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The Sunday Magazine Profile

The Sunday Magazine

English, Public affairs, 1 season, 174 episodes, 4 hours, 4 minutes
About
CBC Radio's The Sunday Edition is a lively three-hour program of conversation, documentaries and music. Michael Enright, an accomplished journalist and broadcaster, is the host and tackles everything ...
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Sunday Politics Panel, katherena vermette, Catherine Tait, That's Puzzling!

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with columnists Susan Delacourt, Matt Gurney and David Staples about where the federal parties stand ahead of Parliament's return, Métis author katherena vermette discusses her latest novel The Circle, CBC/Radio-Canada President and CEO Catherine Tait outlines her plans to navigate the media industry's challenging terrain, and our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 37 minutes, 31 seconds
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CBC/Radio-Canada President Catherine Tait on C-18, media mistrust and her goals for the public broadcaster

Public mistrust. Tech giant wars. Layoffs. The news about the news hasn't been very positive lately. As for the public broadcaster? Loud calls to defund and reform, amidst all of the existing industry turmoil. Catherine Tait is the President and CEO of CBC/Radio-Canada – tasked with leading the organization through these tumultuous times. She speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about the roadmap she's crafting for the remainder of her term, and how she plans to navigate the bumpy road ahead.
1/1/130 minutes
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Climate protests, Edward Burtynsky, Naomi Klein, Vogue Ukraine's wartime pivot

Host Piya Chattopadhyay explores how post-tropical storm Lee is affecting Atlantic Canada, environmental journalist Arno Kopecky reflects on the weekend's global climate protests, artist Edward Burtynsky outlines how his industry roots shape his perspective on art, writer and activist Naomi Klein delves into online conspiracy culture, and Vogue Ukraine's editor-in-chief Venya Brykalin explains how his magazine has shifted focus during the Russian invasion. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 31 minutes, 26 seconds
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Naomi Klein on conspiracy culture and confronting our doppelgangers

Have you ever met your doppelganger? It could be a stranger that people constantly mistake you for, or a celebrity that friends say you’re a spitting image of. But for acclaimed author, filmmaker and social activist Naomi Klein, finding her doppelganger turned into a much darker experience. That’s because Klein has been mistaken for noted conspiracy theorist and anti-vaccine crusader Naomi Wolf for years. Klein joins Piya Chattopadhyay to explain why she used that experience as a starting point for her book Doppelganger: A Trip into the Mirror World, which takes on the complicated, messy and misinformation-filled world of social media where “the other Naomi” thrives.
1/1/129 minutes, 4 seconds
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Canada-India Tensions, Karl Subban, IPCC chair Jim Skea, Longtermism

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with South Asian history professor Neilesh Bose about how Canada's allegations against India are playing out in diaspora communities, political science professor Bessma Momani and former diplomat Arif Lalani unpack how recent events are affecting Canada's role on the world stage, Karl Subban talks about finding joy in hockey despite the problems plaguing it, IPCC chair Jim Skee reflects on the climate crisis, and Royal Ontario Museum curator Alexandra Palmer unspools the radical history of the cardigan. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 31 minutes, 49 seconds
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How Canada's hockey dad finds joy in a sport divided by controversy

Hockey season is here, with the NHL's preseason kicking off this weekend and many kids and parents gearing up for youth leagues. As the father of three pro hockey players, Karl Subban knows the excitement this time of year can spur – a feeling he aims to capture in his new book for kids, The Hockey Skates. Subban joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about his family's experience overcoming adversity in hockey, and why he still feels optimistic about the sport despite the cultural problems that continue to plague it.
1/1/118 minutes, 36 seconds
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Irwin Cotler, Alicia Elliott, Notwithstanding clause, Science denialism, Caitlin Moran

Guest host Rebecca Zandbergen speaks with human rights advocate and former federal minister Irwin Cotler about Canada's complicated history with Nazis, author Alicia Elliott shares her new novel exploring motherhood and Indigenous life, law professor Carissima Mathen explains the notwithstanding clause and the most recent attempts to invoke it, Dr. Peter Hotez discusses the threat that misinformation poses to medical and scientific progress, and feminist writer Caitlin Moran makes the case for more open discussion about the issues facing men and boys. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 40 minutes, 28 seconds
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Alicia Elliott on fiction, motherhood and mental illness

Following her acclaimed essay collection A Mind Spread Out on the Ground, Mohawk writer Alicia Elliott is back with a new novel that draws on her own deeply personal experiences to tell a story of motherhood, mental illness and intergenerational trauma. And Then She Fell follows Alice, a young Haudenosaunee mother who goes through a kind of looking glass, as she deals with postpartum depression and married life away from her family and traditions. It’s a story of difficult truths, told with humour, horror and a bit of surrealism. Elliott joins Rebecca Zandbergen to talk about the novel, the personal experiences that inspired it, and best practices for sharing difficult stories – both in fiction and beyond.
1/1/123 minutes, 32 seconds
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Understanding the Hamas attack on Israel, John Ibbitson, Thats Puzzling!, Mnoomin

Host Piya Chattopadhyay explores what led to the Hamas attack on Israel and what may come next with The Economist's Gregg Carlstrom, University of Ottawa's Thomas Juneau and American University's Dan Arbell, The Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson talks about what two former Canadian prime ministers can teach us about navigating the country's modern challenges, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, and we meet the communities rekindling relationships with mnoomin. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 29 minutes, 58 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for October 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are Ruth Hodder from Winnipeg, and Stephen Quinn, host of CBC Vancouver's morning radio show The Early Edition.
1/1/120 minutes, 39 seconds
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The latest in Gaza and Israel, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Canadian Jewish and Palestinian communities, Teaching kids to read

Host Piya Chattopadhyay explores the latest on the situation in Gaza and Israel, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Viet Thanh Nguyen shares his family's refugee origin story and reflects on war and memory, Raja Khouri and Jeffrey Wilkinson discuss solidarity efforts in Canadian Jewish and Palestinian communities, and our Sunday Documentary digs into the debate about how to teach kids to read. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 38 minutes, 51 seconds
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Viet Thanh Nguyen rewrites our narrative of war stories

For Viet Thanh Nguyen, wars happen both on the battlefield and again in memory. The Pulitzer Prize-winning writer speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about the profound impact war has had on his own life, and how our selective remembrance and the people we forget shape our national narratives. His new memoir, A Man of Two Faces, weaves together his views on contemporary life, his family’s refugee origin story, and the myth and legacy of America.
1/1/124 minutes, 38 seconds
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Healthcare crisis in Gaza, Zadie Smith, Grief among Israelis and Palestinians, Killers of the Flower Moon

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Palestinian public health expert Yara Asi about the consequences of war on Gaza's healthcare system, author Zadie Smith talks about the enduring relevance of the 19th century trial that inspired her new novel The Fraud, Bassam Aramin and Ayelet Harel reflect on identifying with the bereaved in the Israel-Hamas war, and Osage National Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear and author David Grann discuss the true story that inspired Martin Scorsese's new film Killers of the Flower Moon. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 32 minutes, 6 seconds
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The true story behind Killers of the Flower Moon

The highly anticipated historical drama Killers of the Flower Moon opens in theaters across Canada this weekend. The Martin Scorsese film, which is already getting Oscar buzz, details a series of murders of Indigenous people from the Osage Indian Reservation for their oil wealth in the early 20th century. Author David Grann wrote the book that inspired the film. Osage Nation Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear consulted on the adaptation. They both join Piya Chattopadhyay to discuss the true story and the lasting legacy the murders have had on the Osage Nation.
1/1/126 minutes, 11 seconds
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Israel-Hamas war, Indigenous identity, Mary Beard, Errol Morris

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The Economist's Gregg Carlstrom about the latest developments in the Israel-Hamas war, Niigaan Sinclair, Tanya Talaga, and Drew Hayden Taylor reflect on complicated questions surrounding Indigenous identity following a CBC investigation into Buffy Sainte-Marie, historian Mary Beard shares lessons for our world from the Roman Empire, filmmaker Errol Morris discusses his new documentary about the late spy novelist John le Carré, and writers Shane Hawk and Waubgeshig Rice talk about the utility of the horror genre in Indigenous storytelling. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 40 minutes, 6 seconds
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Historian Mary Beard finds lessons for our modern world in the Roman Empire

Has the celebrated historian Mary Beard seen the new TikTok trend about how often men think about the Roman Empire? Of course. "Blokes thinking about being Roman is a good start," she says, "I will show you it's more interesting even than you imagine." Her new book Emperor of Rome explores what it was really like to rule the Roman Empire – from tales of sex and murder, to boring admin duties. In a wide ranging interview with Piya Chattopadhyay, Beard sheds new light on ancient history, and offers important lessons for our world today.
1/1/126 minutes, 6 seconds
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The week in politics, Amy Schneider, Qatar and the Israel-Hamas war, That's Puzzling!

Guest host Rebecca Zandbergen speaks with columnists Kelly Cryderman, Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney about the CPP clash and the carbon tax carve-out, Jeopardy! champion Amy Schneider reflects on her record-setting 40-game streak and becoming a transgender representative along the way, Middle East expert Younes Zangiabadi explains how Qatar has become a key player in the Israel-Hamas war, and our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 23 minutes, 10 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for November 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, guest host Rebecca Zandbergen competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are Bruce Rae in Vancouver, and CBC senior entertainment reporter Eli Glasner.
1/1/123 minutes, 25 seconds
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Barbra Streisand, Israel-Hamas war, Kent Monkman, Canadian peacekeepers in Vietnam

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with music and film legend Barbra Streisand about her career and the misconceptions she's out to correct with her new memoir, Roland Paris and Bijan Ahmadi explore the global and local ripple effects of the Israel-Hamas war, artists Kent Monkman and Gisèle Gordon discuss writing an origin story for Monkman's alter ego character Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, and our Sunday Documentary explores the role of Canadian peacekeepers in the Vietnam War. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 39 minutes, 29 seconds
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'I'm certainly not a diva': Barbra Streisand wants to set the record straight

She's a legendary singer, actor and director whose career has spanned six decades... and made her a rare EGOT winner. Now, Barbra Streisand is telling her own story in My Name is Barbra – an anticipated memoir 10 years in the making. In a wide ranging Canadian broadcast exclusive interview, Streisand speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about misconceptions she's out to correct about herself, her fraught relationship with her mother, why she's stepping out of the spotlight... and what she does at night to free her mind from the world's many challenges.
1/1/125 minutes, 11 seconds
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Getting out of Gaza, Jay Ingram, Caster Semenya, Combatting antisemitism and Islamophobia

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Palestinian Canadian Suzan Harb about her family's harrowing journey out of Gaza, science journalist Jay Ingram projects how we'll live in the future, Sam Adler-Bell explores the rise of "statementese" online, champion runner Caster Semenya reflects on being at the centre of debates around gender in sports, Deborah Lyons and Amira Elghawaby talk about the rise of antisemitism and Islamophobia since the start of the Israel-Hamas war. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 38 minutes, 37 seconds
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Runner Caster Semenya says she's not done fighting for the right to compete

She has two Olympic golds and four podium finishes at the World Championships. But Caster Semenya can no longer compete in elite competition, all because of what's long defined the middle distance runner more than her athletic achievement: her gender. Semenya has higher testosterone levels than average women, which has made her a lightning rod in conversations around gender in sports for years. Now, she's telling her own story in a memoir called The Race to Be Myself. She joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about being the subject of debate in public and how she's keeping up her fight for all women to be respected and included in sports.
1/1/125 minutes, 46 seconds
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Israel-Hamas temporary ceasefire, Tomson Highway, Online shopping, COP28, The rise of tokens

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The Economist's Gregg Carlstrom about the latest in the Israel-Hamas war, Cree writer Tomson Highway explains the importance of laughter in dark times, The Atlantic's Amanda Mull explains how the tools that should make us more informed shoppers are actually leaving us more confused, Kathryn Harrison and Simon Dalby analyze Canada's climate commitments and the intersection between climate change and conflict, and Rachel O'Dwyer explores what the rise of tokens tells us about money. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 32 minutes, 2 seconds
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Tomson Highway wants us to laugh through dark times

It can be difficult to talk to kids about what's happening in the world – especially when it involves civil unrest, illness and death. But Tomson Highway wants to make it a little easier. The renowned Cree author, musician and playwright joins Piya Chattopadhyay to discuss his new musical children's book, Grand Chief Salamoo Cook is Coming to Town!, and explains why bringing laughter to dark situations can sometimes be the best medicine.
1/1/121 minutes, 24 seconds
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Humanitarian crisis in Gaza, The future of the Israel-Hamas war, That's Puzzling!, Maria Ressa

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Doctors Without Borders Canada executive director Joseph Belliveau about the humanitarian crisis in Gaza, Middle East expert and former Israeli diplomat Joshua Krasna breaks down the dilemmas facing Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as the Israel-Hamas war continues, our Sunday Documentary explores one man's fight to change the law preventing him from getting justice in Newfoundland, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, and Nobel Peace Prize-winning journalist Maria Ressa warns of disinformation's threat to democracy. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 41 minutes, 51 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for December 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are thirteen year old Moss Martin in Colchester County N.S, and host of CBC kid's The Studio K Show, Tony Kim.
1/1/123 minutes, 10 seconds
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American influence amid crises, Adventures in Whiskyland, Emmanuel Jal, Riffing on 'rizz', COP and Shohei Ohtani

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Dartmouth College government professor Stephen G. Brooks about American influence on the world stage amid global crises, our Sunday Documentary follows journalist Adrian Ma's dilemma over a special bottle of whisky, child solider-turned-artist and peace activist Emmanuel Jal shares his insights on conflict and trauma, Stacy Lee Kong, Clifton Cremo, and Chris Turner riff on some of the stories that got people talking this week. Plus: A Christmas story from comedian and satirist Rick Mercer. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 34 minutes, 26 seconds
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Adventures in Whiskyland

In 2016, Toronto journalist and journalism professor Adrian Ma received a special gift from his uncle while visiting Hong Kong – a bottle of whisky distilled in 1952, and released 25 years later to mark Queen Elizabeth's Silver Jubilee. Since then, the whisky enthusiast has grappled with how to honour such a meaningful present and precious piece of whisky history. Ma takes us on a journey to Scotland to discover more about the bottle's story while he contemplates whether to save, drink or sell it, in a documentary produced by CBC's Audio Doc Unit.
1/1/119 minutes, 15 seconds
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Sunday Politics Panel: Dec 17, John Lee Clark,Whats next for the war in Ukraine, Taylor Lorenz, AITA at 10 years

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with columnists Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney about the foreign policy debates and domestic crises defining federal politics, deafblind poet and activist John Lee Clark traces the evolution of Protactile language, global affairs analyst Michael Bociurkiw takes stock of the state of the war in Ukraine, technology columnist Taylor Lorenz looks back on the year's biggest moves in the digital world, and we mark the 10th anniversary of the r/AmItheAsshole Reddit forum. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 40 minutes, 21 seconds
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Protactile communication is 'reinventing everything,' says deafblind poet

Deafblind people are leading a language revolution, and John Lee Clark has written its manifesto. Over the last decade, the poet, author and scholar has been on the frontlines of Protactile – a touch-based language developed and used primarily by people with hearing and vision loss. Clark joins Piya Chattopadhyay, along with interpreter Halene Anderson, to talk about his book Touch the Future, trace the evolution of Protactile, and outline the barrier of distantism that he says keeps deafblind people at an arm's length from the rest of society. A transcript of this conversation is available at https://cbc.ca/1.7060008
1/1/124 minutes, 35 seconds
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Paul Rogers, Oliver Jeffers, Marion Nestle, Yotam Ottolenghi

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Paul Rogers about prospects for peace amid global conflict, author and illustrator Oliver Jeffers shares his vibrant visions for the future, Marion Nestle talks about her pioneering role in food politics, Canadian writers unwrap the narratives folded into dumplings, and top chefs Yotam Ottolenghi and Noor Murad extoll the virtues of your kitchen pantry. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 37 minutes, 32 seconds
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Oliver Jeffers shares his vibrant visions of a better tomorrow

Author and illustrator Oliver Jeffers has inspired a fanbase of kids around the world with his books like How to Catch a Star, The Day the Crayons Quit and Lost and Found. Now, Jeffers is back with a vibrant new book for all ages, which explores the history of humankind and his dreams for a better future. It's called Begin Again, and Piya Chattopadhyay recently spoke with him about it on stage at the Toronto Reference Library's Bram and Bluma Appel Salon.
1/1/126 minutes, 36 seconds
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The year in global affairs, Disney at 100, Susan Orlean, Ed Yong

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with political scientist Bessma Momani and former Canadian diplomat Arif Lalani about the global events that shaped 2023, The Sunday Magazine producer Pete Mitton explores Disney's hold on the world's imagination as the company turns 100, The New Yorker staff writer Susan Orlean talks about what animals can teach us about being human, and Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist Ed Yong reveals the wild world of animal senses.
1/1/11 hour, 33 minutes, 42 seconds
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For 100 years, this Mickey Mouse operation has thrived. Is Disney now losing its magic?

One of the biggest entertainment stories of 2023 was one the world's biggest entertainment companies turning 100. Disney has endured through the decades with its beloved characters, theme parks and technological innovations. As it caps off its centennial, The Sunday Magazine producer Pete Mitton explores how the humble animation studio came to dominate the world’s imagination… and whether the figurative castle it’s built can withstand the changing world around it for another 100 years.
1/1/124 minutes, 11 seconds
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Rising tensions in the Middle East, That's Puzzling!, Economic Outlook, Maya Shankar

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The Economist's Middle East correspondent Gregg Carlstrom about rising tensions in the region, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, economist Jim Stanford forecasts Canada's economic prospects for 2024, and cognitive scientist Maya Shankar explores how we can all weather change better. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 32 minutes, 27 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for January 2024

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Kicking off the new year with a brand new challenge are Bonita Moore, from Shediac, N.B., and the newly-retired host of CBC Radio's Tapestry, Mary Hynes.
1/1/126 minutes, 45 seconds
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Houthi strikes, 'Godmother of AI', Genocide case against Israel, AI's use in hiring

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with the University of Ottawa's Thomas Juneau about the U.S.-U.K. strikes on Houthis in Yemen, we break down the genocide case against Israel at the International Court of Justice, 'Godmother of AI' Fei Fei Li reflects on her groundbreaking work, and investigative journalist Hilke Schellmann unearths how AI is being used to help guide hiring decisions. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 29 minutes, 38 seconds
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'Godmother of AI' on the wonder and worry of the tech she helped create

Fei Fei Li is known in scientific circles as the "Godmother of AI." The Stanford University computer science professor's groundbreaking work teaching computers to "see" and recognize vast data sets laid the groundwork for generative artificial intelligence tools like ChatGPT that are taking the world by storm now. She joins Piya Chattopadhyay to mull over the philosophy and wonder of AI, as well as the growing concerns around it... and to reflect on her journey – from growing up in tough economic circumstances in the United States after emigrating from China, to being at the forefront of a scientific revolution.
1/1/125 minutes, 8 seconds
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State of the NDP, Israeli security, Year of democracy, Anti-war protest in Russia

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with John Ibbitson, Brad Lavigne and Raisa Patel about the challenges and chances marking the road ahead for the NDP, international relations expert Guy Ziv breaks down the relationship between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the country's security community, global politics expert Yascha Mounk talks about the risks democracies will face in the coming year, and our Sunday Documentary explores crackdowns on anti-war protest in Russia. For more, visit https://cbc.ca/sunday.
1/1/11 hour, 36 minutes, 3 seconds
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Sunday Documentary: Sasha's Message

About a month after Russia's war in Ukraine began, artist Sasha Skochilenko walked into a St. Petersburg grocery store and began sticking anti-war messages on the shelves. The act of protest landed her in Russian detention and charged with spreading "false information" about the Russian military. Julia Pagel has followed her journey through the justice system during wartime with Skochilenko's loved ones, who've been advocating for the artist throughout. She shares that story in Sasha's Message, a documentary produced by CBC's Audio Doc Unit.
1/1/127 minutes, 59 seconds
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Sunday Politics Panel, Ira Glass, Israel-Hamas war, Protest law and culture

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney about what awaits MPs as they return to Parliament, This American Life host Ira Glass reflects on his audio legacy, CBC News foreign correspondent Chris Brown brings us the latest on the Israel-Hamas war, law professor Richard Moon outlines the legal landscape of protest in Canada, and journalist Vincent Bevins talks about what makes street movements succeed and fail. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 39 minutes, 7 seconds
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'I'm out for my own fun': Ira Glass on the secret to his success

From layoffs to lack of trust, the main narrative about the news media for years now has been one of doom and gloom. But Ira Glass has bucked the trend. The host and creator of This American Life hasn't just thrived on public radio – he's also helped kick off a profit-turning age of podcasting. With his venerable show approaching its 30th anniversary, Glass speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about his audio legacy, the key to good storytelling, and what he would tell aspiring journalists looking to enter the fray in these turbulent times.
1/1/125 minutes, 55 seconds
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Global conflicts, Jon Ronson, Alberta gender policies, Turkey-Syria earthquake, Aisha Harris

This week on The Sunday Magazine, guest host David Common speaks with Arif Lalani and Bessma Momani about the week in global conflict from the Middle East and Ukraine, podcaster Jon Ronson talks about how COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns helped fuel culture wars, Dr. Bachir Tajaldin reflects on the recovery effort one year after the devastating earthquake in Turkey and Syria, CBC Calgary's Jason Markusoff breaks down Alberta's new gender policies for children and youth, and culture critic Aisha Harris discusses the intersection of identity and entertainment. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 14 minutes, 8 seconds
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Jon Ronson explores how pandemic lockdowns fuelled culture wars

Journalist Jon Ronson has made a career out of challenging orthodoxies and examining the fringes of society, from people who've been publicly shamed, to the American military’s exploration of paranormal tools, and the porn industry. In the newest season of his BBC podcast Things Fell Apart, he tackles the culture wars and how they exploded during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns. Ronson joins David Common to talk about his journalistic approach, and why he thinks curiosity should trump ideology in storytelling.
1/1/124 minutes, 30 seconds
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Canadian telecom, Dr. Jen Gunter, U.S. politics, Morgan Campbell

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The Globe and Mail's Alexandra Posadzki about the battle to control Rogers and how telecom is being reshaped in Canada more broadly, Dr. Jen Gunter debunks menstruation myths, The Washington Post's Toluse Olorunnipa unpacks the wild week in American politics, and sports journalist Morgan Campbell recounts his experience growing up Black in Canada with a family that has deep American roots. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 37 minutes, 12 seconds
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Why we need to talk about periods, full stop

Dr. Jen Gunter is known as the internet’s resident gynecologist for good reason. Famed for taking down those who peddle misinformation and pseudoscience, Dr. Gunter is applying her signature feminist lens to menstruation in her new book, Blood. She joins Piya Chattopadhyay to break down reproductive anatomy, and why our longstanding period of menstrual shame should be replaced with science and evidenced-based research.
1/1/126 minutes, 28 seconds
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The lastest developments in the Middle East, Thats Puzzling!, Navalny and NATO, Lara St. John

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The Economist's Middle East correspondent Gregg Carlstrom about the latest developments in the Israel-Hamas war as Israel gears up for a major land offensive on Rafah, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, journalist Catherine Belton discusses the global impact of the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, Canada's former NATO ambassador Kerry Buck explains the importance of a united NATO, and internationally acclaimed violinist Lara St. John chronicles her fight against abuse in the classical music industry. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 41 minutes, 57 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for February 2024

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing this month are challengers, Nikki Reklitis from Ottawa, ON., and the co-host of CBC Radio's As it Happens, Chris Howden.
1/1/125 minutes, 52 seconds
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Reflecting on two years of war in Ukraine, backlash against DEI initiatives, the Republican primaries, The Sunflower Duo, and winter cities

Frontline reporter Illia Ponomarenko reflects on the early days of the war in Ukraine and how they influenced the course of the conflict in his new memoir, Ijeoma Oluo examines the backlash against Diversity, Equity and Inclusion projects and what it says about the current state of antiracism discussions, David Shribman dissects the Republican primaries, we revisit the story of a Ukrainian refugee finding home in the artistic community of St John's Newfoundland, and our Sunday Documentary explores how Canadians can learn to embrace all of winter's pleasures.
1/1/11 hour, 34 minutes, 8 seconds
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What the backlash against DEI initiatives say about progress in our conversations on anti-racism

In 2020, widespread protests over racial injustice sparked a global conversation and had a ripple effect beyond a street movement – prompting new diversity initiatives from classrooms to boardrooms.But fast forward to today, and those Diversity, Equity and Inclusion projects are under new scrutiny in the corporate world and beyond. Ijeoma Oluo has long been recognized for leading dialogues on race and racism through her writing. Her new book, Be A Revolution examines the importance of highlighting the joys, realities and sometimes invisible nature of activism and what the new backlash against DEI projects say about this moment in antiracism discussions.
1/1/123 minutes, 33 seconds
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Remembering Brian Mulroney, Israel-Hamas war, Mitch Albom, That's Puzzling!

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with political columnists Susan Delacourt, Matt Gurney, and Emilie Nicolas about the legacy of Brian Mulroney, Canada's former Ambassador to Israel Jon Allen weighs in on the latest developments in the Israel-Hamas war, author Mitch Albom examines the nature of truth with new novel The Little Liar, and our monthly brain game, That's Puzzling! returns.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 35 minutes, 55 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for March 2024

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are Stefani Langenegger, host of CBC Saskatchewan's The Morning Edition, and Jim Danahy in Quispamsis, N.B.
1/1/126 minutes, 24 seconds
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Israel-Hamas war, Bruce Poon Tip, Stunts at the Oscars, Killers of the Flower Moon

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Middle East experts Bijan Ahmadi and Nader Hashemi about the latest developments in the Israel-Hamas war, travel businessman Bruce Poon Tip reflects on what responsible tourism means today, our Sunday Documentary spotlights the decades-long effort for stunt workers to get their Oscar due, and author David Grann and Osage National Principal Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear discuss the true story that inspired Martin Scorsese's film Killers of the Flower Moon.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 37 minutes, 35 seconds
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Bruce Poon Tip implores us to see travel as a 'two-way conversation'

Spring break season is seeing many Canadians jet off for sunny vacations. But between climate change and cultural tensions, what does it mean to be a responsible traveller today? Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Bruce Poon Tip about the questions he thinks we should all be asking when it comes to booking that cruise, resort or backpacking trip. The Canadian founder of G Adventures reflects on this critical post-pandemic moment in the travel industry, and why it counts to care about the destinations you're visiting.
1/1/123 minutes, 14 seconds
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Russia's presidential election, A taste of Syrian culture, Online regulation and our digital discourse, Rex Chapman

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Russia reporter Catherine Belton about the country's presidential election and what six more years of Vladimir Putin in power could mean for Russia and the world; Canadian researcher Karen E. Fisher and Zaatari refugee camp resident Mohammad Shwamra discuss a new cookbook that highlights the history and culture of Syrian refugees; tech observers Kate Knibbs, Taylor Owens and Philip Mai offer their analysis on the prospect of a TikTok ban, online harms legislation and Kate Middleton's royal photo bomb; and former NBA star Rex Chapman shares his journey through addiction.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 32 minutes, 28 seconds
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From NBA star to sleeping in his car: Rex Chapman shares journey through addiction

Rex Chapman was one of the NBA's brightest stars when he was drafted in 1988. But by 2014, he was sleeping in his car, addicted to OxyContin, and gambling and shoplifting to fund his addiction. After rehab eventually gave way to recovery, he emerged as a social media star during the pandemic for sharing funny and inspirational videos, and incisive social commentary. Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Chapman about all the highs and lows of his journey, as detailed in his new memoir, It's Hard for Me to Live with Me.
1/1/129 minutes, 38 seconds
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Famine, Christine Blasey Ford, Princess of Wales' cancer diagnosis, Moscow attack, Authoritarian leaders

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with researcher Alex de Waal about the impact famine has on people and societies, Christine Blasey Ford reflects on her decision to testify of alleged sexual assault against Brett Kavanaugh, former CBC News London bureau chief Ann MacMillan breaks down reaction to the Princess of Wales' cancer diagnosis, Bruce Hoffman unpacks the Moscow concert hall attack, and journalist Steve Coll explores what Saddam Hussein's secret tapes reveal about dealing with authoritarian leaders today.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 27 minutes, 12 seconds
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Christine Blasey Ford's testimony against Kavanaugh made her a target. But she would do it again

In 2018, Christine Blasey Ford stood before a United States Senate Judiciary Committee and testified that she was sexually assaulted in high school by then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who denied the allegation. Her story sparked a media frenzy, with some casting her as a trailblazing women's rights advocate and others questioning her credibility and motivations. In a Canadian exclusive interview, Blasey Ford speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about her road to speaking out and the aftermath of her testimony, as explored in her memoir One Way Back.Read more about this story at https://www.cbc.ca/1.7152943
1/1/121 minutes, 52 seconds
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Carbon tax, Police reform, NATO at 75, Hala Gorani

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with climate policy columnist Adam Radwanski and Parliament Hill reporter Stephanie Taylor about the prospects and politics of the carbon tax, retired superintendent Keith Merith offers his vision for police reform, defence experts Joel Sokolsky, and Richard Shimooka size up Canada's role in NATO as the alliance turns 75, and storied journalist Hala Gorani shares her lifelong quest for belonging.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 33 minutes, 51 seconds
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Storied news anchor Hala Gorani shares her lifelong search for belonging

For three decades, anchor and correspondent Hala Gorani has reported on conflict and displacement around the world for outlets including CNN and NBC. Along the way, she's also grappled with her own sense of belonging, as the kid of Syrians, raised in the United States and France, who globe trots to tell other people's stories. She joins Piya Chattopadhyay to discuss what she's learned about identity on that journey, as explored in her memoir But You Don't Look Arab.
1/1/126 minutes, 7 seconds
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Week in politics, Linguistic distinctions, Aid worker risks, That's Puzzling!, Solar eclipse

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Toronto Star columnist Susan Delacourt and The Line's Matt Gurney to break down the week in Canadian politics, writer and humourist Eli Burnstein talks about the value of understanding fine distinctions in everyday langauge, humanitarian policy researcher Abby Stoddard discusses the threats facing aid workers in Gaza, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, and host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks Bob McDonald unpacks the science, mythology and magic of Monday's solar eclipse.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 35 minutes, 8 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for April 2024

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are Saroja Coelho, host of Mornings on CBC Music and Just Asking on CBC Radio, as well as Vancouver listener Peter McGregor.
1/1/123 minutes, 38 seconds
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Iran attack, Fran Lebowitz, Housing promises, Donald Trump's first criminal trial

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The Economist Middle East correspondent Gregg Carlstrom about tensions between Iran and Israel, humourist and public speaker Fran Lebowitz opines on the art of conversation, economist Mike Moffatt explores how far the federal Liberals' pre-budget promises may go toward fixing Canada's housing crisis, and lawyer and Slate journalist Dahlia Lithwick tees up Donald Trump's first criminal trial.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 29 minutes, 57 seconds
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Fran Lebowitz is offline, and she wants to stay there

For decades, Fran Lebowitz has earned fans and fuelled ire for sharing her opinion on... well, just about everything. Ahead of her latest speaking event in Toronto, the writer, humourist and public speaker joins Piya Chattopadhyay to share what's on her mind lately, from the spread of disinformation, to why she doesn't suffer FOMO [fear of missing out] as someone who's got no time for the internet, and why she'd make a great mayor of her beloved New York.
1/1/123 minutes, 51 seconds
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David Sanger, Aging parents, Roméo Dallaire, India's election

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with veteran New York Times White House and national security correspondent David Sanger about the era of "new cold wars" shaping our world today, CanAge CEO Laura Tamblyn Watts walks through ways families can talk to aging parents about plans for the future, retired Canadian Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire reflects on the political and personal legacy of the Rwandan genocide 30 years on, and Foreign Policy editor-in-chief Ravi Agrawal breaks down what's at stake for the world as India's election gets underway.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 34 minutes, 34 seconds
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Tired of truces, Roméo Dallaire appeals for 'lasting peace'

This month marks 30 years since the genocide in Rwanda led to the deaths of more than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus in one of the worst massacres of the 20th century. But even though Rwanda has largely recovered, retired Canadian Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire says the world hasn't learned the lessons from that time to prevent future wars and mass atrocities. The former commander of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Rwanda tells Chattopadhyay about his own mental health journey over the last three decades and why he's so disappointed in the international community – including Canada – for letting conflicts around the world spiral out of control.
1/1/126 minutes, 1 second
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Campus protests, AI in elections, Amazon's rise, Black history education

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The New York Times national education reporter Alan Blinder about the Israel-Hamas war protests roiling school campuses, Craig Desson from CBC's Audio Doc Unit unpacks the powers and perils of AI in elections, Wall Street Journal reporter Dana Mattioli traces Amazon's rise to dominance, and Dalhousie University historian Afua Cooper discusses her mission to fill gaps in Black history education in Canada.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 28 minutes, 55 seconds
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How big is too big? Amazon's omnipresence earns success – and scrutiny

If you bought anything online recently, there's a good chance you shopped on Amazon. The tech giant's success has made it synonymous with e-commerce. But it's also long faced scrutiny over its business practices. Now, Amazon is facing a lawsuit from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, accusing it of illegally protecting a monopoly over online retail. The company denies the allegations. Wall Street Journal reporter Dana Mattioli has been covering Amazon for years. Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with her about how Amazon became the behemoth it is today, as explored in her book The Everything War: Amazon's Ruthless Quest to Own Everything and Remake Corporate Power.
1/1/121 minutes, 27 seconds
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Week in politics, A.J. Jacobs, Jen Psaki, That's Puzzling!

Host Piya Chattopadhyay breaks down the week in politics with columnists Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney, writer A.J. Jacobs shares what he learned living by an originalist reading of the U.S. Constitution for a year, ex-White House press secretary Jen Psaki reflects on media and politics, and we play another round of our monthly brain game That's Puzzling!Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 38 minutes, 21 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! For May 2024

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are The Fifth Estate co-host Steven D'Souza and listener Jo Mather from Sydenham, Ont.
1/1/123 minutes, 10 seconds
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Israel-Hamas war, Plant intelligence, Canada-India tensions, American working class voters, Mother's Day

Guest host David Common speaks with The Economist Middle East correspondent Gregg Carlstrom about another dynamic week in the Israel-Hamas war, science and environment journalist Zoë Schlanger shines a light on the latest research around plant intelligence, CBC News senior reporter Evan Dyer shares his latest reporting about the killing of Sikh activist Hardeep Singh Nijjar, our Sunday Documentary explores the role working class voters in Michigan may play in the U.S. election, and we trace the origin of Mother's Day.Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 32 minutes, 34 seconds
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Sunday Documentary: Detroit Takes the Wheel

In this American election year, Michigan is once again a must-win state. And whether it swings to Joe Biden or Donald Trump may again come down to the wants of its blue collar workers in industries like auto and steel. They're traditionally Democrats, but since Trump came on the scene, many have chosen to vote Republican. The Sunday Magazine producer Pete Mitton travels to Detroit to hear what's on workers' minds, and finds there's a new issue adding to the uncertain outcome this fall: EVs
1/1/124 minutes, 19 seconds
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Fort McMurray fires, Ali Velshi, Jeff Rubin, Rethinking 'pests'

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Fort McMurray, Alta. residents new and old about their experiences with with wildfires, Canadian MSNBC correspondent Ali Velshi shares how his family's journey shaped his path in journalism, economist Jeff Rubin makes the case that inflation and sanctions are reshaping the global economic order, and science journalist Bethany Brookshire reflects on why we label some animals "pests."Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 34 minutes, 9 seconds
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How Canadian journalist Ali Velshi's values propelled him to the top tier of American journalism

In his new book, Small Acts of Courage, MSNBC's chief correspondent Ali Velshi argues that working for social justice and in public service is the most important part of his and his family's history because, as he writes, "democracy isn't democracy unless it's universal." Velshi, whose family came to Canada from India via South Africa and Kenya, joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about the meaning of citizenship, his family's journey, and the role journalism should play in a healthy democracy.
1/1/129 minutes, 17 seconds
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Pressure on Israel, Justin Trudeau's trajectory, Niigaan Sinclair's Winnipeg, Posture history

Guest host David Common speaks with political analyst Dahlia Scheindlin about how recent international court developments are playing out in Israeli society amid the war with Hamas, political journalist Stephen Maher charts the turbulent trajectory of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, columnist and Indigenous studies professor Niigaan Sinclair explores how Winnipeg helps tell the story of Canada, and medical historian Beth Linker sets the record straight on posture.Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 31 minutes, 42 seconds
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How Winnipeg helps tell the story of Canada

It's been dubbed Canada's coldest city, poorest city and even most racist city. But also: chill, artsy and the best city in our country to raise a family. Most importantly to Niigaan Sinclair, though... Winnipeg is home. The columnist and Indigenous studies professor joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about his new essay collection Wînipêk, which marries his personal stories of Winnipeg with reflections on how the city helps tell the story of Canada.
1/1/130 minutes, 52 seconds
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Donald Trump's guilty verdict, Global supply chain, Marty Baron, That's Puzzling!

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with The Washington Post's White House Bureau Chief Toluse "Tolu" Olorunnipa about what Donald Trump's guilty verdict could mean in this election year, the Canadian Anti-Hate Network's Bernie Farber reflects on recent attacks at Canadian Jewish institutions, we present Chattopadhyay's on-stage conversation with former Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron about his storied career, and we play another round of our monthly brain game That's Puzzling!
1/1/11 hour, 31 minutes, 43 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for June 2024

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are stand-up comic and host of CBC Radio's Laugh Out Loud, Ali Hassan, and Halifax listener Katie McCulloch.
1/1/127 minutes, 41 seconds
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The week in global affairs, Golf politics, How to save local news

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Arif Lalani and Jennifer Welsh about the week in global affairs, BBC golf correspondent Iain Carter explores how a battle in the golf world is shaking up the sport and transcending the green, and we present an on-stage conversation with journalists April Lindgren, Mohsin Abbas, Juanita Taylor, and Nicholas Hune-Brown about the vital role of local news – and new ideas emerging to enhance it.Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 37 minutes, 45 seconds
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Why local news in Canada matters — and what some people are doing to try to save it

Over the past two decades, hundreds of local radio, television, print, and online news outlets have shuttered in communities across Canada. But some people and projects are also offering hope for the future of local news in our country. For the latest installment in the series Trust Talks – an ongoing CBC initiative that aims to engage in meaningful conversations about the future of journalism – Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with journalists from a variety of backgrounds about the vital role that local news plays, the challenges and rewards of telling local stories, and new ideas and strategies emerging to enhance local journalism.The guests featured in this discussion are April Lindgren, a professor at Toronto Metropolitan University's School of Journalism and the principal investigator of the Local News Research Project; Mohsin Abbas, the publisher of Diversity Reporter Media Inc., which publishes four community newspapers in Southwestern Ontario; CBC News Senior Reporter Juanita Taylor, who covers Canada's North; and Nicholas Hune-Brown, executive editor of the Toronto online magazine The Local.Their conversation took place at the Canadian Association of Journalists' national annual conference in Toronto.
1/1/152 minutes, 19 seconds
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Immigration attitudes, Global supply chain, Ukraine's draft measures, Breast politics

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Toronto Star immigration reporter Nicholas Keung and University of Toronto political science associate professor Phil Triadafilopoulos about changing attitudes towards immigration in Canada and beyond, The New York Times global economy reporter Peter S. Goodman outlines the risks facing the global supply chain, our Sunday Documentary explores how Ukraine's new draft measures are sparking tensions for people inside and outside the country, and sociologist Sarah Thornton uncovers the power and politics of breasts.Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1/1/11 hour, 31 minutes, 6 seconds
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Why making mistakes can help make your career

Can a massive screw-up lead someone to success? Radio host Terry O'Reilly's book, My Best Mistake, proves it's possible. In it, he shares stories of epic fails that turned into epic wins. From Jaws to Swanson TV dinners, he speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about all of the mistakes that led to some of the biggest breakthroughs, beloved products, and changed lives – and the world – as we know it.
18 minutes, 30 seconds
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How to be an adult, Jerry Saltz, Terry O'Reilly, A Canadian musical mystery

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Stanford University's former Dean of Freshmen Julie Lythcott-Haims about how to be an adult – no matter your age, Jerry Saltz reflects on his winding road to finding his voice in art criticism, radio host Terry O'Reilly shares stories of big mistakes that led to major success, and producer Pete Mitton unearths the tale of Canada's first-ever music copyright case. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 39 minutes
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How 'Doom' creator John Romero shaped video games and culture at large

Video game legend John Romero opens up about his tumultuous upbringing and how he went on to make his mark on the video game industry by pioneering the first-person shooter genre through games like Wolfenstein 3D, Doom and Quake. He joins Rebecca Zandbergen to talk about his new memoir, Doom Guy: Life in First Person, and how the video game industry has changed and shaped culture at large — from the relationship between fictional and real-world violence, to the conception of video games as an art.
20 minutes, 38 seconds
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Canada's housing crisis, John Romero, The legacy of Pat John, Temple Grandin

Guest host Rebecca Zandbergen speaks with Andy Yan and Alex Bozikovic about the federal government's role in solving Canada's housing crisis, Doom and Quake creator John Romero reflects on how video games have changed culture, CBC's Duncan McCue shares his documentary about The Beachcombers actor Pat John, and scientist and autism activist Temple Grandin makes her case for nurturing visual thinkers like her. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 41 minutes, 40 seconds
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Frances Haugen says it’s time for accountability from tech giants

Between Canada's Online News Act, Donald Trump's recent indictment tied to the Jan.6 riots and increasing worries over harm, our relationship with social media and big tech companies is more complicated than ever. Frances Haugen, the former Facebook employee who blew the whistle on the company by disclosing thousands of internal documents joins Zandbergen to talk about the standoff between Meta and the Canadian government over Bill C-18 and what she think needs to happen to hold big tech to account.
29 minutes, 47 seconds
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The wildfire evacuation in Yellowknife, George Saunders, Seeking accoutibility from big tech, The basketball game, The origin of naval mottos

The latest on wildfires in NWT and B.C., a conversation with short story master George Saunders, Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen on Bill C-18 and how Canada is navigating the impact of big tech, a documentary about a summer camp basketball game that changed lives, and a new installment our language segment, Word Processing. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 41 minutes, 40 seconds
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Are the radical roots of plant-based eating erased when meatless cuisine goes mainstream?

From a hippie commune’s brown rice and tofu, to a fast food chain’s bleeding vegan patty – plant-based cuisine has come a long way in North America. Alicia Kennedy’s new book, No Meat Required, traces the histories of subculture that have defined alternative food. The food and culture writer talks to guest host Rebecca Zandbergen about why the radical roots of meat-free dining are a key ingredient to a new and critical climate-conscious way of eating.
21 minutes, 9 seconds
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Environmentalist Bill McKibben, politics of plant-based eating, Taylor and Ticketmaster, Goodreads, Bianca Andreescu

Guest host Rebecca Zandbergen is joined by environmentalist Bill McKibben to discuss what our response should be to this summer's climate disasters, food writer Alicia Kennedy looks at the history of plant-based food politics, and panel unpacks Taylor Swift's cultural impact, Plus, we examine the Goodreads controvery and revisist Piya's 2022 interview with tennis star Bianca Andreescu. Find more at at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 36 minutes, 21 seconds
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How navigating vision loss gave one man a new view of blindness

As a teen, Andrew Leland was diagnosed with a hereditary eye disease that develops progressively. Now, in middle age, the journalist and audio producer describes himself as "near the end of sight." In his memoir The Country of the Blind, Leland reflects on his lifelong journey of vision loss and grapples with his identity, as he straddles sightedness and blindness. He joins Megan Williams to talk about how his experience taught him that blindness is not a binary.
25 minutes, 29 seconds
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Trump's indictment, A journey through vision loss, Russian journalist Mikhail Zygar, Anti-Black racism in North America

Guest host Megan Williams speaks with political scientist Rob Goodman about how the state of American democracy affects Canada, writer Andrew Leland shares the lessons he's learned from his journey of vision loss, journalist Mikhail Zygar traces the historical roots of Russia's war in Ukraine, and race politics scholar Debra Thompson probes the nuances of anti-Black racism in Canada. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 33 minutes, 1 second
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These 'tenacious beasts' are clawing their way back from extinction

The biodiversity crisis is very real and very dire. But University of Montana environmental philosopher Christopher Preston wants to draw our attention to some positive developments in the world of wildlife. He calls them "tenacious beasts" – the whales, bears, bison, otters, and beyond that have faced extinction in the eye, and made remarkable comebacks. Some have had help from humans, while others have done it on their own. And Preston says they should all give us hope for bringing more species back from the brink. He joins Megan Williams to talk about his book Tenacious Beasts: Wildlife Recoveries that Change How We Think about Animals.
25 minutes, 6 seconds
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Justin Trudeau's cabinet shuffle, Wildlife recovery, Mapping the ocean floor, Christine Sinclair

Guest host Megan Williams is joined by journalists Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney to break down Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's cabinet shuffle, environmental philosopher Christopher Preston highlights animal species that have clawed back from the brink of extinction, ocean journalist Laura Trethewey unpacks the scientific and business interests in mapping the seafloor, and we revisit Piya Chattopadhyay's conversation with Canadian soccer superstar Christine Sinclair as Team Canada fights to continue on in the women's World Cup. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 33 minutes, 21 seconds
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Hitting the brakes on the notion that travel transforms us

Be honest, do you ever really want to hear about someone else’s vacation? Agnes Callard argues that we have falsely imbued travel with a sense of virtue... and the fact that you privately zone out when hearing about a friend’s overseas adventure is proof that travel is not the transformative, metamorphic experience it’s commonly framed to be. The philosopher joins Megan Williams to make her case, as she first laid out in a viral and divisive essay for The New Yorker, and to reflect on the greater value of contrarian takes and public debate.
23 minutes, 25 seconds
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Extreme heat, The history of ice, A case against travel, Barbie's feminist roots, Gogol Bordello's Eugene Hütz

Guest host Megan Williams unpacks heat's unique role in the broader picture of climate change with science writer Jeff Goodell, environmental writer Amy Brady outlines how ice revolutionized the world, philosopher Agnes Callard makes her case against travel, M.G. Lord explains how Barbie has variously mirrored and clashed with broader culture, and Gogol Bordello's Eugene Hütz talks about music as a form of resistance. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 39 minutes, 51 seconds
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Relishing the cultural and historical impact of hot dogs with Jamie Loftus

Whether it’s a Montreal steamie, Japadog from Vancouver or Toronto street meat – hot dogs have long been a summertime classic. In the summer of 2021, the pursuit of the perfect hot dog took Jamie Loftus across the U.S in a quest to find the top dog. The comedian and podcaster speaks to guest host Megan Williams about her journey exploring the origins of the humble dog, including its impact on the labour movement and North American culture.She’ll tell you why you should never ask for ketchup on your hot dog in Chicago, and what state favours SpaghettiOs as a topping!
20 minutes, 34 seconds
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Mayor Olivia Chow, How hotdogs impact culture, Jacob Mikanowski, Beverly Glen-Copeland, 40 years of the Dream in High Park

Guest host Megan Williams talks to Mayor Olivia Chow about her vision for Canada's biggest city, Jamie Loftus outlines the cultural impact of the hotdog, Jacob Mikanowski ruminates on the rich history of eastern europe, we revisit our conversation with musician Beverly Glen-Copeland, and Guy Sprung remenisces on 40 years of The Dream in High Park. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 37 minutes, 6 seconds
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Focus on the 'slow times' to see life amid wartime, says Afghan writer

The image of Afghanistan that we tend to see in the news is one of constant conflict. But Toronto-based writer Jamaluddin Aram is out to show another side of life during wartime. His debut novel Nothing Good Happens in Wazirabad on a Wednesday showcases everyday life in an Afghan neighbourhood amid the country’s civil war in the 1990s. He joins David Common to discuss how his own childhood in Kabul influenced the book, and why he wanted to show how life in Afghanistan is as full as anywhere else in the world.
22 minutes, 36 seconds
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Saving Canada's news industry, Baseball's pitch clock, Migrants and precarious work, Jamaluddin Aram

Guest host David Common unpacks how job cuts, concentration and the Online News Act are shaping our media landscape with Kevin Newman, Vass Bendar, and Sue Gardner, producer Pete Mitton considers the impact baseball's pitch clock has on the game and what it says about our relationship with time, Mostafa Henaway explores how immigrant workers are treated in Canada, and Afghan writer Jamaluddin Aram shows a different side of life during wartime in his debut novel Nothing Good Happens in Wazirabad on a Wednesday. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 29 minutes, 42 seconds
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Exploring art, history and belonging through the lens of the Tibetan diaspora

In April 2012, New York's Rubin Museum of Art – which specializes in Himalayan regions – had an unnamed 15th century mudstone statue on display. It seemed to depict a mythic Buddhist figure from Tibet, but it was nameless and devoid of a backstory. When writer Tsering Yangzom Lama looked at the icon, she saw a symbol of all that's been lost for those who fled Tibet — an autonomous region in China that it claims as part of its territory, but that many Tibetans have claimed as independent for centuries. The statue also inspired Lama's debut novel, We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies, an intergenerational story of a Tibetan family in exile. Lama walks Piya Chattopadhyay through her work of fiction, set between refugee settlements and one of the world's largest Tibetan diasporas: Toronto.
21 minutes, 52 seconds
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Adam Gopnik, Tsering Yangzom Lama, Ali Hassan, Kevin Lambert, Book cover art

Guest host David Common brings you The Sunday Magazine's Canadian summer reading guide: The New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik reflects on the meaning of mastery, Tsering Yangzom Lama explores art, history and belonging through the lens of the Tibetan diaspora, comedian Ali Hassan shares his struggle to understand who he is in relation to his Muslim-Pakistani heritage, Kevin Lambert explains how his upbringing in Saguenay, Que. shaped his daring debut novel, and we dig into the process of creating book cover art. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 37 minutes, 13 seconds
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Editor Landon Jones helped create our celebrity-obsessed culture. Now he regrets it.

As the former managing editor of People magazine, Landon Jones helped create the celebrity-obsessed culture we live in today. And now he has some serious misgivings. Celebrities, he says, used to be famous for their accomplishments. Today they're famous… for being famous. He joins David Common to talk about the history and psychology of celebrity – from Alexander the Great to Kim Kardashian – and why he says one of the worst things that can happen to anyone today, is to become famous.
22 minutes, 22 seconds
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Conflict in Russia, Future of city livability, Social media and kids' mental health, The costs of fame

Guest host David Common explores the implications of the conflict between the Wagner Group private militia and Russia's military with The Washington Post reporter Mary Ilyushina, urban development experts Alkarim Devani, Murtaza Haider and Andy Yan discuss the future of city livability, psychologist Jean Twenge warns about social media's impact on kids' mental health, former People editor Landon Jones charts the rise of celebrity culture he helped create, and we revisit the historic feats of Canadian jockey Ron Turcotte and the thoroughbred horse Secretariat. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 36 minutes, 23 seconds
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Are we alone in the universe? Why asking the question matters as much as answering it

As long as we've looked up into the starlit sky, people have wondered: Are we alone in the universe? And it’s a question that science takes seriously too, with NASA holding its first ever public meetings into its investigation of UFO reports earlier this spring. Still, given the vastness of the universe, there’s a good chance we’ll never know the answer. But science writer and author of The Possibility of Life, Jaime Green, says it’s still an important question to ask, because it teaches us much about ourselves. She joins guest host David Common to talk about the cutting edge science behind the search for extraterrestrial life... and Star Trek too.
20 minutes, 25 seconds
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Manitoba collision, The week in politics, Michelle Good, Art and representation, The search for extraterrestrial life

Guest host David Common speaks with CBC Senior Reporter Sam Samson about the latest on Thursday's deadly collision in southwestern Manitoba, Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney break down the political controversy surrounding Paul Bernardo's prison transfer and the fallout from David Johnston’s resignation as special rapporteur on foreign interference, Jaime Green walks through the cutting edge science behind the search for extraterrestrial life, Michelle Good shares the conversations she thinks we should be having about Indigenous life in Canada, Mark and Sam Pupo invite us into their kitchen to celebrate Father's Day, and Aisha Harris reflects on the intersection of identity and entertainment through pop culture. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 42 minutes, 7 seconds
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Peter Singer on the new frontier of animal liberation

It's been nearly 50 years since philosopher and ethicist Peter Singer published the book Animal Liberation, which helped to define the animal rights movement as we know it today, by suggesting the rights of humans and animals should be given equal consideration. He’s just released an update, Animal Liberation Now. He joins guest host David Common to discuss how the animal rights movement has evolved, and where it needs to go next.
23 minutes, 18 seconds
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Trudeau's surprise Ukraine visit, What will NATO support for Ukraine look like?, Peter Singer, Air quality and health concerns, How A.I impacts human ethics, Jody Rosen's bicycle history

Margaret Evans reports on Trudeau's surprise Ukraine trip and Catherine Belton discusses NATO's long term goals there, Peter Singer talks about the impact of his book Animal Liberation nearly 50 years on, Dr. Melissa Lem looks at the short and long term risks posed by poor air quality, Peter Mitton explores how AI can compromise our ethics, and Jody Rosen shares the history of the bicycle. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 38 minutes, 45 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for June 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, guest host David Common competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this week are Andrew Preville of Kelowna, B.C., and Marcy Markusa, the host of the CBC WInnipeg morning show, Information Radio.
21 minutes, 46 seconds
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The pushback against LGBTQ+ acceptance in Canada, Kira Yarmysh, The changing risk of wildfires in Canada, That's Puzzling!, The role of animals in conflict

Guest host David Common speaks to Justin Ling, Syrus Marcus Ware and Rachel Giese about the pushback against LGBTQ+ acceptance as Pride season kicks off, Alexei Navalny's press secretary explains why he's facing more jail time, fire expert Mike Flannigan discusses how to improve wildfire management, That's Puzzling! is back, and so is the white whale supspected of being a Russian spy; Gervase Phillips uncovers the history of animal espionage. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 30 minutes, 3 seconds
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How parking explains the world

It's something every driver can relate to — that feeling of elation that comes from finding the perfect parking spot and the utter deflation at being unable to find one at all. Slate writer Henry Grabar says parking isn't just a mundane chore or frequent frustration - it can actually tell us a lot about our cities, our pscyhes and our culture. He joins guest host Robyn Bresnahan to talk about his new book, Paved Paradise: How Parking Explains the World.
26 minutes, 48 seconds
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Election-eve in Alberta, Michelle Min Sterling on her debut novel Camp Zero, how parking explains the world and how plagues explain our history

Naheed Nenshi and Ryan Jespersen tee up the Alberta election, author Michelle Min Sterling discusses her debut novel Camp Zero, Slate writer Henry Grabar reveals how parking explains the world and sociologist Jonathan Kennedy charts the history of human plagues. Plus, the Pulitzer prize-winning poet whose work has a hint about the series finale of Succession.
1 hour, 36 minutes, 11 seconds
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Colleen Jones on her sweeping careers on and off the ice

Colleen Jones has appeared on Canadian television screens for decades. As a broadcaster, she started out covering the supper hour sports beat, went to many Olympic Games and blazed a trail for other women sportscasters. As a curler, she's been a champion for decades, winning her first national title at the age of 22 and then coming back to win the Scotties Tournament of Hearts five more times. Last month Jones retired from broadcasting. She joins guest host Robyn Bresnahan to talk about her sweeping career, and what lies ahead.
24 minutes, 29 seconds
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How the Ottawa Senators became a hot property, what happened to the centre in Alberta poltiics, the legacy of Martin Amis, Colleen Jones relfects on a sweeping career

Donovan Bailey reveals why he's part of a bid to buy the Ottawa Senator and sports writer Ian Mendes unpacks why the team is such a hot proptery, producer John Chipman visits Alberta to look for the middle ground before the province's election, long time CBC journalist Colleen Jones reflects on her sweeping careers in curling and broadcasting, and we remember celebrated British author Martin Amis. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 32 minutes, 44 seconds
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Does the 'Godfather of AI' think he's created a monster?: 'A little bit. Yes'

Geoffrey Hinton, the British-Canadian computer scientist who left his post at Google this month to sound the alarm about AI’s threat to humanity, says he knows he’s scaring people with his predictions. He hopes he’s scaring politicians into doing something. In a wide-ranging interview with guest host Robyn Bresnahan, Hinton also offers some hope: Humanity has survived some big threats before, like nuclear weapons, but only by taking them seriously and getting to work on solutions.
24 minutes, 58 seconds
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Canada-China relations, balancing motherhood and work, Alberta's wildfire emergency, the 'Godfather of AI', the case for talking about class

Guest host Robyn Bresnahan is joined by journalists Nathan VanderKlippe and Janyce McGregor who analyze growing tensions between Canada and China, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks about juggling motherhood and work in her new memoir, we take stock of the wildfire situation in Alberta, the 'Godfather of AI', Geoffrey Hinton warns of the danger it poses, and author Deborah Dundas makes the case for more open conversations about class. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 39 minutes, 35 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for May 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling! Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this month are Shirra Wall of Nanaimo, B.C., and Elamin Abdelmahmoud, the host of Commotion on CBC Radio.
22 minutes, 10 seconds
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King Charles's coronation, Re-thinking crime reporting, Workplace culture at CSIS, That's Puzzling!

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with CBC's former London bureau chief Ann MacMillan about the coronation of King Charles III and how he'll shape the monarchy going forward, former crime reporter Tamara Cherry makes the case for overhauling how the media approaches crime coverage, former CSIS intelligence officer Huda Mukbil explores her fight against racism and bullying within Canada's spy agency, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, and we take a look at the newly-minted King Charles III coin. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 34 minutes, 49 seconds
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Former Buzzfeed News head Ben Smith reflects on the outlet's rise and fall and the current media maelstrom

The past few weeks have seen news headlines dominated by people who usually deliver them, with the unexpected exits of big-name TV hosts, Twitter clashing with media outlets, Fox News settling a $787-million dollar lawsuit and Buzzfeed News bidding adieu. Ben Smith, the former Buzzfeed News editor-in-chief and former media columnist for the New York TImes joins Piya Chattopadhyay to weigh in on the fallout. In his new book Traffic: Genius, Rivalry, and Delusion in the Billion-Dollar Race to Go Viral, Smith looks back at the forces that shaped the media moment we're now all living through.
27 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ben Smith on the current media maelstrom, author Lizzie Stark on the history of eggs, The Sunday Politics Panel and Inuk scholar Norma Dunning

Host Piya Chattopadyay talks to former Buzzfeed News head and Semafor founder Ben Smith about the current media maelstrom and his latest book, Lizzie Stark cracks open her new book of essays on the cultural history of eggs, our Sunday Politics Panel parses the PSAC strike, Bill C-11 and the reponse to the Sudan crisis and Inuk scholar Norma Dunning shares how the 'disc system' disrupted Inuit culture. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 35 minutes, 4 seconds
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Test driving the promise of EV pickup trucks as they roll out on Canadian roads

The 2035 deadline to electrify Canadian vehicles is looming, and drivers of Canada's most loved, and sometimes hated, vehicles are finally getting EV options. In his documentary, producer Pete Mitton kicks the tires of the first generation of electric pickups, to find out how they measure up - both in the eyes of traditional pickup truck owners, and against the promise that they'll be better for the planet.
24 minutes, 17 seconds
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PSAC and the state of labour unions, the power of trees, Canada's Chief Nursing Officer, the promise of EV pickups and the case for browing

What the PSAC srike reveals about the state of labour unions, author Peter Wohlleben makes the case for leaving forests alone to fight climate change, we meet Canada's Chief Nursing Officer Leigh Chapman, find out why browsing is good for the soul, and producer Pete Mitton road test drives the promise of EV pick trucks as they hit the market. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 38 minutes, 4 seconds
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Temple Grandin says the education system isn't making space for visual thinkers like her

We've come a long way in understanding autism since scientist and inventor Temple Grandin was first diagnosed with it back in the 1950s. And that's thanks in large part to her advocacy and research. But at age 75, Grandin says that despite our gains in embracing neurodiversity, too many "visual thinkers" like her are being let down by education systems that put too much stress on algebra, and too little on shop class. The renowned autism activist sits down with Piya Chattophadhyay to talk about why it's important to society that the next generation of inventors and visual thinkers are not left behind.
22 minutes, 11 seconds
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Temple Grandin, Banning TikTok, The state of labour, Basketball and Black culture

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with President Joe Biden's former tech advisor Tim Wu about the case for banning TikTok, scientist and autism activist Temple Grandin warns education systems are leaving visual thinkers like her behind, economist Jim Stanford takes stock of the labour movement amid strike votes and stubborn inflation, historian Theresa Runstedtler talks about how Black players from the 1970s shaped basketball, and producer Craig Desson shares the story of a Montreal man on a mission to preserve film projectors. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 40 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ari Shapiro on the power of stories when the world feels disconnected

Ari Shapiro is one of the hosts of National Public Radio's flagship news show All Things Considered. He's spent his career reporting from around the world and building bridges between audiences through storytelling. Now, Shapiro is sharing some of his most meaningful experiences in a new memoir called The Best Strangers in the World. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to exchange tales from the road and discuss why he thinks journalism has an increasingly essential role to play in fostering connection and community in divisive times.
23 minutes, 58 seconds
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Remembering Gordon Pinsent

Legendary Canadian actor Gordon Pinsent died Saturday, February 25 at the age of 92. A native of Grand Falls, Newfoundland, he started acting in the 1940s as a teenager. Pinsent had more than 150 film and TV credits to his name and was a lead player at the Stratford Festival for many years. Among other accolades, he won five Gemini awards and three Genie awards for roles, including 2001's The Shipping News and Sarah Polley's 2006 film, Away From Her. Fellow Newfoundlanders Mark Critch and Mary Walsh who both acted with Pinsent and called him a friend, join host Piya Chattopadhyay to share personal and professional memories of him and to talk about his legacy on and off the screen and stage. 
18 minutes, 45 seconds
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US President Biden's visit to Ottawa, Word Processing: The exclamation mark's rich history, Pro-paraclimber Maureen Beck, Author Premee Mohamed, The wonders of awe

Guest host David Common discusses U.S. President Joe Biden's visit to Ottawa with journalists Susan Delacourt and Marieke Walsh, Author Florence Hazrat explores the history of the exclamation mark, former world champion paraclimber Maureen Beck shares her journey into the world of professional climbing, Alberta author Premee Mohamed reveals how climate change informs her fiction, and we explore the latest research on awe and why it's a more powerful and important force than you might think. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 37 minutes, 5 seconds
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The fiction of finding closure and other lessons from Booker Prize-winning author Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan's new novel Lessons follows the life of one man over several decades and asks how we value our experiences, how we understand trauma – and how all of it changes over time. The Booker Prize-winning author joins Piya Chattopadhyay to discuss how we tell our own stories, and why he took a page from his own life and family experience to craft this one.
29 minutes, 36 seconds
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Reforming the RCMP, Maria Ressa, Donald Trump's indictment, That's Puzzling!

Host Piya Chattopadhyay is joined by Eli Sopow, Pam Palmater, and Jane Gerster to discuss the future of the RCMP and what real change needs to look like in the wake of the Mass Casualty Commission's final report, Slate's Dahlia Lithwick explains the significance of the indictment of former U.S. President Donald Trump, Nobel Peace Prize-winning journalist Maria Ressa rings the alarm about disinformation's threat to democracy, and our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 34 minutes, 55 seconds
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What's next for the war in Ukraine, Reporter Maggie Haberman, Author John Irving, Memes and democracy

Guest host David Common dissects the next phase of the war in Ukraine with global affairs analyst Michael Bociurkiw, researchers Joan Donovan and Emily Dreyfuss reveal how internet memes can disrupt democracy, New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman ruminates on the making of Donald Trump, and author John Irving discusses why he's drawn to stories about LGBTQ characters and women's rights. Discover more at http://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 30 minutes, 39 seconds
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David Suzuki, Ari Shapiro, WHO at 75, The nature of belief

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with David Suzuki about his his legacy and future as he leaves The Nature of Things, NPR's Ari Shapiro shares stories from his journalism journey, WHO special advisor Dr. Peter Singer talks about the public health agency's greatest challenges as it turns 75, Dina Nayeri ruminates on the nature of belief, and a Montreal cathedral finds a second life for its century-old church bells. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 38 minutes, 21 seconds
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Anne Applebaum on the war in Ukraine, Jeopardy! champ Mattea Roach, The legacy of Pat John, Breaking down 'bureaucratese'

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Anne Applebaum about the state of U.S.-Russia relations and the future of the war in Ukraine, Mattea Roach talks about life after Jeopardy!, Duncan McCue shares his documentary about The Beachcombers actor Pat John, and we break down "bureaucratese" in the latest installment of our ongoing language series, Word Processing. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 36 minutes, 36 seconds
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The week in politics, historian Yuval Noah Harari, author George Saunders, and the future of the Iranian regime

Host Piya Chattopadhyay unpacks the convoy hearings, Chrystia Freeland's rhetoric on the economy and 'friend-shoring,' and Liz Truss's resignation as British prime minister with our Sunday Politics Panel; historian and philosopher Yuval Noah Harari explains why he's covering life's big questions for kids; we take stock of the domestic and international scrutiny facing Iran; George Saunders holds a funhouse mirror up to our current moment with his new collection of short stories; and we look back on the Toronto Blue Jays' 1992 World Series win. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 31 minutes, 17 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for March 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, host Piya chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this week are Ottawa listener Liz Inrig, and Loren McGinnis, host of The Calgary Eyeopener
19 minutes, 55 seconds
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Drug decriminalization in B.C., John Hendrickson on life with a stutter, The trial of Genaro García Luna, That's Puzzling!, The science behind musical taste

Guest host David Common speaks with former Vancouver mayor Kennedy Steward about British Columbia's drug decriminalization pilot, journalist John Hendrickson reflects on living with a stutter, investigative reporter Tim Golden unpacks what the Genaro García Luna trial reveals about the war on drugs, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, and record producer-turned-neuroscientist Susan Rogers breaks down the science behind musical taste. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 29 minutes, 37 seconds
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Health minister Jean-Yves Duclos, Cartoons and culture, Spotlighting female jazz composers, Physicist Brian Cox

Guest host David Common speaks with federal health minister Jean-Yves Duclos about the ongoing funding feud between federal and provincial leaders and the future of health-care in Canada, voice actor Eric Bauza digs into the ways cartoons shape our culture, Terri Lyne Carrington sheds light on unsung female jazz composers of the past century, and physicist and broadcaster Brian Cox talks about his work promoting science literacy. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 22 minutes, 1 second
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John Irving explains why The Last Chairlift will be his last long novel

John Irving is the acclaimed author of novels including The Cider House Rules, The World According to Garp and In One Person. He joins David Common to talk about his latest book The Last Chairlift, why he's drawn to stories about LGBTQ characters and women's rights, and why he can't stop picking on his native United States – even after permanently relocating to Canada and acquiring Canadian citizenship.
26 minutes, 10 seconds
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Fixing health-care, Fitness history, Turkey-Syria earthquakes, Astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Old English

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with University of Ottawa professor Colleen Flood about the federal government's pitch for fixing health-care, historian Natalia Petrzela explores the evolution of fitness – and who it leaves behind, BBC Chief International Correspondent Lyse Doucet shares the latest on the relief and recovery effort following earthquakes in Turkey and Syria, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson outlines his mission to make our place in the cosmos make sense, and writer Hana Videen reveals the magic of Old English. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 31 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ottawa's 2.3 billion dollar settlement deal, McKinsey & Company's influence, Biden presidency turns two, Rethinking 'pests'

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Niigaan Sinclair about the significance of the federal government's $2.8-billion residential school settlement with hundreds of First Nations, investigative journalist Walt Bogdanich about the influence of consulting firm McKinsey & Company, journalist Chris Whipple evaluates Joe Biden's first two years as U.S. president, and science journalist Bethany Brookshire reflects on why we label some animals "pests." Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 21 minutes, 51 seconds
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Astronaut Roberta Bondar, Media mogul Moses Znaimer, Actor Simu Liu, Martha Wainwright performs

Host Piya Chattopadhyay revisits some of our favourite conversations with notable Canadians from the past year. Dr. Roberta Bondar reflects on her historic space mission and legacy, Moses Znaimer looks back on 50 years since the launch of Citytv, Simu Liu shares his real-life immigrant superhero origin story, and Martha Wainwright performs and talks about growing up in a famous musical family, then going into the family business herself. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 34 minutes, 30 seconds
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Canada's transportation landscape, Pico Iyer's pursuit of paradise, What's next for China as 'zero-COVID' ends, Bambi at 100, Nora McInerny on rejecting toxic positivity

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with political science and urban studies professor Anthony Perl about the state of Canada's transportation landscape, travel writer Pico Iyer explores the meaning of paradise in various cultures, The Washington Post's China bureau chief Lily Kuo offers insight into what's next for China as 'zero-COVID' ends and Lunar New Year travel begins, we share the story of the original Bambi on its 100th anniversary, and writer Nora McInerny takes down 'toxic positivity.' Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 32 minutes, 5 seconds
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Why Akim Aliu doesn’t shy away from hockey's harsh realities in new graphic memoir for kids

Former professional hockey player Akim Aliu is telling his life story in a new graphic memoir called Dreamer, which follows his journey from Nigeria to Ukraine to Canada – right up to the NHL. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about why he's opening up to a younger generation about how hazing and racism impacted his career, and why he says the game’s future depends on meaningful action towards inclusivity and accessibility for people from all walks of life.
27 minutes, 28 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for December 2022

In our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this week are Coquitlam, B.C. listener Judie Phillips, and Jason D'Souza, soon-to-be host of CBC Radio's Victoria afternoon show, All Points West.
21 minutes, 59 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for February 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, guest host David Common competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this week are Edmonton listener Tanya Ewashko, and Marcia Young, host of CBC Radio's World Report.
21 minutes, 14 seconds
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The latest on election interference, The possibility of Korean reunification, Robert Waldinger on the secret to happiness, Thats Puzzling! March 2023

Host Piya Chattopadhyay is joined by Robert Fife, and Duff Conacher to unpack the latest allegations of election interference from China and what they could mean for the government, Jihyun Park and Seh-Lyn Chai advocate for Korean reunification though their new memoir, Robert Waldinger shares the key to happiness, and our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 30 minutes, 5 seconds
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How fitness became a cultural obsession – and who it leaves behind

From group exercise classes to at-home equipment and the latest trendy athletic apparel... fitness has become a cultural obsession in North America. But as historian Natalia Petrzela explores in her book Fit Nation, the meaning of fitness has changed dramatically over time. She joins Piya Chattopadhyay to walk through its evolution to becoming a lifestyle industry, why – despite its popularity – fitness often remains inaccessible, and how we might make exercise more equitable.
23 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Emergencies Act inquiry, Sort Of's Bilal Baig, Health-care and colonization, A backstory of butts

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with columnists Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney about what we've learned from the public hearing phase of the Public Order Emergency Commission's inquiry into the federal government's use of the Emergencies Act, Dr. Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay explores the intersection of healthcare and colonization, Bilal Baig charts the success of their TV show Sort Of, Heather Radke shares a political backstory of butts, and Nedal Huoseh traces his unlikely journey to representing Canadian soccer star Alphonso Davies. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 33 minutes, 3 seconds
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Sunday Politics Panel March 12th, 2023, The evolution of the Oscars, Helen Branswell on the COVID-19 pandemic 3 years on, Canada's 'lost buildings'

Guest host Helen Mann speaks journalists Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney about how Justin Trudeau’s decision to appoint a special rapporteur to probe allegations of election interference is playing out in Ottawa and around the country, The New Yorker's Michael Schulman unpacks the evolution of the Oscars, Helen Branswell reflects on the third anniversary of the COVID-19 pandemic, and Raymond Biesinger, and Alex Bozikovic unearth the history of memorable buildings across Canada that no longer stand. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 28 minutes, 40 seconds
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Yuval Noah Harari helps kids tackle life’s big questions

Historian and philosopher Yuval Noah Harari has sold more than 40 million books in 65 different languages, making him one of our best-known, modern-day public intellectuals. His new book, Unstoppable Us: How Humans Took Over the World, turns his attention to a younger audience. He says it's important to cover big issues in order for kids to become critical thinkers and participate in the current-day discourse. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to share his thoughts on the war in Ukraine, climate change and the need to raise kids who make better choices than previous generations.
25 minutes, 8 seconds
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Rethinking why we villainize rats, raccoons and squirrels

Pigeons, squirrels, raccoons, and rats are all animals that many despise and would describe as "pests." But Bethany Brookshire wants us to consider why we categorize them that way. The science journalist interrogates the ways we label some animals in her book Pests: How Humans Create Animal Villains. She joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about how our tendency to lump such creatures together reveals less about them and more about our own human species, and our relationships with power, property, our culture and beliefs.
23 minutes, 4 seconds
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Russia's Christmas ceasefire, Lexicographer Susie Dent, The New Yorker's David Remnick, That's Puzzling!

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Washington Post reporter Catherine Belton about Russia's Orthodox Christmas ceasefire and Putin's standing as the war in Ukraine nears the one-year mark, lexicographer Susie Dent talks about the power of finding the perfect word, The New Yorker editor David Remnick discusses this moment in American politics and the aftermath of the Jan. 6 report, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! continues, and we hear why lists are in and resolutions are out for 2023. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 36 minutes, 59 seconds
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A leading reporter on infectious disease reflects on three years of covering the pandemic

Veteran health and science journalist Helen Branswell joins guest host Mann to reflect on the third anniversary of the COVID-19 pandemic and the 20th anniversary of the SARS outbreak in Toronto. Branswell is widely regarded as one of the first journalists in North America to report news of the virus for the U.S. health website STAT. The Canadian journalist shares her thoughts on the increasingly political nature of health reporting, why the public needs to be better informed about how science evolves, and lessons learned.
22 minutes, 1 second
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The New Yorker’s Adam Gopnik on the art and meaning of mastery

If you could master a new skill, what would you try? And what would you learn about yourself in the process? New Yorker staff writer and author Adam Gopnik put himself to the test by apprenticing with several masters: a classical painter, a master baker, a boxer, a driving instructor and more. The result is his new book, The Real Work: On the Mystery of Mastery. He joins David Common to talk about the importance of hands-on skills and why the journey of learning can be more rewarding than perfecting the craft.
22 minutes
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Abortion and the midterms, Big tech's hold on workers, A case for prison abolition, Canadian veteran remembered

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Dahlia Lithwick about how abortion rights shaped the results of the U.S. midterm elections, historian Robert C. Engen shares the story of Canadian veteran-turned-WHO director-general George Brock Chisholm, Cory Doctorow considers big tech's hold on workers and consumers, and El Jones makes the case for prison abolition. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/Sunday
1 hour, 24 minutes, 43 seconds
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Silicon Valley Bank's collapse, Adam Gopnik, The ICC indicts Vladimir Putin, Uyghur journalist Gulchehra Hoja, The magic of Old English

Guest host David Common speaks with political economist John Rapley about the fallout from the collapse of Silicon Valley Bank, The New Yorker's Adam Gopnik reflects on the meaning of mastery, former UN prosecutor Payam Akhavan offers his take on the International Criminal Court's arrest warrant for Vladimir Putin, Uyghur journalist Gulchehra Hoja shares her story of preserving Uyghur culture in exile, and writer and medievalist Hana Videen reveals the magic and mystery of Old English. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 34 minutes, 31 seconds
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Simu Liu's real-life immigrant superhero origin story

Canadian actor Simu Liu rose to international fame after being cast in the Marvel blockbuster Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings. At 33-years-old, the former star of CBC's Kim's Convenience has penned a memoir called We Were Dreamers: An Immigrant Superhero Origin Story, which goes well beyond Hollywood headlines. His real-life story doesn't gloss over family strife and violence, the weight of diverse representation in Hollywood and his own missteps along the way. In June 2022, he joined Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about all of that and the hope his story will inspire others to pursue their dreams in the face of uncertainty.
29 minutes, 19 seconds
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A view from the top with former world-champion paraclimber Maureen Beck

For the better part of her life, Maureen Beck has been climbing her way into the record books as a two-time world paraclimbing champion and an eight-time undefeated American champion. Beck, who was born with one hand, was named a 2019 National Geographic Adventurer of the Year. She’s been sharing her story in a series of talks, including a stop in Toronto. Beck joins guest host David Common to talk about her journey in the professional climbing world, how she adapted to become a champion, and how she took on one of the most difficult climbs of her career, in a remote mountain range in the Northwest Territories called The Cirque of the Unclimbables.
20 minutes, 55 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for January 2023

In our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this week are London, Ont. listener Sookie Mei, and Tom Power, the host of q. Come for the brain workout, stay for this edition's unexpected love letter to 1980s music!
23 minutes, 35 seconds
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Canada's health-care crisis, Soccer star Christine Sinclair, 'Sportswashing' and the World Cup, Food politics trailblazer Marion Nestle

Host Piya Chattopadhyay explores solutions to Canada's health-care crisis with Dr. Danielle Martin, soccer star Christine Sinclair talks about equality in sports, Jules Boykoff breaks down "sportswashing" as the World Cup kicks off in Qatar, Marion Nestle looks back on her storied career in food politics, and writers unwrap their dumpling stories. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/Sunday
1 hour, 38 minutes, 31 seconds
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Pico Iyer’s pursuit of paradise

Almost every culture and religion around the world has some version of paradise. For some, it can be found in simple pleasures, while for others, paradise is elusive. Travel writer and essayist Pico Iyer has spent decades thinking and writing about the concept. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to discuss his new book, The Half Known Life: In Search of Paradise, which takes readers from the grand mosques of Iran to the empty streets of North Korea and the funeral pyres of Varanasi, India, all to better understand what paradise means to people, and to himself.
26 minutes, 24 seconds
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Cynical about the art world? Critic Jerry Saltz wants to change your perspective

As a Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic for New York Magazine who sees upwards of 25 art shows per week, you might expect Jerry Saltz would embody the elitism and pretension that's often associated with the art world. But Saltz is the polar opposite. As a self-described "failed artist"-turned-long haul trucker who didn't get his start in criticism until he was in his 40s, Saltz aims to champion – and sometimes pan – art, with accessibility, humility, and humour. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to share his story and his book, Life Is Art, which spans the last 20-plus years of his criticism and the world's titanic changes during that period.
27 minutes, 18 seconds
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Water's role in the climate crisis, Democracy and the U.S. midterms, That's Puzzling!, Designing book covers

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with climate scientist Simon Donner about the central role water plays in the climate crisis as COP 27 kicks off, historians Sean Wilentz and Allida Black evaluate the state of American democracy, producer Pete Mitton charts Florida's shift away from swing state status, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! continues, and we peer into the process of creating book cover art that catches the eye. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 35 minutes, 5 seconds
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The politics behind butts are anything but peachy

Why has the human backside been at the forefront of our cultural conversations for so long? In her book Butts: A Backstory, Radiolab contributor Heather Radke examines the politics of the buttocks through the lens of race, gender and power. As she tells Piya Chattopadhyay, our complicated relationship with the beloved – and sometimes maligned – body part reveals a bigger story about our species, our histories and ourselves.
21 minutes, 24 seconds
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Why El Jones believes in a world without prisons

A recent report from Canada's top prison watchdog offered a bleak picture of this country's track record when it comes to incarcerated people, particularly Black and Indigenous prisoners. It found those inmates face rampant racial discrimination, bias and stereotyping. And in many cases, it's getting worse. Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with long-time prisoner advocate, poet, professor, and activist El Jones, who believes there is a clear, if not simple, way forward: Get rid of prisons altogether. Her new book, Abolitionist Intimacies, examines the prison abolition movement, shares personal stories of prisoners and their families, as well as Jones's own poetry and prose.
25 minutes, 45 seconds
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MAID and mental disorders, Rick Mercer, A child's diary of war, That's Puzzling!, Pong at 50

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with Dr. Jitender Sareen about why some psychiatrists are calling for a delay to the expansion of MAID to people whose sole medical condition is a mental disorder, Rick Mercer shares his take on Canada's political discourse today, 12-year-old Yeva Skalietska describes her experience of the war in Ukraine's early days, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! continues, and we explore how Pong changed the world of video gaming. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 37 minutes, 23 seconds
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Emergencies Act inquiry, One year of the war in Ukraine, Former Costa Rican president Carlos Alvarado Quesada

Host Piya Chattopadhyay unpacks the Emergencies Act inquiry's final report with journalists Susan Delacourt and Matt Gurney, museum worker and art historian Milena Chorna shares her battle to protect Ukrainian culture, Viktoriia Zabiian and Anna Dobrovolskaya reflect on keeping up the fight for human rights one year into the war in Ukraine, and former Costa Rican president Carlos Alvarado Quesada talks about what the world can learn from his country's record on climate change. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 32 minutes, 12 seconds
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Global affairs rundown, Bilag Baig, Remembering Gordon Pincent and Newfoundland's Sunflower Duo

Host Piya Chattopadhyay discusses Ukraine, Russia, China and Canada in our global affairs rundown, we remember Canadian actor Gordon Pincent, we share a Sunday documentary telling the story of Newfoundland's Sunflower Duo and Bilag Baig discusses Sort Of's continued success.
1 hour, 19 minutes, 42 seconds
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A climate change call to action from Costa Rica's former president

In his four years as president of Costa Rica, Carlos Alvarado Quesada helped turn his small, Central American nation into a global leader in fighting climate change – not to mention an example for larger, richer countries to follow. He committed to decarbonization by 2050, vowed to keep oil and gas in the ground, and continued efforts to restore forest cover and protect marine environments. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about his work... and challenges more developed countries like Canada to follow his lead. And he doesn't hide his dislike for "just transition" plans that still rely heavily on oil and gas, especially at a time when those companies are reaping record profits.
24 minutes, 35 seconds
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That’s Puzzling! for April 2023

In the latest edition of our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, host Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this week are Toronto listener Rob Firing, and Jeanne Armstrong, host of CBC Radio's Information Morning Fredericton.
21 minutes, 36 seconds
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Mattea Roach reflects on life after Jeopardy!

Since her historic 23-win run on Jeopardy! in the spring, Mattea Roach has been keeping herself busy. The 24-year-old LSAT tutor has returned to the popular game show for its Tournament of Champions, started hosting a political podcast and signed with a literary agent to work on ideas for a possible book. But even with all those accomplishments, Roach says she’s constantly being asked what she’s going to do next. She joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about life after Jeopardy!, and all the pressure that comes with her newfound fame.
25 minutes, 27 seconds
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Canada's precarious economy, Author Orhan Pamuk, Art critic Jerry Saltz, Mental illness narratives

Host Piya Chattopadhyay takes stock of Canada's precarious economy with economists Benjamin Tal and Sheila Block, Orhan Pamuk discusses his latest book Nights of Plague, Jerry Saltz reflects on his 20-plus years of art criticism, writer Rachel Aviv interrogates mental illness narratives, and R.L. Stine marks 30 years of Goosebumps. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 30 minutes, 5 seconds
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Parliament returns, Gogol Bordello's Eugene Hütz, Police violence, Former NHLer Akim Aliu

Host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with journalists Paul Wells and Emilie Nicolas about federal political priorities as Parliament gets set to return, Gogol Bordello frontman Eugene Hütz talks about showing solidarity with Ukraine through music, Robert Samuels explores questions raised following the Memphis police beating of Tyre Nichols, and former NHLer Akim Aliu shares his fight for inclusion in hockey. Discover more at https://www.cbc.ca/sunday
1 hour, 33 minutes, 59 seconds
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That's Puzzling! for November 2022

In our monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, Piya Chattopadhyay competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown. Playing along this week are Midland, Ont. listener Kim-Eden English and Jeff Douglas, host of CBC Radio's Halifax afternoon show, Mainstreet.
20 minutes, 50 seconds
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Christine Sinclair on World Cups, equal pay and valuing the journey

Canadian soccer star Christine Sinclair has played in five World Cups, won Olympic gold, and holds the record for the most goals scored in international play. But she doesn't get a cut of her Team Canada jersey sales. And she and her teammates are still fighting for pay equity with their male counterparts. As the men's World Cup kicks off in Doha, Piya Chattopadhyay sits down with the Canadian women's soccer team captain to talk about her long and storied career, and how she – and the country – are evolving when it comes to equality in sports and beyond. While she often shuns the spotlight, Sinclair says she penned her new memoir, Playing the Long Game, to shine a light on women in sport in the hopes of inspiring a new generation.
25 minutes, 51 seconds
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Canadian actor Eric Bauza 'toons' in to the complicated history of cartoons

In the new series Stay Tooned, Eric Bauza is exploring the critical role cartoons play in our culture. As the Canadian voice actor tells David Common, cartoons are far more than zany antics and punchlines. He says they also touch upon complicated subjects, from race to consumerism, and have a deeper way of impacting how we see the world. Last weekend, Bauza picked up a Children's Emmy Award for his work voicing Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and other Looney Tunes characters.
20 minutes, 38 seconds