words resonated with many across the country and beyond. In today’s episode, the stylist turned poet tells Róisín Ingle how that poem changed the course of her life this year, leading to the release of her very first book. Brierton also speaks about embracing her creativity, getting out of her comfort zone and about her decision to give up alcohol. The pair share their Christmas plans, discuss the merit of the Brussels sprout and Jan performs a new festive poem called Dear Santa. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/23/202132 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 534 Christmas comfort eating with Grace Dent

Feast your ears on this deliciously festive food episode with columnist, broadcaster and author Grace Dent. As restaurant critic for The Guardian and a regular face on Masterchef, Grace tells Róisín Ingle what tasty treats feature in her Christmas spread every year. The pair reminisce about Yuletide dinners through the decades, from the joy of the humble pud, to the homemade trifle lathered with Birds custard. This episode is a culinary walk down a very festive memory lane. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/16/20211 hour, 4 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 533 Christmas Book Club: Our best reads of 2021

It has been another fantastic year for books: Sally Rooney’s Beautiful World, Where Are You, Megan Nolan’s Acts of Desperation, Catherine Ryan Howard’s 56 Days, Oh William! by Elizabeth Strout, Louise Nealon’s Snowflake, Fíona Scarlett’s Boys Don’t Cry, the list goes on and on. In this episode Róisín is joined by our book clubbers Niamh Towey, Ann Ingle and Bernice Harrison to share their favourite reads of the year (some old, some new) and the books they’ll be gifting this Christmas. Books mentioned:56 Days - Catherine Ryan HowardActs of Desperation - Megan NolanApples Never Fall - Liane MoriartyAre You Somebody - Nuala O’FaolainBright Burning Things - Lisa HardingComrades - Rosita BolandDaisy Jones and the Six - Taylor Jenkins ReidDid Ye Hear Mammy Died? - Seamus O’ReillyEmpire of Pain - Patrick Radden KeefeHow to Kill Your Family - Bella Mackie Iron Annie - Luke CassidyMagpie - Elizabeth DayNell - Nell McCaffertyNora - Nuala O’ConnorOh William! - Elizabeth StroutOpenhearted - Ann IngleThe End of the World is a Culture de Sac - Louise KennedyThe Opposite of Butterfly Hunting - Evanna LynchReal Estate - Deborah LevySlug - Hollie McNishSmall Things Like These, Claire KeeganSnowflake - Louise NealonState of Terror - Hillary Clinton and Louise PennyWe Don’t Know Ourselves - Fintan O’Toole Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/9/202137 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 532 Double Disadvantage: The cost of the pandemic on Irish youth

For thousands of young people across Ireland, the impact of the pandemic has been catastrophic. This is especially true for children from disadvantaged communities, who may have grown up with gangland violence on their doorstep, or in a home with addiction, overcrowding or poverty. For many, the usual supports they relied on, like schooling and youth clubs were taken away overnight. In a new documentary series by The Irish Youth Foundation, musician and presenter Mary-Kate Geraghty (MayKay) travels to Limerick, Waterford and Dublin to speak to the young people in these communities, about how their lives were affected during the lockdowns. In today’s episode, MayKay shares what she learned from listening to their stories. We’re also joined by Suzi Cronin, the Youth Work Team Lead at Southhill Hub in Limerick and by Ellen Burke, a young member of the travelling community who speaks about her experience engaging with youth services in Waterford. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/2/202149 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 531 Violence against women is a men's issue - Jackson Katz & Ryan Hart

The vast majority of violence against women and girls (and men and boys) is perpetrated by men. Why then is it viewed primarily as a women’s issue? On UN International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Róisín talks to two men who are activists in the area about why we urgently need to reframe the conversation and why more men need to speak out. Guests: Dr Jackson Katz, co-founder of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) program and Ryan Hart, domestic abuse advocate.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/25/20211 hour, 1 minute, 52 seconds
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Ep 530 Comrades: Rosita Boland and Brianna Parkins

Living alone during lockdown and cut off from her wide circle of friends, Irish Times journalist and author Rosita Boland, wrote a beautiful book of essays called Comrades: A Lifetime of Friendships. The book is an exploration of camaraderie, from the imaginary, the unrequited, to the ones lost along the way. In today’s episode, Boland joins Róisin Ingle to speak about the different friendships which have shaped her life and the pair reminisce about their own journey. But first, Irish Times columnist Brianna Parkins shares her experience of making new pals as an Australian in Ireland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/18/20211 hour, 1 minute, 34 seconds
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Ep 529 Lara Marlowe: Love in a Time of War

When Lara Marlowe met Robert Fisk in 1983 in Damascus, he was already a famous war correspondent. She was a young American reporter who would become a renowned journalist in her own right. For the next twenty years, they were lovers, husband and wife and friends, occasionally angry and estranged from one another, but ultimately reconciled. In today’s podcast, Marlowe, who is The Irish Times Paris correspondent, talks to her colleague and friend Kathy Sheridan about the memoir she has written telling the story of their time together, Love in a Time of War: My years with Robert Fisk. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/11/202155 minutes, 53 seconds
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Ep 528 Polish “Savita” case / Sarah Gilmartin’s Dinner Party

The death of a 30-year-old woman in Poland, likened to the Savita Halappanavar case, has sparked protests and candlelit vigils in an outpouring of opposition to restrictive abortion laws which campaigners claim played a role in her death. Irish Times Europe correspondent Naomi O’Leary has the details of this story and explains why the case will resonate in Ireland.Later, Róisín talks to prize-winning Irish author Sarah Gilmartin about her brilliant novel, Dinner Party: A tragedy, which tells the story of a family of dysfunctional siblings and their monstrous mother.Presenter: Róisín IngleProduced by: Jennifer Ryan and Suzanne BrennanSound: JJ Vernonwww.irishtimes.com/podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/4/202142 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 527 Evanna Lynch: The Opposite of Butterfly Hunting

Harry Potter star Evanna Lynch was just 11 when her eating disorder began to manifest. She struggled for several years with anorexia, with spells in and out of hospital including a three month stay in a facility in England. In her memoir, The Opposite of Butterfly Hunting, she explores with breathtaking clarity, her path to recovery and her struggle to deal with the complexities and contradictions within herself. Now 30 and living in London, she talked to Roisin Ingle about navigating all of this while also coming to terms with the international fame which came when she won the part of Luna Lovegood in the Harry Potter movie franchise. It's a story about the tragedy and glory of growing up, one Lynch hopes will help anyone touched by this devastating, often misunderstood illness.If you’re affected by any of the issues discussed in today’s episode, contact BodyWhys.ie or [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/28/20211 hour, 1 minute, 34 seconds
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Ep 525 Ann Ingle: Openhearted

In her memoir, Openhearted, Ann Ingle tells the story of her life with her late husband Peter, the “wild Irishman” she fell in love with while on holiday in Cornwall at the age of 20. Presented as a series of essays, Ann writes about everything from love, sex and heartbreak, to money, rearing children, writing, ageing, and so much more. In today’s episode, she talks to Kathy Sheridan about what she has learned and continues to learn into her ninth decade. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/14/20211 hour, 9 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ep 524 The Sally Rooney Effect

Last month Irish writer Sally Rooney launched her highly anticipated third novel Beautiful World, Where Are You. Since its release, the book has topped bestseller lists across the world and continues to fly off the shelves. We here at the Women’s Podcast devoured the book in just a few days and we’re still not ready to stop talking about it. That’s why in today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by Irish Times columnists Emer McLysaght and Fintan O’Toole to get their thoughts on the book and to discuss the Sally Rooney effect: the mass appeal of her writing, the impact she’s had on the literary world and the spotlight she’s shone on emerging Irish writers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/7/202151 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ep 523 Vicky Pryce: Women vs Capitalism

In her new book, Women vs Capitalism, economist Vicky Pryce presents readers with an uncomfortable truth: we will not achieve equality for women without radical changes to contemporary capitalism. In today’s episode she speaks to Kathy Sheridan about all the ways in which our economic structure is built to put women at a disadvantage, from the gendered threat of robot labour to the lack of women in economics itself. Pryce also shares her personal journey of moving from Greece to the UK in her teens, her experiences in the male-dominated financial sector and the challenges of being a working mother. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/30/202155 minutes, 20 seconds
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Ep 522 Jade Jordan: Nanny, Ma and Me

Last year, when most of us were busy baking banana bread or learning how to crochet, Irish actress Jade Jordan spent her time in lockdown delving back into the pasts of her mother Dominique and grandmother Kathleen. Spurred on by the death of George Floyd, Jade was eager to explore and add to the discussion surrounding race and discrimination in Ireland. The result of these conversations between Jade and the women closest to her, is the book, Nanny, Ma and Me: An Irish story of family, race and home. In today’s episode, she tells Róisín Ingle about the power of looking back into the past, the importance of speaking out and standing up to racism and why when people come together to talk, the possibilities are endless. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/23/20211 hour, 4 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 521 How women can save the planet (and why they shouldn’t have to)

We cannot resolve the climate emergency without fighting for gender equality. Women, especially poor women of colour, are suffering most as a result of the climate crisis, our highest-profile climate activists are women and girls and yet, at the top table it is men who are deciding the earth’s future. In her latest book, How Women Can Save the Planet, award-winning journalist Anne Karpf argues that when it comes to fighting climate change we are not all in it together, but we could be. In today’s podcast she joins Róisín, Sadhbh O’Neill, policy coordinator with Stop Climate Chaos, and Catherine Cleary, writer and founder of the Pocket Forests initiative, to talk about many of the issues raised in the book, the debate about women and climate change and what we can all do to help. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/16/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 520 Elizabeth Day

In today’s podcast Róisín talks to the journalist, author and presenter of the brilliant How To Fail podcast Elizabeth Day. She has just published her latest novel, Magpie, a thrilling, stylish and psychologically astute story of jealousy, motherhood and power. In this funny, moving and revealing conversation, Day explains how some of the book’s themes relate to her own life, why it was important to her to write about mental illness with sensitivity and why she is a Derry girl at heart. She also tells Róisín about her lockdown wedding to husband Justin Basini, some of her favourite How To Fail guests and her friendship with Fleabag creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/9/202158 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ep 519 Our Table: from Direct Provision to Taste of Dublin

Taste of Dublin returns to the Inveagh Gardens this week. A celebration of eating, drinking and entertainment, the festival runs for five days from the 1st- 5th September and features live cooking demonstrations, wine tastings and food stalls from all over the world. This year, Our Table will be joining the festival line up, selling a selection of products and showcasing start up businesses from the migrant background. Our Table was founded by activist Ellie Kisyombe and food writer Michelle Darmody, who met through a shared conviction that Direct Provision was an unjust system and that talking about it through food might help to start an important conversation. In today’s episode, Kisyombe and Darmody speak to Róisin Ingle about the origins of Our Table and their involvement in this year’s festival. Also joining the conversation is pastry chef and Irish Times food writer Aoife Noonan who will be doing a live demonstration at Taste of Dublin this Sunday. See https://dublin.tastefestivals.com/ for all details. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/2/202135 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 518 Back To School: Third time lucky?

It’s that time of year again. The back-to-school sun is shining as thousands of children around the country return to the classroom. Parents, children and teachers alike will be hoping for some normality as the new school year begins, but will it be all plain sailing? In this episode Róisín Ingle is joined by journalist and parenting expert Jen Hogan and by Maria Rushe, a secondary school teacher based in Donegal. They discuss the worries and concerns facing parents and students, the current rules around masks and vaccinations and they’ve loads of tips and advice for the new academic year ahead. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/26/202139 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ep 517 The Breakup Monologues: Rosie Wilby

In her new book The Breakup Monologues, comedian Rosie Wilby takes you on a journey back through her romantic history, celebrating the ups and downs and the many lessons learned along the way. The book serves as a love letter to those breakups and includes anecdotes from friends and interviews with relationship therapists, scientists and sociologists. In this conversation, the “breakup queen” tells Róisín Ingle about her obsession with heartache, the new language around dating and why lesbians are the unofficial, unrecognised world champions of breakups. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/19/202147 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 516 The Bright Side - Anne Gildea and Ruth Meehan

The Bright Side, by Irish director Ruth Meehan opens in Irish cinemas on August 20th. The film was inspired by Anne Gildea’s best-selling memoir ‘I’ve got cancer, what’s your excuse’ and tells the story of Kate (Gemma-Leah Devereux), a world-weary comedian who is diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of thirty-five. Already suicidal, Kate sees this as a guilt-free way out, but the prospect of death soon becomes the best reason to choose life. In this episode, Gildea and Meehan tell Roisin Ingle how the idea for the film came about, their strong emotional ties to the story and some of their favourite moments from the set. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/12/202140 minutes, 29 seconds
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Ep 515 World Breastfeeding Week / Maternity Restrictions

The first week of August marks World Breastfeeding Week, which aims to encourage breastfeeding and improve the health of babies around the world. Globally, Ireland has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates, with just over one third of mothers breastfeeding their newborn when they leave hospital and fewer than 6% of babies still breastfed exclusively at 6 months old. In this episode, broadcaster and "accidental" breastfeeding spokesperson Aoibhinn Ní Shúillebháin speaks to Róisín Ingle about the lactation supports needed for mothers, the world-wide marketing ploy that is follow-on milk and why the government need to fully fund and implement the National Maternity Strategy and the National Breastfeeding Action Plan in Budget 2022.We’re also joined by maternity care campaigner Emma Carroll, who set up the Facebook page In our shoes: Covid Pregnancy to highlight the unfair restrictions placed on expectant mothers and partners in Ireland’s maternity hospitals. Carroll tells Ingle about her own experience of giving birth in a pandemic, about the stories she’s hearing from other mothers and why she says it’s unacceptable that you can have a meal in a pub with your partner but must go through the maternity process alone. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/5/20211 hour, 8 seconds
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Ep 514 Britney Spears’ conservatorship battle

In 1998, a fresh-faced 16-year-old Britney Spears became an overnight global superstar with the release of her debut single Baby One More Time. She went on to sell over 150 million records, win multiple awards and gain a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. But for nearly half of Spears’ impressive career, the singer hasn’t had full control over her life. For the last thirteen years, she has been under a conservatorship controlled by her father, which gives him the legal right to make decisions on her finances, work commitments, health and personal life. This summer, Spears has been fighting the conservatorship in court, describing the details of her life in a harrowing testimony which shocked fans around the world. In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle speaks to Kimberly Wehle, Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore about the details of her conservatorship battle and to journalist Louise Bruton about the life and career of America’s biggest pop star. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/29/202143 minutes
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Ep 513 Big Night In: Dr Marie Cassidy

In this episode, we are bringing you a conversation from our Big Night In series of events, which took place in late 2020. On a cold Winter's evening, Róisín Ingle was joined on Zoom by former state pathologist Dr Marie Cassidy in front of a live virtual audience. Cassidy spoke about her very unconventional career choice, the unexpected fame that came with it and the Irish obsession with death. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/22/20211 hour, 6 minutes, 24 seconds
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Ep 512 Ethel Rohan: In the Event of Contact

In this episode Róisín talks to author Ethel Rohan, who describes herself as “a kind of a queen of uncomfortable stories”. Rohan has written a number of short story collections and a novel. Her latest book, In the Event of Contact, is a collection of 14 stories set in Ireland, England, and America about abuse survivors who turn their trauma into power. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/15/202140 minutes, 53 seconds
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Ep 511 Women and art: identity, sexuality, race and power

Art historian Catherine McCormack recently published her book, ’Women in the Picture: Women Art and the Power of Looking’. In it, she argues that women's identity has long been stifled by woeful narratives and a limited set of archetypes. In this episode, Catherine speaks to Róisín Ingle about how studying art has shaped her feminism, why history fooled us into thinking there were no female artists in the past, the idea of the monstrosity of the female body in art and lots more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/8/202147 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ep 510 How to Get Back Out There: A guide

After more than a year working remotely, socialising on zoom and staring at the four walls of our own houses, the thought of getting back out into the world can seem a little daunting. While the reopening of society brings with it the chance to meet friends, eat out and reunite with loved ones, it can also bring a sense of uncertainty and social anxiety. For some of us, FOMO - the fear of missing out - has been replaced with FOJI - the fear of joining in. To discuss the difficulties, logistics and etiquette of getting back out there, Róisín Ingle is joined by Irish Times columnists Jennifer O’Connell and Laura Kennedy and Helen Vaughan, psychotherapist and owner of Maynooth Counselling. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/1/202137 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ep 509 Post-pandemic beauty with Marian Keyes

Last week, author Marian Keyes joined Roisin Ingle live on Zoom, for a post-pandemic beauty chat in association with Clarins. In front of a virtual audience, the pair spoke about online cosmetic discoveries during the last very strange year, products they relied on to keep their spirits up, new post-pandemic beauty trends and the joy of letting yourself go. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/25/202151 minutes, 35 seconds
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Ep 508 The Benefits of Being Shy & Meeting the Midwife

With her book ‘Shy: How being quiet can lead to success’, author and journalist Annie Ridout has written a practical guide which teaches us to recognise shyness as a gift and something to be embraced, rather than fixed. Róisín talks to Ridout and our co-producer Suzanne Brennan, who is a shy person, about this often misunderstood attribute. Also in this episode: My Expert Midwife founder and One Born Every Minute star, Lesley Gilchrist, talks to our co-producer Jennifer Ryan about the importance of self-care for women after giving birth and how the pandemic has obliterated new mothers’ usual support networks. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/17/202159 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 507 What it means to be transgender in Ireland

On today’s show Róisín chats to one of Ireland’s leading trans activists, Sara R Phillips, chair of the Transgender Equality Network Ireland and a board member of the National Women’s Council of Ireland, about what it means to be transgender in Ireland today. In a wide-ranging conversation, Sara addresses some of the common questions people may have, she dispels a few trans myths, shares stories from her own life, and lots more.https://www.teni.ie/https://www.belongto.org/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/10/20211 hour, 26 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 506 Mother and Baby Homes Commission member speaks publicly

Yesterday, survivors of Ireland’s mother and baby homes heard from one of the members of the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes, when professor Mary Daly spoke publicly about the Commission’s work at an online event organised by Oxford University. To date, none of the Commission members have gone before the Oireachtas or given a press conference following the publication of its lengthy report in January. On today’s episode, Tuam mother and baby home survivor Teresa O’Sullivan, Maeve O’Rourke of the Clann Project and Irish Times political correspondent Jennifer Bray talk to Róisín Ingle about this latest development. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/3/202151 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 505 Why women are poorer than men

Why Women are Poorer than Men is the debut book from Annabelle Williams, a journalist and editor who specialises in investing, economics and consumer affairs. The book explores injustices from old-age poverty to the gendered housing crisis and illustrates how society conspires to limit women's wealth. In today’s episode, Williams joins Róisín Ingle to discuss the many reasons why women are poorer than men and what we can do about it. Also joining the discussion and sharing their personal experiences with money, is Dr Katriona O’Sullivan, a lecturer in the Department of Psychology at Maynooth University and Rachael Ingle, a former chairperson of the Irish Association of Pension funds and the CEO of Aon Solutions Ireland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/31/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 504 Nothing Compares: Sinead O'Connor’s Rememberings

In this specially extended podcast, Sinead O'Connor invites us into her home to talk about her extraordinary new memoir Rememberings. Over coffee and cigarettes she talks Róisín Ingle through her traumatic childhood, her singular musical career and the liberation she found in tearing up that photo of the pope. And there's more: Prince, family bonds, nuns, shame, writing, singing, head shaving, truth-talking, touring and swearing. Rememberings by Sinead O'Connor is published by Sandycove, an imprint of Penguin Books, on June 1st 2021. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/27/20211 hour, 47 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 503 The 8th: documenting a defining moment in Irish history

It’s three years since the referendum to repeal the Eighth Amendment was passed by a landslide on May 25th 2018. Now, film directors Aideen Kane, Lucy Kennedy and Maeve O’Boyle are releasing their documentary, The 8th, about that defining moment in Irish history. With footage gathered over a three-year period, The 8th brings us voices from both sides of the referendum campaign. It takes us behind the scenes of the Together for Yes campaign with co-leader, Ailbhe Smyth, and follows self-described glitter activist and co-presenter of the podcast Don’t Stop Repealin’, Andrea Horan, as they chart a bold strategy of grassroots activism. In today’s episode, Róisín talks to Ailbhe Smyth and to The 8th director, Lucy Kennedy, looking back at a campaign that brought about a monumental change in Ireland’s abortion laws after a 35-year long struggle. The 8th is released on video-on-demand in Ireland and the UK on 25 May, to coincide with the third anniversary of the referendum. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/24/202148 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ep 502 Fíona Scarlett: Boys Don’t Cry

The inspiration for Fíona Scarlett’s debut novel came to her just over three years ago while scrolling through Twitter. The schoolteacher turned author happened across a tweet by a paediatric palliative care doctor, in which he had listed what his young patients said they would miss the most when they died. Using their answers as a springboard, Scarlett immediately opened up her laptop and wrote what is now the first chapter of Boys Don’t Cry. In today’s episode, she tells Róisín Ingle why, having only started writing in her mid thirties, it’s never too late to try your hand at something new. She also speaks lovingly about her father who died last year, the next book in the pipeline and her literary inspirations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/20/202139 minutes, 1 second
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Ep 501 Wild Mountain Thyme

When the trailer for Wild Mountain Thyme was released late last year, it was immediately met with widespread criticism, not only for its delusional depictions of modern Irish life, but for its dodgy Irish accents and over the top Paddywhackery. Written and directed by John Patrick Shanley, the film is based on his play Outside Mullingar, which ran on Broadway in 2014. It stars Emily Blunt and Jamie Dornan as Rosemary and Anthony, two lonely souls who have grown up beside each other on neighbouring farms. Completing the star studded cast is Jon Hamm and Christopher Walken. After keeping us waiting for almost six months, the film was finally released to Irish audiences on April 30th. We invited comedian Erin McGathy and journalist Jenn Gannon to watch the movie and share their thoughts and observations with Róisín Ingle on today’s episode. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/17/202130 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 500 Older & Bolder: celebrating our 500th episode

Today is a BIG day for us. It’s our 500th episode! We love any excuse for a party, as you know, so in lieu of being able to gather the team together for some bubbles we did a very pandemic thing and partied with our listeners over Zoom. Last Thursday evening we held a live episode of the podcast with some very special guests aged 19 to 81, who shared their feelings on ageing and becoming Older & Bolder. They were: Yara Alagha, Rosemary Adaser, Olivia O’Leary, Allie O’Rourke, Jan Brierton, Ann Ingle, Hilary Fannin, Dr Rosaleen McDonagh, Dr Catherine Motherway and Iniolu Ekeolu. It was an emotional evening, as Kathy and Róisín reminisced about some of their most memorable episodes and talked about how far we’ve come since that very first show about women in politics back in 2015. Since then we’ve covered everything from sex toys to fashion, pregnancy to pensions, theatre, domestic violence, abortion and so much more. In today’s episode, you can hear highlights from the live show, including from TV presenter Angela Scanlon who couldn’t make it on the night. Thanks for listening and here’s to 500 more!If you would like to watch our special 500th episode Older & Bolder, go to our Facebook page @itwomenspodcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/13/202146 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 499 Hollie McNish on life, sex and poetry

Hollie McNish writes about so much of what it means to be a woman. In her latest book, Slug… and other things I’ve been told to hate, she writes about death and grief, growing up and periods, parenting, her relationship with her body, masturbation and lots more. The book is a mixture of poetry, prose, short stories and essays. It’s not your usual “poetry book” and it’s all the better for it. In this episode, McNish talks to Róisín Ingle about her life and career, women’s bodies, her amazing grandmothers, her posh Cambridge education and growing up in the same village as Kate Middleton. Hollie also performs two brilliant poems from Slug, which is published in Ireland this week. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/10/20211 hour, 4 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ep 498 Standing up to fast fashion: Laura Egan from Studio Minti

Have you ever really thought about where your clothes come from? Who makes them and what conditions are they working in? What happens to all the material waste from unwanted garments? These are the thoughts and questions that inspired Dublin fashion designer Laura Egan to launch Studio Minti, a sustainable online fashion hub & preloved clothing store. Leaving behind a career in London, Egan now sells vintage and second-hand clothes, upcycles and alters existing outfits and educates her customers on sustainable fashion. In this episode, the designer speaks to Róisín Ingle about her early creative influences, the best ways to reimagine the items already in your wardrobe, and as we emerge from lockdown and begin dressing ourselves again, why we should all be considering a move away from fast fashion.Also just a reminder to please join us tonight, Thursday May 6th, on Facebook LIVE as we celebrate 500 episodes of The Women's Podcast. We're hosting a storytelling event called Older and Bolder to mark this mega milestone with guests including Olivia O’Leary, Allie O’Rourke, Hilary Fannin, Dr Catherine Motherway, Angela Scanlon, Rosaleen McDonagh and Yara Alagha. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/6/202139 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 497 Politics, feminism and the pandemic - with former minister Gemma Hussey

In 1982, Gemma Hussey became Ireland’s first female minister for education. She was appointed by Taoiseach Garret Fitzgerald after winning a seat for Fine Gael in Wicklow. Her appointment caused a bit of a culture shock among several of her male fellow ministers and for five years she was the only woman in cabinet. A lifetime liberal feminist, Hussey was co-founder of the Women’s Political Association and after she retired from politics in 1989, she wrote a book based on her cabinet diaries, At the Cutting Edge. It was hailed as the most thorough and realistic account of life inside cabinet in Ireland and caused quite a stir. In today’s podcast, Hussey looks back at her political career with Kathy Sheridan, recalling what it was like to be the only woman in cabinet, some of the shocking sexism she had to deal with - including Charlie Haughey snapping her bra strap - and the ferocity of the 1983 campaign on the Eighth Amendment. They also discuss the pandemic, the loss of her husband Derry just days before Christmas, women in politics today, and lots more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/3/202152 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ep 496 Breast density / ‘Cooking for Freedom’

Lifestyle blogs are ten a penny, but well-informed health blogs are hard to find. Siobhán Freeney’s ‘Being Dense’ is an Irish blog aiming to raise awareness around breast density, a condition that increases the risk of developing cancer, because it can lead to breast cancers being masked on mammograms. On today’s podcast, Freeney talks to Kathy Sheridan about her patient advocacy work, her own experience with breast cancer, and explains why breast density notification must become part of regular breast screening in Ireland. Also on today’s show, Róisín chats to Romana Testasecca of Watermelon Fitness, who is raising much needed funds for ‘Cooking for Freedom’ - a small charity which helps asylum seekers in Direct Provision buy food for themselves. She is holding on online event called ‘Move to Feel Good’ and it’s happening this Bank Holiday Monday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/29/202149 minutes, 35 seconds
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Ep 495 Roisin Kiberd: A personal journey through the Internet

Roisin Kiberd was born in 1989, the same year that Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist, invented the World Wide Web. In her new book The Disconnect, Kiberd takes a look at life growing up alongside the ever-expanding, ever-evolving Internet. In these interlinked essays, she examines our dependency and obsession with the online world, the ways we are more connected than ever before, and the disconnect this breeds. She asks what we have gained, what we have lost, and what we have willingly given away in exchange for this connected life. In today’s episode, Kiberd speaks to Róisín Ingle about the pressures of social media, the murky world of online dating and how her all-consuming relationship with technology eventually led to her breakdown. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/26/202156 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ep 494 “It undermines you as a person”: one woman’s experience of identity theft

Until a few weeks ago, 19-year-old UCC law student Alicia O’Sullivan had never heard of Admireme.vip. The website is an 18+ subscription-only platform, which describes itself as a place to share the “most intimate and secret content”. Alicia only became familiar with it after images purporting to be her appeared on the site. Someone had stolen her identity and set up a fake profile, doctoring pictures from her Instagram and photoshopping her face onto the bodies of nude women. Alicia went to the Gardaí about the scam, but feels she wasn’t taken seriously. In today’s episode, she speaks to The Irish Times journalist Jennifer O’Connell about that experience and why she has decided to speak out, launching the campaign group Safety Over Stigma, so others don’t have to go through the same ordeal. Also on the today’s show, Labour senator Ivana Bacik, whose party first introduced the Harassment, Harmful Communications and Related Offences Bill that became Coco’s Law, explains why what happened to Alicia is illegal under this law and the need for better enforcement. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/22/202143 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 493 Alexandra Heminsley: Some Body to Love

Alexandra Heminsley is a best selling author, journalist and broadcaster. Her latest memoir Some Body to Love is an open-hearted exploration into body image, identity and family life. In the book, Heminsley shares her experiences of IVF, pregnancy and sexual assault, all of which have had a profound effect on her own sense of self. She also details the breakdown of her marriage, following her then-husband's transition. In today’s episode, she speaks to Róisín Ingle about her journey to motherhood, building a LGBTQ+ family and re-configuring her life path. Alexandra will also be taking part in this year’s West Cork Literary Festival, where she’ll be discussing the book and hosting a memoir and life-writing workshop. Full details will be released on westcorkliteraryfestival.ie in May. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/19/20211 hour, 10 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ep 492 The Muslim Sisters of Éire

If you’ve ever passed the GPO on Dublin’s O’Connell Street on a Friday evening, you’re very likely to have seen the Muslim Sisters of Éire (MSOE) hard at work. The group is a grassroots, non-profit, all-female organisation, established in 2010 to promote integration and social inclusion, and to provide support services to the most vulnerable. Every Friday night at their soup kitchen in Dublin city centre, they serve hot meals to more than 500 people in need. But that’s just one of the many valuable charitable services they provide. On today’s show, Róisín speaks to chairperson and founder of the MSOE, Lorraine O’Connor, and to Sabina Syed, who has been volunteering with her for the past eight years. They discuss the work they do, how the pandemic has impacted it, observing a second Ramadan in lockdown and dispelling negative stereotypes about Islam. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/15/202141 minutes, 42 seconds
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Ep 491 The Book Club: Acts of Desperation - Megan Nolan

In this book club episode, Róisín, Ann Ingle, Bernice Harrison and Niamh Towey discuss Acts of Desperation, the debut novel from Waterford writer Megan Nolan. The book focuses on a turbulent relationship between the unnamed narrator and the “exceptionally beautiful” Ciaran, a half-Danish poet. Their intense love affair begins at a gallery launch, with our narrator pondering “Is it possible to love someone without knowing them, by sight?”. However, their infatuation spirals quickly downhill and the reader is brought into the darkest depths of their dysfunction. It’s an exploration of early adult life, and as one of our book clubbers puts it “what it is to be a young woman in all its various different guises”. As to be expected, it’s a lively discussion with differing viewpoints, some minor disagreements and the odd expletive. If you’d like to listen back to our episode with the author Megan Nolan, you can find it here: https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-483-megan-nolan-acts-of-desperation Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/12/202138 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 490 Men Who Hate Women: Laura Bates

In today’s episode we are delving deep into the ‘manosphere’ with English feminist writer and founder of the Everyday Sexism Project Laura Bates. The ‘manosphere’ relates to a collection of websites, blogs and online forums promoting masculinity, hostility towards women and strong opposition to feminism. In her ground-breaking new book, Men Who Hate Women, Bates goes undercover to expose these vast misogynist networks and communities, from incels to pick up artists to men’s rights activists. She explores what it is that attracts men to the movement, how it grooms and radicalises young boys and what can be done to stop it. Bates tells Róisín Ingle why, given that these groups are linked to the real life murders and crimes against women, we can't afford to ignore this brand of terrorism. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/8/20211 hour, 37 seconds
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Ep 489 Predicting the pandemic: Sue Rainsford - Redder Days

Sue Rainsford handed in the final manuscript of her novel Redder Days on the 14th of March 2020, the same day that Irish schools and colleges closed their doors due to Covid-19. It was remarkable timing, given the (now all too familiar) pandemic theme running through her book. Set in a world wracked by climate change, Redder Days tells the story of a survivalist cult who seek to escape a mysterious contagion only known as ‘red’. In today’s episode, the author speaks to Róisín Ingle about this accidental prediction, an idea she’s had since 2013. They also discuss her childhood spent in South Dublin, her love for dystopian writing and plans for her next book. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/5/202142 minutes, 12 seconds
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Ep 488 Brain fog: why you shouldn't ignore it and how to beat it

Have you ever felt like your brain is fuzzy, that you just can't seem to focus on the task in hand, or you have trouble finding the right word in a sentence? If the answer is yes, then you may be one of the many people - and most often it is women - who has experienced brain fog. In her new book, Beating Brain Fog: Your 30-day Plan to Think Faster, Sharper, Better, neuroscientist and health psychologist, Dr Sabina Brennan, throws light on the experience, which is not a condition in itself, but rather an indication that something else may be amiss. Brain fog can be a symptom of many conditions including migraine, multiple sclerosis and long Covid – in which some people continue to suffer months after the initial Covid-19 symptoms have passed. On today's podcast, Róisín talks to Dr Brennan and Joanna Leszczuk, who followed the 30-day plan in the book after she suffered brain fog as a result of coronavirus. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/1/202140 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 487 Punch Line: Becky Cheatle and Allie O'Rourke

This Wednesday March 31st marks International Transgender Day of Visibility. It's an annual event celebrating transgender and non-binary people which also aims to raise awareness of discrimination of this community worldwide.. In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by two trans women Allie O'Rourke and Becky Cheatle, winners of the Virgin Media Discovers Short Film Competition and a prize of 30,000 euro towards producing their short film 'Punch Line’. Both are stand up comedians and worked as co-writers on the project, while Cheatle will direct and O’Rourke will act in the production. Based on true events, ‘Punch Line’ tells the story of how a transgender stand-up comedian reframes a transphobic attack she experiences during the day and works it into her comedy routine later that evening. In this conversation, the pair discuss their experiences as trans women in Ireland, how society can be more inclusive and their exciting plans for the film which is currently in pre-production. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/29/202143 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 486 Abortion NI: Westminster intervenes / A Good Father

The UK government has intervened to compel the introduction of full abortion services in Northern Ireland due to a lack of progress on the issue by politicians there. Almost a year after abortion was officially decriminalised in Northern Ireland, women there are still being forced to travel to Britain for terminations. Cara Sanquest is an Irish woman living in London who set up the London Irish Abortion Rights Campaign and is now Campaigns and Research Manager for the MP Stella Creasy. She worked with Creasy on the 2019 Westminster legislation which decriminalised abortion in the North and on today's podcast she tells Róisín why, nearly two years on, the UK government has had to intervene once again. Also on today's show, Róisín talks to author Catherine Talbot about her chilling debut novel, A Good Father, which explores the male-dominated crime known as ‘family annihilation’. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/25/202143 minutes, 18 seconds
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Ep 485 Melissa Rice: Sobering

Melissa Rice is what you might describe as an unexpected addict. Growing up in a happy family in Kirkby, on the outskirts of Liverpool, Rice excelled in school and later qualified as a primary school teacher. Discovering alcohol in her early teens, she used it as a form of escapism, a route to confidence and sociability. But by the time she had reached her early twenties, her relationship with alcohol began to unravel every aspect of her life, including her teaching career, her friendships and her family. Now three years sober, the former primary school teacher turned author is sharing her story. In her new book Sobering: Lessons learnt the hard way on drinking, thinking and quitting, she describes her journey to rock bottom, “hitting every shameful branch along the way” and the long difficult road to recovery. Written with the expert help of rehab and addiction specialists, the book offers invaluable advice and an insight into the powerful hold that addiction can take over someone’s life. In today’s episode, Rice speaks to Róisín Ingle about the crucial role mental health plays in addiction issues, the abortion she had at nineteen and how it has shaped her journey since and why she still needs to take her recovery one day at a time. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/22/20211 hour, 4 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 484 Sarah Everard: how can the world be safer for women?

The murder of 33-year-old Sarah Everard in London prompted thousands of women to share stories about fearing for their personal safety and the modifications they make to their behaviour in order to feel safe. That collective trauma has spilled out on social media and elsewhere all over the world. On Tuesday, a socially distanced peaceful 'Reclaim the Streets' protest organised by ROSA was held in Dublin. Others are planned for Cork, Limerick and Galway today. In the latest issue of The Irish Times, the results of a survey carried out by Transport Infrastructure Ireland were published. It found that large numbers of Irish women fear for their safety using public transport, cycling or walking alone. The 'Travelling in a Woman’s Shoes' report also found that women felt “heavily responsible” for their own safety when travelling and there was “little focus” in society generally on the role men can play in ensuring their safety. The fact that women are fearful is not shocking to women, but it seems like the penny is still dropping on this issue for many men. On today’s podcast Róisín speaks to our three guests about how society can help women feel safer in the world.Guests: Founder of the Everyday Sexism project and author of books including Girl Up and Men Who Hate Women, Laura Bates, Ruth Coppinger, a former Solidarity TD and founding member of ROSA, a movement for reproductive justice in Ireland, and 22-year-old NUI Galway student Anna Golden, who is a member of Plan International’s Irish and Global Youth Advisory Panel. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/18/202155 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ep 483 Megan Nolan: Acts of Desperation

Acts of Desperation is the darkly funny debut novel from Waterford writer Megan Nolan. Set in Dublin, it tells the story of an intense love affair between the narrator and her boyfriend Ciaran, a half-Danish poet. Their dysfunctional relationship plays out over the pages and lends itself to the question: why do women stay with toxic men? Nolan began writing the book while in Athens in 2016 and completed it three years later. In today’s episode, she speaks to Roisin Ingle about her bookish childhood in the sunny south east, her short stint in Trinity college and the positive reaction to her first venture into fiction writing. We’ll be discussing Acts of Desperation in our next episode of the book club, which will be out next month. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/15/202133 minutes, 13 seconds
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Ep 482 Sarah Everard and Lockdowniversary: what if more women had been in charge?

The disappearance of Sarah Everard in London and the subsequent discovery of a body in woodland by police searching for her, has got many of us talking about the everyday fear that women experience when it comes to being alone in public. Ms Everard, a 33-year-old marketing executive, went missing after leaving a friend’s house in Clapham, south London, at about 9pm on March 3rd. The Met Police announced on Wednesday that a diplomatic protection officer held in relation to her disappearance had been arrested on suspicion of murder. On today’s podcast, Róisín and Kathy discuss why, 40 years after the original Reclaim the Night marches, women are still scared and whether things would be different if men felt as frightened every time they went for a walk alone.Also in this episode, Kathy speaks to Aoife McLysaght, professor of genetics at TCD, Holly Cairns, Social Democrat TD for Cork South-West and Dr Gabrielle Colleran, vice president of the Irish Hospital Consultants Association, about this week’s grim anniversary marking one year since Ireland first entered a coronavirus-induced lockdown. We ask: would things have been any better if more women had been in charge?Plus: Patrick Freyne makes a guest appearance on the Women’s Podcast, reading his highly entertaining take on that Oprah interview with Meghan and Harry. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/11/20211 hour, 19 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ep 481 Stories of Overcoming / Celine Byrne

Last Thursday, the Irish Times Women’s Podcast hosted an evening of storytelling to mark International Women’s Day. Guests on the night were invited to share their stories of overcoming a challenge, in front of our virtual audience on Zoom and Facebook. In today’s episode, you’ll hear a selection of highlights from the event, including a brilliant story of using creativity to work around academic challenges from senator Lynn Ruane and a moving tale about reclaiming the joy of sea swimming from trans woman and activist Aoife Martin. Journalist Brianna Parkins spoke lovingly about her hard-working mum Lorraine and activist Ailbhe Smyth spoke about the severe depression and anorexia she endured as a young woman in the early 1970s. You can watch back the event in full on The Women’s Podcast Facebook page here: https://fb.watch/45I8OGwTe-/Later on, Irish soprano Celine Byrne joins Roisin Ingle to speak about her brand new live-stream concert La bohème, which is taking place on Saturday 13th of March live from the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre. The opera singer speaks to Ingle about a tough year personally and professionally, her journey into music and the excitement of returning to the stage. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/8/202156 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ep 480 China’s detention of Uighur Muslims: “It’s a state of emergency”

China is facing mounting global criticism over its treatment of the mostly Muslim Uighur population in the north-western region of Xinjiang. Rights groups say China has detained more than a million Uighurs over the past few years in what the state says are "re-education camps". However there is evidence that Uighurs in these camps are being used as forced labour, that families are being separated and that women are being subjected to human rights violations including rape, forced marriage, torture and forced sterilisation. Countries including the US, the Netherlands and Canada have accused China of genocide and crimes against humanity, while more than 50 Irish faith leaders have signed a statement condemning the persecution of the Uighurs and other Muslims in China. But activists say the international community must take action to end what they say is the biggest concentration camp system since World War II. In today’s podcast, Róisín talks to Yara Alagha, a parliamentary researcher in Seanad Éireann for the Civil Engagement Group, and to American Uighur and activist, Aydin Anwar, about the horrendous situation for Uighurs in the formerly independent Republic of East Turkistan and what the international community can do to help. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/4/202149 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 479 Above Water: Trish Kearney

Trish Kearney was one of the six Irish swimmers who charged former swim coach George Gibney with sexual abuse offences in 1992. Known in her younger days as Patricia McCahill, the Olympic hopeful was abused by Gibney from the age of thirteen. The abuse lasted over seven years. The case against Gibney was subsequently dropped following an appeal, but his crimes were later outed by journalist Johnny Watterson in a piece for the Sunday Tribune. Now nearly thirty years on, he remains a free man, who has never stood trial for his actions. In her memoir Above Water, Trish writes about the child she once was, growing up in a happy family who nurtured her talent and passion for swimming. She details the years of abuse suffered at the hands of her coach, a man trusted by her family and the wider community. In today’s episode, she speaks to Róisín Ingle about her stolen youth, coming to terms with the past and finding peace and happiness along the way. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/1/20211 hour, 9 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ep 478 Professional Troublemaker - Luvvie Ajayi Jones

Luvvie Ajayi Jones wants you to be a fear-fighting troublemaker. We're all afraid of something: of hearing the word 'no', of being different, of being 'too much', or not enough. In her new book, The Fear-Fighter Manual, the award-winning author, podcaster and TED talker, shows us how to embrace fear and get past it to live our best lives. In today's podcast Luvvie talks to Róisín about why we should all strive to be professional troublemakers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/25/202151 minutes, 39 seconds
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Ep 477 Making memories - with Professor Veronica O'Keane

Have you ever wondered why you remember some things and not others? Or why, even though you might share an experience with someone, their memory of it differs to yours? Psychiatrist Veronica O'Keane has spent 38 years working in neuroscience and psychiatry with patients whose ability to make sense of the world is impaired. In her book, The Rag and Bone Shop: How We Make Memories and Memories Make Us, she draws on that experience to explain why the way we memorise some things and forget others, is driven by our emotions. On today's podcast Róisín speaks to professor O’Keane about how we make memories and how they shape what we know and how we feel. She also talks about the importance of collective memory of the past and why she believes the deletion of the audio recordings of the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes is a devastating loss for that reason. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/22/202141 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ep 476 All Against Racism

In the last twelve months, almost half of young people between the ages of 18 and 24 have witnessed or experienced racism. This shocking statistic is part of new research by The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission, who have recently launched their All Against Racism campaign. Featuring interviews with eleven people from different ethnic backgrounds, the campaign aims to explore racism in Ireland and challenge the individual and societal attitudes that allow it to continue. In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by Teresa Buczkowska and Raihana Zeroug who both feature in the awareness drive. Buczkowska, a Polish migrant woman living in Ireland since 2005, works as an integration officer in the Immigrant Council of Ireland. Zeroug is a young student of Politics and Sociology at UCD who has been involved with sport and racism initiatives through Sport Against Racism Ireland. Together they discuss the importance of listening to different perspectives and experiences, the need for diversity in leadership and the issues surrounding direct provision. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/18/202131 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ep 475 All the single ladies: love in lockdown

In Ireland 40% of people don’t live in a couple. When you look at those in the 16-29 age bracket, that skyrockets to 71%. After almost a year of lockdowns, give or take the odd month when restrictions were relaxed, the rules introduced to fight the spread of coronavirus have meant that sex between single people, or established couples who don’t cohabit, has in effect been illegal, against regulations, or only allowed outdoors. So, is it possible to date in a pandemic? How difficult is it to live a life starved of physical affection? And, what will dating be like when all of this is over? In response to a listener email highlighting some of the issues around being a single person in the pandemic, we gathered a panel of women together on Valentine’s Day to discuss the realities of dating, or not, during lockdown. In today’s podcast Róisín talks to Irish Times advice columnist Roe McDermott, journalist, blogger and Irish Times contributor Filomena Kaguako and Emily Wicks, a beauty blogger and plus size model from Waterford who was on First Dates last year. 🚨Announcement 🚨- Season three of the Women’s Podcast 'Big Night In' kicks off at 7pm on Saturday March 6th. We’ve got Mary McAleese, Tolu Makay, Maeve Higgins, and more, lined up for an evening of conversation with Róisín Ingle. Tickets on sale, soon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/15/202142 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ep 474 Thin Places: Kerri ní Dochartaigh

Nature writer and essayist Kerri ní Dochartaigh was born in Derry, Northern Ireland at the height of the Troubles. The daughter of a Catholic mother and Protestant father, her childhood was one of trauma and violence. Struggling to identify with either side, her family were forced out of two homes and were also victim to a frightening petrol bomb attack. In her first book, Thin Places, ní Dochartaigh lays bare the ways in which these events affected her life. Weaving between two contrasting genres, nature writing and memoir, the book is an emotional history of the Troubles and an exploration into the comforting and healing power of the natural world. In today’s episode, the writer speaks to Róisín Ingle about the meaning of Thin Places and the idea that certain locations can make us feel closer to the other world. They also discuss her experiences growing up in the North, some serendipitous moments along the way and the meandering search for a sense of belonging. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/11/202147 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 473 Poland's abortion crisis

Thousands of Poles have taken to the streets again in recent weeks, in protest against the introduction of new legislation effectively banning abortion. It follows last October’s constitutional court ruling that outlawed abortions in the case of foetal abnormalities. According to the ruling, which cannot be appealed, the only remaining circumstances for a Polish woman to end a pregnancy legally in her home country are in cases of rape, incest or health risk.On today's podcast Róisín speaks to three women about the situation in Poland: Julia Marciniak, Hospitality and Tourism coordinator for Unite the Union and Polish pro choice activist, Iwonna Kowalska, a Warsaw-based member of the Polish Grannies protest group, and Alibhe Smyth, a longtime LQBTQ+ and abortion rights campaigner here in Ireland.https://www.amnesty.org/en/countries/europe-and-central-asia/poland/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/8/202139 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 472 “Women and girls are never to blame” - Dr Jessica Taylor

Dr Jessica Taylor is a UK-based psychologist, sexual violence survivor and author of the best-selling book Why Women Are Blamed For Everything. She is also a senior lecturer in forensic and criminal psychology and the Director of Victim Focus - an organisation that addresses victim blaming practices in social care, policing, mental health and support services. On today’s podcast she talks to Róisín about a new, world-first training and research programme she has developed in partnership with Rape Crisis Network Ireland. The programme is in response to the Covid-19 pandemic and the proliferation of online counselling services. Its aim is to ensure that remote trauma counselling for victims of sexual violence is carried out correctly, that it is standardised and that it is really working for the victims. Jessica also talks to Róisín about her own life story, overcoming shocking rape and physical abuse as a teenager, returning to education and training to be a psychologist, going on to become one of the UK’s most vocal advocates for survivors of sexual violence. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/4/202155 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ep 471 Bad Bridget

Bad Bridget is a five-part podcast series which tells the unheard stories of Irish girls and women who emigrated to North America in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The series is a culmination of over five years worth of research by historians Elaine Farrell of Queen’s University Belfast and Leanne McCormick of Ulster University. Each episode delves into the lives of these women who travelled across the Atlantic and didn’t quite find the American dream. The extensive research into police, court and prison records uncovers the types of criminal activity in which Irish women were involved, including drunkenness, sex work and murder. In the 1860s, Irish women alone made up 86% of the female prison population in New York, while a 19th-century survey of 1,238 foreign-born sex workers found that 706 were Irish, just over half. In today’s episode, Farrell and McCormick speak to Róisín Ingle about the Irish women that history chose to forget. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/1/202149 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ep 470 Lockdown Style: what have we become?

What’s your lockdown style? Are you still getting fully dressed, washing your hair and putting makeup on? After 12 months at home, for many of us, leggings have become part of our daily uniform while our jeans are gathering dust. A year into this new comfy way of life, we ask the question, what have we become? To discuss this, Roisin is joined on today’s show by beauty columnist Laura Kennedy, comedian and co-founder of the MOB comedy theatre and school, Erin McGathy, and Jen Hogan, parenting columnist, author and mother of seven. Also in this episode, Roisin recites an excellent poem by a woman called Jan Brierton, which truly captures the spirit of Lockdown 3. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/28/202136 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ep 469 The shocking gender disparity on Irish radio / Conductor Marin Alsop

In our latest podcast we hear about the Gender Disparity Report on Irish radio, compiled by the Why Not Her? collective. It outlines a continuing gender disparity among the 20 most-played songs by Irish artists on Irish stations between June 24th and December 24th, 2020. On today’s podcast, Roisin Ingle speaks to activist and Why Not Her? founder Linda Coogan-Byrne about the report’s findings, where improvements have been made and what she believes needs to be done to achieve greater gender and racial diversity on Irish Radio. The hugely successful singer-songwriter RuthAnne also gives her reaction to the report and describes her own experience as an artist trying to break through what she describes as the “lad sound” on Irish Radio.Later in the show, we speak to Marin Alsop, a groundbreaking orchestra conductor considered to be one of the best in the world. Marin was recently a guest tutor on the National Concert Hall's award-winning Female Conductor Programme. Our co-producer Jennifer Ryan caught up with her afterwards. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/25/20211 hour, 32 seconds
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Ep 468 Five Minute Therapy - Sarah Crosby

Five Minute Therapy is the first book by Dublin-based psychotherapist Sarah Crosby. Packed full of practical exercises and powerful insights, it provides readers with the tools to reflect on their life experiences and explore who they are and who they might like to be. Think of it as your own pocket therapist. In today’s episode, Crosby speaks to Róisín Ingle about her journey from archaeology to psychotherapy, her early struggles with an eating disorder and how the Instagram page @theMindGeek set the wheels in motion for the book. From boundary setting, the joys of self discovery and how to be a good friend to others, Sarah shares some excellent tips on how to mind your mental health during another tough lockdown. Also, a reminder that Winter Nights is kicking off on Monday 25th January. It’s a five-day online festival of conversation, culture and ideas. Amongst the events, Roisin Ingle will be joined by Holocaust survivor Edith Eger as they explore ways to change the thoughts and behaviours that can keep us prisoners of our past. More information and tickets can be found here: https://www.irishtimes.com/winter-nights Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/21/202141 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 467 Professor Jane Ohlmeyer

This Friday, Trinity College Dublin professor Jane Ohlmeyer will deliver the Ford Lectures at the University of Oxford in England. Just ten women have delivered the prestigious lectures since they were founded in 1896 and prof Ohlmeyer will be the first woman from a university in Ireland to be invited to do so. Born in what was then Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) to a Northern Irish mother and a South African father, Ohlmeyer grew up in Belfast at the height of the Troubles. On today's podcast she talks to Kathy Sheridan about the last impact witnessing that violence has had on her. She also speaks in detail about her career, her fascination with the British Empire and Ireland's place in it, the experience of being a woman bashing on the glass ceiling in higher education and how she is feeling about the Ford Lectures. Rumour has it prof Ohlmeyer will be in the running for the soon-to-be vacant provost job at TCD. But as she explains in this podcast, she can't really go into that at the moment. Watch this space....If you'd like to see prof Ohlmeyer deliver The Ford Lectures, they begin on Friday 22 January at 5pm online. Tune in by following the link on the Oxford website - https://www.history.ox.ac.uk/james-ford-lectures-british-history Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/19/202138 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ep 466 The Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes

Raw, tired, angry and emotional. That’s how our guests on today’s podcast feel.It’s as they attempt to digest the government-commissioned report from the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes released this week. It found a shocking number of deaths and widespread abuses at religious institutions for unmarried mothers and their children in this country. Set up in 2015 following revelations about the deaths and burials of hundreds of children in Tuam, Co Galway, the commission was charged with examining what happened to vulnerable women and children in mother and baby homes in the State during the period from 1922 up to 1998. It found that 9,000 children - most of them babies - died in these institutions during that time. On Wednesday, Taoiseach Mícheál Martin apologised to survivors on behalf of the State saying, "we embraced a perverse religious morality and control, judgementalism and moral certainty, but shunned our daughters."To talk about the report, Kathy Sheridan is joined today by Rosemary Adaser, survivor of the industrial school and mother and baby home system, Noelle Brown who was adopted from Bessborough mother and baby home as an infant, and legal academic Mairead Enright, who has written extensively on law and feminism, reproductive justice and historical injustice. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/15/20211 hour, 6 minutes, 40 seconds
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Ep 465 Ten Truths to Change Your Life with Caroline Foran

Author and podcaster Caroline Foran took the world by storm in 2016 with the release of her best selling self-help book, Owning It: Your Bullsh*t-Free Guide to Living with Anxiety. Now, she’s back with her third book Naked: Ten Truths to Change Your Life, which challenges readers to explore, embrace and expose their vulnerability. From realising that you’ll never really have it all figured out to accepting that someone else’s success doesn’t take from yours, the truths featured in this practical guide will help produce positive change in your life. In today’s episode, Foran sits down with Róisín Ingle to discuss the power of your own vulnerability, how to deal with imposter syndrome and what life is like as a new mother in the middle of a pandemic. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/11/202132 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ep 464 The Book Club: Untamed - Glennon Doyle

In our first book club of 2021, Róisín, Ann Ingle, Bernice Harrison and Niamh Towey discuss Untamed, a memoir by American author Glennon Doyle. This is Doyle’s third memoir, which follows on from her two previous best sellers, Love Warrior and Carry On, Warrior. Untamed is the story of how Doyle left her troublesome marriage, fell head over heels in love with soccer star Abby Wambach, found her inner voice and eventually learned how to stop pleasing and start living. The book has garnered many famous fans all over the world, with the singer Adele announcing to her 39 million Instagram followers that “this book will shake your brain and make your soul scream. I am so ready for myself after reading this!” So, is this the perfect ‘New Year, New You’ guide to motivate you through January? Let’s see what our book clubbers have to say. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/7/202149 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 463 Things can only get better in 2021, right?

If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that the future is never certain. But with a number of vaccines against Covid-19 on the way, there is some light at the end of the tunnel. Last year we learned how to live in a pandemic, somehow managing to keep the show on the road in ways we never thought were possible before. We learned that, for many of us, working from home is possible. We found ways to keep in touch with friends and family, even though we couldn’t physically be with them. We got used to wearing masks and keeping our distance. How much of this will we have to carry through this year? What does our ‘new normal’ look like in 2021? What can we look forward to? To discuss this, and more, Kathy Sheridan is joined once again by Irish Times journalists Jennifer O’Connell and Kitty Holland, and performance artist, poet and writer, Felicia Olusanya, to look ahead to what’s in store this year. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/4/202135 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ep 462 Panel Review: Looking back at 2020

At the start of 2020, as we began a new decade, we were caught up with news stories about the Australian bushfires, the seemingly never-ending Brexit talks, a then-looming Irish general election, and students from 72 schools around the country began opening time capsules sealed in 1996 containing their hopes and dreams for 2020. How many of them could have guessed what lay ahead?Bubbling away in the background, further down the news agenda here, the World Health Organisation was dealing with the emergence of a ‘novel coronavirus’ in Wuhan, China, a disease that would dramatically change our lives.Covid-19 is the prism through which 2020 will forever be viewed and while it has swept across the world devastating communities, killing millions and bringing the world’s economies to their knees, life has somehow carried on.In today’s podcast Kathy Sheridan is joined by Irish Times journalists Jennifer O’Connell and Kitty Holland, and performance artist, poet and writer, Felicia Olusanya to take a look back at the year gone by.Stay tuned to the end for a performance by Felicia of her beautiful pandemic poem, Still. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/31/202057 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ep 461 Best of 2020

The time has finally come to say goodbye to 2020. But before we bid adieu to the longest year on record, we want to take you on a journey back through the last twelve months of The Women’s Podcast. The year 2020 will not just be remembered for the pandemic, it will also be remembered for the global Black Lives Matter movement, the historic US election result and the scandal around the sealing of the Irish Mother and Baby Home records. Róisín Ingle brings you a selection of these highlights including a conversation with Sinead O’Connor who spoke to us from her cabin in the garden, a touching interview with Dr Catherine Motherway, Intensive Care Consultant at University Hospital Limerick and a snippet from our lockdown inspired series, The Big Night In with playwright and actor Olwen Fouéré. And of course, amongst all of that, there’s not one, but two highlights from our Summer episodes on Normal People. Here’s a link to each episode mentioned in today’s podcast:Ep 387 Sinead O’Connor https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-386-sinead-oconnor-rosemary-smithEp 392 Catherine Motherwayhttps://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-392-frontline-women-domestic-abuse-pandemicEp 392 Domestic Abuse Pandemichttps://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-392-frontline-women-domestic-abuse-pandemicEp 395 Mary Lou McDonaldhttps://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-395-mary-lou-mcdonaldEp 397 Normal People https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-397-normal-peopleEp 405 Normal People’s Ita O’Brienhttps://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-405-normal-peoples-ita-obrien-on-how-to-make-great-tv-sexEp 406 How to be anti- racist (Black Lives Matter)https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-406-black-lives-matter-racism-in-ireland-and-beyondEp 411 Big Night In - Olwen Fouéréhttps://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-411-big-night-in-with-olwen-fouereEp 423 Fat Cow, Fat Chance - Jenni Murrayhttps://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-423-fat-cow-fat-chanceEp 441 Sealing the Records https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-441-releasing-the-records-maeve-orourke-mary-harneyEp 446 US Election 2020https://soundcloud.com/irishtimes-women/ep-446-us-election-2020-is-it-really-time-to-celebrate Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/28/202042 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 460 Maeve Binchy - Season of Fuss

In this special festive episode, we’re bringing you a story written by Maeve Binchy, first published in The Irish Times on Saturday, December 29th, 1984. Read by Róisín Ingle, the story captures the beautiful ordinariness of everyday life, the fuss and excitement of the holidays and the place of a woman at the head of her family. With true emotional tugs and important lessons to be learned, we hope this story offers you some solace this pandemic Christmas eve. So sit back, relax, wrap some presents or venture out for a walk, whatever you do, enjoy Season of Fuss by the brilliant Maeve Binchy. Merry Christmas. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/24/202020 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 459 Emma Gannon: Olive, childfree by choice

Emma Gannon is a writer, broadcaster and podcaster who is best known for her podcast Ctrl Alt Delete and Sunday Times Bestselling business book The Multi-Hyphen Method. In 2020 she published her debut novel, Olive, in which she explores the lives of four female friends whose paths diverge after a close-knit college experience. The book’s protagonist is the titular Olive, whose first-person narrative focuses on her decision to not have a baby, or to be childfree by choice. It’s a timely theme and Olive has garnered high praise from the likes of Marian Keyes, no stranger to tackling meaty themes in relatable ways in her own books. In this episode, Emma chats to Róisín about the book, how she researched the theme of women choosing to be childfree and what the reaction to it has been like.Also in this episode: Highlights from the final event in our second season of the Big Night In with the broadcaster Olivia O’Leary. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/21/202030 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ep 458 Pandemic Puppies & Farms: Thalia Heffernan

Over the past year, the sale of puppies in Ireland has increased by over 200%. It’s no surprise that during these difficult times with lockdown restrictions still in place, people have opened their hearts and homes to new four-legged friends. However, many do not realise that by buying dogs online, they could be unknowingly contributing to Ireland’s illegal puppy trade. In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by model, artist and DSPCA ambassador Thalia Heffernan for an eye opening and important discussion on the reality of Ireland’s puppy farms. In recent weeks, the model has begun using her Instagram platform to warn against the online purchase of dogs and to educate people on the horrible reality of life for a breeding dog, forced to churn out litter after litter. Now, as animal shelters brace themselves for the inevitable influx of unwanted dogs in the new year, Thalia is playing her part by donating proceeds of her artwork to the DSPCA. You can follow @ThaliaHeffernan on Instagram for more details. But first, as part of our ongoing #ShopLocal spotlight, Róisín spoke to Bebhinn Flood, owner of The Design House in Temple Bar and Greystones Co. Wicklow. It’s a creative space with features a designer boutique alongside a beauty hub, with the ethos being to support and nurture Irish creators and small Irish businesses. See TheDesignShop.ie Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/17/202051 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 457 Our Book Club’s Best Reads

We’ve reassembled our book club one last time before we bid adieu to 2020, to have a chat about the books they got lost in this year. Ann Ingle, Niamh Towey and Bernice Harrison join Róisín to recommend some great reads that you might consider gifting to your nearest and dearest this Christmas and to drop a few not-so-subtle hints about the books they hope to find under the tree for themselves on December 25th. Ireland’s booksellers have played a blinder throughout this pandemic, going to great lengths to get books to their customers despite a really challenging trading environment. With that in mind, please do your best to shop locally this Christmas and help to make sure our independent bookshops survive Covid-19 too.Books mentioned today:1.Irish Country Furniture and Furnishings 1700-2000, by Claudia Kinmonth2.A Promised Land, by Barack Obama 3.The Searcher, by Tana French 4.Big Girl, Small Town, by Michelle Gallen5.The Lying Life of Adults, by Elena Ferrante6.Fat Cow, Fat Chance by Jenni Murray7.Queenie, by Candice Carty Williams8.Intuitive Eating, by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch9.Exciting Times, by Naoise Dolan10.32 words for Field, by Manchan Mangan11. Tennis Lessons, Susannah Dickey12. More Than a Woman, Caitlin Moran13. A Ghost in the Throat, by Doireann Ni Ghríofa Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/14/202026 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ep 456 Sharon Shannon

In 2020, Irish musician Sharon Shannon was due to travel the world celebrating her 30th anniversary in the music industry. However, Covid as we know, scuppered everyone's plans. Making the most of her time in lockdown, the Clare native, set about writing and recording a brand new album called The Reckoning. It features over a dozen remote collaborations from artists in locations across the globe. In this conversation, Shannon tells Róisín Ingle all about this new found creative energy, which as well as writing a brand new album, also inspired her to pick up the electric guitar and completely redecorate her house. Surrounded by her two dogs and a sleeping cat called Lucy, the pair discuss the healing power of music and the much anticipated return of spontaneity. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/10/202036 minutes, 42 seconds
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Ep 455 A Girl From Mogadishu: Ifrah Ahmed

Somali-Irish activist Ifrah Ahmed is one of the world's foremost campaigners against Female Genital Mutilation. Ahmed came to Ireland in 2006 after fleeing her war-torn home country and during a medical examination it was found that she had suffered terrible trauma as a result of FGM. A founding member of the United Youth of Ireland, she has been gender adviser to the prime minister of Somalia and has worked with Unicef, Amnesty International and the Irish Refugee Council.In today’s podcast she talks to Kathy Sheridan about her decision to channel the anger she felt about her experience of FGM and turn it into a force for change. “If I didn’t speak, how many more girls would be the victim of FGM today?” she says. Now her life story has been made into a film by director and producer Mary McGuckian. McGuckian joins Ahmed in this podcast to talk about that film, A Girl From Mogadishu.Before you go – A reminder that our sixth and final 'Big Night In' will happen this Saturday December 12th 2020, with the wonderful broadcaster Olivia O’Leary. If you haven’t got a ticket remember you can still get them on www.irishtimes.com/bignightin and keep an eye on our Instagram too as we’ll also be giving away some tickets. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/7/202054 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ep 454 Waking the Feminists - Five Years On

This year marks the fifth anniversary of a pivotal moment in Irish cultural history. In November 2015, the Waking the Feminists movement emerged in response to decades of underrepresentation for women in Irish theatre and performance practice. In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by Lian Bell and Sarah Durcan, the two powerhouses behind the campaign which began on social media, gained traction all over the world, and can count Meryl Streep amongst its many supporters. The pair reminisce on a seismic time for women’s equality, the progress made and the work still to be done. But first, we’re championing #ShopLocal on The Women’s Podcast and each week in the run up to Christmas, we’ll be showcasing an Irish business that we think deserves your attention. This week, Roisin caught up with Cara Dunne from Cara Luna Designs, a small, design studio with values of eco-friendliness, inclusivity and non-binary representation at its heart. Amongst her wares are greeting cards, calendars and personalised illustrations. You can see more at www.caralunadesigns.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/3/202038 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ep 453 Four Wise Women: How to Survive Christmas 2020

In today’s episode, we’re bringing you the recording from our recent Women’s Podcast Live event. On Thursday evening, in front of a very festive Zoom audience, our crack squad of Irish Times columnists presented the ultimate Christmas 2020 survival guide. Joining us on the evening was beauty reporter Laura Kennedy, who came bearing the best gift ideas this side of Bethlehem, including a pandemic themed beer and a candle which smells like the Westbury bathrooms. Advice columnist Roe McDermott came bearing insightful counsel on how to deal with everything from tricky family situations to self-care. Food writer Lilly Higgins brought us gorgeous recipes that will help make your feast the finest around. And finally, Hilary Fannin, who writes a weekly lifestyle column, came grinning and bearing it, because whatever happens this Christmas, we have to laugh. It was a wonderful evening spent in the company of four very wise women, all thanks to our sponsor Green & Black’s. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/30/20201 hour, 1 minute, 59 seconds
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Ep 452 The Greatest Secret: Rhonda Byrne

Rhonda Byrne shot to worldwide fame in 2006 with her massively successful film and book, The Secret. With fans like Oprah Winfrey, the book went on to sell more than 30 million copies, making Byrne a multi-millionaire.The Secret claimed to show us the path to create anything we want to be, do or have. Now Byrne has written its follow-up, The Greatest Secret, through which she hopes to help people learn how to find true peace without having to spend hours meditating each day. She talks to Róisín Ingle about writing her phenomenally successful first book The Secret, the 14-year search for truth which led her to The Greatest Secret, why none of us has to suffer if we stay “aware” and how the pandemic can be an opportunity to change the course of your life for the better. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/26/202058 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 451 The Book Club: Just Like You – Nick Hornby

In this book club podcast Róisín, Ann Ingle, Bernice Harrison and Niamh Towey discuss our latest read, Nick Hornby’s ninth novel, Just Like You. The author, known for his portrayal of the interior lives of men in books including the much loved, High Fidelity, is back with a funny age-gap love story set to a backdrop of Brexit London. In it, Hornby attempts to inhabit the point of view of a black man in his 20s and a woman in her 40s, with excursions into football and music.Does he successfully embody the lives of the two protagonists? In the era of Black Lives Matter, has the author managed to handle the issue of race appropriately? And, how does Brexit work as a literary device? As usual there were some strong opinions among our book clubbers, minor disagreements and even a slightly uncomfortable exploration of a hypothetical age-gap love story involving two of our panelists. We’ll have details of our upcoming Christmas book club meeting in a later episode and on our social media channels. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/23/202031 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 450 Food Month: Lilly Higgins

It's Food Month in The Irish Times but you might say it's been Food Month pretty much everywhere since last March when the pandemic took hold and we found ourselves spending a lot more time in our homes and particularly in our kitchens. We were delighted to welcome resident Irish Times Food Columnist Lilly Higgins back to the podcast to discuss the foods that have been keeping her and her family going over lockdown - did anybody say duck pancakes? She also made a compelling case for her one woman campaign to bring back the Vol-au-vent, the giant variety of course. Living in Cobh, Co Cork with her husband and small children, Higgins talks about the dishes that have been the crowd pleasers with her family and with readers over Lockdown including a Goan Fish Curry that takes only fifteen minutes to prepare. She's also been cooking up a storm on Instagram and she told Roisin Ingle all about building a new community of foodies on that platform.Here's the three recipes featured in this episode:Yee-Haw! Cowboy Beans with Roast Chickenhttps://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/food-and-drink/yee-haw-cowboy-beans-with-roast-chicken-1.3869324Goan Fish Curryhttps://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/food-and-drink/a-quick-easy-curry-that-can-be-made-in-15-minutes-goan-so-1.3993016One Pot Paprika Chickenhttps://www.google.ie/amp/s/www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/food-and-drink/recipes/one-pot-paprika-chicken-1.4071851%3fmode=amp Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/19/202038 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ep 449 Rosemary Adaser: Growing up black in Irish institutions

While many of us were rightly outraged by the Government's approach to rushing through the Mother and Baby Homes Bill, and relieved by the U-turn that followed the public campaigning of survivors and human rights experts, one aspect of that story got very little attention. For black or mixed-race people born or raised in mother and baby homes and industrial schools, the abuse they received was of a different nature than that meted out to their white-skinned inmates. Rosemary Adaser was one of those people and she came on the podcast to talk about her experience of systemic racism, physical and sexual abuse and the trauma of having a non-Irish heritage which meant she was, as she puts it, "at the bottom of the pecking order". Rosemary was dehumanised in these institutions, called a savage, demeaned and made to feel ashamed of her heritage, her Irish mother and Ghanaian father. It was only in her fifties and living in London that she began to look back at her past and at her Irish identity. In this powerful interview, she spoke to Roisin Ingle about why we need to tell the whole story of these institutions, and the people that were brutalised in them, if we are to fully understand our past. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/16/202058 minutes, 21 seconds
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Ep 448 Suicide Cluster: The lives and deaths of 8 young women in Ballyfermot

You might have seen a shocking and disturbing news story in The Irish Times this week by Kitty Holland who wrote about a cluster of suicides among young women in west Dublin last year which was linked to the housing crisis, domestic violence, social media and recreational drug use. Though the area has had a female suicide rate three times the national average since 2015, it was the deaths of eight women in their 20s and early 30s over a 10-week period that prompted a HSE report. Four of the women who died between April and July 2019 were from Ballyfermot and the others were from neighbouring Clondalkin, Tallaght and Palmerstown. Several were young mothers. One of the most striking things from the report into these suicides was fears by some of these young women that their children could be removed by Tusla and that was cited as a reason why some mothers in distress don’t seek help. On the podcast to discuss this were reporter Kitty Holland, People Before Profit Councillor Hazel Norton and S.W.A.A.T. Co-ordinator (Supporting Women to Access Appropriate Treatment) with Ballyfermot Star Denise Joy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/12/202032 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ep 447 Twilight Together & Ireland's TikTok Superstar: Ruth Medjber & Victoria Adeyinka

In this episode, we meet Ruth Medjber the talented young music photographer who, having lost all her work due to the pandemic, found a novel and engaging way to capture the story of Ireland in Lockdown. Medjber told Roisin Ingle about why she began taking photographs of people at their front windows, to show the rich and diverse tapestry that made up the universal details of our locked down lives. She traveled the country taking photos of people (and sometimes their dogs) and the result has been made into a beautiful book called Twilight Together: Portraits of Ireland At Home. Medjber spoke about growing up with photography in her DNA and about how this latest project has made her reevaluate her art in a positive sense. Also in the episode, we hear from Drogheda teenager Victoria Adeyinka who has 11.5m followers on Tik Tok where she entertains the masses with funny, heartwarming skits. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/9/202046 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ep 446 US Election 2020: Is it really time to celebrate?

Four years ago this week, we called an Emergency Episode of this podcast to lament and analyse the ascent of racist, sexist Donald Trump to The White House. Four years later we assemble again in a slightly more hopeful mood against a backdrop of Biden possibly emerging victorious. We can't forget though that nearly 70 million voters choosing Trump again, despite or perhaps because of, his four year reign which has included white supremacist allegiances, children in cages, lies, sexism, narcissism, meltdowns and more lies. Joining our host Kathy Sheridan for this invigorating conversation which included an exploration of 'tenacious optimism' and 'fuck you feminism' was feminist giant Mona Eltahawy, human rights lawyer Simone George and Irish Times Washington Correspondent Suzanne Lynch. Cheerful is not an option, says Mona. Righteous anger and activism are what we need to dismantle the patriarchal structures that are still alive and well whether, when all the votes are finally counted, Biden/Harris or Trump/Pence take The White House. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/5/202056 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 445 Early Bird: Áine Lawlor returns to Morning Ireland

In today's episode, Kathy Sheridan talks to broadcaster Aine Lawlor as she marks the move from anchoring RTE Radio 1's News At One to a gig she has to set the alarm much earlier for as one of the co-presenters of the flagship programme Morning Ireland. She talked to Sheridan about her long career, her passion for current affairs, her thoughts on the US Election and the importance of speaking so openly about her cancer diagnosis in 2011. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/2/202044 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ep 444 A Ghost in the Throat: Doireann Ní Ghríofa

In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by Doireann Ni Ghriofa, a talented poet and the author of an original, evocative and lyrical book called A Ghost In the Throat. This stunning debut is an exploration into Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire, one of the greatest love poems of the Irish language, written by Eibhlín Dubh Ní Chonaill. A fluid hybrid of essay and autofiction, Ni Ghríofa weaves in her own lived experience as she sets herself the huge task of writing a new translation of the 18th century poem. It’s a visceral read, dripping with breast milk, full of the mundanity and the glory of motherhood. She spoke about the poem's powerful resonance and her lifelong obsession with finding out the rest of the story. Also, a reminder that tickets are still available for our Big Fright In this Halloween night with British writer and journalist Caitlin Moran joining us as our special guest. Tickets available on irishtimes.com/big-night-in Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/29/202047 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 443 Break the Mould: Sinéad Burke

In this episode Kathy Sheridan talks to little person Sinéad Burke about her extraordinary activism and her new stigma-busting book Break the Mould. You'll know Burke from such accolades as appearing on the cover of Vogue (Meghan Markle chose her for the gig) and her TED talk 'Why design should include everyone'. She is a writer, academic, influencer, activist and broadcaster who has been fearless in her mission to make the world a more inclusive and accessible place. A tireless campaigner and passionate fashionista, Burke spoke to Sheridan about how she broke the mould and explained why standing out and being yourself is a message people of all ages need to hear. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/26/202046 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ep 442 In Her Shoes: Erin Darcy

In today’s episode Roisin Ingle meets Galway based Erin Darcy the author of a new book called In Her Shoes which tells the stories of women left behind by the Eighth Amendment. In early 2018 Darcy created an online art project, In Her Shoes Women of the 8th to safely and anonymously share private stories of the real and devastating impact of the 8th amendment. In the five months leading up the referendum on abortion, the project had a simple request for undecided voters: put yourself in her shoes. Within weeks there were hundreds of stories pouring in and what began as a solo act of grassroots activism unleashed a national conversation on human rights that would help change Ireland forever. She spoke about coming to Ireland as a teenager from America after falling in love with an Irish man she met on an online message board. In a wide ranging interview, we hear about her activism, her art and about the power of storytelling. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/22/202050 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 441 Sealing The Records: Maeve O'Rourke & Mary Harney

For years now, campaigners and activists have been calling on the government to prevent records compiled by the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes from being sealed for 30 years. Proposed legislation related to the commission’s records, the Records Bill, was brought forward by Minister for Children Roderic O’Gorman and the debate continues this week in Dail. Organisations such as the Clann Project, Justice for Magdalenes and the Adoption Rights Alliance are all against the records being sealed. They say it will result in people being unable to access information “disappeared" relatives or babies "buried in unmarked graves." In today's episode we asked human rights lawyer Maeve O’Rourke to talk to us about the issues and about her long battle together with with the Clann Project to ensure that women survivors of human rights abuses in Ireland get access to their personal information. Also with us was Mary Harney, a woman now in her seventies who was born in Bessborough Mother and Baby Home in Cork. Mary told us her life story and explained the devastating repercussions of being denied access to information about her identity. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/19/202058 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ep 440 Jen Hogan: Why we need to talk about pregnancy loss

The 15th of October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day. Each year, to mark the day, a global wave of light is created through the lighting of candles by parents who have lost a baby through miscarriage, stillbirth or in infancy. It is estimated that one in four pregnancies ends this way and yet there is still a silence and taboo that surrounds the subject. In this episode, Irish Times parenting columnist and author Jen Hogan speaks to Róisín Ingle about her personal experience of miscarriage and the devastation of each loss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/15/202031 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ep 439 Caoimhe Butterly: 400 Welcomes

You’ve probably heard of the 400 Welcomes campaign, an all-female campaign group, made up of doctors, teachers, writers, community and social care workers and musicians . One of the women behind the campaign is Caoimhe Butterly, a human rights campaigner who has been fighting for justice all over the world for most of her adult life. Originally from Dublin, she was inspired by her parents to look outside her own comfortable circumstances and fight for the most vulnerable. Following a recent fire in Moria refugee camp in Lesvos, Greece, over 13,000 people now face the bleakest conditions which are getting worse by the day. Those in the new camp face inadequate access to food, water and weather-proofed shelters. #400Welcomes is calling on the Irish government to bring 400 people from Lesvos to Ireland with relocation outside of the system of Direct Provision. The Government originally said they would only take in four unaccompanied minors, now it says they will take fifty men, women and children. We spoke to Butterly about her interesting family background, her motivation, her hopes for the campaign and the ways her fight for justice has changed since she became a mother. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/12/202046 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ep 438 Majella Moynihan - A Guarded Life

In 1984, Majella Moynihan was a fresh faced young garda recruit when she gave birth to a baby boy. Charged with breaching An Garda Siochana disciplinary rules - for having premarital sex with another guard and for becoming pregnant and having a child while unmarried - she was pressured to give up her baby for adoption or face dismissal. It forced her into a decision that would have devastating impacts on her life. Moynihan left the Guards in 1998 and in 2019, following an RTE documentary on her case, she received an apology from the Garda Commissioner and Minister for Justice for the ordeal she endured as a young garda. She spoke to Roisin Ingle about her memoir A Guarded Life and the reality of a police culture steeped in misogyny and prejudice. Majella Moynihan is a hero, whose courage and resilience led to her speaking out against an institution that traumatised and bullied her for years, for the "crime" of being a pregnant, unmarried woman in Ireland.Also, a reminder that tickets are still available for our Big Night In Season 2. Our next guest is Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry. Tickets available on irishtimes.com/big-night-in Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/8/202059 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ep 437 Herself: Clare Dunne

Who knows when we'll get to lose ourselves in the darkness of a cinema again? But when we do all of us at The Women's Podcast are urging you to go and see a wonderful Irish film called Herself which tells the story of a brutalised single mother Sandra and her dream to build her own house where she and her two small daughters can be safe. The story of the film was written by Dubliner Clare Dunne who also stars, and was inspired by a real-life friend of Clare's who was forced to declare herself homeless and live in a hotel in order to get on the housing list. It tells the story of how women in this situation. women fleeing terrifying home situations of domestic abuse, are treated by society and the legal system. But at the heart, it's a hopeful, uplifting film directed by Phyllida Lloyd (Mamma Mia!) about how one woman took matters into her own hands despite all the obstacles. Already critically acclaimed, Herself - a co-prodcution between Sharon Horgan's company Merman and Element Pictures - is moving, funny and at times painful to watch. Clare Dunne joined us on the episode to talk about a movie that was a real labour of love.Also, a reminder that tickets are still available for our Big Night In Season 2. Tickets available on irishtimes.com/big-night-in Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/5/202054 minutes
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Ep 436 The Glorious Guinness Girls

The most fabulous and famous family dynasty in Britain and Ireland during the 1920s were the grand-daughters of the first Lord Iveagh also known as the Glorious Guinness Girls. The glamour, the drama and the secrets are explored in fiction by writer Emily Hourican who spoke to Kathy Sheridan about her new novel The Glorious Guinness Girls. Hourican talks about the inspiration for the book, her geographically diverse childhood and her cancer diagnosis five years ago. Also, a reminder that tickets are still available for our Big Night In Season 2 which kicks off on Saturday October 3rd with Senator Eileen Flynn. Tickets available on irishtimes.com/big-night-in Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/1/202055 minutes, 31 seconds
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Ep 435 The Skin Nerd: Jennifer Rock

On the podcast today we have skin expert Jennifer Rock who aswell as talking about her new book The Skin Nerd Philosophy, deals with all your pandemic skin problems and delves into looking after this most important organ every day of the year. We are also very excited to bring you details of season 2 of our Big Night In. From this Saturday October 3rd we'll be back on zoom to bring you conversations with talented inspiring women such as Senator Eileen Flynn, Caitlin Moran and Claire Byrne. For more details go to https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/irish-times-big-night-in-online-interviews-with-r%C3%B3is%C3%ADn-ingle-restart-this-saturday-1.4366413 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/28/202052 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 434 Dr Catherine Motherway

Last April, which seems a hundred years ago now, we spoke to Dr Catherine Motherway, consultant anaesthetist at University Hospital Limerick and former President of the Intensive Care Society of Ireland. In this episode, Roisin Ingle catches up with her to find out Dr Motherway's views on Level 3, life on the frontline, societal compliance with covid restrictions and her hopes and fears as we face into a winter of living with the virus. As a new report from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation shows women's voices being "drowned out" globally in terms of coronavirus reporting. The Women's Podcast will continue to amplify the voices of women on all aspects of this crisis. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/24/202037 minutes, 12 seconds
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Ep 433 After The Silence: Louise O'Neill

Cork author Louise O'Neill joined Roisin Ingle on the podcast to talk about her latest novel After The Silence. The book marks a departure for O'Neill in that it's a thriller but what hasn't changed is the uncompromising, gently probing voice of the writer of novels such as Asking For It which on publication became a national talking point. In After The Silence, set on a small Island off the coast of Cork, she explores themes such as emotional abuse and the kind of notoriety that follows a small community devastated by a traumatic event - in this case the unexplained murder of a beautiful young Islander. O'Neill talks about writing, about life in Lockdown and about the new and very different experience of writing a thriller. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/21/202043 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 432 The Joy of Orgasms: Jenny Keane

There is a lot of confusion and covid-weariness swirling around at the moment so we thought we'd bring you an episode that will divert, intrigue and definitely distract you. Jenny Keane is an holistic sex expert and yoga teacher who runs hugely popular online workshops teaching people to explore their sexuality and enhance sexual pleasure. Her path to an empowering form of sex education began when she was experiencing health issues around her periods but from there she expanding her knowledge and expertise to help women (and men) tune in to their own bodies so that they can experience themselves and the world in a more connected way. What's a yoni? What are the mysteries of female ejaculation? Advice for women who’ve never experienced an orgasm? Jenny knows it all. She certainly taught Roisin Ingle a thing or three. For more find Jenny on instagram @hellojennykeane We hope this episode is a satisfying experience for all our listeners. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/17/202047 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ep 431 The Nothing Man: Catherine Ryan Howard

There are hundreds of books out at the moment so it's difficult as an author these days, when people are reading more than ever, to stand out from the crowd. One writer who has managed to do that with her terrifying novel The Nothing Man is Catherine Ryan Howard, the Cork woman who has won a devoted army of fans with her always original and often disturbing books. This latest one is a riveting read and Catherine talked to Roisin Ingle about her unusual journey into writing: she once worked as a desk agent in a hotel in Walt Disney World, and got her first big break when she went back to study English at Trinity College as a mature student. She also talked about setbacks, success and being child-free. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/14/202052 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 430 Menopause & Klopp, Actually

When we've asked you what subjects you'd like us to discuss on the podcast, menopause is often mentioned. One listener who got in touch was Helen Kirwan who talks to Roisin Ingle on the latest episode. Helen is going through peri-menopause and has found some of the symptoms stressful and difficult. She talks honestly about coping at this seismic time in a woman's life, while we get some expert advice and important information from menopause expert Caoimhe Hartley who says there should be no stigma or taboo subjects when it comes to women's health. Also on this episode, Laura Lexx talks about her hilarious and heartwarming book which imagines life married to everyone's favourite bespectacled German football manager Jurgen Klopp. A string of truly funny tweets about the enigmatic Liverpool Manager landed her a two-book deal during Lockdown and while she doesn't know much about football, her tribute to Klopp's no nonsense style won her legions of fans. She talks to Roisin and reads an extract from her new book. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/10/20201 hour, 14 minutes, 14 seconds
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Ep 429 The Book Club: Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld

Our last Book Club took place months ago, early in Lockdown, so we are delighted that in this show Ann Ingle, Bernice Harrison and Niamh Towey are back to discuss our latest read. The book under discussion is Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld, a political fantasy that imagines what life would have been like for Hillary Clinton had she turned down Bill Clinton's proposal of marriage. So it's a what if novel that imagines the life and times of Hill without Bill. Sittenfeld, the author of sharp, compassionate and always clever books such as American Wife, explores how life might have turned out for the Clintons, for America and for the world if these two political heavyweights had never got married. It's a lively discussion and as usual not everyone agrees with each other but we wouldn't want it any other way. We'll announce our next book soon, but until then enjoy this Book Club episode. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/7/202042 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ep 428 Nimko Ali: What we’re told not to talk about (but we’re going to anyway)

Female genital mutilation is a practice that, according to the World Health Organisation, has affected 200 million women and girls alive today. Today’s guest, author and anti-FGM campaigner Nimko Ali is on a mission to end this worldwide by 2030. In her new book, What We’re Told Not to Talk About (But We’re Going to Anyway): Women’s Voices from East London to Ethiopia, Ali shares her own personal story of FGM and the stories of many other women which are often left unheard. It is a series of intimate and illuminating conversations with women on the subjects of sex, masturbation, periods, pregnancy, the menopause and more. In this episode, the author speaks to Róisín Ingle about challenging the patriarchy, freezing her eggs and trying to make the world a better place. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/3/202039 minutes, 21 seconds
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Ep 427 Back to School & parenting anxious kids

It’s been a long time coming, but this week the kids are finally going back to school. For many, it will be a welcome return to normality and routine, but it may bring about some challenges too. In this episode, Róisín Ingle speaks to Irish Times parenting columnist and mother of seven Jen Hogan, who is juggling four different start times and coming to terms with a whole new set of rules and regulations for her children. Psychologist Malie Coyne also joins Ingle to discuss her new book, Love In, Love Out - A compassionate approach to parenting your anxious child. This book is a valuable roadmap for parents who are feeling lost or overwhelmed trying to support a child with anxiety. They speak about the importance of self compassion, building resilience and how to support children who are worried about returning to school. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/31/202055 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 426 Georgie Crawford & The Good Glow

Cancer is life changing in many ways, but our guest this week found that her devastating diagnosis in 2017 set her off on a new career path. Georgie Crawford, mother of one, lives with her husband Jamie in Dublin and is the host of the hugely successful The Good Glow podcast. She started the podcast as she struggled to come to terms with her cancer diagnosis and treatment and found that talking to others about their life changing stories helped her to deal with what was a very difficult time in her life. Thanks to the success of the podcast she was able to leave her job in radio and make a very successful living creating content that has struck a chord with millions. As she launches a spin off The Good Glow Health, Roisin Ingle talked to her about her illness and recovery and about her life now as one of Ireland's most popular podcast hosts. We're also still looking for happy stories so do send us news of any uplifting things that have happened to you during the pandemic. Email us on [email protected] or find us on social @itwomenspodcast and the best story will win a bundle of books from us here at The Women's Podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/27/202040 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 425 How to Fall in Love in a Pandemic

After six months of a global pandemic we needed some good news so this episode features Mimi Wilcox, a young filmmaker from Chicago who after a whirlwind weekend romance in her home town with an Irish man decided to visit him in Ireland for five days. The only problem was, Leo Varadkar announced Lockdown the day she arrived. Air travel was cancelled and Mimi was stuck in Ireland with David Michael McKernan, a man she barely knew. What happened next? We find out in the film they made together about their Lockdown experience How to Fall in Love in a Pandemic. Mimi came on the podcast to tell Roisin Ingle the whole story. Speaking of good news, has anything great happened for you or your family in the last six months? If it has we want to hear about it as an antidote to the gloom. Tell us by emailing [email protected] and the best bit of good news will win some great new books to keep you going through Autumn. If you don’t want to email send us your good news on instagram, twitter or facebook @itwomenspodcast put Good news! In the subject line and let us know your happy happenings. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/20/202030 minutes, 12 seconds
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Ep 424 The Artist’s Way: Unlock your creativity with Julia Cameron

The Artist’s Way was first published in 1991 by screenwriter and teacher Julia Cameron. A classic guide to creativity, the book has sold over five million copies and has recently been redesigned and relaunched for a new generation. Hailed by celebrities such as Alicia Keys, Russell Brand and Reece Witherspoon, it’s key ideas include Morning Pages, a daily ritual designed to declutter the mind, and the Artist’s Date, a commitment to set aside time each week to nurture your creative soul. Even if you feel like you haven’t a creative bone in your body, Cameron maintains ‘there is no such thing as a non-creative person’. In this conversation with Róisín Ingle, the author explains how the book came about after her recovery from alcoholism, how the practises work to move past creative blocks and why you're never too old to try something new. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/13/202042 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 423 Fat Cow, Fat Chance: Dame Jenni Murray’s weight loss journey

By age sixty-four, Jenni Murray's weight had become a disability. The broadcaster and author avoided the scales, wore a uniform of baggy black clothes and refused to make connections between her weight and health issues. A successful author and the host of BBC Woman’s Hour, Murray appeared to have it all, but in private she lived with a growing fear that she wouldn’t even make it to seventy. In this episode, she speaks to Kathy Sheridan about the life changing surgery which helped her lose eight stone in less than a year and why she decided to document her weight loss journey in the new book, Fat Cow, Fat Chance. This latest offering from Murray is a refreshingly honest account of what it’s like to be fat when society dictates that skinny is the norm. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/6/202050 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 422 Big Night In: Emma Donoghue

The last Big Night In of our first season took place on Zoom last Saturday night with author, literary historian and playwright Emma Donoghue. The Room-author joined us from her home in Ontario, Canada where she lives with her partner and two teenage children. Donoghue has just released The Pull of the Stars, a novel set 100 years ago in Dublin during The Great Flu. The pandemic setting was a complete coincidence she told Roisin Ingle, explaining that the book had been written and submitted before Covid-19 hit. She spoke about her writing life, going to the Oscars, sexuality, parenting and her swotty tendencies which began in childhood. This was our last Big Night In for a while so we wanted to thank our sponsor Green & Blacks for providing gorgeous hampers of chocolate and every single one of you who joined us over these distracting, joyful and entertaining Lockdown conversations. We'll definitely be bringing The Big Night In back. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/30/202057 minutes, 39 seconds
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Ep 421 The Joy of Yoga: Cathy Pearson & the Celtic Yoga Woodland Festival

Yoga has had an excellent pandemic. There's been a boom in online classes and even President Michael D Higgins was still getting his downward dog on in the Áras during Lockdown. So it's the perfect time for a free online yoga festival and in this episode we talk to Cathy Pearson, the woman behind the Celtic Woodland Yoga Festival, a three day gathering for people who love yoga or who are just yoga curious. Pearson spoke to Roisin Ingle about the festival, about how she went from a job in the film industry to a life in the healing arts in the jungles of Thailand and about how she juggles her practice and motherhood. For more details and to register for free go to celticwoodlandyogafestival.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/27/202030 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ep 420 Tennis Lessons: Susannah Dickey on periods, sex and friendship

In this episode Roisin Ingle talks to Susannah Dickey, the author of a stunning debut novel Tennis Lessons which is set in Northern Ireland and follows a young woman as she struggles to find her place in the world. Dickey is an award-winning poet from Derry but her new novel shows her gift for the longer novel form. She has written a fantastic book containing rich dialogue and a gritty, authentic coming of age story. We follow the unnamed protagonist from the age of 3 right up to her late twenties, as she deals with the break-up of her parents marriage, various sexual encounters and trying to reconcile the life she imagined for herself with the one that is playing out. It's also the story of friendship, the kind that puts you back together when you are lost. Also, in this episode Ingle announces our final Big Night In with special guest Room-author Emma Donoghue. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/23/202050 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ep 419 Grief, death & celebrating lives during a Pandemic

On today's episode, we are talking about life, death and grief in the time of Covid-19. This is a fraught issue, not just for those who've lost loved ones to the virus but for those with friends or relations that died during this very strange time of socially distanced funerals where numbers are severely limited. Roisin Ingle spoke to Orla Keegan at The Irish Hospice Foundation’s Bereavement Support Line which launched on the 9th June to provide a confidential space for people to speak about their experience or to ask questions relating to the death of someone during the COVID-19 pandemic or a previous bereavement. Also, back in March The Irish Times put forward an open call to readers to share their personal experiences of bereavement during the pandemic. Some of those who contributed also shared their story on the confronting coronavirus podcast. Today we bring you some of those recordings to shine a light on the very different kind of mourning that has been happening at this time. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/20/202031 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ep 418 Dublin's 9th woman Lord Mayor: Hazel Chu

In this episode, Roisin Ingle talked to Green Party Councillor Hazel Chu who has just been elected Lord Mayor of Dublin, only the 9th woman in the city's history to take on the role. On a Zoom call from her new home the Mansion House in Dawson Street, Chu told Ingle why being the first person of colour in the role is important and reflects the rich diversity of the city. She spoke about her experience of racism, why she wants her daughter Alex to grow up being proud of her Chinese heritage and the Green Party leadership challenge. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/16/202037 minutes, 21 seconds
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Ep 417 Cancelled Weddings: Laura de Barra & Suzanne Brennan

For many women the Spring and Summer of 2020 will always be the time when their much anticipated weddings were prevented from happening because of the pandemic. While not exactly life or death, there’s no getting away from the fact that the cancellation of these special and meticulously planned days were a cause of disappointment for everyone involved. In this episode, two almost-brides author Laura de Barra and Women’s Podcast co-producer Suzanne Brennan talk about how they feel about their weddings not happening, what they did to mark the day and whether the pandemic has changed their approach to the postponed Big Day. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/13/202028 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 416 Karin Slaughter

On today’s episode, Róisín Ingle speaks to American crime writer Karin Slaughter from her home in Atlanta, Georgia. Slaughter has just released her 20th novel, The Silent Wife, which follows the investigation into a brutal attack on a young woman. In this conversation, the author paints a picture of lockdown life with her two and a half cats and takes a look at the US response to coronavirus. They also talk about Karin’s stand-alone book Pieces of Her which is being adapted for Netflix and why crime novels are the perfect form of escapism. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/9/202039 minutes, 42 seconds
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Ep 415 Big Night In with Lynn Ruane

Activist, writer, addiction specialist and senator Lynn Ruane was the brilliant guest for our seventh Big Night In hosted by Róisín Ingle. An audience of over 150 joined us on Zoom to watch this force of nature speak about some of the lighter moments from inside the Seanad, her learnings from lockdown and why The Real Housewives of New York has become her new obsession. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/6/202053 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ep 414 UN Women & Megan O’Neill

No pandemic is gender-neutral and neither is Covid-19, which is negatively affecting the lives of women and girls. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka is the Executive Director of UN Women and she spoke to Roisin Ingle from lockdown in South Africa about the three areas where women and girls are particularly at risk in the current crisis: Domestic violence, frontline work - the majority of workers are women - and financially. Previously, Mlambo-Ngcuka served as Deputy President of South Africa, the first woman to hold the position and at that point the highest ranking woman in the history of South Africa. Also in the episode, singer songwriter Megan O'Neill spoke about her new song Fire With Fire, inspired by the way women in the music industry are pitted against each other. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/2/202032 minutes, 39 seconds
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Ep 413 Solo parenting in a pandemic

During the pandemic, there has been increased pressure placed on one parent families, from shopping struggles and homeschooling demands to dealing with feelings of loneliness and isolation. In today’s episode, we hear from Clare O’Leary, a single parent living in Wexford with her 5 year old son Peter. Clare has just completed the first year of a psychology degree at Waterford IT and spoke to Róisin Ingle about lone parenting and studying while in lockdown. We also hear from Niamh Wynne, from One Family Ireland, who coordinates the New Steps, New Futures programme which helps single parents going back into education or the workplace Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/29/202032 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 412 Staycation Once Again: Holidaying at home

Where are you going on your holliers? That's the question we are asking on this episode with travel writer Joan Scales who has been uncovering deals up and down the country from castles to hotels, from campsites to cottages. Whether you are the adventurous type or fancy a bit of luxury, there is an Irish holiday for you so we wanted to help you with all the options that are available. In pandemic times. supporting our homegrown tourism industry and the 250,000 jobs reliant on that industry feels positively patriotic. From June 29th the tourism sector will start to slowly crank back into gear and in this episode we explore the many wonderful possibilities when it comes to a great Irish holiday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/25/202024 minutes, 51 seconds
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Ep 411 Big Night In with Olwen Fouéré

Born in Ireland, to Breton parents, Olwen Fouéré is a writer, producer and theatre maker. A reviewer once said of her that if she sat on a stage doing nothing it would still be completely compelling. Fouéré makes theatre that people find disturbing or unsettling and much of her extensive body of work is provocative, the kind of art that stays with you or even might change you a bit. Since the 1970s she has been working solidly in film and theatre. Her film work includes This Must Be The Place with Sean Penn, Mandy with Nicolas Cage and The Survivalist which is very apt these days. In theatre, she is best know for a powerhouse performance of Salome at The Gate and Riverrun, her own seminal work which evoked the voice of the river in Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake and toured all over the world. Fouéré spoke to Roisin Ingle at our sixth Big Night In on Zoom about life, loss, art, love, family and open relationships. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/22/20201 hour, 26 seconds
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Ep 410 Sex & The Pandemic: Cindy Gallop

Some listeners may remember Cindy Gallop from 2009 when she did a hugely popular Ted Talk in which she shared her experience of how hardcore pornography had distorted the way a generation of young men thinks about sex - and now she's fighting back. This was the genesis of her social sex company Make Love Not Porn, a user-generated video-sharing platform where people can submit videos of themselves having “real world” sex. Make Love Not Porn has been positively thriving during the pandemic and Gallop joined Roisin Ingle to discuss how dating younger men led to her creation of the company and why her mission to get people talking about sexual activity in a normal, shame-free way could mean the end of rape culture and gender-based abuse. In this episode, we also pay tribute to the seven sisters and their aunt in Co Tipperary, members of the traveling community, who this week spoke out about the horrific sexual abuse they were exposed to over decades. Their bravery followed the sentencing of their father James O'Reilly to jail for 20 years after being convicted of 58 counts of rape and nine counts of sexual assault following a 27-day trial at the Central Criminal Court. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/18/202052 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ep 409 Rachael English: The Paper Bracelet

It feels like a lifetime ago, but it was only March when Morning Ireland presenter and best-selling author Rachael English came in to the Irish Times studio talk to us about her fifth novel The Paper Bracelet. The gripping story centres around a fictional Mother and Baby home in the West of Ireland and the paper bracelets that were used to identify the babies born there who were then sent away for adoption. Each bracelet contains details of the lives of the young women incarcerated in these homes and the secrets, shame and lies that still echo in Ireland today. Roisin Ingle talked to English about her writing, about her 30 year career in RTE and about the excitement of covering the last General Election. (Remember that?) In this episode, we also bring you an update into some of the issues raised at the recent Webinar: Unpacking The Impacts: Covid-19 and Women's Mental Health particularly around domestic violence during the pandemic. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/15/202048 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ep 408 Tik Tok Tadpoles & Women's Mental Health

It was not on the agenda at her career guidance meetings at school, but somehow in Lockdown 17-year-old schoolgirl Hannah McSorley has ended up as a "Tik Tok Tadpole Influencer". The tens of thousands of tadpoles in her garden have earned more than half a million followers on the platform and a US Influencer agent has come calling, so it looks like tadpoles are going to be this teenager's lucrative new career. You can see why we needed to get her on the podcast. We also had to talk about women's mental health in this episode, because we know that women are disproportionately affected in terms of depression, anxiety and sleeplessness. We spoke to two women, Louise O'Leary and Dr Cliona Loughnane, working in this field about the mental health Webinar they are running on Friday June 12th. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/11/202042 minutes, 13 seconds
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Ep 407 Big Night In: Hilary Fannin

Our fifth Big Night In happened on Zoom in front of an audience of 250 on Saturday June 6th with author, playwright and Irish Times columnist Hilary Fannin. She spoke about her debut novel The Weight of Love, her early childhood memoir Hopscotch and about life in lockdown with her sons, partner and long suffering cat. Fannin also reflected on her decision to become a college student - doing a masters in creative writing in Trinity College - for the first time in her fifties. She spoke with warmth and humour about her insecure childhood with bohemian parents Bob and Marie, which at one point saw the family being evicted from their home. We had a lot of excellent feedback about the event and are delighted to bring you this conversation between Irish Times columnists Roisin Ingle and Hilary Fannin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/8/20201 hour, 7 minutes, 51 seconds
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Ep 406 How to be Anti-Racist: three black Irish women explain

The year 2020 will not just be remembered for the pandemic. It will also be remembered for George Floyd and his final words 'I can't breathe' as he lay dying, the knee of a Minnesota police officer on his neck. The incomprehensible killing of Floyd, a father of two, shone a light yet again on the pervasive racism experienced by the black community all over the world. The protests in America saw people express collective outrage and solidarity. In Dublin thousands gathered to do the same, kneeling together in silence and calling for an end to the Direct Provision System. It's not good enough, as political activist Angela Davis said, to not be racist. We need to be anti-racist. And we need to talk about what that means. Three young black Irish women Amanda Adewole, Tobi Lawal and Felicia Olusanya aka Felispeaks came on the podcast to discuss their experiences of everyday racism, the events in America and the ways in which white people, with all of the privilege we benefit from because of the colour of our skin, can become part of the solution rather than the problem. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/4/202055 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ep 405 Normal People's Ita O'Brien on how to make great TV sex

The sex in the TV adaptation of Sally Rooney's novel Normal People became a huge national talking point. It was praised for its authenticity and complained about on Liveline for very different reasons. In this episode Ita O'Brien, intimacy coordinator, talks to Roisin Ingle about why her job choreographing the sex scenes between Marianne and Connell was akin to the role of a choreographer brought on set to oversee a fight scene. Nothing was left to chance from consent to safe words, which meant the actors were protected and the sex in Normal People was always integral to the story and never gratuitous. A former dancer and actor, O'Brien previously worked on programmes such as Sex Education and Gentleman Jack and offers a fascinating glimpse behind a relatively new part of the film and TV industry. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/1/202053 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ep 404 Big Night In with Lisa Hannigan

We were joined by almost 300 listeners, readers and Irish Times subscribers last Saturday night for our fourth Big Night In on Zoom. This one was with acclaimed singer and musician Lisa Hannigan. It was a magical night of conversation between podcast host Roisin Ingle and Hannigan who shared her thoughts on creativity in a pandemic and life in lockdown with her 14 month old child. This episode includes snippets of the songs she sang and a lengthy back and forth between the singer and the fans who gathered to hear her talk. Also on the podcast we mark World Menstrual Hygiene Day with findings from a survey showing how women and girls are managing periods in a pandemic. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/28/202047 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ep 403 Naoise Dolan, Write Now & Repeal memories

It's two years since 64.66 per cent of us voted to Repeal the 8th Amendment. Roisin Ingle reads her column looking back on that important day. Also on this episode, we hear from the author of a brilliant debut novel Exciting Times. Naoise Dolan spoke about her writing life and launching a book in Lockdown. And finally, Geraldine Quigley is a writer from a working class background who was helped by the Write Now scheme run by Penguin Random House. The scheme is open to people resident in the Republic of Ireland for the first time this year, and she came on the podcast to encourage writers from diverse backgrounds to apply, Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/25/20201 hour, 2 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 402 Jane Casey, crime writer

Jane Casey is one of the most successful crime writers of recent times, blazing a trail in a genre that has been dominated recently by Irish women such as Liz Nugent and Tana French. Originally from Ireland she is based in London and married to a criminal barrister, which comes in handy for gruesome plotlines. Her latest novel starring her kickass detective Maeve Kerrigan is called The Cutting Place and it follows the murky goings on in one of London’s most elite gentlemen’s clubs. In the episode, host Roisin Ingle also reflects on the ways the pandemic is negatively affecting the lives of women according to a recent report from the Central Statistics Office. Finally, our next Big Night In on Zoom is with the wonderful singer Lisa Hannigan this Saturday May 23rd at 8pm. Listen to the podcast to find out how you can win a chance to join us there. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/21/202029 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 401 When Lockdown Is Lifted

There's something in the air. A tiny bit of longed for freedom. The timeline for the gradual lifting of lockdown restrictions has been released and we want to celebrate. Over the past few weeks and months we've been collecting stories from our guests and from listeners. We asked them one simple question: what are you most looking forward to when lockdown is lifted? The answers were funny, warm and sometimes surprising and we heard from a whole range of people from Sinn Fein leader Mary Lou McDonald to journalist Alison O'Connor. What are you looking forward to most when we are finally given our freedom? We hope you enjoy this episode and it gives you plenty of inspiration for the days, weeks and months to come. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/18/202020 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ep 400 Amy Huberman celebrates our 400th episode

Welcome to our 400th episode! We never imagined when we started the podcast back in September 2015 that we'd still be here 400 episodes later telling women's stories and delving into the issues that are important to us. Over those nearly five years we've had many well known guests such as Margaret Atwood, Samantha Power, Marian Keyes and Caitlin Moran. In today's special ep we are joined by actor, writer and all-round joy bringer Amy Huberman. Amy (and more than 250 of our closest friends) came for the Zoom chats last Saturday night and told us about lockdown life with her kids (and BOD!), the fearlessness that comes with getting older and the "hot tools" every woman needs in a pandemic. Now that we're 400 we also thought it was about time we joined Instagram, so tune in to this episode to find out how following us on insta @itwomenspodcast could land you a gorgeous hamper of chocolate from our sponsors Green & Blacks. Thanks for staying with us these 400 episodes. And here's to the next 400! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/14/20201 hour, 1 minute, 49 seconds
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Ep 399 Frances Fitzgerald

In this episode, Róisín Ingle was joined by MEP and former Tánaiste Frances Fitzgerald. In a recent article for The Irish Times, Fitzgerald wrote about the impact this pandemic is having on women and the need to document their stories for future generations. “Women are so rarely written about in these global events, much less so when their work is behind the scenes.” In this conversation, they reflect on the women who make up nearly 80% of the healthcare workers across Europe, the domestic violence pandemic and the EU response to the crisis. ‘When this is over, let us not forget the women’ by Frances Fitzgerald is available to read here: https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/coronavirus-when-this-is-over-let-us-not-forget-the-women-1.4239130 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/11/202034 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 398 Alison Spittle & Joanne McNally

In this episode, comedians Alison Spittle and Joanne McNally join Róisín Ingle to discuss the highs and lows of the London lockdown life. From living with housemates who refuse to socially distance, yearning for life back at home and waiting for the tsunami of single guys from all the lockdown divorces, this conversation with two of Ireland’s funniest comedians will hopefully bring a bit of joy to your day. We’ve also just announced our next guest for The Women’s Podcast Big Night In - it’s Amy Huberman! - so if you’d like to join us this Saturday May 9th, send us your voice note of what you can’t wait to do once lockdown is lifted to [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/7/202036 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 397 Normal People

In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by journalist Jenn Gannon and author Emer McLysaght for a discussion about Normal People, the Irish TV show that has everyone talking. It’s the small screen adaptation of Sally Rooney’s best selling novel, which was released just eighteen months ago. Lenny Abrahamson and Hettie McDonald directed the new series from Element Pictures, which was filmed last summer in Dublin and Sligo. It’s already been the topic of a heated discussion on Liveline (it’s the national broadcaster promoting "fornication" don’t you know) and has received rave reviews both at home and abroad. Jenn and Emer have binge watched the entire 12 part series and share their thoughts on how the show perfectly portrays teenage lust, angst and awkwardness. No spoilers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/4/202029 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ep 396 Eavan Boland & New Irish Writing

In today's episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by three of Ireland’s newest authors, Michelle Gallan (Big Girl, Small Town), Niamh Campbell (This Happy) and Rachel Donohue (Temple House Vanishing). 2020 will be a milestone year for each of these authors, as it marks the release of their debut novels. This conversation was recorded before the coronavirus outbreak, when all three women were able to come into studio and speak to Róisín about their new books and the inspiration behind them.Today is also Poetry Day Ireland. We pay tribute to Eavan Boland, leading Irish poet and champion of women's voices, who died on Monday. Nessa O’Mahony joined Róisín to take a look back on the poet’s life and read one of her most moving works, ‘The Pomegranate’. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/30/20201 hour, 15 minutes, 34 seconds
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Ep 396 Big Night In: Deirdre O’Kane on Zoom

In the second of our ‘Big Night In’ zoom events, Róisín Ingle was joined by comedian and actor Deirdre O’Kane. In front of an audience of 250 podcast listeners, Deirdre spoke about lockdown life at home with her family in Dublin and about her new quarantine hobbies, which include painting pebbles and running into Ryan Tubridy on her daily walks along Dun Laoghaire pier. O'Kane also revealed how the installation of a “gin altar” in her kitchen has made the lockdown a bit more bearable. Check out @itwomenspodcast on twitter or facebook, for information on any upcoming live events. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/27/202057 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 395 Mary Lou McDonald

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke with president and leader of Sinn Fein, Mary Lou McDonald. Earlier this month, McDonald received a positive diagnosis of Covid-19, after waiting sixteen days for her test results. She spoke openly and honestly about her experience with the illness and the immediate sense of connection she felt with everyone who has also contracted the virus. In this conversation, the party leader reveals what it’s like finally getting back to work, her hopes for post pandemic Ireland and what the future holds for Sinn Féin, on the sidelines of the historical agreement between Fine Gael and Fine Fáil. She also has some good Netflix recommendations in there too. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/23/202048 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 394 Uncharted - Margaret Heffernan

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke with entrepreneur, CEO and keynote speaker Margaret Heffernan. In her latest book ‘Uncharted: How to navigate the future’, Margaret explores the people and organisations who aren’t daunted by uncertainty. The timing of this book is remarkable given that we are in the midst of a global crisis nobody saw coming. In this conversation, Margaret reveals how the idea for the book came about, why creative thinking is a must have in times of crisis and what we, as a society, can learn from this pandemic when it’s over. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/20/202046 minutes, 13 seconds
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Ep 393 Big Night In: Marian Keyes on Zoom

This episode is the live recording taken from the first ever Zoom event for The Women's Podcast. Last Saturday night, Marian Keyes joined Róisin Ingle and a whole host of podcast listeners on Zoom for a virtual get-together. In this conversation, Marian spoke about lockdown life, grocery shopping for her elderly mother, her new found obsession with cosmetics and how cooking "proper fancy dinners out of a book" helps take her mind off things. There's also some great listener questions at the end of the discussion. Check out @itwomenspodcast on twitter or facebook, for information on any upcoming live events. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/16/20201 hour, 3 minutes
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Ep 393 Lockdown Book Club & Sex Toys Boom

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke with Shawna Scott from Sex Siopa about the recent increase in sex toy sales due to the Covid-19 lockdown. In their conversation, Shawna reveals the most in demand products, the best toys for beginners and why now, more than ever, is a great time to start experimenting. Róisín also caught up with our book club members, Niamh Towey, Bernice Harrison and Ann Ingle, who have some great recommendations to help us through this long period of lockdown. From old reliables, laugh out loud reads and a book guaranteed to get the creative juices flowing, hopefully you’ll find something to add to your lockdown reading list. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/13/20201 hour, 1 minute, 43 seconds
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Ep 392 Frontline Women & Domestic Abuse Pandemic

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke with Dr Catherine Motherway, a Consultant Anaesthesiologist and Intensive Care Physician at University Hospital Limerick. In this open and honest conversation, Catherine reveals what life is really like working on the frontline in ICU. She spoke to Roisin about dealing with the emotional toll of the outbreak, preparing memory books for the families of Covid-19 patients and how, when news of the pandemic first broke, she didn’t sleep properly for three weeks.Also, in this episode, Róisín spoke with Women’s Aid chief executive Sarah Benson about the rise in cases of domestic violence during the coronavirus outbreak. Domestic abuse survivor Bernie D’arcy also shared her story about the ongoing abuse she suffered at the hands of her husband before finally finding the courage to escape the situation with the help of Women’s Aid. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/9/20201 hour, 14 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ep 391 Angela Scanlon & Razan Ibraheem

In this episode, Syrian born journalist Razan Ibraheem spoke to Róisín Ingle about adjusting to this new life under lockdown and the importance of maintaining a routine each day. With the first case of coronavirus confirmed in Syria nearly three weeks ago, Razan discusses the disastrous impact the outbreak may have on her home country. Also, Irish TV presenter Angela Scanlon joined Róisín from her home in London which she shares with her husband Roy and their two year old daughter Ruby. She spoke to Róisín about the power of gratitude, the joys of baking bread with her mum over Instagram and her brand new RTE chat show, ‘Ask Me Anything’ which like lots of things is "up in the air at the moment". Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/6/202048 minutes, 51 seconds
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Ep 390 Pandemic Pantry - Roz Purcell & Catherine Cleary

Today’s episode is all about food, glorious food. Róisín Ingle caught up with food blogger Roz Purcell, to talk about her new fundraiser "Feasta: A Homecooking Collection of Recipes for the Mater and Mercy Hospitals". It's a gorgeous pdf cookbook available to download for €5, and it was specifically developed to help the frontline staff working to fight against Covid-19, with proceeds going to the Mater Hospital and the Mercy Hospital.Also, Irish Times restaurant critic Catherine Cleary spoke to Róisín about her brand new podcast, The Comfort Feed and shared the secret of how to recreate a Big Mac at home. Irish Times contributor Tanya Sweeney was also on the line to tell us how she’s getting on under lockdown in Stoneybatter with her fiancé and toddler: "The first few weeks felt like we were in a tumble dryer, we didn’t know what way was up".Link to Roz’s GoFundMe:https://www.gofundme.com/f/get-cooking-for-good?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=m_pd+share-sheet Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/2/202046 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ep 389 On Call For Ireland & Home Beauty Hacks

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke with Dr. Zoë Lynch, a young Irish doctor who has just returned home to Ireland having spent the last two years living and working in Australia. After hearing the HSE’s plea for medical professionals to “be on call for Ireland”, Zoë dropped everything and set about trying to get the next flight home. Zoë was instrumental in organising the flight which brought over ninety young Irish doctors back to Ireland to work in hospitals around the country. Also Irish Times beauty writer Laura Kennedy joined Róisín to discuss some much needed self care and beauty hacks. Speaking from her apartment in London, Laura revealed what life is like under lockdown in a city of nearly nine million people. She also had lots of tips for chipped shellacs, dodgy roots and unwanted fuzz. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/30/202045 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ep 388 Home Schooling & Direct Provision In Lockdown

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke with Precious Matumba who lives in direct provision in Mosney. Precious arrived in Ireland from Zimbabwe in 2018 with her two children, who are now in second and third class. She spoke to Róisín about Lockdown Life and her fears for those in the direct provision system.Also, Róisín’s 10 year old twin daughters Joya and Priya shared their homeschooling experience so far: “Covid-19 is trying to make us sad, but we just turn it around and say, well we just get to spend more time with our families” Finally author and journalist Jen Hogan spoke to Róisín about homeschooling her seven children. It’s quite the challenge for Jen, who is also trying to juggle a busy work schedule, but she's managing it like a pro. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/26/202045 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ep 387 Sinéad O’Connor & Rosemary Smith

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke to music legend Sinéad O’Connor, who is on lockdown at her home in Bray with members of her family including her sons and two grandchildren. Sinéad has just returned from the USA after her American tour was cancelled due to the pandemic. She spoke to Roisín from the cabin in her garden about corona beards, self isolation, her spiritual side and how music and Netflix are helping her in these strange times. Róisín also caught up with 82 year old Rosemary Smith. The former racing driver, Rosemary is taking social distancing in her stride, enjoying a glass of wine each evening in the garden with her neighbours. Also, Kathy Sheridan was on the line to tell us how she’s been getting on over the last week at home with her daughter in Kildare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/23/20201 hour, 20 seconds
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Ep 386 Lockdown Life: Rome, Dublin and Waterford

In this episode, Róisín Ingle spoke to three women about how life has changed since the outbreak of the coronavirus. Irish Times journalist Jennifer O'Connell lives in Waterford and has all the latest statistics on Covid-19 in Ireland. She also shared some insights into the right and wrong way to do 'social distancing'. Meanwhile, MJ O'Brien is a 71 year old living in Dublin city centre, she spoke to Róisin about surviving these surreal times as an older woman on her own. Finally, Romana Testesecca from Watermelon Fitness spoke to Róisín about life under lockdown in Rome and how her daily online fitness classes are spreading joy to the wider community. We want to know what you’d like us to cover on the podcast so get in touch on twitter or facebook @itwomenspodcast or email us on [email protected] We’re in this together. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/19/202058 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 385 Pandemic Life & Patricia Scanlan

In the first of our episodes recorded remotely, Róisín Ingle catches up with her mother Ann, who is finding ways to keep herself busy during the coronavirus outbreak. “It’s all about trying to make life as normal as possible”. We’re also looking for your Pandemic Poems at this time to spread a bit of joy within the Women’s Podcast community. If you're feeling inspired, email us on [email protected] even if it’s just to let us know how you are getting on. We'd love to hear from you. Last week before the social distancing measures came into force, Kathy Sheridan was joined in studio by best selling author Patricia Scanlan to talk about her brand new book, The Liberation of Brigid Dunne. They spoke about Patricia’s journey from librarian to author, the ten years she spent living undiagnosed with endometriosis and her most rewarding work to date; The Open Door Project. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/16/202038 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ep 384 Coronavirus Pandemic: The Delay Phase

In the words of Irish Minister for Health Simon Harris, we are now "in the delay phase". Schools, colleges and other public facilities are set to close in Ireland this evening for at least two weeks, in response to the spread of coronavirus. In this episode, Kathy Sheridan was joined in studio by three newly elected TD's who gave their reaction to the measures being introduced today by the government; Sinn Féin’s Claire Kerrane, Fine Gael’s Jennifer Carroll MacNeill and Holly Cairns from the Social Democrats. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/12/20201 hour, 13 minutes, 14 seconds
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Ep 383 International Women’s Day - Live with Accenture

Happy International Women’s Day. This episode was recorded live from The Convention Centre in Dublin, as part of Accenture’s International Women’s Day Celebrations. Kathy Sheridan hosted the ‘People Like Us’ panel which explored how speaking out and sharing challenging life experiences can have a positive impact on society. Joining Kathy on stage was Senator Lynn Ruane, Izzy Keane the Creator of Izzy’s Wheels, spoken word artist Sasha Terfous and CEO of IDA Ireland Martin Shanahan. Thanks to everyone who attended the event and to Accenture for inviting us back again. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/8/202029 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ep 382 Bookclub: Motherwell by Deborah Orr

In this episode, our book clubbers got to grips with Motherwell: A Girlhood by Deborah Orr. It’s a fiery, honest memoir, which ultimately became the final piece of work from the late journalist and author. Irish Times journalists Niamh Towey and Bernice Harrison shared their views on the memoir alongside Róisín Ingle and her mother Ann. We had lots of differing opinions around the table, but one thing is for sure; this book is guaranteed to spark important conversations about motherhood, family and relationships. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/5/202054 minutes, 31 seconds
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Ep 381 How to Raise Teenagers: Mothers (and a teen daughter) discuss

The teenage years are a period of intense growth, both emotionally and physically. Add to that, the pressures of social media, school, relationships and sexuality and you’ve got a real parenting challenge on your hands. For this episode on raising teenagers, Róisín Ingle spoke to author and mum of seven Jen Hogan, Irish Times social affairs correspondent Kitty Holland and her seventeen year old daughter Rosie. They discussed some of the biggest challenges when it comes to parenting, the importance of open and honest communication and what life is like for a teen in 2020. They also shared their thoughts on the new parenting book 'Talk to Me' by Anita Conlon, which is full of advice on how to have those difficult conversations with teens. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/2/202047 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ep 380 Leap Year the Movie & Women working together

2020 is a leap year, meaning that we get an extra day, the 29th February. According to tradition, this is the day in which it’s “acceptable” for a woman to propose to a man. To celebrate this bonus day in the calendar, we invited comedian Erin McGathy and journalist Jenn Gannon to watch the movie ‘Leap Year’ starring Amy Adams and Mathew Goode. Also in this episode, Róisin Ingle spoke to Australian author Sam George Allen and Irish journalist Louise Bruton about the power and pleasure of working with other women. Sam recently released her new book Witches, which explores the different ways women collaborate together, while Louise is part of the newly established Rogue Collective, a new online publication which features an all female line up.Plus Irish Times journalist Jennifer O’Connell joined Róisin to speak about some of the biggest stories of the week including Harvey Weinstein’s guilty verdict and Duffy’s brave statement about her rape and subsequent exit from music. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/27/20201 hour, 11 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 379 Anne Enright Live

This episode of The Women’s Podcast was recorded live at Liberty Hall Theatre in Dublin with the award winning author Anne Enright as our special guest on the night. Anne has just released her much anticipated seventh novel, ‘Actress’. The Book follows the life of stage and screen star Katherine O’Dell as told through the eyes of her daughter Norah. Anne spoke to Kathy Sheridan in front of a packed audience about life as a reluctant feminist, the writing process and why the theme of motherhood pops up in her books again and again. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/24/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ep 378 Me and White Supremacy

Three years ago, Layla F. Saad began an Instagram challenge called #MeandWhiteSupremacy, which asked her followers to own up to their racist beliefs and behaviours, however big or small. Thousands of people took part in the challenge and discussed the ways in which their actions have damaged people of colour. This viral challenge became the inspiration behind Layla’s new book, Me and White Supremacy, which expands upon the subject using personal experiences, definitions and exercises for the reader. In this episode, Layla spoke to Kathy Sheridan about the book and the different aspects of white supremacy; including “white fragility”, “white silence” and the issue of cultural appropriation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/20/202037 minutes, 54 seconds
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Ep 377 Siobhan McSweeney

In this episode, Róisín Ingle was joined by actress, activist and Cork woman Siobhan McSweeney. Best known for playing the legendary Sister Michael on Derry Girls, Siobhan spoke to Róisín about growing up in Cork, swapping science for acting & the upcoming third series (will it be the final series?). She also spoke candidly about the recent death of her father and the outpouring of love & support from the Derry Girls cast and crew. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/17/202053 minutes
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Ep 376 Stories of 'How we met' / Good Food: Better Sex

In this special Valentine's Day episode, we've got loads of lovely 'how I met my partner' stories from listeners and guests of The Women's Podcast. From workplace romances, to "swapping books and meaningful looks", sit back and enjoy listening to all the interesting and moving ways people have fallen in love. Also, Róisín Ingle spoke to Shiatsu practitioner and author Joanne Faulkner about her brand new cookbook Good Food: Better Sex. The book is filled to the brim with recipes that will maintain and improve your sexual health: Perfect for some culinary inspiration this Valentine's weekend. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/13/20201 hour, 4 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ep 375 Gaff Goddess & Love Island

In this episode, Róisín Ingle was joined in studio by property manager and DIY Instagrammer Laura de Barra, who has just released her brand new book ‘Gaff Goddess’. The book is full of handy tips & tricks which will show you just how easy it is to remove mould growing in the bathroom or to fix that leaky tap. It will even show you how to hang that picture frame you swore you’d put up months ago. Laura spoke to Róisín about working in the male dominated London property market, the importance of ‘zoning’ your space & why She-I-Y is not just for girls. Plus Orlaith Condon from ‘My Pod on Paper’ was here to discuss all the latest from Love Island. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/10/20201 hour, 15 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 374 Marita Conlon McKenna & Anything You Can Do, I Can Do...Almost

In this episode, Bernice Harrison spoke to Irish author Marita Conlon McKenna about her new book, The Hungry Road. As with the author’s well known children’s book Under the Hawthorn Tree, this new novel is set in Ireland during the famine. Marita revealed the real life inspiration behind the characters and why she decided to revisit such a dark time in Irish History. Also, Róisín Ingle spoke to presenter Romana Testasecca about her new web series, ‘Anything you can do, I can do...almost’, which launched this month. In the series, Romana tries her hand at a wide range of activities hoping to inspire others to try something new. She spoke to Róisín about learning Brazilian funk, rock climbing and acrobatics. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/6/202041 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ep 373 The Long Goodbye: Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s/Dementia

In this episode, Ciara Jordan and Áine Ryan joined Kathy Sheridan in studio to speak about their experience caring for parents with Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Ciara’s mum Bernie was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s five years ago, while Áine’s father George developed Dementia around the same time. They spoke to Kathy about the early signs of the illness, what life is like for them now a few years down the line, and how best to support someone going through the same experience. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/3/202052 minutes, 1 second
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Ep 372 Irish General Election Special: The Issues Affecting Women

In the run up to polling day on February 8th, we invited three inspiring women into The Women’s Podcast to examine the 2020 Irish General Election through a feminist lens. Which political parties and candidates supported Repeal, who is fighting for equal pay and how can we increase female representation and diversity in politics? In studio with Kathy Sheridan to discuss all of this was CEO of Women for Election, Ciarín De Buis, Independent Senator Lynn Ruane and Irish Times political journalist Jennifer Bray. Róisín Ingle was also here with some stories of the week, including the couple in Cork who are running against each other in the upcoming Irish election and a headline-grabbing convention in Florida called ‘Make Women Great Again’. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/30/202058 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ep 371 Roz Purcell

In this episode Róisín Ingle was joined by former model, food blogger & influencer Roz Purcell, who has just released her third cookbook ‘No Fuss Vegan’. Roz spoke to Róisín about her early life growing up on a farm in Tipperary, learning to cook with her grandparents and the unlikely inspiration behind her latest book. They also took a look back at Roz’s journey into the modelling industry and the eating disorder that troubled her early twenties. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/27/202050 minutes, 35 seconds
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Ep 370 Single mother by choice Clodagh O’Hagan on finding a sperm donor

In this episode, Kathy Sheridan is joined by Clodagh O’Hagan, who is now over twenty weeks pregnant with her first child. In late 2018, Clodagh made the decision to have a baby on her own using artificial insemination. Despite being given just a 2-5% chance of becoming pregnant, Clodagh defied the odds and is now looking forward to her new arrival this May. She spoke to Kathy about deciding to go it alone, choosing a donor (which she compares to online dating) and the medical process behind the successful pregnancy. We also hear from Irish Times Social Affairs Correspondent Kitty Holland who spoke to Róisín Ingle about her recent piece on the homeless crisis in Dublin. Kitty visited a free food stall in the city centre and spoke with lots of different people using the service, including a family with five children and an eighty year old woman. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/23/202045 minutes, 3 seconds
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EP 369 Are public toilets failing women?

Have you ever wondered why there’s always a long queue in the women’s toilets, while men just seem to waltz in and out? Why do some public toilets charge you for the pleasure of emptying your bladder? And what’s with the lack of decent public toilets in nearly every city around the world? These are the kind of questions that occupy the mind of Canadian journalist & author Lezlie Lowe. In her brand new book No Place To Go: How Public Toilets Fail Out Private Needs, Lezlie takes a look at the many ways that public bathrooms just don’t work. Lezlie spoke to Kathy Sheridan about becoming Canada’s ‘Toilet Lady’ and why the queue for the women’s bathroom is ultimately a feminist issue. Also joining the discussion is Fóra.ie journalist Zuzia Whelan, who has written about Ireland’s dreadful approach to women’s toilets for the Dublin Inquirer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/20/202042 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 368 Female friendship: The good, the bad and the lonely

In this episode, we’re exploring the complex world of female friendships: why do some friends come and go? How to go from acquaintance to best pal? And what are friendship apps like Bumble BFF really like? To discuss this and more, Róisín Ingle was joined by American comedian Erin McGathy, London based journalist Laura Kennedy and Irish Times columnist Hilary Fannin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/16/202051 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ep 367 Dr Niamh Shaw – Astronaut-in-waiting

In this episode, Róisín Ingle is joined by Dr. Niamh Shaw who’s on a mission to make it into outer space. As a young girl, Niamh dreamed of becoming an astronaut, but never thought of it as an achievable ambition. That all changed in her early forties when she finally decided to believe in herself and pursue her long held childhood dream. In her new book, Dream Big (out this March) Niamh documents her space journey so far, which includes taking a zero gravity flight, simulating a mission to Mars in the Utah desert and getting to watch a live rocket launch. She spoke to Róisín about her next ambitious plan and how we can encourage young women to choose careers in STEM. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/13/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 366 Jane Goodall – The wondrous chimp-filled life of a legend

In today’s episode Róisín Ingle spoke to Jane Goodall, the woman who devoted her life to the study of chimpanzees. In this fascinating conversation, Jane describes how her African adventure started in 1957 when she travelled to Kenya by boat (it took over a month). With no formal training or scientific background, Jane became a chimp researcher under the supervision of archaeologist Louis Leakey. She told Róisin about how her mother’s unwavering support enabled her to reach her goals, what it’s really like to live amongst chimps in the wild and how her unusual methods of research annoyed the senior academics who thought they knew better. She also talks about the ways each one of us can contribute as the world grapples with climate crisis. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/9/202049 minutes, 35 seconds
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Ep 365 Women’s Epiphanies on Nollaig na mBan

It’s Women’s Christmas or as it’s known in Ireland Nollaig na mBan and it’s also the Feast of the Epiphany. To mark the occasion The Irish Times Women’s Podcast been collecting Epiphanies or as Oprah calls them “a-ha moments” from women. In this special episode women recount the lightbulb moments that influenced and in some cases transformed their lives. You’ll hear epiphanies from lots of inspiring women including the award winning author Margaret Atwood, musician and writer Andrea Corr, former United States Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power, fashion designer Sonya Lennon and podcast presenters Kathy Sheridan and Róisín Ingle. A New Year brings with it a feeling of hope, change and motivation. We hope this episode is just what you need to get that New Year’s spring in your step. It might even lead to an epiphany of your own. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/6/202033 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ep 364 What’s in Store for Women in 2020?

2020 is finally here, but what has the year in store for women around the world? In today’s episode Kathy Sheridan is joined in studio by Syrian born journalist Razan Ibraheem, Irish Times social affairs correspondent Kitty Holland and Irish Examiner columnist Alison O’Connor. Together, they took a look at how women will be making waves around the world in the coming year; including which Irish female authors will be making their debut, what the year has in store for women in sport and how the world of politics will be shaped by strong females. They also revealed their own goals for 2020. Get ready to be inspired. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/2/202050 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 363 The Women’s Podcast Review of 2019

2019: It was the year of fanny flutters, Brexit & Borris. The year that Finland elected the youngest ever female prime minister, America won The Women’s World Cup, a new royal baby was born, Wagatha Christie had everyone talking and the fight for women’s rights escalated across the world. To review the very best and worst bits of the last year with Kathy Sheridan are journalists Jennifer O’Connell, Alison O’Connor and Syrian born journalist Razan Ibraheem. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/30/201956 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 362 Tererai Trent / The Grass Ceiling

Tererai Trent, an academic from Zimbabwe, was in Dublin recently for the Simmons Leadership Conference. As a young girl born into poverty, Tererai was not allowed to attend her local school. Despite this, she went on to obtain a degree in agricultural education, a Masters in public health and in 2009, she completed her PhD. Oprah Winfrey once described Tererai as her all time favourite guest and from this inspiring conversation with Róisín Ingle, it’s easy to see why. Also in this episode: The Grass Ceiling is a short film created by Iseult Howlett. The film explores female participation in sport and looks at how being physically active and part of a team can benefit you in all aspects of life. Also in the discussion, is Irish Times restaurant critic Catherine Cleary, who along with Iseult has joined a soccer team in recent years. They spoke to Róisín Ingle about the strong female athletes featured in the film and the joy of returning to team sports. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/26/201938 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ep 361 How to Have a Calm Christmas

In today’s episode, Psychotherapist and mindfulness teacher Padraig O’Morain is on hand to help bring a little calmness into our lives this festive season. With the constant rushing around, the frantic shopping and the pressure to achieve the "perfect" Christmas, it’s important to take some time to look after yourself too. He spoke to Róisín Ingle about preparing yourself for stressful family gatherings and the easy mindfulness techniques you can use to inject some calm into your Christmas. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/23/201929 minutes, 24 seconds
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Ep 360 The Murder of Mr Moonlight – Catherine Fegan

In today’s episode, Kathy Sheridan is joined in studio by award winning journalist Catherine Fegan, who has just released the book, ‘The Murder of Mr Moonlight’. It tells the story of DJ Bobby Ryan (Mr. Moonlight) who went missing in 2011 and the strange circumstances surrounding the discovery of his body 22 months later. In May 2019, after a fifteen week trial, Pat Quirke was found guilty of the murder. Catherine is the Chief Correspondent for the Irish Daily Mail and reported on the trial every single day. Following the verdict, she wrote this insightful and meticulous account of the case that gripped the nation. She spoke to Kathy about the trial, the two women at the centre of the story and how jealousy, control and greed led to the killing of an innocent man. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/19/201945 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ep359 The Ultimate Guide to Last Minute Christmas Shopping

In today’s episode, Róisín Ingle is joined in studio by beauty writer Laura Kennedy and fashion stylist Corina Gaffey to help you out with some brilliant last minute gift ideas. From photo jigsaws, subscription boxes, house plants, eco-friendly makeup and reusable tampon applicators, there’s something for everyone in this guide to last minute Christmas Shopping. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/16/201935 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ep 358 Joanne McNally

On today’s show, Róisín Ingle is joined by comedian and all-round legend Joanne McNally. In this hilarious conversation, Joanne speaks about living with four other single women, (one of whom is a sexual psychologist), why she mostly uses tinder for content ideas and how her favourite pastime of ‘drinking with the girls’ was the inspiration for her latest show, Prosecco Express.Also, Rosita Boland joins Kathy Sheridan in studio to discuss Time Magazine’s, youngest ever Person of the Year, Greta Thunberg. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/12/201935 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 357 Book Club: The Dutch House / Irish Composer Emer Kinsella

Ep 357 Book Club: The Dutch House / Irish Composer Emer KinsellaThe Book Club is back and this time Róisín Ingle, Bernice Harrison, Ann Ingle and Niamh Towey are chatting about The Dutch House by Ann Patchett. The book tells the story of two siblings, Danny and Maeve Conroy, and how their lives unfold over the course of five decades. Also Róisín Ingle chats with Irish violinist Emer Kinsella about her life in Hollywood, California, where she works as a composer, scoring music for the big screen. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/9/201933 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 356: Elizabeth Strout On Bringing Olive Kitteridge Back to Life.

In today’s episode we’re joined by the Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, Elizabeth Strout, who has just released her new book, ‘Olive Again’. It’s the much anticipated sequel to her best seller ‘Olive Kitteridge’ which was released in 2008. After eleven years, we’re thrown back into the chaos of Olive’s life as she adapts to changes within herself and the world around her.Elizabeth explains to Róisín Ingle how Olive’s fiery character appeared to her as she emptied the dishwasher, why she kept writing even when the publishers weren’t interested and how her isolated childhood growing up in Maine on America’s East Coast shaped her view on the world.Also, Irish Times journalist Jennifer O'Connell is in studio to discuss the Chilean feminist anthem taking the world by storm and the content moderators who are suing Facebook Ireland for psychological injuries. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/5/201951 minutes, 14 seconds
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Ep 355: Megan Phelps Roper / The Gender Pay Gap

Megan Phelps Roper was born into the Westboro Baptist Church, a small Kansas based ministry which garnered world-wide condemnation for their anti-gay protests and pickets at 9/11 memorials and soldier’s funerals. Megan spoke to Róisín Ingle about her new memoir, Unfollow, which details her early life in the church, why her family celebrate tragedy and death and what inspired her to leave it all behind. Also, women’s rights campaigner Tatjana Latinovic was in Dublin recently to speak at the ‘Practical Steps to Workplace Equality Conference’ organised by the charity Dress for Success. Tatjana is the chair of the Icelandic Women’s Rights Association and spoke to Kathy Sheridan about how Iceland has become known as a gender equality paradise and how the historical women’s day off in 1975, when 90% of women in Iceland went on strike, put them at the forefront of the fight for equal rights. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/2/20191 hour, 3 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 354: Michel Roux Jr. and Margot Janse

As we wrap up Food Month here in The Irish Times, we’re joined in studio by award winning chefs Michel Roux Jr. and Margot Janse. The pair travelled to Dublin recently to judge the Euro-Toques Ireland Young Chef of the Year 2019 Competition, which was won by Gráinne Mullins, a head pastry chef at Galway restaurant Lignum. Margo has enjoyed a lengthy career in South Africa working as a head chef in her women dominated restaurant kitchen Le Quartier Français and now focuses her time on her charity Isabelo, Feeding Hungry Minds. Michel, was once a judge on BBC’s Masterchef and runs legendary Le Gavroche, a Michelin Star restaurant in London. They spoke to Róisín Ingle about the cut-throat culture in restaurant kitchens and the challenges faced by female chefs as they try to succeed in male dominated environments.Also Bernice Harrison tells Kathy why she won’t be partaking in the upcoming Black Friday madness and explains why Bikram Yoga is back in the news. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/28/201938 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ep: 353 Women Defenders in the Gaza Strip

In today’s episode, we examine what life is like for women living in the Gaza Strip, in southern Palestine. Róisín Ingle spoke to Mona Al Shawa and Hala Riziq, who travelled over to Dublin recently with Trócaire for some respite and to share their experiences with Irish people. Both have made it their life’s mission to defend women’s rights in a place where violent conflict and an oppressive patriarchy make “double victims” of women and girls : Hala works in development and gender based violence, while Mona is the Director of the Women’s Rights Unit of the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/25/201931 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 352: It’s a Yes! Together For Yes on how the 8th was repealed

In today’s episode, Tanya Sweeney tells Roisín Ingle why the opening of an Oliver Bonas store in Dublin is bad news for our wallets. (She spent too much on a neon rainbow lamp. What? It sparked joy!) They also discuss that car crash Prince Andrew interview and after encouraging us all to de-clutter our homes, ask why is Marie Kondo now selling her own home-ware range? Also on this episode, Roisín speaks to Alison O’Connor and co-founders of the Together For Yes Campaign, Ailbhe Smyth and Orla O’Connor. Together with Gráinne Griffin, they have written It’s a Yes! ; a new book which reveals the inner workings of that historic women-led campaign. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/21/20191 hour, 15 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ep 351 Marian Keyes LIVE

Last week The Women’s Podcast left behind the usual surrounds of the studio for a live recording in House on Leeson Street, with thanks to our sponsors Green & Black's. Marian Keyes was the special guest on the night and treated the live audience to an exclusive excerpt of her brand new book Grown Ups. Marian also spoke about her love of the dark winter nights, why she keeps turning down Dancing With The Stars and how she feels about Ireland in 2019. She also gave some exclusive news about a new book she's just started writing. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/18/201953 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 350 Margaret Heffernan / Ana Kriégel

In this episode, Róisin speaks to entrepreneur, author and ground breaking business leader, Margaret Heffernan. As the former CEO of five businesses, Margaret shares her incredible insight into the complexities of how an organisation works. Having spent a lot of her career focusing on the role of women in business and leadership roles, Margaret also speaks about how women can positively change the workplace culture and how helpfulness is the key to any happy working environment. Also, Roisín and Kathy discuss the recent Irish Times articles concerning Ana Kriégel; the first written by Orla Muldoon who's headline read ‘Ana Kriégel was murdered by boys because she was a girl’ and the second written by Kathy herself. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/14/201955 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 349 Samantha Power

In this episode we are joined by former US ambassador to the UN Samantha Power. The Dublin born academic and author talked to Kathy Sheridan about how she became one of the most powerful women in American Foreign Affairs and discussed her acclaimed memoir The Education of An Idealist. Power also goes back to her difficult childhood in Dublin and the custody battle which led to her, aged 9, leaving Ireland and making a home in America with her mother and brother. She talks about Trump, Barack Obama and what gives her hope in a turbulent world. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/11/20191 hour, 7 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 348 What Gay Byrne did for Irish women

Today we’ve dedicated the podcast to Gay Byrne - the legendary broadcaster who died on Monday 4th November - and specifically to his impact on women in Ireland. Most of the listeners to his radio show were women, he regularly made space for women on both radio and on The Late Late Show, allowing their voices to be amplified on topics such as divorce, sex, religion, contraception and feminism. He allowed Ireland to see women in a way that challenged the pervasive view in the 19709s and 1980s. One of the many women who spoke about these issues on the Late Late was Ann Marie Hourihane who appears on this episode. Both Women’s Podcast host Roisin Ingle and Ann Marie are super fans of Gay, and are both very sad at the loss of him this week. To some degree this is a bit of a Gay Byrne love in but much more than that it’s a look back at the part Gay played in changing society, particularly for women in allowing these important conversations to take place. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/7/201938 minutes, 41 seconds
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EP 347 Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood is a literary legend and you can imagine how excited we were to have her on The Women’s Podcast for the third time. As author of The Handmaid’s Tale - and many other award winning novels - she brought us the world of Gilead and started a powerful global conversation about women which still resonates today at a time when Donald Trump is the leader of the free world and reproductive rights continue to be restricted in America. Along with Bernadine Evaristo she has just won the Booker prize for The Testaments, a sequel to the Handmaid’s Tale. She talked to Kathy Sheridan about misogyny, feminism, parenting and the climate crisis. We hope you enjoy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/4/20191 hour, 1 minute, 19 seconds
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Ep 346: Abortion, Northern Ireland, Amanda Palmer & more

In what was a momentous week for Northern Ireland, The Women’s Podcast travelled to Belfast for our first podcast recording in that beautiful city.It was the week abortion was decriminalised in the North after a long grassroots struggle by feminist activists. So what happens next?Panellists including Alliance for Choice activist Danielle Roberts, performer Kellie Turtle and Alliance party Assembly member Paula Bradshaw discussed the conversation that will happen in the North over the five month consultation period before abortion services are introduced next March.And we were joined in the Belfast Mac by our special guest Amanda Palmer, who told our audience about her own experiences of abortion and sang the song you didn’t hear on The Late Late Show – Voicemail for Jill. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/31/20191 hour, 18 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 345 Mná na hÉireann Women of Ireland fund, Breast Cancer Awareness Month

In this episode, Kathy Sheridan talks to women and organisations who have benefited from the Mná na hÉireann Women of Ireland fund which was set up to increase the economic mobility of women across the country. We also mark the end of Breast Cancer Awareness Month by talking to one survivor of the illness who now volunteers educating women and girls in how to detect early signs of the illness. Ger Collins (46), tells Róisín Ingle how she was so grateful for the help she received, following a diagnosis of breast cancer, she is now sharing her experiences with teachers and transition-year students with Breast Cancer Ireland. We also have details of a competition to win a great hamper to celebrate the launch of Family Unplugged by Peter Cosgrove. Listen for more details. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/28/201954 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ep 344 Interview: Andrea Corr

Barefoot Pilgrimage is a new book by Andrea Corr, the musician, songwriter and actress who was the lead singer of pop group The Corrs with her three siblings Sharon, Caroline and Jim. The memoir is a love letter to her late parents Jean and Gerry and a meditation on life, grief and hope. Corr came in to The Women’s Podcast studio and talked to Roisin Ingle about the memoir, her career, religion, feminism, bodily autonomy, family, loss and the joy and release of expressing herself through words. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/24/201947 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ep 343 True Blood Part 2: Emma Barnett on ‘Period. It’s About Bloody Time’

The BBC broadcaster Emma Barnett was the first person in the UK to announce she was menstruating on live TV news. Now she has written a call-to-arms manifesto on why we need to destroy the ludicrous stigma around periods. In the second part of our True Blood series, Emma talks to Kathy about the history of the taboo of periods, the stories women shared with her for the book and the new wave of activism dedicated to normalising menstruation. Emma also talks about being diagnosed with endometriosis just three years ago and why an inability to talk about periods contributes to so many people suffering from the debilitating disorder in silence. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/21/201931 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ep 342 True Blood Part 1: We Need to Talk about Periods

In the first of a two-part series, we explore why we find periods so hard to talk about and what can be done to help break the stigma that still exists around them. For today’s show, Kathy is joined by Labour councillor Deirdre Kingston, Niamh Dunne, a youth ambassador for Plan International Ireland, and by Claire Hunt of Homeless Period Ireland, to discuss first periods, taboos, period poverty and lots more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/17/201948 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ep 341 Give Birth Like a Feminist, Susan Jane White's Clever Batch

In today's podcast, journalist and founder of the Positive Birth Movement, Milli Hill, talks to Jennifer Ryan about her book Give Birth Like a Feminist. She says pregnant people need to realise that they have choices when it comes to giving birth and the power imbalance between health professionals and those giving birth needs to be redressed. Also in this episode, Róisín Ingle chats to Susan Jane White about her new cook book, Clever Batch. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/14/201948 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ep 340 WAGatha Christie, Postnatal Depression, Consent & Young Men

In today's podcast, Kathy and Róisín revel in the joys of WAGatha Christie; Tanya Sweeney speaks candidly about postnatal depression; and Irish Times journalist Jack Power reviews 'Consent: Everything a Guy Needs to Know about Sex, Love and Consent', Inti Chavez Perez's sexual health and relationships guidebook aimed at boys and young men. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/10/201951 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 339 Flo Perry on How to Have Feminist Sex

Flo Perry is a writer and illustrator, who has managed to make a career out of her passion for drawing breasts and penchant for quizzing people on their sex lives at parties. In her book 'How to Have Feminist Sex', she explores everything from faking it, to consent; from stress, to kink; and how losing your virginity isn't so different to eating your first chocolate croissant. In today’s podcast she talks to Róisín about the book and her mission to get more people talking openly about what they do and don't want from every romantic encounter. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/7/201920 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ep 338 OMGWACA LIVE: "Getting a trolley in Marks and Spencer is the ultimate notions!"

Last night The Irish Times, in association with Green & Black’s Chocolate, brought Oh My God What A Complete Aisling authors Sarah Breen & Emer McLysaght to The Docklands in Cork for a live recording of the Women’s Podcast.Róisín sat down with Sarah and Emer to discuss their third novel 'Once, Twice, Three Times an Aisling', their plans for the fourth book, what it’s like to write with your best friend and the rip-roaring success of the Aisling series as a whole.In today’s podcast, we bring you the recording of the event.Thanks to our sponsor Green and Blacks, to everyone in Irish Times Sales for helping organise the event and to the Docklands in Cork for hosting. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/3/201946 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ep 337 Wallis Bird on music, social change & choosing to be the 'cool aunty'

In today’s podcast, Róisín talks to singer-songwriter Wallis Bird about her sixth album 'Woman', which is released this week. Wallis talks to Róisín about what's inspired her for the new album - #MeToo, Trump, Brexit, the war in Syria - about how falling in love and being in a grown-up relationship has changed her, why she shaved her head to record 'Woman', and why living in Berlin is as annoyingly cool as it seems.**A reminder that the annual march for choice takes place this Saturday 28th September, on International Safe Abortion Day, beginning at the Garden of Remembrance at 2pm. “No one left behind” is the Abortion Rights Campaign’s message this year and you can find all the details of the march on their website www.abortionrightscampaign.ie Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/26/201940 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 336 Republic of Shame – Caelainn Hogan on chronicling Ireland’s mother-and-baby homes

In her new book ‘Republic of Shame’, journalist Caelainn Hogan examines Ireland’s mother-and-baby homes and the collusion of the Catholic Church with the Irish State. Personal accounts from survivors, nuns and others bring the truth forward for all to see. In today’s podcast, Róisín speaks to Caelainn about the stories of the women she spoke to, the lack of understanding of the suffering they endured and the appalling legacy of Ireland’s mother-and-baby homes. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/23/201932 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ep 335 “We need to ask more questions” – Vicky Phelan on the power of speaking out

In 2018, Limerick woman Vicky Phelan became a household name as Irish women's voice for justice, when she chose to speak out and lift the lid on what has become one of the greatest political and medical scandals of our time. In today’s podcast she talks to Róisín about her memoir ‘Overcoming’, which details her remarkable personal story from her early life and a life-threatening accident, through to motherhood, a battle with depression and later, her devastating discovery that her cancer had returned in shocking circumstances.Plus: Orna Mulcahy, a managing editor here at the Irish Times, chats to Róisín about the dangers of inputting too much personal data to pregnancy and period-tracker apps, Culture Night 2019 and Dublin’s newest museum, MoLi. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/19/201953 minutes, 42 seconds
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Ep 334 Medicinal Cannabis Campaigner Vera Twomey

In today’s episode, Cork woman Vera Twomey talks to Kathy about her memoir, For Ava. Ava is Vera's daughter and she suffers from Dravet Syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy that causes multiple seizures a day. The only medication that has any effect on Ava's condition is a form of medicinal cannabis that Vera has, for years, fought tooth and nail to gain access to. For Ava tells the story of that campaign, pays tribute to those who helped the family achieve their goal and shows the lengths a parent will go to for their child's health and happiness.Earlier this year, legislation allowing people access to medical cannabis on a limited basis over the next five years was signed into law. It allows compassionate access to cannabis for medical reasons in cases where conventional treatment has failed. However discussions are still ongoing to secure a supplier for the Irish market and as yet no such products have been supplied. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/16/201933 minutes, 40 seconds
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Ep 333 Women & FF / Sophie White’s Filter This / Inaccessible Dublin

In today's podcast, journalist, author and podcaster Sophie White talks to Róisín Ingle about her debut novel, Filter This, in which she peels back the social media mask that many people wear to disguise what’s really going on in their lives.Following her comments about candidate selection this week, Fianna Fail Councillor and General Election candidate Lisa McDonald discusses her belief that the party has a problem with women.Plus: Journalist and wheelchair user Louise Bruton explores the problem with accessibility when it comes to Dublin's gig venues and tells us what is on her cultural radar - the Dublin Fringe Festival and Margaret Atwood's new book The Testaments. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/13/201954 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 332 What Is 'Nunchi' & Why Do We Need It?

Nunchi is a guiding principle of Korean life, considered essential for survival, happiness and success. Roughly translating as self-awareness, Nunchi is the art of a reading a room and using that knowledge for the good of everyone in it. Korean-American author Euny Hong has written the ultimate guide to this secret skill, The Power of Nunchi. In today's show, she talks to Róisín about good and bad nunchi, the difference between nunchi and empathy, and how anyone can learn this superpower the Koreans see as an essential life skill. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/9/201921 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 331 "I fear no man": DA Rachael Rollins / Belfast Rally For Choice / Jess Phillips

On today’s podcast: Kathy speaks to the District Attorney of Suffolk County in Massachusetts, Rachael Rollins, who is the first woman to hold that particular office and also the first woman of colour to be appointed as a DA across the whole of Massachusetts Commonwealth. Rollins was in Dublin ahead of her appearance at the Kennedy Summer School in Co. Wexford this weekend. They talk about her landslide victory, her drive to reform criminal justice, Trump, and why she fears no man.Also today: Róisín talks to Rally for Choice activist Rosa Thompson about the 2019 march, which takes place this Saturday September 7th in Belfast.But before all of that: Irish Times senior features writer Deirdre Falvey chats to Róisín about what's coming up in the Dublin Fringe Festival, the Booker shortlist and Labour MP Jess Phillips's stunning take-down of Boris Johnson in the House of Commons. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.