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The New Criterion

English, Arts, 1 season, 318 episodes, 3 hours, 58 minutes
About
A monthly review of the arts and intellectual life. Interviews, poetry readings, musical criticism, and more. newcriterion.com
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Music for a While #89: Ragtime & other riches

Jay begins this episode with Paul Hindemith, who in 1921 combined his interest in ragtime with his love of Bach. There is also a minuet by Ravel, glancing back at Haydn. There is a song by Zemlinsky, setting Langston Hughes. There are wonders and curiosities in this episode—which, by the way, has a sponsor: Michael Lohafer, who, as Jay says, is “a particular authority on Mozart.” Mr. Lohafer says, “My sponsorship is on behalf of all attentive listeners to Music for a While who enjoy the well-considered selections that always delight the ear.” Bach, Fugue in C minor from “The Well-Tempered Clavier,” Book 1 Hindemith, “Ragtime (Well-Tempered)” Ravel, “Menuet sur le nom d’Haydn” Schumann, “Faschingsschwank aus Wien” Zemlinsky, “Afrikanischer Tanz” from “Symphonische Gesänge” Liszt, “Canzonetta del Salvator Rosa” from “Années de pèlerinage, deuxième année: Italie” Vasks, Dolcissimo from “The Book” Prokofiev, Sonata No. 7, Precipitato Martinů, Fantasia for String Quartet, Oboe, Theremin, and Piano Gounod, “Ah! lève-toi, soleil!” from “Roméo et Juliette” Tchaikovsky-Pletnev, Pas de deux from “The Nutcracker”
5/22/202449 minutes, 17 seconds
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Music for a While #88: Shout it out

In this episode, Jay begins with a shout—“Carolina Shout,” the classic jazz number by James P. Johnson. There are songs by Schumann, Puccini, and Porter (Cole). There are piano preludes—starter pieces by their composers. At the end, there is a sunburst of calypso. Enjoy this smorgasbord. Johnson, James P., “Carolina Shout” Schumann, “Röseleine, Röseleine!” Bonds, Margaret, “Young Love in Spring” Szymanowski, Prelude in E-flat minor, Op. 1, No. 8 Gorecki, Prelude, Op. 1, No. 4 Puccini, “Bevo al tuo fresco sorriso,” from “La rondine” Puccini, “Chi il bel sogno,” from “La rondine” Young, Victor, arr., Evans, Bill, “When I Fall in Love” Porter, Cole, “Don’t Fence Me In” Tanker, André, arr., Shaw, Theron, “Morena Osha”
4/22/202439 minutes, 54 seconds
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Peter Vertacnik reads from “The Nature of Things Fragile”

The Friends of The New Criterion recently gathered for an evening in celebration of Peter Vertacnik, whose “The Nature of Things Fragile” won the magazine’s twenty-third poetry prize. Listen to hear Peter read a number of poems from this new collection.
4/8/202416 minutes, 51 seconds
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Music for a While #87: Spring forward

Jay has assembled a little celebration of spring: songs, arias, a symphony, a sonata. Who doesn’t want to sing spring? Argento, “Spring,” from “Six Elizabethan Songs” Sinding, “Rustle of Spring” Wagner, “Du bist der Lenz,” from “Die Walküre” Beethoven, “Spring” Sonata, Rondo Strauss, “Herr Lenz” Saint-Saëns, “Printemps qui commence,” from “Samson et Dalila” Schumann, “Er ist’s” Hoiby, “Always It’s Spring” Wolf, “Er ist’s” Schumann, “Spring” Symphony, first movement Warlock, “Pretty Ring Time”
4/4/202438 minutes, 28 seconds
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Goodbye, Dr. Banda

On March 14, the Friends and Young Friends of The New Criterion gathered at the magazine’s headquarters to hear remarks from Dr. Alexander Chula on his new book, “Goodbye, Dr. Banda: Lessons for the West From a Small African Country.”
3/18/202417 minutes, 40 seconds
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Music for a While #86: A Williams gala

Recently, Carnegie Hall hosted a John Williams gala. The program was all-Williams and the composer himself conducted most of the concert. In this episode, Jay hosts his own little Williams gala. All by John Williams: “The Mission” Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra from “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” Olympic Fanfare and Theme Main Title from “Catch Me If You Can” Raiders March from “Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark” Flying Theme from “E.T.” The Imperial March, a.k.a. Darth Vader’s Theme, from “Star Wars”
3/15/202436 minutes, 43 seconds
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Is there life after woke?

On February 29, the Galliard Society joined the Friends and Young Friends of The New Criterion at The Players in New York for remarks delivered by Dominic Green.
3/4/202437 minutes, 52 seconds
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Music for a While #85: Our leap baby

Rossini was born on February 29, 1792. So Jay doffs his cap to him. We also hear Schubert, Brahms, Ravel, and worthy others (including Dvořák, who knew how to swing). Rossini, Overture to “La gazza ladra” Schubert, Symphony No. 5, first movement Ravel, Piano Concerto in D for Left Hand Alone Dvořák, Symphony No. 7, Scherzo Chopin, Étude in A flat, Op. 25, No. 1, “Aeolian Harp” Brahms, Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Rondo
2/27/202437 minutes, 25 seconds
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Jeremy Black & James Panero in conversation

On the River Thames, the rise of cities & the future of history.
2/15/202444 minutes, 28 seconds
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Music for a While #84: A world of (love) songs

A Valentine’s Day special—with music by the likes of Strauss, Poulenc, and Barber, sung by the likes of Jessye Norman, Arleen Auger, and Leontyne Price. A bouquet, a box of candies—a musical present for you. Trad., arr. Quilter, “Over the Mountains” Strauss, “Traum durch die Dämmerung” Strauss, “Amor” Poulenc, “Fleurs” Koechlin, “Si tu le veux” Prokofiev, Amoroso, from “Cinderella” Fusté, “Háblame de amores” Donaudy, “O del mio amato ben” Leoncavallo, “Mattinata” Barber, “Nocturne” Wild, Étude on Gershwin’s “Embraceable You” Bridge, “Love Went A-Riding”
2/14/202442 minutes, 59 seconds
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Music for a While #84: Pieces & people to know

Some rare Prokofiev, some common Prokofiev. An operatic blast from the past (Price and Tucker). A tribute to Colette Maze, a French pianist who has died at 109. Another tribute to Ewa Podleś, the great Polish contralto. A mixture of music, and thoughts, in this episode. Tchaikovsky, “Miniature Overture” from “The Nutcracker” Prokofiev, Symphony No. 2 Puccini, Love Duet, “Madama Butterfly” Prokofiev, Symphony No. 5 Prokofiev, Amoroso from “Cinderella” Debussy, Arabesque No. 1 Prokofiev, “The Field of the Dead,” from “Alexander Nevsky”
1/26/202447 minutes, 22 seconds
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Music for a While #83: Christmas carols (& other timely music)

Jay offers tracks of various types—appropriate to the season. From William Byrd on through spirituals and George Shearing. Merry Christmas. Bach, Christmas Oratorio Handel, “Messiah” Byrd, “This Day Christ Was Born” Niles, “I Wonder as I Wander” “Ding Dong! Merrily on High,” with George Shearing and his quintet Gounod, “Noël” Leontovych, “Carol of the Bells” Trad.?, “Long Ago in Bethlehem” Rutter, “Shepherd Pipe’s Carol” Adam, “O Holy Night” A medley of spirituals, from Chanticleer
12/19/202340 minutes, 41 seconds
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Music for a While #81: Pictures, souvenirs & more

Mussorgsky was inspired by some pictures at an exhibition. Mendelssohn, Strauss, and Tchaikovsky, among others, were inspired by their sojourns in Italy. In this podcast, Jay leads an enjoyable and enriching tour. Mussorgsky, “Pictures at an Exhibition” Mendelssohn, Symphony No. 4, Saltarello Strauss, “Aus Italien,” “Neapolitan Folk Life” Tchaikovsky, “Capriccio italien” Verdi, “Va, pensiero,” from “Nabucco” Mozart, “Ave verum corpus” Sibelius, “The Swan of Tuonela” Mozart, “Alleluia” from “Exsultate, jubilate”
10/30/202342 minutes, 51 seconds
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Wilfred M. McClay & James Panero in conversation

Executive Editor James Panero sits down with Visiting Critic Wilfred M. McClay to discuss “The burden of the humanities,” the fifth annual Circle Lecture of The New Criterion. The full text of the speech will be available in the November 2023 issue. For more information about the Circle of The New Criterion, visit newcriterion.com/circle.
9/20/202345 minutes, 47 seconds
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Music for a While #80: Telling the time

A phrase has crept up into our political discussion: “to know what time it is.” Jay begins this episode with a Rodgers & Hart song: “I Didn’t Know What Time It Was.” Then we have Mozart, Boccherini, Rachmaninoff, Donizetti—a slew of interesting items. The episode ends with Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five. Rodgers & Hart, arr. Riddle, “I Didn’t Know What Time It Was” Mozart, String Quartet in C, K. 465, first movement Boccherini, Quintet No. 4, “Fandango” movement Rachmaninoff, Serenade in B-flat minor, Op. 3, No. 5 Donizetti, excerpt from “Poliuto” Rachmaninoff, “Lilacs,” arranged by the composer for piano Rachmaninoff, “Lilacs” (song) Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Quintet in F major, Op. 143, first movement Atkins, “Heebie Jeebies”
9/13/202341 minutes, 31 seconds
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Music for a While #79: Flicka-fest

Frederica von Stade—known all over as “Flicka”—is an American mezzo-soprano and one of the greatest singers of our time, or any. Last month, Jay recorded a podcast with her, a “Q&A”: here. She is one of the most versatile singers. What Jay presents here is a sampler. Mozart, “Ah, perdona al primo affetto,” from “La clemenza di Tito” Fauré, “La rose” Trad., arr. Britten, “O Waly, Waly,” “Come You Not from Newcastle?,” “Oliver Cromwell” Rossini, “Bel raggio lusinghier,” from “Semiramide” Trad., arr. Canteloube, “Baïlèro,” from “Chants d’Auvergne” Hall, “Jenny Rebecca” Berlioz, “L’île inconnu,” from “Les nuits d’été” Mahler, Symphony No. 4, last movement
8/29/202341 minutes, 30 seconds
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Music for a While #78: Musical moments

Several composers have written “moments musicaux,” or “musical moments,” including Schubert and Rachmaninoff. So has a contemporary American, Joshua Nichols. Jay plays a “moment” from each composer. (Actually, Rachmaninoff gets two.) He also plays music from Brazil, etc. The episode ends with a souvenir of the late André Watts. Rachmaninoff, Moment musical in C major, Op. 16, No. 6 Villa-Lobos, Aria from Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 Villa-Lobos, “A prole do bebê” (complete) Oswald, Elegy Nichols, Joshua, Moment musical, “A great slide with a side of funk” Offenbach, Barcarolle from “The Tales of Hoffmann” Rachmaninoff, Moments musicaux, Op. 16 (complete) Verdi, “Non so le tetre immagini,” from “Il corsaro” Schubert, Moment musical in F minor, Op. 94, No. 3
7/18/202341 minutes, 35 seconds
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Music for a While #77: ’Tis of thee

A program of American, or American-ish, music, in honor of Independence Day. Trad., “My Country, ’Tis of Thee” Dvorak, String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96, “American,” final movement Puccini, “ Dovunque al mondo ,” from “Madama Butterfly” Joplin, “Gladiolus Rag” Gershwin, “Summertime,” from “Porgy and Bess” Gershwin-Wild, Virtuoso Étude on “Liza” Copland, “Going to Heaven!” Wheeler, “Isolation Rag” Bernstein, “Mambo,” from “West Side Story” Harbison, “Standards” Lowry-Copland, “At the River”
6/26/202344 minutes, 3 seconds
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Music for a While #76: Bustin’ out

Yes, June is bustin’ out, and so is a new episode. Jay plays that song and several others, known and less known. There’s also piano music, a violin piece—a tasty musical meal. Rodgers & Hammerstein, “June Is Bustin’ Out All Over,” from “Carousel” Kern & Harbach, “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes,” from “Roberta” Albéniz, “Evocación,” from “Iberia,” Book 1 Strauss, Adolf, “Ich weiß bestimmt, ich werd' dich wiedersehen” Bloch, “Nigun,” from “Baal Shem” Romberg & Hammerstein, “Stout-hearted Men,” from “The New Moon” Lehrer, “Alma” Respighi, “Notturno”
6/13/202343 minutes, 41 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the June issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the June 2023 issue and reads from its opening pages.
6/7/202318 minutes, 12 seconds
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Music for a While #75: A coronation, a swan & more

“Zadok the Priest” is the musical hit of British coronations, and has been since the 1720s. “The Swan” is a hit too, and is never more magical than in Godowsky’s piano arrangement. These are two of the selections in this episode. Others are by Mozart, Leroy Anderson, and other worthies. An appetizing, eclectic menu. Handel, “Zadok the Priest” Mozart, Serenade from “Don Giovanni” Anderson, Piano Concerto in C Handel, “Ah, mio cor, schernito sei,” from “Alcina” Saint-Saëns-Godowsky, “The Swan” Bacewicz, String Quartet No. 4 Cilea, “Poveri fiori” from “Adriana Lecouvreur” Bach-Godowsky, Andante from the Violin Sonata No. 2 in A minor
5/17/202347 minutes, 45 seconds
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The meaning of ballet with Lincoln Jones

On May 11, 2023, The New Criterion welcomed Lincoln Jones, the director of the American Contemporary Ballet, Los Angeles, alongside the dancer Hannah Barr for a discussion and demonstration of ballet at a Friends and Young Friends spring soirée in the editorial offices, with an introduction by Executive Editor James Panero. To become a Friend or Young Friend of The New Criterion, follow this link: https://newcriterion.com/friends.
5/15/202340 minutes, 47 seconds
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Isaac Sligh & James Panero in conversation

Isaac Sligh & James Panero discuss the Republic of Georgia, Crusaders, travel writing, audiophiles & more. To read Isaac's article on Crusaders and the Caucasus in The Critic, visit https://thecritic.co.uk/issues/march-2023/land-of-ghosts-and-legends/. To learn more about the Ralston Listening Library, which Isaac used to curate, visit https://new.sewanee.edu/ralstonlisteninglibrary/.
5/4/202318 minutes
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Roger Kimball introduces the May issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the May 2023 issue and reads from its opening pages.
5/2/202318 minutes, 25 seconds
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Music for a While #74: Speak low, speak high

Jay concludes this episode with “Speak Low,” the Kurt Weill song (lyrics by Ogden Nash). Before that, you have any number of other interesting things. Well, a specific number: six. A very tasty menu of music. Handel, “The Harmonious Blacksmith” Strauss, “Malven” Boccherini-Berio, “Ritirata notturna di Madrid” García Lorca, “Sevillanas” Wagner, “Lohengrin,” Prelude to Act III Wolf, “Die Spröde” Weill & Nash, “Speak Low”
4/24/202337 minutes, 8 seconds
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Music for a While #73: Happy Easter

A program of music, by a slew of composers. Bach, “Preis und Dank,” from the Easter Oratorio Bach, “Mache dich, mein Herze, rein,” from the St. Matthew Passion Mascagni, Easter Hymn, from “Cavalleria rusticana” Trad., arr. Bonds, “You Can Tell the World” Handel, “I know that my Redeemer liveth,” from “Messiah” Rimsky-Korsakov, “Russian Easter Festival Overture” Fauré, Pie Jesu, from Requiem East, James H., “He’s So Wonderful” Mahler, Symphony No. 2, “Resurrection”
4/5/202345 minutes, 43 seconds
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Adam Kirsch & James Panero in conversation; a reading by Brian Brodeur

Adam Kirsch & James Panero discuss the April poetry issue, the New Criterion Poetry Prize, and more. Brian Brodeur reads selections from his winning book, Some Problems with Autobiography (Criterion Books).
4/3/202326 minutes, 15 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the April issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the April 2023 issue and reads from its opening pages.
3/31/202318 minutes, 56 seconds
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Music for a While #72: Songs, dances, laments . . .

A smorgasbord of music, from the light and Viennesey to the angular and modern. Bacewicz, Overture for Orchestra Vustin, “Lamento” Sæverud, “Ballad of Revolt” Johnston/Burke, “Pennies from Heaven” Escaich, “Nun komm” Helmesberger, “Entr’acte Valse” Mussorgsky, Serenade, from “Songs and Dances of Death” Strauss, Eduard, “Mit Extrapost — Polka schnell” Giordano, “Amor ti vieta,” from “Fedora”
3/22/202340 minutes, 17 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the March issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the March 2023 issue and reads from its opening pages.
3/8/202317 minutes, 48 seconds
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Robert Erickson & James Panero in conversation

Robert Erickson and James Panero discuss Plutarch, plays, pastrami, and more. The second of our podcasts on the Hilton Kramer Fellowship. The texts used in the New Criterion classics reading group are as follows: —Histories, Herodotus, Landmark Edition, tr. Andrea L. Purvis, ed. Robert B. Strassler —Persians, Aeschylus, tr. Janet Lembke & C. J. Herrington —Theogony and Works & Days, Hesiod, tr. M. L. West —Parallel Lives, Plutarch, tr. John Dryden, ed. Arthur Hugh Clough —Metamorphoses, Ovid, tr. Charles Martin —Aeneid, Vergil, tr. Sarah Ruden
2/27/202334 minutes, 6 seconds
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Music for a While #71: Music in the life of Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson, the great English historian and journalist, passed away last month. Music was important in the life of Paul Johnson. Jay has arranged a little program, in tribute. Mozart, Clarinet Concerto, first movement Bruckner, Scherzo from Symphony No. 9 Brahms, Intermezzo in B-flat minor, Op. 117, No. 2 Mozart, Ave verum corpus Nelson, “Crazy” Mozart, Clarinet Quintet Schumann, Finale from “Faschingsschwank aus Wien” Kern & DeSylva, “Look for the Silver Lining”
2/7/202341 minutes, 44 seconds
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Benjamin Riley and James Panero in conversation

Benjamin Riley and James Panero discuss the Hilton Kramer Fellowship, the bridges of Robert Adam, and what it takes to write for The New Criterion. This is the first podcast in a series celebrating the tenth anniversary of the magazine’s Hilton Kramer Fellowship.
1/30/202315 minutes, 2 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the February issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the February 2023 issue and reads from its opening pages.
1/26/202318 minutes, 49 seconds
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Harry Mount addresses the Young Friends

Remarks from Harry Mount on the publication of his new book Et Tu, Brute? The Best Latin Lines Ever.
1/19/20236 minutes, 50 seconds
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Music for a While #70: Ringtones and other tunes

This episode features the “Nokia tune”—which actually comes from a Spanish guitar piece. We also have tributes to two late-greats: the clarinetist Stanley Drucker and the organist Frederick Swann. And music by Handel, Berkeley, Guillaume Connesson (b. 1970), et al. A wonderful assortment. Poulenc, Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, last movement Debussy, “La plus que lente” Handel, “No, no, I’ll take no less,” from “Semele” Tárrega, Gran Vals Connesson, “Céléphaïs” from “Les Cités de Lovecraft” Bach, Gigue from the French Suite No. 1 in D minor Berkeley, Sonatina for Guitar, first movement Elvey, arr., Swann, “Crown Him with Many Crowns”
1/12/202342 minutes, 11 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the January issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the January 2023 issue and reads from its opening pages.
1/5/202315 minutes, 59 seconds
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Music for a While #69: Noël!

A Christmas podcast: with carols, songs, and other things from all over. Various musical presents under this Tannenbaum. Bach, “Grosser Herr, o starker König,” from the Christmas Oratorio Trad., “The First Noël” Trad., “Joy to the World” Rinker & Huddleston, “December” Trad., “O du fröliche” Trad., “Balulalow” Trad., “Everywhere I Go, Somebody Talkin’ ’Bout Jesus” Gruber and Mohr, “Silent Night” Tormé & Wells, “The Christmas Song” Trad., “Angels We Have Heard on High” Bach, “Herr, wenn die stolzen Feinde schnauben,” from the Christmas Oratorio
12/19/202241 minutes, 34 seconds
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Music for a While #68: Preludes and other short wonders

As our heading suggests, Jay fills this episode with preludes and other short pieces, and songs—by Tchaikovsky, Debussy, Shostakovich, and others. A wonderful, filling assortment. Shostakovich, Fugue in A major, from Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87 Debussy, “La fille aux cheveux de lin” Debussy, “Minstrels” Shostakovich, arr. Tsyganov, Prelude in D flat, Op. 34 Shostakovich, arr. Tsyganov, Prelude in C-sharp minor, Op. 34 Bach, arr. Kanneh-Mason, “Komm, süsser Tod” Tchaikovsky, Scherzo, from “Souvenir d’un lieu cher” Tchaikovsky, Mélodie, from “Souvenir d’un lieu cher” Clarke, “The Cloths of Heaven” Dunhill, “The Cloths of Heaven” Debussy, arr. Hartmann, “La fille aux cheveux de lin” Clarke, “Down by the Salley Gardens” Trad., arr. Britten, “Down by the Salley Gardens”
12/6/202247 minutes, 46 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the December issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the December 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
11/22/202220 minutes, 1 second
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James Panero on “A library by the book”

James Panero reads “A library by the book,” his article on the politicization of the American library in the December 2022 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2022/12/a-library-by-the-book
11/14/202224 minutes, 58 seconds
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Music for a While #67: Mornings, etc.

This episode begins with “Early in the Morning,” the song by Ned Rorem (who just turned ninety-nine). It proceeds with “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’.” Later on, there is “Sunday Morning,” one of the “Sea Interludes” from Britten’s opera “Peter Grimes.” Jay was not going for a morning theme. It just happened that way. There is other music too, including a hymn, both in its straightforward choral version and in an improvisation by a famous, and devoted, pianist. Rorem, “Early in the Morning” Rodgers & Hammerstein, “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’,” from “Oklahoma!” Schoenberg, “Waldsonne” Britten, “Sea Interlude,” “Sunday Morning,” from “Peter Grimes” Shostakovich, Interlude No. 2, from “Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk” Chapí, “Carceleras,” from “Las hijas del zebedeo” Trad., “Come, Come, Ye Saints” Johannesen, Improvisation on a Mormon Hymn
10/27/202234 minutes, 52 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the November issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the November 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
10/26/202216 minutes, 9 seconds
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The fourth annual Circle Lecture: “The beginnings” by Joshua T. Katz

The New Criterion’s Visiting Critic Joshua T. Katz discusses “The beginnings: first words, first lines, first stories.”
10/25/20221 hour, 7 minutes, 39 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the October issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the October 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
10/17/202217 minutes, 14 seconds
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Joshua T. Katz and James Panero discuss “The beginnings”

Executive Editor James Panero sits down with Visiting Critic Joshua T. Katz to discuss “The beginnings: first words, first lines, first stories,” the fourth annual Circle Lecture of The New Criterion.
10/11/202218 minutes, 42 seconds
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Music for a While #66: September songs

True to the title of this episode, Jay has September songs: classical (Strauss and Ives, for example); popular (Earth, Wind & Fire!); and in between (Weill). A wonderful and timely bouquet. Marx, “Septembermorgen” Weill-Anderson, “September Song” Stenhammar, “September” Schmidt-Jones, “Try to Remember” Ives, “September” Strauss, “September” Earth, Wind & Fire, “September”
9/21/202227 minutes, 50 seconds
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Music for a While #65: Moods, indigo and not

As you can tell from the heading, Jay plays “Mood Indigo” in this episode—or rather, Ella Fitzgerald sings it. There is more jazz at the end, as the Oscar Peterson Trio does up “Tangerine.” This episode also includes an aria by Puccini—two versions of it. Then there is a rare and wonderful tone poem by Liszt. And more. Highly interesting, and nourishing. Chopin, Etude in C minor, Op. 10, No 2 (“Revolutionary”) Ellington, “Mood Indigo” Puccini, “Aria di Rinuccio” from “Gianni Schicchi” (in Italian) Puccini, “Rinuccio’s Aria,” from “Gianni Schicchi” (in English) Liszt, Symphonic Poem No. 13, “From the Cradle to the Grave” Puccini, “Senza mamma” from “Suor Angelica” Schertzinger, “Tangerine”
9/9/202248 minutes, 30 seconds
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Music for a While #64: Horne-o-rama

This summer, Jay had a long talk with Marilyn Horne, the great mezzo-soprano, resulting in a piece called “A Life of Singing.” He thought a podcast, to accompany the piece, would be good. You may well agree. Tracks of various types, showing the versatility, and the heart, of this extraordinary singer. Mahler, “Liebst du um Schönheit,” from “Rückert-Lieder” Bizet, “Dat’s Love” (Habanera), from “Carmen Jones” Schubert, “Die junge Nonne” Wolf, “Auf einer Wanderung” Wagner, “Träume,” from “Wesendonck-Lieder” Rossini, “Tanti affetti in tal momento!” from “La donna del lago” Bizet, “Adieux de l’hôtesse arabe” Bernstein, “Somewhere,” from “West Side Story” Trad., arr. Davis, “Shenandoah” Malotte, “The Lord’s Prayer”
8/16/202250 minutes, 51 seconds
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Music for a While #63: Little things, big things

This episode begins with Mozart—a movement from a piano sonata. It ends with a popular song, from the mid-1950s: “Little Things Mean a Lot.” In between are wonders and curiosities—including the Orientalist song on which the James Bond theme is based. Mozart, Allegretto from Sonata No. 10 in C major, K. 330 “The Star-Spangled Banner,” arranged by Stravinsky “The Tahiti Trot,” an arrangement by Shostakovich of “Tea for Two” Norman, Monty, “Bad Sign, Good Sign” Norman, Monty, “The James Bond Theme” Stutz-Lindeman, “Little Things Mean a Lot”
8/3/202232 minutes, 59 seconds
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Music for a While #62: Beyond the sabre

Jay presents a program of music by Aram Khachaturian. You get the “Sabre Dance,” sure, from the ballet “Gayane.” But plenty more, too. Very interesting fellow, Khachaturian. All tracks by Aram Khachaturian Waltz from “Masquerade” (orchestra) Suite from “Gayane” Adagio from “Spartacus” Waltz from “Masquerade” (piano) Piano Concerto Violin Concerto
6/28/202241 minutes, 20 seconds
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Music for a While #61: “Just about the best thing ever”

Sometimes Jay indulges in hyperbole—but the hyperbole is not far off. In this episode, he calls Dawn Upshaw’s 1989 recording of “No word from Tom” (Stravinsky) “just about the best thing ever.” You may well agree. He begins the episode with another “just about the best thing ever”: Leontyne Price in “Summertime” (Gershwin), live in Munich, 1968. Also on the menu are Mozart, Bridge, Medtner, and Szymanowski. A winning line-up. Gershwin, “Summertime” from “Porgy and Bess” Mozart, String Quartet No. 2 in D major, K. 155 Medtner, Fairy Tale No. 3 Bridge, “Allegro appassionato” Szymanowski, Violin Concerto No. 2 Stravinsky, “No word from Tom” from “The Rake’s Progress”
6/14/202228 minutes, 18 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the June issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the June 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
6/1/202216 minutes, 41 seconds
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Music for a While #60: A wide and wonderful world

Jay begins and ends with Simon Preston, the English organist, who recently passed away. He also pays tribute to Alexander Toradze, the Georgian-born American pianist who also passed away in recent days. There is a little piece by Chopin, with which Jay is in love. And more. You remember Mitch Miller, from “Sing Along with Mitch”? Well, he began his career as an oboist. And Jay has him in a concerto by Vaughan Williams. It is a wide, wonderful world, this world of music. Bach, Fugue from Toccata, Adagio, and Fugue in C major, BWV 564 Vaughan Williams, Oboe Concerto, second movement Chopin, Étude No. 2 in A flat from “Trois nouvelles études” Rossini, Inflammatus, Stabat Mater Shostakovich, Piano Concerto No. 2 in F, first movement Boulanger, Georges, “American Vision” Widow, Toccata from Organ Symphony No. 5
5/27/202237 minutes, 23 seconds
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James Panero on “The obtuse bard”

James Panero reads “The obtuse bard,” his article on Winslow Homer in the June 2022 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2022/6/the-obtuse-bard
5/27/202214 minutes, 53 seconds
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Douglas Murray on “The War on the West”

Douglas Murray discusses his latest book, “The War on the West,” during an event for the Friends of The New Criterion with an introduction by James Panero, Executive Editor.
5/25/202234 minutes, 7 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the May issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the May 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
5/6/202219 minutes, 20 seconds
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Music for a While #56: Playing on

A couple of weeks ago, Alexei Lubimov, a Russian pianist, was playing at an anti-war concert in Moscow. Police burst in to stop the concert. Lubimov kept playing until he had finished his piece (a Schubert impromptu). At the end of this episode, Jay plays a recording by Lubimov (Chopin this time). There is also Bach, Granados, Kapustin, Glass—a fine assortment. Bach, Sinfonia, Easter Oratorio Granados, “Canciones amatorias” Kapustin, Prelude No. 10 in C-sharp minor Berg, “Die Nachtigall,” from “Seven Early Songs” Glass, Etude No. 6 Vaughan Williamson, “Silent Noon” Chopin, Berceuse
5/2/202234 minutes, 42 seconds
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Larry P. Arnn and James Panero discuss “Consistency in politics”

A conversation between Larry P. Arnn, the president of Hillsdale College and the 2022 Edmund Burke Award winner, and Executive Editor James Panero on the future of education in America and the salvation of free government. https://newcriterion.com/gala
4/11/202225 minutes, 57 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the April issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the April 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
4/7/202218 minutes, 14 seconds
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The New Criterion Poetry Prize

New Criterion Poetry Editor Adam Kirsch & Executive Editor James Panero discuss the April 2022 poetry issue; in celebration of The New Criterion Poetry Prize, Bruce Bond & Nicholas Pierce read from their winning books.
4/1/202233 minutes, 18 seconds
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Kelly Jane Torrance on the front lines of journalism

On February 24, Kelly Jane Torrance, Op-Ed Editor of the New York Post, addressed a gathering of the Young Friends of The New Criterion in New York. Listen to her remarks on the recent invasion of Ukraine and working on the front lines of journalism during a crisis. Torrance is introduced by Roger Kimball, Editor of The New Criterion, with prefatory remarks by Executive Editor James Panero.
3/11/202236 minutes, 31 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the February issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the February 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
2/7/202219 minutes, 3 seconds
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Music for a While #58: “I hate music”?

That’s the title of a Bernstein song: “I Hate Music” (“but I like to sing”). In this episode, Jay has Barbara Bonney sing it. There’s also music by Mozart and other familiar composers. And music off the beaten path: Catoire? And a brand-new work by the American Scott Wheeler. And more. The episode ends as the previous one did: with a piece by Leroy Anderson. After Phil Smith and some of his friends played this piece at Lincoln Center, Smith said, “Well, that was a gasser.” For sure. Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel, “La complaisante” Bernstein, “I Hate Music” Catoire, “Étude fantastique” Mozart, “Deh vieni non tardar,” from “The Marriage of Figaro” Wheeler, Scott, Adagietto from “Birds of America”: Violin Concerto No. 2 Trad., arr. Carl Davis, “Shenandoah” Anderson, “Bugler’s Holiday”
1/24/202231 minutes, 31 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the January issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the January 2022 issue and reads from its opening pages.
1/10/202217 minutes, 34 seconds
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Music for a While #57: “Hold out your light”

This episode begins with a Vivaldi concerto and ends with a seasonal favorite: “Sleigh Ride,” by Leroy Anderson. In between, there is music by Bruch, Grieg, Stephen Foster, and others. In the mix is a spiritual, “Hold Out Your Light.” An eclectic, refreshing, and interesting program of music. Vivaldi, Flute Concerto in D, Op. 10, No. 3 Bruch, Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor Bell, Joshua, cadenza for first movement of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto Grieg, Finale from String Quartet in G minor Bristow, Symphony No. 4, “Arcadian” Trad., “Blow the Wind Southerly” Trad., “Hold Out Your Light” Foster, “Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair” Anderson, “Sleigh Ride”
1/5/202240 minutes, 11 seconds
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Music for a While #56: Welcome, Christmas

In this episode, Jay does his annual Christmas show—this year featuring E. Power Biggs, Heidi Grant Murphy, Oscar Peterson, Marilyn Horne, and other worthy performers. A glad season, with glad music. “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen” Handel, “And He Shall Purify,” from “Messiah” “Angels We Have Heard on High” “Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella” “Long Ago in Bethlehem” “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town” “In dulci jubilo” “O Come, All Ye Faithful” “Last Month of the Year” “O Holy Night” Handel, “Worthy is the Lamb” and “Amen,” from “Messiah”
12/18/202140 minutes, 47 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the December issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the December 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
12/9/202118 minutes, 50 seconds
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Music for a While #55: Nuts

This episode begins with the “Chinese Dance” from “The Nutcracker”—a ballet that has been banned in Berlin. Wokeness has hopped the pond. Jay also plays an excerpt from an old, old opera based on the tale of Orpheus and Eurydice; and an excerpt from a new opera based on the same. In addition, there is music by Franz Schubert, Daniel Asia, and Stephen Sondheim—who passed away on November 26, at ninety-one. A striking menu of music, this episode has. Tchaikovsky, “Danse chinoise,” from “The Nutcracker” Gluck, “Che farò senza Euridice,” from “Orfeo ed Euridice” Aucoin, “This is what it is to love an artist,” from “Eurydice” Asia, “Halleluyah,” from Symphony No. 2 Schubert, arr. Dietz, “Ave Maria” Sondheim, “A Little Priest,” from “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street”
12/2/202128 minutes, 32 seconds
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Robert Erickson & James Panero discuss Herodotus & more

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, sits down with Robert Erickson, Assistant Editor, to discuss the Histories of Herodotus and other major works in ancient Greek.
11/29/202132 minutes, 10 seconds
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Music for a While #54: Joy in music

Nelson Freire, who passed away this month, said that pianists ought to play with joy. He did. There is a lot of joy in this episode, and sublimity, ethereality, and other qualities to savor. From Wagner to Errol Garner. Trad., arr. Schindler, “Jasmine Flower” Puccini, “Signore, ascolta,” from “Turandot” Wagner, “Selig, wie die Sonne meines Glückes lacht,” from “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg” Albéniz-Godowsky, Tango in D major Kern-Garner, “The Way You Look Tonight”
11/18/202122 minutes, 40 seconds
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Music for a While #53: Songs and memories

A piece he was writing about soccer, believe it or not, put Jay in mind of a song. So did the title of the latest Bond movie. There have been some passings in music recently: of Carlisle Floyd, Edita Gruberová, and Bernard Haitink. Jay pays tribute to these musicians, and, as usual, to music itself. Trad., arr. Britten, “Come You Not from Newcastle?” Trad., arr. ?, “Ain’t Got Time to Die” Chopin, Etude in E major, Op. 10, No. 3 Chopin-Melichar, “In mir klingt ein Lied” Floyd, “Ain’t it a pretty night,” from “Susannah” Bellini, “Casta diva,” from “Norma” Bruckner, Symphony No. 8
11/4/202133 minutes, 16 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the November issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the November 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
10/29/202117 minutes, 17 seconds
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Conrad Black delivers the third annual Circle Lecture: “Is America in irreversible decline?”

Conrad Black delivers the third annual circle lecture titled “Is America in irreversible decline?” with an introduction by Roger Kimball.
10/18/202141 minutes, 21 seconds
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Conrad Black & James Panero discuss “Is America in Irreversible Decline?”

Occasioned by the third annual Circle Lecture of The New Criterion, Conrad Black discusses his essay for the forthcoming November 2021 issue with James Panero.
10/4/202136 minutes, 52 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the October issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the October 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
9/30/202117 minutes, 51 seconds
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Music for a While #52: Strains of Salzburg

In the current issue of the magazine, Jay has a chronicle on the 2021 Salzburg Festival. In this episode, he plays some of the music he discusses: from Bach to Mozart to Gershwin. (There are seven composers in all.) A marvelous array of pieces and performers. Bach, Keyboard Partita No. 1 in B flat, Gigue Handel, “Lascia la spina, cogli la rosa,” from “Il trionfo del Tempo e del Disinganno” Bach, Keyboard Partita No. 5 in G, Gigue Mozart, Exsultate, jubilate Cimara, “Stornello” Gershwin, Preludes Massenet, “En fermant les yeux,” from “Werther” Beethoven, Missa solemnis
9/22/202138 minutes, 34 seconds
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James Panero on “New worlds”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, reads the essay “New worlds,” his reflections on a discovery of fifteenth-century Venetian glass beads in Alaska, from the September issue.
9/9/202113 minutes, 47 seconds
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Music for a While #51: From Mozart to Borge

The opening piece, Jay says is one of the most joyous, most exuberant pieces ever written. It is a movement of a symphony, actually—the finale. Jay closes this program with Victor Borge, the musician-comedian, or comedian-musician—but in a serious vein. There is much to soak in, in this relatively brief program. Maybe the kind to listen to twice. Mozart, Symphony No. 34 in C, K. 338, finale Rorem, “Ferry Me Across the Water” Bach-Loussier, Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 Henriques, Lullaby
9/8/202128 minutes, 57 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the September issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the September 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
9/1/202117 minutes, 42 seconds
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Music for a While #50: Pieces from all over

It is characteristic of this podcast to contain a variety of music. But this episode is exceptionally diverse, with music by George Walker, Lili Boulanger, and Florence Price, to go with music by Mozart, Shostakovich, and Hindemith. Jay lays it out for you. Interesting and rewarding musical terrain. Walker, “Lyric for Strings” Shostakovich, Concerto No. 1 in C minor for Piano, Trumpet, and Strings, last movement Mozart, Serenade No. 10 in B flat for winds, “Gran Partita” Boulanger, Lili, “D’un vieux jardin,” from “Trois Morceaux” Price, “Ethiopia’s Shadow in America” Hindemith, “Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber,” March
8/25/202141 minutes, 21 seconds
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Music for a While #49: Sparks

“Care to romp around in some Romantic piano music?” asks Jay. “Virtuosic Romantic piano music? High-quality salon stuff? Well, that’s what we’re going to do.” Jay gives us a program of the talented, witty, dashing Moritz Moszkowski (1854–1925). The final piece is maybe Moszkowski’s best loved: “Étincelles,” or “Sparks.” Music of Moritz Moszkowski Étude de Virtuosité in F, Op. 72, No. 6 “Chanson bohème” “Caprice espagnole” Piano Concerto No. 2 in E, Op. 59 Étude de Virtuosité in A flat, Op. 72, No. 11 “Guitarre,” arr. Sarasate “Étincelles”
7/30/202135 minutes, 33 seconds
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Music for a While #48: Bach and Bach-ish

Jay has a piece by Bach, and one of his best. He has another piece once attributed to Bach. And he has a third piece that may or not be—by the master, that is. In any case, wonderful music, and a highly interesting program. Bach?-Stokowski, Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 Stölzel (formerly attributed to Bach), “Bist du bei mir” Bach, Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 538
7/15/202134 minutes, 3 seconds
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Music for a While #47: Just perfect

When Jay says “just perfect,” in this episode, he is referring to Marilyn Horne’s singing of “At the River.” This is the piece that ends the podcast. It’s a little Independence Day nod. Elsewhere, Jay discusses and plays a Debussy song, two famous guitar pieces, and a piano piece by Frederic Rzewski, the American composer (also a political radical), recently deceased. A neat, varied, interesting, and enriching program. Debussy, “La mer est plus belle que les cathédrales” Villa-Lobos, Prelude No. 5 Rzewski, “Down by the Riverside” Barrios, “Julia Florida” Lowry, arr. Copland, “At the River”
6/30/202125 minutes, 43 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the June issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the June 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
6/24/202111 minutes, 18 seconds
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Music for a While #46: Bach, beekeeping, and more

This episode begins with a poem, first published in The New Criterion, in 2002: Charles Tomlinson’s “If Bach had been a beekeeper.” It speaks of “the honey of C major.” We then duly hear some Bach in C major. We also hear a famous aria—an aria made famous by a movie. And “Estrellita,” in two different versions: the original song, plus what Heifetz did to it, or rather, for it. The podcast includes other appetizing items as well. A fine smorgasbord. Bach, Prelude and Fugue in C major, “The Well-Tempered Clavier,” Book 2 Catalani, “Ebben? Ne andrò lontana,” from “La Wally” Ponce-Heifetz, “Estrellita” Coleridge-Taylor, “You Lay So Still in Sunshine” Milhaud, “Love, My Heart” Shostakovich, Piano Concerto No. 2, first movement Ponce, “Estrellita”
6/17/202137 minutes, 42 seconds
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Mene Ukueberuwa on doing journalism well

On May 26, 2021, Mene Ukueberuwa addressed a gathering of the Young Friends of The New Criterion in New York. Listen to his remarks on the state of American journalism and what it means to do journalism well. Mene is introduced by Roger Kimball, Editor of The New Criterion, with prefatory remarks by Executive Editor James Panero. Mene works as an editorial writer at The Wall Street Journal, where he covers the economy, taxes and regulation, and other hot topics. He joined the Journal in 2018 after stints at City Journal and The New Criterion, where he was a Hilton Kramer Fellow.
5/29/202128 minutes, 45 seconds
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Music for a While #45: Spring, sprung, sung

Jay provides a program of songs and arias about spring: a variety of composers and languages. And performers. Maria Callas and Ella Fitzgerald are among them. This is a wonderful category of music: rhapsodic, hopeful, giddy, appreciative. Spring it up. Argento, “Spring,” from “Six Elizabethan Songs” Hahn, “Le printemps” Strauss, “Der Lenz” Wagner, “Du bist der Lenz,” from “Die Walküre” Rachmaninoff, “Spring Waters” Saint-Säens, “Printemps qui commence,” from “Samson et Dalila” Hoiby, “Always It’s Spring” Rodgers & Hammerstein, “It Might As Well Be Spring”
5/19/202128 minutes, 2 seconds
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James Panero on “The right angle”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, reads the essay “The right angle,” his reflections on Isaak Walton’s “The Compleat Angler” from the June issue of The New Criterion.
5/17/202115 minutes, 52 seconds
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Music for a While #44: Stomping, singing, exulting

In this episode, Jay begins with some playing by Maxim Lando, a teenage pianist. There is also a solo-violin piece by John Corigliano: “Stomp.” At the end, Jay pays tribute to Christa Ludwig, one of the greatest singers of all time, who has passed away at 93. In a life of interviewing, he has been starstruck very few times, he says. He was by Christa Ludwig. Sibelius, Piano Sonata in F, Op. 12 Led Zeppelin / Maxim Lando, “Stairway to Heaven” Glazunov, finale, Symphony No. 5, “Heroic” Corigliano, “Stomp” Mancini, Theme to “Peter Gunn” Brahms, “Wie Melodien zieht es mir”
5/7/202143 minutes, 37 seconds
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James Panero on “Man & beast”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, reads the essay “Man & beast,” his reflections on the zoo from the May issue of The New Criterion.
4/19/202115 minutes, 7 seconds
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Music for a While #43: Embraceability

This episode ends with “Embraceable You,” the Gershwin song—but in a piano arrangement by Earl Wild. An extraordinary thing. The episode begins with some Bach—the same piece, more or less, two different ways. Jay also has some music by Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, known by some as “the African Mahler.” There is a story, too, about French horn playing. Does your pulse race when you have a big solo? You bet it does. Much to savor here. Bach, Prelude in E minor from Book I of “The Well-Tempered Clavier” Bach-Siloti, Prelude in B minor Coleridge-Taylor, Clarinet Quintet in F-sharp minor, Op. 10, first movement Dove, “Departure,” from “Airport Scenes” Tchaikovsky, Symphony No. 5, slow movement Gershwin-Wild, “Embraceable You”
4/8/202128 minutes, 30 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the April issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the April 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
4/5/202114 minutes, 50 seconds
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Adam Kirsch & James Panero “On ‘getting‘ poetry”

“Like many adult pleasures, poetry is an acquired taste. We don’t grow up surrounded by it, the way we do pop music and movies, whose conventions become second nature. Rather, poetry is to our usual ways of reading and writing as classical music is to pop, or as ballet is to dancing at parties.” That’s from “On ‘getting’ poetry,” a feature essay in the April 2021 issue by our poetry editor, Adam Kirsch. Adam joins James Panero to discuss the state of poetry and the special April poetry section, for which he served as lead editor.
3/29/202123 minutes, 6 seconds
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James Panero on “Sublet with Bellini”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, reads his essay from the April issue of The New Criterion on the rehanging of The Frick Collection in the former home of the Whitney Museum.
3/22/202114 minutes, 58 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the March issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the March 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
3/10/202117 minutes, 3 seconds
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Music for a While #42: From a toast to a prayer

Jay begins with a toast from “La rondine,” Puccini’s opera; he ends with “The Lord’s Prayer,” sung by Leontyne Price on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Lots in between, of course: including tributes to the jazz pianist and composer Claude Bolling; the jazz guitarist Pat Metheny; and the organist John Weaver. A delicious program. Puccini, “Bevo al tuo fresco sorriso,” from “La rondine” Fauré, “Reflets dans l’eau” Bolling, “Baroque and Blue,” from Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano Prokofiev, Piano Sonata No. 7 Metheny, “Have You Heard” Weaver, Variation on “Sine Nomine” Malotte, “The Lord’s Prayer”
2/28/202144 minutes, 15 seconds
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Music for a While #41: Well-tempered and Catalan

What a strange title. What could it mean? That Jay addresses “The Well-Tempered Clavier” (both books), that masterpiece by Bach. And that he addresses music by Catalan composers. A successful mixture, we think you will find. Bach, Prelude and Fugue in C major, “The Well-Tempered Clavier,” Book II Montsalvatge, two songs from “Cinco canciones negras” Mompou, “Secreto,” from “Impresiones íntimas” Mompou, “Damunt de tu només les flors,” from “Combat del somni” Fábregas, Elisenda, “Pluja brodada,” from “Imitació del foc” Bach, Prelude and Fugue in F-sharp minor, “The Well-Tempered Clavier,” Book I Bach, “Gigue” Fugue in G major
2/3/202136 minutes, 42 seconds
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Isaac Sligh & James Panero discuss Russia & beyond

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, sits down with Isaac Sligh, the 2020–21 Hilton Kramer Fellow, to discuss Isaac’s travels in the Russian Arctic and in the Caucasus Mountains of Georgia.
1/29/202123 minutes, 51 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the February issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the February 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
1/29/202114 minutes, 44 seconds
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James Panero on “Next stop”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, discusses the history of Pennsylvania Station and the new Moynihan Train Hall in Manhattan.
1/25/202114 minutes, 44 seconds
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Music for a While #40: Entering into heaven

In 1913, Vachel Lindsay wrote “General William Booth Enters into Heaven.” It speaks of the founder of the Salvation Army. Peggy Noonan cited this poem in a recent column. In 1914, Charles Ives set the poem to music. You will hear it in this episode. Also a Beatles concerto (yes), a rag by an early Metropolitan Opera soprano (yes), some American standards, and, at the end, transcendent Mahler. Jay plays off a good amount of reader mail. An amazingly eclectic, interesting episode. Shchedrin, Piano Concerto No. 1 Robison, “Think Well of Me” Rutter, “Beatles Concerto,” first movement Pinkard-Alexander-Mitchell, “Sugar” Ives, “General William Booth Enters into Heaven” Pinkard-Bernie-Casey, “Sweet Georgia Brown” Case, “Metropolitan Rag” Handel, “Rejoice greatly,” from “Messiah” Mahler, Symphony No. 2, “Resurrection”
1/18/202146 minutes, 26 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the January issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the January 2021 issue and reads from its opening pages.
1/2/202115 minutes, 54 seconds
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Music for a While #39: Sounds of Christmas

Jay has an assortment for you—some Bach, some jazz, some Russian, some French, a spiritual . . . It all ends with a thrilling “First Nowell.” Bach, “Jauchzet, frohlocket,” Christmas Oratorio Berlin, “White Christmas” Bach, “Nun seid ihr wohl gerochen,” Christmas Oratorio Gauntlett, “Once in Royal David’s City” Trad., “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen” Chesnokov, “Gabriel Appeared” Trad., “Il est né, le divin Enfant” Trad., “Somebody Talkin’ ’bout Jesus” Trad., “The First Nowell”
12/23/202041 minutes, 31 seconds
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James Panero, Benjamin Riley & Andrew L. Shea discuss the 2020 art issue and look ahead to 2021

James Panero, Benjamin Riley & Andrew L. Shea discuss the 2020 art issue and look ahead to 2021. Read “Albert Pinkham Ryder: isolato of the brush,” by Andrew L. Shea: https://newcriterion.com/issues/2020/12/albert-pinkham-ryder-isolato-of-the-brush Read Benjamin Riley’s interview with Clive Aslet & Dylan Thomas: https://newcriterion.com/issues/2020/12/an-interview-with-clive-aslet-dylan-thomas Read “Unmaking the met,” by James Panero: https://newcriterion.com/issues/2020/12/unmaking-the-met
12/18/202017 minutes, 4 seconds
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Music for a While #38: Bits and pieces

This episode is a real smorgasbord—works, mainly short, by Domenico Scarlatti, Rachmaninoff, Duparc, Stravinsky, Jonathan Dove, and Jerome Kern, among others. A tasty, diverse spread. You may well want it all. Scarlatti, D., Sonata in G, K. 14 Rachmaninoff, Andante, Cello Sonata Duparc, Lento, Cello Sonata Lachenmann, “Five Variations on a Theme by Franz Schubert” Stravinsky, Piece for Solo Clarinet Shostakovich, Impromptu (for viola and piano) Dove, “Fair Ship,” from “Under Alter’d Skies” Kern-Tatum, “The Way You Look Tonight”
12/17/202048 minutes, 45 seconds
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James Panero on “Unmaking The Met”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, discusses the past, present, and future of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2020/12/unmaking-the-met
12/16/202041 minutes, 53 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the December issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the December 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
12/3/202015 minutes, 26 seconds
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Music for a While #37: Over the moon

In honor of the recent “blue moon,” Jay plays four songs about the moon—two classical, two popular. He also has some Quincy Jones, some Cannibal Corpse (yup), some Villa-Lobos, and some Bruckner. Complain if you will, but not about a lack of variety. Rodgers & Hart, “Blue Moon” Bellini, “Vaga luna, che inargenti” Dvořák, “Song to the Moon,” from “Rusalka” Howard, “Fly Me to the Moon” Jones, “The Streetbeater” Cannibal Corpse, “Frantic Disembowelment” Villa-Lobos, “Punch,” from “The Baby’s Family” Villa-Lobos, “Lullaby” from “The Baby’s Family” Bruckner, Symphony No. 4
11/13/202034 minutes, 19 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the November issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the November 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
10/31/202016 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Founders’ priceless legacy, by Myron Magnet

The New Criterion’s Visiting Critic Myron Magnet delivers the second annual Circle Lecture, followed by an interview with Myron by Executive Editor James Panero.
10/21/20201 hour, 28 minutes, 47 seconds
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James Panero on Plymouth Rock

James Panero reads “Like a Rock,” his Letter from Plymouth in the November 2020 issue of The New Criterion.
10/19/202015 minutes, 53 seconds
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Music for a While #36: ‘Remember me’

That’s what Dido sings in Purcell’s opera, about her and Aeneas: “Remember me!” Jay is reminded of this when filling out forms on the Internet. In this episode, he plays Dido, plus Charlie Parker, Franz Schmidt, Leonard Bernstein, Lyle Lovett, and others. An unusually eclectic show—which also brings the Op. 1 by a young woman from Las Vegas: a “quarantine rag.” Trad., “The Parting Glass” Parker or Davis, “Donna Lee” Verdi, “Parmi veder le lagrime,” from Verdi’s “Rigoletto” “Glow-Worm” Schmidt, Adagio from Quintet in A major Mosca, Kristen, “Quarantine Rag” Bernstein, “I Am Easily Assimilated,” from “Candide” Lovett, “If I Had a Boat” Purcell, “Dido’s Lament,” from “Dido and Aeneas”
10/14/202041 minutes, 8 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the October issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the October 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
10/8/202017 minutes, 50 seconds
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Music for a While #35: Greatness, consolation, transcendence

That’s a lot to promise in one humble music podcast, isn’t it? Greatness, consolation, and transcendence? But it is truth in advertising. Handel, “Dopo notte atra e funesta,” from Handel’s “Ariodante” Pärt, “Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten” Mozart, Clarinet Concerto Trad., “Shenandoah” Brahms, Piano Trio No. 1 in B major, Op. 8 Bach, “Mache dich, mein Herze, rein,” from St. Matthew Passion
10/1/202038 minutes, 42 seconds
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Music for a While #34: Twelve, sixteen, and other ages

Mozart wrote his “Orphanage Mass” when he was twelve. Pretty good. Mendelssohn wrote his Octet in E flat when he was sixteen. Really good. Jay provides excerpts from these works, and also presents Chopin and Argerich, Strauss and Davidsen, and more. As the episode begins with Mozart, it ends with Mozart: a heavenly soprano aria from some vespers. You could well nigh ascend. Mozart, Mass in C minor (“Waisenhausmesse”), K. 139 Mendelssohn, Octet in E flat Chopin, Largo, Piano Sonata No. 3 in B minor, Op. 58 Strauss, “Cäcilie” Strauss, “Ruhe, meine Seele!” Mozart, “Laudate Dominum omnes gentes,” from “Vesperae solennes de confessore”
9/19/202034 minutes, 21 seconds
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Music for a While #33: ‘Great are companions such as these’

That is a line from a hymn. Jay says it must apply to Bach’s Cello Suites, which players of that instrument get to live with all life long — through good times and (maybe most important) bad. Of course, all of the pieces on this program may be called “great companions”: from the pens of composers famous and obscure. An appetizing, companionable episode. Bach, Allegro assai, Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 Bach-Rachmaninoff, Preludio, Violin Partita in E major Tchaikovsky-Wild, Pas de quatre, “Swan Lake” Bach, Sarabande, Cello Suite in C minor Mancini, “Quanto dolce è quell’ardore” Dalza, “Calata ala spagnola” Monteverdi, “Quel sguardo sdegnosetto” Price, F., “Down a Southern Lane” Trad., arr. F. Price, “My Soul’s Been Anchored in the Lord”
9/4/202039 minutes, 19 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the September issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the September 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
9/2/202018 minutes, 11 seconds
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Music for a While #32: Gettin’ jiggy

Jay begins with a gigue, a jig, by Leclair. We also have Haydn, Brahms, and Penderecki. (The Brahms is played by Leon Fleisher, the great American pianist who has died in recent days.) There are also two items from the American Songbook — one of them sung by Jack Teagarden, the other by Frank Sinatra. This episode ends with a spiritual, a powerhouse. Leclair, Jean - Marie the Elder, Gigue from the Violin Concerto in B flat, Op. 10, No. 1 Haydn, Presto from Piano Sonata in G, H. XVI:40 McHugh/Adamson, “ Where Are You? ” Penderecki, Chaconne from “Polish Requiem” Brahms, Rondo from Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor Whiting/Mercer, “Too Marvelous for Words” Trad., “Soon I Will Be Done with the Trouble of the World” (sung in recital by Latonia Moore)
8/24/202046 minutes, 54 seconds
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James Panero on “a classical illness”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, discusses the pathology of recent protests and the impending demise of Teddy Roosevelt’s statue at the American Museum of Natural History. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2020/9/a-classical-illness
8/17/202014 minutes, 56 seconds
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Music for a While #31: Four-handed phenomena

The title of this episode pretty much tells the story: Jay discusses, plays, and celebrates piano duets. Schubert, “Marche militaire” No. 1 in D major, Op. 51, No. 1 Debussy, “En bateau,” from the “Petite Suite” Mendelssohn, Andante and Allegro brillante, Op. 92 Mozart, Concerto for Two Pianos in E flat
8/7/202037 minutes, 16 seconds
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Music for a While #30: A joyful jolt

Actually, Jay says “an ingenious, joyful jolt.” He is speaking of the Toccata in G by Théodore Dubois. That’s how the podcast begins. We also get Grieg (and a memory of a TV game show, long ago). Lead Belly (singing “Study War No More”). Mozart, Hahn, and “America” — a fugue on “America,” which is also known as “My Country, ’Tis of Thee” (and as “God Save the Queen” by some of our cousins). Dubois, Toccata in G Grieg, “Morning Mood” from “Peer Gynt” Trad., “Study War No More” Mozart, “Soave sia il vento” from “Così fan tutte” Hahn, Danse, Piano Concerto Thayer, Fugue on “America” from the Organ Sonata No. 2
7/24/202025 minutes, 57 seconds
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Music for a While #29: America: plenty good room

In honor of Independence Day, Jay does an all American program: ending with “Plenty Good Room,” the spiritual. He begins with some ballet, cowboy style: “Hoe Down” (Copland). Along the way, we have songs, piano pieces, an aria, some bluegrass—Happy Fourth, to all. Copland, “Hoe-Down,” from “Rodeo” MacDowell, “By a Meadow Brook,” from “Woodland Sketches” Beach, “Ah, Love, but a Day” Wheeler, Scott, “Isolation Rag” Hoiby, “Lady of the Harbor” Meyer, Edgar, et al. (?), “Death by Triple Fiddle” Floyd, “Ain’t It a Pretty Night?” from “Susannah” Gershwin-Heifetz, Prelude in C-sharp Minor Trad., “Plenty Good Room”
7/1/202036 minutes, 12 seconds
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Music for a While #28: Poems, songs, and shouts

This episode begins with a shout -- “a shout of joy on the organ,” Jay says. It also has a poem, written and recited by Langston Hughes. And a song, setting that same poem. The episode includes a little Broadway -- and other curiosities, finds, and wonders. Enjoy “music for a while.“ Hughes-Manz, “God of Grace and God of Glory” Langston Hughes, “I, Too” Margaret Bonds, “I, Too” Frederic Rzewski, “The People United Will Never Be Defeated!” Coleman-Stewart, “Thank God I’m Old” Herbert Murrill, “Carillon” Handel, “O Lord, whose mercies numberless,” from “Saul” Trad., arr. Bonds, “This Little Light o’ Mine”
6/23/202027 minutes
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Eric Gibson and James Panero discuss sculpture in exile and culture under siege

In a new podcast from The New Criterion, Eric Gibson and James Panero discuss sculpture in exile and culture under siege. Eric Gibson's book "The Necessity of Sculpture: Selected Essays and Criticism, 1985–2019" can be found at https://newcriterion.com/bookstore?mode=criterion. Cover photo: the recently defaced Robert Gould Shaw Memorial in Boston, Massachusetts, depicting Shaw and the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, an African-American regiment during the Civil War.
6/18/202051 minutes, 22 seconds
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Music for a While #27: Vexed and unvexed.

“Got a real smorgasbord for you,” says Jay—“even more than usual. An almost wacky variety.” He begins with Rachmaninoff, turns to Satie, then to a classic American song, then to Satie again, then to Penderecki, and on to Fauré and Busoni (no, not Bach-Busoni). Some interesting issues, points, personalities, and, of course, music. Rachmaninoff, “Spring Waters” Satie, “Vexations” Androzzo, Alma Bazel, “If I Can Help Somebody” Satie, “Gymnopédie” Penderecki, “La Follia” Fauré, “Le secret” Busoni, “Berceuse”
6/10/202040 minutes, 46 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the June issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the June 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
6/3/202017 minutes, 56 seconds
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Music for a While #26: Time, timelessness, etc.

Jay begins with some festive music: specifically, the “Festive Overture” of Shostakovich. He has a showtune: “Some Other Time.” He has an Aretha Franklin hit, about zoomin’. He has a spiritual: “Ain’t Got Time to Die.” Some French organ music. And more. He ends with Karel Ančerl, the great Czech conductor who endured horror and produced much beauty and brilliance. Tracks played: Shostakovich, “Festive Overture” Bernstein and Comden & Green, “Some Other Time,” from “On the Town” Aretha Franklin et al., “Who’s Zoomin’ Who?” Trad., “Ain’t Got Time to Die” Guilmant, March on a Theme by Handel Tchaikovsky, “Garland Waltz” from “Sleeping Beauty” Mahler, Symphony No. 9, final movement
5/28/202039 minutes, 30 seconds
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James Panero on “the woman who saw the future.”

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, reconsiders the Gilded Age author Anna Bowman Dodd and her uncanny predictions about the future.
5/20/202016 minutes, 26 seconds
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Music for a While #25: Sons, daughters, and others

Jay plays some music by a Bach son. There is also Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, and other composers. The episode ends with a tribute to Rosalind Elias, the late American mezzo-soprano: the thirteenth and last child of Lebanese immigrants. Tracks played: Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel, Rondo II in C minor Saint-Saëns, “Aimons-nous” Beethoven, Sonata for Piano and Violin in G major, Op. 3, No. 3, final movement Hahn, “À Chloris” Dohnányi, Serenade in C Wolf, “Benedeit die sel’ge Mutter” Tchaikovsky, String Sextet in D minor, “Souvenir de Florence” Verdi, “Stride la vampa,” from “Il trovatore”
5/16/202042 minutes, 5 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the May issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights of the May 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
5/7/202017 minutes, 31 seconds
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Music for a While #24: Springtime, round two

Jay’s previous episode was devoted to music of spring. As he points out, it’s still spring—and there’s a lot of spring music out there. So he goes a second round. This round serves up Schubert, Mahler, Copland, Rodgers & Hammerstein, and more. A colorful, happy bouquet. Tracks played: Argento, “Spring” Schumann, “Spring” Symphony Mahler, “Frühlingsmorgen” Mahler, “Der Trunkene im Frühling,” from “Das Lied von der Erde” Copland, “Appalachian Spring” Schubert, “Frühlingsglaube” Duke, “April in Paris,” Count Basie and His Orchestra Rodgers & Hammerstein, “It Might As Well Be Spring”
4/21/202035 minutes, 12 seconds
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James Panero on plagues, art & Venice

James Panero, the Executive Editor of The New Criterion, discusses the long history of plagues and their relationship to the art of our Western tradition, especially in Venice.
4/20/202016 minutes, 47 seconds
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Music for a While #23: Springtime

Jay has seven pieces—songs, an opera aria, a piano piece, a violin sonata, and a violin concerto. All in honor of spring. It has sprung, whether the pandemic likes it or not. Happy spring, everyone. Tracks played: Vivaldi, “Spring,” from “The Four Seasons” Hahn, “Le Printemps” Beethoven, “Spring” Sonata Saint-Saëns, “Printemps qui commence,” from “Samson and Delilah” Strauss, “Herr Lenz” Sinding, “Rustle of Spring” Hoiby, “Always It’s Spring”
4/13/202026 minutes, 38 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the April issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses the April 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
4/9/202015 minutes, 29 seconds
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Music for a While #22: Music as Balm—and Delight

The title of this episode pretty much tells its story. Jay plays balm-like music, and delight-giving music—heavy on the Bach. At the beginning of the show, he asks, “Need I say that music is extra-important in these strange and trying times?” He answers, “Of course I don’t.” Tracks played: Bach–Petri, “Sheep May Safely Graze” Bach, “Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen” Bach, “Alleluia” Chopin, Étude in A flat, Op. 25, No. 1, “Aeolian Harp” Haydn, Piano Concerto in D Elgar, Nimrod Variation Bach, Bourées from English Suite No. 2 in A minor Bach, Gigue from English Suite No. 2 in A minor Ochs, attr. Handel, “Dank sei dir, Herr” Bach, Allegro for keyboard only, Violin Sonata No. 6 in G Trad., “Give Me Jesus”
4/1/202048 minutes, 1 second
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Music for a While #21: A Little Program for Kids (and Their Parents, and Others)

Lots of parents now have kids at home, in need of schooling. A friend of Jay’s asked him, “Could you put together a little program for my kids?” Here it is: Bach, Mozart, Brahms, Chopin, and worthy others. A neat, balanced smattering. For “kids” of all ages. Tracks played: Bach, Prelude in C major, Book I, “The Well-Tempered Clavier” Chopin, Etude in C major, Op. 10, No. 1 Mozart, Twelve Variations on “Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman” Brahms, “Wie Melodien zieht es mir” Wagner, Prelude, Act III, “Lohengrin” Puccini, “Addio, mio dolce amor,” from “Edgar” Debussy, “Reflets dans l’eau” Turina, “Zapateado” Shostakovich, Scherzo, Piano Quintet in G minor Lowry, arr. Copland, “At the River”
3/23/202044 minutes, 44 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the March issue

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, introduces a handful of noteworthy pieces from the March 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.
3/9/202015 minutes, 37 seconds
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Music for a While #20: Upward and Onward

Jay ends this episode with the beloved theme song to “The Jeffersons,” “Movin’ on Up.” It was co-written and sung by Ja’net DuBois, who died recently. Also in this episode you have two arias by Handel; a piano piece by Ravel, miraculously played; some little-known Mozart, which is knockout; and yet more. Take a break away, as Jay says. Tracks played: Handel, “Bel piacere,” from “Agrippina” Galuppi, Andante from the Keyboard Sonata No. 5 in C major Handel, “Pensieri, voi mi tormentate,” from “Agrippina” Ravel, “Une barque sur l’océan,” from “Miroirs” Mozart, Chaconne from the ballet music to “Idomeneo” DuBois-Barry, “Movin’ on Up”
3/5/202033 minutes, 11 seconds
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Jay Nordlinger & James Panero on Music Criticism

Jay Nordlinger, the music critic for The New Criterion, joins James Panero for a discussion of the classical music world and the life of a critic today.
2/24/202027 minutes, 42 seconds
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James Panero on The Frick Collection

James Panero, the executive editor of The New Criterion, discusses the architectural history of one of New York’s artistic treasures, all the way up to the ill-advised renovations being undertaken today.
2/19/202016 minutes, 18 seconds
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Music for a While #19: From Rosa to Mirella

This episode begins with a song by Giuseppe Martucci, sung by Rosa Feola, the young Italian soprano. It ends with an aria by Giacomo Puccini, sung by Mirella Freni, the legendary Italian soprano who died in recent days. In between is a smorgasbord, including Haydn, Mozart, and a couple of British songs that Jay and others love. Tracks played: Martucci, “Maggiolata” Haydn, Cello Concerto in C major Mozart, Great Mass in C minor Dunhill, “The Cloths of Heaven” arr. Britten, “Down by the Salley Gardens” Mozart, Horn Concerto No. 3 in E flat Puccini, “Vissi d’arte,” from “Tosca”
2/13/202035 minutes
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Roger Kimball: Sovereignty or submission

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, introduces the magazine’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference held in Washington, D.C.
2/6/202016 minutes, 21 seconds
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John O’Sullivan on the Left v. the nation.

John O’Sullivan, an editor at large at National Review, shares his thoughts on the importance of a national consensus and recent factors undermining it. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C. A form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue under the title, “The Left v. the nation.”
2/6/202019 minutes, 11 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the February 2020 issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
2/3/202016 minutes, 35 seconds
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Music for a While #18: Maestro/Mahatma Jansons

Mariss Jansons, the great Latvian conductor, born in 1943, died toward the end of last year. Jay talks about him, relating stories both from him and about him. (Jay interviewed Jansons twice, ten years apart.) And, of course, we hear music—from Jansons and his orchestras. Tracks played: Bizet-Shchedrin, from “Carmen Suite” Tchaikovsky, Symphony No. 2 in C minor Beethoven, Symphony No. 9 in D minor Mahler, Symphony No. 7 in E minor Brahms, Symphony No. 2 in D major
1/30/202039 minutes, 48 seconds
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Michael Anton on the War of Ideas

Michael Anton, a scholar and former staffer for the National Security Council, discusses the notion of a “liberal international order” and its place in the present-day war of ideas. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C. An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “The enemy is an idea.”
1/29/202018 minutes, 18 seconds
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Angelo M. Codevilla on Collective & Individual Liberty

Angelo M. Codevilla, a professor emeritus of international relations at Boston University and a fellow at the Claremont Institute, discusses the notion of liberty as it relates to American history and self-governance. An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “Liberty: collective and individual.”
1/27/202019 minutes, 20 seconds
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John Fonte on Sovereignty & its Enemies

John Fonte, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute and the author of Sovereignty or Submission: Will Americans Rule Themselves or be Ruled by Others? (Encounter), offers his thoughts on “transnational progressivism” and the forces abetting it.
1/21/202015 minutes, 3 seconds
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Victor Davis Hanson on the Meaning of Citizenship.

Victor Davis Hanson, who is the 2019–20 Visiting Critic for The New Criterion, discusses the notion of citizenship as understood in the twenty-first century. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C. An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “Pre- and post-citizens.”
1/14/202021 minutes, 24 seconds
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Music for a While #17: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Jay begins with a Schubert work, and some singers and pianists who have performed it. He moves on to a funky, frenetic thing called “Techno-Parade.” Later, there is some Wagner by a great new singer. There is some immortal Rachmaninoff. And, at the very end, a song by the late Jerry Herman: “It’s Today,” from “Mame.” A diverse, appetizing musical menu. Tracks played: Schubert, “Winterreise,” Schäfer and Schneider Schubert, “Winterreise,” Hotter and Raucheisen Schubert, “Winterreise,” Schreier and Eschenbach Connesson, “Techno-Parade” “The Lark in the Clear Air” (arr. Michael McHale) Wagner, “Dich, teure Halle,” from “Tannhäuser” Rachmaninoff, “Let Now Thy Servant Depart in Peace,” from “Vespers” Herman, “It’s Today,” from “Mame”
1/9/202041 minutes, 3 seconds
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James Piereson on the Idea of an American Nation

James Piereson, a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, discusses the genesis of the American nation-state. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C. An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “The idea of an American nation.”
1/9/202017 minutes, 23 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
1/6/202016 minutes, 55 seconds
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Music for a While #16: Merry Christmas

Jay plays his favorite Christmas tracks: from Bach to gospel to jazz and beyond. Performers include Hermann Prey, James Cleveland, George Shearing, Heidi Grant Murphy, and Leontyne Price. A gift of a podcast. Tracks played: Bach, “Grosser Herr, o starker König” from the Christmas Oratorio “The First Nowell” (Schwarzkopf et al.) “I Saw Three Ships” (Schwarzkopf et al.) “Ding Dong Merrily on High” (George Shearing and his quintet) “Long Ago in Bethlehem” (Murphy and Murphy) “The Shepherd’s Pipe Carol” (Murphy and Murphy) “Oh, What a Pretty Little Baby” (James Cleveland et al.) “The Twelve Days of Christmas” (Sutherland et al.) “O Holy Night” (Leontyne Price et al.) “Jerusalem in the Morning” (Chanticleer)
12/24/201944 minutes, 29 seconds
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James Panero remembers John Simon

James Panero on the legacy of John Simon (1925–2019), the inimitable critic and longtime contributor to The New Criterion.
12/18/201916 minutes, 4 seconds
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Music For a While #15: Erotic and Other Evenings

Jay went to the ballet in Kyiv, for “Carmen Suite” and “Scheherazade.” He said, “It was the most erotic evening you could ever spend alone.” He plays some music from “Carmen Suite” in this episode, plus Bach, Scriabin, and Glass. And Frank Bridge, that half remembered and estimable English composer. There is much beauty, and much of interest, in this episode. Tracks played: Bach, Toccata in F-sharp minor Bizet-Shchedrin, Carmen Suite Scriabin, Piano Concerto Scriabin, Etude in D-sharp minor, Op. 8, No. 12 Glass, Funeral Music of Amenhotep III from “Akhnaten” Bridge, “Love Went A-Riding”
12/18/201933 minutes, 30 seconds
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James Hankins & James Panero discuss Leonardo da Vinci

James Hankins, a Professor of History at Harvard, joins James Panero to discuss the monumental Leonardo exhibition at the Louvre and the artist’s legacy five hundred years after his death.
12/6/201932 minutes, 39 seconds
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Music for a While #14: Fightin’ Words and Good Music

This episode begins with a liturgical piece by James MacMillan—a living composer—and ends with another liturgical piece by Wynton Marsalis—another living composer. In between, you’ve got some Saint-Saëns, some Sibelius, and some other music. Jay says some provocative—possibly offensive—things about a couple of cello concertos. Otherwise, it’s sweetness and light, mainly. A good show. Tracks played: James Macmillan, Miserere Saint-Saëns, Cello Concerto No. 1 in A minor Bach, Sarabande in E flat Sibelius, Scherzo from Symphony No. 1 in E minor Marsalis, Gloria Patri from “The Abyssinian Mass”
12/4/201938 minutes, 34 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the December 2019 issue of The New Criterion

The Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion discusses highlights in this month’s issue and remembers the life and work of Peter Collier.
12/2/201915 minutes, 28 seconds
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James Panero on American architectural style

James Panero discusses the architectural virtues and vices of the American home, and culls a few examples of past styles from the city of Portland, Maine.
11/20/201921 minutes, 13 seconds
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Music for a While #13: Rustles, Hisses, and Slogs

Jay ends with “Rustle of Spring,” the piano piece by Christian Sinding. It used to be universally known. It deserved to be. Jay also plays Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Shostakovich, Amy Beach, Havergal Brian, and Jörg Widmann. He tells some stories, makes some points. A rich and diverse world, music. Tracks played: Tchaikovsky, Piano Concerto No. 1 Brian, Double Fugue in E flat Widmann, “Con brio” Brahms, Violin Concerto Shostakovich, Symphony No. 5 (Bernstein, New York Philharmonic) Shostakovich, Symphony No. 5 (Maazel, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra) Beach, “Ah, Love, but a Day” Sinding, “Rustle of Spring”
11/15/201936 minutes, 28 seconds
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James Panero on Turner’s watercolors

James Panero recounts a recent trip to Mystic, Connecticut, and offers his thoughts on “J. M. W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate” and other developments at the Mystic Seaport Museum.
11/12/201913 minutes, 35 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the November 2019 issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
11/7/201917 minutes, 41 seconds
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Music for a While #12: Holy stuff (and other stuff)

When Harriet Cohen finishes playing her arrangement of Bach’s “Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier,” Jay says, “Holy stuff.” There is other stuff too in this episode: including “Tain’t What You Do (It’s How You Do It).” There may also be a little Beach Boys, classically performed. Jay likes that opening Bach piece so much, he ends with it, too: in a different version. Bach-Cohen, “Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier” Gluck, “Che farò senza Euridice?” Oliver and Young, “Tain’t What You Do (It’s How You Do It)” Feinberg, Piano Sonata No. 3 Bernstein, Sonata for Clarinet and Piano Wilson and Love, “Good Vibrations” (sung by the King’s Singers) Grieg-Ginzburg, “In the Hall of the Mountain King” Bach–Swingle Singers, “Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier”
10/29/201933 minutes, 15 seconds
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Annette Kirk, James Panero & Roger Kimball on the literary legacy of Russell Kirk

Remarks occasioned by Criterion Books’ republication of Russell Kirk’s “Old House of Fear,” with a new introduction by James Panero. https://newcriterion.com/bookstore?mode=criterion
10/25/201913 minutes, 12 seconds
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“Leninthink” by Gary Saul Morson

Gary Saul Morson, the Lawrence B. Dumas Professor of the Arts and Humanities at Northwestern University, delivers the inaugural Circle Lecture on the pernicious legacy of Vladimir Lenin.
10/15/20191 hour, 5 minutes, 9 seconds
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Music for a While #11: Immortality

Someone asked Jay to name one composer whose music he would take with him to a desert island. He names him (Bach). He also says farewell to Marcello Giordani, the Italian tenor, and Jessye Norman, the American soprano. We also get an opera overture, a Beethoven overture, some Gershwin—and “Take This Job and Shove It.” Quite a menu, quite a program. Tracks played: Bach, Prelude in C major, Book I, “The Well-Tempered Clavier” Chopin, Etude in C major, Op. 10, No. 1 Nicolai, Overture to “The Merry Wives of Windsor” Gershwin, “I Loves You, Porgy” from “Porgy and Bess” Beethoven, Triple Concerto Coe, David Allan, “Take This Job and Shove It” Betta, Marco, “Amuri mancatu” Trad., “Give Me Jesus”
10/15/201937 minutes, 3 seconds
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Gary Saul Morson & James Panero discuss “Leninthink”

Gary Saul Morson, the Lawrence B. Dumas Professor of the Arts and Humanities at Northwestern University and the author of “Leninthink,” joins James Panero to discuss the pernicious legacy of Vladimir Lenin.
10/7/201914 minutes, 17 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the October 2019 issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
10/2/201915 minutes, 25 seconds
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Music For a While #10: Pure joy

That’s what Jay calls a Bach piece arranged for organ by Jean Guillou: pure joy. There is some more pure joy in this episode too—including the final movement of Brahms’s Horn Trio, which Jay plays to honor Myron Bloom, the great French-horn player who died on September 26. He also honors, at the end, Christopher Rouse, the American composer, who died on September 21. Music, said Rouse, in a statement to be issued after his passing, “has given me life and a reason for living.” Jay also plays some Ella Fitzgerald, some Leontyne Price, and more. There is also a tale from opera lore: about Rudolf Bing and George Szell, who were too big for the same town. Tracks played: Bach-Guillou, Sinfonia Beethoven, “Pastoral” Symphony Brahms, Horn Trio Gershwin, “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” Chopin, “Winter Wind” Etude Barber, “Knoxville: Summer of 1915” Rouse, Symphony No. 3
9/30/201939 minutes, 46 seconds
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Music for a While #9: Who Cares?

Jay does, and you will too. “Who Cares?” is a Gershwin song, which Gershwin arranged for piano (alone). Jay has André Watts play this. He later has Ella Fitzgerald sing the song, accompanied by another André, Previn. In between, he talks about Gabriel Fauré, and plays him. He talks about Arcadi Volodos, than whom there is no better pianist in the world, Jay says. We hear Volodos in Bach—Bach arranged by Samuil Feinberg, an earlier Russian pianist. We hear more Bach, played by Feinberg himself. And some Callas. And some Offenbach. A wonderful menu of music, with tasty comments to go with it. Tracks played: Gershwin, “Who Cares?,” arranged for piano by the composer Fauré, Violin and Piano Sonata No. 2, third movement Bach-Feinberg, Largo from Bach’s Trio Sonata No. 5, BWV 529, for organ Bach, Prelude and Fugue in C major, Book II, “The Well-Tempered Clavier” Cherubini, “Dei tuoi figli la madre,” from “Medea” Offenbach, “Galop infernal” (“Can-Can”), from “Orpheus in the Underworld” Gershwin, “Who Cares?,” performed by Ella Fitzgerald, André Previn, and Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen
9/18/201933 minutes, 50 seconds
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Roger Kimball accepts the Phillips Award

Roger Kimball, the editor and publisher of The New Criterion, accepts the 2019 Thomas L. Phillips Career Achievement Award from the Fund for American Studies at the twenty-sixth annual TFAS Journalism Awards Dinner on September 12.
9/13/201914 minutes, 15 seconds
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Music for a While #8: Festival time

As Jay tells us at the beginning, he has been reviewing from two summer festivals: the Mostly Mozart Festival (New York) and the Salzburg Festival, in Mozart’s hometown. He discusses and plays a variety of music performed at these festivals: Haydn, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Enescu – and Mozart, for sure. Tracks played: Mozart, Overture to “The Magic Flute” Mendelssohn, “Variations sérieuses” Beethoven, Violin Concerto Enescu, Octet Mozart, Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595 Handel, “Tornami a vagheggiar,” from “Alcina” Handel, “Verdi prati,” from “Alcina” Haydn, Symphony No. 88
9/3/201943 minutes, 31 seconds
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James Panero on Venice's Last Judgment

James Panero on the beginning and end of the Most Serene Republic, occasioned by "Venice's last judgment" from the September 2019 issue.
8/22/201915 minutes, 4 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the September 2019 issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
8/21/201916 minutes, 4 seconds
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Music for a While #7: Hello, old friends — and new.

Jay revisits some old favorites and hails at least one new favorite. Tracks played: Tchaikovsky, Waltz from “The Sleeping Beauty” Mozart, Sonata for Violin and Piano in B flat, K. 454 Steve Reich, “It’s Gonna Rain” McHugh/Koehler, “Spreadin’ Rhythm Around” Arvo Pärt, Symphony No. 4 Arensky, Piano Trio in D minor Scriabin, Prelude in C major, Op. 13, No. 1 Robby Dupree, “Steal Away”
8/1/201943 minutes, 44 seconds
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Nightmare at the Museum: a discussion between James Panero and Andrew Shea

A conversation on cultural politics, occasioned by the resignation of Warren B. Kanders from the board of the Whitney Museum of American Art.
7/30/201924 minutes, 30 seconds
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Music for a While #6: The best song ever written

Or rather, three nominees. Plus, Gerard Schwarz, the trumpeter/conductor whom Jay interviewed recently on his “Q&A.” This episode provides beauty, wonder, excitement, controversy, solace – it’s music. Tracks played: Haydn, Trumpet Concerto, final movement, Gerard Schwarz et al. Piston, Symphony No. 4, Seattle Symphony, Gerard Schwarz Stölzel, “Bist du bei mir,” Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Gerald Moore Caccini, “Amarilli,” Janet Baker et al. Mahler, “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen,” Christa Ludwig et al.
7/17/201935 minutes, 21 seconds
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Music For a While #5: America!

Music For a While #5: America! by The New Criterion
7/8/201939 minutes, 14 seconds
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Music for a While #4: A tutu or two

Introducing this episode, Jay says, “Gonna throw a little ballet at you” – and he does. Some music from ballets. He also throws in some arias, some jazz, and more. An interesting, diverse, soul-pleasing episode. Tracks played: Massenet, “Elegy,” the Berlin Philharmonic, Herbert von Karajan Massenet, “Elegy,” José van Dam et al. Massenet, “Elegy,” Art Tatum Massenet, “The Dream,” Tito Schipa Massenet, “Gavotte,” Victoria de los Angeles Desyatnikov, piano prelude, Lukas Geniusas Prokofiev, excerpt from “On the Dnieper,” Ukrainian State Symphony Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar Glazunov, “Hail” and “Grande bacchanale” from “The Seasons,” Minnesota Orchestra, Edo de Waart Glazunov, Symphony No. 5, “Heroic,” last movement, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, José Serebrier
6/27/201938 minutes, 47 seconds
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Music for a While #3: Soft days and harder

Jay discusses, and plays, an old song: “A Soft Day.” You also have a little music from Brazil. And a composer who escaped the Nazis. And some Cole Porter. Also, what about the question of Wagner? Can you listen to him, SOB that he was? Finally, Franco Zeffirelli died – which leads to a reflection on him, and to an aria. In short, there’s plenty to think about in this episode, and plenty to hear.
6/24/201927 minutes, 40 seconds
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Music for a While #2: Postcards

From Norway, a story about Mrs. Grieg – and some music by Mr. From Israel, some thoughts about Bruch, Bloch, and others. This episode also includes a dollop of Rameau, a spiritual, a heavenly piece by Chopin, and more. Food for thought and soul.
6/14/201928 minutes, 5 seconds
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Music for a While #1: Hello

Jay Nordlinger begins a new podcast, a music ’cast. As he says, he’ll talk about music – make some points, tell some stories, tell some jokes – but mainly play music. Because why talk when you can listen? He begins this inaugural episode with the song from which he swipes his title (“Music for a While”). There is also some piano music by Prokofiev – music seldom heard. Jay remembers a couple of musicians who have died recently. And he closes with a song from “Kiss Me, Kate,” which is back on Broadway. “Music for a while,” goes Henry Purcell’s song, “shall all your cares beguile.”
6/5/201928 minutes, 26 seconds
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Roger Kimball receives the 2019 Bradley Prize

Roger Kimball, the editor and publisher of The New Criterion, is honored as one of three recipients of the 2019 Bradley Prizes at The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation’s awards ceremony and gala on April 4.
5/29/201910 minutes, 52 seconds
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Andrew Roberts & James Panero discuss Churchill & Burke

Andrew Roberts, a historian and the recipient of The New Criterion’s seventh annual Edmund Burke Award, joins James Panero to discuss Winston Churchill’s debt to Burke.
5/16/201911 minutes, 7 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the May issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
4/24/201915 minutes, 34 seconds
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James Panero on Jeffrey Hart

James Panero remembers the great literary scholar, editor, and mentor from the April issue of The New Criterion.
4/22/201913 minutes, 55 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the April issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
3/27/201915 minutes, 42 seconds
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David Yezzi & James Panero discuss the 2019 poetry issue; a reading by Nicholas Friedman

James Panero discusses the April issue with the New Criterion poetry editor David Yezzi, followed by 2018 New Criterion Poetry Prize–winner Nicholas Friedman reading a selection of poems from his collection “Petty Theft.”
3/25/201929 minutes, 35 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the March issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
3/1/201924 minutes, 28 seconds
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James Piereson & James Panero discuss the Trump presidency.

Occasioned by “Trumping right along,” a review of Victor Davis Hanson’s new book, “The Case for Trump,” in the March 2019 issue of The New Criterion. newcriterion.com/issues/2019/3/trumping-right-along
2/28/201933 minutes, 54 seconds
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Daniel McCarthy & James Panero discuss conservatism in the modern age

Daniel McCarthy, the editor of Modern Age, joins James Panero to discuss the history of the American conservative movement.
2/7/201920 minutes, 53 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the February issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
2/4/201915 minutes, 59 seconds
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Gerald J. Russello on Kirk & the unwritten constitution

Gerald J. Russello on Russell Kirk’s legal philosophy, part of a series occasioned by Kirk’s centenary, published in the January 2019 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2019/1/the-unwritten-constitution
1/10/201935 minutes, 37 seconds
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R. R. Reno on the politics of the imagination

R. R. Reno on Russell Kirk and the cult and culture of “openness,” part of a series occasioned by Kirk’s centenary, published in the January 2019 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2019/1/the-politics-of-the-imagination
1/9/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 35 seconds
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Daniel McCarthy on Russell Kirk, worldly conservative

Daniel McCarthy on Kirk and foreign policy, part of a series occasioned by Kirk’s centenary, published in the January 2019 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2019/1/russell-kirk-worldly-conservative
1/7/201936 minutes
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Daniel J. Mahoney on Russell Kirk & the politics of prudence

Daniel J. Mahoney on Edmund Burke, Russell Kirk & the conservative ethos, part of a series occasioned by Kirk’s centenary, published in the January 2019 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2019/1/conservatism-the-politics-of-prudence
1/4/201949 minutes, 34 seconds
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Roger Kimball on Russell Kirk’s centenary

Roger Kimball introduces a symposium on Russell Kirk’s centenary, published in the January 2019 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2019/1/permanent-things-russell-kirks-centenary
1/3/201921 minutes, 36 seconds
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James Panero on the ghost stories of Russell Kirk

James Panero on Russell Kirk’s ghost stories and published fiction, part of a series occasioned by Kirk’s centenary, published in the January 2019 issue of The New Criterion. https://newcriterion.com/issues/2019/1/the-ghosts-of-russell-kirk
1/2/201927 minutes, 50 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the January issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
1/1/201915 minutes, 25 seconds
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James Panero on college architecture

James Panero on the meaning of campus style and Dartmouth’s new Hood Museum from the December issue of The New Criterion.
12/18/201818 minutes, 19 seconds
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William Logan & James Panero discuss poetry & criticism

William Logan & James Panero discuss “Identity cards,” Logan’s most recent poetry chronicle for The New Criterion. https://www.newcriterion.com/issues/2018/12/identity-cards
12/17/201818 minutes, 39 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the December issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
12/1/201814 minutes, 36 seconds
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John Simon & James Panero discuss “Critics & criticism”

Occasioned by Simon’s essay in the November 2018 issue of The New Criterion. https://www.newcriterion.com/issues/2018/11/critics-criticism
11/29/201819 minutes, 58 seconds
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Parlo Come Pittore: A discussion on the life & work of Andrew Forge

From the evening lecture series at the New York Studio School, a panel discussion on the life & work of Andrew Forge, occasioned by the publication of “Observation: Notation,” edited by David Cast, from Criterion Books. James Panero moderates the discussion among Cast, William Bailey, Betty Cuningham, and Kyle Staver. Recorded October 3, 2018.
11/9/201854 minutes, 8 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the November issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
11/1/201815 minutes, 16 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the October issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
10/1/201815 minutes, 42 seconds
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James Panero on the legacy of J. Marion Sims

James Panero reads “Sims City,” on the ignominious removal of a Central Park monument, from the September 2018 issue of The New Criterion. https://www.newcriterion.com/issues/2018/9/sims-city
9/24/201811 minutes, 37 seconds
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Eric Gibson & James Panero discuss the work of Alberto Giacometti

Eric Gibson & James Panero discuss the work of Alberto Giacometti. Occasioned by Gibson’s essay, “Giacometti Renewed,” in the September 2018 issue of The New Criterion. https://www.newcriterion.com/issues/2018/9/giacometti-renewed
9/7/201821 minutes, 45 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the September issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
9/1/201817 minutes, 4 seconds
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Laura Jacobs & James Panero discuss ballet & Jacobs’s new book, “Celestial Bodies”

James Panero talks to Laura Jacobs about ballet & her new book, “Celestial Bodies.” Look for a review of Jacobs’s book, by Karen Wilkin, in the September 2018 issue of The New Criterion.
8/9/201829 minutes, 38 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the June issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
6/1/201814 minutes, 29 seconds
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Victor Davis Hanson accepts the Edmund Burke Award (complete remarks)

Our sixth annual Edmund Burke Award Gala honored historian, classicist, and scholar, Victor Davis Hanson. Listen to the complete ceremony, including remarks from Roger Kimball, James Panero, James Piereson, and a Q&A session.
5/31/201853 minutes, 59 seconds
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Victor Davis Hanson and James Panero discuss “Burke today.”

Victor Davis Hanson and James Panero discuss “Burke today.” by The New Criterion
5/30/201814 minutes, 36 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces the May issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
4/30/201817 minutes, 3 seconds
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David Yezzi & James Panero discussion; a reading by Poetry Prize winner Moira Egan

David Yezzi & James Panero discuss the 2018 poetry issue; a reading by Poetry Prize winner Moira Egan
4/13/201832 minutes, 1 second
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Roger Kimball introduces the April issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
4/3/201817 minutes, 18 seconds
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Art & an affront: Roger Kimball introduces the March issue of The New Criterion

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.
3/8/201811 minutes, 13 seconds
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Dominic Green & James Panero discuss “Puttin’ on the style”

Dominic Green & James Panero discuss Green’s recent essay on writing, and on English style, which appeared in the February 2018 issue of The New Criterion.
3/7/201814 minutes, 31 seconds
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Classical music spring preview with Eric C. Simpson and Jay Nordlinger

Associate Editor Eric C. Simpson and music critic Jay Nordlinger discuss their highlights for the second half of the 2017–18 music season in New York. Lead-in/lead-out music: J. S. Bach, Chaconne from Partita No. 2 in D minor for solo violin, performed by Eric C. Simpson. Image by Nils Olander via Creative Commons
1/30/201853 minutes, 36 seconds
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Marco Grassi & James Panero discuss “E. V. Thaw, 1927–2018”

Marco Grassi & James Panero discuss Grassi’s recent essay on the life and work of E. V. Thaw, which will appear in the February 2018 issue of The New Criterion.
1/29/201817 minutes, 31 seconds
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Michael J. Lewis & James Panero discuss “Vincent Scully, 1920–2017”

Michael J. Lewis & James Panero discuss Lewis’s recent essay on the life and work of Vincent Scully, which appeared in the January 2018 issue of The New Criterion. https://www.newcriterion.com/issues/2018/1/vincent-joseph-scully-19202017
1/12/201831 minutes, 55 seconds
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“Why populism fails” featuring James Piereson

“Populism and its critics” brought together preeminent conservative thinkers from both sides of the Atlantic to discuss the rise of President Donald Trump, Brexit, and the overarching populist movements that enabled both. James Piereson concludes the first section of the conference with a presentation titled “Why populism fails.”
10/6/201749 minutes, 34 seconds
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“The political crisis of our times...” and “Is it a free country?...”

The continuation of "Populism and its critics," a joint conference hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit. Presentations include: “The political crisis of our times: the dire implications of democratization in the 
twenty-first century,” by Jeremy Black “Is it a free country? Transatlantic misunderstandings about populism,” by Daniel Johnson
10/6/20171 hour, 45 minutes, 49 seconds
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“Populists & the past: lessons from the Roman, Venetian & Dutch Republics”

“Populism and its critics” brought together preeminent conservative thinkers from both sides of the Atlantic to discuss the rise of President Donald Trump, Brexit, and the overarching populist movements that enabled both. The second session begins with remarks by Michael Mosbacher from The Social Affairs Unit. It continues with a presentation titled “Populists & the past: lessons from the Roman, Venetian & Dutch Republics,” by Douglas Carswell.
10/2/201746 minutes, 39 seconds
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"Populism and its critics" featuring Roger Kimball, George Nash and Andrew C. McCarthy

“Populism and its critics” brought together preeminent conservative thinkers from both sides of the Atlantic to discuss the rise of President Donald Trump, Brexit, and the overarching populist movements that enabled both. The first part of the conference, hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit, features an introduction by The New Criterion editor Roger Kimball. Introductory presentations include: “How should conservatives respond to the populism challenge?” by George Nash “Governance: populism meets reality,” by Andrew C. McCarthy
10/2/20171 hour, 24 minutes, 19 seconds
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Fall classical music preview with Eric C. Simpson and Jay Nordlinger

Associate Editor Eric C. Simpson and music critic Jay Nordlinger discuss their picks for the first half of the 2017–18 New York music and opera season. Intro/extro: Variations on "The Last Rose of Summer" by H. W. Ernst, performed by Eric C. Simpson. Image by Nils Olander via Creative Commons
9/25/201750 minutes, 30 seconds
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David Pryce-Jones & James Panero discuss "Miłosz Among the Ruins"

David Pryce-Jones and James Panero discuss "Miłosz Among the Ruins," David's essay from the September 2017 issue of The New Criterion. https://www.newcriterion.com/issues/2017/9/milosz-among-the-ruins-8799
9/12/201715 minutes, 6 seconds
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Roger Kimball at The Heritage Foundation

Roger Kimball, Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, traces the rise of populism in the United States and abroad in this lecture at The Heritage Foundation.
7/8/20171 hour, 2 minutes, 41 seconds
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James Panero & David Yezzi discuss the 2017 poetry issue; a reading by Poetry Prize winner John Foy

James Panero & David Yezzi discuss the 2017 poetry issue; a reading by Poetry Prize winner John Foy by The New Criterion
4/21/201737 minutes, 54 seconds
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Classical Music Spring Preview with Eric C. Simpson & Jay Nordlinger

New Criterion Associate Editor Eric C. Simpson and music critic Jay Nordlinger preview New York's spring 2017 season. Intro/extro: Fuga from J. S. Bach's Sonata in C major for solo violin, performed by Eric C. Simpson.
1/16/20171 hour, 7 minutes, 14 seconds
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George Knight: Yale Center for British Architecture – Conserving Kahn

The architect George Knight describes the vision and process behind his firm's renovation of the Yale Center for British Art.
11/21/201621 minutes, 20 seconds
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Michael J. Lewis: I swear by Apollo

The art historian Michael J. Lewis discusses the evolution of museum architecture.
11/21/201617 minutes, 52 seconds
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Bruce Cole: The museum as "town hall"

The historian Bruce Cole advocates a separation between the worlds of art appreciation and community organizing.
11/14/201619 minutes, 11 seconds
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Karen Wilkin: Less can be more

The art critic Karen Wilkin praises the merits of simple museum displays and a contemplative approach to art art works.
11/14/201620 minutes, 55 seconds
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Eric Gibson: Notes on the postmodern museum

The Wall Street Journal art critic Eric Gibson describes the way postmodernism reshaped the character of museums.
11/7/201615 minutes, 42 seconds
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James Panero: The museum of the present

Executive Editor James Panero discusses the character and trends of contemporary art museums.
10/31/201619 minutes, 17 seconds
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Roger Kimball introduces "The Future of Permanence"

Roger Kimball's introduction to our symposium on museums, held Friday, October 21 at the French Consulate in New York.
10/27/201616 minutes, 19 seconds
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Classical music season preview with Eric C. Simpson & Jay Nordlinger

Associate editor Eric C. Simpson and music critic Jay Nordlinger discuss their picks for the first half of the 2016–17 New York musical season. Intro/extro: Variations on "The Last Rose of Summer" by H. W. Ernst, performed by Eric C. Simpson. Image by Nils Olander via Creative Commons
10/14/20161 hour, 31 seconds
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James Panero, Eric Simpson, Benjamin Riley, and Mene Ukueberuwa discuss the Hilton Kramer Fellowship

The current and past Hilton Kramer fellows discuss The New Criterion’s Hilton Kramer Fellowship with Executive Editor James Panero.
9/1/20168 minutes, 37 seconds
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Roger Kimball, James Panero, and the Editors discuss highlights from the September 2016 issue

Roger Kimball, James Panero, and the Editors discuss highlights from the September 2016 issue by The New Criterion
8/29/201610 minutes, 40 seconds
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James Panero and Benjamin Riley discuss the new “newcriterion.com”

Executive editor James Panero and outgoing Hilton Kramer Fellow Benjamin Riley discuss the new “newcriterion.com”
8/23/201613 minutes, 56 seconds
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Roger Kimball, James Panero, and Dominic Green on the Yale Center For British Art

Roger Kimball, James Panero, and Dominic Green on the renovated Yale Center for British Art; aired originally on WNPR.
5/12/20163 minutes, 3 seconds
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J. S. Bach: Largo

Eric C. Simpson plays the Largo from Bach's Sonata No. 3 in C Major for Solo Violin.
3/21/20163 minutes, 26 seconds
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Anthony Daniels & James Panero on "Good and Evil in the Garden of Art"

For The New Criterion, James Panero talks to Dr. Anthony Daniels, aka Theodore Dalrymple, the frequent and acclaimed (and frequently acclaimed) essayist for the magazine. Dr. Daniels is the author of new book of essays, "Good and Evil in the Garden of Art: Discrimination as the Guarantor of Civilization," published by Criterion Books.
3/9/201611 minutes, 39 seconds
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Classical Music Spring Preview with Eric Simpson & Jay Nordlinger

Assistant editor Eric C. Simpson and music critic Jay Nordlinger discuss their picks for the second half of the 2015–16 New York musical season. Music: Fuga from J. S. Bach's Sonata in C major for solo violin, performed by Eric C. Simpson. Image by Nils Olander via Creative Commons
1/12/201652 minutes, 51 seconds
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Steven Semes & James Panero on the "architecture of place"

For The New Criterion, James Panero talks to Steven W. Semes, Director of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at the Notre Dame School of Architecture, and the author of "The Future of the Past: A Conservation Ethic for Architecture, Urbanism and Historic Preservation." Semes's essay on an "architecture of place" will appear in the December 2015 issue of The New Criterion.
10/15/201527 minutes, 5 seconds
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Classical music season preview with Eric C. Simpson & Jay Nordlinger

Assistant editor Eric C. Simpson and music critic Jay Nordlinger discuss their picks for the first half of the 2015–16 New York musical season. Intro/outro: Fuga from J. S. Bach's Sonata in G minor for solo violin, performed by Eric C. Simpson. Image by Nils Olander via Creative Commons
9/18/201546 minutes, 34 seconds
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Social Affairs Unit in London: Part 1 of 2

PAPERS BY: Peter Berkowitz (The Hoover Institute), Andrew McCarthy (The Foundation for the Defense of Democracy), Kenneth Minogue (UK), Jeremy Black (UK), Daniel Johnson, and John O'Sullivan OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Roger Kimball, Brian Anderson (The City Journal), Judge Robert H. Bork, Gerald Frost (UK), George Nash, James Piereson (The William E. Simon Foundation), Herbert London (The Hudson Institute), Michael Gleba (The Scaife Foundation) FIRST BROADCAST: 09/28/07
9/8/20152 hours, 59 minutes, 12 seconds
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Social Affairs Unit in London: Part 2 of 2

PAPERS BY: Peter Berkowitz (The Hoover Institute), Andrew McCarthy (The Foundation for the Defense of Democracy), Kenneth Minogue (UK), Jeremy Black (UK), Daniel Johnson, and John O'Sullivan OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Roger Kimball, Brian Anderson (The City Journal), Judge Robert H. Bork, Gerald Frost (UK), George Nash, James Piereson (The William E. Simon Foundation), Herbert London (The Hudson Institute), Michael Gleba (The Scaife Foundation) FIRST BROADCAST: 09/28/07
9/8/20153 hours, 2 minutes, 53 seconds
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Eve of SAU in London: John O’Sullivan presents “The President, the Pope, and the Prime Minister”

John O’Sullivan presents his new book “The President, the Pope, and the Prime Minister.” On the eve of The New Criterion and Social Affairs Unit (London) Conference. FIRST BROADCAST: 09/27/07
9/8/201538 minutes, 4 seconds
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SAU in London: The Impact of Small Magazines

FIRST BROADCAST: 10/18/07 PARTICIPANTS: David Yezzi, Roger Kimball, Anthony Daniels, Eric Ormsby, David Pryce-Jones, Kenneth Minogue
9/3/201539 minutes, 53 seconds
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Andrew Roberts on his book “Masters and Commanders”

Luncheon with the distinguished English historian Andrew Roberts. Mr. Roberts will be speaking about his new book: Masters and Commanders: How Roosevelt, Churchill, George Marshall and Alanbrooke Won the War in the West, 1941-1945. FIRST BROADCAST: 05/18/09
9/3/201546 minutes, 20 seconds
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The Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity

On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism. The Duranty Prize is named after Walter Duranty, the New York Times Moscow corresponded in the 1920s and 1930s who whitewashed Joseph Stalin’s forced starvation of the Ukrainians (the Holodomor) and many other aspects of Soviet oppression. Duranty was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for his efforts. It has never been revoked. Audio copyright Ed Driscoll, www.eddriscoll.com.
9/1/20151 hour, 1 minute, 44 seconds
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Introduction to The Kennedy Phenomenon

Roger Kimball introduces The Kennedy Phenomenon, a conference presented by The New Criterion on Tuesday, November 19. First broadcast 11/22/13.
9/1/20158 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Kennedy Phenomenon: "Watching the Kennedy Train-Wreck"

Roger Kimball reads Peter Collier’s paper on oft-overlooked unsavory details of the Kennedys' lives. Much of the paper is drawn from Collier’s book, coauthored with David Horowitz, The Kennedys: An American Drama. First broadcast 11/22/13.
9/1/201528 minutes, 39 seconds
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The Kennedy Phenomenon: "The Many Misjudgments of Richard Hofstadter"

Fred Siegel discusses his new book The Revolt against the Masses and the myriad oversights of the historian Richard Hofstadter. First broadcast 11/22/13.
9/1/201520 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Kennedy Phenomenon: "The Kennedy Assassination and the Kennedy Legend"

James Piereson outlines the differences between the legends surrounding Kennedy and the historical facts, touching on his new book, Camelot and the Cultural Revolution. First broadcast 11/22/2013.
9/1/201547 minutes, 56 seconds
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The Kennedy Phenomenon: "JFK, Conservative"

Ira Stoll discusses his new book, JFK, Conservative, and argues that Kennedy wasn't a liberal messiah but actually had more in common with future Republicans than his progressive supporters realize. First broadcast 11/22/13.
9/1/201518 minutes, 34 seconds
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Question & answer session from The Kennedy Phenomenon

A brief question and answer session about JKF, his assassination, and his legacy with Roger Kimball, Fred Siegel, James Piereson, and Ira Stoll. First broadcast 11/21/2013.
9/1/201538 minutes, 22 seconds
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Edward Jay Epstein on the mysteries surrounding the Kennedy assassination

Commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of JFK's assassination, Edward Jay Epstein reflects on Cold War politics, Castro, the CIA, Lee Harvey Oswald, and his new book, The JFK Assassination Diary: My Search For Answers to the Mystery of the Century. Includes a Q&A with the speaker and an intro by James Piereson. First broadcast 11/20/13.
9/1/20151 hour, 1 minute, 32 seconds
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Andrew C. McCarthy talks Islam

Andrew C. McCarthy covers Boston, the Blind Sheikh, the Arab Spring, and Turkey in his remarks at TNC's board dinner. First broadcast 6/5/13.
9/1/201527 minutes, 13 seconds
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Poet George Green reads from his award-winning Lord Byron's Foot

George Green reads from Lord Byron's Foot, his collection of poetry that won the 2012 New Criterion Poetry Prize at a Friends & Young Friends event. First broadcast 5/1/2013.
9/1/201513 minutes, 22 seconds
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James Panero on price gouging at the Met, with Fred Dicker

Are public museums like the Met overburdening visitors with "recommended" admission fees? Panero goes on 1300 AM to discuss his latest Daily News article during Fred Dicker's Albany-based radio program. First broadcast 3/25/2013.
9/1/201512 minutes, 40 seconds
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Classical recital: Jules Massenet's "Méditation," from Thaïs

Eric Simpson, violin, and Lawrence Perelman, piano, gave a recital for TNC Friends and Young Friends, including pieces from Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, and Ysaye.
9/1/20157 minutes, 1 second
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Classical recital: Beethoven's "Spring" sonata, Allegro

Eric Simpson, violin, and Lawrence Perelman, piano, gave a recital for TNC Friends and Young Friends, including pieces from Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt, and Ysaye.
9/1/20158 minutes, 52 seconds
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James Panero talks fracking with Fred Dicker

New Criterion Managing Editor James Panero goes on 1300 AM to discuss fracking, natural gas, and environmentalism on Fred Dicker's Albany-based radio program.
9/1/201518 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Pillars of Liberty: "The Age of Discussion" by Roger Kimball

Roger Kimball's paper, presented at the conference hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit, "The Pillars of Liberty: Sustaining the Building Blocks of a Free Society."
9/1/20151 hour, 56 seconds
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The Pillars of Liberty: "Marshall's Men: American High Command in the Second World War"

Gen. Josiah Bunting III's paper, presented at the conference hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit, "The Pillars of Liberty: Sustaining the Building Blocks of a Free Society."
9/1/201539 minutes, 58 seconds
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The Pillars of Liberty: "Patriotism, Allegiance, and the Nation State" by Andrew Roberts

Andrew Roberts's paper, presented at the conference hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit, "The Pillars of Liberty: Sustaining the Building Blocks of a Free Society."
9/1/201542 minutes, 11 seconds
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The Pillars of Liberty: "Liberty: Do We Need a Law for That" by Andrew C. McCarthy

Andrew C. McCarthy's paper, presented at the conference hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit, "The Pillars of Liberty: Sustaining the Building Blocks of a Free Society."
9/1/201542 minutes, 11 seconds
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The Pillars of Liberty: "The Future of the Press" by Keith Windschuttle

Keith Windschuttle's paper, presented at the conference hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit, "The Pillars of Liberty: Sustaining the Building Blocks of a Free Society."
9/1/201556 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Pillars of Liberty: "Liberty is an Evolutionary Mechanism" by Kevin D. Williamson

Kevin D. Williamson's paper, presented at the conference hosted by The New Criterion and the Social Affairs Unit, "The Pillars of Liberty: Sustaining the Building Blocks of a Free Society."
9/1/20151 hour, 5 minutes, 10 seconds
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Remarks from the Hilton Kramer memorial reception

Roger Kimball, James Piereson, and Grace Glueck delivered remarks at the memorial reception for New Criterion founding editor Hilton Kramer who recently passed away. The reception took place on May 9, 2012 at the Century Club in New York.
9/1/201520 minutes, 54 seconds
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Emily Esfahani Smith on the Mike Huckabee Show

The New Criterion Associate Editor Emily Esfahani Smith discusses HBO's Girls and the hook up culture with Gov. Mike Huckabee.
9/1/20158 minutes, 27 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Show: What's a Museum?

James Panero discusses "What's a Museum?" on The Brian Lehrer Show (WNYC).
9/1/201517 minutes, 33 seconds
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Anthony Daniels on the Euro Crisis

The New Criterion author Anthony Daniels delivers remarks in New York City about the "European experiment." With an introduction by editor Roger Kimball. First broadcast on November 30, 2011.
9/1/201540 minutes, 35 seconds
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Andrew C. McCarthy: The Muslim Threat

The New Criterion contributor Andrew C. McCarthy delivers remarks in Effingham, Illinois, about the threat of Islamism to the United States. A Friend of The New Criterion, Dwight Erskine, introduces McCarthy to the Effingham audience. Recorded on October 1, 2011.
9/1/201539 minutes, 45 seconds
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Roger Kimball: The Grim Future of Statism

The New Criterion editor Roger Kimball delivers remarks in Effingham, Illinois, about the future of statism and The New Criterion's 30th anniversary. A Friend of The New Criterion, Dwight Erskine, introduces Roger Kimball to the Effingham audience. Recorded on October 1, 2011.
9/1/201526 minutes, 6 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 1 of 12

Roger Kimball, editor of The New Criterion, delivers an introduction about the question at hand, "Is America in Decline?"
9/1/201516 minutes, 44 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 2 of 12

Historian and author Keith Windschuttle presents his paper, "Pax Americana and What the World Would Lose if the U.S. Declined."
9/1/201531 minutes, 14 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 3 of 12

Keith Windscuttle responds to questions and comments from conference participants and audience members.
9/1/201518 minutes, 46 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 4 of 12

Political scientist Charles Murray presents his paper, "An Exceptional Decline."
9/1/201525 minutes, 11 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 5 of 12

Charles Murray responds to the questions and comments of conference participants and audience members.
9/1/201521 minutes, 28 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 6 of 12

Andrew C. McCarthy, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, presents his paper, "Things Have Been Worse. . . . Haven't They?"
9/1/201523 minutes, 3 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 7 of 12

Andrew C. McCarthy responds to the questions and comments of conference participants and audience members.
9/1/201534 minutes, 36 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 8 of 12

Simon Green, a professor of modern history at the University of Leeds, presents his paper, "Tocqueville and the Possibility of American Decline."
9/1/201526 minutes, 22 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 9 of 12

Professor Simon Green responds to the questions and comments of conference participants and audience members.
9/1/201525 minutes, 30 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 10 of 12

British writer and editor Daniel Johnson presents his paper, "The Mythology of Decline."
9/1/201533 minutes, 8 seconds
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 11 of 12

After presenting his paper, "The Mythology of Decline," writer and editor Daniel Johnson responds to the questions and comments of conference panelists and audience members.
9/1/201547 minutes
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TNC/SAU Conference: Is America in Decline? Part 12 of 12

Concluding remarks by John O'Sullivan, editor-at-large of National Review, and vice president of Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty.
9/1/201531 minutes, 23 seconds
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Lord Conrad Black on American Culture

Lord Conrad Black, former chairman of the Telegraph Media Group and best-selling author, speaks to the Editor and Friends of The New Criterion about American culture today. Posted on: 07/20/2011 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, Conrad Black
9/1/201533 minutes, 46 seconds
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Amb. John Bolton Keynote Address at Limited Government Conference

Amb. John Bolton's Keynote Address at "The Wisdom of the Founders: The Fate of Limited Government in an Age of Uncertainty" Posted on: 11/09/2010
9/1/201527 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Future of Artists' Lofts

From the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC, James Panero talks about an expansion of the loft law protecting New York City tenants in manufacturing or commercial space converted for residential lofts. Posted on: 06/24/2010
9/1/201517 minutes, 23 seconds
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Roger Scruton on "I Drink Therefore I Am: A Philosopher's Guide to Wine."

First broadcast 5/25/10 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, Roger Scruton
9/1/201546 minutes, 34 seconds
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Elucidations & Corrections: Arts Criticism

The Goldring Arts Journalism Program S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University honors "The New Criterion." Posted on: 01/19/2010 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, Jay Nordlinger, James Panero, David Yezzi, Laura Jacobs
9/1/201552 minutes, 54 seconds
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Swallow Anthology Reading at The Grolier

First broadcast 12/4/09 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, David Yezzi, Ernest Hilbert, Adam Kirsch & Callie Siskel
9/1/201520 minutes, 46 seconds
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Social Affairs Unit Conference: Part 1

"The New Statism or Democratic Despotism Comes of Age" by Roger Kimball and "The Islamist Left Versus the Constitution" by Andrew McCarthy
9/1/20151 hour, 44 minutes, 35 seconds
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Social Affairs Unit Conference: Part 2

"Nice 'N' Easy: The Age of Micro Tyranny" by Mark Steyn Posted on: 10/23/2009 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, Andrew C. McCarthy, Mark Steyn, Jeremy Black, Michael Mosbache, Tim Congdon
9/1/20151 hour, 14 minutes, 24 seconds
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Social Affairs Unit Conference: Part 3

"The State and the Threat to Democracy" by Jeremy Black and "The Paradox of the Intellectual and the Future of Capitalism" by Tim Congdon Posted on: 10/26/2009 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, Andrew C. McCarthy, Mark SteynJeremy Black, Tim Congdon, Daniel Johnson, Herb London, David Pryce-Jones
9/1/20151 hour, 53 minutes, 1 second
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Social Affairs Unit Conference: Part 4

"The Criminalization of Making Money" by Lionel Shriver Posted on: 10/26/2009 PARTICIPANTS Jeremy Black, Roger Kimball, Andrew C. McCarthy, Mark SteynJeremy Black, Tim Congdon, Daniel Johnson, Herb London, Michael Mosbacher, Lionel Shriver
9/1/20151 hour, 1 minute, 57 seconds
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Risky Arts Business

James Panero discusses 'The Culture Crash' on The Brian Lehrer Show (WNYC).
9/1/201518 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Enduring Legacy of William F. Buckley Jr.

A panel discussion recorded at the Conservative Political Action Conference, Washington DC., on 2/28/2009. With James Panero, Matthew Continetti (Weekly Standard) and Daniel McCarthy (American Conservative). Hosted by Mark Henrie. Sponsored by the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. Posted on: 08/24/2009 PARTICIPANTS James Panero, Matthew Continetti, Daniel McCarthy
9/1/20151 hour, 31 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Culture Crash

First broadcast July 8, 2009. A discussion with James Panero and City Journal's Ben Plotinsky about "The Culture Crash," how risky investments have endangered New York’s leading arts institutions, James Panero's article from a special issue of City Journal on "New York's Tomorrow." Posted on: 08/21/2009
9/1/20155 minutes, 27 seconds
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"Taking the Occasion," poems by Daniel Brown

The eighth annual New Criterion Poetry Prize winner reads selections from his book at an evening with the Friends of The New Criterion. Posted on: 04/17/2009 PARTICIPANTS David Yezzi , Dan Brown
9/1/201512 minutes, 58 seconds
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Jay Nordlinger on the future of classical music, from an evening with The New Criterion.

First broadcast 3/27/2009 download Jay Nordlinger on the future of classical music, from an evening with the Friends of The New Criterion. Posted on: 03/27/2009 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, Jay Nordlinger
9/1/201546 minutes, 11 seconds
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Roger Kimball on Tenured Radicals with John J. Miller

"For at least ten years...students have been much more receptive to the message of [the book], namely that it's a bad thing when the curriculum gets politicized and when higher education is...turned over to ideologues rather than to scholars...[B]ut I haven't noticed any softening on the part of the faculty," says Roger Kimball, author of Tenured Radicals: How Politics Has Corrupted Our Higher Education. Posted on: 02/23/2009 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, John J. Miller
9/1/201513 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Milt Rosenberg Show: Free Speech in an age of Jihad

Roger Kimball, David Yezzi, and James Panero discuss the New Criterion special pamphlet "Free Speech in an Age of Jihad." From the Milt Rosenberg Show, WGN. Recorded live in the Chicago studios 8/14/2008.
9/1/201559 minutes, 15 seconds
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'What Is to Be Done? Legislative Opportunities and Pitfalls,' PANEL THREE AND CONCLUDING REMARKS

Libel Tourism, “Hate Speech,” and Political Freedom, a conference held by The New Criterion and the Foundation for Defense of Democracies Posted on: 04/10/2008 PARTICIPANTS Robert Bork, Roger Kimball, Andrew C. McCarthy, Jay Nordlinger,Daniel Kornstein, John J. Walsh
9/1/20151 hour, 38 minutes, 16 seconds
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Roger Kimball on liberalism's response to Islam

From an evening with the Illinois chapter of the Friends of The New Criterion. Recorded on 8/16/2008.
9/1/201542 minutes, 37 seconds
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'The Dimming of Liberty: Legal Jihad and the Criminalization of Resistance'

Libel Tourism, “Hate Speech,” and Political Freedom, a conference held by The New Criterion and the Foundation for Defense of Democracies Posted on: 04/10/2008 PARTICIPANTS Roger Kimball, Mark Steyn
9/1/201545 minutes, 45 seconds
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'Suppressing Discussion of Islam,' PANEL TWO from Free Speech in an Age of Jihad

Libel Tourism, “Hate Speech,” and Political Freedom a conference held by The New Criterion and the Foundation for Defense of Democracies Posted on: 04/10/2008 Participants: Clifford D. May, Robert Spencer, Steven Emerson, Frank J. Gaffney, Jr., Claudia Rosett, Ibn Warraq
9/1/20151 hour, 25 minutes, 21 seconds
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'The Face of Libel Tourism,' OPENING REMARKS AND PANEL ONE from Free Speech in an Age of Jihad

Libel Tourism, “Hate Speech,” and Political Freedom a conference held by The New Criterion and the Foundation for Defense of Democracies First broadcast: 04/10/2008 Participants: Roger Kimball, Stanley Kurtz, Rachel Ehrenfeld, Brooke Goldstein, Ezra Levant
9/1/20151 hour, 44 minutes, 39 seconds
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Joseph Epstein on the future of small magazines

First broadcast 1/18/2008
9/1/201545 minutes, 58 seconds
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John O’Sullivan on Poland and the Cold War, from an evening with the Friends of The New Criterion

First broadcast 9/28/2007
9/1/201531 minutes
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James Panero discusses Classical Realism on NPR's All Things Considered

First broadcast 12/17/2006
9/1/20154 minutes, 54 seconds
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Peter Pettus & James Panero discuss "From Selma to Montgomery"

For The New Criterion, James Panero talks to Peter Pettus about his new book, "The March in Memory: From Selma to Montgomery," published by Criterion Books.
8/26/201527 minutes, 6 seconds
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Remarks from the Hilton Kramer memorial reception

Roger Kimball, James Piereson, and Grace Glueck delivered remarks at the memorial reception for New Criterion founding editor Hilton Kramer who recently passed away. The reception took place on May 9, 2012 at the Century Club in New York.
5/9/201220 minutes, 54 seconds