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The Institute of World Politics Profile

The Institute of World Politics

English, Education, 1 season, 567 episodes, 1 day, 13 hours, 36 minutes
About
The Institute of World Politics is a graduate school of national security and international affairs, dedicated to developing leaders with a sound understanding of international realities and the ethical conduct of statecraft, based on knowledge and appreciation of the principles of the American political economy and the Western moral tradition. **Please note that the views expressed by our guest lecturers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Institute of World Politics.**
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TikTok from First Principles: Why it’s the CCP’s Most Potent Weapon Against America and the West

Jan Jekielek explains many facts/realities about CCP policies, activities, and laws. The first was the 2017 National Intelligence Law and the second the concept of Military-Civil Fusion, one of Xi Jinping’s seven national priorities. He discusses much of what we’ve learned about how TikTok works, and about what TikTok is, and how it is likely being used given these realities and precedents.
6/6/20241 hour, 4 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ukraine’s Most Important Battle: Fighting for American Hearts and Minds

About the Lecture: Glenn Corn will provide a ground-level perspective of the current situation in Ukraine and discuss why it's important for the U.S. to support the Ukraine's fight against the Russian invasion. About the Speaker: Glenn Corn is a 34-year veteran of the U.S. Intelligence and Foreign Affairs communities. Prof. Corn served for over 20 years abroad, including tours in Russia, Turkey, Central Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East. He also held senior leadership positions within the Intelligence Community in the U.S. and is a graduate of multiple specialized training programs in the fields of Intelligence, Security, Adult Education and Training and Executive Leadership. He is a founding partner of the Strategic Advisory and Consulting firm “Varyag” and Expert contributor to the “Cipher Brief”. He has a master’s degree in Russian Language and Literature from American University and a bachelor’s degree in Russian Studies from Hofstra University, and he is also a graduate of the U.S. Army Russian Institute. He speaks Russian and Turkish.
4/17/202458 minutes, 31 seconds
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Countering the Dragon: Preparing for Potential Chinese Aggression

An Alexander Hamilton Society student roundtable discussion focusing on current affairs in East Asia, what would happen leading up to an invasion of Taiwan or conflict breaking out in the South China Sea, the policy implications behind it for the region, the United States, and the rest of the world, and then identify unique policy responses outside of what the current thinkers are considering. About Michael Sobolik Michael Sobolik is a Senior Fellow in Indo-Pacific Studies for the American Foreign Policy Council (AFPC). His work covers American and Chinese grand strategy, regional economic and security trends, America’s Asian alliance architecture, and human rights. Michael also serves as editor of AFPC’s Indo-Pacific Monitor e-bulletin, AFPC’s review of regional developments. His analysis has appeared in The Diplomat, Foreign Policy, The Hill, Jane's Defence Weekly, The National Interest, National Review, Newsweek, Providence, and RealClearDefense. Before joining AFPC, Michael served as a Legislative Assistant in the United States Senate from 2014 to 2019. While in the Senate, Michael drafted legislation on China, Russia, India, Taiwan, North Korea, and Cambodia, as well as strategic systems and missile defense. Michael is an undergraduate student at Texas A&M University, where he studied political philosophy. He also earned his Master of International Affairs degree in American grand strategy and U.S.-China relations at the Bush School of Government and Public Service.
4/13/20241 hour, 9 minutes, 37 seconds
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UNESCO 3.0

About the Debate: In Nov 1945, the U.S. joined UNESCO, a new post-WWII organization designed to promote world peace and security. In Dec 1984, President Reagan took the U.S. out of UNESCO citing corruption and mismanagement. In Oct 2003, President George Bush rejoined UNESCO to advance human rights, tolerance, and learning. In Dec 2018, President Trump took the U.S.out of UNESCO citing anti-Israel bias, and the U.S.’s mounting arrears to UNESCO resulting from Palestine’s election as a full member. In July 2023, President Biden rejoined UNESCO for the third time to combat increasing Chinese influence at the organization. Given the problematic relationship between the U.S. and UNESCO, and the organization’s history of controversial initiatives, was this a wise decision? What are the pros and cons for the U.S. of being a member of UNESCO once again? About the Presenters: Gerald C. Anderson served as Director of Administration and Finance at the Pan American Health Organization in Washington, DC, from March 2014 to July 2021. Prior to joining PAHO, Mr. Anderson served from 2011-2014 as Secretary for Administration and Finance at the Organization of American States in Washington DC. Mr. Anderson served the United States Foreign Service from 1980 - 2010, completing his serviced as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of International Organizations. Mr. Anderson also served in Foreign Service posts in Warsaw, Tel Aviv, Seoul, Jerusalem, and at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, Mr. Anderson served in the United States Peace Corps in Benin, West Africa, and in the International Trade Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Mr. Anderson holds a Master of Arts degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, Washington, DC, (1980) and a Bachelor of Arts from Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois (1976). Stephen Engelken is a veteran of 38 years in the U.S. Foreign Service. Notably, he was Deputy Chief of the U.S. Mission to UNESCO in 2007-2010, serving as Charge’ d’Affaires for seven months in this period. Engelken went on from there to serve as Deputy Chief of the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan (2010-2011). Prior to those senior assignments, he served postings abroad in Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Lebanon, Italy; France, and Australia and at the State Department in Washington as Director of Pakistan/Bangladesh Affairs, Director of the Office of Proliferation Threat Reduction, Deputy Director of the office of Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Operations, and Deputy Director of Arabian Peninsula Affairs. Since his retirement in 2012 while Principal Officer in Peshawar, Pakistan, Mr. Engelken has taught at Foreign Service Institute, the State Department’s training center. Mr. Engelken is a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and a resident of Washington, D.C. He holds a B.A. in International Affairs from George Washington University. He is also a graduate of the Ecole Nationale d’Administration in France. Mr. Engelken speaks French, Italian, and Arabic.
3/27/20241 hour, 33 minutes, 46 seconds
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China's Space Operations: Assessing PLA Capabilities for U.S. Strategy

This lecture is part of the Student Speaker Series About the Lecture: China's advancements in space technology and orbital operations are second only to the U.S. Historically assisted by the Soviet Union, China's space program has set an impressive timeline of space launch milestones, meeting every spacefaring goal for the past 30 years. Under the guise of scientific research, PLA documentation and dual-use technology has demonstrated that even commercial space activities serve military interests. As investment in launch capabilities increases and China's presence in cislunar space becomes more of a concern, what are the intentions, plans, and capabilities behind China's interest and activities in space? With tensions rising in the South China Sea and the Taiwan Strait, will China start utilizing space operations to support terrestrial military activity? Does China's capacity to operate in space match its strategic interests? How does China's advancing capabilities create more risk for U.S. space interests? This lecture will discuss a brief history of China's accomplishments in space and highlight PLA ambitions and operations in three areas: counterspace weapons in orbit, a permanent lunar presence, and interest in the future space economy. The lecture will also discuss the risk these three areas pose to U.S. interests and the proposed strategies for deterrence in what the DoD, NATO, and the PLA define as a new "warfighting domain." About the Speaker: Carlos Alatorre is an M.A. candidate for Statecraft and National Security Affairs at IWP with a specialization in Defense. Prior to joining IWP, he was a middle school teacher who spent five years teaching English in South Korea and China before deciding to make a transition to the national security and intelligence field. He brings his experience of Chinese political culture and East Asian geography (as well as his Mandarin skills) to complement his studies in Chinese military and geopolitical affairs in the Indo-Pacific. His research focuses on China's usage of emerging technologies, specifically the PLA's research in and implementation of AI, space/cislunar operations, and hypersonic missiles. Originally from Southern California, he earned his B.A. in Philosophy from the University of California, Santa Barbara.
3/14/202449 minutes, 35 seconds
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Book Lecture: Revealing Secrets

***This lecture is sponsored by the IAFIE Washington DC Chapter and the IWP IAFIE Alpha Student Chapter*** About the Lecture: For a long time, the Australian Signals intelligence (or Sigint) story has been kept secret. Until now… Why does Australia have a national signals intelligence agency? What does it do and why is it controversial? And how significant are its ties with key partners, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and New Zealand, to this arrangement? Revealing Secrets is a compelling account of Australian Signals intelligence, its efforts at revealing the secrets of other nations, and keeping ours safe. It brings to light those clever Australians whose efforts were for so long entirely unknown or overlooked. Blaxland and Birgin traverse the royal commissions and reviews that shaped Australia’s intelligence community in the 20th century and consider the advent and the impact of cyber. In unearthing this integral, if hidden and little understood, part of Australian statecraft, this book increases our understanding of the past, present and what lies ahead. About the Speakers: John Blaxland is Professor of International Security and Intelligence Studies in the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre (SDSC), Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs at the Australian National University (ANU). He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a Fellow of the Royal Society of New South Wales. He was also formerly a military intelligence officer, Head of SDSC and Director of the ANU Southeast Asia Institute. He is the author and editor of several publications on military history, intelligence and international security affairs. Clare Birgin’s career in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) spanned 30 years, with a focus on national security and intelligence. She had postings in Warsaw, Moscow, Geneva, and Washington DC as the Liaison Officer of the Office of National Assessments, followed by postings as Ambassador in Hungary, Serbia, Kosovo, Romania, North Macedonia and Montenegro. Subsequently she was a Visiting Fellow at the ANU before joining John Blaxland’s history writing team. She has been awarded the Polish Government’s Knight’s Cross Medal and the Bene Merito Medal by the former Polish Foreign Minister.
3/13/20241 hour, 4 minutes, 36 seconds
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Addressing The Evolving Security Challenges In Korea - 20240304 150517 - Meeting Recording 1

About the Lecture: **This lecture is part of the Asia Initiative Lecture Series** For 25 years after the end of the Cold War, most of the national security community assumed that nuclear weapon use was unlikely to be part of any future war. But over the last few years, North Korea has made regular threats of nuclear weapon use and Russia also threatened nuclear weapon use associated with its invasion of Ukraine. Moreover, the Chinese nuclear weapon force is rapidly expanding. These developments appear to make future nuclear weapon use more possible, especially limited nuclear weapon use. The escalatory implications of limited nuclear weapon use have not been well researched. This situation forces us to reevaluate more broadly the national security risks in many regions, and especially in Korea. This briefing addresses four major security developments on the Korean peninsula that contribute jeopardy to the national security of South Korea, the United States, and other U.S. allies. Nuclear weapon use is of course a major issue, but so is North Korean instability. Another issue is the dramatic decline in the size of the ROK Army, the result of demographic challenges and political choices, especially when coupled with the ROK decision to only partially fund its plan to offset its manpower reductions with technology versus manpower tradeoffs. And the potential for third party intervention, and especially Chinese intervention, further complicates Korean security. These four issues are developed, and suggestions made for how South Korea and the United States can at least partially mitigate these challenges.” About the Speaker: Bruce W. Bennett is a Senior International/Defense Researcher at The RAND Corporation. He is an expert in Northeast Asian security issues, having visited the region over 125 times and written much about Korean security. His research addresses issues such as the North Korean military threats, countering the North Korean nuclear threat and provocations, future ROK military force requirements, Korean unification, the Korean military balance, and potential Chinese military intervention in North Korea. Dr. Bennett specializes in “asymmetric threats” such as weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and how to counter those threats with new strategies, operational concepts, and technologies. He has recently completed reports on the current North Korean nuclear, chemical, biological, and cyber threats, and teaches a class at the Pardee RAND Graduate School on “Understanding Nuclear Forces.” He has worked with the Pentagon and with US commanders in Northeast Asia and the Persian Gulf on these subjects. He has facilitated a large number of seminar/war games to address these issues. Dr. Bennett received a Ph.D. in policy analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School (1979 dissertation on “Uncertainty in ICBM survivability”) and a B.S. in economics from the California Institute of Technology.
3/8/202456 minutes, 9 seconds
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Wagner Group: The Privatization of the Instruments of National Power

About the Lecture: The Wagner Group has operated as a manifestation of Russian influence, supporting critical Russian interests in key domains across the globe. The organization, originally founded in 2014 by oligarch businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin as a private mercenary force, has become one of the more prolific instruments of power projection in the Russian geopolitical arsenal. About the Speaker: Dr. John R. McCarthy is currently the Senior Program Advisor with the US Navy’s only explosives, weapons, and foreign materiel Technical Exploitation command. In 2006, John was recruited from the private sector by Naval Surface Warfare Center, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division and subsequently mobilized as a naval reserve officer to initiate programmatic, infrastructure, and organizational development for the newly established Technical Support Detachment (TSD), which was to specialize in investigating, exploiting, and attacking the improvised explosive device (IED) manufacturing network on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan. The command, renamed Expeditionary Exploitation Unit ONE (EXU-1), now spans the globe working with Combatant Commanders, Special Operations Command and forces, and the Intelligence Community supporting technical exploitation, technical intelligence collection, counterterrorism, and irregular warfare activities. Prior to his return to active-duty military and current federal service, John held a senior leadership position supporting business and financial operations at a non-profit healthcare organization and was a technical business development executive for a global specialty chemical manufacturer serving the industrial sector, for over 16 years. In addition, he has served as an adjunct professor and part time faculty of leadership & management and other business and intelligence disciplines for a number of universities, since 2004. Educationally, Dr. McCarthy holds a Graduate Certificate of Intelligence Studies (Strategic Intelligence in Special Operations concentration), a Master of Science of Strategic Intelligence (MSSI) degree, a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree, and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Organization and Management with a specialization in Leadership studies. Always seeking to enhance and broaden his knowledge base, Dr. McCarthy remains engaged in continuous learning opportunities and is a currently enrolled in IWP’s Certificate of Graduate Study program focusing on Statecraft and National Security.
3/7/20241 hour, 5 minutes, 22 seconds
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The World of Lobbying and Current State of Politics on Capitol Hill

About the Lecture: The current state of politics is divisive, and navigating this is no easy task. As we enter an election year, with over 15 years of non-profit, trade association, multi-client, corporate lobbying experience, and a current advisor to dozens of politicians, political candidates, and past presidential campaigns, Brian Johnson is a captivating speaker who will share with us his insights on lobbying and the current state of the political landscape. About the Speaker: Brian Johnson is an experienced government and public affairs executive with over 15 years of non-profit, advocacy, trade association, multi-client representation, political campaign/fundraising, and management experience. Throughout his career, Brian has developed and executed numerous strategic government and public affairs campaigns, drafted and had countless pieces of legislation introduced, secured tens of millions of dollars in targeted Appropriations, worked intimately on, and helped pass, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), and was named to “The Hill’s Top Lobbyist 2020” list. Currently, Brian serves as the Vice President of Government & Public Affairs for Veterans Guardian, the largest veteran-owned and operated disability claims consulting company in the world, helping tens of thousands of veterans every year secure benefits they are legally, ethically, morally and medically entitled. In this capacity Brian manages all lobbying, public affairs campaigns, and political giving as head of the company's Washington, DC operations. Politically, Brian advises on dozens of political campaigns, serves on several elected officials’ Steering Committees, and is heavily involved in local politics. As a policy expert he has testified before Congress and his expert commentary has been featured on BBC, CNN, C-SPAN, Fox News, Fox Business News, PBS, Real Clear Politics, and many more.
2/27/20241 hour, 3 minutes, 33 seconds
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Is America Teachable? Lessons Never Learned in our Dealings with "Russia"

About the Lecture: In 1991, Ukraine’s independence set the tombstone for the USSR, and the U.S. regained its global primacy. Where are we today? How is it possible that In 2004, a top American expert argued, “stop criticizing Putin and start helping him”? Or that In 2021, Ukraine was not even mentioned in the new administration’s Interim Global Security Guidelines? And what do our dealings with Moscow from the end of WWI through 1991 tell us? About the Speaker: Mr. Victor Rud practiced law for forty years and served as special counsel to a member of the U.S. Delegation to the Madrid Review Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe. Before the fall of the Soviet Union, he represented, in the West, Soviet dissidents persecuted by the KGB. Mr. Rud has spoken, domestically and internationally, before various audiences on issues bearing on U.S./Russian relations, including specifically Ukraine. Among them are the State Department, West Point, American University Kyiv, and the UN. His analysis and commentary have been carried by The Hill, Center for European Policy Analysis, The Messenger, Kyiv Post, and Forbes, among others. Mr. Rud is past Chairman of the Ukrainian American Bar Association, and Senior Advisor to the Centre for Eastern European Democracy in Canada, and to Open Court, an NGO in Ukraine. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and law degree from Duke University.
2/26/20241 hour, 13 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Perspective of an American Advisor to Putin's Transition Team

About the Speaker: Jim Carter is a Senior Fellow with the America First Policy Institute’s Center for American Prosperity. Previously, as Director, he oversaw the Center’s operations, including research and policy development impacting economic growth, tax and budget policy, regulation, trade, and labor productivity. For nearly a decade, Jim was Vice President of Government Affairs at Emerson, a diversified global manufacturing and technology company based in St. Louis, Missouri. In addition to managing Emerson’s global, federal, and state government affairs, Mr. Carter’s lobbying portfolio included tax policy, international trade, and management of the company’s political action committee. Before joining Emerson, Mr. Carter served in the Bush and Clinton Administrations, as a senior staff member on the Senate Budget Committee, and as a policy advisor to former Senators John Ashcroft, Sam Brownback, and Connie Mack. Jim has served as a Deputy Undersecretary at the Department of Labor, a Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Department of Treasury, and Associate Director of the National Economic Council at the White House. While at the Treasury Department, he received the Secretary of the Treasury’s “Exceptional Service Award” and a separate award for his work on behalf of the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003. Mr. Carter has been published more than 200 times on fiscal policy, economics, and other public policy matters for leading publications, including The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Investor's Business Daily, Politico, The Hill, The Daily Caller, and USA Today. He is a frequent speaker, including as an adjunct professor at The George Washington University and as a lecturer in the Public Management program at Johns Hopkins University. Jim is a 2014 recipient of Johns Hopkins University’s “Excellence in Teaching” award. He also appeared in season three of House of Cards, playing a U.S. senator. Jim recently served on the board of directors for both the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and the National Capital Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. He is a former president of the Business-Government Relations Council, a non-profit organization that seeks to increase governmental awareness of the role of business in national affairs. He holds degrees from George Mason University and Truman State University.
2/8/202437 minutes, 38 seconds
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Finding Waypoints: A Warrior's Journey Towards Peace and Purpose

About the Book: What starts as a minute-by-minute account of a disaster in a war zone quickly turns into an uplifting story of survival and triumph in FINDING WAYPOINTS: A Warrior’s Journey Towards Peace and Purpose by Terese Schlachter and Col. Gregory D. Gadson, (Ret.). Emmy Award winning television producer Schlachter was working at the Pentagon Channel when she attended a press event at Walter Reed Army Medical Center’s Military Advanced Training Center (MATC) in 2007 after a decade covering national news for NBC and MSNBC in Washington. There, the co-authors met for the first time. Their resulting book is the result of their extraordinary relationship, a hybrid of biography and autobiography, that tells the story of a man who survived the worst and has used his experience to enrich the lives of others. ***Copies of the book will be made available for purchase at the conclusion of the event and can be signed by the author.*** Purchase the book here. About the Authors: Terese Schlachter is a Washington, D.C., based writer and producer of videos and documentaries (NBC News, Dept of Defense) who first met Colonel Gadson when covering the new veterans facility at the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center in 2007. She became his fast friend and confidante during his painful recovery and rehabilitation. Terese is a three-time Emmy Award-winning television producer and founder and Chief Storyteller of Ridgeback Communications. Her short film "Picture Perfect" was nominated for "Best Short" at the 2017 DC Indie Film festival as well as a National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Emmy. She lives in Shady Side, Maryland, with her husband Jon, and Lillian, a Rhodesian Ridgeback dog. Colonel Gregory Gadson, (Ret.) was grievously wounded in an IED attack in Iraq in 2007 while he and his unit were returning from a service for two fallen soldiers. He subsequently lost both legs and severely injured his right arm, and, in the course of his rehabilitation and recovery, he became a source of inspiration and motivation for other war-wounded at the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Due to his longtime connection with West Point as a football player there, and his friendship with the coach of the then-struggling NY Giants in 2007, Gadson soon became a motivational co-coach and spiritual guide, helping the team go from nearly last place to Superbowl Champions in 2008. Gadson subsequently starred in a major Hollywood movie, Battleship, and has been an admired motivational speaker and coach for numerous organizations, both civilian and military, for several years now. An avid outdoorsman and enthusiast of skiing, cycling, and deep-sea fishing, he has led numerous adventure-travel expeditions for wounded veterans. He is the recipient of the 2010 NCAA Inspiration Award and the 2017 Henry Biscardi Achievement Award. In his honor, in October 2022, the new veterans center at Wayne State University was named the Colonel Gregory Gadson Office of Military and Veterans Academic Excellence. When not traveling around the country as a motivational speaker, Gadson enjoys time at home in Alexandria, VA, with his wife, children, and grandchildren, and continues to pursue his acting career and his love of photography.
2/8/20241 hour, 11 minutes, 5 seconds
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Montesquieu's The Spirit of the Laws: A Critical Text

About the Lecture In the struggle to adopt the US Constitution, the philosopher Montesquieu’s book, Spirit of the Laws, was frequently cited by both proponents and opponents of ratification. Highly regarded at the time of America’s founding, this 1748 masterpiece has fallen into unjust neglect which Professor Allen’s fresh translation and commentary should do much to rectify. Professor Allen will discuss Montesquieu’s thought on matters of special importance for IWP students, including national security, economics, political and constitutional order, and their moral, cultural, and religious implications. Professor Allen will highlight Montesquieu’s account of the conflict between freedom and slavery, a conflict which intersects with the greatest questions of our own age. About the Speaker W. B. Allen, Emeritus Professor of Political Philosophy and Dean of James Madison College at Michigan State University, served previously as Chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He is General Editor of The State of Black of America (2022) and resident scholar and former Chief Operating Officer of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education in Washington, D.C. His latest publication is the newly released Montesquieu's The Spirit of the Laws: A Critical Edition, Parallel Text and Commentary (Anthem Press). Recognized for excellence in liberal education on the 1997 Templeton Honor Roll and as a 2014 Salvatori Prize laureate, he has published extensively, including George Washington: A Collection (Liberty Fund, Inc.), Rethinking Uncle Tom: The Political Philosophy of H. B. Stowe (Lexington Books), George Washington: America’s First Progressive (Peter Lang, Inc.) and scores of essays.
2/8/202456 minutes, 29 seconds
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Montesquieu's The Spirit of the Laws: A Critical Text

About the Lecture In the struggle to adopt the US Constitution, the philosopher Montesquieu’s book, Spirit of the Laws, was frequently cited by both proponents and opponents of ratification. Highly regarded at the time of America’s founding, this 1748 masterpiece has fallen into unjust neglect which Professor Allen’s fresh translation and commentary should do much to rectify. Professor Allen will discuss Montesquieu’s thought on matters of special importance for IWP students, including national security, economics, political and constitutional order, and their moral, cultural, and religious implications. Professor Allen will highlight Montesquieu’s account of the conflict between freedom and slavery, a conflict which intersects with the greatest questions of our own age. About the Speaker W. B. Allen, Emeritus Professor of Political Philosophy and Dean of James Madison College at Michigan State University, served previously as Chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He is General Editor of The State of Black of America (2022) and resident scholar and former Chief Operating Officer of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education in Washington, D.C. His latest publication is the newly released Montesquieu's The Spirit of the Laws: A Critical Edition, Parallel Text and Commentary (Anthem Press). Recognized for excellence in liberal education on the 1997 Templeton Honor Roll and as a 2014 Salvatori Prize laureate, he has published extensively, including George Washington: A Collection (Liberty Fund, Inc.), Rethinking Uncle Tom: The Political Philosophy of H. B. Stowe (Lexington Books), George Washington: America’s First Progressive (Peter Lang, Inc.) and scores of essays. Learn more about IWP graduate programs Make a gift to IWP
2/7/202457 minutes, 22 seconds
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The United States in the Multipolar World

About the Lecture: This discussion will focus on how and why the world is shifting into a multipolar world. The speaker will cover how the United States will need to maneuver to not only keep its current place as the main pole, but also survive the ever coming change. About the Speaker: Mr. Robert T. Roseberry holds a Bachelor of Science in Strategic Intelligence and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Psychology, as well as a Master of Strategic Intelligence Studies from IWP. He has followed world events over the past year and how the globe is changing. Through his research he believes he can give insight on how the United States can travers these unknown waters. Robert currently lives in South Carolina and enjoys traveling and a good Irish whiskey. He is looking to join the United States Airforce this year.
2/6/202448 minutes, 16 seconds
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Philosophical Aspects of the Formation of the European Union

About the Lecture: Dr. Bulcsu Hoppal would like to highlight some philosophical aspects of the nature of the European Union. He will argue that philosophical personalism (personalistic understanding of the human being) played a decisive role in the formation of the EU. He will address theoretical issues and discuss how Europe is a philosophical phenomenon. About the Speaker: Dr. Bulcsu Hoppál is an associate professor at the Corvinus University of Budapest at the department of Political Science, visiting DC for this month only.
2/6/20241 hour, 9 minutes, 42 seconds
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Book Lecture: Pillars for Freedom

About the Lecture If America’s center, its citizenry, is not strong, our nation cannot lead internationally: If the United States falters, despotic regimes, led by the People’s Republic of China, will fill the void created, heralding ruin. America can only succeed in this quest if it works most diligently with established as well as new allies. This requires that a new global alliance for freedom be built, which links together established and nascent alliance structures that venerate liberty and the primacy of the individual. To act boldly, America must marshal an integrated strategy that spans the entirety of hard, sharp, and soft power in order to protect freedom, security, and prosperity in the face of unprecedented threats, which may be recognized, emergent, or liminal in nature. The building blocks for this renaissance in global leadership already exist but are only partially assembled. To erect this structure, timeless values must be fused with emerging technologies and geopolitical realities, to induce needed change. Book Synopsis America’s future will be unlimited if we return to wholesomeness, gratitude, and vision, for we must rise as one people, or we shall fall as many. Pillars for Freedom charts a brave path forward to imbue America with strength, economic security, and virtue. The American Experiment is unique in history in its conception of liberty, which is freedom from oppressive government and its yoke. We are a nation that rests on the rule of law and not the imperfections present in all humankind. Today, the bureaucratic state, which controls our government, relies on diversion, untrue narratives, and misdirection to cover incompetence and gross misdeeds. This cannot be our country’s standard. The maintenance of liberty rests upon our faith, our Founding, our families, and our commitments to uncorrupted education and science. Pillars for Freedom describes in consummate detail the powers America must reconstitute and wield in order to reclaim our destiny. Through marshaling our priceless heritage, we can rebuild our military, secure economic strength, and reassert energy dominance, as we erect our civil society. The book describes the actions America must take in all these spheres. Purchase the book here About the Speaker Richard B. Levine served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Technology Transfer and Security Assistance. He directed the Department of the Navy’s organization in these matters during the Reagan administration. Richard previously served on the National Security Council staff, in the White House, as Director, International Economic Affairs, and as Director, Policy Development. Richard holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School and a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy, with honors, from the Johns Hopkins University. Richard is the recipient of two presidential letters of commendation and the Department of the Navy’s highest honor given to a civilian employee, the Distinguished Civilian Service Award. Richard serves as a senior advisor to former government officials, including Michael R. Pompeo, on matters involving national security, strategy, and international economics. He is the author of the new book, Pillars for Freedom. He is the coauthor, with Vice Admiral John M. Poindexter and Robert C. McFarlane, of America’s #1 Adversary. Richard lives in North Carolina with his wife, Terry.
2/1/20241 hour, 2 minutes, 4 seconds
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Political Islam and its International Implications

About the Speakers: Maria Schwaz, a certified social worker, spent 5 years working in psychiatric facilities. While on maternity leave to care for her six children, she received training in Christian pedagogy and has since been teaching at schools and parishes. The European migration crisis of 2015 spurred her on to study the core tenets of Islam. In 2018, she assumed the role of managing director at the International Center for the Study of Political Islam in Austria. In this position, she began extensive lecturing activities on both national and international levels, working with governmental and non-governmental organizations. Johann Turnau was born in Austria in 1954. He graduated with a Doctor of Law from the University of Innsbruck in 1979. He spent the next few years working for the Federal Chamber of Commerce and the Federal Ministry for Foreign Affairs. From 1985 to 1988, he was the First Secretary at the Austrian Embassy in Lagos/Nigeria, and he was the Counsellor at the Austrian Embassy here in Washington, D.C., from 1988-1992. From 1998 to 2001, he served as the Austrian Ambassador to Algeria. From 2001 to 2006, he was the Austrian Ambassador to Indonesia, also accredited to Singapore and Timor Leste. From 2006-2012, he worked in the Federal Ministries of Foreign Affairs and European and International Affairs. From 2012-2016, he served as the Ambassador to Japan. He then served as the Ambassador to Australia, New Zealand, Tonga, Vanuatu, Fiji, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Kiribati and Nauru and was the Austrian Ambassador designate to the Federated States of Micronesia, Samoa, Tuval from 2016-2019. As of 2020, he is a Senior Consultant and member of the Austrian Senior Experts Pool (ASEP), President of the Rotary Club Gastein, and Chairman of the Inter Country Committee Austria – Ukraine. He is also certified by the OSCE and registered with the EU for election monitoring and observation.
2/1/20242 hours, 17 minutes, 30 seconds
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The American Civil Rights Movement and Public Diplomacy

About the Lecture Former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Alphonso Jackson will discuss the interconnection between the American Civil Rights movement and international human rights yesterday and today. Jackson grew up in segregated Dallas, Texas. In 1965, he marched for Civil Rights on Bloody Sunday in Selma, Alabama. The relationship between foreign affairs and the American Civil Rights story was highlighted in an address by Secretary of State Dean Rusk in 1963 and remains true today. “As the matters stand, however, racial discrimination here at home has important effects on our foreign relations. This is not because such discrimination is unique to the United States. Discrimination on account of race, color, religion, national or tribal origin may be found in many countries. But the United States is widely regarded as the home of democracy and the leader of the struggle for freedom, for human rights and human dignity.” -Secretary of State Dean Rusk before the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee, 1963 (The Department of State Bulletin, Volume 49: “Fulfilling Our Basic Commitments as a Nation, Statement by Secretary Rusk”) About the Speaker Secretary Alphonso Jackson, former Secretary of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, has decades of experience in housing and community development. His expertise includes the development of affordable and market-rate housing, handling complex urban development issues, and housing finance. Jackson was appointed by President George W. Bush as the 13th Secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate in March 2004. Before being appointed Secretary, Jackson served as the Deputy Secretary of HUD, managing the daily operations of the $36 billion agency. After his government service, Jackson served as Vice Chairman of Mortgage Services with JP Morgan Chase, followed by Senior Advisor to the CEO at First Data Corporation(now Fiserv Corporation). Early in his professional career, he was president and COO of American Electric Power-Texas, a $13 billion utility company and subsidiary of American Electric Power. From 1988-1996, he was president and CEO of the Housing Authority of the City of Dallas, ranked among the best-managed large-city housing agencies during his tenure. As a college student, Jackson volunteered as a student protester in Alabama on Bloody Sunday in March 1965, a civil rights protest from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. Jackson serves on the United States Institute for Peace International Advisory Board and Ford’s Theater Society Board of Trustees. He also recently served on the United States Department of State Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board(Chair). He is a member of The Alfalfa Club and Horatio Alger Association(Board of Directors). He has been awarded numerous civic awards and eleven honorary degrees from colleges and universities, including his alma mater, Washington University in St. Louis, MO. Jackson holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and a Master’s in Education Administration from Truman State University. He also has a Juris Doctor from Washington University School of Law in St. Louis, MO.
1/31/20241 hour, 15 minutes, 2 seconds
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Turkey, Russia, & Iran through the Lens of Modern Warfare & Terrorism

About the Lecture: From the Black Sea to the Eastern Mediterranean, war and counterterrorism operations define this century. The stakes in this vast, interconnected region are high and growing, and the U.S. needs a better policy and set of statecraft strategies. Russia, joined by help from Iran, wages war against Ukraine. Russian troops occupy part of Georgia. They now have naval, air, and ground bases in Syria. Iran has mounted attacks against U.S. and coalition troops in Iraq since at least 2005 and against U.S. and coalition personnel in Syria since at least 2015. Tehran has amped up funding, equipping, and training Hizballah, Hamas, and Houthi militants since the Arab Spring. Turkey, responsible for protecting NATO’s southeastern flank, now deeply mistrusts the U.S. alliance with the YPG and Peshmerga, blames the U.S. for shielding Fethullah Gülen in Pennsylvania, and rejects U.S./NATO sanctions against its decision to buy Russian S-400s and Russian and Iranian energy. This highly volitile region is on fire. What actions and relationships will calm the waters? Or are we careening towards WWIII? Or…given the sophistry over our definitions of modern warfare and counterterrorism operations, are we already in WWIII? If so, how do we organize ourselves to win? Come share your ideas and hear ways we might realign U.S. policy architectures and statecraft practices. About the Speaker: Paula Doyle has over 30 years of national security and foreign policy experience with the Central Intelligence Agency, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and the U.S. Department of State. Her areas of deep subject matter expertise include Turkey, Iran, Russia, Foreign Cyber Programs and Capabilities, Counterintelligence, Nuclear Weapons and Proliferation Programs, the Middle East, and NATO. Ms. Doyle teaches a 700-level course on Turkey, Russia, and Iran at Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service, Center for Security Studies Program. She serves on the Board of Directors for the OSS Society, on the Board of Directors for the Central Intelligence Retirees Association, and as a Fellow at the National Security Institute, housed at George Mason University.
1/30/20241 hour, 3 minutes, 57 seconds
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Political Islam and its International Implications

About the Lecture: This event is a joint lecture with the following schedule: 3:00 PM: Eleonore Witt-Dörring, Senior Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Political Islam International, will discuss political Islam and its content according to Islamic texts. 4:00 PM: Break 4:15 PM: Dr. Bernhard Zimburg, Education Division Manager at the Center for the Study of Political Islam International, will discuss political Islam as a global phenomenon and recent international developments. About the Speakers: Ms. Eleonore Witt-Dörring, a certified social worker, spent 5 years working in psychiatric facilities. While on maternity leave to care for her six children, she received training in Christian pedagogy and has since been teaching at schools and parishes. The European migration crisis of 2015 spurred her on to study the core tenets of Islam. In 2018, she assumed the role of managing director at the International Center for the Study of Political Islam in Austria. In this position, she began extensive lecturing activities on both national and international levels, working with governmental and non-governmental organizations. A clear understanding of Islam is of the utmost importance for dealing with the social and security policy challenges of our time. Dr. Bernhard Zimburg was born in Austria in 1954. He graduated with a Doctor of Law from the University of Innsbruck in 1979. He spent the next few years working for the Federal Chamber of Commerce and the Federal Ministry for Foreign Affairs. From 1985 to 1988, he was the First Secretary at the Austrian Embassy in Lagos/Nigeria, and he was the Counsellor at the Austrian Embassy here in Washington, D.C., from 1988-1992. From 1998 to 2001, he served as the Austrian Ambassador to Algeria. From 2001 to 2006, he was the Austrian Ambassador to Indonesia, also accredited to Singapore and Timor Leste. From 2006-2012, he worked in the Federal Ministries of Foreign Affairs and European and International Affairs. From 2012-2016, he served as the Ambassador to Japan. He then served as the Ambassador to Australia, New Zealand, Tonga, Vanuatu, Fiji, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Kiribati and Nauru and was the Austrian Ambassador designate to the Federated States of Micronesia, Samoa, Tuval from 2016-2019. As of 2020, he is a Senior Consultant and member of the Austrian Senior Experts Pool (ASEP), President of the Rotary Club Gastein, and Chairman of the Inter Country Committee Austria – Ukraine. He is also certified by the OSCE and registered with the EU for election monitoring and observation.
1/30/20242 hours, 21 minutes, 25 seconds
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Private Investment as a Critical Support to U.S. National Security

About the Lecture: Mr. Dave Horvath brings his background in business and the military to the lectern at IWP to discuss private investment as it relates to U.S. national security. In this lecture, he will discuss the importance of American private capital to fill gaps left by traditional government efforts and how private investment fills that gap. He will also discuss private investment and finance as a post-government career. About the Speaker: Dave Horvath graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 2009. After graduating, Dave served 10 years on active duty, first as a Ranger-qualified Field Artillery Officer and Military Intelligence Officer, and later as a Special Operations Officer, with extensive service overseas. After transitioning from active duty, Dave pursued his MBA at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and embarked on a career in strategy consulting, private equity, and now late-stage technology investing at Disruptive, an Austin, TX-based growth equity firm. Dave currently leads the Washington, DC, office for Disruptive, in addition to a large portion of the firm’s National Security and Dual-use technology portfolio.
1/23/202453 minutes, 56 seconds
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Politicization of US Intelligence: Causes and Consequences

***This lecture is sponsored by the IWP IAFIE Alpha Student Chapter*** About the Lecture: "The Politicization of U.S. Intelligence: Causes and Consequences” is a presentation in association with Dr. Gentry's recent book, Neutering the CIA: Why US Intelligence Versus Trump Has Long-Term Consequences (Armin Lear Press, 2023). Beginning in 2016 and continuing into 2021, current and former U.S. intelligence officers engaged in domestic partisan politics to an unprecedented extent. This discussion will describe and assess what happened at various agencies, the causes of the politicization, consequences for the agencies and national decision-making, and prospects for renewed politicization in 2024. ***Copies of Dr. Gentry's book will be made available for purchase at the conclusion of the event and can be signed by the author.*** Purchase the book here. About the Author: Dr. John A. Gentry teaches for the School of Defense and Strategic Studies, Missouri State University. He was for 12 years an intelligence analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency, where he mainly worked on economic issues associated with the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact countries; for two of those years, he was a senior analyst on the staff of the National Intelligence Officer for Warning. He is a retired U.S. Army Reserve officer, with most assignments in special operations and intelligence arenas. He was mobilized in 1996 and spent much of 1996 as a civil affairs officer in Bosnia. Dr. Gentry formerly taught at Georgetown University, Columbia University, and the National Intelligence University. He has an economics background and received a Ph.D. in political science from George Washington University. He writes regularly on intelligence and security issues. His most recently published book is Neutering the CIA: Why US Intelligence versus Trump Has Long-Term Consequences (Armin Lear Press, 2023).
12/14/202356 minutes, 47 seconds
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By Way of Deception Thou Shalt Do War: The Psychology of Intelligence with Dr. Enrico Suardi ('19)

Step into the intriguing world of intelligence and deception as we delve into the psychological tactics of warfare. About Speaker: Dr. Enrico Suardi (IWP Class of 2019, Executive MA in National Security Affairs) is director of psychiatry at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, director of forensic services at the Ross Center in Washington, D.C., and the 2024-25 president-elect of the Washington Psychiatric Society. A diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, and forensic psychiatry, on faculty at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Georgetown University, and George Washington University, he has served as chief child and family psychiatrist at the U.S. State Department. Dr. Suardi studied political psychology with Jerrold Post, completed his M.D. and a residency in preventive medicine in Milan, Italy, and obtained an MSc in Public Health and Policy from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. About Lecture: This presentation is part of a series of lectures on the behavioral sciences in US national security and public safety. The premise is that the human factor is the basis of crises and the source of solutions. Dr. Suardi will provide an overview of the psychology of HUMINT and intelligence analysis. He will explore the complexity of the spy-agent relationship, recruitment and handling. He will review the psychological literature on counterespionage, starting from Jerrold Post's declassified article on the anatomy of treason. He will conclude discussing the psychology of intelligence analysis and some of the analytic techniques developed to counter human cognitive limitations and biases. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
12/6/202354 minutes, 56 seconds
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Energy Security in a Changing World: Dilemmas and Solutions with Haroon Hakimi ('20)

Haroon Hakimi, IWP class of 2020 and current Doctoral candidate, discusses "Energy Security in a Changing World: Dilemmas and Solutions." This video is part of the 2023 Annual Chancellor's Council Meeting sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
12/5/202336 minutes, 58 seconds
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Wither the CIA? with Fred Rustmann

Mr. Fred Rustmann, an IWP Chancellor’s Council Member and Retired Senior CIA Operations Officer, discusses "Wither the CIA?" This video is part of the 2023 Annual Chancellor's Council Meeting sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/28/202341 minutes, 53 seconds
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2023 Chancellor Council Meeting: Introduction & Remarks by Dr. James S. Robbins

Dr. James S. Robbins, IWP's Dean of Academics, provides introductory remarks for the 2023 Chancellor's Council Meeting. This video is part of the 2023 Annual Chancellor's Council Meeting sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/27/20238 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ukraine’s Return to Europe and the Death Throes of an Empire with James Rice

James Rice, IWP Alumnus, discusses "Ukraine's Return to Europe and the Death Throes of an Empire." This video is part of the 2023 Annual Chancellor's Council Meeting sponsored by the Institute of World Politics. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/16/202339 minutes, 37 seconds
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Moscow and Tehran: U.S. Policy Considerations with Mr. Ilan Berman

The IWP Student Chapter of the Alexander Hamilton Society welcomes Mr. Ilan Berman to speak on the relationship between Russia and Iran. About the Lecture: The IWP Student Chapter of the Alexander Hamilton Society welcomes Mr. Ilan Berman to speak on the relationship between Russia and Iran. The lecture will go over the history of the Iranian-Russian strategic relationship, where it is today, what challenges it poses to U.S. national security interests, and what U.S. policy makers can do to address these challenges in the future. About the Speaker: Mr. Ilan Berman is Senior Vice President of the American Foreign Policy Council (AFPC) in Washington, D.C., and is an expert on regional security in the Middle East, Central Asia, and Russia. He has consulted in the past for the Central Intelligence Agency and the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. He has assisted various governmental agencies and congressional offices with foreign policy and national security issues. Mr. Berman is also a member of the Associated Faculty at Missouri State University's Department of Defense and Strategic Studies. A frequent writer and commentator, he has written for the Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, the New York Times, Foreign Policy, the Washington Post, and USA Today, among many other publications. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/15/20231 hour, 4 minutes, 18 seconds
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Foreign Leaders Analysis: A Profile of Narendra Modi of India with Dr. Enrico Suardi ('19)

Dr. Enrico Suardi, IWP Class of 2019 and Chief of Psychiatry at St. Elizabeths Hospital, discusses "Foreign Leaders Analysis: A Profile of Narendra Modi of India." This video is part of the 2023 Annual Chancellor's Council Meeting sponsored by the Institute of World Politics. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/13/202345 minutes, 42 seconds
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Reflections about Oskar Halecki with Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz

Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz discusses "Reflections about Oskar Halecki." This lecture is part of the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium, titled "Intermarium and Trimarium - Concepts and New Realities." About the Speaker At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz holds the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. He teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He also leads directed studies. Dr. Chodakiewicz was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. Dr. Chodakiewicz has authored numerous works in both English and Polish. While at the University of Virginia, he edited the Kosciuszko Chair’s bulletin: Nihil Novi. Dr. Chodakiewicz writes weekly columns for popular Polish press and has published on foreign policy in various venues, including The Journal of World Affairs, American Spectator, and National Review Online. He is the author of numerous scholarly monographs and books, including  Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas, which is a depiction of the Eastern Borderlands of the West on the rim of the former Soviet Union. His interests include the post-Soviet zone, the Second World War and its aftermath, Europe in the 19th and 20th century, Western civilization and its intellectual tradition, extremist movements in history, conspiracy theory and practice, and comparative civilizations. About the Symposium This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/202322 minutes, 36 seconds
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Oskar Halecki , a Political Activist? - with Professor Thaddeus V. Gromada

Professor Thaddeus V. Gromada discusses "Oskar Halecki , a Political Activist?" This lecture is part of the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium. About the Speaker Dr. Thaddeus Vladimir Gromada, a prominent figure born in Passaic, New Jersey, to Polish immigrant parents with a rich cultural heritage, boasts an extensive career in academia and community leadership. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in East Central European History from Fordham University under the mentorship of renowned historian Oskar Halecki. Dr. Gromada served as a full Professor of Modern European History at New Jersey City University and was instrumental in establishing the Multi-Ethnic and Immigration Studies program there. He also held various roles in the Polish Institute of Arts & Sciences of America (PIASA), culminating in his tenure as Executive Director and President, actively fostering academic connections between Polish and American institutions. Dr. Gromada played a pivotal role in expanding PIASA's reach by affiliating it with the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, organizing scholarly conferences, and strengthening ties with other ethnic groups. Additionally, he facilitated collaborations with Polish academic and cultural organizations, resulting in the development of professional archives and library resources. Under his leadership, PIASA successfully paid off its mortgage and established cordial relations with the Polish Embassy and Consulate General. Dr. Gromada's contributions were recognized through various awards and honors, including the Commander's Cross of Merit from Poland, solidifying his legacy as a dedicated scholar and cultural ambassador. About the Symposium This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/202322 minutes, 4 seconds
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Oskar Halecki in the Independent Poland (1918-1939) with Professor Marek Kornat

Professor Marek Kornat discuss "Oskar Halecki in the independent Poland (1918-1939)." This lecture is part of the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium. About the Speaker Marek Kornat is a historian. He graduated with his PhD from the Jagiellonian University (UJ) in Kraków in 2000, and subsequently obtained the title of Professor of Humanities in 2015. His scholarly activity focuses on history of Polish diplomacy and international relations in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the issues of the Second Polish Republic (1918-1939). He also deals with the history of Polish political thought, the historiography of totalitarian regimes and the origins and significance of the Sovietology. Since 2011, he has been employed in the Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAN), as Head of the Chair of 20th Century History. Since 2008, he has also been lecturing at the Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University (UKSW) in Warsaw. He has delivered lectures at foreign research centers including Centre National de la Recherche (research) Scientifique in Paris, Harriman Institute at Columbia University in New York and Institut für Wissenschaften vom Menschen in Vienna as well as Europäische Institut in Mainz. He has been granted scholarships by the Foundation for Polish Science, the De Brzezie Lanckoronski Foundation, the Kościuszko Foundation and the British Academy. He is the author of 10 books and over 300 articles concerning the above issues. About the Symposium This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/202341 minutes, 30 seconds
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People's Poland towards Oskar Halecki and his works (1945 - 1990), with Professor Tadeusz Rutkowski

Professor Tadeusz Rutkowski discusses "People's Poland towards Oskar Halecki and his works (1945 - 1990)." This lecture is part of the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium. About the Speaker Tadeusz Paweł Rutkowski is a historian of modern history, professor at the University of Warsaw. He specializes in the history of Poland and Eastern Europe in the 20th century, including science policy and the history of historiography. Author, among others, „Nauki historyczne w Polsce 1944 – 1970. Zagadnienia politycznej i organizacyjne”, ("Historical sciences in Poland 1944 - 1970. Political and organizational issues"), Warsaw 2007, „Adam Bromberg i „Encyklopedyści”. Kartka z dziejów inteligencji polskiej w PRL”, ("Adam Bromberg and "Encyclopedists". A page from the history of the Polish intelligentsia in the Polish People's Republic"), Warsaw 2010, „Pańska, szlachecka, faszystowska. Polska w sowieckiej propagandzie, kulturze i historiografii 1917 – 1945” („Pańska”, noble's, fascist. Poland in Soviet propaganda, culture and historiography 1917 – 1945”), Warsaw 2020. About the Symposium This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/202339 minutes, 38 seconds
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Introduction to the Intermarium and Trimarium – Concept and New Realities Symposium

This video introduces the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium, titled "Intermarium and Trimarium - Concepts and New Realities." This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/20233 minutes, 14 seconds
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Implications of U.S. Policy for Russia’s Strategic Decision Making on Ukraine with Dr. Lenczowski

Dr. John Lenczowski discusses "The Implications of U.S. Policy for Russia’s Strategic Decision Making on Ukraine." This lecture is part of the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium. About the Speaker From 1981 to 1983, Dr. Lenczowski served at the State Department in the Bureau of European Affairs and as the Special Advisor to Under Secretary for Political Affairs Lawrence Eagleburger. From 1983 to 1987, he was the Director of European and Soviet Affairs at the National Security Council. In that capacity, he was the principal Soviet affairs adviser to President Reagan. He has been associated with several academic and research institutions in the Washington area, including Georgetown University, the University of Maryland, the American Enterprise Institute, the Ethics and Public Policy Center, the Council for Inter-American Security, and the International Freedom Foundation. He has also served on the staff of Congressman James Courter. Dr. Lenczowski attended the Thacher School, earning his B.A. at the University of California, Berkeley, and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He founded The Institute of World Politics in 1990 and served for President until 2021. He now serves as President Emeritus and Chancellor at the Institute. About the Symposium This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/202339 minutes, 50 seconds
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East Central Europe - Oskar Halecki's Concept: How It Was Developed and Why It Matters

Professor Marek Kornat discuss "Oskar Halecki in the independent Poland (1918-1939)." This lecture is part of the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium. About the Speaker Marek Kornat is a historian. He graduated with his PhD from the Jagiellonian University (UJ) in Kraków in 2000, and subsequently obtained the title of Professor of Humanities in 2015. His scholarly activity focuses on history of Polish diplomacy and international relations in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the issues of the Second Polish Republic (1918-1939). He also deals with the history of Polish political thought, the historiography of totalitarian regimes and the origins and significance of the Sovietology. Since 2011, he has been employed in the Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAN), as Head of the Chair of 20th Century History. Since 2008, he has also been lecturing at the Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University (UKSW) in Warsaw. He has delivered lectures at foreign research centers including Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris, Harriman Institute at Columbia University in New York and Institut für Wissenschaften vom Menschen in Vienna as well as Europäische Institut in Mainz. He has been granted scholarships by the Foundation for Polish Science, the De Brzezie Lanckoronski Foundation, the Kościuszko Foundation and the British Academy. He is the author of 10 books and over 300 articles concerning the above issues. About the Symposium This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/202336 minutes, 9 seconds
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Professor Oskar Halecki - Polish Scholar In-Exile (1939 - 1973), with Dr. Alexander M. Jablonski

Dr. Alexander M. Jablonski discusses "Professor Oskar Halecki - Polish Scholar In-Exile (1939 - 1973)." This lecture is part of the 16th annual Kościuszko Chair Conference and the 4th Oskar Halecki Symposium. About the Speaker Dr. Alexander Maciej Jabłoński, P.Eng. received his BSc & MS (civil engineering) from the Technical University of Cracow, Poland (1970), MS (mechanics and materials engineering) from the University of Illinois at Chicago (1982) and PhD (structural dynamics) from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada (1989). He has more than 50 years of experience in various fields of engineering, reconnaissance projects, project management and strategy planning, and about 130 publications. He worked as engineer in Poland, Finland, Norway, Germany, the USA, and Canada. Since 1992, he has been working as Research Scientist, Research Engineer, and Manager in Canadian federal laboratories. He is working now at the David Florida Laboratory, Canadian Space Agency. He is also an Adjunct Research Professor at the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Carleton University in Ottawa. He is Fellow of the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute (CASI), Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), Member of Aerospace Division (ASD) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASD ASCE), and recipient of various engineering and scientific awards. Since his early life in Poland, he has studied Polish and world history for decades. He writes historical essays and presentations, especially on the modern history of Poland, including World War II and the post-war era of the Soviet occupation. Currently, he is the President of the Oskar Halecki Institute in Canada and a member of the Program Council of the Institute of Heritage of the National Thought (IDMN), Warsaw, Poland. About the Symposium This virtual joint symposium is organized by The Institute of World Politics, in Washington, D.C., USA, and The Oskar Halecki Institute in Ottawa, ON, Canada to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the passing away of Professor Oskar Halecki. Sponsors The Institute of World Politics, Washington, D.C., United States The Oskar Halecki Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Co-Sponsors Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IH PAN) Institute of Heritage of the Polish National Thought (IDMN) Instytut Historii USKW (Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski University) ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/11/202328 minutes, 49 seconds
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Christian Genocide in Nigeria: Its Causes and Reasons It Continues with Mr. Douglas Burton

Investigative reporter Douglas Burton will discuss the rise of genocidal terrorist movements in Nigeria. About this event Join IWP and Douglas Burton for a public lecture on Christian Genocide in Nigeria: its Causes and Reasons It Continues, A Report of Initial Findings from Investigative Reporting. About the Speaker: Douglas Burton is an award-winning conflict reporter specializing in Nigerian war news. Doug mentors conflict reporters in North-Central Nigeria as the Managing Editor of TruthNigeria.com. Since 2019, he has authored scores of reports with The Epoch Times, Zenger News, and The Catholic News Agency. His work has been featured in Fox Nation, American Thought Leaders, The Westminster Institute and The Washington Times. Doug was honored by the Catholic Media Association in Jun, 2023 as a First Place Winner for Best Coverage of Religious Liberty Issues. Having served the Washington Times Corporation as an assignment editor for two decades, Doug brought his skills to Baghdad in 2005 to support the U.S. occupation there for two years. From 2015 he began covering the campaign against the Islamic State as an independent reporter until 2017 and switched to reporting the persecution of Christians in Nigeria shortly thereafter. He produced the most complete story about the blasphemy murder of Deborah Emmanuel on May 12, 2022, in Nigeria’s northern city of Sokoto. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/9/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Changing Dynamics of Outer Space Competition with Dr. Matthew Jenkins

Dr. Matthew Jenkins ('23) will discuss what drives states to pursue a space policy and the competitive landscape that is outer space. About the Lecture: The lecture provides a historical overview of space competition, highlighting what drives states to go to space. The lecture concludes with an overview of the new landscape of space power competition in 2023 and highlights the role of non-state actors, commercial space, and dual-use systems including how they all combine to make space less transparent, and more unstable than it has ever been. About the Speaker: Dr. Matthew Jenkins (’23) had spent 16 years serving in the U.S. Air Force and Space Force, where he built and operated satellites to support the military and the Intelligence Community. He was ready to learn additional skills beyond engineering. After falling in love with strategic-level policy during an assignment on Capitol Hill, he decided to pursue IWP’s Doctor of Statecraft of National Security to connect his technical expertise to an in-depth understanding of space policy issues. As a result, he has interfaced with the National Space Council at the Executive Office of the President and briefed the House Homeland Security Committee staff on emerging space challenges. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/3/20231 hour, 2 minutes, 12 seconds
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The World Post-Putin with Mr. Robert T. Roseberry ('23)

Robert T. Roseberry ('23) will discuss what the world post-Putin could look like. About the Speaker: Mr. Robert T. Roseberry holds a Bachelor of Science in Strategic Intelligence and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Psychology, as well as a Master of Strategic Intelligence Studies from IWP. He has studied Eastern European history and its political workings since he was a teenager. As a native Ukrainian, he has followed the developments of the war between Ukraine and Russia and has formulated who might be the next successor after Vladimir Putin and the Russian power structure. Robert currently lives in South Carolina and enjoys traveling and a good Irish whiskey. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
10/11/202359 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Impact of Russia's State Failure with Mr. Janusz Bugajski

Mr. Janusz Bugajski will discuss the state of Russia today and the consequences a failed Russian state may have on the world. About the Lecture: The Russian Federation is a failed state. It has proved unable to transform itself into a nation-state, a civic state, or a stable imperial state. Moscow’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine has accelerated the process of state rupture through economic decline, falling revenues, elite conflicts, military incompetence, and regional and ethnic disquiet. Russia confronts an existential paradox. Without economic reform and regional autonomy, the federal structure will become increasingly unmanageable. But even if democratic reforms are undertaken by a weakening central state several regions can exploit the opportunity to secede. The prospects for violent internal conflicts substantially increase if reforms are indefinitely blocked. Growing fractures in the Russian Federation will also have a major impact on all neighboring countries for which Western policymakers are not prepared. About the Speaker: Mr. Janusz Bugajski is a Senior Fellow at the Jamestown Foundation in Washington DC and host of television shows broadcast in the Balkans. Bugajski has authored 21 books on Europe, Russia, and trans-Atlantic relations. His recent books include Failed State: A Guide to Russia’s Rupture (2022), Eurasian Disunion: Russia’s Vulnerable Flanks (with Margarita Assenova) (2016); and Conflict Zones: North Caucasus and Western Balkans Compared(2014). His forthcoming book is titled Pivotal Poland: Europe’s Rising Strategic Player. He is a contributor to several media outlets in the US and Europe and has testified before a number of US congressional committees including: the Helsinki Commission, Senate Foreign Relations, Senate Armed Services, House Foreign Affairs, and House Defense Appropriations. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
10/6/202359 minutes, 2 seconds
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Structure of INDOPACOM and Comparable U.S. Agencies for Asia-Pacific Region

Dr. Gordon W. Rudd will discuss the staff structure of Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) and comparable U.S. agencies focused on the region. ***This lecture is part of the Asia Initiative Lecture Series.*** About Lecture: INDOPACOM is a U.S. regional Combatant Command covering most of Asia and the Pacific. It is based in Hawaii and has an Air Force, Army, Navy, Marine, and Special Forces Component Commands, also located in Hawaii. All of these commands have formations located in Asia and the Pacific. These commands have an integrated staff system – to be covered in this presentation. The Department of State and other USG Agencies have comparable regional offices that only loosely align with INDOPACOM, but are not subordinate to it. Theater engagement, i.e. working with friends and allies in the region, is critical to the success of INDOPACOM. About the Speaker: Dr. Gordon W. Rudd has served as Professor of Strategic Studies, U.S. Marine School of Advanced Warfighting (SAW) since January 1998. Prior to working with SAW, he spent two years (1996-1998) as Professor of Strategic Studies with the U.S. Marine Command and Staff College. During the period 2003-2004, he was detached for nine months to serve as field historian in Iraq with Office of Reconstruction & Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA) and the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA). From 1972 to 1995, he served as an infantry officer in the U.S. Army. He has had troop service in infantry, airborne, mech, and Special Forces formations. He has served as a Joint Service Officer (JSO) and Foreign Area Officer (FAO). Overseas assignments include: Panama, Lebanon, Israel, Korea, Iraq, Bosnia, and Turkey. His operational experience includes participation in Lebanon 1984-85 (UNTSO), northern Iraq 1991 (PROVIDE COMFORT), and Bosnia 1994 (UNPROFOR). His military training and education courses include: Infantry Basic and Advanced Courses; Ranger, Special Forces, Scuba, and HALO courses; DLI – French; USA Command & General Staff Course (non-res); USN Command & Staff Course (resident). In addition to his full-time teaching, Dr. Rudd has taught military history courses at the Darden School of Business of the University of Virginia and for the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets. While at SAW, he has taught classes at the Marine the Expeditionary Warfare School, the Marine Command and Staff College, and the Marine Corps War College. Dr. Rudd is the author of two books: - Humanitarian Intervention: Assisting the Iraqi Kurds in Operation Provide Comfort, 1991, published in 2004. - Reconstructing Iraq: Regime Change, Jay Garner, and the ORHA Story, published in 2010. His current research interests include military history, particularly WWII, comparative politics, and regional studies. Dr. Rudd earned his doctorate in history from Duke University in 1993. He earned an undergraduate degree in Political Science from Virginia Polytechnic & State University in 1972. He has earned masters degrees from the Naval War College (1988), Duke University (1990), and St. John’s College (1999). ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
10/4/20231 hour, 7 minutes, 30 seconds
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Soldier-Citizens and Citizen-Soldiers: Spiritedness and the Constitution

Rebecca Burgess discussed the impact of the Constitution on spiritedness and the unique role of soldiers and citizens to defend it. This event is sponsored by the Jack Miller Center. About the Lecture: Soldier-Citizens and Citizen-Soldiers: Spiritedness and the Constitution - The Founding generation was famously concerned about the dangers to liberty that a standing army could pose. Less well remembered is how that generation’s general ambivalence about professional soldiers along with the government’s inability to pay them resulted in soldiers besieging Congress in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, demanding redress. Congress fled to Princeton. But the “Pennsylvania Mutiny” resulted in long-lasting effects for both the nation’s civilians and military: It showcased significant cracks in the Articles of Confederation government, helping set in motion the Constitutional Convention and the inclusion of a constitutional provision for Congress to support federal armies and a navy. Later on, Alexis de Tocqueville would observe that “it is through the soldiers above all that one can pride oneself on having a democratic army pervaded by the love of freedom and respect for rights that one was able to inspire in the people themselves.” This lecture will consider the ties between the US military and the Constitution, and the mutual contributions of soldiers and citizens to defend their Constitution. About the Speaker: Rebecca Burgess is senior editor of American Purpose, acting director of the Classics in Strategy and Diplomacy project, and an SME consultant for the George W. Bush Institute's Veterans and Military Families program. A visiting fellow in national security with the The Independent Women's Forum, she is a 2021 National Security Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. She’s an Advisory Board Member of Combined Arms and of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation/Monticello, and a SME for the NEH Educating for American Democracy: A Roadmap for Excellence in History and Civics Education project. Additionally, she serves on the Reader Review Board of the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps Journal. Rebecca researches the political and social institutions of democratic governance, including civics and national security, civil-military relations and the military life cycle, veterans and politics, and theories of political decay, war, empire and expansion. She has nearly two decades of combined public policy, administrative, and academic experience, holding the position most recently as a research fellow both in Foreign and Defense Policy and Social, Cultural, and Constitutional Studies at the American Enterprise Institute. A Ph.D. (ABD) in politics at the University of Dallas, her work has been solicited for congressional testimonies, and been featured in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Economist, Military Times, Law & Liberty, The American Interest, The Strategy Bridge, and War on the Rocks, among others. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
10/2/202355 minutes, 41 seconds
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Soldier-Citizens and Citizen-Soldiers: Spiritedness and the Constitution

Rebecca Burgess will discuss the impact of the Constitution on spiritedness and the unique role of soldiers and citizens to defend it. This event is sponsored by the Jack Miller Center. About the Lecture: Soldier-Citizens and Citizen-Soldiers: Spiritedness and the Constitution - The Founding generation was famously concerned about the dangers to liberty that a standing army could pose. Less well remembered is how that generation’s general ambivalence about professional soldiers along with the government’s inability to pay them resulted in soldiers besieging Congress in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, demanding redress. Congress fled to Princeton. But the “Pennsylvania Mutiny” resulted in long-lasting effects for both the nation’s civilians and military: It showcased significant cracks in the Articles of Confederation government, helping set in motion the Constitutional Convention and the inclusion of a constitutional provision for Congress to support federal armies and a navy. Later on, Alexis de Tocqueville would observe that “it is through the soldiers above all that one can pride oneself on having a democratic army pervaded by the love of freedom and respect for rights that one was able to inspire in the people themselves.” This lecture will consider the ties between the US military and the Constitution, and the mutual contributions of soldiers and citizens to defend their Constitution. About the Speaker: Rebecca Burgess is senior editor of American Purpose, acting director of the Classics in Strategy and Diplomacy project, and an SME consultant for the George W. Bush Institute's Veterans and Military Families program. A visiting fellow in national security with the The Independent Women's Forum, she is a 2021 National Security Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. She’s an Advisory Board Member of Combined Arms and of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation/Monticello, and a SME for the NEH Educating for American Democracy: A Roadmap for Excellence in History and Civics Education project. Additionally, she serves on the Reader Review Board of the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps Journal. Rebecca researches the political and social institutions of democratic governance, including civics and national security, civil-military relations and the military life cycle, veterans and politics, and theories of political decay, war, empire and expansion. She has nearly two decades of combined public policy, administrative, and academic experience, holding the position most recently as a research fellow both in Foreign and Defense Policy and Social, Cultural, and Constitutional Studies at the American Enterprise Institute. A Ph.D. (ABD) in politics at the University of Dallas, her work has been solicited for congressional testimonies, and been featured in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Economist, Military Times, Law & Liberty, The American Interest, The Strategy Bridge, and War on the Rocks, among others. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
10/2/202355 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Road to Socialism and Back: An Economic History of Poland, 1939–2019

Dr. Peter J. Boettke, Professor of Economics and Philosophy at George Mason University, discussed his book, "The Road to Socialism and Back: An Economic History of Poland, 1939–2019." About the Author Peter J. Boettke, Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute, is a Professor of Economics and Philosophy at George Mason University, the director of the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, and BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism at the Mercatus Center. He received his Ph.D. from George Mason University. Prof. Boettke has developed a robust research program that expands an understanding of how individuals acting through the extended market order can promote freedom and prosperity for society, and how the institutional arrangements shape, reinforce, or inhibit the individual choices that lead to sustained economic development. His most recently published books include F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy; and The Four Pillars of Economic Understanding. Prof. Boettke is the editor of numerous academic journals, including the Review of Austrian Economics and the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, and of the book series, Cambridge Studies in Economics, Choice, and Society. He has served as President of the Southern Economic Association, the Mont Pelerin Society, the Association of Private Enterprise Education, and the Society for the Development of Austrian Economics. About the Book The Road to Socialism and Back: An Economic History of Poland, 1939–2019 For four decades during the latter half of the 20th century, Poland and its people were the subjects of a grand socio-economic experiment. Under the watchful eye of its Soviet masters, the Polish United Workers’ Party transformed the mixed economy of this nation of 35 million into a centrally planned, socialist state (albeit one with an irrepressible black market). Then, in the closing decade of the 20th century, under the leadership of Polish minister of finance Leszek Balcerowicz, the nation was transformed back into a mixed economy. In this book, we document the results of this experiment. We show that there was a wide chasm between the lofty goals of socialist ideology and the realities of socialism as the Polish people experienced them. We also show that while the transition back from a socialist to a mixed economy was not without its own pain, it did unleash the extraordinary productive power of the Polish people, allowing their standard of living to rise at more than twice the rate of growth that prevailed during the socialist era. The experiences of the Poles, like those of so many behind the Iron Curtain, demonstrate the value of economic freedom, the immiserating consequences of its denial, and the often painful process of regaining lost freedoms. Read more: https://www.fraserinstitute.org/studies/the-road-to-socialism-and-back-an-economic-history-of-poland-1939-2019 Download the book for free:https://www.fraserinstitute.org/sites/default/files/road-to-socialism-and-back-an-economic-history-of-poland-1939-2019.pdf This event is sponsored by the Center for Intermarium Studies and the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
9/28/202355 minutes
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Why Ukraine Must Win, with Thomas Cromwell

Thomas Cromwell, author of "Why Ukraine Must Win," gave a discussion about his book at The Institute of World Politics on September 5, 2023. Thank you to our sponsors who made this event possible: Jennifer London Malcolm McNaughton Kirk Vazal John Czop About the speaker: Mr. Thomas Cromwell is a native of England who spent 25 years in the Middle East before settling near Washington, DC. As publisher and editor of the Middle East Times for 18 years, he spent long periods in Egypt, Jordan, Cyprus, Greece and Turkey. He has traveled to Communist countries for first-hand experience of life under totalitarianism, and visited 130 countries altogether. He worked in Ukraine before the Maidan Revolution. He is the author of several books that examine patterns of human behavior in history based on the interplay of religion, politics and ideology. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
9/10/20231 hour, 6 minutes, 18 seconds
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Modern Terrorist Propaganda Summer Seminar And Training

Featuring: Dr. Christopher C. Harmon, IWP Professor and Brute Krulak Center for Innovation and Future Warfare Distinguished Fellow at Marine Corps University. About the Lecture: Terrorist groups have used a fantastic variety of means to seize attention, explain themselves, and seek recruits and support: song and speech, “guerrilla theater,” leaflets, radio, cable TV, newspapers, print ads, books, videos, web sites, e-zines… Social media is only their latest endeavor. This training will cover the modern terrorist propaganda techniques being used today so you can recognize them in your work. This training is developed from the recent book: The Terrorist Argument. The Terrorist Argument: Modern Advocacy and Propaganda, a recent book for the Brookings Institution, is a highly original merging of media studies & terrorism studies. Christopher C. Harmon and Randall G. Bowdish paired a medium of strategic communication with a named terrorist group. Examined in successive chapters are propaganda works of nationalists such as the Algerians and Irish; Maoists; secular Iranian dissidents; eco-terrorists, and other groups such as the potent Islamist organizations Hezbollah, Al Qaeda, and ISIS. Highlights from this multi-year study will be offered in an illustrated lecture and Q&A session by the lead author, Dr. Harmon of the Institute of World Politics. About the Speaker: Dr. Christopher C. Harmon ran counterterrorism studies programs for the U. S. government in two of our Defense Department’s regional academic centers (Garmisch Germany & Honolulu Hawaii). His work on “how terrorist groups end” was explored in a lecture series in the Washington, D.C. area from 2004 onward, with overseas dates including INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon, France (2010). Dr. Harmon is the lead author or editor of seven books about revolutionary warfare, insurgency, terrorism, or counterterrorism. The latest is just now out from Marine Corps University Press, entitled Warfare in Peacetime. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
7/11/20231 hour, 11 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Role Of Multilateral Cooperation In Shaping AI Governance

Mr. Mohammed Motiwala will discuss the importance of multilateral cooperation on AI and the U.S. government's efforts in this year. About Lecture: Are you curious about the latest developments in artificial intelligence (AI) and how they are shaping the world? As AI rapidly advances, it is increasingly clear that cooperation among nations is essential for maximizing the benefits and minimizing the risks of this powerful technology. Join us for a lecture on the importance of multilateral diplomacy in AI cooperation, presented by Mohammed Motiwala, a Foreign Service Officer with extensive experience in international relations. In this talk, you will learn: The current state of AI technology and its potential applications in various fields. The challenges and risks associated with AI, such as biases, privacy concerns, and cyber attacks. The importance of international cooperation in promoting trustworthy AI. Examples of successful multilateral initiatives in AI cooperation and their impact on global governance This lecture is open to anyone interested in the intersection of technology and diplomacy, whether you are a student, a researcher, a policymaker, or a curious citizen. Join us and discover how multilateral diplomacy can help us navigate the future of technology and build a better world. About the Speaker: Mohammed Motiwala is a career member of the U.S. Foreign Service. He is currently in the Cyberspace and Digital Policy Bureau covering the OECD and the Global Partnership on AI. Mohammed's most recent assignment was a graduate program at the National Intelligence University where he focused on Eurasia. Prior to that, he was an Analyst focusing on Russia in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, the State Department’s component of the Intelligence Community. His last overseas assignment was as an Assistant Cultural Affairs officer in Kyiv, Ukraine. His other overseas assignments were in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Lebanon. Prior to joining the Department of State, Mr. Motiwala worked as a hedge fund analyst at MTB Capital in New York City. Mr. Motiwala has a B.S. in Economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in Strategic Intelligence from the National Intelligence University. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
6/5/202352 minutes, 35 seconds
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A Historical Overview Of Coercive Persuasion

Dr. Enrico Suardi ('19) will discuss state and non-state actors' attempts at developing tools of psychological coercion and manipulation. About the Lecture: This presentation is part of a series of lectures on the behavioral sciences in US national security and public safety. The premise is that the human factor is the basis of crises and the source of solutions. Is the human mind the new, sixth domain of operations, or has it been the main domain of operations since Sun-Tzu advised winning without fighting? Nation-states and non-state actors have attempted to develop tools for brainwashing. These efforts have yielded no truth serum, no recruitment pill. Group pressure and psychological manipulations under conditions of deprivation break down most of us over time. However, false confessions are elicited and the coerced individuals are psychologically maimed. Dr. Suardi will start off by providing a historical overview of coercive persuasion, and will then discuss the psychology and neuroscience of coercion and ethical persuasion. He will conclude with highlights of the ongoing 21st-century cognitive warfare. About the Speaker: Dr. Enrico Suardi (IWP Class of 2019, Executive MA in National Security Affairs) is director of psychiatry at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, director of forensic services at the Ross Center in Washington, D.C., and the 2024-25 president-elect of the Washington Psychiatric Society A diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, and forensic psychiatry, on faculty at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Georgetown University, and George Washington University, he has served as chief child and family psychiatrist at the U.S. State Department. Dr. Suardi studied political psychology with Jerrold Post, completed his M.D. and a residency in preventive medicine in Milan, Italy, and obtained an MSc in Public Health and Policy from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
6/5/202359 minutes, 14 seconds
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Over-Classification: How Bad Is It, What's The Fix?

Mr. Henry Sokolski and Mr. Ezra Cohen will discuss ongoing efforts and recommendations for reforming security classification policy. About the Speakers: Mr. Henry D. Sokolski is the Executive Director of the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center, a Washington-based nonprofit organization founded in 1994 to promote a better understanding of strategic weapons proliferation issues among policymakers, scholars, and the media. He teaches graduate-level classes on nuclear policy in Washington, D.C. He is also a Senior Fellow for Nuclear Security Studies at the University of California at San Diego’s School of Global Policy and Strategy. From 1989 to 1993, Sokolski served as the Deputy for Nonproliferation Policy in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, for which he received the Secretary of Defense’s Medal for Outstanding Public Service. Prior to this, he worked in the Secretary of Defense’s Office of Net Assessment on strategic weapons proliferation issues. In addition to his Executive Branch service, Mr. Sokolski worked on the Hill from 1984 through 1988 as senior military legislative aide to Senate Armed Services Committee member Dan Quayle and from 1982 through 1983 as special assistant on nuclear energy matters to TVA Subcommittee Chairman Senator Gordon J. Humphrey. He also worked as a consultant on nuclear weapons proliferation issues to the Intelligence Community’s National Intelligence Council; received a Congressional appointment to the Deutch Proliferation Commission, which completed its report in July 1999; served as a member of the Central Intelligence Agency’s Senior Advisory Panel from 1995 to 1996; and was a member of the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism, which operated until 2010. Mr. Sokolski has been a resident fellow at the National Institute for Public Policy, the Heritage Foundation, and the Hoover Institution. He also has taught political science courses at the University of Chicago, Rosary College, Georgetown, and Loyola University. On January 11, 2021, President Donald J. Trump appointed Mr. Ezra Cohen to a three-year term on the PIDB and designated him to serve as Chair for a two-year term that ended on January 10, 2023. Prior to his appointment to the PIDB, Mr. Cohen served in senior leadership positions at the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community, most recently as the Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security and Director for Defense Intelligence, Office of the Director of National Intelligence from November 2020 to January 2021. In this role, he exercised authority, direction, and control over the Defense Intelligence Enterprise and Combat Support Agencies. Additionally, he served as the principal civilian intelligence advisor to the Secretary of Defense on all military intelligence related matters, including signals intelligence, human intelligence, sensitive activities, geospatial intelligence, sensitive reconnaissance, counterintelligence, law enforcement, and security. His previous government positions include Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (SO/LIC); Principal Deputy Assistance Secretary of Defense for SO/LIC; Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Counter-Narcotics and Global Threats; Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Intelligence Programs on the National Security Council; Deputy Defense Intelligence Officer for South Asia at the Defense Intelligence Agency; and as a DoD Operations Officer. Mr. Cohen began his government service as an intern researching 1820’s tariff legislation in the Center for Legislative Archives, a part of the National Archives and Record Administration. Mr. Cohen has also worked in the private sector for Oracle Corporation. Mr. Cohen received a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from the University of Pennsylvania.
6/5/202359 minutes, 21 seconds
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Affordable And Mass - Producible Nuclear Safeguards For Homeland Security

Dr. Will H. Flanagan will discuss proposed nuclear safeguards for mass-produced nuclear energy and the risks involved in doing so. About the Lecture: In the nuclear era, a single weapon snuck through a border is able to significantly shift geopolitical balances. In 2007, Congress mandated the use of radiation detectors on all inbound containers but there is currently no way effectively meet this goal. Nuclear safeguards exist at all major ports of entry, though they are not always able to scan every item of cargo. Cerium Laboratories is addressing one aspect of this problem by producing a semiconductor-based “neutron intercepting system on a chip” (NISoC). Such detectors are made a modern semiconductor fabrication facilities in batches of 10,000 with a cost of a few dollars per device. This has the potential to shift nuclear safeguards in a direction where a detector can be placed on every inbound container ship. The current status of this effort will be discussed as well as future prospects. About the Speaker: Dr. Will Flanagan received his undergraduate education at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Lured from astronomy research by the fascinating connection between cosmology and particle physics, he began doing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology at Texas A&M through a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) internship. Dr Flanagan later returned to Texas A&M for his PhD, searching for dark matter at the CMS experiment along the LHC beam line. His hitchhike through the field of particle physics has included various neutrino experiments as well as development of novel particle detectors. Dr Flanagan’s current focus is developing a solid-state neutron detector with Austin-based Cerium Labs. The team recently completed a short journal publication and is actively developing future prototypes with applications from nuclear nonproliferation to hydrogen exploration. Before joining Cerium, Dr. Flanagan was an assistant professor at University of Dallas and remains an affiliate professor there with an active lab. Dr. Flanagan is also a member of the Texas Army National Guard as is currently activated to teach physics at the United States Military Academy at West Point. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
6/5/202343 minutes, 26 seconds
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The War in Ukraine: An Estonian Perspective

Amb. Kristjan Prikk will discuss Estonia's views on the War in Ukraine and how the conflict is about much more than just Ukraine. About Lecture: - The tragedy unrolling in Ukraine right now is not a result of a temporary misunderstanding but rather of a long-term Russian strategic gamble - The immediate impact of the war is mostly felt in Ukraine and in her neighboring countries but the consequences are considerably wider - This is a European war. However, U.S. global vital interests are clearly in play more than in any recent conflict. - The strategic objective and how to reach it. About the Speaker: Amb. Kristjan Prikk has served as Estonia´s Ambassador to the United States since May 2021. This is his third diplomatic posting to Washington, DC. Before assuming his current duties, Prikk served for nearly three years as the Permanent Secretary of the Estonian Ministry of Defense. In this role he was responsible for the management of the Ministry and for the coordination of activities of the agencies under the Ministry, including the Estonian Defense Forces, the Estonian Foreign Intelligence Service, and the Centre for Defense Investments. Prior to becoming the Permanent Secretary, Mr. Prikk worked as Undersecretary for Defense Policy in the Ministry of Defense from July 2017 to August 2018. From 2015 to 2017 Mr. Prikk was the Director of National Security and the Defense Coordination Unit of the Estonian Government Office, coordinating the development and implementation of the whole-of-government interagency approach to national defense in Estonia and advising the Prime Minister on these issues. He also served as Deputy Director of the same office for two years prior to becoming the Director in 2015. His previous Ministry of Defense assignments include serving as Defense Counsellor at the Estonian Embassy in Washington, D.C. (2010-2013) and as Director of International Cooperation Department in Tallinn (2007-2010). Prior to joining the Ministry of Defense, Mr. Prikk worked at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on NATO issues mainly pertaining to its enlargement and its partnership with Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia in the Security Policy and Arms Control Bureau (2006-2007). Additionally, he has held assignments as a diplomat covering trade and economic issues at the Estonian Embassy in Washington (2002-2006) and as a foreign trade and World Trade Organization specialist at the Foreign Ministry’s headquarters in Tallinn (1999-2002). Mr. Prikk holds a Master’s degree from the Strategic Studies Program of the United States Army War College (2013) and a Bachelor’s degree in political science and economics from the University of Tartu, Estonia (2000). In 2000-2001, Mr. Prikk performed his required military service in the Estonian Defense Forces, where he remains a reserve officer, and is also a member of Estonia’s voluntary defense organization Kaitseliit (Estonian Defense League). He has been decorated with the Order of the White Star (4th Class) by the President of the Republic of Estonia, the Cross of Merit (1st Class) of the Ministry of Defense of Estonia, as well as other decorations from the Estonian Defense Forces, the Estonian Foreign Intelligence Service, and the Estonian Police and Border Guard Board, among others. Mr. Prikk is married to Liis, with whom he has two daughters and a son. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/w...
5/31/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 48 seconds
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Maoist Revolutionary War Outside China

Dr. Christopher C. Harmon discusses "Maoist Revolutionary War Outside China," a topic on which he is offering a class at IWP (IWP 706, https://www.iwp.edu/courses/maoist-revolutionary-wars-outside-china/). ***This event is part of IWP's China Series, organized by the China/Asia Program.*** About the Lecture: The ideas of Mao tse Tung had a powerful impact—whatever one may think of their morals or their intellectual value. Maoism created the modern People's Republic of China and was then sent on outward marches to influence others around the world. The “export” of Maoist revolutionary warfare began by 1950, was refreshed with the 1965 pamphlet of Defense Minister Lin Biao “Long Live the Victory of People’s War,” and has recently been re-examined by scholar Julia Lovell’s 2019 volume Maoism: A Global History. Dr. Harmon is lecturing on Wednesday, May 17th about this phenomenon, bringing forward examples of Maoist revolutions in Vietnam, Malaysia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, and Peru. The lecture draws upon the substance of his new syllabus at the Institute of World Politics, a course on the theory and practice of Maoism, to commence this summer (2nd term; July-August). About the Speaker: Christopher C. Harmon directed “Comprehensive Security Responses to Terrorism” at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies, a program detailed in Jane’s Intelligence Review (“Regional Teamwork,” September, 2018). Dr. Harmon lectured on Maoist revolutionary warfare for many years at the staff college for Majors at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia, where he later held three academic chairs. He has published on the Peruvian Maoists of “Shining Path” in the journal Small Wars and Insurgencies. Harmon’s eighth book--Warfare in Peacetime, is forthcoming this spring. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
5/24/202359 minutes, 54 seconds
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Ronald Reagan’s Global Strategy for Peaceful Victory in the Cold War

Dr. William Inboden discusses President Reagan's strategy and approach to defeating the Soviet Union towards the end of the Cold War. About the Lecture: With decades of hindsight, the peaceful end of the Cold War seems a foregone conclusion. But in the early 1980s, most experts believed the Soviet Union was strong, stable, and would last into the next century. Ronald Reagan entered the White House with a different view. Rather than seeing the Soviet Union as a rival superpower to be contained, Reagan viewed Soviet Communism as a vile idea to be defeated. Accordingly, he developed a comprehensive strategy designed to deter Soviet strengths, exploit Soviet weaknesses, and bring Soviet communism to a negotiated surrender. About the Speakers: Dr. William Inboden is Executive Director and William Powers, Jr. Chair at the Clements Center for National Security at the University of Texas-Austin. He also serves as Associate Professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and Editor-in-Chief of the Texas National Security Review. Inboden’s other roles include Associate with the National Intelligence Council, Member of the CIA Director’s Historical Advisory Panel, and member of the State Department’s Historical Advisory Council. Previously he served as Senior Director for Strategic Planning on the National Security Council at the White House, at the Department of State as a Member of the Policy Planning Staff, as a staff member for Representative Tom DeLay and Senator Sam Nunn, and as a Civitas Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and his commentary has appeared in numerous outlets including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, National Review, NPR, CNN, and BBC. Inboden is the author or co-editor of four books. His most recent book is The Peacemaker: Ronald Reagan, the Cold War, and the World on the Brink (Dutton, a Penguin Random House imprint 2023). Inboden received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in history from Yale University and his A.B. in history from Stanford University. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
5/22/202350 minutes, 36 seconds
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Remarks by Amb. Aldona Wos at the Presidential Investiture and Commencement

After being formally inducted as the third President of The Institute of World Politics, Ambassador Aldona Woś gave remarks to the Class of 2023, highlighting IWP’s mission and the graduates’ critical role in making the world better, safer, and more harmonious. Ambassador Woś also called the graduates to stand together to defend the values of freedom and democracy. This event took place on May 13, 2023 at the Fairmont. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
5/17/20238 minutes, 37 seconds
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Keynote Address by Chen Guangcheng at IWP Commencement 2023

Chen Guangcheng, Chinese human rights activist and Distinguished Fellow at the Catholic University of America, gave the keynote address at IWP's Presidential Investiture and Commencement for the Class of 2023. Mr. Chen was honored by IWP for his moral courage in the face of totalitarian coercion and received a Doctor of Laws, Honoris Causa, from the Institute. In his remarks, Mr. Chen discussed how he resisted the Chinese Communist Party and encouraged our graduates to stand firm in their values even when those in power attempted to suppress them. This event took place on May 13, 2023 at the Fairmont. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
5/17/202321 minutes, 45 seconds
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Valedictory Remarks by Kevin Phelan, Class of 2023

Kevin Phelan was recognized as the Valedictorian of the Class of 2023, and Gillian Hand was recognized as the Salutatorian. IWP's Presidential Investiture and Commencement Ceremony took place on May 13, 2023 at the Fairmont in Washington, D.C. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
5/17/20233 minutes, 50 seconds
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Global Energy Security: The Role of Canada

Panelists discuss issues concerning global energy security and Canada's role in supplying an alternative solution. This lecture took place at The Institute of World Politics on April 17, 2023. Speakers: Mr. James Rajotte Alberta’s Senior Representative to the United States Mr. Craig Weichel Counsellor and Program Manager for Energy and Environment at the Embassy of Canada Dr. Sara Vakhshouri Founder and President of SVB Energy International; Adjunct Professor of Energy Security at The Institute of World Politics About the Lecture: Topics discussed throughout the panel will include: (1)Russia’s war, the current global energy crisis and the need for alternative energy sources. Can Canada be a new energy partner for Europe?; (2) Canada’s “responsible” energy production strategy; (3) Energy transition and the need for reliable, sustainable and responsible resources. Where does Canada stand during this?; and (4) The importance of the U.S.- Canada energy partnership in the context of the long-term energy integrity and security of the two countries and North America in general transitions. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
5/16/20231 hour, 46 minutes, 21 seconds
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The Myths and Realities of the 1968 Tet Offensive

Dr. James S. Robbins, IWP Dean of Academics, gave a lecture on "The Myths and Realities of the 1968 Tet Offensive" at IWP's campus in Reston, VA on April 13, 2023. This lecture is part of the Asia Initiative Lecture Series, organized by IWP's China/Asia Program. About the Lecture: Most of what Americans have heard about the Tet Offensive is wrong. That the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces were handily defeated was considered immaterial by the press; that it could mount attacks at all was deemed a military triumph for the Communists. This persistent view of Tet is a defeatist storyline that continues to inspire America’s foreign enemies and its domestic critics of the use of force abroad. James S. Robbins provides an antidote to the flawed Tet mythology still shaping the perceptions of American military conflicts against unconventional enemies and haunting our troops in combat. In his re-examination of the Tet Offensive, Robbins analyzes the Tet battles and their impact through the themes of terrorism, war crimes, intelligence failure, troop surges, leadership breakdown, and media bias. The result is an explosion of the conventional wisdom about this infamous incident, one that offers real lessons for today’s unconventional wars. Without a clear understanding of these lessons, we will find ourselves refighting the Tet Offensive again and again. About the Speaker: Dr. James S. Robbins is a national security columnist for USA Today and Senior Fellow in National Security Affairs at the American Foreign Policy Council. Dr. Robbins is a former special assistant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and in 2007 was awarded the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Meritorious Civilian Service Award. He is also the former award-winning Senior Editorial Writer for Foreign Affairs at The Washington Times. His work has also appeared in The Wall Street Journal, National Review, and other publications. He appears regularly on national and international television and radio. Dr. Robbins holds a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and has taught at the National Defense University and Marine Corps University, among other schools. His research interests include terrorism and national security strategy, political theory and military history. Dr. Robbins is the author of five books, including The Real Custer: From Boy General to Tragic Hero, This Time We Win: Revisiting the Tet Offensive, and the critically acclaimed Last in Their Class: Custer, Pickett and the Goats of West Point. Purchase Dr. Robbins' book, "This Time We Win: Revisiting the Tet Offensive": https://www.amazon.com/This-Time-Win-Revisiting-Offensive/dp/1594036381 ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/27/20231 hour, 10 minutes, 26 seconds
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The North Korean Threat and Allied Policy Options - with Bruce Klinger

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on February 16, 2023. This lecture is part of the Asia Initiative Lecture Series. About the Lecture: The North Korean regime’s increasing rate and diversity of missile launches shows that Pyongyang is making significant progress toward implementing a more capable and flexible nuclear strategy, including pre-emptive strikes with strategic, tactical, and battlefield nuclear weapons. North Korea’s exponential increase in missile launches, combined with extensive military exercises and provocations close to the inter-Korean border, have increased regional tensions and risk triggering a military crisis that would involve the United States and its allies. Pyongyang continues to reject all attempts by the U.S., South Korea, and Japan for diplomatic dialogue. Washington and its allies must respond resolutely to the growing North Korean threat while simultaneously seeking ways to reduce the potential for stumbling into war. About the Speaker: Mr. Bruce Klingner specializes in Korean and Japanese affairs as the senior research fellow for Northeast Asia at The Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center. Klingner’s analysis and writing about North Korea, South Korea, and Japan, as well as related issues, are informed by his 20 years of service at the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency. Klingner, who joined Heritage in 2007, has testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. He is a frequent commentator in U.S. and foreign media. His articles and commentary have appeared in major American and foreign publications and he is a regular guest on broadcast and cable news outlets. He is a regular contributor to the international and security sections of The Daily Signal. From 1996 to 2001, Klingner was CIA’s deputy division chief for Korea, responsible for the analysis of political, military, economic, and leadership issues for the president of the United States and other senior U.S. policymakers. In 1993-1994, he was the chief of the CIA’s Korea branch, which analyzed military developments during a nuclear crisis with North Korea. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/25/20231 hour, 1 minute, 3 seconds
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The War in Ukraine: A Belgian Perspective - with Amb. Jean-Arthur Régibeau

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on March 7, 2023. About the Speaker As the Ambassador of Belgium, Jean-Arthur Régibeau represents His Majesty the King of the Belgians and Belgium’s federal government in the United States of America and in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. He is responsible for the direction of the Embassy and its Consulates. Ambassador Régibeau is both a Belgian and Swiss citizen, he studied law, international law, and International Relations in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Italy. In the ‘80s, he began his career in the banking world in New York, he also escorted groups of Belgian tourists visiting the United States. After a few years of working for private business and as a legal advisor, Jean-Arthur Régibeau joined the Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1998. He was the diplomatic advisor to the Minister of Defense from 1999 to 2002 and he went on to be First Secretary at the Belgian Embassy in Berlin. From 2003-2007, Mr. Régibeau returned to Brussels as Head of the Private Office of the Minister of Defense. In 2007, he was appointed Director-General in charge of Multilateral Organizations at the Foreign Ministry. In this capacity, he managed some aspects of the Belgian presidency of the European Union in 2010. He was also Deputy Commissioner for the commemoration of World War I. In 2016, he took up his role as Ambassador to the Russian Federation, Armenia, Belarus, and Uzbekistan. Ambassador Régibeau has been a guest professor on European institutions, Europe, and Globalization at the University of Liège (Belgium). Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/25/202356 minutes, 32 seconds
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The U.S.-Philippines Alliance - with Amb. Jose Manuel G. Romualdez

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on March 9, 2023. About the Lecture With the inaugural anniversary of the Marcos Jr. administration coming up, Philippine Ambassador to the United States Jose Manuel G. Romualdez will elaborate on what’s in store for the Philippine-US relations on topics of PH-US bilateral relations, PH foreign policy priorities, PH perspectives on global and regional security challenges, the PH-US alliance within the context of the Indo-Pacific, and prospects for future relations. About the Speaker Jose Manuel “Babe” del Gallego Romualdez was appointed Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines to the United States of America in July 2017 by President Rodrigo Roa Duterte. On 29 November 2017, he presented his credentials to US President Donald J. Trump and formally assumed office as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary. Additionally, as the head of the Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C., Ambassador Romualdez is concurrently the Philippines’ emissary to the Commonwealth of Jamaica, Republic of Haiti; Republic of Trinidad and Tobago; Antigua and Barbuda; Bahamas; Barbados; Dominica; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; and Saint Lucia. Prior to his appointment, Ambassador Romualdez was designated as a special envoy of the Philippine President to the United States. He also served as a member of several Philippine business delegations visiting the United States, China, Japan and New Zealand from 1989 to 2012. Ambassador Romualdez has extensive experience as a media practitioner and business executive. He used to be the Chief Executive Officer of Stargate Media Corporation and Publisher of People Asia Magazine (The Philippine Star affiliate). He was president of the Manila Overseas Press Club and vice-president of Rotary Club of Manila. Ambassador Romualdez writes columns for The Philippine Star. All his columns have a wide following of readers both in the Philippines and abroad. Born and raised in Manila, Ambassador Romualdez received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from De La Salle College in 1970. An avid golfer, he is affiliated with Manila Golf and Country Club and the Manila Polo Club. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/25/202329 minutes, 9 seconds
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The Free World’s Response to a Sino-Taiwanese War, with LCDR Chris D. Glass

LCDR Chris D. Glass ('18), Lead Analyst for the Kennedy Maritime Analysis Center’s Fleet Operations Integration Division at ONI, discussed "The Free World’s Response to a Sino-Taiwanese War" at The Institute of World Politics on April 2, 2023. This event is part of IWP's China Lecture Series. About the Lecture: In the aftermath of the calamitous withdrawal from Afghanistan in August 2021, America’s authoritarian rivals increasingly discerned an upset to the global order. Furthermore, recent years of nationalistic and quasi-isolationist rhetoric, an ongoing economic downtown, and a global pandemic have exacerbated the international perception of America’s decline. These factors likely contributed to Russia’s seemingly miscalculated invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 and are very likely impacting the People’s Republic of China’s (PRC) own strategic assessments regarding a forceful reunification with Taiwan. This has been evidenced by the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) increasingly bellicose rhetoric in addition to nascent civil-military fusion between the Chinese military and state-owned enterprises (SOE); the latter of which could potentially enable the PRC to advance its timeline for an invasion of Taiwan. In response to this evolving threat, it is incumbent on the U.S., coalition partners, and the free world to consider a range of options to deter Beijing during the current competition phase; de-escalate, demonstrate substantial cost, and force the CCP to recalculate in the window of a crisis; and should such a crisis escalate to a Sino-Taiwanese conflict, execute operations to aid Taiwan. About the Speaker: As a Navy civilian at ONI, Mr. Glass previously worked as an all-source intelligence analyst with the Global Maritime Environment Division’s Transnational Threat Department providing fleet and national decision-makers with in-depth knowledge of the maritime domain in USINDOPACOM and USSOUTHCOM. Mr. Glass presently runs a large and growing team of U.S. Naval officers, enlisted, and civilians as the lead analyst for ONI Kennedy Maritime Analysis Center, Fleet Operations Integration Division’s primary line of effort. He has authored a significant number of products and briefs in direct response to increasing signal demands from the DoD and IC writ large. Customers have included the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Commander ONI, and the Commander of USINDOPACOM among others. Chris also currently oversees a DoD and IC-wide monthly community of interest which includes more than 40 individual offices and 400 members which have equities informing senior leaders in the IC, U.S. Military, and Federal Government. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/25/202356 minutes, 3 seconds
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No Limits Partnership: The China-Russia Information Nexus - with Bret Schafer

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on March 2, 2023. This event is part of the China Lecture Series About the Lecture Throughout Russia’s war in Ukraine, Chinese messengers have surprised many Western observers by framing the conflict on Putin’s terms, promoting pro-Kremlin narratives, and embracing Russian disinformation campaigns, including falsely suggesting that the United States is funding biological weapons laboratories in Ukraine. Though the Ukrainian war is the starkest example of China and Russia’s interest alignment in the information space, China’s drift towards Russian narratives—and its adoption of Russia’s information manipulation tactics—has been evident since at least 2019, when the Hong Kong protests and the start of the global pandemic inspired a more confrontational Chinese approach to global messaging. Understanding the implications of this alignment, its global reach, and its limitations, is critical in formulating an effective, democratic response. About the Speaker Bret Schafer is a senior fellow and head of the Alliance for Securing Democracy’s information manipulation team. Bret is the creator and manager of Hamilton 2.0, an online open-source dashboard tracking the outputs of Russian, Chinese, and Iranian state media outlets, diplomats, and government officials. As an expert in computational propaganda, state-backed information operations, and tech regulation, he has spoken at conferences around the globe and advised numerous governments and international organizations. His research has appeared in the New York Times, USA Today, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post, and he has been interviewed on NPR, MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera, and the BBC. Prior to joining GMF, he spent more than ten years in the television and film industry, including stints at Cartoon Network and as a freelance writer for Warner Brothers. He also worked in Budapest as a radio host and in Berlin as a semi-professional baseball player in Germany’s Bundesliga. He has a BS in communications with a major in radio/television/film from Northwestern University, and a master’s in public diplomacy from the University of Southern California, where he was the editor-in-chief of Public Diplomacy Magazine. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/25/20231 hour, 4 minutes, 28 seconds
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In Defense of Capitalism: Debunking the Myths, with Dr. Rainer Zitelmann

Dr. Rainer Zitelmann discussed his new book, "In Defense of Capitalism: Debunking the Myths" at The Institute of World Politics on March 31, 2023. About the Speaker: Rainer Zitelmann is a historian, sociologist and multiple bestselling author, whose books include Hitler’s National Socialism and The Power of Capitalism. He published 26 books. His books have been translated into numerous languages around the world. In recent years, he has written articles and been the subject of interviews in leading media such as Forbes, Newsweek, The Daily Telegraph, The Times, Le Monde, Corriere della Sera, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, and numerous media in Latin America and Asia. His latest book In Defense of Capitalism is to be published in 30 languages. About the Book, In Defense of Capitalism: "One of the most important books in decades defending capitalism... Adam Smith would have been impressed – and proud.” -Steve Forbes, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Media "The many myths critical of capitalism are refuted with a wealth of facts and cogent arguments that the critics will not be able to effectively answer. Anyone who wants to know the truth about capitalism should read this book.” -John Mackey, Whole Foods Markets Founder Purchase the book: https://www.amazon.com/Defense-Capitalism-Rainer-Zitelmann/dp/164572073X ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/25/20231 hour, 11 minutes, 37 seconds
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Developing Deradicalization Programs for US Domestic Extremism, with Dr. Baiju Gandhi

Dr. Baiju Gandhi, Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrist and IWP student, discussed "Developing Deradicalization Programs for US Domestic Extremism" on March 30, 2023 at The Institute of World Politics. This lecture is part of IWP's Student Speaker Lecture Series. About the Lecture: In recent years, the United States homeland has seen an increased threat from domestic terrorism and extremism. Addressing this unique threat requires utilizing new tools to supplement law enforcement. Deradicalization programs may be one of these tools. Such programs’ goals are to disengage radicalized or radicalizing individuals from acting violently and slowly pull that individual’s mindset toward a less extreme state. While these programs have been in place in Europe for many years, development in the United States is in its infancy. In this lecture, we will review psychological theories of radicalization and deradicalization, describe existing deradicalization programs in Europe, and address suggestions for development of deradicalization programs in the United States. About the Speaker: Dr. Baiju Gandhi is a physician with a specialization in general psychiatry and sub-specialization in the psychiatric care of the medically ill. He graduated from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and Harris School of Public Policy in 2009 with a joint M.D.-M.A. in public policy. His interests include the intersection of behavioral science and national security. He is currently a student at IWP (Institute of World Politics), pursuing a graduate certificate in non-violent conflict. ***Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ ***Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
4/25/202341 minutes, 38 seconds
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The War in Ukraine: A Belgian Perspective - with Amb. Jean-Arthur Régibeau

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on March 7, 2023. About the Speaker As the Ambassador of Belgium, Jean-Arthur Régibeau represents His Majesty the King of the Belgians and Belgium’s federal government in the United States of America and in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. He is responsible for the direction of the Embassy and its Consulates. Ambassador Régibeau is both a Belgian and Swiss citizen, he studied law, international law, and International Relations in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Italy. In the ‘80s, he began his career in the banking world in New York, he also escorted groups of Belgian tourists visiting the United States. After a few years of working for private business and as a legal advisor, Jean-Arthur Régibeau joined the Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1998. He was the diplomatic advisor to the Minister of Defense from 1999 to 2002 and he went on to be First Secretary at the Belgian Embassy in Berlin. From 2003-2007, Mr. Régibeau returned to Brussels as Head of the Private Office of the Minister of Defense. In 2007, he was appointed Director-General in charge of Multilateral Organizations at the Foreign Ministry. In this capacity, he managed some aspects of the Belgian presidency of the European Union in 2010. He was also Deputy Commissioner for the commemoration of World War I. In 2016, he took up his role as Ambassador to the Russian Federation, Armenia, Belarus, and Uzbekistan. Ambassador Régibeau has been a guest professor on European institutions, Europe, and Globalization at the University of Liège (Belgium). Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/24/202356 minutes, 32 seconds
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The U.S.-Philippines Alliance - with Amb. Jose Manuel G. Romualdez

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on March 9, 2023. About the Lecture With the inaugural anniversary of the Marcos Jr. administration coming up, Philippine Ambassador to the United States Jose Manuel G. Romualdez will elaborate on what’s in store for the Philippine-US relations on topics of PH-US bilateral relations, PH foreign policy priorities, PH perspectives on global and regional security challenges, the PH-US alliance within the context of the Indo-Pacific, and prospects for future relations. About the Speaker Jose Manuel “Babe” del Gallego Romualdez was appointed Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines to the United States of America in July 2017 by President Rodrigo Roa Duterte. On 29 November 2017, he presented his credentials to US President Donald J. Trump and formally assumed office as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary. Additionally, as the head of the Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C., Ambassador Romualdez is concurrently the Philippines’ emissary to the Commonwealth of Jamaica, Republic of Haiti; Republic of Trinidad and Tobago; Antigua and Barbuda; Bahamas; Barbados; Dominica; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; and Saint Lucia. Prior to his appointment, Ambassador Romualdez was designated as a special envoy of the Philippine President to the United States. He also served as a member of several Philippine business delegations visiting the United States, China, Japan and New Zealand from 1989 to 2012. Ambassador Romualdez has extensive experience as a media practitioner and business executive. He used to be the Chief Executive Officer of Stargate Media Corporation and Publisher of People Asia Magazine (The Philippine Star affiliate). He was president of the Manila Overseas Press Club and vice-president of Rotary Club of Manila. Ambassador Romualdez writes columns for The Philippine Star. All his columns have a wide following of readers both in the Philippines and abroad. Born and raised in Manila, Ambassador Romualdez received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from De La Salle College in 1970. An avid golfer, he is affiliated with Manila Golf and Country Club and the Manila Polo Club. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/23/202329 minutes, 9 seconds
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No Limits Partnership: The China-Russia Information Nexus - with Bret Schafer

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on March 2, 2023. This event is part of the China Lecture Series About the Lecture Throughout Russia’s war in Ukraine, Chinese messengers have surprised many Western observers by framing the conflict on Putin’s terms, promoting pro-Kremlin narratives, and embracing Russian disinformation campaigns, including falsely suggesting that the United States is funding biological weapons laboratories in Ukraine. Though the Ukrainian war is the starkest example of China and Russia’s interest alignment in the information space, China’s drift towards Russian narratives—and its adoption of Russia’s information manipulation tactics—has been evident since at least 2019, when the Hong Kong protests and the start of the global pandemic inspired a more confrontational Chinese approach to global messaging. Understanding the implications of this alignment, its global reach, and its limitations, is critical in formulating an effective, democratic response. About the Speaker Bret Schafer is a senior fellow and head of the Alliance for Securing Democracy’s information manipulation team. Bret is the creator and manager of Hamilton 2.0, an online open-source dashboard tracking the outputs of Russian, Chinese, and Iranian state media outlets, diplomats, and government officials. As an expert in computational propaganda, state-backed information operations, and tech regulation, he has spoken at conferences around the globe and advised numerous governments and international organizations. His research has appeared in the New York Times, USA Today, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post, and he has been interviewed on NPR, MSNBC, CNN, Al Jazeera, and the BBC. Prior to joining GMF, he spent more than ten years in the television and film industry, including stints at Cartoon Network and as a freelance writer for Warner Brothers. He also worked in Budapest as a radio host and in Berlin as a semi-professional baseball player in Germany’s Bundesliga. He has a BS in communications with a major in radio/television/film from Northwestern University, and a master’s in public diplomacy from the University of Southern California, where he was the editor-in-chief of Public Diplomacy Magazine. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/22/20231 hour, 4 minutes, 28 seconds
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The North Korean Threat and Allied Policy Options - with Bruce Klinger

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on February 16, 2023. This lecture is part of the Asia Initiative Lecture Series. About the Lecture: The North Korean regime’s increasing rate and diversity of missile launches shows that Pyongyang is making significant progress toward implementing a more capable and flexible nuclear strategy, including pre-emptive strikes with strategic, tactical, and battlefield nuclear weapons. North Korea’s exponential increase in missile launches, combined with extensive military exercises and provocations close to the inter-Korean border, have increased regional tensions and risk triggering a military crisis that would involve the United States and its allies. Pyongyang continues to reject all attempts by the U.S., South Korea, and Japan for diplomatic dialogue. Washington and its allies must respond resolutely to the growing North Korean threat while simultaneously seeking ways to reduce the potential for stumbling into war. About the Speaker: Mr. Bruce Klingner specializes in Korean and Japanese affairs as the senior research fellow for Northeast Asia at The Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center. Klingner’s analysis and writing about North Korea, South Korea, and Japan, as well as related issues, are informed by his 20 years of service at the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency. Klingner, who joined Heritage in 2007, has testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. He is a frequent commentator in U.S. and foreign media. His articles and commentary have appeared in major American and foreign publications and he is a regular guest on broadcast and cable news outlets. He is a regular contributor to the international and security sections of The Daily Signal. From 1996 to 2001, Klingner was CIA’s deputy division chief for Korea, responsible for the analysis of political, military, economic, and leadership issues for the president of the United States and other senior U.S. policymakers. In 1993-1994, he was the chief of the CIA’s Korea branch, which analyzed military developments during a nuclear crisis with North Korea. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/21/20231 hour, 1 minute, 3 seconds
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Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms at 80 - with Donald Bishop

Event recorded live at IWP, DC, on February 21, 2023. About the Lecture In his State of the Union Address of 1941, President Roosevelt proclaimed “Four Freedoms.” Eighty years ago this month, the publication of four paintings by the Vermont artist Norman Rockwell inspired Americans. The Office of War Information launched a major information campaign directed at both domestic and foreign publics. The Four Freedoms became shorthand for the war goals of the Allies. Both FDR’s Four Freedoms and the famous paintings by Norman Rockwell are, however, fading from public memory. Mr. Bishop will review the campaign’s antecedents, the State of the Union address of 1941; the impact of Norman Rockwell’s four paintings; elaboration of Four Freedom themes in sculpture, music, and film; OWI’s messaging directed at domestic and foreign audiences, and the impact of the Four Freedoms in the postwar period. About the Speaker An Air Force Vietnam veteran who also served in Korea and on the Air Force Academy faculty, teaching history, Mr. Bishop joined the U.S. Information Agency as a Foreign Service Officer in 1979. During a 31-year career in USIA and State, he served in Hong Kong, Korea, Taiwan, Capitol Hill, Bangladesh, Nigeria, and twice in China. At the Pentagon, he was the Foreign Policy Advisor to the Commandant of the Marine Corps and then the USAF Chief of Staff before a final year at the American Embassy in Kabul. He is now a Krulak Center Distinguished Fellow at Marine Corps University in Quantico. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/20/202353 minutes, 27 seconds
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Lessons Learned From the Russo-Ukraine War and How They Can be Applied to a U.S. China Conflict

*This lecture is part of the Student Speaker Series* About the Lecture As Russia and Ukraine clash for the survival of their civilizations there are many lessons that can be learned from this war. These lessons should be studied if the United States desires an advantage against the rising threat of China. The areas covered in this presentation will include the will to fight and the how to fight. In these sections there are many factors that could hinder the United States should a conflict erupt with China Finally, several possible solutions to the dilemmas that are before the United States will be discussed. About the Speaker Mr. Robert T. Roseberry holds a Bachelor of Science in Strategic Intelligence and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Psychology and is completing his Master of Strategic Intelligence Studies from IWP. He has studied Eastern European history and its’ political workings since he was a teenager. As a native Ukrainian he has followed the developments of the war between Ukraine and Russia and has formulated theory that could be useful should China assume a more aggressive posture that would quickly escalate. Robert currently lives in South Carolina and enjoys traveling and a good Irish whiskey. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/3/202358 minutes, 56 seconds
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From General to Statesman: President Ulysses S. Grant, Military Realism & Foreign Policy

*This event is presented in partnership with Baylor University* About the Lecture Is American politics and foreign policy being militarized? Is the health of American civil-military relations being compromised? With former military officers occupying traditionally civilian political positions and retired officers stepping into the partisan political fray, these dangers cannot be dismissed out of hand. One danger, some argue, is an increased chance of war because the military mind is too focused on using force to solve problems. Others see the military mind as inherently parochial, always seeking more resources, prestige, and autonomy for its organization, even at the expense of sound strategy and foreign policy. To understand the full implications of increased military influence in American politics, strategy, and foreign policy, we need a more complete picture of the military mindset. Peter Campbell argues that this can be accomplished by using the theory of Military Realism to identify some of the underappreciated tendencies of the military mind. When considering the use of force, the military realist focuses on the interactive nature of violence, the ever-present frictions in war, and the uncertainty generated by the use of force for political ends. Campbell argues that President Ulysses S. Grant’s approach to foreign policy was informed by a Military Realist perspective. At times, Grant’s military realism and political inexperience were a liability in foreign policy. Overall, however, Grant’s military realist outlook tempered calls for the use of force in foreign policy during his administration. Along the way, Campbell shows that Grant was a preeminent strategic thinker and that unique aspects of his character also shaped his leadership and foreign policy. When we appreciate the military realist perspective, we can better assess the potential implications of military influence on American politics, strategy, and foreign policy in the future. About the Speaker Dr. Peter Campbell is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Baylor University. He holds an M.A. in war studies from King’s College London and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Military Realism: The Logic and Limits of Force and Innovation in the U.S. Army (University of Missouri Press, 2019). His areas of research include national security decision-making, civil-military relations, strategy, international relations scholarship and policy relevance, insurgency and counterinsurgency, the just war tradition, and cyber warfare. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/Web…31090&id=18
3/3/202351 minutes, 59 seconds
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The Coming Hypersonic Revolution and its Impact on International Security - with Bill Brunner

About the Speaker Mr. Bill Bruner is the co-founder and CEO of New Frontier Aerospace, a technology development company in Seattle, Washington. NFA is developing a range of applied technologies for the aviation, space, and energy markets – to include a renewably fueled, vertical takeoff & landing hypersonic aircraft that will deliver passengers and cargo anywhere on Earth in less than two hours. From 2007 to 2009, Bill was the Assistant Administrator for Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs (OLIA) at NASA. Under Bill’s leadership, the 30-person OLIA team directed all of NASA’s relations with the U.S. Congress, governors, state legislators and local governments. Prior to joining NASA, Bill had a distinguished career as an aviator in the United States Air Force, from which he retired as Colonel. Among his decorations is the Bronze Star, awarded for service in the First Gulf War. He then served in several key positions in Washington — among them as a space and airpower expert on the staff of the Secretary of the Air Force; as a Military Fellow in the Office of the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives; and as an Office Director within the Office of the Secretary of Defense, where he won the Assistant Secretary of Defense Paul H. Nitze Award for Excellence in International Security Affairs. Bill is a graduate of the National War College, the Air Force Fighter Weapons School, and the Air Force’s School of Advanced Air and Space Power Studies — where his thesis topic was “National Security Implications of Inexpensive Space Access.” He has earned master’s degrees, with distinction, in National Security Strategy and Airpower Arts and Sciences. His bachelor’s degree in Physical Science (Astronomy) is from San Francisco State University. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/3/202343 minutes, 51 seconds
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Pursuing Justice Worldwide - with Amb. Morse H. Tan

About the Speaker Ambassador Morse H. Tan served as the first Asian-American Ambassador at Large in U.S. history. A unique position in world history, Ambassador at Large for Global Criminal Justice Tan pursued preventative, mitigating and accountability-seeking justice throughout the world for mass atrocity crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. The top policy position in the entire U.S. government in this area, Ambassador Tan advanced this mission in places such as Rwanda, Kosovo, Syria, Burma, China, Iraq, Guatemala, Sri Lanka, Nagorno-Karabakh, North Korea, Sudan, Lebanon, and El Salvador. The foremost legal scholar on North Korea, Ambassador Tan published “North Korea, International Law and the Dual Crises” (Routledge) and more law review articles on this subject than any other scholar. Named “Korean-American of the Year” and an Emerging Leader by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, he has participated in a range of media engagements, such as the National Law Journal and United Press International (UPI). His speaking invitations include Cornell Law School, the Tiffany Memorial Lecture and the National Press Club. Ambassador Tan has worked in legal academia for close to two decades. His journey in legal academia began as a founding faculty member at the first American Juris Doctor program in Asia, Handong International Law School. Ambassador Tan has served as a visiting scholar at Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law and the University of Texas Law School, and Professor of Law at Northern Illinois University College of Law, and he currently serves as Dean at Liberty University School of Law. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
3/3/20231 hour, 48 seconds
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U.S. Cold War Strategy against China

(NOTE: The main mic feed was lost at 44:00. We apologize for the change in sound quality.) This lecture is part of the China Lecture Series and was recorded live on January 25, 2023 at the Reston Campus of The Institute of World Politics. About the Speaker Dr. John Lenczowski is the Founder, President Emeritus, and Chancellor of The Institute of World Politics, an independent graduate school of national security, intelligence, and international affairs in Washington, D.C. IWP is dedicated to developing leaders with a sound understanding of international realities and the ethical conduct of statecraft, based on knowledge and appreciation of American founding principles and the Western moral tradition. Offering a doctoral program, seven Master’s degrees, and eighteen certificate programs, IWP is the only academic institution dedicated to teaching all the arts of statecraft, including: military strategy, the art of diplomacy; public diplomacy, opinion formation, political warfare; intelligence, counterintelligence, economic strategy, and moral leadership, and how these arts are integrated into national strategy. From 1981 to 1983, Dr. Lenczowski served in the State Department in the Bureau of European Affairs and as Special Advisor to Under Secretary for Political Affairs Lawrence Eagleburger. From 1983 to 1987, he was Director of European and Soviet Affairs at the National Security Council. In that capacity, he was the principal Soviet affairs adviser to President Reagan. He has been associated with several academic and research institutions in the Washington area, including Georgetown University, the University of Maryland, the American Enterprise Institute, the Ethics and Public Policy Center, the Council for Inter-American Security, and the International Freedom Foundation. He has also served on the staff of Congressman James Courter. Dr. Lenczowski attended the Thacher School, earned his B.A. at the University of California, Berkeley, and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He is the author of Soviet Perceptions of U.S. Foreign Policy (1982); The Sources of Soviet Perestroika (1990), Cultural Diplomacy: A Multi-faceted Strategic Asset of Soviet Power (1991); Full-Spectrum Diplomacy and Grand Strategy (2011) and numerous other writings and addresses on U.S. foreign policy, public diplomacy, cultural diplomacy, counter-propaganda, political warfare, Soviet/Russian affairs, comparative ideologies, intelligence, strategic deception, counterintelligence, and integrated strategy. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/Web…31090&id=18
1/27/20231 hour, 13 minutes, 38 seconds
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Thinking about Ukraine: Four Options -- Dr. Henry Nau

About the Lecture America can escape “forever” wars, but it cannot escape “forever” debates about American foreign policy. The debate today about Ukraine reflects four time-tested ways of thinking about America’s role in the world. Nationalists urge America to stay out of Ukraine and conflicts in general outside the western hemisphere. Realists, now called Restrainers, envision a “frozen conflict” or status quo outcome that splits the difference between western and Russian/ Chinese interests in Ukraine and Taiwan. Liberal internationalists appeal to diplomacy and the Minsk process to reach a cease fire, demilitarization and gradual settlement of disputes through peaceful processes and institutions. Finally, conservative internationalists address the conflict in ideological terms, authoritarian versus democratic governments, and insist that freedom “wins” in Ukraine and Taiwan through a Cold War process of balancing power and eventual negotiations that tilt toward freedom. About the Speaker Henry R. Nau is an Emeritus Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University. He holds a B.S. degree in Economics, Politics and Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He taught at Williams College (1971-73) and George Washington University (1973-2019) and as visiting professor at Columbia University, Stanford University and Johns Hopkins SAIS. His books include Conservative Internationalism: Armed Diplomacy Under Jefferson, Polk, Truman, and Reagan (Princeton 2013, paperback with new preface 2015); The Myth of America’s Decline (Oxford 1990, paperback with new preface 1991); At Home Abroad (Cornell 2002); and Perspectives on International Relations (Sage 2021, 7th edition 2021). His latest articles include “Why Reagan Matters,” The National Review, July 10, 2022; “Why Nation-Building is Inevitable,” Providence, August 31, 2021; and “What Trump Gets Right about U.S. Foreign Policy,” The National Interest, April 30, 2020. From January 1981 to July 1983, he served on President Reagan’s National Security Council as senior staff member and White House sherpa for the Annual G-7 Economic Summits at Ottawa (1981), Versailles (1982), Williamsburg (1983) and a special summit with developing countries at Cancun, Mexico (1982). Dr. Nau also served, in 1975-1977, as Special Assistant to the Under Secretary for Economic Affairs in the Department of State and, from 1963-65, as Lieutenant in the 82nd Airborne Division, Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. From 1989-2016 he directed the U.S.-Japan-South Korea Legislative Exchange Program bringing together semiannually legislators from the U.S. Congress, Japanese Diet and South Korean National Assembly, the only forum for regular off the record political discussions among these three major Asia allies. In recognition of this Program, the Japanese Government awarded Professor Nau The Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, presented by the Japanese Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to the United States, Kenichiro Sasae, at the Japanese Embassy, September 29, 2016. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/Web…31090&id=18
1/25/202359 minutes, 23 seconds
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Foreign Leaders Analysis: A Profile of Xi Jinping with Dr. Enrico Suardi (’19)

About the Lecture This is a segue of my overview of the involvement of the behavioral sciences in US national security. The premise of this series is that the human factor is the basis of crises and the source of solutions. International politics at the highest levels is to an extent personal. The assessment of foreign leaders has been part of the original mission of the U.S. Intelligence Community since teams led by William Langer and Henry Murray were tasked with profiling Adolph Hitler. With his intellectually influential work in government and academia, Jerrold Post later developed the multidisciplinary psycho-biographical method. Current approaches include psycho-biographies as well as computer-based systems built on empirical research, the studies of Alexander George on operational codes, and Margaret Hermann’s Leader Trait Assessment content-analytic technique. I will review how the IC has assessed foreign leaders since WWII and I will present a profile of the Chinese Communist Party’s General Secretary Xi Jinping. I will highlight how Xi Jinping’s personal history of trauma and growth aligns with China’s historical narrative of order and chaos. I will discuss strategic empathy as a tool of statecraft and full-spectrum diplomacy. A conversation may follow about the strengths, weaknesses, and influence of leadership analysis in U.S. national security and foreign policy-making. About the Speaker Dr. Enrico Suardi (IWP Class of 2019, Executive MA in National Security Affairs) is director of psychiatry at Saint Elizabeths Hospital and director of forensic services at the Ross Center in Washington, D.C. A diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry and forensic psychiatry, on faculty at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Georgetown University and George Washington University, he has served as chief child and family psychiatrist at the U.S. State Department. Dr. Suardi studied political psychology with Jerrold Post. He completed his M.D. and a residency in preventive medicine in Milan, Italy and obtained an MSc in Public Health and Policy from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
1/25/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 56 seconds
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China Is Preparing for War, America Is Not with Mr. Gordon G. Chang

This lecture is a part of the Annual Pearl Harbor Day Lecture Series and is presented in collaboration with IWP's China/Asia Program. Recorded live on November 29, 2022 at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.. About the Lecture Xi Jinping is not only implementing the fastest military buildup since the Second World War, but he is also mobilizing the Chinese people for war. He has just created a new war cabinet. He talks about war all the time. The American political and military establishments, however, are not taking Xi seriously, and in Washington, there is an evident lack of sense of urgency. This mismatch will have severe consequences. About the Speaker Gordon G. Chang is the author of The Great U.S.-China Tech War and Losing South Korea, booklets released by Encounter Books. His previous books are Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On the World and The Coming Collapse of China, both from Random House. Chang lived and worked in China and Hong Kong for almost two decades, most recently in Shanghai, as Counsel to the American law firm Paul Weiss and earlier in Hong Kong as Partner in the international law firm Baker & McKenzie. His writings on China and North Korea have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The National Interest, The American Conservative, Commentary, National Review, Barron’s, and The Daily Beast. He is a columnist at Newsweek and writes regularly for The Hill. He has spoken at Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Penn, Princeton, Yale, and other universities and at The Brookings Institution, The Heritage Foundation, the Cato Institute, RAND, the American Enterprise Institute, the Council on Foreign Relations, and other institutions. He has given briefings at the National Intelligence Council, the Central Intelligence Agency, the State Department, and the Pentagon. He has also spoken before industry and investor groups including Bloomberg, Sanford Bernstein, Royal Bank of Scotland, and Credit Lyonnais Securities Asia. Chang has appeared before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs and the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. Chang has appeared on CNN, Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network, CNBC, MSNBC, PBS, the BBC, and Bloomberg Television. He is a regular co-host and guest on The John Batchelor Show. Outside the United States, he has spoken in Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei, Hong Kong, New Delhi, Seoul, Singapore, Tokyo, The Hague, London, Ottawa, Toronto, and Vancouver. He served two terms as a trustee of Cornell University. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
12/2/20221 hour, 20 minutes, 23 seconds
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Modern Applications of Xenophon’s Persian Expedition

This event is part of the Student Speaker Lecture Series and was recorded live at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C. on November 14, 2022. About the Lecture Navigating terrain is difficult. Navigating terrain in an unknown land, without a local guide, surrounded by hostile parties, in an arid climate, and dangerously low on supplies makes the journey significantly more perilous. However, the trek throughout these lands and the skills – both brain and brawn – needed to safely traverse a course back home requires unparalleled knowledge in how to adapt to and strategize for the usage of the geography around oneself. Utilizing the account of Xenophon’s, and his fellow Greek mercenaries’, trials throughout Anatolia and Mesopotamia at the turn of the 5th century B.C.E. helps illustrate the critical importance of geography. This talk looks at providing an analysis for an ancient account of strategy in unfamiliar territories to highlight those principles that transcend time and should be considered even in contemporary operations. About the Speaker Sean Honesty is an M.A. candidate in the Statecraft and National Security Affairs program with a concentration in Public Diplomacy and Strategic Influence. His primary interest of study centers around Mediterranean geopolitics, particularly concerning the cross-cultural challenges facing Europe and MENA, and their effects on U.S. national security considerations for the Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/15/202243 minutes, 12 seconds
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PRC Cyberattacks on Taiwan: What the U.S. Should Learn from Them

This lecture was recorded live on November 7, 2022 at the Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.. About the Lecture Information warfare is an essential part of the People’s Republic of China’s (PRC) defense doctrine. The PRC uses cyber to carry out information operations. Washington should analyze the PRC’s cyber attacks on Taiwan to understand its cyber capabilities and intentions against the United States. This presentation will analyze the PRC’s 2020 attack on Taiwan’s telecom and gas sector, its 2021 attack on Taiwan’s financial sector, and its disinformation operations regarding COVID-19. These attacks reveal that the PRC is likely to attack the United States’ critical infrastructure sector as a way to halt vital services and psychologically degrade the American public’s trust in the government. Additionally, the PRC’s attacks on Taiwan reveal that the PRC is successful at attacking adversaries on the narrative battlefield by using social media. Today, the United States is not prepared to successfully counter or prevent such attacks. This presentation will explain the four actions the United States needs to perform to curb PRC cyber attacks and information operations in the cyber domain: encourage the private sector to develop a robust cybersecurity system through incentive mechanisms, use the principle of reciprocity for actions the government will take against the PRC if cyber attacked, pursue long-term offensive cyber measures such as network reconnaissance against the PRC, and educate the public on PRC disinformation capabilities through a nationwide public affairs campaign. About the Speaker Gillian Hand is a current graduate student at The Institute of World Politics and is set to graduate in December of 2022 with a Masters in Statecraft and National Security Affairs. She is currently working as an analyst at Rockwood Company where she helps government clients work through complex problems to achieve mission success. She has extensive experience in research and analysis through completing several national security research projects for high-ranking government officials. Her areas of expertise include emerging threats and China studies. At IWP, she has focused heavily on understanding how to properly implement the tools of statecraft and create an integrated strategy. Gillian has spent substantial time studying abroad in China to improve her Mandarin skills. She earned her B.A. in International Affairs from George Washington University. She is also a National Military Foundation Scholar (2021) and Association of Former Intelligence Officers Scholar (2021). Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/9/202238 minutes, 44 seconds
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Secrets of the Archives: Reconsidering Research of Bukovsky & Romerstein

Diana West discusses "Secrets of the Archives: Reconsidering Research of Bukovsky & Romerstein." This event is a Herb Romerstein Memorial Lecture on Propaganda and Deception in collaboration with the Intermarium Lecture Series. About the Speaker: Diana West is an award-winning journalist and the author of The Red Thread: A Search for Ideological Drivers Inside the Anti-Trump Conspiracy (Center for Security Policy Press, 2019), American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press 2013) and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press 2007). In Fall of 2013, West brought out a companion volume to American Betrayal titled: The Rebuttal: Defending American Betrayal from the Book-Burners, which includes essays by Vladimir Bukovsky and M. Stanton Evans, among others. Honors include one of Newsmax's 50 Best Conservative Blogs; the Hero of Conscience Award from the American Freedom Alliance; and the Center for Security Policy's Mightier Pen Award. Both American Betrayal and The Red Thread have been showcased at The Pumpkin Papers Irregulars Dinner, a club of intelligence experts and writers that meets every Halloween in Washington, D.C. A journalist since graduating from Yale, West began writing a weekly newspaper column at the Washington Times, where she also wrote editorials under Editorial Page Editors Helle Dale and the late Tony Blankley. The column would be nationally syndicated for 15 years. A collection of West's columns came out under the title, No Fear: Selected Columns from America's Most Politically Incorrect Columnist (Bravura Books). West is also one of 19 co-authors of Shariah: The Threat to America, a publication of the Center for Security Policy, West's work has appeared in many publications and news sites including The American Spectator, Breitbart News, The Daily Caller, Dispatch International, The Epoch Times, Family Security Matters, Gates of Vienna, Manhattan, Inc., M, Inc., National Wildlife Magazine, The New Criterion, The Public Interest, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, The Washington Post Magazine, The Weekly Standard, and her fiction has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly. She has made numerous television, documentary and radio appearances, and addressed audiences including at the American Legion, the Danish Parliament, the Heritage Foundation, the Hudson Foundation, ICON, Institute for the Study of Strategy and Politics, Judicial Watch, the National Vietnam Veteran and Gulf War Coalition, the Naval War College, the Union League Club, and Yale. She blogs at dianawest.net, and is now making videos at https://www.patreon.com/DianaWest. Having earned her permanent Twitter suspension, Diana now thinks aloud and uncensored at Gab @realDianaWest. Learn more about IWP graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/ Make a gift to IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
11/4/202252 minutes, 3 seconds
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MENA: A Summary and Forecast

Dr. Norman Bailey discusses "MENA: A Summary and Forecast." This event is part of a virtual series on the MENA region with Dr. Bailey. The other lectures may be found here: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvtOVOq0jLNIqDJhubnW_1ACbx-EQm1O5 About the speaker: Dr. Norman Bailey is an Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security at The Institute of World Politics and a Professor of Economic Statecraft at the Galilee International Management Institute. Dr. Bailey was a senior staff member of the National Security Council during the Reagan administration and of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence during the George W. Bush administration. *IWP Admissions* https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ *Support IWP* https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
11/4/20221 hour, 1 minute, 17 seconds
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Modern Intelligence Operations Across Multi-Domain Environments

This lecture was recorded live on October 24, 2022 at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.. About the Lecture This lecture will discuss how intelligence capabilities and operations have evolved to enable our national government leaders and military forces to seamlessly counter and/or defeat a near-peer adversary capable of contesting the U.S. in all domains [air, land, maritime, space, and cyberspace] in both competition and armed conflict. This evolution has changed the way tactical, operational, and strategic intelligence capabilities support both national strategy and military operations. It also requires simultaneous, integrated, and synchronized intelligence operational planning and execution, at the speed and scale needed to avoid surprises, gain the advantage, and satisfy all types of intelligence consumers in near-real-time. Today’s intelligence community has adapted our ability to seamlessly analyze, fuse, and share what was once domain-centric information into a single ecosystem that supports the national leadership and military commanders across all domains and all levels of competition/war. About the Speaker Col. Stephen Iwicki has served in the U.S. Intelligence community in both a military and industry capacity for the last 35 years. He began his intelligence career when he was commissioned as an Army Intelligence Officer in 1985 after an ROTC Scholarship for his undergraduate studies. Over the next 20 years, he served in positions of increasing responsibility with extensive experience in managing every facet of the intelligence process from raw intelligence collection and processing to strategic-level analysis supporting White House Cabinet members. He is experienced in employing both foreign and domestic intelligence capabilities in support of national security. IWP Admissions https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
10/31/202252 minutes, 24 seconds
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How to Address the Innovation Adoption Problem in Defense

This lecture is part of the *Kosciuszko Chair/Center for Intermarium Studies* Lecture Series and was recorded live on October 24, 2022 at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.. About the Lecture In the past, emerging and disruptive technologies were often created by the Government and their benefits were largely controlled by the Government. Over the last few decades, the Government lost the ability to control the development and spread of innovative technologies, so the key focus has become on getting access to these innovations. The defense industry has been a slow adopter of new technologies, particularly in Europe. Further, the established ways of innovating the defense industry, such as the reliance on foreign investment and prime contractors are increasingly less suitable in the modern world. Recently, NATO has launched a new Innovation Fund and DIANA accelerator program to stimulate public-private collaboration in the defense industry. They model their fund after IQT, a CIA venture capital fund established in 1999. Yet, the US has a mixed recent history of attracting innovators for defense purposes. The Pentagon is working to update its procurement law to stimulate small technology companies to work on defense projects, yet venture capital investors are reluctant to support companies with a defense focus. How to address the innovation adoption problem? What are the key obstacles in the US and what are the lessons for the wider NATO Alliance? What are the successful case studies and what were the key drivers of success? About the Speaker Mr. Mikolaj Firlej is a Lecturer in AI and Regulation at the Surrey Institute for People-Centred AI and School of Law, University of Surrey. He is also a Research Affiliate at the Faculty of Law, University of Oxford. Mikolaj’s research focuses on providing a deeper understanding of the role of human factors in the increasingly algorithmic decision-making across various sectors. Specifically, he focuses on the operationalization of the emerging legal principle of meaningful human control over the use of autonomous systems, typology of standards applicable to AI systems, and legal issues of privacy-preserving technologies. Mikolaj graduated from the University of Oxford and Warsaw with degrees in law, socio-legal studies, public policy, and philosophy. IWP Admissions https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
10/31/202252 minutes, 35 seconds
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A View of the Ukraine War You Haven’t Heard with Mrs. Mitzi Perdue

This event is part of the Intermarium Lecture Series and was recorded live at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C. on Monday, October 17, 2022. About the Lecture After spending time on the ground in Ukraine as a guest of Ukrainian law enforcement, and after visiting bombed-out police stations and learning something of the trauma that a country endures when lawlessness takes over, she came to believe that one of the great unmet needs in Ukraine today is helping law enforcement recover from the invaders’ attempts to destroy it. In this lecture, Mitzi will share information on what the invaders did, how this has encouraged human trafficking, and what it’s meant for the proliferation of the sale of irradiated scrap metal poached from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. She’ll end with reasons why she believes the Ukrainians will prevail. For a hint, the reasons involve breadcrumbs, colorful nail polish, and a large yellow rose. About the Speaker Mitzi Perdue is an anti-human trafficking advocate, a former rice farmer, past president of the 40,000-member American Agri-Women and a US Delegate to the United Nations Decade on Women Conference in Nairobi. In the 1990s, and early 2000s her nationally syndicated column, “The Environment and You,” was the most widely syndicated environmental column in the US. Recently she’s written a biography of Mark Victor Hansen, the Chicken Soup for the Soul guy. Hansen is in the Guinness Book of Worlds’ Records for selling half a billion books. Royalties for Mark Victor Hansen, Relentless will go to supporting Law Enforcement in Ukraine. IWP Admissions https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=
10/30/202252 minutes, 22 seconds
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Countering the Threat of Insider Spies

Dr. David Charney discussed "Countering the Threat of Insider Spies" at the IWP Chancellor's Council Meeting on September 28, 2022. Learn more about the Chancellor's Council: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/chancellors-council/
10/30/202255 minutes, 14 seconds
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The World Crisis and American Grand Strategy, with Walter Russell Mead

Wall Street Journal columnist Walter Russell Mead discussed "The World Crisis and American Grand Strategy" as the keynote address at IWP's Gala on September 28, 2022. Learn more about IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/about/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=13
10/30/202227 minutes, 9 seconds
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The U.S. Nuclear Deterrent and the Military Buildup of our Adversaries

Rebeccah Heinrichs, IWP Adjunct Professor, discusses "The U.S. Nuclear Deterrent and the Military Buildup of our Adversaries" at the IWP Chancellor's Council Meeting on September 28, 2022 Learn more about the Chancellor's Council: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/chancellors-council/
10/30/202228 minutes, 40 seconds
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The Evolution of North Korean Espionage

This event was streamed live at The Institute of World Politics, D.C. on Thursday, October 13, 2022. About the Lecture In the world of espionage, North Korea remains one of the hardest targets as it remains the most reclusive and enigmatic communist regime on the planet. The question remains, then, how did North Korea develop its Modus Operandi (M.O.) in order to achieve its ultimate foreign policy goal? – which is the “revolutionization” of South Korea through reunification under Kim Jong Un. In this lecture, first, North Korea’s exploitation of its unique Juche ideology as a tool of indoctrination will be discussed – specifically, North Korea’s totalitarian and monolithic dictatorial system, known as suryong, meaning Supreme Leader, will be assessed. Second, the evolution of North Korea’s conduct of espionage during and after the Cold-War will be highlighted, including traditional espionage operations – recruitment of South Koreans – as well as special operations, such as terrorist attacks. Third, several cases of North Korea’s exploitation of its intelligence officers will be addressed – those who were brainwashed to sacrifice their lives for the sake of the regime until their defection to the U.S. or South Korea to pursue their life of freedom. About the Speaker Dr. Amanda Jihyun Won recently graduated from The Institute of World Politics’ (IWP) Doctor of Statecraft and National Security (DSNS) program, and has been serving as Director of the China Asia Program at IWP since September 2022. Amanda is also the founder of IWP’s Asia Initiative Lecture Series (AILS) through which diverse scholar-practitioners have presented their expertise on Asia. Amanda also holds an M.P.S. in Arts and Cultural Management from the Pratt Institute in New York and an M.A. in Government (with a specialization in National Security Studies) from Johns Hopkins University. Her professional experience includes having worked in both the NGO and government sectors, serving as a legislative assistant at the New York City Council and as a Diplomatic & Consular Affairs and Partnership intern at the New York City Mayor’s Office for International Affairs. She has also worked at the U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) where she was a contributor to that organization’s publication: The Parallel Gulag: North Korea’s “An-Jeon-Bu” Prison Camps. Dr. Won will also be teaching a course at IWP on the topic of North Korean Espionage starting in the Spring Semester of 2023. IWP Admissions https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
10/23/20221 hour, 14 minutes, 55 seconds
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Communism in China and the Oppression of Ethnic Minorities

This lecture is in partnership with the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation and was recorded live on September 29, 2022 at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.. About the Lecture Dr. Adrian Zenz will discuss how under Xi Jinping, the Chinese Communist Party is resorting to Mao Zedong's playbook of using ideology to oppress and assimilate ethnic groups. He will describe the suppression of religious and other freedoms especially among Uyghurs and Tibetans, and describe what can be done today to promote human rights for those who suffer under this regime. About the Speaker Dr. Adrian Zenz is Senior Fellow and Director in China Studies at the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, Washington, D.C. (non-resident). His research focus is on China’s ethnic policy, Beijing’s campaign of mass internment, securitization and forced labor in Xinjiang, public recruitment and coercive poverty alleviation in Tibet and Xinjiang, and China’s domestic security budgets. Dr. Zenz is the author of Tibetanness under Threat and co-editor of Mapping Amdo: Dynamics of Change. He has played a leading role in the analysis of leaked Chinese government documents, including the “China Cables,” the “Karakax List,” and the “Xinjiang Papers.” Dr. Zenz is an advisor to the Inter-Parliamentary Alliance on China, and a frequent contributor to the international media. Dr. Zenz obtained his Ph.D. in social anthropology from the University of Cambridge. He conducted ethnographic fieldwork in western China in Chinese and regularly analyses original Chinese source material. Dr. Zenz has provided expert testimony to the governments of Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States. After the publication of his research on forced labor in cotton picking, the U.S. government banned the import of goods made with cotton from Xinjiang. Following his research on population optimization and birth prevention, an independent Tribunal in the United Kingdom determined that China’s policies in the region constitute genocide. Dr. Zenz’s work on parent-child separation in Xinjiang prompted The Economist to feature this atrocity on its cover page and to refer to it as “a crime against humanity” that represents “the gravest example of a worldwide attack on human rights.” Dr. Zenz has acted as an academic peer reviewer for a wide range of scholarly journals, including The China Journal, Asian Studies Review, International Security (Harvard University), China Perspectives, Central Asian Survey, the Asia Pacific Journal of Education, Asian Ethnicity, China: An International Journal, the Journal of Chinese Political Science, Issues and Studies, and Development and Change. Dr. Zenz is a member of the Association of Asian Studies. He has published opinion pieces with Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. IWP Admissions https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
10/5/20221 hour, 19 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Economic Situation in the MENA Region

This event is part of a virtual series on the MENA region with Dr. Bailey. About the speaker Dr. Norman Bailey is an Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security at The Institute of World Politics and a Professor of Economic Statecraft at the Galilee International Management Institute. Dr. Bailey was a senior staff member of the National Security Council during the Reagan administration and of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence during the George W. Bush administration. *IWP Admissions* https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ *Support IWP* https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
10/3/202259 minutes, 27 seconds
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Civic Virtue and the Constitution

This lecture was recorded live at The Institute of World Politics on September 15, 2022. This lecture was sponsored by the Jack Miller Center. ( https://jackmillercenter.org/ ) About the Lecture The Constitution of the United States of America is a practical document, laying out rules for managing public affairs through the offices of government. Although the Constitution does not mention the word “virtue”, George Washington and John Adams, among many others, asserted that the republic could not function without it. But how does virtue function civically? In other words, what is civic about virtue? This address will explore the civic character of virtue, trying to understand not why it is necessary, but how it operates. About the Speaker Dr. Geoffrey M. Vaughan is a professor of political science at Assumption University and a Visiting Fellow at the James Madison Program for American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. His publications emphasize the modern period from Hobbes to Habermas, but he has also published on literature with a forthcoming piece on the Natural Law in the tales of Sherlock Holmes. He is writing on the role of the philosopher-king in modern political thought and a book on the meaning of American citizenship. IWP Admissions https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
9/22/202257 minutes, 35 seconds
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Chernobyl: The First Domino in the Fall of the Soviet Union

This event was recorded live on September 14, 2022 at the Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C. _About the Lecture_ The paper sets the stage for the stressors the Soviet Union was dealing with in the 1980s and dives into how Chernobyl not only accelerated, but caused the collapse of the Soviet Union. The straw that broke the camel’s back as it were. The Soviet Union’s love of secrets and deception would become their undoing as their web of lies became exposed to the world following the accident. _About the Speaker_ *Wendell P. Bryant III* is an M.A. candidate for Statecraft and National Security Affairs, focusing on National Defense. His primary interest is the emerging technologies in cyberwarfare namely Artificial Intelligence and Mass Data Collection, and ultimately their significant importance in continuing to ensure U.S. national security now and into the future. Originally from Tennessee and a Captain in the United States Army, he enjoys all sports with a special place in his heart for Ultimate Frisbee, an avid lover of movies and shows, video games, reading, writing, food experimentation, socializing, poker, and politics. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
9/15/202238 minutes, 3 seconds
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A Year On: Current Events in Taliban Afghanistan

_About the Lecture_ This event was recorded live on September 8, 2022 at The Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C.. With one year going by after the Taliban’s seizure of Afghanistan, the fundamental question remains in the minds of the people most affected: is the Taliban able to bring stability to the nation and form a legitimate government in the country? A short introduction covering The Bonn Agreement (Post-9/11 and the U.S.’s sacrifices and achievements in Afghanistan) and The Doha Agreement (Failures of the peace process, the withdrawal of American forces, collapse of the Afghan government, and violent return of Taliban) will begin the lecture. The first part of this lecture will focus on “a blind spot in the world and a voiceless nation,” addressing questions of what happened to the government, the democratic institutions, and values that led to the culminating point of the Taliban’s takeover and their rule thus far? How has the Taliban behaved toward women; ethnic, religious, and political groups; and former members of government and ANDSF in the past year? Topics of unemployment, poverty, and the current security situation including the resurgence of ISIS and other terrorist groups’ activity over the past year will be discussed. The second part of the lecture will focus on the reaction of the Resistance forces in opposition to the Taliban, which includes former government members, and defense and security forces in their ranks. The final part of the lecture will address the salient question of whether the Taliban has fulfilled its end of the Doha Agreement’s commitments. These commitments can be categorized into three parts: the Taliban and its connection to international terrorist organizations; the establishment of a genuine Intra-Afghan peace process; and the Taliban’s (as a would-be legitimate governing entity) relationship with the surrounding region and its actors. The lecture will conclude with suggestions and solutions for the failings of the Taliban and their governing system in Afghanistan. _About the Speaker_ *Mr. Mohibullah Noori* is a modern and moderate politician resisting on behalf of democracy and regional integration within Afghanistan. He is the leader of the Heart of Asia Nations Integration Movement and former Policy Director at the National Security Council of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Mr. Noori has written several books on regional integration policy and has been an advocate for this idea since 2001. He is known in Afghanistan for his ideas on the Fajristan Civilizational Region, Heart of Asia Regional Order, and Government of Peace. He believes that, in order to bring lasting peace to Afghanistan, there is a need for a Government of Peace based on three principal agreements: national agreement on a moderate, democratic, and decentralized system to appropriately reflect the diversity of the country; partnership with the neighboring countries on a regional integration policy; and global agreement on a neutrality policy with the great powers to prevent Afghanistan’s “Ukrainization.” IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
9/12/20221 hour, 10 minutes, 36 seconds
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Terrorism at Munich: Lessons Learned 50 Years On

About the Lecture Not many events of the late 20th century are as important and foreboding as the seizing of 11 athletes at the Munich Olympics in 1972. Black September, a Palestinian group, held the Israeli captives during a long drama observed over T.V. by as many as one billion people. Then, at a nearby airfield, German police botched a counterterrorism effort and the hostages were murdered by their Palestinian captors. While five of the terrorists perished in the ensuing firefight with German authorities, three escaped overseas and, in a style archetypal for the business of terrorism, they gave a press conference. Politics, sentiment about Germany, feeling for and against Israel, strategy, media, and counterterrorism were all themes of that month – and years of discussions and plans that ensured. The Germans set about forming an elite CT team – which in turn helped stand up U.S. and European counterparts. States were stirred to begin countering terrorism: appeasement was rebalanced by some aggressiveness in official postures and law-making. Even so, using force remained rare – except in the case of Israel which opened a careful assassination plan against terrorist infrastructure overseas. About the Speakers Dr. Christopher Harmon wrote his political science dissertation on terrorism in the early 1980s and continued that work as Legislative Aide for Foreign Policy to a member of Congress and, much later, director of counterterrorism studies programs at the Marshall Center in Germany for the U.S. government. A professor at civilian and military graduate schools including the Naval War College, Dr. Harmon began teaching courses at The Institute of World Politics after 9/11 — on terrorism, and later on counterterrorism. He now serves as a full-time professor at IWP. Lead author or editor of eight books, he serves as Distinguished Fellow at the Brute Krulak Center for Innovation and Future Warfare at Marine Corps University. Mr. Aaron Danis is a career terrorism and counterterrorism specialist, holding a Bachelor’s degree in Military Studies and a Master’s degree in Security Policy Studies. He is a retired U.S. Army intelligence officer, and has served in the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, the U.S. Coast Guard, the Treasury Department, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
9/7/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 11 seconds
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China’s Threat in the Realm of 5G and Cyber

(NOTE: we apologize for the drop in sound quality at the end of the Q&A, but we decided to keep the section because of the importance of the content) This event took place at The Institute of World Politics on September 1, 2022. About the Lecture: The U.S. and Europe have regarded the economic relationship with China as that of a trading partner, but China views things far more seriously, seeming to view the U.S. as an opponent or worse. As an executive who was at the table when Lucent transferred its operations to China and when British Telecom deployed Huawei’s gear into its networks, Jon Pelson has unique insights into the benefits and risks of relying on networks provided by a company so close to the Chinese Communist Party. His access to intelligence officials also illuminated the little-known realities of Huawei’s deployments around America’s nuclear missile sites and the extent of the CCP in directing China’s leading equipment companies to serve the geopolitical allies of China, from North Korea to Iran. But as Pelson describes, the answers to the technology conflict may not lie in political maneuvering, but in unleashing the power of free countries to innovate and surpass even the massive R&D capabilities of China’s technology sector. By creating the right partnership between government and private sector, America can deliver greater solutions, faster, and help free countries retake the lead. About the Speaker: Mr. Jonathan Pelson, a telecom industry veteran and author of Wireless Wars: China’s Dangerous Domination of 5G and How We’re Fighting Back, tells the story of how the U.S. lost the wireless market to China and describes a path to retake the lead. The former Chief of Convergence Strategy for British Telecom and leader of organizations at other global telecom companies, he uses his extraordinary access to tell the stories of the executives who faced Huawei and China’s other telecom equipment companies, describing the grave consequences to freedom and security if we don’t respond to the threat of China’s global ambitions. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
9/4/202251 minutes, 39 seconds
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Internal Conflicts in the MENA Region

Dr. Norman Bailey, IWP Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security, discusses "Internal Conflicts in the MENA Region." This lecture took place on August 25, 2022 and is part of a series on "The MENA Region: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly." Part 1, “The MENA Region in May 2022: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly," may be found here: https://soundcloud.com/theiwp/the-mena-region-in-may-2022-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly Part 2, “The Abraham Accords: What do they Mean for MENA," may be found here: https://soundcloud.com/theiwp/the-abraham-accords-what-do-they-mean-for-mena Part 3, "External Conflicts in the MENA Region," can be found here: https://soundcloud.com/theiwp/external-conflicts-in-the-mena-region About the speaker: Dr. Norman Bailey is an Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security at The Institute of World Politics and a Professor of Economic Statecraft at the Galilee International Management Institute. Dr. Bailey was a senior staff member of the National Security Council during the Reagan administration and of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence during the George W. Bush administration. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
9/2/20221 hour, 7 minutes, 37 seconds
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The Politics of Classical Aesthetics, Natural Law, and Conflicts in Art

Mr. Arthur Kwon Lee, Resident Artist at the McLean Project for the Arts, discusses the role of moral relativism and ideological subversion by artists and galleries in the contemporary mass media culture. This event took place at The Institute of World Politics on August 10, 2022. About the Speaker: Arthur Kwon Lee is a Korean American painter whose gestural mark making harmonizes expressive color palettes with world mythologies. His work has won awards from George Washington University, the Korean Artists Association, the Corcoran Gallery of Art and most recently the inaugural title of ‘Artist of the Year’ by the Eileen Kaminsky Family Foundation. Lee draws inspiration from a broad range of sources including Jungian psychoanalysis, local religious traditions, and his lifelong commitment to martial arts. Prior to developing a love for painting, Lee was a Division One athlete who placed in the US Tae Kwon Do Nationals for three consecutive years. Lee has carried this martial intensity into his artwork where it translated into large-scale works and a diversity of dynamic brushstrokes. The resulting compositions attest to an artist who uses his entire body to paint symbolically evocative works that contain oblique references to archetypal myths from around the world. Luminous colors, gestural expressionism, and philosophical acumen bring a refreshing sentiment to art that draws our sometimes compartmentalized and fractured times into a synthetic, representative whole. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=18
8/13/202251 minutes, 39 seconds
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How the PLA Applies Sunzi’s Art of War to Contemporary Warfare

Mark Metcalf, Lecturer in Global Commerce at the McIntire School (UVA), discusses "How the PLA Applies Sunzi’s Art of War to Contemporary Warfare." This lecture took place at The Institute of World Politics on July 21, 2022. About the Lecture: Over the past decade, PLA-affiliated authors and publishers have produced numerous academically-rigorous texts that are used to teach its members about Sunzi and how his teachings should be regarded in the context of modern warfare. Many of the perspectives that are discussed are distinctly Chinese, not apparent to most Western readers, and provide unique insights into the ways that the PLA views modern warfare. About the Speaker: Mark Metcalf joins the McIntire School in 2020 as a Lecturer in Global Commerce teaching “Doing Business in China,” a seminar that investigates the historical, political, and sociological roots of business practices and norms in the PRC. Since 2014, he has taught courses in Chinese literature in UVA’s Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, including a semester-long seminar on The Art of War. Prior to UVA, Professor Metcalf spent over 25 years as a contractor working as a Signals Analyst, Systems Engineer, Project Manager (PMP), Technical Translator (Russian and Chinese), and Intelligence Analyst in support of the Department of Defense and other U.S. government agencies; assignments involved extensive travel to Europe, Asia, and Australia. This was preceded by service as a Naval Officer, during which he was initially assigned aboard a frigate homeported in Japan, where he qualified as a Surface Warfare Officer. He subsequently transferred to the Naval Security Group and spent the majority of his naval career as a Naval Cryptologist, retiring at the rank of Commander. Professor Metcalf’s current research is focused on contemporary Chinese military perspectives regarding strategy and ethics. He enjoys translating and analyzing Chinese military texts in order to better understand the PRC military’s approaches to decision making. He is particularly interested in understanding the uniquely Chinese historical and philosophical roots that engender such practices, perspectives that are often misunderstood in the West. Professor Metcalf has published his research in academic and professional journal articles and book chapters. He has been invited to the U.S. Naval War College to give presentations about topics ranging from the role of technical standardization in Chinese PLA Navy ship construction, to Chinese perspectives on the relevance of The Art of War to modern warfare. Since 2017, he has participated in the annual Regional Security Working Group held at China Foreign Affairs University in Beijing. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
7/25/20221 hour, 14 seconds
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Anti-Ukrainian Propaganda in Poland

Maria Juczewska (’19) discusses the role of anti-Ukrainian propaganda and disinformation campaigns in Poland’s political and social arena. This is a recording of a lecture that was originally given at The Institute of World Politics on June 23, 2022. It is part of the Intermarium lecture series. About the Speaker: Maria Juczewska is a communication specialist with a versatile international experience. Her education in linguistics, culture studies, and international affairs, combined with years of living abroad, makes her point of view unique and comprehensive. Mrs. Juczewska worked for the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies from 2014-2020, and she is a graduate of IWP’s M.A. program. At present, she is working on her Ph.D. in political philosophy. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
7/25/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 55 seconds
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External Conflicts in the MENA Region

Dr. Norman Bailey, IWP Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security, discusses "External Conflicts in the MENA Region." This lecture took place on July 20, 2022 and is part of a series on "The MENA Region: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly." Part 1, “The MENA Region in May 2022: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”, may be found here: https://soundcloud.com/theiwp/the-mena-region-in-may-2022-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly Part 2, “The Abraham Accords: What do they Mean for MENA”, may be found here: https://soundcloud.com/theiwp/the-abraham-accords-what-do-they-mean-for-mena About the speaker: Dr. Norman Bailey is an Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security at The Institute of World Politics and a Professor of Economic Statecraft at the Galilee International Management Institute. Dr. Bailey was a senior staff member of the National Security Council during the Reagan administration and of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence during the George W. Bush administration. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
7/20/202252 minutes, 58 seconds
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The Strategic and Economic Implications of Anti-Russian Sanctions

Gary Brode, Founder of Deep Knowledge Investing, discusses "The Strategic and Economic Implications of Anti-Russian Sanctions,” as well as how U.S. policy is failing to protect the dollar's reserve currency status and its effect on American consumers. This event took place on June 29, 2022 as a part of The Institute of World Politics' lecture series. About the Speaker: Gary Brode has spent three decades in the hedge fund business. Most recently, he was Managing Partner and Senior Portfolio Manager for Silver Arrow Investment Management, a concentrated long-only hedge fund with options-based hedging. In 2020, he launched Deep Knowledge Investing, a research firm that works with portfolio managers, RIAs, family offices, and individuals to help them earn higher returns in the equity portion of their portfolios. The firm provides actionable high-return investment ideas with a focus on what the market is missing, as well as timely market commentary. Deep Knowledge Investing advised subscribers to short the market in February of 2020 just before the Covid shutdowns and again in January of 2022 just ahead of Federal Reserve rate hikes. The firm has a large and accomplished Board of Advisors with wide expertise. Their work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal and Barron’s, and in appearances on CNBC, Bloomberg West, and RealVision. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
7/12/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 5 seconds
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Beyond Nuclear Crisis: New and Long-Term Strategy for the Korean Peninsula

Col. David Maxwell (ret.), Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD), discusses "Beyond Nuclear Crisis: New and Long-Term Strategy for the Korean Peninsula." This lecture was part of the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. It took place on July 7, 2022. About the Lecture: The Yoon and Biden administrations have an opportunity for a new approach to the Korean security challenge. The Alliance way ahead is an integrated deterrence strategy as part of the broader strategic competition that is taking place in the region. There is a need for a Korean “Plan B” strategy that rests on the foundation of combined ROK/U.S. defensive capabilities and includes political warfare, aggressive diplomacy, sanctions, cyber operations, and information and influence activities, with a goal of denuclearization but ultimately the objective must be to solve the “Korea question” (e.g., the unnatural division of the peninsula) with the understanding that denuclearization of the north and an end to human rights abuses and crimes against humanity will only happen when the Korea question is resolved that leads to a free and unified Korea, otherwise known as a United Republic of Korea (UROK). About the Speaker: Colonel David S. Maxwell (ret.) is the Editor-in-Chief of Small Wars Journal. He is a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a Senior Fellow at the Global Peace Foundation(where he focuses on a free and unified Korea), and a Senior Advisor to the Center for Asia Pacific Strategy. He is a 30-year veteran of the US Army, retiring as a Special Forces Colonel. He has worked in Asia for more than over 30 years, primarily in Korea, Japan, and the Philippines. Colonel Maxwell served on the United Nations Command / Combined Forces Command / United States Forces Korea CJ3 staff where he was a planner for UNC/CFC OPLAN 5027-98 and co-author of the original ROK JCS – UNC/CFC CONPLAN 5029-99 (North Korean instability and regime collapse). He later served as the Director of Plans, Policy, and Strategy and then Chief of Staff for the Special Operations Command Korea. He commanded the Joint Special Operations Task Force Philippines (JSOTF-P), served as the G3 for the United States Army Special Operations Command, and culminated his service as a member of the military faculty at the National War College. Following retirement, he served as the Associate Director of the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. Colonel Maxwell is a fellow at the Institute of Corean-American Studies, an advisory to Spirit of America, and on the Board of Directors of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea, the International Council of Korean Studies, the Council on Korean-US Security Studies, the Special Operations Research Association, the OSS Society, and the Small Wars Journal. He earned a B.A. in political science from Miami University, and an M.A. in Military Arts and Science from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and from the School of Advanced Military Studies, and an M.S. in National Security Studies from the National War College. Colonel Maxwell teaches Unconventional Warfare and Special Operations for Policy Makers and Strategists. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
7/12/20221 hour, 29 minutes, 3 seconds
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The Abraham Accords: What do they Mean for MENA?

Dr. Norman Bailey discusses “The Abraham Accords: What do they Mean for MENA?” This lecture took place on June 23, 2022. It is part of a series on the MENA region with Dr. Bailey. His first lecture in the series may be found here: https://www.iwp.edu/events/the-mena-region-in-may-2022-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly/ About the speaker: Dr. Norman Bailey is an Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security at The Institute of World Politics and a Professor of Economic Statecraft at the Galilee International Management Institute. Dr. Bailey was a senior staff member of the National Security Council during the Reagan administration and of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence during the George W. Bush administration. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
6/24/202257 minutes, 23 seconds
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America on Europe’s Eastern Frontier

Dr. Gábor Csizmazia discusses “America on Europe’s Eastern Frontier.” This event took place at The Institute of World Politics on June 21, 2022. About the Lecture: Dr. Csizmazia will discuss current U.S. foreign policy trends relating to the Eastern-Central European region. About the Speaker: Dr. Csizmazia is an assistant lecturer at the Institute for American Studies at the University of Public Service in Hungary and a consultant for EuroAtlantic Consulting & Investment Plc. He also was a visiting scholar at George Washington University, with a focus on U.S. foreign and security policy concerning Central and Eastern Europe. Dr. Csizmazia has written numerous publications on international relations regarding U.S policy and East-Central Europe. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
6/24/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Russia-Ukraine War and Global Energy Security

Chief Executive Officer of CGAI Mr. Kelly Ogle and IWP adjunct professor Dr. Sara Vakhshouri discuss "The Russia-Ukraine War and Global Energy Security." This event took place at The Institute of World Politics on June 21, 2022. About the lecture: Mr. Kelly Ogle and Dr. Sara Vakhshouri will discuss global energy issues with the backdrop of the ongoing Russia-Ukraine war. About the speakers: Mr. Kelly Ogle is the Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. Among being an entrepreneur, scholar, and published author, Mr. Ogle manages the Energy Security Forum and hosts Energy Security Cubed, a weekly podcast discussing all facets of energy security. He has held positions as a board member of several companies, public, private and non-profit, such as the board of the Humboldt Broncos hockey club. Mr. Ogle received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Saskatchewan, a Master of Strategic Studies from the University of Calgary and holds the ICD.D designation from the Institute of Canadian Directors. Dr. Sara Vakhshouri is the founder and president of SVB Energy International, a strategic energy consulting firm with offices in Washington DC and Dubai. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Energy Security at The Institute of World Politics. Dr. Vakhshouri has about two decades of experience of working in the energy industry with extensive experience in global energy market studies, energy security, and geopolitical risk, and she has consulted numerous public and private sector energy and policy leaders. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
6/24/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 59 seconds
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The Behavioral Sciences in U.S. National Security

Dr. Enrico Suardi, IWP Class of 2019 and Director of Psychiatry at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, discusses "The Behavioral Sciences in U.S. National Security." **Sound improves around 4:33. This event took place at The Institute of World Politics on May 25, 2022. About the lecture: Dr. Suardi will provide a historical overview of the involvement of the behavioral sciences in addressing society’s security needs during peacetime and wartime. The U.S. Constitution entrusts to the government the responsibility for the common defense and general welfare of the nation. National security is today understood as the response to threats by nation-states and non-state actors to the domestic tranquility. The organization of national security requires shared efforts at federal, state, and local levels. From the beginnings in WWI, when psychologists helped assess, select, and place military service members based on their suitability, the scope of the contributions of the behavioral scientists has broadened to include a variety of clinical and consultative roles in national security organizations. The multi-domain, hybrid threats of the 21st century command our best effort to shed light on the human factor, focus on preventative approaches in managing threats, and maintain ethical standards in our professional conduct. About the speaker: Dr. Enrico Suardi (IWP Class of 2019, Executive MA in National Security Affairs) is director of psychiatry at Saint Elizabeths Hospital and director of forensic services at the Ross Center in Washington, D.C. A diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry and forensic psychiatry, on faculty at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Georgetown University and George Washington University, he has practiced psychiatry for over 15 years in public and private settings, including serving as chief child and family psychiatrist at the U.S. State Department. Currently, he is the secretary of the Washington Psychiatric Society and the treasurer of the D.C. Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals. Dr. Suardi studied medicine and public health in Milan, Italy and obtained an MSc in Public Health and Policy from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. His interest in political and operational psychology stems from a longstanding passion for international affairs and diplomacy. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
6/3/20221 hour, 12 minutes, 50 seconds
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Turkey’s President Erdogan’s Balancing Leading to the 2023 Elections

IWP professor Dr. Henry P. Williams discusses "Turkey’s President Erdogan’s Balancing Leading to the 2023 Elections." About the lecture Dr. Henry P. Williams will discuss how Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is walking a tightrope leading up to the 2023 national elections, as well as the implications for the Western alliance and NATO. About the speaker Dr. Henry P. (Phil) Williams III is originally from Michigan. He received degrees and diplomas from Culver Military Academy, the University of Virginia, the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, the University of Florence, Italy, and two Masters and a Doctorate in International Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, a joint Tufts and Harvard Program. He has lived in four foreign countries and has studied and worked professionally in four foreign languages: French, Greek, Italian, and Turkish. Formerly a Wall Street and International Investment Banker, he currently operates a small consulting business and lectures on a variety of topics, including American History, Turkey, and the Middle East. He has been featured on National Public Radio related to several of his interests, has written news commentary pieces on Turkey and the Middle East, and has published scholarly articles on Ottoman and Turkish Law. He has recently spent two semesters (2016-17) in Istanbul teaching a course at Koç University titled “Turkey and America, East and West – Where the Twain Meet.” Dr. Williams is a past National Board member of the English-Speaking Union, a Past Virginia State President of the Sons of the American Revolution, and has served on the board of the American Friends of Turkey for over twenty-three years. He is the author of Turkey and America: East & West – Where the Twain Meet. At IWP, Dr. Williams teaches The Turks: Relations with the MENA, Europe and America, Then and Now, which IWP plans to offer in summer 2022. IWP Admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/ Support IWP: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/WebLink.aspx?name=E231090&id=3
6/2/202259 minutes, 52 seconds
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THE 56: Liberty Lessons From Those Who Risked All to Sign The Declaration of Independence

Author Douglas MacKinnon discusses his book "THE 56: Liberty Lessons From Those Who Risked All to Sign The Declaration of Independence." This event took place on May 23, 2022 at The Institute of World Politics. About the book: "THE 56: Liberty Lessons From Those Who Risked All to Sign The Declaration of Independence" by Douglas MacKinnon honors the 56 signers of The Declaration of Independence and details why the genius and vision of these admittedly imperfect men are just as relevant today. This is a book that also serves as a plea not to cancel our shared American history. As the author stresses: “If our history is bad, let us condemn it and learn from it. If it is good, let us praise it and build upon it. But let us never twist, censor, or cancel our shared American history.” Purchase the book here: https://www.amazon.com/56-Liberty-Lessons-Declaration-Independence/dp/1637584245 About the author: Douglas MacKinnon is a former White House and Pentagon official and bestselling author working with other former government officials to establish a Foundation to preserve the history and protect the reputations of our Founding Fathers. Make a gift to IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/ IWP admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/
6/1/202253 minutes, 16 seconds
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The MENA Region in May 2022: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Dr. Norman Bailey, IWP Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security, discusses The MENA Region in May 2022: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. About the Speaker: Dr. Norman Bailey is an Adjunct Professor of Economics and National Security at The Institute of World Politics and a Professor of Economic Statecraft at the Galilee International Management Institute. Dr. Bailey was a senior staff member of the National Security Council during the Reagan administration and of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence during the George W. Bush administration. Make a gift to IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/ IWP admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/
5/19/202243 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ukrainian National Identity and Russian Intelligence Failure

Ethan S. Burger, IWP Cyber Intelligence Instructor and International Attorney, discusses "Ukrainian National Identity and Russian Intelligence Failure." About the Lecture: Upon independence in 1991, Ukraine was divided by linguistic and geographic fault lines. This situation existed throughout Ukrainian society and presumably its institutions. Over the subsequent 30 years, the extent of social cohesion changed. The schools began to teach about Ukrainian history and emphasize the Ukrainian language and literature. Throughout Ukrainian society, a civic culture evolved where the concept of “citizenship” supplanted ethnic or linguistic identity in importance. Whereas Russian President Putin maintained his post-Soviet persona, a majority of Ukrainians were educated in an independent Ukraine that was more influenced by Western than Russian values. President Putin believed that his armed forces could exploit fault lines that remained in Ukraine to achieve a decisive military victory in a short amount of time and with light casualties. Most specialists believed that the Russians intended to decapitate the leadership of the Ukrainian government and put a “friendly” government into power. Both Russia and the NATO countries undervalued Ukraine’s social cohesion political culture and hence its willingness and ability to resist Russian aggression militarily. Clearly, Russia’s military setbacks can be attributed to intelligence failures when assessing Ukrainian societal unity. Similarly, the NATO countries might have been more forthcoming with military assistance to Ukraine if it had confidence that Ukraine, if properly armed, could resist Russian aggression. About the Speaker: Ethan S. Burger, Esq. is an Instructor and Advisory Board Member for IWP’s Cyber Intelligence Initiative. He is a Washington D.C.- based international attorney and educator with a background in cybersecurity, transnational financial crime, and Russian legal matters. He has been a full-time faculty member at the American University (School of International Service — Transnational Crime Prevention Center) and the University of Wollongong (Australia) (Faculty of Law — Centre for Transnational Crime Prevention), as well as an Adjunct Professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, Washington College of Law, and the University of Baltimore. He oversaw a program on transnational crime and corruption for US Department of Justice at Yaroslav Mudryi National Law University and gave lectures in Kyiv, Lviv, and Odessa. Mr. Burger earned his J.D. at the Georgetown University Law Center, A.B. from Harvard University, and obtained a Certificate in Cybersecurity Strategy from Georgetown University. Make a gift to IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/ IWP admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/
4/26/202257 minutes, 23 seconds
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War in Ukraine: Geopolitical Implications for Europe and the United States

Dr. Lucja Cannon discusses "War in Ukraine: Geopolitical Implications for Europe and the United States." This lecture is part of the 12th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. About the lecture: Analysis of far reaching effects that the war in Ukraine is having on foreign policies of Western Europe, mainly Germany, and Eastern Europe, mainly Poland, and the increasing distance between the two. Repercussions for European integration and the position of the United States are also explored. About the speaker: Dr. Lucja Swiatkowski Cannon is a strategist, expert and author on Eastern Europe, Russia and US-East European relations. She has a BA, M.Phil. and Ph.D. in international relations and Russian/East European studies from Columbia University. Make a gift to IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/ IWP admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/
4/22/202232 minutes, 57 seconds
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Polish-Ukrainian Relations, Past and Present: Some Thoughts

This lecture is part of the 12th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. About the lecture: The current crisis in Ukraine has understandably evoked not only worldwide sympathy for the appalling plight of the Ukrainian people but also admiration for the magnanimous Polish response to the consequent mass exodus of refugees. These developments, however, serve to obscure the complex historical reality of Polish-Ukrainian relations in the modern era. This presentation offers an objective and impartial assessment of a generally tense and often violent symbiosis. About the speaker: Peter Stachura held a Personal Chair in Modern European History at the University of Stirling (UK), where he was also Director of The Centre for Research in Polish History. He is now Director of the independent Research Centre for Modern Polish History and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, London. Professor Stachura has published extensively in his primary research specialisms of Weimar Germany and the Second Polish Republic.
4/22/202229 minutes, 6 seconds
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Channeling Stalin: Unscrambling Russian Propaganda in Ukraine

This lecture is part of the 12th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. About the lecture: In Ukraine, Russia has presently redeployed a trusty Soviet propaganda trope: “liberation from Nazism.” This narrative is, of course, mendacious. Yet, every lie contains a kernel of truth. Our objective here is to extract it and put it in its proper context. We shall consider “liberation” and “Nazism” separately. “Liberation from Nazism” is standard Soviet cliche originating in the Second World War. However, Moscow also lustily employed it during the crushing of the Polish Poznan uprising in June 1956, the Hungarian insurrection in November 1956, and the Czechoslovak upheaval in August 1968. In fact, throughout its history, the USSR justified its imperialist aggression invariably in terms of bringing “liberty” and annihilating evil. Usually, the target was “fascism/Nazism/Hitlerism” but there were derivatives such as “imperialism,” “oppression,” and so forth. Often the Soviets would refer to their actions as “rendering fraternal assistance.” All those propaganda threads are present today in the war in Ukraine. A more sophisticated iteration of “liberation from Nazism” focuses on the Western public, while its cruder form targets domestic, Russian audiences. About the speaker: Dr. Chodakiewicz holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
4/22/202234 minutes, 30 seconds
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The American Rescue of Poland Through Danzig in 1919

This lecture is part of the 12th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. About the lecture: In early 1919, newly reborn Poland was virtually a landlocked country. Border conflicts caused by the geopolitical earthquake of World War I had brought international trade to a standstill. The only hope for economic relief and humanitarian aid to the war-ravaged nation was access to the Baltic sea through German-controlled Danzig. In the late winter of 1919, the small Mission to Danzig, led by the first chief of the American Relief Administration in Poland, Colonel William R. Grove, and the versatile Chief Delegate of the Polish Government, Mieczysław Jałowiecki, would play an indispensable role in opening Poland's economy to the world, before the decisive showdown with Bolshevik Russia in 1920. About the speaker: Nicholas Siekierski earned his PhD at the Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History at the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. His dissertation, "Operations of the American Relief Administration in Poland, 1919-1922", tells the story America's critical role in the early history of the Second Polish Republic. Dr. Siekierski is also a translator, most recently of 485 Days at Majdanek, the memoir of concentration camp survivor Jerzy Kwiatkowski, published last year by the Hoover Institution. It was the subject of a presentation at last year's Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium at IWP.
4/22/202244 minutes, 32 seconds
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Hitler’s Eastern Dream: Its Origins and Consequences

This lecture event is part of the 12th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. About the lecture: This talk will provide a broad overview of Germanic expansion into Eastern Europe which provides the historic background to Hitler’s Eastern Dream. About the speaker: Joseph Poprzeczny holds a Master of Arts degree in history from the University of Western Australia, where he also majored in Economics. He has been a part-time tutor (American and Soviet Politics), 1971-1972, at the University of Western Australia; full-time Teaching Fellow (British and Chinese Economic History), 1973-1975, Monash University, Melbourne; and part-time tutor (South-East Asian history course), 1982, Murdoch University, Perth. He has worked for various federal politicians as an electoral officer and researcher. This eventually led him to become a journalist with various State and national publications before he retired in 2015. In 2004 his book, Hitler’s Man in the East, Odilo Globocnik, was published in America. He is currently working on two other unconnected research projects.
4/22/202251 minutes, 38 seconds
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Current Discussions on the Rule of Law in Poland

In this video, Dr. Marcin Romanowski discusses "Current Discussions on the Rule of Law in Poland – In Light of Changes in the Judiciary after 1989." This lecture is part of the 12th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. About the lecture: Since 2015, the United Right (Zjednoczona Prawica) has won the presidential and parliamentary elections twice, gaining a majority that allows for self-rule. The reforms, in particular in the area of the judiciary, met with fierce resistance from liberal and post-communist opposition parties and judges from higher courts. The central institutions of the European Union (the Commission, the EU Parliament, and the CJEU) are also involved in the dispute, interfering – in the opinion of the Polish Constitutional Tribunal – with the constitutional competencies of the EU Member States in a way that goes beyond scope of the competences conferred upon the EU by its Members in the Treaties. However, the real source of the aggressive opposition to judicial reforms is the fact that the Polish judiciary has not been transformed since 1989 when communism has officially fallen in Poland. As a result of the so-called “Round Table,” agreements were made in 1989 between a part of the opposition and the communist party, leaving the judiciary unchanged, becoming a de facto guarantee of the status quo for post-communist interest groups. Since 2015, Poland has been struggling with many unresolved problems from the communist era. Settlements with the past were implemented after 1989 to a very small extent, which influenced and still affects the quality of political, social, and academic life, and media, making Poland a country of “late post-communism.” The judiciary, the reform of which is under dispute, is one of the most important areas of this “late post-communism.” The lecture will present the causes of contemporary disputes over the Polish rule of law. About the speaker: Dr. Romanowski is an assistant professor at the Department of Theory and Philosophy of Law of the Faculty of Law and Administration within the Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw. He has a doctoral degree in law from the Faculty of Law and Administration at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun. The main areas of his research interest are the law of settlement with the past lawlessness in countries, the natural law and the non-positivist concepts of law, the theory of European and global law, and legal anthropology and its applications in the creation and application of the law. During his professional career, Dr. Romanowski was the Director of the Institute of Justice (2016-2019), an expert of the parliamentary investigative commission to investigate allegations of corruption cases disclosed in the media during work on the amendment of the Broadcasting Act (2003-2004) and a co-author of the report prepared by this commission and, in the years 2005-2007 and 2015-2019, advisor to the Minister of Justice. Since 2019, he has served as Poland’s Deputy Minister of Justice. Make a gift to IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/ IWP admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/
4/22/202253 minutes, 6 seconds
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Strategic Deception and Active Measures

Dr. John Lenczowski gives a lecture on "Strategic Deception and Active Measures." This is the 10th Annual Ronald Reagan Intelligence Lecture sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the speaker: Dr. John Lenczowski is Founder, President Emeritus, and Chancellor of The Institute of World Politics, an independent graduate school of national security, intelligence, and international affairs in Washington, D.C. From 1981 to 1983, Dr. Lenczowski served in the State Department in the Bureau of European Affairs and as Special Advisor to Under Secretary for Political Affairs Lawrence Eagleburger. From 1983 to 1987, he was Director of European and Soviet Affairs at the National Security Council. In that capacity, he was principal Soviet affairs adviser to President Reagan. He has been associated with several academic and research institutions in the Washington area, including Georgetown University, the University of Maryland, the American Enterprise Institute, the Ethics and Public Policy Center, the Council for Inter-American Security, and the International Freedom Foundation. He has also served on the staff of Congressman James Courter. Dr. Lenczowski attended the Thacher School, earned his B.A. at the University of California, Berkeley, and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He is the author of Soviet Perceptions of U.S. Foreign Policy (1982); The Sources of Soviet Perestroika (1990), Cultural Diplomacy: A Multi-faceted Strategic Asset of Soviet Power (1991); Full-Spectrum Diplomacy and Grand Strategy (2011) and numerous other writings and addresses on U.S. foreign policy, public diplomacy, cultural diplomacy, counter-propaganda, political warfare, Soviet/Russian affairs, comparative ideologies, intelligence, strategic deception, counterintelligence, and integrated strategy. Make a gift to IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/ IWP admissions: https://www.iwp.edu/admissions/
4/21/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 4 seconds
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THE CORPORATE WARRIOR? Strategies for Executives from Top Generals

About the lecture: Author, James Farwell will review the precepts of strategy and leadership that the military uses, and applies them to the business world. This presentation will show commercials that companies use, and that the book describes, in terms of effective communication and loyalty-building strategy. About the speaker: James P. Farwell is an author, attorney, and national security expert who has advised the U.S. Government on global initiatives and actions, communication strategy, cyber policy development and authorities, and cyber security. He holds a B.A. from Tulane University, a J.D. in Law from Tulane University, and a D.C.L.S. in Comparative Law from the University of Cambridge (Trinity College). He is an Associate Fellow at King’s College, London, and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C. He is a Visiting Scholar at A.B. Freeman Tulane School of Business.
4/8/202245 minutes, 14 seconds
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Russia’s War on Ukraine

About the lecture: David Satter discusses the origins of Russia’s war on Ukraine, its likely evolution, and what the U.S. can do to help Ukrainians prevail. About the speaker: David Satter is a former Russia scholar, Moscow correspondent (Financial Times of London), and author of five books on Russia and the Soviet Union. More about IWP: Learn more about our graduate programs: www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/. Learn more about supporting the work of IWP: www.iwp.edu/donate/.
3/30/20221 hour, 1 minute, 54 seconds
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Ukraine and Russia: What’s going on?

This event is a part of the Intermarium Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: On February 24, 2022, the Russian Federation launched a war on Ukraine. Building upon its aggressive strategy, which began in 2014, Russia continues its attack, encroaching upon Ukraine’s sovereignty and leaving disaster in its wake. Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz will discuss the situation and give insight into what is going on in Ukraine. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University. More about IWP: Learn more about our graduate programs: https://www.iwp.edu/academic-programs/. Learn more about supporting the work of IWP: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/.
3/18/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Algerian Dream: Youth and the Quest for Dignity

About the lecture: Nearly two-thirds of Algeria’s population is under the age of 35. Growing up during or soon after the violent conflict that wracked Algeria in the 1990s, and amid the powerful influences of global online culture, this generation views the world much differently than their parents or grandparents do. An exploration of this generation, their hopes for the future, and the frustrations that brought them into the streets en masse since 2019 reveals much about the politics, economy, and society of North Africa’s sleeping giant—and its future. The event is moderated by Dr. Zak Allal (’18), non-resident scholar at IWP. About the speaker: Andrew G. Farrand is a non-resident senior fellow covering North Africa at the Atlantic Council and author of The Algerian Dream (2021). He lived and worked in Algeria from 2013 to 2020, implementing youth development programs across the country alongside a range of creative projects. “An expert on North Africa” (The New Yorker), he is the translator of Inside the Battle of Algiers (2017) by Zohra Drif, a contributor to Uncommon Alger (2016), and author of numerous articles on Algeria. He is well known in Algeria as a travel writer, photographer, and media personality. A graduate of Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, he is a proficient Algerian Arabic and French speaker. In 2020 he served as host of Andi Hulm (“I Have a Dream”), Algeria’s first entrepreneurship reality television show.
3/14/202259 minutes, 40 seconds
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Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow the World

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow The World is a gripping history of China’s deteriorating relationship with Hong Kong, and its implications for the rest of the world. For 150 years as a British colony, Hong Kong was a beacon of prosperity where people, money, and technology flowed freely, and residents enjoyed many civil liberties. In preparation for handing the territory over to China in 1997, Deng Xiaoping promised that it would remain highly autonomous for fifty years. An international treaty established a Special Administrative Region (SAR) with a far freer political system than that of Communist China―one with its own currency and government administration, a common-law legal system, and freedoms of press, speech, and religion. But as the halfway mark of the SAR’s lifespan approaches in 2022, it is clear that China has not kept its word. Universal suffrage and free elections have not been instituted, harassment and brutality have become normalized, and activists are being jailed en masse. To make matters worse, a national security law that further crimps Hong Kong’s freedoms has recently been decreed in Beijing. This tragic backslide has dire worldwide implications―as China continues to expand its global influence, Hong Kong serves as a chilling preview of how dissenters could be treated in regions that fall under the emerging superpower’s control. About the speaker: Mark L. Clifford is the author of Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow the World: What China’s Crackdown Reveals About Its Plans to End Freedom Everywhere and the president of the Committee for Freedom in Hong Kong. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Hong Kong and a BA from the University of California Berkeley. A Walter Bagehot Fellow at Columbia University, he lived in Asia from 1987 until 2021. Previously, Clifford was executive director of the Hong Kong-based Asia Business Council, the editor-in-chief of the South China Morning Post (Hong Kong), and publisher and editor-in-chief of The Standard (Hong Kong). He held senior editorial positions at BusinessWeek and the Far Eastern Economic Review in Hong Kong and Seoul. He has won numerous academic, book, and journalism awards. Follow him @MarkLClifford or see more information at www.markclifford.org.
3/3/20221 hour, 22 minutes, 35 seconds
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Does America have the Industrial Base it needs to be a Great Power?

About the lecture: The U.S. has been through three waves of de-industrialization since the 1970s. Manufacturing sectors — ranging from cars to machine tools, semiconductors to electronics, and pharmaceuticals and personal protective equipment — have weakened in comparison to our economic competitors. The deficits in U.S. capacity manifested itself during the first year of COVID on the medical front. Other U.S. shortfalls should be the subject of deep national concern with respect to our aerospace and defense sectors, which provide much of the country’s military systems and critical infrastructure. Dr. Jeb Nadaner will discuss the U.S. industrial base, its relative decline, and where it’s going. About the speaker: Dr. Jeffrey (Jeb) Nadaner is the Executive Director of SAFE’s Commanding Heights initiative, which is focused on advancing and defending U.S. and allied critical supply chains. He also served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Policy, the Director of the USMC Krulak Center of Innovation, and Vice President of Engineering and Technology at Lockheed Martin.
2/2/20221 hour, 33 seconds
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The Trend Toward a Concentration of Power and China’s Hegemonic Goal

This event is part of the China Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: With the rise of totalitarian China, it is more important than ever to understand a historical tendency towards the concentration of not only political, but economic and informational forms of power. Dr. Anders Corr’s latest book, The Concentration of Power: Institutionalization, Hierarchy & Hegemony, is a theoretical analysis of trends in world history that he has developed over the past thirty years of international research and scholarship. He argues that from the beginning of the archeological and textual evidence in history, power is organized around twelve theories of hierarchy that affect every segment of society. From international politics, to unions, associations, corporations, and the military, Dr. Corr breaks them down and provides readers with a sense of what the world could face if we allow hierarchy to continue its historical development toward a global and illiberal hegemony. Be it in China, the United States, or the European Union, all are vying for global influence and the utilization of the structure of the United Nations, or other newer international institutions, to promote either the principles of human rights and democracy, or in the case of Beijing, the exact opposite. This clash between democracy and autocracy on a global level is part of a “ratchet process” of history that Dr. Corr describes, and that could turn to a war of massive proportions, or a continued trend towards a global and illiberal hegemony. As the world slips towards what could be an “end of history” in a Beijing-led international system, no greater stakes have ever imposed themselves on an unsuspecting global public. About the speaker: Anders Corr (B.A. Yale 2001 Summa, Ph.D. Harvard 2008) founded Corr Analytics Inc to provide clients with business intelligence and strategic analysis of international politics. He is Publisher of the Journal of Political Risk, which works with a wide variety of authors, from Ivy League professors to Filipino peasants. His areas of expertise include Asia, historical analysis, grand strategy, social movements, quantitative analysis, public opinion, and international security. Dr. Corr has studied and researched in Kenya, Britain, and Italy, and analyzed China, Russia, Romania, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Brunei, Pakistan and Israel for private clients. He led the U.S. Army Social Science Research and Analysis group in Afghanistan, which oversaw 600 Afghan contract employees on 44 survey projects and conducted quantitative predictive analysis of insurgent attacks. Dr. Corr conducted analysis for US Pacific Command (USPACOM), US Special Operations Command Pacific (SOCPAC), and US European Command (EUCOM) on risks to U.S. national security in Asia and Europe, including in the Philippines, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Ukraine. Dr. Corr conducted red team modeling and simulation for the Defense Department of terrorist attacks against extremely sensitive military facilities and worked on social networking for early warning of pandemics and biological weapons of mass destruction. His current research focuses on great power grand strategies, alliance politics, military strategy, authoritarian political influence, international organizations, and the effects of military technology on the likelihood and outcome of war. He authored No Trespassing: Squatting, Rent Strikes, and Land Struggles Worldwide (South End Press, 1999), and edited Great Powers, Grand Strategies: The New Game in the South China Sea (U.S. Naval Institute Press, 2018). He has peer reviewed for the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Urban History, and Routledge Press. He frequently appears in the media, including the Financial Times, New York Times, CNBC, UPI, AFP, Bloomberg, Fox, Forbes, Epoch Times, Al Jazeera, Japan Times, South China Morning Post, Straits Times, and Institutional Investor.
1/31/202259 minutes, 43 seconds
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Poland, Martial Law’s 40th Anniversary (13 December 1981-13 December 2021)

This event is part of the Intermarium Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: On December 13, 1981, the Communist regime imposed martial law in Poland. The objective was to crush “Solidarity,” a Polish national liberation movement which was masking as the Soviet Bloc’s first independent, self-governed trade union. Thousands were imprisoned, and hundreds died when the red riot police and military assaulted industrial plants, mines, offices, and universities. Inspired by John Paul II and assisted by the Catholic Church, the Poles resisted underground. Afterwards the Communists claimed that they saved Poland from a Soviet invasion. They had no choice but destroy “Solidarity” because the Soviets were going to attack otherwise. However, Moscow preferred for Warsaw to restore order itself. In fact, Poland’s Communist dictator General Wojciech Jaruzelski himself begged the Kremlin to intervene. Ultimately, Jaruzelski himself carried out the Soviet Union’s orders and destroyed overt “Solidarity.” He did not do it for “Poland” or “the Poles.” He lashed out at “Solidarity” because he feared punishment by the Kremlin. Woven into our analysis, we supply also some personal recollections, naming names of our confederates and sharing the events that we participated in. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
1/28/202238 minutes, 20 seconds
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Conquest Without War: The Threat of Communist Chinese Political Influence Operations

This event is co-sponsored by the Movement for the Renaissance of Vietnam, the National Bureau of Asian Research and The Institute of World Politics About the Lecture: “Conquest Without War: The Threat of Communist Chinese Political Influence Operations” is focused on the multifaceted threat of Communist Chinese influence operations: propaganda, disinformation, psychological disarmament operations, commercial cooptation of business leaders, and influence over politicians, the media, Hollywood, and academia. About the Speaker: Dr. John Lenczowski is the Founder, President Emeritus, and Chancellor of The Institute of World Politics, a Graduate School of National Security, Intelligence, and International Affairs based in Washington, D.C. with a satellite campus in Reston, VA.
1/11/20221 hour, 28 minutes, 37 seconds
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Europe is Essential and NATO is the Key

About the lecture: In today’s competitive world our prosperity and our way of life depend on unity among the world’s democracies. Given the strength of the transatlantic economy and the success of NATO, the dynamic relationship between Europe and America is the engine of the global economy and the force supporting the rules-based world order. How we grow together or if we grow apart will determine our individual and collective fate. About the speaker: Michael Ryan served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Policy in the Pentagon following a distinguished career in the United States Air Force and the Senior Executive Service. A graduate of the Air Force Academy, Colonel Ryan began his career as a fighter pilot flying the A-10 in Europe during the Cold War. His extensive background in World Affairs includes service at NATO headquarters, the U.S. Mission to the European Union, U.S. European Command headquarters, and in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He is a graduate of the French War College in Paris, was a National Defense Fellow at the U.S. Congress, and is a Distinguished Graduate of the Joint Military Intelligence College. He holds a Master’s Degree in International Relations and has lectured extensively in Europe and the United States. His latest articles on transatlantic relations appeared recently in The National Interest.
12/22/20211 hour, 20 seconds
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National Readiness for Great Power Competition

The 24th Annual Pearl Harbor Day Lecture. About the lecture: The discussion will examine the current security environment, the growth of Chinese military capabilities, and efforts by the United States and its allies and partners to strengthen deterrence and compete more effectively below the threshold of armed conflict. About the speaker: General Joseph L. Votel is a retired U.S. Army Four Star officer and most recently the Commander of the U.S. Central Command – responsible for U.S. and coalition military operations in the Middle East, Levant and Central and South Asia. During his 39 years in the military, he commanded special operations and conventional military forces at every level. His career included combat in Panama,Afghanistan and Iraq. Notably, he led a 79-member coalition that successfully liberated Iraq and Syria from the Islamic State Caliphate. He preceded his assignment at CENTCOM with service as the Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command and the Joint Special Operations Command. Votel was recognized with the Distinguished Military Leadership Award from the Atlantic Council, the U.S. – Arab Defense Leadership Award from the National Council on U.S. – Arab Relations, the Patriot Award from the Congressional Medal of Honor Society, the SGT James T. Regan Lifetime Achievement Award from the “Lead the Way” Foundation and the Freedom Award from the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. In January of 2020, General Votel became President & CEO of Business Executives for National Security (BENS). He is a Strategic Advisor for Sierra Nevada Corporation as well as a member of the Board of Trustees for Noblis Corporation. Votel is a nonresident Distinguished Fellow at the Middle East Institute and the Belfer Center at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and advises the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point. He sits on the Executive Board of Freedom House and the Center for Ethics and the Rule of Law (CERL). He serves on the Board of Directors for Service to School, Minnesota Wire, Digital Force Technologies and Owl Cyber Defense. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Votel is a 1980 graduate of the United States Military Academy and earned master’s degrees from the U.S. Army Command and Staff College and the Army War College. He is married to Michele; and they have two grown sons, a daughter-in-law and two grandchildren. The Votels reside in Lake Elmo, Minnesota.
12/13/20211 hour, 1 minute, 53 seconds
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Gaza Conflict 2021: A Book Talk by Jonathan Schanzer

About the lecture: The May 2021 conflict between Israel and the terrorist group Hamas generated headlines around the world. However, much of the reporting ignored the history, funding, political dynamics, and other key components of the story. Jonathan Schanzer explores the hidden headlines of the recent conflict, while drawing lines between the history of decades past and current events in one of the most volatile territories in the Middle East. About the speaker: Jonathan Schanzer, former terrorism finance analyst at the United States Department of the Treasury, is senior vice president for research at Foundation for Defense of Democracies. He is the author of the new book Gaza Conflict 2021: Hamas, Israel and Eleven Days of War. Purchase book here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1956450017/.
12/8/202157 minutes, 16 seconds
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Putin’s Playbook: Russia’s Secret Plan to Defeat America

About the lecture: Just because the “Russian collusion” between Russian President Vladimir Putin and former US President Donald Trump turned out to be a hoax, it doesn’t mean that Russia did not intervene in 2016 election, and in two subsequent elections. Not only Moscow’s covert influence operations poisoned American politics, the Kremlin also sowed confusion about the real Russian threat to the United States. In today’s presentation, Ms. Koffler will speak about Putin’s long-range plan— his “playbook”—to destabilize, weaken and subdue the United States, preparing for the war that he believes is inevitable. She will also reveal how unprepared the U.S. lumbering bureaucracy is to defend America from Putin’s threat. About the speaker: Rebekah Koffler, the author of Putin’s Playbook: Russia’s Secret Plan to Defeat America, is a former intelligence officer who served as a Russian Doctrine & Strategy specialist in the Defense Intelligence Agency from 2008 until late 2016. She has delivered classified briefings to top U.S. military commanders, NATO ministers, the directors of the CIA and DIA, the White House National Security Council, and senior congressional staff. In her post-public service career, Rebekah is a writer, commentator, and national security consultant whose work has been published on the Fox News website, The Hill, the New York Post, the Daily Caller, and the Washington Times. She has appeared on Fox News, Newsmax, One America News, and the Sean Hannity nationally syndicated radio show. Purchase book here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07ZZJ8HF4/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1.
12/7/202159 minutes, 35 seconds
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Syria, The Tragedy of A Pivotal State

About the lecture: Syria has seen an internecine civil war for the last decade. It has involved 4 out of the 5 Permanent Security Council members on either side of the conflict making it international, throwing to the wind the cardinal principles of the UN Charter particularly, sovereignty, non-interference, and self-defense. It sets an extremely retrograde principle for the conduct of international relations. About the speaker: Ambassador Rajendra Abhyankar is Visiting Professor at the College of Liberal Arts, Purdue University, Lafayette. From 2012 to 2019, he was Professor of Practice of Diplomacy and Public Affairs at the O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University. Amb. Abhyankar was in the Indian Foreign Service from June 1968 and retired in August 2005. He was Secretary in the Ministry of External Affairs from 2001 to 2004, retiring as Ambassador to the EU, Belgium and Luxembourg. He has been Indian Ambassador to Cyprus, Syria, Turkey, Azerbaijan and Consul General in San Francisco. From 2005 to 2009 he was Professor/ Director of Centre for West Asian Studies, Jamia Millia Islamia University, Delhi. He has written seven books on Indian diplomacy and related issues. His latest book is Syria, The Tragedy of a Pivotal State (Palgrave, 2020).
11/29/202152 minutes, 28 seconds
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The UN’s Human Security Challenge: The Plight of North Korean Refugees in China

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The problems arising from the presence of North Korean refugees in China warrant a human security approach, meriting protection from the UN and the international community. There are three scenarios dreaded by the refugees: first is being caught by North Korean border patrol while trying to escape; second is being subjected to human trafficking ring; and third is being repatriated after being caught by either the Chinese police or North Korea’s own secret police operating in China. Despite the 1995 agreement between the UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) and China, which provides the UNHCR unimpeded access to all refugees within China, the UNHCR has been passive in exerting its mandate to protect the North Korean refugees. One possible solution is the construction of a refugee camp in China or Mongolia. If China allowed for this, it would catapult itself as a genuine “soft power” deserving of the much-coveted G2 status. Otherwise, China’s leadership ambition, UNHCR’s reputation, and most importantly, human rights of the refugees will remain in jeopardy so long as the discriminatory sŏngbun system in North Korea continues. About the speaker: Ambassador Jung-Hoon Lee is Dean and Professor of International Relations at the Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University. He is formerly the ROK government’s Ambassador for Human Rights as well as its inaugural Ambassador-at-Large for North Korean Human Rights. On campus, he served as Dean of the Underwood International College and the Office of International Affairs. He has also served as Director of the Institute of Modern Korean Studies, the Yonsei Human Liberty Center, the Center for American Studies (IEWS), and the Center for European Studies (IEWS). His other academic affiliations include a visiting professorship at the Dept. of Politics, Faculty of Law, Keio University, and a senior fellowship at Harvard Kennedy School’s Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. Ambassador Lee has advised South Korea’s National Unification Advisory Council, Ministry of Unification, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, National Security Council, and the National Assembly. In the case of the Ministry of Unification, he chaired the Advisory Committee for Humanitarian Affairs. His current domestic commitments include his role as Chairman of SaveNK, an NGO that helps the defector community, Senior Advisor to the Future Korea Weekly, a current affairs magazine, and Chairman of the Board of Tongwon Educational Foundation. Internationally, he is a Board Member of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) based in Washington, D.C., an International Patron of the Hong Kong Watch, a UK-based organization that promotes Hong Kong’s democracy, and an Advisory Council Member of the International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute, also based in London. He received his BA from Tufts University, MALD from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, and D.Phil. from the University of Oxford (St. Antony’s College). In 2017, he published Tongbukah Kyŏkrang ui Hanbokp’anesŏ [In the Midst of a Northeast Asian Current]. His most recent journal contributions include “Déjà Vu in South Korea? Lessons from the 1992 Philippines Withdrawal” in The Washington Quarterly (2020), “The UN’s Human Security Challenge: The Plight of North Korean Refugees in China” in the Journal of International Politics (2020), and “North Korea’s Nuclear and Human Rights Conundrum: Implications for South Korea’s Unification Goal” in Pacific Focus (2020).
11/17/20211 hour, 21 minutes, 3 seconds
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The Massacre in Jedwabne Revisited

This lecture event is part of the 14th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference presented by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: On July 10, 1941, the Germans burned alive most of the Jewish population of Jedwabne in north-eastern Poland. Some of the local Christians assisted in the crime but the nature of their exact involvement and deeds remains obscure. In fact, recently declassified documents suggest it was more negligible than some scholars argued before. However, we shall not know the precise details of the crime and the exact perpetrators without an exhumation and further forensic study of the victims. Dr. Chodakiewicz will discuss new evidence and present a documentary collection he co-edited: over 2,000 pages of newly accessible evidence of the crime. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
11/12/202114 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Forgotten Battlefield? September 1939 and the History of World War II

This lecture event is part of the 14th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference presented by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: Dr. Radzilowski will discuss the Invasion of Poland in 1939 by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union and the seemingly deliberate amnesia about the campaign that persisted for almost 80 years. He will examine Poland’s defensive strategy and its successes and failures and why historians have failed so often to understand the campaign’s importance. He will draw on recent scholarship on the topic as well as comparisons with another campaign that is similarly misremembered, the Sino-Japanese War that began in 1937. Lastly, Dr. Radzikowski will examine the role of Cold War politics and efforts of Western countries to save face after their inadequate response to the threats of totalitarianism in the 1930s and 1940s in shaping popular perceptions of these campaigns. About the speaker: Dr. John Radzilowski has taught history, art history, and geography at University of Alaska Southeast on the Ketchikan campus since 2007. Prior to moving to Alaska, he taught history courses at the University of St. Thomas, Hamline University, and Anoka-Ramsey College in Minnesota. Dr. Radzilowski also served as assistant project director at Center for Nations in Transition, at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota where he helped design and administer USAID and State Department-sponsored training programs for business, economics, and political science faculty and NGO leaders in Ukraine and east central Europe. Dr. Radzilowski’s research and teaching interests are wide-ranging and diverse: immigration and ethnicity, military history, war and genocide, the impact of technology on the history and geography of the Great Plains and Midwest, local and regional studies, and the history of Poland, Russia, Ukraine, and central and eastern Europe.
11/12/202155 minutes, 39 seconds
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Uncle Władek – One Katyn Family Story: Major Władysław Julian Siemek, Geographer (1897 – 1940)

This lecture event is part of the 14th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference presented by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: This lecture will focus on the forgotten human aspect of the 1940 Katyń massacre of Polish officers by the NKVD. Dr. Alexander Jabłoński will discuss the life of one Polish officer – Major Władysław Julian Siemek, a staff member of the highly regarded pre-war military institution, the Military Geographical Institute (Wojskowy Instytut Geograficzny) in Warsaw, Poland. More than 30% of its staff perished during WWII, with the majority killed in Katyń forest. About the speaker: Alexander M. Jabłoński received his BSc & MS in civil engineering at the Technical University of Cracow, Poland (1970), MS in mechanics and materials engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago (1982) and PhD in structural dynamics at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada (1989). He has more than 50 years of experience in various fields of engineering, and reconnaissance projects, project management and strategy planning. He worked as an engineer in Poland, Finland, Norway, Germany, and in the USA. Since 1992, he has been working as Research Scientist, Research Engineer and Manager in Canadian Public Service. He was one of Managers of the Space Plan Task Force (SPTF) for the development of the Long-Term Space Plan III for Canada (1999-2009). Currently, he is working at the David Florida Laboratory, Canadian Space Agency in Ottawa. He is also an Adjunct Research Professor at the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Carleton University in Ottawa. He is Fellow of CASI, Associate Fellow of AIAA, Member of Aerospace Division of ASCE, and recipient of various engineering and scientific awards. Since his early life in Poland, he has studied the Polish and world history for decades. He writes historical essays and presentations, especially on the modern history of Poland including the World War II and the postwar era of the Soviet occupation. Currently he serves as President of the Oskar Halecki Institute in Canada and as a member of the Program Council of the newly established Institute of the Heritage of the National Thought in Warsaw, Poland.
11/12/202141 minutes, 43 seconds
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Strategic Defense Against Communism: The case of Cardinal Wyszynski (1901 – 1981)

This lecture event is part of the 14th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference presented by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: Prof. Grzegorz Kucharczyk will summarize the analysis of communism provided by the Cardinal Wyszyński, Primate of Poland. Shortly before WWII, Rev. Stefan Wyszynski pointed to the destructive role played by Western intellectuals infatuated with communism, calling them “strange people.” In 1934, Stefan Wyszynski first drew attention to a new strategy of the international communist movement, which aimed its efforts at intelligentsia as a class very much prone to fall into this trap. More than thirty years later, in 1967, Cardinal Wyszyński warned against “a new type of communism reflected in the youth revolution.” As the Primate of Poland, Cardinal Wyszynski not only correctly analyzed communism but also knew what means were to be employed to achieve victory against this ungodly ideology. This victory was to be achieved over long distances, and therefore, strategic perspective was very much needed. In 1981, the Cardinal said, “When you go to war, and we are in a war, you have to use binoculars.” The latter, in the form of the Great Novena and the Millennial celebration of 1966, was efficiently used by the blessed Cardinal Wyszyński. About the speaker: Grzegorz Kucharczyk is a professor at the Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences, at the Gorzow Academy of Jacob of Paradyz and in the Center for Totalitarian Studies at the Pilecki Institute. His main research fields include: history of Germany (particularly Prussia) in the 19th and the 20th century, history of anti-Catholicism, and the history of Polish political thought.
11/12/202133 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Evolution of Active Measures and Disinformation

This lecture event is part of the 14th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference presented by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: It was initially believed that active measures would disintegrate and disappear with the collapse of the Soviet Union. However, it has become evident that active measures have not disappeared, but rather have only largely transferred to the digital domain. The term active measures was coined in the 1920’s; however, Russia has practiced these political warfare tactics for centuries. Through all this time the message has stayed the same, Russia hopes to sow divisions between societies and allies, but ultimately wants citizens to lose hope in liberal democracies. The end goal is to make the world a safer place for Putin’s authoritarian regime. Through analyzing active measures that have taken place in both the near abroad nations and the United States from the Cold War years until today, it becomes evident that active measures have not disappeared, but rather have only evolved in their technique and form. About the speaker: Ms. Agnes Tycner recently graduated from The Institute of World Politics with a master’s degree in Statecraft and International Affairs with a specialization in Russia and Central/Eastern Europe. She will be working for the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation starting January as a Research Fellow in Polish Studies. Agnes also plans to continue her education by attending law school.
11/12/202137 minutes, 55 seconds
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Inaugural Address By Hon. James H. Anderson, Ph.D., President Of The Institute Of World Politics

Hon. James H. Anderson gave an inaugural address after a formal inauguration ceremony installing him as the second President of The Institute of World Politics. The event took place on October 27, 2021 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C.
11/9/202118 minutes
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Keynote Address by GEN (Ret.) Keith Alexander at IWP's 30th (+1!) Anniversary Gala

GEN (Ret.) Keith Alexander, Founder & Co-CEO of IronNet Cybersecurity, former commander of USCYBERCOM, and former director of the National Security Agency, gave the keynote address at The Institute of World Politics' 30th (+1!) Anniversary Gala on October 27th at the Mayflower Hotel.
11/9/202137 minutes, 20 seconds
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Cyber Terrorism: Current Threats and Responses

Prof. Paul Davis gave a talk on "Cyber Terrorism: Current Threats and Responses" at IWP's annual Chancellor's Council Meeting, which was held on October 27, 2021 at the Mayflower Hotel. Prof. Davis is an Adjunct Professor at IWP, Vice President of Government Business Development for SecureDAM, and Founder and President of JANUS Think. At IWP, he teaches Cyber Terrorism and Intelligence (IWP 692). Learn more about joining the Chancellor's Council: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/chancellors-council/
11/9/202144 minutes, 8 seconds
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Defectors and Intelligence

Prof. Alan Messer gave a talk on "Defectors and Intelligence" at IWP's annual Chancellor's Council Meeting, which was held on October 27, 2021 at the Mayflower Hotel. A former CIA Analyst and Operations Officer with with 32 years of combined experience, Prof. Messer teaches a course at IWP entitled "A Counterintelligence Challenge: The Enigmas and Benefits of Defectors" (IWP 676). Learn more about joining the Chancellor's Council: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/chancellors-council/
11/9/202141 minutes, 3 seconds
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Economic Freedom: The Forgotten Weapon in the War on Terror

Dr. Anne Rathbone Bradley discussed "Economic Freedom: The Forgotten Weapon in the War on Terror" at IWP's annual Chancellor's Council Meeting, which took place on October 27, 2021 at the Mayflower Hotel. Dr. Bradley is an Adjunct Professor at IWP, and serves as the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and Academic Director at the Fund for American Studies. She formerly served as an Economic Analyst for the CIA’s Office of Terrorism Analysis. At IWP, she teaches a course on Economics for Foreign Policy Makers (IWP 642/IWPO 642). Learn more about joining the Chancellor's Council: https://www.iwp.edu/donate/chancellors-council/.
11/9/202140 minutes, 5 seconds
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Afghanistan in Perspective

About the interview: Dr. John Tierney, IWP professor, gives a historical perspective on the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan. He discusses potential consequences, strategic culture, and how the U.S. should respond to August 16th. About the speaker: Dr. John Tierney is a Professor Emeritus at The Institute of World Politics and teaches History of American Foreign Policy, History of International Relations, Peace, Strategy and Conflict Resolution, and U.S. Foreign Policy: Current and Future Challenges. Dr. Tierney is a Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1981-1993); He formerly participated in various national security negotiations for the U.S. Government. He was Executive Director of the Congressional Caucus on National Defense and the National Security Research Group, U.S. House of Representatives. He is former Chairman of the Politics Department at Catholic University and former Professor of International Relations at University of Virginia and The Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of Chasing Ghosts and The Politics of Peace.
10/21/20211 hour, 4 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Evolution of U.S. Nuclear Policy: Continuity and Change

About the lecture: This lecture will review the nuclear weapons policies established by various administrations of both parties, focusing on the areas of bipartisan continuity and possible upcoming changes being considered by the current administration. About the speaker: The Honorable David J. Trachtenberg is Vice President of the National Institute for Public Policy, a nonprofit research center located in Fairfax, Virginia. He was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on October 17, 2017 as Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy and served in this capacity until his retirement from government service in July 2019. From October 2017 until January 2018, he also served as the Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, the principal civilian advisor to the Secretary of Defense on defense policy matters. His duties spanned a range of regional and functional portfolios, including homeland defense, space, cyber, nuclear, and missile defense policy, technology security policy, and strengthening security cooperation activities with allies, friends, and partners abroad. He was also the senior Department of Defense civilian official responsible for developing, coordinating, and overseeing compliance with DoD policy regarding civilian casualties resulting from military operations.
10/1/20211 hour, 22 seconds
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Security Situation on The Korean Peninsula

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Colonel David S. Maxwell will discuss the nature, objectives, and strategy of the Kim family regime, why the regime poses a threat to the Republic of Korea, and why it is in the US national interest to ensure there is a strong ROK/US alliance to deter war. He will outline the “Big Five” — war, regime collapse, human rights, asymmetric threats, and unification. He will underline that the only way the world will see an end to the North’s nuclear program, threats, human rights abuses, and crimes against humanity is through unification and the establishment of a United Republic of Korea. About the speaker: David S. Maxwell is a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD).* He is a 30-year veteran of the US Army, retiring as a Special Forces Colonel with his final assignment teaching national security at the National War College. He served over 20 years in Asia, primarily in Korea, Japan, and the Philippines. Colonel Maxwell served on the ROK/US Combined Forces Command staff and the Special Operations Command Korea. He is the co-author of the first CONPLAN 5029, the plan for North Korean Instability and Regime Collapse. He commanded the Joint Special Operations Task Force Philippines and was the G3 at the US Army Special Operations Command. Following retirement, he served as the Associate Director of the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. He is on the Board of Directors of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea, the International Council of Korean Studies, the Council on Korean-US Security Studies, the Special Operations Research Association, the OSS Society, and the Small Wars Journal. He earned a B.A. in political science from Miami University, and an M.A. in Military Arts and Science from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and from the School of Advanced Military Studies, and an M.S. in National Security Studies from the National War College. Colonel Maxwell has taught Unconventional Warfare and Special Operations for Policy Makers and Strategists at graduate schools in the DC area. * FDD is a Washington-based nonpartisan research institute focusing on national security and foreign policy.
9/28/20211 hour, 28 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Founders’ Philosophy of Foreign Policy

This event is in honor of Constitution Day and co-sponsored by the Jack Miller Center About the lecture: The American Founders had a coherent philosophy of foreign policy, which was informed by the principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence. Those principles provided guides for statesmen to achieve the overarching goals of American foreign policy: securing the rights and interests of the United States and its citizens, and satisfying the demands of justice. About the speaker: Christopher Burkett is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Ashbrook Scholar Program for undergraduate students at Ashland University. He is editor of Ashbrook’s 50 Core American Documents and has written on the American Founding, Progressivism, and American Foreign Policy.
9/24/20211 hour, 50 seconds
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A Space Vision To Guide America’s Strategic Competition with China

This event is part of the China Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Today’s space race is different than the Cold War-era race between the United States and the Soviet Union to achieve symbolic space milestones to prove the superiority of our market-based economic system for the benefit of unaligned nations. Space 2.0 or the new space race, primarily between the United States and China, is about the economics of space-derived capabilities, access to space resources, and the technologies for acquiring and controlling them. Strategic competition with China is occurring 24/7 on across all domains of which space is increasingly becoming America’s Achilles heel. China aims to be the dominant space power by 2050 – just 30 years from today. The United States can either prepare and position itself to shape a future with American strategic leadership in space or resign itself to second-class. Thus, the new space race is a high-stakes economic competition that will influence our modern way of life and the prospect of democratizing American society for millions will be threatened by authoritarianism. About the speaker: Dr. Mir Sadat has more than 25 years of experience in private industry and government. Mir is a former policy director at the U.S. National Security Council, where he led interagency coordination on defense and space policy issues. In this role, Mir supported the establishment of both the US Space Force and US Space Command, and reviewed national security decisions involving civil space (NASA) and the US commercial space sector. Mir is also a naval officer with intelligence and space qualifications and in his preceding two naval assignments; he served as a space policy strategist with Chief of Naval Operations and as a space operations officer with U.S. Tenth Fleet. Mir has a Ph.D. from Claremont Graduate University and has taught at various universities in California and Washington, DC.
7/8/202153 minutes, 35 seconds
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Strategy, Statecraft, and Character in Ulysses S. Grant’s Civil War Memoir

About the lecture: As a general, Ulysses S. Grant was often dismissed as a butcher of men and no strategist. This reputation is undeserved, however. Ulysses S. Grant’s memoir of the Civil War is a treasure trove of insights for the strategist. In its pages, Grant invites his reader to contemplate with him the constant struggle to reconcile military means with political ends, the way military maxims crumble under the weight of the reality of war, and, most importantly, the vital role that character and personality play in the design and execution of military operations and strategy. About the speaker: Peter Campbell is Associate Professor of Political Science at Baylor University. He holds an MA in War Studies from King’s College London and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Military Realism: The Logic and Limits of Force and Innovation in the U.S. Army (University of Missouri Press, 2019). His areas of research include national security decision making, civil-military relations, strategy, international relations scholarship and policy relevance, insurgency and counterinsurgency, the just war tradition, and cyber warfare.
6/22/202157 minutes, 14 seconds
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Japanese Foreign Intelligence and Grand Strategy

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Based on an excerpt from his recently published book, Japanese Foreign Intelligence and Grand Strategy (Georgetown University Press), Dr. Williams will discuss Japan’s intelligence cooperation with the United States during the Cold War. Drawing from and modifying a generic framework presented by H. Bradford Westerfield, the presentation assesses the impact of bilateralism – defined as “behaving [primarily] in the international system within the remit of the bilateral [US-Japan] alliance” (Hook et al. 2005, 72) – on Japan’s foreign intelligence-related institutions and activities across four core mechanisms of liaison: institution building and collaborative operations, facilities access, information sharing, and support via training and equipment provisions. It highlights how the United States initially assisted in establishing intelligence organizations in Japan that would serve as liaison partners and engage in various forms of collaborative operations in pursuit of regional geostrategic objectives during the Cold War. Other liaison mechanisms served a similar function and were also employed as a means of keeping a junior ally under Washington’s intelligence umbrella. While Japanese foreign intelligence largely adhered to bilateralist norms, the relationship did occasionally cause tensions between the respective intelligence communities and their political overseers. About the speaker: Dr. Brad Williams is an associate professor in the Department of Asian and International Studies at the City University of Hong Kong. He has studied, taught, and conducted research in Australia, Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Myanmar, Taiwan, and the US. Brad has published on a diverse range of issues in Japanese politics and foreign policy and is also the author of Resolving the Russo-Japanese Territorial Dispute: Hokkaido-Sakhalin Relations (Routledge 2007, 2011).canva
6/7/20211 hour, 19 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Moral Imperative for Intervention Post-Natural Hazard

About the book, "Ethics, Law, and Natural Hazards: The Moral Imperative for Intervention Post-Natural Hazard": This book argues that the international community has a moral duty to intervene on behalf of a population affected by a natural hazard when their government is either unable or unwilling to provide basic, life-saving assistance. The work draws on law, international relations theory, and political philosophy to articulate that non-response to a natural hazard is unethical. In providing policy suggestions the author articulates what should happen based on an ethical analysis. Readers will thus gain an ethical lens with which to view intervention in the aftermath of a natural hazard. The book encourages readers to consider the nuances of arguments from various disciplines about whether or not intervention is appropriate. Whilst arguing throughout that an intervention policy in response to natural hazards should be developed by the international community, the study also accounts for why intervention should only be used in very limited situations. This interdisciplinary approach makes the book essential reading for researchers, academics, and policy-makers working in the areas of international law, humanitarian studies, human rights, international relations, and political science. About the speaker: Dr. Lauren Traczykowski is an American living in Birmingham, England. She started her education at Boston University studying International Relations. Whilst completing her undergraduate degree, she studied American Foreign Policy at IWP for one summer. After completing her degree and with three internships under her belt – the U.S. Department of State, Fine Gael HQ (Dublin), and Demos (London) – Dr. Traczykowski moved to Washington, D.C. to work for the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to contribute to the Hurricane Katrina response and recovery from within the Office of International Affairs. Dr. Traczykowski then moved to the U.K. to do an MA in International Studies: Globalisation & Governance. Later, she completed a Ph.D. in Global Ethics focusing on the research she will present. Whilst still working on her Ph.D., Dr. Traczykowski taught modules on Bioethics, Contemporary Ethics, Politics and the State, Professional Ethics, and Medical Ethics at institutions around the West Midlands of the United Kingdom. Dr. Traczykowski now teaches at Aston University (Birmingham, U.K.) as a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor). Her main teaching is in Business Ethics and Ethics in a Crisis. Dr. Traczykowski is also editing a collected work on Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching to be submitted to Edward Elgar Publishing later this year.
6/2/202152 minutes, 45 seconds
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Operating inside Asia: The Secrets to Success

About the lecture: As head of three Asian countries’ flagship firms, Mr. McCarthy learned the secrets to being successful in other cultures. Often, he was the only American working with 3,000 local employees, giving him a peek into the Zeitgeist of the local business and government leaders that most Americans never see. He learned how to succeed in turnarounds where many others had failed and how to first think like a local then gain their trust. He developed a set of skills and tactics that allowed him to build strong high-performing local teams. In this lecture, he will explain his use of “Sunau or Ting Hua” and other recommendations for how to succeed overseas that will surprise many Americans. About the speaker: Mr. Timothy F. McCarthy’s career has been evenly divided between the U.S. and overseas. During the ’90s, he was President of Fidelity Investment Advisor Group prior to becoming President of Charles Schwab and Co. In 2000, Mr. McCarthy became Chairman of Good Morning Securities Group in South Korea then Chairman and CEO of Nikko Asset Management in Japan. These were the first times each country’s government approved a foreigner to lead one of their flagship financial services companies. Also, notably, during this tenure at Nikko, he co-founded the Rongtong JV in China. His firms attracted over 8 million Asians to invest $300 billion in fund assets. He is now active in venture capital high-tech investing. Mr. McCarthy is fluent in 6 languages. He has published two books – one a best seller in Japanese. Mr. McCarthy’s academic history includes an MBA from the Harvard University Graduate School of Business as a Baker Scholar in 1978 and a BA in Economics and International Relations from the University of California, Davis, with honors in 1973.
6/1/20211 hour, 18 seconds
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2021 Student Symposium: Incels as a Domestic Terrorist Group

Full title: Incels as a Domestic Terrorist Group Within the Violent Non-State Actor Framework About the lecture: This presentation will define and analyze the threat of incels as an emerging domestic terrorist threat within the Violent Non-State Actor framework. In an era of online recruitment and social media radicalization, incels have created a community that centers around getting revenge as a result of being rejected by women in the past. This online network of disgruntled individuals has served as the breeding ground for lone actor violence that has claimed more than 50 lives in the United States and Canada. About the speaker: Hannah Wilk works as an Investigative Analyst and is pursuing her master’s degree at The Institute of World Politics. She is studying Statecraft and National Security Affairs with a concentration in Public Diplomacy and Strategic Influence. In 2019 she received her bachelor’s degree in Criminology from George Mason University with a concentration in Homeland Security and a double minor in Intelligence Analysis and Forensic Psychology. In her free time Hannah enjoys spending time with friends and family, baking, and trying out new brunch spots in the Washington, D.C. area.
5/21/202124 minutes, 55 seconds
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2021 Student Symposium: Muqtada al-Sadr and the Mahdi Army: Friend or Foe

About the Lecture: Muqtada al-Sadr is the leader of the Sadrist Movement, a Shia political group with a militia called the Mahdi Army. Al-Sadr has a complicated history with the United States but is now in a position to create a stable democracy and protect Iraq from Iranian influence. While the U.S. looks to thwart Iranian efforts in the region, it needs to consider how to work with political actors like al-Sadr. About the Speaker: Caroline Hickey is a graduate student at IWP where she is pursuing a Master’s degree in Statecraft and International Affairs. Her regional interest is in the Middle East and has focused her studies on Iraq and Afghanistan.
5/18/202120 minutes, 39 seconds
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2021 Student Symposium: Avenging Angels: Russia’s Legacy of Female Terrorism

Full title: Avenging Angels: Russia’s Legacy of Female Terrorism in Revolution and the Chechen Conflict About the Lecture: Female-perpetrated terrorism is a compelling subject largely for the shocking dichotomy between traditional perceptions of femininity and brutal, premeditated violence. From the fiery revolutionaries of the 1800s to modern-day Chechen suicide bombers, Russia’s legacy of women’s involvement in terrorist activity is remarkable for its violence, fervor, and popular mythologization. This presentation will discuss what in Russia’s political history and society has encouraged such distinctive, violent female political actors by assessing the revolution’s “avenging angels” and modern “black widows” as part of the same legacy. It will also explore the personal, ideological, and cultural disparities between female terrorists in Russia’s revolutionary era and those in modern-day Chechnya. About the Speaker: Emily Miller is an international development professional with five years of experience in business development, communications, and program design/implementation. She graduates this semester with an M.A. in Statecraft and National Security Affairs from IWP, with a specialization in Public Diplomacy and Strategic Influence. Her graduate research has focused on pre-Soviet and Soviet Russia, the influence of non-state actors on international security, and the intersection of policymaking and ideology.
5/18/202123 minutes, 27 seconds
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Book Review: MAOISM -- A Global History by Julia Lovell

About the book review: In certain ways China has moved off its Maoist model. But Maoism has had strong and unexpected roles in the violent underground in many places outside China. The best known cases may be the revolutionary wars of the latter 20th c. in Malaya, Vietnam, and Cambodia. But other contests by ideological Maoists opened up in India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and even the western hemisphere's Peru. What is Maoism's appeal to foreigners? To what degree has it been exportable? In this new podcast, Professor Christopher C. Harmon will offer his insights into "Maoism Overseas" and discuss the admirable new book on the topic by Julia Lovell. About the Speaker: Dr. Harmon holds the Bren Chair of Great Power Competition at Marine Corps University and is also a professor at IWP, where he teaches courses on Military Strategy and Terrorist Advocacy and Propaganda.
4/30/202124 minutes, 30 seconds
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Foreign Threats to the US Federal Elections

About the lecture: Ethan S. Burger will share his views of the most surprising feature of the long-awaited unclassified version of the National Intelligence Council’s Intelligence Community Assessment “Foreign Threats to the 2020 US Federal Election,” March 10, 2021, principally that is it contained few if any surprises. Perhaps its discussion of China and Iran influence campaigns are noteworthy — the former country did not “take sides” in the presidential contest and the latter engaged in an effort targeting individual voters. To date, no one has systematically examined what if any impact foreign influence campaigns have there been on the 2020 Congressional elections. Compared with its efforts in 2016, Russia’s actions seemed not to affect the election outcome in the form of influencing opinions or suppressing turnout. In a sense, this reflects that its objective of sowing further discord within American society has achieved a level of success previously not anticipated. Nonetheless, at least throughout the summer, the Russian leadership seems to believe that Mr. Trump would be re-elected. Shortly before being fired by President Donald Trump after the election, Christopher Krebs, the Department of Homeland Security Director saw that his agency, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, had achieved its goal of ensuring “the most secure [presidential election] in American history.” Indeed “t]here is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.” Mr. Burger will seek to put China’s, Iran’s, and Russia’s efforts into a historical context, where their objectives are similar to those of many countries’ attempts to sway voters in foreign countries to place into power a “friendly government,” albeit with less sophisticated tools. In the future, the principal cybersecurity threats are likely to be attacks on infrastructure, governmental institutions, and financial crimes. About the Speaker: Ethan S. Burger, Esq., is a Washington-based international legal consultant and an cyber instructor with IWP's Cyber Intelligence Initiative, where he teaches a seminar about the international law governing cyber operations. His lectures at the IWP have included: The Application of International Law to Cyber Operations, Better Understanding Russian Use of Mercenaries to Advance Foreign Policy Goals, and Contextualizing Russian Interference in the 2016 UK Brexit Referendum and the U.S. Presidential Election. His areas of interests include corporate governance, transnational crime (corruption, cybercrime, and money laundering), and Russian affairs. After working as an attorney on Russian commercial, investment, and risk issues, he segued into academic, and advisory roles. He has taught at Vilnius University about cybersecurity issues while on a Fulbright Foundation grant during which time he participated in the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence’s, a seminar on the international law governing cyber operations. He was a full-time faculty member at the Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (American University — School of International Service) and the Centre for Transnational Crime Prevention (Wollongong University — Faculty of Law).He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University and J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center.
4/26/202141 minutes, 13 seconds
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Fear and Insecurity: Addressing North Korean Threat Perceptions

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Diplomacy with North Korea must factor in an understanding of the Kim regime’s fears and insecurity. Pyongyang’s military actions and negotiating gambits jeopardize the United States, South Korea, and other nations’ vital interests and policy goals. Accordingly, the study of North Korean threat perceptions—how Kim Jong-un thinks about the utility of force and about threats to his regime—is essential for averting strategic surprise and buttressing diplomacy. Dr. Cronin will address North Korean threat perceptions by examining the ruling elite’s basic instincts of fear and insecurity. Drawing on the more than seven-decade of war and cold war on the Korean peninsula, he will offer constructive ideas for diplomacy, crisis management, and security policy. About the speaker: Patrick M. Cronin is the Asia-Pacific Security Chair at Hudson Institute. Dr. Cronin’s research program analyzes the challenges and opportunities confronting the United States in the Indo-Pacific region, including China’s total competition campaign, the future of the Korean peninsula, and strengthening U.S. alliances and partnerships. Dr. Cronin was previously senior advisor and senior director of the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), and before that, senior director of the Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS) at the National Defense University, where he simultaneously oversaw the Center for the Study of Chinese Military Affairs. Dr. Cronin has a rich and diverse background in both Asian-Pacific security and U.S. defense, and foreign and development policy. Prior to leading INSS, Dr. Cronin served as the director of studies at the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). At IISS, he also served as editor of the Adelphi Papers and as the executive director of the Armed Conflict Database. Before joining IISS, Dr. Cronin was senior vice president and director of research at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). In 2001, Dr. Cronin was confirmed by the United States Senate to the third-ranking position at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). While serving as Assistant Administrator for Policy and Program Coordination, Dr. Cronin also led the interagency task force that helped design the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC). From 1998 until 2001, Dr. Cronin served as director of research at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Prior to that, he spent seven years at the National Defense University, first arriving at INSS in 1990 as a senior research professor covering Asian and long-range security issues. He was the founding executive editor of Joint Force Quarterly, and subsequently became both deputy director and director of research at the Institute. He received the Army’s Meritorious Civilian Service Award upon his departure from NDU in 1997. He has also been a senior analyst at the Center for Naval Analyses, a U.S. Naval Reserve intelligence officer, and an analyst with the Congressional Research Service and SRI International. He was associate editor of Strategic Review and worked as an undergraduate at the Miami Herald and the Fort Lauderdale News. Dr. Cronin has taught at Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program, Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and the University of Virginia’s Woodrow Wilson Department of Government. He read international relations at St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford, where he received both his M.Phil. and D.Phil. degrees, and graduated with high honors from the University of Florida. He regularly publishes essays in leading publications and frequently conducts television and radio interviews.
4/23/20211 hour, 25 minutes, 21 seconds
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How to Best Leverage U.S. Alliances and Partnerships against the PRC

This event is part of the China Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The United States is party to several security alliances and partnerships in the Indo-Pacific Theater. These relationships vary in scope and commitment, but they are all rooted in shared concerns about the PRC’s hegemonic ambitions. Collectively, they have the potential to provide the United States with clear, long-term advantages over the PRC, diplomatically, economically, and militarily. Leveraging these advantages will require sustained U.S. leadership and innovative statecraft. About the speaker: The Honorable James H. Anderson is a former Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Policy and a twice confirmed presidential appointee. In August 2018, the U.S. Senate confirmed Dr. Anderson as Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy, Plans, and Capabilities. In June 2020, the U.S. Senate confirmed him as Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. Prior to his most recent Pentagon service, he served as the Vice President for Academic Affairs at the Marine Corps University and Dean of Academics at the Marine Corps War College. He has also worked as Professor at the George C. Marshall Center for European Security Studies, Director of Middle East Policy at the Pentagon, Project Manager at DFI International, Research Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, and Associate Professor at Command and Staff College, Marine Corps University. Dr. Anderson is the co-author of Leading Dynamic Seminars: A Practical Handbook for University Educators (Palgrave Macmillian, 2013), and the author of America at Risk: The Citizen’s Guide to Missile Defense (Heritage Foundation, 1999). He has written more than eighty articles and op-eds on a wide range of national security topics. Earlier in his career, Dr. Anderson served three years on active duty as an intelligence officer in the United States Marine Corps. Dr. Anderson earned his Doctorate in International Relations and Masters of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School, Tufts University. He is a recipient of numerous professional awards, including the Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, the Department’s Highest Award for non-career Federal employees.
4/21/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 25 seconds
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“The Pygmy Among the Giants”? – Polish Eastern Policy

Full title: “The Pygmy Among the Giants”? – Polish Eastern Policy in the Eyes of the British Political Elite (1919–1923) This lecture event is part of the 11th Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. Lady Blanka Rosenstiel and the American Institute of Polish Culture (AIPC) established the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP in 2008. The Kościuszko Chair serves as a center for Polish Studies in the broadest sense, including learning, teaching, researching, and writing about Poland's culture, history, heritage, religion, government, economy, and successes in the arts, sciences, and letters, with special emphasis on the achievements of Polish civilization and its relation to other nations, particularly the United States. We remain grateful for Lady Blanka’s leadership in founding this Chair at IWP. About the lecture: The Treaty of Versailles established the new order in Western Europe, but its clauses did not bring peace to independent Poland. The young state was struggling with external threats. First of all, from Soviet Russia, the Ukrainian national self-determination was endangering the Polish state’s security; in 1919, the Polish-Lithuanian antagonism sprang to life. In reality, its political, social, and military situation was anything but “stable.” Those conditions made the Polish-British inter-state diplomatic relation the essential factor in Polish foreign policy. This discussion attempts to explain the evolution of the British political elite’s perception of Polish Eastern policy. The speaker will introduce the British attitude towards Poland since the Peace Conference in Paris, which commenced its proceedings from 18th January 1919 until 15th March 1923, when Britain recognized Polish Eastern borders. The talk seeks to answer the following questions: what kind of factors—a geopolitical theory or a strategic necessity—determined British policy towards Polish Eastern policy? Moreover, what factors influenced the British approach towards Poland? Finally, according to the British officials, what role did the Eastern border’s recognition play in the Anglo-Polish reciprocal relationship? What was the importance of this fact in the perception of Poland’s role as one of the factors of stability in East-Central Europe? About the speaker: Dr. Jolanta Mysiakowska carried out her graduate work at the University of Warsaw (2005). She has a doctorate in modern history from the Polish Academy of Sciences (2010). In 2015, she won a research grant from the Polonia Aid Foundation Trust. In 2020, she won a research grant from Lanckorońskis’ Foundation. Currently, she works with the Institute of National Remembrance, Warsaw, Poland. She is also editor-in-chief of Glaukopis—a scholarly periodical produced in cooperation with The Institute of World Politics (Washington, D.C., USA). She is a historian of 20th century Poland, with a particular interest in developing independent Poland after the First World War, its political and domestic situation, and its inter-state diplomatic relationship with Great Britain. She also has research interests in political ideology from the late 19th to the first half of the 20th century—Member of British International Study Association and Britain and the World association. Much of her recent research is focused on the perception of independent Poland among the British political and intellectual elite (1919–1926).
4/20/202132 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Art of Provocation

This lecture event is part of the 11th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. Lady Blanka Rosenstiel and the American Institute of Polish Culture (AIPC) established the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP in 2008. The Kościuszko Chair serves as a center for Polish Studies in the broadest sense, including learning, teaching, researching, and writing about Poland's culture, history, heritage, religion, government, economy, and successes in the arts, sciences, and letters, with special emphasis on the achievements of Polish civilization and its relation to other nations, particularly the United States. We remain grateful for Lady Blanka’s leadership in founding this Chair at IWP. About the lecture: Revolutionary history abounds with ruse, deception, disinformation, manipulation, diversion, and a variety of devious mechanisms in the struggle by political visionaries, from gnostics to secret societies to anarchists to Marxists and others, to impose their utopian schemas on the unsuspecting. A technique encompassing that genre of mayhem that stands out and has been raised to the level of art is provocation (provokatsiya in the Russian). Provocation was a mainstay of the Tsarist counterintelligence service, the Okhrana, and then perfected up to the strategic level by the Soviet security services from the Cheka, through the KGB, and now to the FSB, SVR, the GRU of the Russian Federation. And, of course, it prospers in other counterintelligence-state cultures as well, such as Islam and China. Simply put, provocation is a key element of political warfare and is a characteristic of the counterintelligence-state. Provocation connotes operational counterintelligence techniques that create conditions to instigate real or imagined opponents — especially notional ones — into some action that will further the state’s objectives at the expense of the opponent(s). The idea here is to instigate something that otherwise would not occur, control the opponent, and ultimately put him out of action – or, better yet, keep controlling him long-term for some other political or operational purpose. This may be at the tactical level (a double agent operation aimed at discrediting an enemy intelligence service) or at the strategic level (the Trust and WiN operations focused on both domestic enemies and foreign intelligence services simultaneously). This presentation will focus on foundational examples of provocation up through recent instances where the art of provocation produced grand scale political, military and strategic outcomes beneficial to Marxist movements and regimes, and state-related terrorist structures. It will also briefly examine how the art of provocation has entered into the ethos of western security/intelligence services as well. About the speaker: Dr. Jack Dziak is a consultant in the fields of intelligence, counterintelligence, counter-deception, and national security affairs. He has served over five decades as a company president and as a senior intelligence officer and senior executive in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and in the Defense Intelligence Agency, with long experience in counterintelligence, hostile deception, counter deception, strategic intelligence, weapons proliferation intelligence, and intelligence education. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Institute of World Politics, and has taught at the National War College, National Intelligence University, Georgetown University, and The George Washington University; and lectures on intelligence, military affairs, and security issues throughout the US and abroad.
4/20/202159 minutes, 33 seconds
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Iron Felix: The Early Days of Feliks Dzierżyński (1877-1926)

This lecture event is part of the 11th Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. Lady Blanka Rosenstiel and the American Institute of Polish Culture (AIPC) established the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP in 2008. The Kościuszko Chair serves as a center for Polish Studies in the broadest sense, including learning, teaching, researching, and writing about Poland's culture, history, heritage, religion, government, economy, and successes in the arts, sciences, and letters, with special emphasis on the achievements of Polish civilization and its relation to other nations, particularly the United States. We remain grateful for Lady Blanka’s leadership in founding this Chair at IWP. About the lecture: Feliks Dzierzynski was a Polish Catholic nobleman, a social democrat, and a monster. He committed national apostasy to advance his international utopian ideas. Having embraced a socialist revolution, he followed the logical path to death and mayhem. His destiny led him to establish and lead Soviet Russia’s secret police, the dreaded Cheka and its avatars. However, the roots of his murderous pathologies reach his teen years when he abandoned the Catholic faith and the cause of Poland’s independence in favor of extreme leftism. He increasingly alienated himself from his background, rejected his inheritance, and transformed himself, first, into an internationalist and, then, into a Soviet Russian chauvinist. Our story focuses on the first stage of the monster’s transformation. Rejecting all that was decent, Dzierzynski embarked on a journey of no return to Communist utopia. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
4/20/20211 hour, 1 minute, 33 seconds
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Boleslaw Piasecki's Game for Life

This lecture event is part of the 11th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. Lady Blanka Rosenstiel and the American Institute of Polish Culture (AIPC) established the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP in 2008. The Kościuszko Chair serves as a center for Polish Studies in the broadest sense, including learning, teaching, researching, and writing about Poland's culture, history, heritage, religion, government, economy, and successes in the arts, sciences, and letters, with special emphasis on the achievements of Polish civilization and its relation to other nations, particularly the United States. We remain grateful for Lady Blanka’s leadership in founding this Chair at IWP. About the lecture: Bolesław Piasecki is considered one of the most controversial Polish politicians of the 20th century. A few years ago, I had the honour of presenting a critical review of one of Piasecki's newer biographies at the Kościuszko Chair symposium at the IWP. As I write a biography of this politician, I wish to share my findings with you. I want to focus on one of the least known episodes in Piasecki's biography – his eight-month stay in a communist prison at the turn of 1944-1945 and the meeting with Stalin's governor in Poland's occupied territories NKVD General Iwan Sierow. This event, both mysterious and sensational, is considered the beginning of Piasecki's agent involvement in cooperation with the Soviets and the foundation of his later position in communist Poland. I will try to verify this view and how these talks could have looked like, and whether Piasecki's last activities' agent-based nature is possible. About the speaker: Wojciech J. Muszyński, PhD, is a historian and a researcher at the Institute of National Remembrance (Warsaw, Poland). His research focuses on the history of political and ideological movements in the Second Polish Republic, Polish-Jewish relations, and military history. He is a Member of the Team to Assess Requests to Recognize Opposition Activity during the People's Republic of Poland at the Chancellery of the President of the Republic of Poland. He is the author or co-author of many monographs, including Białe Legiony 1914–1918. Od Legionu Puławskiego do I Korpusu Polskiego (2018); Białe Legiony przeciwko bolszewikom. Polskie formacje wojskowe w Rosji 1918–1920 (2019), Toreadorzy Hitlera. Hiszpańscy ochotnicy w Wehrmachcie i Waffen-SS 1941–1945 (2019). He is also the co-author of the 2018 Award-Winning History Book on the history of the National Military Union, Przeciwko PAX Sovietica (2018).
4/20/202143 minutes, 36 seconds
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485 Days at Majdanek, Surviving a German Concentration Camp

This lecture event is part of the 11th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. Lady Blanka Rosenstiel and the American Institute of Polish Culture (AIPC) established the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP in 2008. The Kościuszko Chair serves as a center for Polish Studies in the broadest sense, including learning, teaching, researching, and writing about Poland's culture, history, heritage, religion, government, economy, and successes in the arts, sciences, and letters, with special emphasis on the achievements of Polish civilization and its relation to other nations, particularly the United States. We remain grateful for Lady Blanka’s leadership in founding this Chair at IWP. About the lecture: Jerzy Kwiatkowski survived 485 days in the Majdanek concentration camp. Months after World War II ended, Jerzy began writing his reminiscence of the horrors he had witnessed. Over 50 years since the first Polish edition was released, an English translation of the gripping memoir has been published by the Hoover Institution Press. This new edition serves as the basis for a discussion of Jerzy Kwiatkowski's early life, his camp experience and his efforts to leave a written testament for his fellow prisoners who never left the gates of Majdanek. About the speaker: Nicholas Siekierski is a PhD candidate at the Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History at the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. He is writing his dissertation on Herbert Hoover and the American Relief Administration in Poland after the First World War. He is also a translator.
4/20/202134 minutes, 28 seconds
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Religious Freedom as the Cornerstone of the Western World

This lecture event is part of the 11th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair in Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium studies. Lady Blanka Rosenstiel and the American Institute of Polish Culture (AIPC) established the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies at IWP in 2008. The Kościuszko Chair serves as a center for Polish Studies in the broadest sense, including learning, teaching, researching, and writing about Poland's culture, history, heritage, religion, government, economy, and successes in the arts, sciences, and letters, with special emphasis on the achievements of Polish civilization and its relation to other nations, particularly the United States. We remain grateful for Lady Blanka’s leadership in founding this Chair at IWP. About the lecture: Today's crisis in Europe and the Western world is, above all, a religious crisis. We live nowadays in times of unusually fierce religious intensification. It holds not only to Islam; instead to various contemporary ideologies and social movements, which religious or quasi-religious characters can be seen easily in their missionary zeal. In Europe and also America, a religious war takes place - a war of life and death. It is not a conflict between religious and non-religious people, but a clash of Christianity – or rather, what remains of it – and Neopaganism. Rivalry with Islam is here of secondary significance. A question arises concerning the proper shape of the political order: is it at all possible for individuals and communities, differing in religion – and if so, then how – to live together in peace and harmony within the framework of one political organism? The proper answer was brought to the world by Christianity: the common life of different communities will be possible if we reject the program of forceful conversion, guaranteeing everybody the right to religious freedom instead. Here religious freedom is understood as freedom to practice one's religion, openly express one's most profound religious beliefs and take action in the public space, motivated by these beliefs. Still, an opposite interpretation of the idea has been widespread – the idea of freedom from religion behind which hides a program for the expulsion of all religious signs and symbols referring to the transcendent dimension of human existence from public space. Which of the two visions of organizing public life wins? The future shape of the Western world depends on the response to this question. About the speaker: Zbigniew Stawrowski (born 1958 in Szczecin, Poland) is a political philosopher, professor at the Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw and the director of the Tischner Institute in Cracow. He is the author of Państwo i prawo w filozofii Hegla [The State and its Rights in the Philosophy of Hegel] (1994), Prawo naturalne a ład polityczny [Natural Law and Political Order] (2006), Niemoralna demokracja [Immoral Democracy] (2008), Solidarność znaczy więź [Solidarity means a Bond] (2010), Wokół idei wspólnoty, [Concerning the Idea of Community] (2012).
4/20/202135 minutes, 25 seconds
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Servants of the Devil: Facilitators of the Criminal and Terrorist Networks

About the lecture: Servants of the Devil: the Facilitators of the Criminal and Terrorist Networks, was published in February of this year. It details the ways in which respectable professionals, businesses, financial institutions, non-profits, and hi-tech companies work with and for criminal syndicates and terrorist organizations, greatly enhancing their ability to pursue their objectives. Recommendations include urging that the facilitators be pursued and prosecuted as well as the criminals and terrorists. About the speakers: Prof. Norman A. Bailey is Professor of Economic Statecraft at the IWP. He currently resides in Israel, where he has taught at three different institutions of higher learning. Prof. Bailey has a background in the armed forces, business, finance, consulting, and academia. He is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the City University of New York. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and Columbia University. He is the author, co-author, or editor of seven books and hundreds of articles, both academic and journalistic. He is the recipient of various honorary degrees, medals, awards, and orders of knighthood. Mr. Bernard Touboul, is for the last 30 years an International Expert in Customs Administration and Enforcement, Border Management, and International Trade Facilitation. He was involved in institutional and governmental development in many countries including in Africa, Asia, Central Asia, western Balkans specially in policy making and strategy crafting for combating illicit trafficking and Trade Based Money Laundering related frauds. He was an official of the French Customs Service. He also holds several graduate degrees in International Trade, Business Administration, and Political Sciences specialized in national security. He is author and co author of several articles related to money laundering and terrorism financing topics.
4/19/202159 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Biden Administration Faces Growing North Korean Threat

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: For decades, every incoming U.S. President has inherited a more dangerous North Korea than his predecessor. President Biden is no exception. During the past four years, North Korea’s nuclear, missile, conventional, and cyber threats increased in scope and sophistication. Pyongyang has historically ramped up tensions early in a new U.S. or South Korean administration to force concessions, which could pose an early foreign policy challenge for the new U.S. administration. North Korea will remain an intractable problem, but President Biden will need to develop a policy of deterrence, containment, pressure, and diplomacy. About the speaker: Bruce Klingner specializes in Korean and Japanese affairs as the senior research fellow for Northeast Asia at The Heritage Foundation’s Asian Studies Center. Klingner has testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. He is a frequent commentator in U.S. and foreign media. His articles and commentary have appeared in major American and foreign publications and he is a regular guest on broadcast and cable news outlets. He is a regular contributor to the international and security sections of The Daily Signal. From 1996 to 2001, Klingner was CIA’s deputy division chief for Korea, responsible for the analysis of political, military, economic and leadership issues for the president of the United States and other senior U.S. policymakers. In 1993-1994, he was the chief of CIA’s Korea branch, which analyzed military developments during a nuclear crisis with North Korea. Klingner is a distinguished graduate of the National War College, where he received a master’s degree in national security strategy in 2002. He also holds a master’s degree in strategic intelligence from the Defense Intelligence College and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Middlebury College in Vermont.
4/7/20211 hour, 27 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Process of Forced Mental Transformation and its Role in World Events

About the lecture: This talk focuses on Martin’s “ATOP” theory of mental manipulation, the four-step process historically used to transform and control human behavior on every level of civilization, from obscure cults to entire nations. About the speaker: Professor Sean Elliot Martin is an Assistant Professor and the Coordinator of Undergraduate and Graduate Intelligence Studies at Point Park University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He has a diverse academic background, as well as a range of collaborations with military and law enforcement entities. He applies creative, interactive methods to teach courses in Intelligence Analysis, Psychological Operations, survival combat, and related subjects.
4/1/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 11 seconds
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Crafting of Natalie Grant’s Book, Disinformation: Soviet Political Warfare

This lecture is in Memoriam of Herb Romerstein. About the lecture: When Natalie Grant (Wraga) died in November 2002 at the age of 101, few people other than family, friends, and some intelligence professionals were aware that one of the keenest minds on the horrid Soviet experience was lost to the western world. Mrs. Grant (Wraga was the surname of her husband Richard) was born in Tsarist Russia. She witnessed and survived the Russian Civil War, one of the bloodiest of modern history; trained some of the early State Department cadres of Soviet specialists; served as a Foreign Service Officer; and wed a storied former Polish counterintelligence officer with whom she partnered in producing some of the most penetrating and original studies on Soviet political warfare — specifically; deception, disinformation, and the whole panoply of active measures. One of the products of that partnership is the book Disinformation, just published by Leopolis Press. Natalie’s husband Richard died in 1967 before she started drafting Disinformation. But she and Richard had been diving deep into the myriad cases of Soviet deception operations for decades, calling attention to what is now termed information warfare, fake news, etc., all of which have a pedigree dating to the earliest years of the USSR and well before. This presentation will focus on Natalie Grant’s story and how she came to write such a seminal work on Soviet political warfare and the difficulties she faced in getting the right people in government, media, and academia to accept the realities of deception and disinformation. Her book couldn’t get traction with publishers, notwithstanding the help of numerous intelligence friends, scholars, family members, and others, Herb Romerstein and this writer included. Given its long gestation period due to lack of publisher interest, Natalie kept on writing and revising until legal blindness made that just too difficult. Fortunately, Leopolis Press brought her efforts to fruition, almost twenty years after her passing. Disinformation is presented to the reader by Leopolis Press as she wrote it, other than the necessary copy-editing process and the need to handle the vagaries of transliteration of the myriad Russian personalities and place names. About the speaker: Dr. Dziak is a consultant in the fields of intelligence, counterintelligence, counter-deception, and national security affairs. He has served over five decades as a company president and as a senior intelligence officer and senior executive in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and in the Defense Intelligence Agency, with long experience in counterintelligence, hostile deception, counter deception, strategic intelligence, weapons proliferation intelligence, and intelligence education. He received his Ph.D. in Russian history from Georgetown University, is a graduate of the National War College, and is a recipient of numerous defense and intelligence awards and citations. He was the co-developer and co-director of the master’s degree program in Strategic Intelligence at the Defense Intelligence School, the original predecessor to the current National Intelligence University. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Institute of World Politics, and has taught at the National War College, National Intelligence University, Georgetown University, and The George Washington University; and lectures on intelligence, military affairs, and security issues throughout the US and abroad. Dr. Dziak is the author of the award-winning Chekisty: A History of the KGB, numerous other books, articles, and monographs, including The Military Relationship Between China and Russia, and Soviet Perceptions of Military Power. He currently is preparing a book on foreign counterintelligence systems.
3/31/20211 hour, 7 seconds
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Robotic Process Automation

This event is part of The Cyber Intelligence Initiative Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: RPA is currently the fastest-growing enterprise technology, according to Gartner. RPA is also the core of hyper-automation, the number 1 strategic technology trend for 2020. Robotic Process Automation (RPA) is the technology allowing every level of government to deploy software robots to perform specific tasks in an automated way. RPA software uses a combination of integrations, advanced technologies, and cognitive processes. RPA can be used to mimic or emulate selected tasks allowing agencies to liberate their workforce from mundane, tedious, and boring tasks and move to what the Office of Personnel Management calls higher-valued work. These may include manipulating data, passing data to and from various applications, triggering responses, or executing transactions. The power of RPA is it securely acts as the workflow for other digital technologies. The UiPath fully automated enterprise is broadly deployed across 79 agencies and 11 states. Agencies are using RPA and other digital labor to bridge the gap between new technologies and legacy systems, to digitally transform government, supplement a shrinking workforce while increasing compliance, reducing errors, saving tax-dollars, and serving citizens better. This discussion will cover the history of RPA in the federal government, provide demonstrations, and look to the future of the fully automated enterprise as hyper-automation takes hold in the government’s automation era. If you have questions, please feel welcome to contact JOLT Advantage Group: Contact page: https://www.joltag.com/contact​. RPA Page: https://www.joltag.com/robotic-proces...​. Knowledge Hub: https://www.joltag.com/knowledge-hub​. About the speakers: Mr. James Walker, a former Army Artillery Officer and federal employee, is currently UiPath’s Evangelist and Public Sector CTO. He served as the Deputy CIO and Services Portfolio Manager at NASA’s Shared Services Center (NSSC) and had key IT positions at DISA, the US Missile Defense Agency, and counter-drug task force in Key West. Jim is a Federal Computer Weekly “Federal 100” alumni and runner-up in Government Computer News “DigIT 2017” award for Robotics, Automation, and Unmanned Systems. He holds a Chief Information Officer certification from the National Defense University and a Graduate degree in Telecommunications. Mr. Brett Fraser has over 20 years of experience working with RPA, cognitive, and AI technologies. Brett brings a wealth of knowledge on automation best practices, lessons learned, and use cases across the public and private sectors.
3/26/20211 hour, 1 minute, 1 second
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Seventy Years of Chinese Strategic Intelligence Threats

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: In 1949, to the surprise of Americans who had hoped that WWII had marked the end of world conflicts, the Soviet Union exploded a nuclear weapon Identical to the bomb the US had dropped on Nagasaki. It was identical because the bomb’s nuclear technology had been stolen through massive espionage by America’s Russian communist wartime ally. Thus the calculus of power that overshadowed the new conflict—nuclear weapons and strategic intelligence operations– set the strategic framework of the fifty-year Cold War conflict. Also in 1949, the People’s Republic of China began pursuing a similar hegemonic course, also relying on stolen nuclear weapons designs and strategic intelligence activities. Just as an aggressive Soviet Union was unwilling to accept either the American position as the world power or even peaceful standards of international behavior, so too does the PRC appear intent on replacing America as the sole remaining superpower in the twenty-first century. The presentation will review key developments in these Chinese efforts and where US policy stands today at the current crossroads in US policy towards the PRC. About the speaker: Kenneth E. deGraffenreid has over 40 years of leadership responsibility as a senior national level expert, practitioner, writer, and teacher in the areas of strategic defense and intelligence policy, and operations; counterintelligence and protective security; continuity of operations; and infrastructure, cyber, telecommunications and information protection. He has served as Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Policy; Deputy National Counterintelligence Executive and Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs as White House Senior Director of Intelligence and Security Programs on the Ronald Reagan National Security Council. A retired Navy Captain, he also served on the Professional Staff of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He has been a Senior Group VP of an R&D and systems engineering firm and VP of a high level policy analysis firm supporting sensitive USG programs in counterintelligence, telecommunications, and security. He is Professor Emeritus at IWP, a graduate school in Washington, D.C. where he developed and directed the first MA degree in Intelligence and security studies to be offered in the United States. Currently, he is a Distinguished Fellow in Intelligence Studies at the American Foreign Policy Council.
3/12/20211 hour, 29 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Return of Great Power Rivalry

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The United States of America has been the most powerful country in the world for over seventy years, but recently the U.S. National Security Strategy declared that the return of great power competition with Russia and China is the greatest threat to U.S. national security. Further, many analysts predict that America’s autocratic rivals will have at least some success in disrupting-and, in the longer term, possibly even displacing-U.S. global leadership. Brilliant and engagingly written, The Return of Great Power Rivalry argues that this conventional wisdom is wrong. Drawing on an extraordinary range of historical evidence and the works of figures like Herodotus, Machiavelli, and Montesquieu and combining it with cutting-edge social science research, Matthew Kroenig advances the riveting argument that democracies tend to excel in great power rivalries. He contends that democracies actually have unique economic, diplomatic, and military advantages in long-run geopolitical competitions. He considers autocratic advantages as well, but shows that these are more than outweighed by their vulnerabilities. Kroenig then shows these arguments through the seven most important cases of democratic-versus-autocratic rivalries throughout history, from the ancient world to the Cold War. Finally, he analyzes the new era of great power rivalry among the United States, Russia, and China through the lens of the democratic advantage argument. By advancing a “hard-power” argument for democracy, Kroenig demonstrates that despite its many problems, the U.S. is better positioned to maintain a global leadership role than either Russia or China. A vitally important book for anyone concerned about the future of global geopolitics, The Return of Great Power Rivalry provides both an innovative way of thinking about power in international politics and an optimistic assessment of the future of American global leadership. About the speaker: Dr. Matthew Kroenig is the deputy director of the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council and the director of the Center’s Global Strategy Initiative. He is also a tenured professor of government and foreign service at Georgetown University. A 2019 study in Perspectives on Politics ranked him one of the top 25 most cited political scientists of his generation. He is the author or editor of seven books, including The Return of Great Power Rivalry: Democracy versus Autocracy from the Ancient World to the US and China (Oxford University Press, 2020) and The Logic of American Nuclear Strategy (Oxford University Press, 2018). His articles and commentary have appeared in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and many other outlets. He co-authors the bi-monthly “Its Debatable” column at Foreign Policy. Dr. Kroenig provides regular commentary for major media outlets, including PBS, NPR, BBC, CNN, and C-SPAN. He previously served in several positions in the US government, including in the Strategy office in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Strategic Assessments Group at the Central Intelligence Agency. He regularly consults with a range of US government entities. He has previously worked as a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a research fellow at Harvard University and Stanford University. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Hertog Foundation, and the Stanton Foundation. He is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations and holds an MA and Ph.D. in political science from the University of California at Berkeley.
3/8/202159 minutes, 56 seconds
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Estonia’s “Total Defense” Principle: Learning from History

This event is part of The Intermarium Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The defensibility of the Baltic states has been a subject of much discussion since the Russian invasion and occupation of parts of Ukraine. A 2016 report by the RAND Corporation caused a stir when it determined that NATO was unprepared to defend the Baltics against a Russian attack, with Russian forces able to reach the outskirts of Tallinn in 60 hours. However, while American strategic thinking is focused on conventional military defense, due to its size, geography, and history, Estonia’s National Security Concept embraces a “total defense” principle. This is important for U.S. strategic thinkers and policymakers to understand and integrate into allied defense strategy and assistance. About the speaker: James A. Rice is the Legislative Director for U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, for whom he has worked since June 2000. In this role, James serves as the chief advisor to Senator Grassley on foreign policy matters, including in Senator Grassley’s capacity as co-chair of the Senate Baltic Freedom Caucus. James’s previous professional experience includes positions in the Iowa Senate, an internship with the British Conservative Party, and work on various political campaigns. James has been recognized by the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs for his contributions to public diplomacy. James received a B.A. from Drake University with majors in political science and history and a M.A. in Statecraft and International Affairs at the Institute of World Politics. He is a native of Davenport, Iowa.
2/23/202155 minutes, 48 seconds
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Communist China’s Modern Intelligence Reforms

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Since their 1949 victory, the Chinese Communist Party has been highly successful in making mainland China a very hard target for foreign espionage. But hitherto, China’s security and intelligence agencies have often endured a lack of interagency coordination, turf battles, and internal corruption. Under Mao Zedong, they were attacked and dismantled during the Cultural Revolution, taking decades to recover. During China’s corruption crisis of the 1990s and 2000s, intelligence and counterintelligence operations were hobbled by internal graft, leading to high-level penetrations by the CIA’s China Program. However, Xi Jinping has systematically attacked these problems since his ascent in 2012. His famous anti-corruption drive was partly intended to blunt alleged American efforts to provide cash for their agents within the Chinese state to secure corrupt promotions. Beijing’s drive to regain “information dominance” (制信息权, zhi xinxi quan) over an increasingly fluid, networked, and technologically sophisticated society appears to be broadly successful. Interagency coordination looks more robust under strengthened party oversight by the new Central State Security Commission. Meanwhile, an intelligence and military reorganization that was launched in 2015 has resulted in a sharper mission focus by the Ministry of State Security and the intelligence units of the People’s Liberation Army. This presentation will review these efforts, and what problems still exist. It will evaluate the possibility that the 2020s will be a decade of better coordinated and more aggressive espionage operations by Beijing, and the extent to which the increasingly successful surveillance state might expand and grow ever stronger inside China. About the speaker: Dr. Matthew Brazil is the researcher and writer. He pursued Chinese studies as an undergraduate at U.C. Berkeley, as an Army officer with tours in Korea and NSA, and as a graduate student at Harvard in their Regional Studies East Asia program. After a stint as the China specialist for the Commerce Department’s Office of Export Enforcement, he was assigned as a Commercial Officer with the U.S. Embassy, Beijing, where he both promoted and controlled U.S. high technology exports to China. Afterward, Matt spent 20 years as a security professional, performing investigations in China for a chip manufacturer, and leading the development of a security organization in China for an American specialty chemicals firm. His PhD dissertation at the University of Sydney (2013) described the place in the Chinese Communist Party of their intelligence organs. That and further research led to his contribution as the coauthor of Chinese Communist Espionage, An Intelligence Primer (2019). Matt has begun research on a second book intended to be an integrated narrative history of intelligence operations in the Chinese Communist movement.
2/19/20211 hour, 23 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ethiopia in 2021: Tackling Challenges and Looking Toward the Future

About the lecture: Ethiopia today is at a crossroad, the government of Ethiopia recently launched a campaign to uphold the rule of law in order to keep the peace and security of its citizens. The government is also gearing up to conduct its first election in the Post-TPLF era in June 2021. All eyes will be on the reformist leader Abiy Ahmed, a 2019 Nobel peace prize laureate who promised to bring his nation of over a hundred million people back to its historical prominence by unlocking the country’s untapped natural resources. Our panelist will analyze the challenges facing the Prime Minister as he embarks on his goal to achieve making Ethiopia a middle-income nation by 2025. One of these challenges currently is the conflict between the federal government of Ethiopia and TPLF leadership in Tigray. About the panelist: Dr. Gedion Timothewos Hessebon, is the current attorney general of Ethiopia. Bronwyn Bruton, a democracy and governance specialist with extensive experience in Africa was a 2008-2009 international affairs fellow in residence at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Ms. Bruton has also served as a program manager on the Africa team of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Office of Transition Initiatives, as a policy analyst on the international affairs and trade team of the Government Accountability Office, and as a program officer at the Center for International Private Enterprise. Yoseph Mulugeta Badwaza is the Senior Regional Advisor at Freedom House, having formerly served as the Senior Program Officer for Ethiopia. Besu Feleke has been a human rights and democracy advocate for 18 years. He is on the board of Friends of Angola, PRO Leadership Inc, Global Innovation Network, Senior Policy Advisor at Solidarity Movement for New Ethiopia, and Community Advisor to the Chief of Police in Alexandria, Virginia. Besu works in various Peacebuilding initiatives and programs in the US and Africa. Professor Jon Abbink is an anthropologist-historian and carries out research on the history and cultures of the Horn of Africa (Northeast Africa), particularly Ethiopia. Learn more about the panelists: https://www.iwp.edu/events/38022/.
2/12/20211 hour, 40 minutes, 36 seconds
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Children of the Borderlands by Doctor Lucyna Kulinska

This event is part of the Intermarium Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The book Children of the Borderlands, by Lucyna Kulinska Ph.D., is not just a collection of eyewitness accounts of people who survived the savage genocide of the Polish population committed by Ukrainians, but is also a case study relevant to the multi-ethnic United States that faces numerous ethnic tensions, pressures, and challenges. It illustrates the involvement of numerous intelligence services in this genocide and the creation of the present Ukrainian state and its identity. About the speaker: Paul Szymanski is a naturalized citizen of the United States. He was born in Gdansk and immigrated from Poland in 1989. He graduated from the Loyola University of Chicago in 1995 and obtained a Bachelor of Business Administration. He works as a Cybersecurity Engineer and is certified as a Project Management Professional. Mr. Szymanski translated short stories by renowned American climber, John Long, into Polish and published them in the book titled Opowiesci z Krainy Largo (The stories from Laro’s world). This translation was a part of a project to obtain a new helicopter for the Tarta’s Mountain Rescue Squad. (The previous helicopter crashed during a rescue of high school students who unfortunately perished in an avalanche.) The book Children of the Borderlands was his first translation from Polish to English. He translated it with Jakub Zarazka and the poems were translated by Sister Jadwiga Szczechowicz from the Albertine Sisters convent. Sister Jadwiga is a former sergeant of the US Marine Corps. Mr. Szymanski enjoys rock climbing, mountaineering, skiing, scuba diving, and has completed four half-ironman triathlons.
2/5/202153 minutes, 13 seconds
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Where the Birds Never Sing, The True Story of the Liberation of Dachau

About the lecture: Jack Sacco’s presentation (based on his award-winning book, Where the Birds Never Sing), details his father’s heroic journey through the greatest battles of World War II with a special focus on the liberation of Dachau. His testimony bears witness to the truth of the Holocaust while honoring both the victims and liberators. About the speaker: Jack Sacco is the award-winning and Amazon #1 bestselling author of Where the Birds Never Sing and Above the Treetops. Originally from Birmingham, Alabama, he earned a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame. He is the winner of the Alabama Library Association’s 2005 Author Award for Where the Birds Never Sing. Past winners of this prestigious award include Harper Lee for To Kill a Mockingbird and Walker Percy for The Second Coming. Where the Birds Never Sing, published by HarperCollins, is a nonfiction account of his father Joe Sacco’s experiences during the Second World War, including his part in the liberation of the notorious Nazi concentration camp at Dachau. The book has been praised by critics and readers alike, including Senator Bob Dole, who contributed the Foreword. In addition, scholars of the Holocaust have been enthusiastic in their praise. Where the Birds Never Sing has been endorsed by Rabbi Abraham Cooper on behalf of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles. Where the Birds Never Sing was nominated for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize and rose to become an Amazon #1 Bestseller. Jack Sacco is in demand as an accomplished public speaker who lectures widely throughout the United States and abroad. He has lectured at Yale University, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Southern California, UCLA, Loyola Marymount University, the University of Texas, and George Mason University, as well as other colleges and conferences throughout the nation. He has been chosen to deliver the keynote presentation at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Dachau. He was also chosen to give a special presentation before the Royal Families of Europe, including the Habsburg, Luxembourg, and Liechtenstein families.
1/19/20211 hour, 25 seconds
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Poland at War (1914-1921)

About the lecture: Most politically active Poles welcomed the outbreak of the Great War as a chance to regain independence for their nation. Polish politicians and their followers were deeply divided among themselves. There were several orientations among them vying for influence. "Russian" Poles were pro-Western and counted on the victory of the Entente and sovereignty at best, or autonomy at worst. "Austrian" Poles pursued an "Austro-Polish solution," hoping that Vienna would unite all Polish lands under the scepter of the Habsburgs. Yet, the Austro-Hungarians increasingly yielded to Prussian prerogatives. Berlin at most entertained an idea of a dwarf Polish puppet state in the central provinces of Poland. Notwithstanding, the Poles raised several armed forces by the sides of the Russian, Austrian, and, lastly, Prussian armies. Meanwhile, emigre Poles, in particular in the United States supported the pro-Entente orientation. They also fielded the largest Polish force in the field which fought first in France and then, from 1919, in Poland itself. As the empires collapsed, it was both the diplomatic effort of the Poles in the West and the valor of Polish arms at home that facilitated the resurrection and defense of the Commonwealth. Ultimately, although they enjoyed some material assistance from the United States, France, and Hungary, it was the valor of Polish arms alone that secured the reborn nation's freedom. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
1/13/202132 minutes, 57 seconds
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Poland's Power and Others vs. the Revolution

About the lecture: It took Poland 123 years to regain its independence in 1918. Since 1772 each generation witnessed lost wars, uprisings, conspiracies, and defeats. Each new generation would continue the struggle afresh. And so it was again in 1905 and between 1914 and 1921. The Poles fought to restore the Old Commonwealth of Poland-Lithuania-Ruthenia. They benefitted from the collapse of the three empires: Russia, Germany, and Austria-Hungary; however, they also had to contend with folk nationalism of the non-historic nationalities, peasant nations of the Intermarium, who asserted their rights to self-determination. Warsaw was thus forced to fight several border wars, including against Germany. But it was the war against the Soviet Union that proved to be the most existential challenge not just to Poland, but to everyone else in the Intermarium. Unfortunately, the Bolshevik menace failed to unite the successor states and the Poles faced Lenin's legions virtually alone. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
1/12/20211 hour, 3 minutes, 15 seconds
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Revolutionary Slaughter and Pogroms

About the lecture: The autocratic system's inefficiencies, Russia's economic backwardness, the opposition's maximalist dissatisfaction, ghoulish slaughter at the front, and food supply failures combined to trigger a revolution in the empire in February 1917. The tsar abdicated and his regime yielded to a dual power system: the center-left provisional government and the leftist revolutionary Soviet. The new arrangement led to the paralysis of the country and the collapse of law and order. Deserters and bandits, along with the peasants, wreaked havoc from below; revolutionary parties fostered anarchy from above. Eventually, after October 1917, when the Bolsheviks seized power, deposing the liberals, chaos was further exacerbated by Lenin's government fostering Red Terror as state policy. In the ensuing Civil War, all possible political orientations raged against one another and against innocent bystanders. Everyone was caught in mayhem and violence, in particular helpless civilians, including traditional elites and Jews. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
1/11/20211 hour, 31 minutes, 6 seconds
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1918: Germany wins and collapses

About the lecture: Germany's final thrust to the east, coupled with revolutionary turmoil in Russia, which Berlin exacerbated greatly by its support of the Bolsheviks, brought victory to the Second Reich. The treaty of Brest Litovsk of March 1918 was an unmitigated triumph for the Germans. It not only allowed them to dominate most of the European part of the collapsing empire of the Tsars but also to establish a springboard to the future domination of the Caucasus and the Middle East. All that collapsed, however, because the United States entered the war and came to the rescue of the beleaguered and wavering Entente Powers. By August 1918 it became obvious that Germany had lost the war. Alas, instead of taking Berlin, the Powers agreed unwisely to an armistice in November 1918. Accordingly, hostilities terminated in the west, but they continued unabated in the east. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
1/5/202112 minutes, 55 seconds
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The Devil and Karl Marx: Communism’s Long March of Death, Deception, and Infiltration

This event is part of the Intermarium Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: “Thus Heaven I’ve forfeited, I know it full well. My soul, once true to God, is chosen for Hell.” So wrote Karl Marx in an 1837 poem. Those lines were, for Marx, at least partly biographical. Likewise disturbing were his openings lines in his Communist Manifesto: “A specter is haunting Europe, the specter of communism. All of the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this specter.” Karl Marx unleashed more than a mere economic program. The man was less an economist than a revolutionary. Marx had a favorite line from Mephistopheles, the devil character in Goethe’s Faust: “Everything that exists deserves to perish.” What Marx wanted was not a mere economic revolution; he wanted a revolution against human nature, to annihilate the entire order, to burn down the house, to undermine “all religion, all morality.” He called for the “forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions.” What Marx advocated had a destructive dimension, a spiritual dimension, even a diabolical dimension. In his latest book, The Devil and Karl Marx: Communism’s Long March of Death, Deception, and Infiltration, Dr. Paul Kengor explores this chilling side of Marx and the Marxist revolution that still rages today. Join us to hear Professor Kengor on this fascinating and disturbing subject. About the speaker: Paul Kengor, Ph.D., is a professor of political science at Grove City College in Grove City, Pennsylvania, and a New York Times bestselling author of over a dozen books. He is senior director and chief academic fellow at the Institute for Faith & Freedom and former visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. His articles have appeared in publications from the Washington Post and USA Today to the Wall Street Journal and New York Times. He is a longtime columnist and senior editor for The American Spectator. Kengor is an internationally recognized authority on (among other topics) Ronald Reagan, the Cold War, communism, socialism, and conservatism.
1/4/202158 minutes, 16 seconds
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Taiwan: China’s Most Important Target On The Way To Global Hegemony

This event is part of the China Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: In 2019 China began to apply noticeable military pressure on Taiwan, which has increased considerably in 2020. China now proclaims in its media almost weekly that it will invade and conquer democratic Taiwan. This mounting threat to Taiwan will be examined, in addition to why the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) must destroy this democracy in order to achieve hegemony first in Asia, and then the world. Yet, all is not lost, there is still time for the United States to help Taiwan deter a Chinese invasion and by doing so, prevent a dark age of CCP hegemony. About the speaker: Mr. Richard D. Fisher, Jr. is a Senior Fellow with the International Assessment and Strategy Center. In 2016 he joined the Advisory Board of the Global Taiwan Institute. He has previously worked with the Center for Security Policy, Jamestown Foundation China Brief, U.S. House of Representatives Republican Policy Committee, and The Heritage Foundation. He is the author of China’s Military Modernization, Building for Regional and Global Reach (Praeger, 2008, Stanford University Press, 2010, Taiwan Ministry of National Defense translation 2012) Since 1996 he has covered scores of international arms exhibits and his articles have been published in the Jane’s Intelligence Review, Jane’s Defence Weekly, Aviation Week and Space Technology, Armed Forces Journal, Far Eastern Economic Review, Asian Wall Street Journal, Defense News, The Epoch Times and the The Washington Times. He has studied at Georgetown University and received a B.A. (Honors) in 1981 from Eisenhower College.
12/18/202051 minutes, 21 seconds
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How Not to Underestimate the Evolving Threat

About the lecture: This lecture will examine the misapplication of new systems in the run-up to conflict–eg French and Russian pre-WWII misunderstanding of best employment of tanks and implications for US force planning. About the speaker: Dr. Dov S. Zakheim is Senior Advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and Senior Fellow at the CNA Corporation, a federally funded think tank. Previously he was Senior Vice President of Booz Allen Hamilton where he led the Firm’s support of U.S. Combatant Commanders worldwide. From 2001 to April 2004 he was Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) and Chief Financial Officer for the Department of Defense, and from 2002-2004 he was also DOD’s coordinator of civilian programs in Afghanistan. From 1985 until 1987, Dr. Zakheim was Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Planning and Resources, playing an active role in the Department’s system acquisition, strategic planning, programming and budget processes. He held other senior DOD posts from 1981-1985. Dr. Zakheim has served on numerous government, corporate, non-profit and charitable boards. He is Vice Chairman of the Foreign Policy Research Institute’s Board of Trustees, and Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Center for The National Interest.
12/15/202056 minutes, 1 second
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Disinformation and the National Security Implications of Technology

About the lecture: Mr. Glenn Gerstell will discuss the national security burdens that our private sector must bear due to the advent of new technology and widespread disinformation online. Please click here for Mr. Gerstell’s New Yorker article on this topic: https://www.newyorker.com/tech/annals-of-technology/the-national-security-case-for-fixing-social-media About the speaker: Glenn S. Gerstell served as the general counsel of the National Security Agency (NSA) and Central Security Service (CSS) from 2015 to 2020. He has written and spoken widely about the intersections of technology and national security and privacy. Prior to joining the NSA, Mr. Gerstell practiced law for almost 40 years at the international law firm of Milbank, LLP, where he focused on the global telecommunications industry and served as the managing partner of the firm’s Washington, D.C., Singapore, and Hong Kong offices. Mr. Gerstell served on the President’s National Infrastructure Advisory Council, which reports to the president and the secretary of homeland security on security threats to the nation’s infrastructure, as well as on the District of Columbia Homeland Security Commission. A graduate of New York University and Columbia University School of Law, Mr. Gerstell is an elected member of the American Academy of Diplomacy and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Earlier in his career, he was an adjunct law professor at the Georgetown University Law Center and New York Law School. He is a recipient of the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal, the Secretary of Defense Medal for Exceptional Civilian Service and the NSA Distinguished Civilian Service Medal.
12/11/202058 minutes, 56 seconds
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Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific

This event is part of the China Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the book: The Indo-Pacific is fast becoming the world’s dominant region. As it grows in power and wealth, geopolitical competition has reemerged, threatening future stability not merely in Asia but around the globe. China is aggressive and uncooperative, and increasingly expects the world to bend to its wishes. The focus on Sino-US competition for global power has obscured “Asia’s other great game”: the rivalry between Japan and China. A modernizing India risks missing out on the energies and talents of millions of its women, potentially hampering the broader role it can play in the world. And in North Korea, the most frightening question raised by Kim Jong-un’s pursuit of the ultimate weapon is also the simplest: can he control his nukes? In Asia’s New Geopolitics: Essays on Reshaping the Indo-Pacific, Michael R. Auslin examines these and other key issues transforming the Indo-Pacific and the broader world. He also explores the history of American strategy in Asia from the 18th century through today. Taken together, Auslin’s essays convey the richness and diversity of the region: with more than three billion people, the Indo-Pacific contains over half of the global population, including the world’s two most populous nations: India and China. In a riveting final chapter, Auslin imagines a war between America and China in a bid for regional hegemony and what this conflict might look like. About the speaker: Michael Auslin, PhD, a historian and geopolitical analyst, is the inaugural Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and is also a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. The best-selling author of four non-fiction books, he is a longtime contributor to the Wall Street Journal, and his writing appears in The Atlantic, Foreign Affairs, Politico, and National Review, among other leading publications. Formerly an associate professor of history at Yale, he was a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader and Fulbright Scholar, among other awards. He appears frequently in U.S. and foreign media, and is the Vice Chairman of the Wilton Park USA Foundation.
12/8/202058 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Dangers of False National Security Narratives

About the lecture: When we accept certain narratives on which national security policy rests, and those narratives are incorrect, we get ourselves into serious trouble. One is reminded about a debate in the British parliament between Winston Churchill and Mr. Chamberlain, with the latter arguing that rearming Britain to take on Germany would probably result in a diminution of free trade with Nazi Germany. To which Winston Churchill said, “shouldn’t that be the idea?” The United States in 1969-70 adopted detente and peaceful coexistence as descriptors of American security policy. At the end of World War II, we adopted the idea of containment of the USSR. We also adopted “Vietnam” to conjure up a quagmire to describe the feared end result of the use of American military force. Today, we have adopted “peaceful rise“ as the way to describe the growing military and economic strength of China; we have long held out the idea that a successful foreign policy in the Middle East had to go through the “peace process”; and successful response to 9-11 required the USA to win the “global war on terror or GWOT”. This lecture will examine how such narratives were developed and what political forces such narratives served. This lecture will also explore each of these narratives and what dead ends they led us to reach, or are still leading us, and compare them to President Reagan’s “peace through strength” strategy. We will also discuss the current administration’s policy with respect to China, the Middle East, and Russia/NATO. Reagan’s peace through strength is often described —wrongly—as no more than simple bullying—a narrative we will also address. Part of this discussion will include my own part in these foreign policy fights over the 1975-2020 period. About the speaker: Mr. Peter Huessy is President of his own defense consulting firm, GeoStrategic Analysis, founded in 1981, and since 2016, Director of Strategic Deterrent Studies at the Mitchell Institute on Aerospace Studies. He was the senior defense consultant at the National Defense University Foundation for 22 years. He was the National Security Fellow at the AFPC, and Senior Defense Consultant at the Air Force Association from 2011 Mr. Huessy has served as an expert defense and national security analyst for over 45 years, helping his clients cover congressional activities while monitoring budget and policy developments on terrorism, counter-terrorism, immigration, state-sponsored terrorism, missile defense, weapons of mass destruction, especially US-Israeli joint defense efforts, nuclear deterrence, arms control, proliferation, as well as tactical and strategic air, airlift, space, and nuclear matters and such state and non-state actors as North Korea, China, Iran, Syria, Venezuela and Hezbollah, Hamas and Al Qaeda. This also includes monitoring activities of think tanks, non-governmental organizations, and other US government departments, as well as projecting future actions of Congress in this area. His specialty is developing and implementing public policy campaigns to secure support for important national security objectives.
12/2/20201 hour, 4 minutes, 5 seconds
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Russia: Revolution and Civil War

About the lecture: A revolution broke out in Russia in February 1917, which overthrew the Tsar. Instead of ushering in a liberal democracy, it quickly degenerated into anarchy, which paved the way for a Bolshevik takeover in October 1917. Non-Bolshevik leftists for the most part refused to save democracy and freedom by refusing to fight for it. The right-wing counterrevolutionaries fought bravely but their slim ranks were overwhelmed by the might of the Reds and the sea of indifference and hostility of the Russian people, who cherished no government. The lands of the former Russian Empire descended into a civil war and, concomitantly, wars of national liberation as borderland nationalities attempted to assert their freedom. Most failed and found themselves back firmly under the boot of Moscow, which was now ruled by the Reds. Only the Entente could have thwarted the Bolshevik victory but the West lacked the will and imagination to invest much to destroy Communism in its cradle. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics, where he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
11/30/202043 minutes, 10 seconds
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Policies in a Strange Land: Conventional Authorities, Cyber Operations

This event is part of the Cyber Intelligence Initiative Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The establishment of US Cyber Command and expansion of Computer Network Exploitation and Computer Network Attack operations under a number of authorities has blurred the lines of traditional national security roles. This lecture explores the policy implications of cyber operations conducted under various authorities and their broader implications for international norms in the cyber domain. About the speaker: Adam Maruyama is a national security professional with deep experience in cyber operations, cybersecurity, and counterterrorism. For more than 15 years, he served in a variety of operational and leadership roles in the national security community. He served in numerous warzones and co-led the drafting of the 2018 National Strategy to Counterterrorism. Adam currently manages cybersecurity software deployments for a number of federal customers.
11/23/202055 minutes, 12 seconds
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Philippines-U.S. Alliance in a Post-Pandemic World

This event is a part of the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: As the world adapts to a new normal, the Philippines and the United States are presented with fresh opportunities to expand their longstanding alliance and partnership. In this lecture, Philippine Ambassador Jose Manuel Romualdez will discuss how the two countries are working together to address the challenges brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, and how this collaboration is re-defining Philippines-U.S. bilateral relations. He will also present the Philippines’ long-term vision and priorities for the alliance and partnership. About the speaker: Jose Manuel “Babe” del Gallego Romualdez was appointed Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines to the United States of America in July 2017 by President Rodrigo Roa Duterte. On 29 November 2017, he presented his credentials to US President Donald J. Trump and formally assumed office as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary. Additionally, as the head of the Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C., Ambassador Romualdez is concurrently the Philippines’ emissary to the Commonwealth of Jamaica, Republic of Haiti; Republic of Trinidad and Tobago; Antigua and Barbuda; Bahamas; Barbados; Dominica; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; and Saint Lucia. Prior to his appointment, Ambassador Romualdez was designated as a special envoy of the Philippine President to the United States. He also served as a member of several Philippine business delegations visiting the United States, China, Japan and New Zealand from 1989 to 2012. Ambassador Romualdez has extensive experience as a media practitioner and business executive. He used to be the Chief Executive Officer of Stargate Media Corporation and Publisher of People Asia Magazine (The Philippine Star affiliate). He was president of the Manila Overseas Press Club and vice-president of Rotary Club of Manila. Ambassador Romualdez writes columns for The Philippine Star. All his columns have a wide following of readers both in the Philippines and abroad. Born and raised in Manila, Ambassador Romualdez received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from De La Salle College in 1970. He plays golf as a pastime and is affiliated with Manila Golf and Country Club and the Manila Polo Club.
11/19/202043 minutes, 24 seconds
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The Katyn Forest Massacre: An Annotated Bibliography of Books in English

This event is part of the Intermarium Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the book: “The Katyn Forest Massacre: An Annotated Bibliography of Books in English” begins with a history of the Katyn Massacre and an overview of the literature on Katyn. The subsequent chapters discuss the authors and contents of some 38 books that have been published over the decades in English about Katyn. Each book contributed something to the evolving literature and general knowledge about the history of the Massacre. Books were written by some prisoners who survived (Czapski and Młynarski), witnesses who were brought to the exhumations (Stroobant and Werth), diplomats and generals who tried to find out what happened to the missing officers (Kot and Anders), family members who were deported to Kazakhstan and Siberia (Adamczyk), researchers and historians (Zawodny, Ciencala, Sanford and Maresch), and authors who believed that raising awareness about Katyn was worthwhile because it might help rectify an injustice (FitzGibbon and Allen). Books written before the Soviet admission of guilt pointed an accusatory finger at the Kremlin. Those written afterwards had the benefit of archival revelations that helped shed light on previously unknown details of the NKVD Katyn operation. The Foreword is by Dr. Alexander M. Jablonski, President of the Oskar Halecki Institute in Canada. About the speaker: Mr. Andrew Kavchak was born in Montreal. He studied political science (BA – Concordia University, MA – Carleton University) and law (LL.B. – Osgoode Hall Law School). He spent his career in the Canadian federal civil service mostly working in policy units with the departments of revenue, industry and international trade. Since retiring he has pursued his hobbies of reading and writing about history. He has written and published several books that are available on Amazon, including Remembering Gouzenko: The Struggle to Honour a Cold War Hero and The Katyn Forest Massacre: An Annotated Bibliography of Books in English. He lives in Ottawa, Canada.
11/16/20201 hour, 5 minutes, 1 second
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Experiences of a Polish Officer in the Austrian Army in WWI

Full title: Experiences of a Polish Officer in the Austrian Army in WWI Dying Echoes: Memoirs of the War 1914-1920 by Stanisław Kawczak This lecture is a part of the 13th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: Andrew Kavchak will discuss his grandfather’s, Stanisław Kawczak, memoirs of WWI, and the subsequent conflicts following Poland’s independence. Dying Echoes: Memoirs of the War 1914-1920 by Stanisław Kawczak was first published in Poland in 1936. The book tells the story and experiences of a young Polish conscript in the Austrian army who fought during WWI wearing the Austrian uniform against the Russian army on the Eastern Front and the Italian army on the Southern Front. From the beginning of the war, his heart was in the struggle for Polish independence and the defeat of the three occupying powers (Germany, Austria, and Russia) which had partitioned Poland since the 1790s. The narrative is vivid and gives the reader an image of the life of a soldier on the march and in the trenches, as well as an account of the political debates about national interests during the “Great War”. About the speaker: Mr. Andrew Kavchak was born in Montreal, Canada. He studied political science earning a BA from Concordia University and MA from Carleton University) and law (LL.B. – Osgoode Hall Law School). He spent his career in the Canadian federal civil service working in policy units with the departments of revenue, industry, and international trade. Since retiring he has pursued his hobbies of reading and writing about history. He has written and published several books that are available on Amazon, including Remembering Gouzenko: The Struggle to Honour a Cold War Hero and The Katyn Forest Massacre: An Annotated Bibliography of Books in English. He lives in Ottawa, Canada.
11/12/202051 minutes, 59 seconds
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Stanislawa Leszczynska: The Miracle of Life in a Death Camp

This lecture is a part of the 13th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: The lecture will present the life and work of a devoted midwife, Stanislawa Leszczynska, who tirelessly assisted pregnant women prisoners of Auschwitz and helped them safely deliver their babies against all odds. About the speaker: Mrs. Maria Juczewska is a communication specialist with a versatile international experience. Her education in linguistics, culture studies, and international affairs, combined with years of living abroad, makes her point of view unique and comprehensive. Mrs. Juczewska worked for the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies from 2014-2020, and she is a graduate of IWP’s M.A. program. At present, she is working on her Ph.D. in political philosophy.
11/12/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 34 seconds
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Saint John Paul II and President Ronald Reagan – an alliance for good

This lecture is a part of the 13th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: 2020 marks what would have been the 100th birthday of St. Pope John Paul II as well as the 42nd anniversary of his election as Pope. This is a great moment to reflect on Saint John Paul II and President Ronald Reagan, two of the most influential figures of the 20th century. With their will, belief in God, and the power of the spoken word, the Polish Pope and American President together liberated Europe and changed world history. There are no coincidences, but Providence is at work. John Paul II stepped onto the world stage just as the most powerful country on earth was about to elect a president unwaveringly committed to the cause of freedom. One became the spiritual leader of the world, the other the political leader of the free world. The two great men are no longer with us, but our need for moral clarity and moral leadership remains. About the speaker: Mrs. Monika Jablonska is a consultant with expertise in international business transactions and NGOs, lawyer and philanthropist. Ms. Jablonska is working on her Ph.D. thesis in political science. She is the author of “Wind from Heaven: John Paul II, The Poet Who Became Pope.” Her second book about St. John Paul II will be released in 2021. She is a contributor to the National Catholic Register, Crisis Magazine, Newsmax and other publications in the United States and Europe.
11/12/202013 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ronald Reagan and John Paul II: Two Partners Who Won the Cold War and Changed History

About the book: Even as historians credit Ronald Reagan and Pope John Paul II with hastening the end of the Cold War, they have failed to recognize the depth or significance of the bond that developed between the two leaders. Acclaimed scholar and bestselling author Paul Kengor changes that. In this fascinating book, he reveals a singular bond—which included a spiritual connection between the Catholic pope and the Protestant president—that drove the two men to confront what they knew to be the great evil of the twentieth century: Soviet communism. A Pope and a President is the product of years of research. Based on Kengor’s tireless archival digging and his unique access to Reagan insiders, the book reveals the inside story of the friendship between Reagan and Pope John Paul II. About the speaker: Dr. Paul Kengor is professor of political science at Grove City College in Pennsylvania, and a New York Times bestselling author of over a dozen books. He is senior director and chief academic fellow at the Institute for Faith & Freedom and former visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. His articles have appeared in publications from the Washington Post and USA Today to the Wall Street Journal and New York Times. He is a longtime columnist and senior editor for The American Spectator. Kengor is an internationally recognized authority on Ronald Reagan, the Cold War, communism, socialism, and conservatism.
11/12/202040 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Count to be Saint: János Esterházy (1901-1957)

This lecture is a part of the 13th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the Lecture: Count Janos Esterhazy opposed the Nazis and Communists; he escaped the former only to be imprisoned and killed by the latter. Now he is hailed as a hero by the Hungarians, Poles, and Jews; the Catholic Church has recognized him as a Servant of God and launched Esterhazy’s beatification process. Meanwhile, Czechia and Slovakia cannot forgive the Count’s Hungarian patriotism and irredentism, thus stalling and derailing his rehabilitation. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics, where he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
11/12/202021 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Conservative Revolution: The Movement That Remade America

This lecture is part of the 13th Annual Kościuszko Chair Conference hosted by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the book: The triumph of the conservative movement in reshaping American politics is one of the great untold stories of the past fifty years. At the end of World War II, hardly anyone in public life would admit to being a conservative, but as Lee Edwards shows in this magisterial work, in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, a small group of committed men and women chipped away at the liberal colossus, and their descendants would scale the ramparts of power in the 1980s and 1990s. Lee Edwards shows that the modern conservative era grew out of the words and deeds of many heroes, particularly the men he calls the Four Misters — Robert Taft (Mister Republican), Barry Goldwater (Mister Conservative), Ronald Reagan (Mister President), and Newt Gingrich (Mister Speaker). Join us as we interview Mr. Edwards about the careers of these four larger-than-life leaders who transformed the conservative movement into a political majority. About the speaker: Dr. Lee Edwards is a Distinguished Fellow in Conservative Thought at the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies at The Heritage Foundation, and an Adjunct Professor of politics at the Catholic University of America. Edwards is a leading historian of American conservatism and author or editor of over 25 books. He was the Founding Director of the Institute of Political Journalism at Georgetown University and a Fellow at the Institute of Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. His awards and honors include the Order of Merit of the Republic of Hungary, the Millennium Star of Lithuania, the Cross of Terra Mariana of Estonia, the Friendship Medal of Diplomacy from the Republic of China (Taiwan), the John Ashbrook Award, the Reed Irvine Accuracy in Media Award, Legend of YAF from Young America’s Foundation, and the Walter Judd Freedom Award. Edwards holds a Ph.D. in world politics from Catholic University and a Doctor of Humane Letters from Grove City College. He lives in Arlington, Va., with his wife Anne, who assists him in all his writing.
11/12/202022 minutes, 28 seconds
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Post-Revolution Sudanese Security Sector Reform and Social Transformation

This event is part of The African Strategic Forum sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: As Sudan transitions to a more transparent, civilian rule, and democratic governance, its Sudan Sovereignty Council civilian and military leadership in Khartoum will be tested on its willingness to dismantle and reform its security sector. The process of building a strong civil society and preparing the country for elections in the next two years will be scrutinized by the global community and other regional stakeholders. This panel will discuss what steps will increase the likelihood of a successful transition and reformed security sector. About the panelist: Dr. Linda Bishai is an adjunct professor at the Elliott School of International Affairs and a Research Staff Member on the Africa Team at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). She works on a wide range of international security issues including African regional economic communities, security cooperation in Africa, and monitoring instability in central and southern Africa. She has twenty years of experience in teaching, training and writing on international law, peacebuilding and security sector reform, and preventing/countering violent extremism. In her previous positions at the American Bar Association and at the U.S. Institute of Peace, Bishai designed and delivered programs on preventing election violence in Sudan and South Sudan, civic education and higher education reform in Sudan, and women’s role in preventing violent extremism in Nigeria and Kenya. As Director of North Africa programs at USIP, Bishai facilitated dialogues on just and sustainable security sector responses to violent extremism and border security in the Sahel and the Maghreb. As Director of Research, Evaluation and Learning at the ABA Rule of Law Initiative, Bishai oversaw the activities of a team of legal researchers and monitoring & evaluation professionals.Bishai has maintained an active academic profile and has taught courses in international relations, international law and human rights. Bishai holds a B.A. in history and literature from Harvard University, a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, and LLM in international law from the University of Stockholm, and a Ph.D. in international relations from the London School of Economics. Dr. Sarah Detzner is a consultant based in Washington, D.C. Her research and consulting work, on behalf of various governments, multilateral institutions, and think tanks and foundations, is focused on security sector reform, particularly monitoring and evaluation as well as the role of civil society and other forms of participation in post-conflict security sector reconstruction efforts. Previously, she served in the Obama administration as a speechwriter for former Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates, campaigned as an Obama 2008 staffer, and worked with the National Democratic Institute in Washington, D.C., Lebanon, and Jordan. She received her doctorate from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and is a fellow of the World Peace Foundation. About the coordinator and moderator: Prof. Hashem Mekki, MA, has taught Arabic Language, Culture & Middle East Media at IWP since 2012. He is the owner of Bridge Language Solutions, providing an array of language translation, interpretation and teaching services to the Washington DC metropolitan area, and the founder of Kele Global, a nonprofit organization that promotes education, health, and economic empowerment in the Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan. He also teaches Arabic language to federal employees & professionals at the National Nuclear Security Administration at the Department of Energy.
11/10/20201 hour, 33 minutes, 6 seconds
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Winning Without War: Building Alliances and Partnerships

About the lecture: The rise of great power politics has resulted in a new, global competition for political influence. Alliances and partnerships are critical to expanding US influence, yet building these partnerships is challenging. This webinar will discuss the importance of these partnerships and suggest ways for the US to expand and strengthen them. About the panelists: Dr. Frank Marlo is Dean of Academics at The Institute of World Politics. He formerly served as a Professor of Strategic Studies at the Marine Corps Command and Staff College. He received his Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in May 2006. From January 2002 until January 2005, he served as Assistant for Counterproliferation Policy in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy. He is the author of Planning Reagan’s War: Conservative Strategists and America’s Cold War Victory. Ambassador Philip Hughes served as the United States Ambassador to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean from November 1990 until July 1993. Prior to this ambassadorial appointment, he served as Executive Secretary of the National Security Council during 1989 and 1990. Ambassador Hughes is currently Senior Director of the White House Writers Group in Washington, DC. Dr. Cailtin Schindler is a Research Professor at The Institute of World Politics and Adjunct Professor at Patrick Henry College. In addition to teaching, Dr. Schindler works for a U.S. Defense contractor providing subject matter expertise research and analysis to various government customers’ operations and programs. Dr. Schindler obtained a Master of Arts in Strategic Intelligence from the Institute of World Politics in 2010 and completed her Ph.D. on the historical origins of U.S. public diplomacy at the University of Leeds. Dr. Schindler authored The Origins of Public Diplomacy in US Statecraft: Uncovering a Forgotten Tradition.
11/6/202058 minutes, 9 seconds
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An Assessment of the Free and Open Indo-Pacific Strategy

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: After 20 years of White House National Security Strategies premised on the hope that great power competition might be mitigated by cooperation with China on counter-terrorism, financial governance or climate change, the Trump administration announced unapologetically in its 2017 National Security Strategy that the United States is in strategic competition with China. The same year the State Department introduced the Free and Open Indo-Pacific strategy and brought back the US-Japan-Australia-India “Quad” to check Chinese expansion in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. No matter who wins the Presidency in November, these key pillars of U.S. strategy should continue. But serious changes are necessary or the strategy will fail. Over the next four years, the United States must re-invest in alliances, multilateral institutions, trade negotiations, and military deterrence or the framing of strategic competition with China will become hollow. About the speaker: Michael Jonathan Green is senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He served on the staff of the National Security Council (NSC) from 2001 through 2005, first as director for Asian affairs with responsibility for Japan, Korea, Australia, and New Zealand, and then as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asia, with responsibility for East Asia and South Asia. Before joining the NSC staff, he was a senior fellow for East Asian security at the Council on Foreign Relations, director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Center and the Foreign Policy Institute and assistant professor at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University, research staff member at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and senior adviser on Asia in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He also worked in Japan on the staff of a member of the National Diet. Dr. Green is also a nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, a distinguished scholar at the Asia Pacific Institute in Tokyo, and professor by special appointment at Sophia University in Tokyo. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Strategy Group, the America Australia Leadership Dialogue, the advisory boards of Radio Free Asia and the Center for a New American Security, and the editorial boards of the Washington Quarterly and the Journal of Unification Studies in Korea. He also serves as a trustee at the Asia Foundation, senior adviser at the Asia Group, and associate of the U.S. Intelligence Community. Dr. Green has authored numerous books and articles on East Asian security, including most recently, By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783 (Columbia University Press, 2017). He received his master’s and doctoral degrees from SAIS and did additional graduate and postgraduate research at Tokyo University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from Kenyon College with highest honors. He holds a black belt in Iaido (sword) and has won international prizes on the great highland bagpipe.
11/3/20201 hour, 6 minutes, 6 seconds
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Regime Change through Women’s Liberation: The Soviets to the Bush Doctrine

This event is part of the Intermarium Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: This lecture investigates the similarities among three different revolutionary women’s liberation campaigns: the Soviet policy of hujum in Uzbekistan in the 1920s and 1930s, the Chinese Communist Party’s policies on marriage reform from 1921 until 1953, and U. S. policies and rhetoric toward Afghan and Iraqi women during the interventions in the early 2000s. It is widely recognized that women’s liberation, when subordinated to another ideological mission, almost invariably falls short of its objectives. Placing these episodes in comparison helps to demonstrate key aspects of the fateful logic of women’s liberation when pursued as a strategy for revolutionary state-building. This comparison also sheds new light on U.S. operations in the Middle East and suggests that the U.S. effort to build democracy shares with revolutionary communism the normative assumption that the disruption of traditional gender norms is one of the first and most important steps toward building a new regime. About the speaker: Dr. Emily Finley holds a PhD in Political Theory from The Catholic University of America and is currently a postdoctoral scholar in Political Science at Stanford University. Her research interests include political ideology, international relations, epistemology, religion and politics, and intellectual history.
10/27/202034 minutes, 46 seconds
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Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD): Power Needs vs. Water Security

This event is part of The African Strategic Forum sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The tension over GERD has created an impasse for the African Union on how to resolve the conflict between these three countries. Our panelists will analyze the politics in Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia around the timeline for filling the dam. The panelists will also provide insights into the prospects of a peaceful resolution and the economic benefits of this grand project may bring throughout the African continent. What role do the African Union (AU), UN, and other international mediators like the U.S. play in this case? About the panelist: Dr. Hani Sewilam is a Professor of Hydrology and Water Resources Management at the RWTH Aachen University in Germany. He is currently the Managing Director of the UNESCO Chair in Hydrological Changes and Water Resources Management at the RWTH Aachen. He is also a professor at the American University in Cairo. Hydrology, water management, desalination and sustainable development are his main areas of specializations. In Germany, his research team focuses on flood risk management and the development of innovative capacity building programme for water professionals. Dealing with water scarcity through desalination, aquaponics, hydroponics, and effective water management is the focus of his other team in Egypt. Another focus of his research is implementing the concept of Water-Energy-Food nexus at local, national and regional levels. Over the last 5 years, Sewilam co-founded an MSc program in “Sustainable Management – Water and Energy” at the RWTH Aachen in Germany and founded another M.Sc. program in “Sustainable Development” at the American University in Cairo. He has contributed significantly to the establishment of the UNESCO Chair in Hydrological Changes and Water Resources Management at the RWTH Aachen. Sewilam is the founder of the first Center for Sustainable Development in Egypt. Sewilam has been raising funds and implementing research and development projects since 2002 with universities and institutions from at least 15 Euro-Mediterranean countries. Sewilam was awarded his PhD with honor from the RWTH Aachen University in the area of water resources management and his MSc from Southampton University in the UK in the area of irrigation management. Dr. Semu Moges has a B.sc in Hydraulic Engineering, M.sc, and Ph.D. in Water Resources Engineering and over 20 years of extensive experience in teaching, research, and consultancy in the area of hydrological modeling, water resources planning and management, climate change. Dr. Moges has taught in many Universities in Ethiopia and abroad. He has coordinated and been involved in many regional and national projects and programs related to the Nile basin. He was the national coordinator for the Applied Training Project of the Nile Basin Initiative. He has also been involved in many regional Nile research. He published in broad areas of river basin hydrology and water resources management. He was among the first researchers published on modeling and evaluation of the impact of GERD along with his Ph.D. students. Currently, Dr. Moges works as a consultant Professional Engineer (P.E.) in the USA. He is also affiliated in teaching and research with the University of Connecticut. He is currently pursuing research to understand the long-term interaction between the Water-Energy-Food nexus.
10/26/20201 hour, 44 minutes, 39 seconds
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Chinese Communist Espionage

This event is sponsored by the Asia Initiative Lecture Series at The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Hitherto, almost all writings about Beijing’s espionage and influence operations have focused on individual cases that shed little light on the actual nature of China’s organs of state security. Dr. Matthew Brazil will speak about how he and his co-author researched original sources in Chinese and unearthed new insights into Beijing’s most secret operations at home and abroad. About the Speaker: Matt Brazil is a non-resident Fellow at The Jamestown Foundation. He worked in Asia for over 20 years as a U.S. Army officer, American diplomat, and corporate security manager. He is the co-author of Chinese Communist Espionage: An Intelligence Primer (Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, Nov 2019). More information on the book and this topic may be viewed at https://www.mattbrazil.net/. The author’s compendium of espionage terms in Chinese and photos from the world of Chinese Communist espionage may be seen at https://www.ccpintelterms.com/.
10/16/20201 hour, 22 minutes, 50 seconds
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What will Foreign Policy Look Like in the next Administration?

About the lecture: Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, U.S. foreign policy has been built on an assumption of hegemony and a sense of exceptionalism that allows–perhaps demands–that the U.S. can control many , if not most, of the events in the post-Cold War world. This has been the view of both major political parties, albeit from quite different perspectives. What they have either not realized or accepted is that the world is changing so rapidly and thoroughly that this American assumption is no longer valid and assuming it is so is counterproductive and even dangerous. How will the next administration approach foreign policy? Will it be able to come to grips with the new realities of the 21st century? About the speaker: Dr. Steven E. Meyer received his undergraduate degrees at the University of Wisconsin in political science and mathematics. He received his M.S. degree in Political Science from Fordham University and a PhD in comparative politics at Georgetown University. After a long career at the Central Intelligence Agency as an analyst and manager, specializing in European and Russian affairs, Dr. Meyer taught security studies, American foreign policy, Russian and European politics and environmental security. He has published many articles and contributed to several books. Currently, he is writing a book on Opportunities Lost After the Cold War. He lectures extensively in the U.S. and Europe.
10/9/20201 hour, 2 minutes, 20 seconds
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Lessons for Strengthening America at Home and in the World

About the book: The Decline of Nations takes an in-depth look at the condition of the contemporary United States and shows why Americans should be deeply concerned. It tackles controversial subjects such as immigration, political correctness, morality, religion and the rise of a new elite class. Author Joseph Johnston provides many historical examples of empires declining, including the Roman and British empires, detailing their trajectory from dominance to failure, and, in the case of Britain, subsequent re-emergence as modern day nation. Johnston delivers riveting lessons on the U.S. government viewed through the lens of excessive centralization and deterioration of the rule of law. He demonstrates the results of weak policies including the surging Progressive movement and the expanding Welfare state. In The Decline of Nations, Johnston asks important questions about diminished military capacity, a broken educational system, and the decline of American arts and culture. He questions the sustainability of the nation’s vast global commitments and shows how those commitments are threatening America’s strength and prosperity. There is no historical guarantee that the United States can sustain its economic and political dominance in the world scene. By knowing the historic patterns of the great nations and empires, there is much to be learned about America’s own destiny. About the speaker: Joseph F. Johnston, Jr., is a graduate of Princeton University and received a master’s degree in history and a law degree from Harvard University. He practiced law in New York City and Washington, D.C., was a visiting lecturer at the University of Virginia law school and is a member of the American Law Institute. He is the author of The Limits of Government, published by Regnery Gateway. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.
10/7/20201 hour, 39 seconds
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How the Civil War Completed the Constitution: A 2020 Perpetuation Address

This event is a part of IWP’s Annual Constitution Day Lecture series. About the lecture: As we celebrate the Constitution, let us reflect that it took the Civil War to make the Constitution conform to our ultimate founding document, the Declaration of Independence. Beginning with the abolition of slavery, the 13th Amendment required other radical changes as well. The triumph and the tragedy of the 13th Amendment become more vivid, as we Americans today assume the duty of perpetuating the Founders’ and Abraham Lincoln’s achievements and intentions. About the Speaker: Dr. Ken Masugi is a Senior Fellow of the Claremont Institute and a Senior Contributor to the online journal of American Greatness. He is also a lecturer in Government at the Johns Hopkins University Center for American Government in Washington, DC.
10/5/20201 hour, 5 minutes, 5 seconds
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Transforming US Intelligence for Irregular War: Task Force 714 in Iraq

This event is sponsored by The Institute of World Politics’ IAFIE Student Chapter. About the book: When Joint Special Operations Command deployed Task Force 714 to Iraq in 2003, it faced an adversary unlike any it had previously encountered: al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI). AQI’s organization into multiple, independent networks and its application of Information Age technologies allowed it to wage war across a vast landscape. To meet this unique threat, TF 714 developed the intelligence capacity to operate inside those networks, and in the words of commander Gen. Stanley McChrystal, USA (Ret.) “claw the guts out of AQI.” In Transforming US Intelligence for Irregular War, Richard H. Shultz Jr. provides a broad discussion of the role of intelligence in combatting nonstate militants and revisits this moment of innovation during the Iraq War, showing how the defense and intelligence communities can adapt to new and evolving foes. Shultz tells the story of how TF 714 partnered with US intelligence agencies to dismantle AQI’s secret networks by eliminating many of its key leaders. He also reveals how TF 714 altered its methods and practices of intelligence collection, intelligence analysis, and covert paramilitary operations to suppress AQI’s growing insurgency and, ultimately, destroy its networked infrastructure.TF 714 remains an exemplar of successful organizational learning and adaptation in the midst of modern warfare. By examining its innovations, Shultz makes a compelling case for intelligence leading the way in future campaigns against nonstate armed groups. About the speaker: Richard H. Shultz, Jr. is the Lee E. Dirks Professor of International Politics at the Fletcher School, Tufts University. He teaches graduate-level courses on various aspects of international security affairs to include: the role of force in international politics; internal conflict and irregular war; special operations strategies for responding to irregular warfare challenges; origins, conduct, and termination of war; intelligence and national security; and crisis management. At the Fletcher School he also is Director of the International Security Studies Program. The ISSP prepares U.S. and international graduate students for public and private sector careers in national and international security policy. Director responsibilities include management of courses and curriculum; conferences and workshops; senior-level speaker series; the military fellows program; crisis simulation exercises; fundraising. Currently, he is Senior Fellow at the U.S. Special Operations Command’s Joint Special Operations University. Previously, in Washington, he served as director of research for the National Strategy Information Center from 2004-2012. In 2010 he completed with Roy Godson a major study focused on Adapting America’s Security Paradigm and Security Agenda to meet the challenges posed by 21st Century armed groups and the states that support them. He also completed a study on Armed Groups and Irregular Warfare: Adapting Professional Military Education, a curricular guide for military educational institutions, among other publications and reports. He has served as a security consultant to various U.S. government departments and agencies concerned with national security affairs. For the last ten years that has included as a senior fellow to the Special Operations Command’s Joint Special Operations University. As a senior fellow, he deploys abroad as a member of military education teams to teach courses on terrorism/counterterrorism, special operations integration, and asymmetric challenges to NATO to foreign military officers. This has included programs taught in Saudi Arabia, Jordan, the UAE, Tunisia, Morocco, Mali, Kenya, Cameroon, each of the Baltic nations, and the NATO School in Germany.
10/1/202058 minutes, 37 seconds
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Becoming Kim Jong Un

This event is sponsored by The Global Impact Discussion: US-East Asia Lecture Series. About the book: When Kim Jong Un became the leader of North Korea following his father’s death in 2011, predictions about his imminent fall were rife. North Korea was isolated, poor, unable to feed its people, and clinging to its nuclear program for legitimacy. Surely this twentysomething with a bizarre haircut and no leadership experience would soon be usurped by his elders. Instead, the opposite happened. Now in his midthirties, Kim Jong Un has solidified his grip on his country and brought the United States and the region to the brink of war. Still, we know so little about him—or how he rules. Enter former CIA analyst Jung Pak, whose brilliant Brookings Institution essay “The Education of Kim Jong Un” cemented her status as the go-to authority on the calculating young leader. From the beginning of Kim’s reign, Pak has been at the forefront of shaping U.S. policy on North Korea and providing strategic assessments for leadership at the highest levels in the government. Now, in this masterly book, she traces and explains Kim’s ascent on the world stage, from his brutal power-consolidating purges to his abrupt pivot toward diplomatic engagement that led to his historic—and still poorly understood—summits with President Trump. She also sheds light on how a top intelligence analyst assesses thorny national security problems: avoiding biases, questioning assumptions, and identifying risks as well as opportunities. In piecing together Kim’s wholly unique life, Pak argues that his personality, perceptions, and preferences are underestimated by Washington policy wonks, who assume he sees the world as they do. As the North Korean nuclear threat grows, Becoming Kim Jong Un gives readers the first authoritative, behind-the-scenes look at Kim’s character and motivations, creating an insightful biography of the enigmatic man who could rule the hermit kingdom for decades—and has already left an indelible imprint on world history. About the speaker: Dr. Jung H. Pak is a senior fellow and the SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies at the Brookings Institution. Prior to Brookings, she held senior positions at the Central Intelligence Agency and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, where she led the U.S. Intelligence Community’s strategic analysis of North Korea as the Deputy National Intelligence Officer. Dr. Pak is the author of Becoming Kim Jong Un (April 2020), which traces and explains Kim’s ascent to the world stage and draws from her deep knowledge and experience as an intelligence officer. Dr. Pak is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Colgate University, where she served as a trustee from 2009-2015. She received her PhD in United States history from Columbia University and studied in South Korea as a Fulbright scholar.
10/1/202054 minutes, 44 seconds
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Human Rights Atrocities in North Korea

About the lecture: The lecture focuses on the human atrocities prevalent in North Korea. It begins with a review of how the world has dealt with post-WWII human rights violations through institutional mechanisms such as International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (together known as the International Bill of Human Rights). It will then shift to discuss how the Kim regimes have successfully flew under the radar despite perpetrating some of the worst cases of human rights violations. The 2014 UN Commission of Inquiry (COI) Report identified the situation as amounting to ‘crimes against humanity’. The COI report concluded that the violations unparalleled in breadth, atrocity, and seriousness provided a lawful foundation to prosecute violators, including the Kim leadership. To date, unfortunately, the recommendations have not yet been followed up. The lecture will examine the breadth of the problems at hand and why the peninsular and regional political dynamics have prevented progress. About the speaker: Jung-Hoon Lee is Dean and Professor of International Relations at the Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University. He is formerly ROK government’s Ambassador for Human Rights as well as its inaugural Ambassador-at-Large for North Korean Human Rights.
9/29/20201 hour, 7 minutes, 14 seconds
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2020 Student Symposium: Deal of the Decade: How the United States Should Handle Afghanistan

Full Title: Deal of the Decade: How the United States Should Handle Afghanistan in the Era of the Taliban Peace Talks About the Lecture: This presentation will start on a brief history of the Taliban, focusing on a post 9/11 world. It will highlight the current Afghanistan environment and the actors involved in the peace talks: the US, the Taliban, and the Afghani Government. The presentation will also cover future possibilities of US-Afghan relations, the different scenarios that may pan out depending on how the Afghani Government and Taliban peace talks go, and the potential ways the US could counter the Taliban now that US troops are leaving Afghanistan, and in so doing strengthening Afghanistan infrastructure. About the Speaker: Caroline Hickey is from Massachusetts and graduated in 2018 from Knox College in Illinois, where she self-designed her major in Middle Eastern & North African Studies. Caroline is continuing her education at IWP where she is pursuing a Master’s degree in Statecraft and International Affairs and continuing her interest in the Middle East by focusing on Iraq and Afghanistan as well as learning Arabic.
9/17/202022 minutes, 4 seconds
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2020 Student Symposium: New Age Public Diplomacy

About the Lecture: This seminar aims to expound on the impact of globalization on US public diplomacy, emphasizing Sports, Entertainment, and Culture. These three mediums, combined with the popularity of social media, continue to spread all American ideals across the globe, opening needed conversations and policies on how best the US can maximize its perception and influence as it continues to safeguard its national interests. About the Speaker: Ms. Gor is a student at The Institute of World Politics, pursuing her M.A in Statecraft and International Affairs; formerly part of the directing team that led the inaugural Global Wellness Day- Kenya 2019 celebrations.
9/17/202025 minutes, 24 seconds
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2020 Student Symposium: The Implications of China’s Belt & Road Initiative for US National Security

About the Lecture: The strategic initiative of China’s leadership to harness an unprecedented influx of wealth from the West to re-establish historical land and sea trade routes is a bold and ambitious effort to cement China’s burgeoning position as the center of global trade in its increasingly unveiled quest for global hegemony which, if successful, will invariably lead it on a collision course with US National Security priorities. About the Speaker: Jared K. Martin is an IWP graduate with an M.A. in Statecraft and National Security Affairs with a research background in the impact of China’s rapidly expanding role in global affairs on US national security priorities.
9/17/202035 minutes, 48 seconds
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Electoral Reform in Angola and Mozambique

About the lecture: There are opportunities and challenges in Angola and Mozambique to reform the electoral processes. What role can the local stakeholders and USG play to pave the way for a more transparent electoral process? About the coordinator and moderator: Prof. Hashem Mekki, MA, has taught Arabic Language, Culture & Middle East Media at IWP since 2012. He is the owner of Bridge Language Solutions, providing an array of language translation, interpretation and teaching services to the Washington DC metropolitan area, and the founder of Kele Global, a nonprofit organization that promotes education, health, and economic empowerment in the Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan. He also teaches Arabic language to federal employees & professionals at the National Nuclear Security Administration at the Department of Energy. Mr. Mekki volunteers with the IWP Center for Human Rights and International Affairs by providing Arabic translations & strategic cultural perspectives on North Africa and Middle East. He holds Bachelors degrees in both Political Science and International Studies from the City College of New York, and a Master of Arts in Strategic Studies and International Politics from IWP. About the panelist: Martina Perino is the Program Manager for the Great Lakes and Southern Africa at the International Republican Institute. Originally from Mozambique and Italy, she has 10 years of democracy and governance experience in Mozambique, DR Congo, Zambia, and Kosovo. In Zambia, she was the Governance and Social sectors Program Manager at the European Union Delegation. There Ms. Perino designed and managed the electoral support project, an Access to Justice project and worked closely with local CSOs and other donors for human rights issues and local governance. In 2017 she joined USAID/Kosovo as the Democracy and Governance Strategic Planning Specialist where, among other tasks, she designed several projects including a local governance and conflict mitigation project, PVE project, media strengthening project, political party and legislative strengthening. Ms. Perino has been an election observer in Mozambique, DR Congo, Zambia, Kosovo, and Albania. Ms. Perino holds a degree in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics and a Master’s in International Development. Florindo Chivucute is the founder and Executive Director of Friends of Angola (FoA), and Radio Angola (an online radio station), activist, blogger and digital media specialist. Florindo earned his Master’s degree in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University and has over 5 years of experience working in non-profit organizations, international development, international relations, peacebuilding, and education while being active in the Community of Portuguese-Speaking Countries (CPLP) in the United States. Since founding Friends of Angola in April 2014, he has led the design and implementation of four projects in Angola: Radio Angola (an online radio station hosted by Florindo); Strengthening Nonviolent Civic Engagement Among the Youth; Strengthening Democracy in Angola Through Community Journalism; Zuela Application – a pro-democracy and social networking smartphone app focused on fostering good governance, eradicating corruption, monitoring elections and human right violations and more. All projects were envisioned as part of a larger theory of change (ToC) to strengthen the capacity of civil society, empower women and youth while promoting nonviolent civic engagement by using new and existing technologies in Angola and the South-Western African Region. These projects were funded by The National Endowment for Democracy (NED).
9/15/20201 hour, 37 minutes, 1 second
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The U.S. and World Order

About the interview: Dr. John Tierney, IWP professor, spoke with IWP about world order. He discussed the the history of polarity, U.S. interest in world order, and what the future could hold in this regard. About the speaker: Dr. John Tierney is a Professor Emeritus at The Institute of World Politics and teaches History of American Foreign Policy, History of International Relations, Peace, Strategy and Conflict Resolution, and U.S. Foreign Policy: Current and Future Challenges. Dr. Tierney is a Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1981-1993); He formerly participated in various national security negotiations for the U.S. Government. He was Executive Director of the Congressional Caucus on National Defense and the National Security Research Group, U.S. House of Representatives. He is former Chairman of the Politics Department at Catholic University and former Professor of International Relations at University of Virginia and The Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of Chasing Ghosts and The Politics of Peace.
9/11/202036 minutes, 43 seconds
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Soviet Defectors: Revelations of Renegade Intelligence Officers, 1924-1954

About the book: The book compiles for the first time corroborative primary sources in English, Russian, French, German, Finnish, Italian, Japanese, Latvian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, and Swedish. The result is the most comprehensive list of Soviet intelligence officer defectors to date. Through the eyes of those officers, it shows the fluctuations in the Soviet recruitment and vetting of personnel for sensitive national security positions, corresponding with fluctuations in the stability of the Soviet government. It also shows the evolution of Soviet threat perceptions and the development of the “main enemy” concept in the Soviet national security system. About the Speaker: Dr. Kevin P. Riehle is an associate professor at the National Intelligence University. He has spent over 28 years in the U.S. government as a counterintelligence analyst studying foreign intelligence services. He received a Ph.D. in War Studies from King’s College London, an MS in Strategic Intelligence from the Joint Military Intelligence College, and a BA in Russian and Political Science from Brigham Young University. He has written on a variety of intelligence and counterintelligence topics, focusing on the history of Soviet and Eastern Bloc intelligence services.
9/11/202053 minutes, 29 seconds
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ACTING – in the interest of National Security

This event is part of the Student Speaker Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The classical definition of acting is ‘living truthfully under imaginary circumstances.’ Contrary to the common perception that acting is ‘pretending,’ the working process of actors (as well as of directors and writers) is an exploratory journey to revealing the truth of every moment, the sum of which must build a narrative that connects to and transforms the audience. This webinar lecture will highlight several functional aspects of an actor’s craft that are also pertinent to the national security practitioner and policymaker: training to truly listen, attaching action to words, using the ‘what if’ to create and to foresee possible scenarios, choreographing the sequence of actions and meanings to achieve a scenario objective with maximum impact, and more. It is the hope of the presenter that some of these elements of an actor’s craft can add value to the existing toolbox of the national security professionals who aim to ‘live and operate truthfully under real circumstances’ in which they deal with real domestic and international ‘actors.’ More importantly, the lecture will discuss the critical element achieved through the study of acting without which all pursuits are bound to be less than fully effective: knowing oneself. About the speaker: Sebastian is currently Creative & Executive Director of Dacian Wolf Productions, a stage and film development, and production company, where he actively writes, directs, and produces. A former Lecturing Professor of Acting and Movement at Pace University, NYC, he holds a BFA in Dance & Theater, an MBA in Accounting, a Certificate of Completion of the Two-Year Professional Acting Program at the William Esper Studio, NYC, and a candidate for the MA in Statecraft and National Security Affairs at IWP. Since arriving in the United States from his native Bucharest, Romania in 1982, Sebastian has toured with the internationally acclaimed Pilobolus Dance Theatre and has taught movement, acting, and choreography workshops in Romania, Russia, Korea, Japan, Italy, Chile, Argentina, as well as at many US universities. His current interests revolve around projects dealing with disinformation and narrative warfare. For more information, please visit www.sebastiantudores.com
8/20/20201 hour, 54 seconds
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Countering Islamist Political Extremism by Orchestrating the Instruments of National Power

This event is part of the Winning without War series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Despite suffering repeated setbacks in recent years, Islamic extremism or more specifically, totalitarian Islamism, and the terrorism it spawns, remains a major threat to the United States and its allies. While there will always be a need for the selective use of military power to counter this threat, effectively addressing it requires non-military tools of statecraft. This webinar will discuss how the United States and its international partners can better use these tools to win the fight against terrorism without over-reliance on combat operations About the speakers: Dr. Christopher C. Harmon has been publishing terrorism studies for over 35 years. His works include two editions of the graduate-level text Terrorism Today (2000; 2007) essays on counterterrorism in the geopolitics journal Orbis, and a volume on terrorist propaganda for The Brookings Institution (2018). Dr. Harmon has lectured in some 15 countries and has taught at The Institute of World Politics and other graduate schools, civilian and military. He holds a Bren Chair at Marine Corps University and the Marine Corps University Foundation. Dr. Douglas E. Streusand is a Professor of International Relations at the US Marine Corps Command and Staff College and Adjunct Professor at The Institute of World Politics. Educated as an Islamic historian, he has pursued a broad range of teaching and research interests, historical and contemporary He has written two books, The Formation of the Mughal Empire and Islamic Gunpowder Empires: Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals and edited a third, The Grand Strategy that Won the Cold War: Architecture of Triumph and numerous articles and book chapters.
8/19/202059 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Power of Humor and Ridicule as a Tool of Influence and Opposition

About the lecture: Charlie Chaplin, Daffy Duck, Dr. Seuss, Team America, and Winnie-the-Pooh have entertained audiences using humor. What is perhaps less known about these entertainers is how their humor and images have been used to denigrate and ridicule dictators and authoritarian regimes. When thinking about propaganda and mass influence, humor and ridicule do not often come to mind. However, humor and ridicule are powerful tools of influence and can be used to encourage opposition to authoritarian rule. This talk will explore what makes humor and ridicule such effective tools of influence and why authoritarian regimes fear ridicule so much. About the speaker: Dr. Schindler is a Research Professor at The Institute of World Politics and Adjunct Professor at Patrick Henry College. In addition to teaching, Dr. Schindler works for a U.S. Defense contractor providing subject matter expertise research and analysis to various government customers’ operations and programs. Dr. Schindler obtained a Master of Arts in Strategic Intelligence from the Institute of World Politics in 2010 and completed her Ph.D. on the historical origins of U.S. public diplomacy at the University of Leeds. Dr. Schindler authored The Origins of Public Diplomacy in US Statecraft: Uncovering a Forgotten Tradition, published by Palgrave Macmillan. Dr. Schindler’s current research is focused on the origins and evolution of Russian political warfare.
8/6/202051 minutes, 28 seconds
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German and Austrian Occupation of the Intermarium, 1915-1919

About the lecture: In 1915 Germany's successful offensive in the east resulted in the occupation of the Western chunk of the Russian Empire, a swath of land between the Baltic and Black Seas. We refer to it as the Intermarium, and it is essentially coterminous with the old Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The Germans shared their conquest with their junior partners, the Austrians. Both made sure not to include the captured lands into their own partitions of Poland. Instead, they kept them apart as the so-called Polish Kingdom and, further east, the Ober Ost. In the former, the Germans favored the Poles; in the latter, they advantaged the Lithuanians, Belarusians, and Jews. In neither place did the occupiers agree to serious political concessions; they permitted local autonomy at best. It was a classical divide et impera situation. The main objective of Berlin (which by 1918 totally dominated its Viennese partner) was to gain a permanent geopolitical advantage and to exploit the area's economy and labor. The Second Reich pursued a similar policy toward Ukraine when it expanded there in the wake of Brest Litovsk in February 1918. Ultimately, however, Germany's plans collapsed as a result of its defeat on the Western Front. About the speaker: About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
8/5/20201 hour, 41 minutes, 2 seconds
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How the Nuclear Arms Control Lobby Killed Arms Control!

About the lecture: Since 1972, the nuclear disarmament community —led by major self-described arms control organizations— hasn’t supported any serious nuclear arms control ideas. They’ve supported dangerous ideas such as the nuclear freeze, opposed American strategic nuclear and missile defense modernization efforts, and denounced the most revolutionary and beneficial agreements such as INF, Start 1, and 2. Nearly 50 years after the SALT 1 nuclear agreement, it has become increasingly difficult to secure genuine and verifiable nuclear agreements such as Start 1 and INF. The United States has entered into nuclear deals with Iran, North Korea, and Russia that do little to improve America’s security. In many respects, the global zero campaign has significantly distorted the debate on nuclear security issues. America’s enemies are increasingly expanding their nuclear arsenals and adopting strategies of using nuclear weapons for coercive and hegemonic objectives. A growing narrative among the media, academia, and some politicians is that nuclear arms control is on the ropes. That’s true, but the reason is not the Trump administration, it is the fault of the US disarmament community and global zero advocates that have effectively killed arms control and repeatedly pushed the USA into bad nuclear deals. About the speaker: Mr. Peter Huessy is President of his own defense consulting firm, GeoStrategic Analysis, founded in 1981, and since 2016, Director of Strategic Deterrent Studies at the Mitchell Institute on Aerospace Studies. He was the senior defense consultant at the National Defense University Foundation for 22 years. He was the National Security Fellow at the AFPC, and Senior Defense Consultant at the Air Force Association from 2011 Mr. Huessy has served as an expert defense and national security analyst for over 45 years, helping his clients cover congressional activities while monitoring budget and policy developments on terrorism, counter-terrorism, immigration, state-sponsored terrorism, missile defense, weapons of mass destruction, especially US-Israeli joint defense efforts, nuclear deterrence, arms control, proliferation, as well as tactical and strategic air, airlift, space and nuclear matters and such state and non-state actors as North Korea, China, Iran, Syria, Venezuela and Hezbollah, Hamas and Al Qaeda. This also includes monitoring activities of think tanks, non-governmental organizations, and other US government departments, as well as projecting future actions of Congress in this area. His specialty is developing and implementing public policy campaigns to secure support for important national security objectives. He is on the Board of the InSeries Theater in Washington; EMPACT, the organization devoted to protecting the US from EMP threats; and MTA, the Maryland Taxpayers Association. He authored legislation calling for the divestment of US pensions from any company doing business with Iran and testified before a number of state legislatures on this subject and on counter-terror policy, including whether or not drivers licenses should be made available to those illegally in the US. He is also a member of Secure American Energy, an organization devoted to breaking the back of OPEC and providing the US with American sources of energy. He has lectured around the world and across the USA on nuclear terrorism, nuclear deterrence, missile defense, homeland security, counter-terrorism policy, and strategic threats to the US and its allies.
7/30/202052 minutes, 16 seconds
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Perspectives for Peace: The Escalation on the Armenian-Azerbaijani Border

This event is part of the Intermarium Lecture Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Ambassador Nersesyan will present the developments following the Azerbaijani attacks on the Tavush Region of Armenia on July 12th, and the political and military response of Armenia. The Ambassador will also reflect on the role of Turkey in the recent escalation and its ramifications on the Karabakh Peace Process, and overall regional developments. The reaction of the OSCE Minsk Group Co-Chairs and in particular, the USA will be discussed as well. About the Speaker: His Excellency Varuzhan Nersesyan is a career diplomat. He was appointed to the post of Ambassador of Armenia to the USA in 2018. Prior to that, his most recent professional experience included serving as Assistant to the Prime Minister of Armenia, and from 2012 to 2018 – Assistant to the President of the Republic of Armenia. His Excellency holds two Master’s Degrees in International Affairs from Yerevan State University, and The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. In addition to his native Armenian, Ambassador Nersesyan is fluent in English, German, and Russian. Please note that that the information for this lecture, including the description, reflects the views of the speaker and not necessarily the views of The Institute of World Politics. In addition, the views expressed by our faculty, research fellows, students, alumni, and guest lecturers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Institute of World Politics.
7/29/202053 minutes, 57 seconds
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Exiled Children - Damned or Delivered?​

This lecture is part of the 10th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: Reinstatement of political relations between the Polish government-in-exile and the Soviet government in July 1941 resulted in so-called amnesty for the Polish citizens deported to USSR between 1940 and 1941. The lecture will discuss the circumstances accompanying the evacuation of Polish children-deportees from the USSR as a part of the so-called General Anders' Army. About the speaker: Mrs. Maria Juczewska is a communication specialist with versatile international experience. Her education in linguistics, culture studies, and international affairs, combined with years of living abroad, makes her point of view unique and comprehensive. Mrs. Juczewska has worked for the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies since 2014. In her scholarly work, she is especially interested in propaganda.​
7/29/20201 hour, 34 minutes, 2 seconds
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Bolshevism, non-Bolshevism, and anti-Bolshevism in White Ruthenia, 1917-1920

This lecture is a part of our 10th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel. This event is sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: Dr. Chodakiewicz is going to discuss the nature of the political movements and ideological developments in White Ruthenia in the aftermath of World War I. About the speaker: Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz holds The Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at The Institute of World Politics and leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, he also serves as a Professor of History and teaches courses on Geography and Strategy, Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Russian Politics and Foreign Policy, and Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States. He is the author of Intermarium: The Land Between the Black and Baltic Seas and numerous other books and articles. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and has previously taught at the University of Virginia and Loyola Marymount University.
7/22/20201 hour, 23 minutes, 28 seconds
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Early Modern Polish Commanders and the Use of Combined Arms​

This event is part of the 10th Annual Kościuszko Chair Spring Symposium in honor of Lady Blanka Rosenstiel sponsored by the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies. About the lecture: The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth’s small armies, based around a seemingly outmoded form of heavy cavalry, Winged Hussars, were able to hold their own against numerically superior foes, including those using tactics and weapons designed specifically to defeat such cavalry for more than two hundred years. This lecture discusses how armies of the Commonwealth and their commanders successfully used a combination of troops and tactics to “shape the battlefield” and overcome superior enemy forces time and again.​ About the speaker: Dr. John Radzilowski has taught history, art history, and geography at University of Alaska Southeast on the Ketchikan campus since 2007. Prior to moving to Alaska, he taught history courses at the University of St. Thomas, Hamline University, and Anoka-Ramsey College in Minnesota. Dr. Radzilowski also served as assistant project director at Center for Nations in Transition, at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota where he helped design and administer USAID and State Department-sponsored training programs for business, economics, and political science faculty and NGO leaders in Ukraine and east central Europe. Dr. Radzilowski’s research and teaching interests are wide-ranging and diverse: immigration and ethnicity, military history, war and genocide, the impact of technology on the history and geography of the Great Plains and Midwest, local and regional studies, and the history of Poland, Russia, Ukraine, and central and eastern Europe.
7/20/202050 minutes, 14 seconds
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Toward the Catastrophe of Armistice

About the lecture: Buoyed by the victory in the east sealed by the Treaty of Brest Litovsk in March 1918, Germany and her allies scrambled to transfer their forces to deliver a decisive blow on the Western front. Unfortunately for them the United States came to the rescue. America's intervention reversed the fortunes of war. By August 1918, the Second Reich suffered its first serious reversal. In September, Germany was retreating in the west and collapsing at home, where mutiny and revolution pushed Berlin to its knees. The Germans thus sought an armistice. Against the advice of the American military leaders, who called for an unconditional surrender, the rest of the Allied, in particular liberal prime minister David Lloyd George, agreed. This was a lethal mistake. By failing to defeat Germany decisively, the Armistice paved the way to the Second World War. About the speaker: Dr. Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy.He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
7/7/202021 minutes, 18 seconds
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COVID-19 and Global Energy Security

About the lecture: In this lecture, Dr. Sara Vakhshouri will discuss the fundamentals and changes in the energy market, and Mr. C. Derek Campbell will talk about physical security of energy infrastructure and cyber security. This lecture will cover themes from Dr. Vakhshouri’s IWP course on “Energy Security and the New Geopolitics of Energy.” The course focuses on the transformation of energy use over the past century and on expanding our understanding of today’s concepts of energy and how they fit within the rubric of national security. About the Speakers: C. Derek Campbell is the Chief Executive Officer of Energy & Natural Resource Security, Inc., an international security company providing “best-inclass” physical and cyber risk mitigation solutions for Critical Energy Infrastructure and Natural Resource assets. In this role, he leads the strategic engagements of the company and directs the development of all market entry strategies. In the public sector, during 2016, Derek served as a Special Security Advisor for the U.S. Special Envoy’s Office on South Sudan, where he lead the South Sudanese Ministry of Interior in the development and implementation of the Joint Operations Center(JOC) which is charged with de-militarizing and establishing police primacy for security in the capital city of Juba, South Sudan. As a United States Marine Officer, Derek served as the Marine Liaison Officer to the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) where he oversaw all Marine Corps Counter-Threat initiatives: CounterDrone/Counter-UAS, Counter-IED, Counter-Tunnel and the like from 2016 to 2019. From 2014 to 2015, Derek served as the Chief of Military Plans for the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) – a Chapter VII Peace Enforcement Mission. Derek is a regular on the international Oil & Gas/Energy speaking circuit speaking as an authority on topics such as Energy Security and the Extractive Industry geo-political and market dynamics in Africa. Dr. Sara Vakhshouri is founder and president of SVB Energy International, a strategic energy consulting firm with offices in Washington DC and Dubai. Dr. Vakhshouri has about two decades of experience of working in the energy industry with an extensive experience in global energy market studies, energy strategy, energy security and geopolitical risk. She has consulted numerous governments, public and private entities, and international organizations like IMF & World Bank. She is also member of the Energy Task Force of the Cyprus Climate Initiative which was launched and initiated by the President of the Republic of Cyprus. She is also Professor of Energy Security at the Institute of World Politics. Dr. Vakhshouri has been a keynote speaker at prestigious energy conferences including the World Energy Congress, Chatham House Middle East & Energy Conference, Platts Oil and Middle East conferences and the Global LNG Congress. She has also been a keynote speaker at Duke University, Sciences Po university in Paris and Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Vakhshouri is frequently quoted and has appeared on Bloomberg, the BBC, The Financial Times, Reuters, Platts, The Wall Street Journal, Energy Intelligence, Foreign Policy, The Washington Post and Voice of America. She is the author of The Marketing and Sale of Iranian Export Crude Oil since the Islamic Revolution. Dr. Vakhshouri has a PhD in Energy Security and Middle Eastern Studies. She has an MA in Business Management (International Marketing) and another MA in International Relations. She has been a Senior Energy Fellow at the Atlantic Council and at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies. Dr. Vakhshouri has also experience of working in both public and private sectors of the Iranian energy industry.
7/1/20201 hour, 3 minutes, 23 seconds
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Assessing the Geopolitical and Geoeconomic Impact of the Covid-19 Crisis

About the lecture: With the pandemic receding in much of the world, government and business leaders are starting to think about the geopolitical and geoeconomic impact of the crisis. In this webinar, Dr. Glancy will discuss his assessment of how the international environment and great power relations will likely change over the next 2 to 5 years in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. Participants in the session will also take away a framework for putting unfolding events into a better context going forward. About the Speaker: Dr. David Glancy, currently a Professor of Strategy and Statecraft at IWP, formerly served as an Associate with Booz Allen Hamilton, where he worked on education technology issues with National Intelligence University. Prior to joining NIU, Dr. Glancy served as an Assistant Professor (contractor) with the College of International Security Affairs (CISA) at National Defense University. Before being assigned to CISA, Dr. Glancy provided advice on strategic communications issues to a variety of government clients for Booz Allen Hamilton. Dr. David Glancy has also held positions at both the State Department and Defense Department. At the State Department, he served as a Senior Advisor for Political-Military Affairs and was responsible for handling a number of high-profile issues (coalition political-military efforts in Iraq, issues related to our global military posture, piracy off the coast of Somalia). At the Defense Department, Dr. Glancy was a policy analyst and advisor with the Office of the Secretary of Defense. During his time at the Pentagon, Dr. Glancy served as the Director of the Global War on Terrorism Communications Group and worked as a special assistant with the Eurasia policy office.
6/19/202059 minutes, 29 seconds
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Overlaps between Cyber, Information, and Intelligence Operations

This event is part of The Cyber Intelligence Initiative Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: A discussion of the challenges presented by the increasingly complex environment created when cyber, information, and intelligence operations overlap and collide. This presentation will explore case studies where the lines between various concepts become blurred, complicating the response and implications. Specifically, we will explore recent items of interest from the increasingly contentious relationship between the US, Russia, and China. How will leaders and managers operative effectively in this environment? What are the important aspects of decision-making in these situations? Why is it even important to get a handle on these dynamics? About the speaker: Jason Atwell is a Specialist Master and Manager with Deloitte’s Government and Public Sector Cyber Risk Advisory practice and an intelligence officer in the US Army Reserve. Over the last few years, he has served as a senior advisor to the CIOs of the US House of Representatives, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the National Institutes of Health helping to navigate the increasingly complex cyber threat environment. During his career he has been a key member of military and civilian staffs conducting civil-military operations in Baghdad, solving complex geospatial problems for the DIA, and working to counter foreign intelligence and influence operations at the US Department of State. He has lectured on Russian information operations at the National Defense University, Iranian use of social media as an enabler at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and cyber threats to supply chains at the Joint Counterintelligence Training Center. His education includes a Master’s degree in English Literature from American University and a fellowship in cyber leadership from Yale. He is also a graduate of both the US Army Intelligence School and John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and completed coursework at the National Intelligence University.
6/18/202047 minutes, 46 seconds
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China’s Influence in South Korea: Belt and Road and More

This event is part of the China Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Dr. Tara O will discuss China’s influence in South Korea, including its extensive Belt and Road Initiative and nearly 30 Chinatowns throughout the country. She will also discuss the implications for South Korean national security. About the speaker: Dr. Tara O is the founder of the East Asia Research Center. She has worked at the Pentagon and the Republic of Korea-U.S. Combined Forces Command as a U.S. Air Force officer focusing on East Asia issues. Her research areas include national security, alliance, human rights in North Korea, defectors, unification, and political and economic systems.
6/16/20201 hour, 10 seconds
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A Covert Action: Reagan, the CIA, and the Cold War Struggle in Poland

About the book: The dramatic, untold story of one of the CIA’s most successful Cold War intelligence operations. December, 1981—the CIA receives word that the Polish government has cut telephone communications with the West and closed the Polish border. The agency’s leaders quickly inform President Ronald Reagan, who is enjoying a serene weekend at Camp David. Within hours, Prime Minister Wojciech Jaruzelski has appeared on Polish national television to announce the establishment of martial law. A new era in Cold War politics has begun: Washington and Moscow are on a collision course. In this gripping narrative history, Seth G. Jones reveals the little-known story of the CIA’s subsequent operations in Poland, which produced a landmark victory for democracy during the Cold War. While the Soviet-backed Polish government worked to crush a budding liberal opposition movement, the CIA began a sophisticated intelligence campaign, code-named QRHELPFUL, that supported dissident groups. The most powerful of these groups was Solidarity, a trade union that swelled to a membership of ten million and became one of the first legitimate anti-Communist opposition movements in Eastern Europe. With President Reagan’s support, the CIA provided money that helped Solidarity print newspapers, broadcast radio programs, and conduct a wide-ranging information warfare campaign against the Soviet-backed government. QRHELPFUL proved vital in establishing a free and democratic Poland. Long overlooked by CIA historians and Reagan biographers, the story of QRHELPFUL features an extraordinary cast of characters—including spymaster Bill Casey, CIA officer Richard Malzahn, Polish-speaking CIA case officer Celia Larkin, Solidarity leader Lech Walesa, and Pope John Paul II. Based on in-depth interviews and recently declassified evidence, A Covert Action celebrates a decisive victory over tyranny for U.S. intelligence behind the Iron Curtain, one that prefigured the Soviet collapse. About the speaker: Seth G. Jones holds the Harold Brown Chair, is director of the Transnational Threats Project, and is a senior adviser to the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). He teaches at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and the Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS) at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. Prior to joining CSIS, Dr. Jones was the director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at the RAND Corporation. He also served as representative for the commander, U.S. Special Operations Command, to the assistant secretary of defense for special operations. Before that, he was a plans officer and adviser to the commanding general, U.S. Special Operations Forces, in Afghanistan (Combined Forces Special Operations Component Command–Afghanistan). In 2014, Dr. Jones served on a congressionally mandated panel that reviewed the FBI’s implementation of counterterrorism recommendations contained in the 9/11 Commission Report. Dr. Jones specializes in counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, unconventional warfare, and covert action, including a focus on al Qaeda and ISIS. He is the author of A Covert Action: Reagan, the CIA, and the Cold War Struggle in Poland (W.W. Norton, 2018), Waging Insurgent Warfare (Oxford University Press, 2016), Hunting in the Shadows: The Pursuit of al Qa’ida after 9/11 (W.W. Norton, 2012), and In the Graveyard of Empires: America’s War in Afghanistan (W.W. Norton, 2009). Dr. Jones has published articles in a range of journals, such as Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and International Security, as well as newspapers and magazines like the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Dr. Jones is a graduate of Bowdoin College and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.
6/15/202055 minutes, 7 seconds
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U.S. China Relations Post-Coronavirus

This event is part of The China Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Dr. Spalding will discuss the origins of the pandemic, implications for US-China economic and other relations, and the state of play in 5G. About the speaker: Dr. Rob Spalding is a national security policy strategist, and globally recognized for his knowledge of Chinese economic competition and influence, as well as for his ability to forecast global trends and develop innovative solutions. He has served in senior positions of strategy and diplomacy within the Defense and State Departments for more than 26 years, retiring as brigadier general. He was the chief architect for the Trump Administration’s widely praised National Security Strategy (NSS), and the Senior Director for Strategy to the President at the National Security Council. Dr. Spalding has written extensively on national security matters. His book, STEALTH WAR: HOW CHINA TOOK OVER WHILE AMERICA’S ELITE SLEPT (Portfolio; 2019) is an executive summary of his almost decade-long work countering Chinese Communist Party influence. It has been translated into additional languages. His academic papers and editorial work are frequently published and cited, both nationally and internationally. His Air Power Journal article on America’s Two Air Forces is frequently used in the West Point curriculum. He has been interviewed about the economy and national security on FOX News, BBC, OAN and CNBC, as well as numerous radio and YouTube channels, both nationally and internationally. Dr. Spalding is a skilled combat leader and a seasoned diplomat. Under Dr. Spalding’s leadership, the 509th Operations Group—the nation’s only B-2 Stealth Bomber unit—experienced unprecedented technological and operational advances. Dr. Spalding’s demonstrated acumen for solving complex technological issues to achieve operational success was demonstrated when he led a low-cost rapid-integration project for a secure global communications capability in the B-2, achieving tremendous results at almost no cost to the government. As commander, he led forces in the air and on the ground in Libya and Iraq. He is a former China strategist for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff at the Pentagon, as well as having served as the senior defense official and defense attaché in Beijing. During the UUV Incident of 2016, Dr. Spalding averted a diplomatic crisis by negotiating with the Chinese PLA for the return of the UUV, without the aid of a translator. Dr. Spalding’s relationship with business leaders, fostered during his time as a Military Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, allowed him to recommend pragmatic solutions to complex foreign policy and national security issues, now driving positive economic outcomes for the nation. Dr. Spalding’s groundbreaking work on competition in Secure 5G has reset the global environment for the next phase of the information age. Dr. Spalding is an Olmsted Scholar, a Life Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C., as well as a Senior Associate Fellow at the Henry Jackson Society of London. He has lectured globally, including engagements at European Cybersec 2019, KAS-ASPI, the Naval War College, National Defense University, Air War College, Columbia University, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and other Professional Military Educational institutions. Dr. Spalding holds a doctorate in economics and mathematics from the University of Missouri, Kansas City. He was a distinguished graduate of the Defense Language Institute in Monterey and speaks both Chinese Mandarin and Spanish
6/12/202054 minutes, 31 seconds
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Brest Litovsk: Roots, Impact, and Implications, December 1917-March 1918

About the lecture: An ephemeral victory for Germany, the Treaty of Brest Litovsk was the first international conference ostensibly appealing to the ideal of national self-determination. It reduced Bolshevik-controlled Russia to the size of its medieval Muscovite predecessor; it also theoretically recognized Ukraine as an independent state, while vassalizing it in practice. The Treaty laid the ground for Germany's domination in the Intermarium. However, its promise soon dissipated as Berlin lost the war to Western Allies, the United States in particular. About the speaker: Dr. Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
6/11/202044 minutes, 49 seconds
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Pushing Back Ideological Support for Militant Islamism

About the interview: Mr. Tobias Brandt, a Brent Scowcroft Award Fellow at the Aspen Strategy Group and IWP alumnus, spoke with IWP about the importance of countering ideological support for terrorism; the narratives used by militant Islamists in their propaganda efforts; the best arguments we can make against terrorist propaganda; and why this topic is important today. About the speaker: Tobias Brandt is a Brent Scowcroft Award Fellow at the Aspen Strategy Group, a policy program of the Aspen Institute in Washington, D.C. He recently completed his Master’s Degree in Statecraft and International Affairs at the Institute of World Politics, graduating as Salutatorian of the class of 2019. Throughout his studies, Mr. Brandt specialized in U.S. foreign policy towards the Middle East, terrorism, and the transatlantic relationship. In his final semester at IWP, he wrote an Honors Thesis on “Pushing Back Terrorist Propaganda and Countering Ideological Support for Militant Islamism.” Originally from Germany, Mr. Brandt received a Bachelor’s Degree in Middle Eastern Studies from the University of Hamburg, where his studies focused on al-Qaida’s propaganda strategy. Our conversation today deals with the topic of his Honors Thesis – counter-terrorist messaging strategy.
6/8/202029 minutes, 20 seconds
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Taiwan’s Cybersecurity Environment versus China’s Cyber Strategy

This event is part of The Cyber Intelligence Initiative Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: Dr. Hwang will introduce China’s cyber strategy and discuss how China views cyberspace as a battleground. He’ll then discuss Taiwan’s cybersecurity environment against attacks. About the speaker: Dr. Ji-Jen (Joseph) Hwang is a Research Scholar at the Institute for East Asian Studies at UC Berkeley. Prior to that, he was a Professor & Program Director of the International Master Program in Strategic Studies at the National Defense University in R.O.C. Taiwan. Dr. Hwang has been a visiting fellow with the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic & International Studies. He also conducted an internship in the Library of Congress while doing his Master course. A native of Taiwan, he holds a Ph.D. in politics from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in the U.K., as well as a Masters in Library Science & Information Studies from the University of North Carolina. He has been working as a volunteer for a think tank based non-profit in the Washington D.C. area as a Deputy Managing Director since April 2018. Lately, his research is focused on the relations between the U.S., China, and Taiwan, in which he particularly focuses on social media and how its features in cyberspace have political impacts on the relations between the countries. He is an expert in the area and been invited as a special lecturer by CSIS, ASPI, NATO, GlobalSec, and INSS.
6/4/202057 minutes, 50 seconds
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Reagan’s Cold War: Indications & Warning Intelligence

The Ninth Annual Ronald Reagan Intelligence Lecture About the lecture: Reagan’s efforts against the Cold War resulted in tremendous global change and the collapse of the Cold War Super Powers bi-polar power structure; including an intense paradigm shift and challenge for Indications & Warning (I&W) intelligence. Traditional Indications and Warning Intelligence – an exact and highly effective analytic method for the Cold War era and before – suddenly entered ‘identity crisis,’ as both the Intelligence Community and its policy-maker customer sought to identify the way forward for forecasting National Security threats in the changing world. Professor Almont will speak on the history, academic theory(ies), and methodological approach to managing the analysis and forecasting challenge of Non-Nation State, National Security Threat Violence in the changed world AFTER Reagan’s Cold War success. About the speaker: IWP Adjunct Professor, Darlene Almont, is a former U.S. Air Force Major with over 30 years of experience in the intelligence community. She is an Assistant Professor at the Director of National Intelligence (DNI)/Defense Intelligence Agency’s (DIA) National Intelligence University (NIU), the U.S. government’s accredited master’s degree-granting institution; teaching Strategic Intelligence courses at the Top Secret level.
6/2/20201 hour, 12 minutes, 13 seconds
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Winning without War: Educating Diplomats, Warriors and Spies!

Focus: China, Russia, Iran, North Korea, radical Islamism, and a global pandemic. Never has the United States faced so many external threats, each of which requires a full-range strategy – both hard and soft power- in order to preserve our freedom and prosperity while avoiding unnecessary armed conflict. At the same time, it is critical to build internal consensus based on our values and history. How can we ensure our military, State Department, Intelligence professionals, executive branch, and congressional leaders are prepared to deal with these complex challenges in the most prudent and effective manner? About the Panelists: Dr. John Lenczowski served in the State Department in the Bureau of European Affairs and as Special Advisor to the Under Secretary for Political Affairs Lawrence Eagleburger from 1981 to 1983. From 1983 to 1987, he was the Director of European and Soviet Affairs at the National Security Council. In that capacity, he was principal Soviet affairs adviser to President Reagan and one of the architects of the national strategy to bring down the Soviet empire. After teaching at Georgetown University, Dr. Lenczowski founded The Institute of World Politics, a non-profit graduate school of national security, intelligence, and international affairs in 1990 and currently serves as its President. He is the author of Full Spectrum Diplomacy and Grand Strategy. He has been consulting with the National Security Council, the State Department and the Defense Department on the China threat, U.S. strategy towards China, human rights, public diplomacy, and a general national security strategy of “winning without war.” Dr. Frank Marlo is Dean of Academics at The Institute of World Politics. He formerly served as a Professor of Strategic Studies at the Marine Corps Command and Staff College. He received his Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in May 2006. From January 2002 until January 2005, he served as Assistant for Counterproliferation Policy in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy. He is the author of Planning Reagan’s War: Conservative Strategists and America’s Cold War Victory Dr. David Glancy, currently a Professor of Strategy and Statecraft at IWP, formerly served as an Associate with Booz Allen Hamilton, where he worked on education technology issues with National Intelligence University. Prior to joining NIU, Dr. Glancy served as an Assistant Professor (contractor) with the College of International Security Affairs (CISA) at National Defense University. Before being assigned to CISA, Dr. Glancy provided advice on strategic communications issues to a variety of government clients for Booz Allen Hamilton. Dr. David Glancy has also held positions at both the State Department and Defense Department. At the State Department, he served as a Senior Advisor for Political-Military Affairs and was responsible for handling a number of high-profile issues (coalition political-military efforts in Iraq, issues related to our global military posture, piracy off the coast of Somalia). At the Defense Department, Dr. Glancy was a policy analyst and advisor with the Office of the Secretary of Defense. During his time at the Pentagon, Dr. Glancy served as the Director of the Global War on Terrorism Communications Group and worked as a special assistant with the Eurasia policy office. About the Moderator: Mr. Michael C. Maibach is a seasoned professional in global business diplomacy, advisor to non-profits, supporter of civic causes. From 2003-2012 he was President & CEO of the European-American Business Council, a group of 75 multinational companies. From 1983 to 2001 Mr. Maibach was Vice President of Global Government Affairs for the Intel Corporation. Today he is a Distinguished Fellow at Save Our States, focused on defending the Founders’ Electoral College.
5/29/20201 hour, 49 seconds
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Are we Becoming more Radical? The Rise of Democratic Socialism in America

About the lecture: Thirty years ago last fall we celebrated the fall of the Berlin wall. Many thought this represented the end of history–capitalism had won and socialism had been swept into the dustbin. Today, we see that a growing segment of the American population favors “democratic socialism” and we see American members of Congress who proudly claim this ideology. We will discuss how we have gotten here and why Democratic Socialism can’t work both on economic grounds and moral grounds. About the speaker: Dr. Anne Rathbone Bradley is the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies. Through this position, Dr. Bradley works to enhance the impact and reach of TFAS and FTE economic education programs through courses, seminars, videos and social media. She also delivers lectures around the country and oversees curriculum development and evaluation for economics courses. Previously, Dr. Bradley served as the vice president of economic initiatives at the Institute for Faith, Work & Economics, where she continues research toward a systematic biblical theology of economic freedom. In addition to her work with TFAS, she is a professor of economics at The Institute for World Politics and Grove City College. She is a visiting professor at George Mason University and has previously taught at Georgetown University and Charles University in Prague. She is currently an Acton Affiliate scholar and a visiting scholar at the Bernard Center for Women, Politics & Public Policy. She is a lecturer for the Institute for Humane Studies and the Foundation for Economic Education. Dr. Bradley serves on the James Madison University Executive Advisory Board and is the President-Elect for the Society of the Development of Austrian Economics. She served as the associate director for the Program in Economics, Politics and the Law at the James M. Buchanan Center at George Mason University. Dr. Bradley’s academic work ranges on the question of income inequality and economic freedom as well as the political economy of terrorism, with specific emphasis on the industrial organization of al-Qaeda. Her academic research has been published in scholarly journals and edited volumes. She is currently working on a book that analyzes the Political Economy of Terrorism. Based on her academic research, she also worked as an economic analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency’s Office of Terrorism Analysis.
5/28/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 26 seconds
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National Self-Determination: Proletarian or Liberal?

About the lecture: During World War I the idea of national self-determination came into its own. There were two principal proponents of this concept. First, Lenin advanced a theory of "proletarian" national self-determination to serve Communism; then, Wilson championed the liberal internationalist idea of national self-determination to support the cause of parliamentary democracy. Both ideas mattered in theory and practice because their advocates were winners; Wilson won World War I; and Lenin staged a successful Putzsch and prevailed in Russia's Civil War. The idea of national self-determination was a great gift to non-historical folk nationalist groups whose activists all clamored for their own states; and it became a bane of historic nations, and not only Great Powers. About the speaker: About the speaker: Dr. Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
5/26/202056 minutes, 35 seconds
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Islamic Insurgency in Northern Mozambique and its Regional Implications

About the lecture: Mozambique is facing Islamic insurgency partly due to social, political, and economic factors. Instead of addressing these underlying issues of the conflict, the Mozambique government has exacerbated it by the heavy-handed security response. Has the government mishandled or miscalculated the threats posed by these Islamic insurgents groups in northern Mozambique? What role can the US policy play in aiding Mozambique so that this doesn’t spill over to other regions? About the moderator: Professor Hashem Mekki, MA, has taught Arabic Language, Culture & Middle East Media at IWP since 2012. He is the owner of Bridge Language Solutions, providing an array of language translation, interpretation and teaching services to the Washington DC metropolitan area, and the founder of Kele Global, a nonprofit organization that promotes education, health, and economic empowerment in Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan. Mr. Mekki volunteers with the IWP Center for Human Rights and International Affairs by providing Arabic translations & strategic cultural perspectives on North Africa and the Middle East. Mr. Mekki previously worked with the Center for Strategic and International Studies and served on the board of Voices of Sudan, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. About the panelist: Martina Perino is the Program Manager for the Great Lakes and Southern Africa at the International Republican Institute. Originally from Mozambique and Italy, she has 10 years of democracy and governance experience in Mozambique, DR Congo, Zambia, and Kosovo. In Zambia, she was the Governance and Social sectors Program Manager at the European Union Delegation. There Ms. Perino designed and managed the electoral support project, an Access to Justice project and worked closely with local CSOs and other donors or human rights issues and local governance. In 2017 she joined USAID/Kosovo as the Democracy and Governance Strategic Planning Specialist where, among other tasks, she designed several projects including a local governance and conflict mitigation project, PVE project, media strengthening project, political party and legislative strengthening. Ms. Perino has been an election observer in Mozambique, DR Congo, Zambia, Kosovo, and Albania. Ms. Perino holds a degree in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics and a Master’s in International Development. Dr. Gregory Alonso Pirio possesses extensive experience in conducting research on political, social and religious issues. He earned an M.A. in African Studies and a Ph.D. in African History from the University of California-Los Angeles and has published a number of academic articles dealing with Pan-Africanism and the Communist International. His dissertation focused on the political economy of Angola and Mozambique. As a consultant to The Strategic Trade Advisory Corporation, Dr. Pirio produced studies of the civil wars in West Africa and its impact on the politics and economy of the region. He recently completed a major study of radical Islamic groups in East Africa and the Horn of Africa for the U.S. military and is held in high regard as a Subject Matter Expert on African affairs. Dr. Pirio has occupied senior positions at the International Broadcasting Bureau/Voice of America. He was Chief of both the English-to-Africa and Portuguese-to-Africa Services for the VOA. In this capacity, he managed the coverage of international news and current affairs with a special emphasis on Africa, the Middle East, and South-Central Asia, and has traveled extensively to cover events and plan programming priorities. This experience afforded him the opportunity to develop an in-depth knowledge of events in diverse geographic regions and enabled him to know personally many political actors especially on the African continent. Dr. Pirio has also spearheaded innovative media projects in diverse countries such as Afghanistan, Angola, Nigeria, Rwanda, and Zimbabwe.
5/21/20201 hour, 41 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Role of Nuclear Weapons in China’s Strategy

This event is part of the China Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: The Chinese seek to supplant the US as the world’s top military and economic power. As Tom Reed noted in his book The Nuclear Express, China is a major proliferator of nuclear weapons technology—to Pakistan, North Korea, Iran, Libya and Iraq. Its own nuclear arsenal is projected to double this decade according to DIA intelligence reports. China rejects even discussing arms control nor does it provide any information about its nuclear arsenal, although it does assert it has adopted a no first use nuclear policy. DIA also believes the PRC has recently tested nuclear weapons, contrary to China’s pledges under the NNPT and CBT. The presentation will explore these issues as well as the use of nuclear weapons—particularly the threat of their use—to contest the US and its allies in the Pacific. Especially ROK, ROC, and Japan. About the speaker: Mr. Peter Huessy is President of his own defense consulting firm, GeoStrategic Analysis, founded in 1981, and since 2016, Director of Strategic Deterrent Studies at the Mitchell Institute on Aerospace Studies. He was the senior defense consultant at the National Defense University Foundation for 22 years. He was the National Security Fellow at the AFPC, and Senior Defense Consultant at the Air Force Association from 2011 Mr. Huessy has served as an expert defense and national security analyst for over 45 years, helping his clients cover congressional activities while monitoring budget and policy developments on terrorism, counter-terrorism, immigration, state-sponsored terrorism, missile defense, weapons of mass destruction, especially US-Israeli joint defense efforts, nuclear deterrence, arms control, proliferation, as well as tactical and strategic air, airlift, space and nuclear matters and such state and non-state actors as North Korea, China, Iran, Syria, Venezuela and Hezbollah, Hamas and Al Qaeda. This also includes monitoring activities of think tanks, non-governmental organizations, and other US government departments, as well as projecting future actions of Congress in this area. His specialty is developing and implementing public policy campaigns to secure support for important national security objectives. He is on the Board of the InSeries Theater in Washington; EMPACT, the organization devoted to protecting the US from EMP threats; and MTA, the Maryland Taxpayers Association. He authored legislation calling for the divestment of US pensions from any company doing business with Iran and testified before a number of state legislatures on this subject and on counter-terror policy, including whether or not drivers licenses should be made available to those illegally in the US. He is also a member of Secure American Energy, an organization devoted to breaking the back of OPEC and providing the US with American sources of energy. He has lectured around the world and across the USA on nuclear terrorism, nuclear deterrence, missile defense, homeland security, counter-terrorism policy, and strategic threats to the US and its allies including (1) leading a great power competition and nuclear workshop at the Louisiana Tech Research Institute in cooperation with USAF Global Strike Command, (2) speaking on China’s security threats to the US at the annual strategic conference in Omaha, Nebraska hosted by Strategic Command, (3) speaking annually at the Exchange Monitor Nuclear Summit, (4) lecturing at the Prague Security Institute in the Czech Republic, (5) teaching at Yonsei University in Seoul, ROK, (6) speaking to the Israeli MOD missile defense experts, (7) reviewing terrorist threats to the US for the California Public Policy Foundation, and (8) annually being a guest lecturer at the Naval Academy on the subject of the history of American nuclear deterrent policy.
5/19/20201 hour, 1 minute, 20 seconds
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How Might the Coronavirus Pandemic Influence U.S.-China Relations?

This event is part of The Global Impact Discussion Series sponsored by The Institute of World Politics. About the lecture: How might the coronavirus pandemic influence U.S.-China relations? Some observers contend that it will accelerate the decoupling of the two countries’ economies; others, that it will compel them to restore a baseline of cooperation to address current and potential transnational threats; and yet others, that it will likely have a number of effects, not all of which will point in the same direction. And how might the pandemic affect global perceptions of each country’s ability to manage domestic crises and its willingness to provide global public goods? Some observers contend that China has “won” on those counts, at least relative to the United States; others, that it has “lost”; and yet others, that it is too early to render such judgments. About the speaker: Mr. Ali Wyne is a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and a nonresident fellow at the Modern War Institute. He is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a David Rockefeller fellow with the Trilateral Commission, and a security fellow with the Truman National Security Project. He is currently writing a book on great-power competition.
5/19/20201 hour, 1 minute, 8 seconds
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Don’t Take Your Base: America’s Baseball Diplomacy with Cuba

About the lecture: The presentation will explore the history of baseball diplomacy between the United States and Cuba, specifically focusing on the Trump administration’s nullification of the 2018 Major League Baseball-Cuban Baseball Federation player agreement. About the speaker: Nathaniel Bader is an IWP student pursuing a master’s degree in Statecraft and National Security Affairs with a concentration in Public Diplomacy and Strategic Influence. Nathaniel graduated summa cum laude from Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell, South Dakota, with degrees in history and nonprofit administration. While at Dakota Wesleyan, Nathaniel was named the Senator George McGovern Scholar, served as parliamentarian for the Student Senate, led the McGovern Engagement Group for Political Activism, and spent time in Uganda working on long-term economic development projects in two rural villages. Nathaniel has interned with Court Appointed Special Advocates and the Africa Center for Strategic Studies. Nathaniel currently works at the American Political Science Association. Nathaniel grew up in South Dakota, and, in his free time, he enjoys watching sports, traveling, playing bar trivia, and watching science fiction films.
5/15/202041 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Intermarium's Nationalisms: Old and New

About the lecture: The Intermarium's Nationalisms: Old and New discusses historic nationalism, which was predicated on civic and local identity, and non-historic nationalisms, which stressed their ethnic and folk character. The former concerned mostly the legacy of the old Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth; the latter reflected newly emergent nations, including the Lithuanians, Ukrainians, and Belarusians. About the speaker: Dr. Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
5/15/20201 hour, 5 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Great War in the Intermarium

About the lecture: This is Dr. Chodakiewicz's first lecture in his series on the First World War and its Aftermath in the Intermarium, the lands between the Baltic and Black Seas, 1914-1921. About the speaker: Dr. Chodakiewicz currently serves as a Professor of History at The Institute of World Politics, where he holds the Kosciuszko Chair of Polish Studies. He also leads IWP’s Center for Intermarium Studies. At IWP, Dr. Chodakiewicz teaches courses on Contemporary Politics and Diplomacy, Geography and Strategy, Mass Murder Prevention in Failed and Failing States, and Russian Politics and Foreign Policy. He was formerly an assistant professor of history of the Kosciuszko Chair in Polish Studies at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at University of Virginia. He also served as a visiting professor of history at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
5/11/20201 hour, 15 minutes, 48 seconds
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Book Review: The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

About the book review: Dr. Christopher C. Harmon, the Bren Chair of Great Power Competition at Marine Corps University and IWP professor, reviewed Erik Larson's new book The Splendid and the Vile, which accounts the leadership of Winston Churchill during his first days as prime minister. Dr. Christopher Harmon gives an in-depth review of the book. He discusses its strengths and weaknesses, his own IWP course (IWP 628), which examines military strategy, and the best reasons to continue to study Winston Churchill, half a century after his death. About the speaker: Dr. Christopher C. Harmon wrote his political science dissertation on terrorism in the early 1980s and continued that work as Legislative Aide for Foreign Policy to a member of Congress and, much later, director of counterterrorism studies programs in Asia and Europe for the U.S. government. A professor at civilian and military graduate schools including the Naval War College, Dr. Harmon began teaching courses at The Institute of World Politics after 9/11 — on terrorism, and later on counterterrorism. Lead author or editor of six books, he holds the Bren Chair of Great Power Competition at Marine Corps University, Quantico VA.
4/30/202023 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Rise of Socialism in American Politics

About the interview: Dr. Joshua Muravchik, Distinguished Fellow at the World Affairs Institute, spoke with IWP about the rise of socialism in American politics. He discussed the history of the socialist movement in America, what the term "democratic socialism" really means, why socialism is popular with millennials, and what we can do to fight the rise of socialism in America. About the speaker: Dr. Joshua Muravchik is a distinguished fellow at the World Affairs Institute. He is a former resident scholar at American Enterprise Institute and a former fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute. Additionally, he is a professor at IWP where he teaches a course on Ideas and Values in American Politics. Dr. Muravchik is the author of eleven books, including Heaven on Earth: The Rise and Fall of Socialism, The Imperative of American Leadership, and Exporting Democracy: Fulfilling America’s Destiny; and also more than 400 articles in newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals.
4/23/202036 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Virus and the China Threat

About the discussion: Dr. John Lenczowski will discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has raised America’s consciousness of the reality of communist rule in China and its implications for the security and prosperity of our country. “For years, our leaders have hoped and dreamed of a benevolent, democratic China. We gave away the store on this fantasy, and now we are paying the price. Ironically, this plague is a wake-up call to the gravity of the threat from communist China.” This event will be moderated by IWP Chairman John Lovewell. About the speaker: Dr. John Lenczowski served in the State Department in the Bureau of European Affairs and as Special Advisor to the Under Secretary for Political Affairs Lawrence Eagleburger from 1981 to 1983. From 1983 to 1987, he was Director of European and Soviet Affairs at the National Security Council. In that capacity, he was principal Soviet affairs adviser to President Reagan and one of the architects of the national strategy to bring down the Soviet empire. After teaching at Georgetown University, Dr. Lenczowski founded The Institute of World Politics, a non-profit graduate school of national security, intelligence, and international affairs in 1990 and currently serves as its President. He is the author of Full Spectrum Diplomacy and Grand Strategy. He has been consulting with the National Security Council, the State Department and the Defense Department on the China threat, U.S. strategy towards China, human rights, public diplomacy, and a general national security strategy of “winning without war.”
4/17/20201 hour, 43 seconds
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What is the Economic Impact of the Coronavirus?

About the interview: Dr. Anne Bradley, Vice President of Economic Initiatives at the Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics and IWP professor, spoke with IWP about the economic impact of the coronavirus. She discussed the future of the economy, the stock market, the new stimulus package, the long term effects of coronavirus, and the role of government in protecting the U.S. economy. About the speaker: Dr. Anne Bradley is the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the Academic Director at the Fund for American Studies. She served as the Vice President of Economic Initiatives at The Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics, where she developed and commissioned research toward a systematic biblical theology of economic freedom. She is a visiting professor at Georgetown University and has previously taught at George Mason University and at Charles University, Prague. She is currently a visiting scholar at the Bernard Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy. She served as the Associate Director for the Program in Economics, Politics, and the Law at the James M. Buchanan Center at George Mason University. She worked as an Economic Analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency. She is also a professor at IWP, where she teaches a course entitled Economics for Foreign Policy Makers
4/13/202030 minutes, 54 seconds
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What is the Impact of the Coronavirus Outbreak on the Energy Market?

About the Interview: Dr. Sara Vakhshouri, Professor of Energy Security at IWP and President of SVB Energy International, spoke with members of the IWP events staff about the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on the energy market. She discussed energy supply and demand, the Russia-Saudi oil war, U.S. shale production, and what the future holds in regard to market stabilization. About the Speaker: Dr. Sara Vakhshouri is founder and president of SVB Energy International, a strategic energy consulting firm with offices in Washington DC and Dubai. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Energy Security at The Institute of World Politics. Dr. Vakhshouri has about two decades of experience of working in the energy industry with extensive experience in global energy market studies, energy security, and geopolitical risk, and she has consulted numerous public and private sector energy and policy leaders. Dr. Vakhshouri has been based in Washington, D.C. since 2009, where she has advised U.S. and European governments, investment banks, financial institutions, law firms, and international corporations on energy markets, trading and pricing, the geopolitics of energy, and investment patterns. She has published articles in numerous journals, including The Economist, Middle East Economic Survey, and Oil and Gas Journal. Dr. Vakhshouri has been the keynote speaker at many energy conferences, including Chatham House, Platts Oil and Middle East conferences, LNG Global Congress, and other international oil, gas, and