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The Howie Severino Podcast

English, Social, 1 season, 327 episodes, 9 hours, 35 minutes
About
Insightful conversations with veteran journalist Howie Severino. This is the first original podcast of GMA News & Public Affairs.
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Book talk: “Some People Need Killing” | ICYMI

Trauma Journalist Patricia Evangelista shares the stories behind her celebrated book. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/3bT1bMmvUnRLEEG2ijh4QC?si=8G_75w90St2pGug6qEULXg
4/23/20243 minutes, 34 seconds
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Baybayin (ᜊᜌ,ᜊᜌᜒᜈ,) calligraphy for the world

The millennial artist Taipan Lucero calls his art CalligraFilipino, applying an Asian art form to the Filipino pre-colonial script Baybayin. He has taken his art overseas where he’s demonstrated it at US universities, Google headquarters, and even at a Golden State Warriors basketball game. It’s his way of honoring Filipino heritage while calling for more teaching of Filipino scripts. Link: https://www.taipanlucero.com/ --- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
4/18/202427 minutes, 12 seconds
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The unique taste of Filipino cuisine | ICYMI

April rings in Filipino food month. Kapampangan Chef Claude Tayag describes Filipino Cuisine” as a symphony of sweet, sour, and salty in a single bite. Catch the full episode here:  https://open.spotify.com/episode/40jHRX3Ln6adjNU58z2Kdb?si=3tagRka0SOuijFgGnL
4/16/20243 minutes, 25 seconds
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[VIDEO] DOH’s dancing doctor on saving lives while having fun

Dr. Eric Tayag speaks with Howie Severino on the eve of his retirement after 35 years of government service.  He talks about how he started using his zumba moves in health campaigns and the challenge of preventing children’s deaths amid a global vaccine shortage.  Is the pandemic over? When should we still wear masks? Why is there a pertussis outbreak? Why did many believe the anti-vaxxers? Dr. Tayag provides clear answers without having to dance.
4/13/202457 minutes, 26 seconds
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[VIDEO] Why "revenge travel" was wrong - Environmental planner Chen Mencias

The end of the pandemic unleashed a flood of tourists around the Philippines that is wreaking havoc on fragile ecosystems. Environmental planner Chen Mencias has been advising local governments to aim for "high value, low volume," and involve local communities in tourism enterprises. She gives hot takes on the Chocolate Hills controversy and the Boracay model of development. And she lists the ways that Filipinos can be responsible tourists, and mentions two localities where local governments are managing their tourism sustainably.
4/12/202455 minutes, 18 seconds
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DOH’s dancing doctor on saving lives while having fun

Dr. Eric Tayag speaks with Howie Severino on the eve of his retirement after 35 years of government service. He talks about how he started using his zumba moves in health campaigns and the challenge of preventing children’s deaths amid a global vaccine shortage. Is the pandemic over? When should we still wear masks? Why is there a pertussis outbreak? Why did many believe the anti-vaxxers? Dr. Tayag provides clear answers without having to dance. CREDITS Producer: Ivy Andrada-Bautista Researcher: Jenica Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
4/11/202454 minutes, 22 seconds
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Championing sustainability through an air-con invention | ICYMI

TOYM Awardee and Young Inventor Angel Palma tells the story behind her affordable air-con that uses no harmful refrigerants and less electricity than conventional air-conditioners. Catch the full episode here:  https://open.spotify.com/episode/6qhsg7mIZRTL98e0zmLaAK?si=_rzmdXruSRW762Ihmel79g
4/9/20245 minutes, 39 seconds
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Why "revenge travel" was wrong – Environmental planner Chen Mencias

The end of the pandemic unleashed a flood of tourists around the Philippines that is wreaking havoc on fragile ecosystems. Environmental planner Chen Mencias has been advising local governments to aim for "high value, low volume," and involve local communities in tourism enterprises. She gives hot takes on the Chocolate Hills controversy and the Boracay model of development. And she lists the ways that Filipinos can be responsible tourists, and mentions two localities where local governments are managing their tourism sustainably. Links: https://youtu.be/k5h6DmJUy-I?si=Ju0thUPfD_Db-K4n https://youtu.be/Y2Xt6snaUk4?si=zL1W3zzk2P85b1lJ https://www.facebook.com/share/v/85JY3SGrnW6rPZxc/?mibextid=TRmnTU&startTimeMs=3000 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqRJV3pJniU Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
4/4/202452 minutes, 57 seconds
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Covering the British royal family | ICYMI

The British royal family has been the talk of the town. On March 22, 2024, Catherine Duchess of Cambridge, announced that she had been diagnosed with cancer following her abdominal surgery in January. In case you missed it, BBC Royal Correspondent Jonny Dymond shares his thoughts on covering the British Royal Family.   Listen to the full episode here: Upload: March 7, 2024 https://open.spotify.com/episode/4J8IFbRKTNWAN7DlSCgHzT?si=i0FBg4GDSMidHDAC_xl_Jw
4/2/20244 minutes, 5 seconds
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Nature storyteller Celine Murillo on her non-stop road trip [VIDEO]

The pandemic locked down many and made them homebodies. But in 2022, married couple Celine and Dennis Murillo left home and spent more than a year on the road, traveling around the Philippines in a camper van they called Eli. They shared their awe at the wonders of the country on YouTube before Celine began a Tiktok series on the native trees and plants they saw on their journeys. In this first part of her conversation with Howie Severino, Celine talks about the practicalities of life on the road – where did they shower and go to the toilet, did they ever feel unsafe, how did they earn a living? Solving those issues enabled her to produce unique educational content about Philippine biodiversity, including showing live specimens of colorful species depicted in monochrome on the country’s money (“Saribuhay sa Salapi”). Celine explains that focusing on the nation’s native species is part of her mission to “decolonize” the public’s view of nature.
3/30/202449 minutes, 44 seconds
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Peace negotiator Miriam Coronel-Ferrer on finding common ground between enemies [VIDEO]

Retired UP professor Miriam Coronel-Ferrer won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for shepherding a peace deal between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, recognizing her as “the first female Chief Negotiator in the world to sign a final peace accord with a rebel group.” Ferrer explains how she remained focused despite the Mamasapano massacre in 2015 which nearly derailed the peace process. She shares insights on how to get opposing forces to talk seriously about peace, referring also to ongoing conflicts in the Philippines and the Middle East. She recalls the lessons of growing up with a famous lawyer-father, Antonio Coronel, who had clients and friends on the opposite side of the political fence as his activist-children.
3/29/202451 minutes, 49 seconds
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Why are scientific names important to know? Nature storyteller Celine Murillo explains

“Nose bleed” could be one reaction of those who hear Celine Murillo on her vlog constantly identify plants and animals by their scientific names aside from their common or local names.   Bit she stresses that having nose-bleed knowledge is part of knowing your environment and can even save your life.   Part of that essential knowledge is why native tree species should be planted and not foreign species such as the mahogany trees that are seen growing in many places, part of an ill-advised government reforestation program.   Does she ever get tempted to call out those who do wrong to the environment? Celine shares her take on that and on her growing influence on Tiktok and elsewhere. Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: Jenica Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
3/28/202422 minutes, 15 seconds
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Nature storyteller Celine Murillo on her non-stop road trip

The pandemic locked down many and made them homebodies. But in 2022, married couple Celine and Dennis Murillo left home and spent more than a year on the road, traveling around the Philippines in a camper van they called Eli. They shared their awe at the wonders of the country on YouTube before Celine began a Tiktok series on the native trees and plants they saw on their journeys.   In this first part of her conversation with Howie Severino, Celine talks about the practicalities of life on the road – where did they shower and go to the toilet, did they ever feel unsafe, how did they earn a living?   Solving those issues enabled her to produce unique educational content about Philippine biodiversity, including showing live specimens of colorful species depicted in monochrome on the country’s money (“Saribuhay sa Salapi”).   Celine explains that focusing on the nation’s native species is part of her mission to “decolonize” the public’s view of nature. Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: Jenica Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
3/28/202423 minutes, 42 seconds
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MIT grad Hillary Andales on having big dreams at a young age | ICYMI

This March, The Howie Severino Podcast celebrates National Women’s Month with extraordinary Filipinas like Hillary Dianne Andales.  In case you missed it, Hillary tells us how her love for science began at a young age. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/0yOw8793TDdgQpATtD6Nl4?si=38QNbX5HTFWk3zOZ_oPT 2w
3/25/20241 minute, 35 seconds
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Magsaysay Awardee Miriam Coronel-Ferrer on being a woman peace negotiator

Then-President Noynoy Aquino took a risk when appointing a woman as peace negotiator with the male-dominated MILF.  But the decision bore fruit with the historic “comprehensive agreement” with the MILF in 2014.   Miriam Coronel-Ferrer talks about the cultural biases women face around the world, including the Philippines despite its high global rankings in gender equality indexes.  She explains how many Filipino women in Muslim Mindanao and elsewhere ended up in public office.   “The more women are able to show the world that women can do it, (biases) become less and less of a problem,” she asserts. But she adds that their struggle needs the voices of feminist men. “Men need to hear from other men.” Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
3/21/202420 minutes, 36 seconds
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Peace negotiator Miriam Coronel-Ferrer on finding common ground between enemies

Retired UP professor Miriam Coronel-Ferrer won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for shepherding a peace deal between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, recognizing her as “the first female Chief Negotiator in the world to sign a final peace accord with a rebel group.”   Ferrer explains how she remained focused despite the Mamasapano massacre in 2015 which nearly derailed the peace process. She shares insights on how to get opposing forces to talk seriously about peace, referring also to ongoing conflicts in the Philippines and the Middle East.   She recalls the lessons of growing up with a famous lawyer-father, Antonio Coronel, who had clients and friends on the opposite side of the political fence as his activist-children. Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
3/21/202427 minutes, 59 seconds
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Marian Pastor Roces on rethinking policy making | ICYMI

This March, The Howie Severino Podcast celebrates National Women’s Month with extraordinary Filipinas like Marian Pastor Roces.  In case you missed it, the art critic and curator tells us why the national narrative must be informed by new science to make more effective policies.  Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/1tsV91UQDtfqzBpxXe06EC?si=zKr_GyXiQVOm3ebE52DjCA
3/19/20242 minutes, 16 seconds
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If you get intimidated by China, you lose — Antonio Carpio [VIDEO]

Former Supreme Court Justice Antonio Carpio has been the strongest and most consistent voice against China’s incursions into Philippine territory. He explains to Howie Severino the Chinese strategy of using intimidation to win control of the sea and what’s holding China back from even more aggressive behavior.  But Carpio believes the Philippines still has space to maneuver in the maritime powder keg and proposes an approach to gain the upper hand, including building a lighthouse and other civilian facilities in disputed territory. 
3/16/202444 minutes, 51 seconds
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We cannot rely forever on the US — Antonio Carpio

The former Supreme Court justice is calling for building up the nation’s self-defense force and forging closer military ties with regional neighbors. Carpio warns that another Trump presidency in the US could introduce changes in global alliances unfavorable to the Philippines. “If you don’t fortify your defenses, you will be erased from the map. That has happened to many countries. And it could happen to us.” With sea level rise, Carpio argues, the Philippines’ “exclusive economic zone” will only get larger. “So all we have to do is hang on to our claim. Never, never give up our claim because everything will be underwater in that area by the end of the century.” CREDITS: Producer: Ivy Andrada-Bautista Researcher: Jenica Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
3/14/202417 minutes, 56 seconds
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If you get intimidated by China, you lose — Antonio Carpio

Former Supreme Court Justice Antonio Carpio has been the strongest and most consistent voice against China’s incursions into Philippine territory. He explains to Howie Severino the Chinese strategy of using intimidation to win control of the sea and what’s holding China back from even more aggressive behavior. But Carpio believes the Philippines still has space to maneuver in the maritime powder keg and proposes an approach to gain the upper hand, including building a lighthouse and other civilian facilities in disputed territory. CREDITS: Producer: Ivy Andrada-Bautista Researcher: Jenica Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
3/14/202424 minutes, 15 seconds
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Covering the royal family is bizarre - BBC Correspondent Jonny Dymond [VIDEO]

Among the BBC’s leading journalists, Jonny Dymond recently came to the Philippines for one of the British broadcaster’s flagship programs, World Questions, and spoke to Howie Severino about what makes the Philippines interesting to outsiders. He also talks about his coverage of the British royal family (“a surprisingly hard job”) and Russian President Putin (“His mission is about Russia, not communism”).   Dymond explains how the BBC has been able to stand up to the British government despite being funded by taxpayers.   In the face of various threats to journalists around the world, he urges media colleagues to keep believing in their mission. “If you don’t have people who are prepared to call out the government, who are prepared to report on the government’s successes and failures, then it’s impossible to say that you really have a functioning democracy,” Dymond asserts.   “It’s easy to be cynical, but coming to the Philippines where I know journalists have been under so much pressure, it kind of straightens my back. It makes me believe again in what we do.”   BBC’s World Questions in Manila moderated by Jonny Dymond airs in the Philippines on BBC Radio on March 9 at 8 P.M.   The panelists on the show:   Atty. Antonio Carpio – Former associate justice of the Supreme Court Dr. Roberto Galang, Dean of the Ateneo de Manila University Gokongwei School of Management Ms. Rafaela David – President of the Akbayan Citizens' Action Party Professor Richard Heydarian – Columnist and senior lecturer at the University of the Philippines BBC WORLD QUESTIONS episode link: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/w3ct59td
3/13/202440 minutes, 27 seconds
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Javea Estavillo on being a climate activist | ICYMI

This March, The Howie Severino Podcast celebrates National Women’s Month with extraordinary Filipinas like Javea Estavillo.  In case you missed it, Javea tells us how the fight against climate change can be both frustrating and enraging, and what her version of an ideal Philippines would look like.  Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/1tsV91UQDtfqzBpxXe06EC?si=zKr_GyXiQVOm3ebE52DjCA
3/12/20244 minutes, 31 seconds
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We’re not a plaything of government – BBC’s Jonny Dymond

Among the BBC’s leading journalists, Jonny Dymond recently came to the Philippines for one of the British broadcaster’s flagship programs, World Questions, and spoke to Howie Severino about what makes the Philippines interesting to outsiders. He also talks about his coverage of the British royal family (“a surprisingly hard job”) and Russian President Putin (“His mission is about Russia, not communism”). Dymond explains how the BBC has been able to stand up to the British government despite being funded by taxpayers. In the face of various threats to journalists around the world, he urges media colleagues to keep believing in their mission. “If you don’t have people who are prepared to call out the government, who are prepared to report on the government’s successes and failures, then it’s impossible to say that you really have a functioning democracy,” Dymond asserts. “It’s easy to be cynical, but coming to the Philippines where I know journalists have been under so much pressure, it kind of straightens my back. It makes me believe again in what we do.” BBC’s World Questions in Manila moderated by Jonny Dymond airs in the Philippines on BBC Radio on March 9 at 8 P.M. The panelists on the show: Atty. Antonio Carpio – Former associate justice of the Supreme Court Dr. Roberto Galang, Dean of the Ateneo de Manila University Gokongwei School of Management Ms. Rafaela David – President of the Akbayan Citizens' Action Party Professor Richard Heydarian – Columnist and senior lecturer at the University of the Philippines LINK: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0380g6d CREDITS: Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
3/7/202438 minutes, 21 seconds
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[VIDEO] Typewriters and the writing life — a convo with Butch Dalisay

The eminent writer is also an avid antique typewriter collector. Butch Dalisay talks to Howie Severino about a bygone pre-internet era when these analog machines were the tools of trade of writers and journalists. Despite the advantages of his laptop, Dr. Dalisay says there’s still a romance and even practicality about typewriters. “Wala kang distraction, you can’t surf,” he says. “It’s much more intimate... You’re disconnected from the world.”  After collecting for years, he’s still searching for one antique model typewriter that was developed specifically for Tagalog writers. He knows it exists because of a trove of 1950s love letters from prison by a Tagalog poet. That typewriter has become, in Butch’s words, his “holy grail.” 
3/3/202438 minutes, 32 seconds
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[VIDEO] Leila de Lima on being hostaged by a fellow inmate

Three months after being released on bail, former senator and prisoner of conscience Leila de Lima describes in graphic and terrifying detail the day in prison when she was held captive by an Abu Sayyaf inmate known for beheading hostages.  She reveals that after the hostage taker was shot dead and she was rescued, she received a concerned call from President Marcos, an early sign that his alliance with the Dutertes could be cracking.  That was her scariest moment, she says, but not among her darkest, which were the times she wasn't allowed a furlough from jail to attend the wakes of close friends, including PNoy.  Not originally a cat lover, she adopted stray cats in prison to keep her company. She took several home after her release and one of them insisted on joining her for this interview.  Otherwise, she was in solitude for nearly seven years while imprisoned in Camp Crame and one of the rare VIP inmates without a mobile phone. "I wanted to follow the rules," she tells Howie Severino. She also was not allowed access to the Internet, so she kept up with the outside world through print newspapers and printouts of online articles delivered by her senate staff.  She says she never lost faith in the judicial system, which she's confident will vindicate her and declare her innocent of all charges.  Yet for the alleged crimes of former President Rodrigo Duterte, she says the only recourse is the International Criminal Court because there is a "clear demonstration of the unwillingness and inability" of the Philippine justice system to investigate.  "That's one of the reasons why nagwawala na si Duterte. Out na ang antagonism niya kay President Marcos because I think he suspects the BBM administration is really cooperating with the ICC." Meanwhile, as she vows to assist the ICC gather evidence, de Lima is back to teaching law and spending time with her aged mother, who was never told by her protective family what her famous daughter went through. 
3/2/202455 minutes, 56 seconds
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Typewriters and the writing life — a convo with Butch Dalisay

The eminent writer is also an avid antique typewriter collector. Butch Dalisay talks to Howie Severino about a bygone pre-internet era when these analog machines were the tools of trade of writers and journalists. Despite the advantages of his laptop, Dr. Dalisay says there’s still a romance and even practicality about typewriters. “Wala kang distraction, you can’t surf,” he says. “It’s much more intimate... You’re disconnected from the world.” After collecting for years, he’s still searching for one antique model typewriter that was developed specifically for Tagalog writers. He knows it exists because of a trove of 1950s love letters from prison by a Tagalog poet. That typewriter has become, in Butch’s words, his “holy grail.” Links: https://cms.philstarlife.com/geeky/313514-rizal-s-typewriter#google_vignette https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/opinion/content/177163/tribute-to-a-typewriter/story/ https://www.philstar.com/lifestyle/arts-and-culture/2019/04/01/1906140/master-commandante-street/amp/ https://www.philstar.com/lifestyle/arts-and-culture/2019/08/26/1946322/scavenging-smith-corona/amp/ https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/400531/butch-dalisays-cabinet-of-curiosities-and-antiquities/amp/ Producer: John Eumer Yanga Researcher: Jen Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
2/29/202436 minutes, 45 seconds
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How do oil spills affect marine environments? | ICYMI

February 28, 2024 will mark the first year since the Mindoro oil spill happened. In case you missed it, diver and underwater filmmaker Robert Suntay explains how harmful this event was on Philippine biodiversity. Listen to the full episode here:  https://open.spotify.com/episode/7DkmKMZlVF02qKogB1XHIG?si=2b52dce3536847fd     
2/26/20244 minutes, 12 seconds
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When Leila de Lima was taken hostage in prison | Part 2

Three months after being released on bail, former senator and prisoner of conscience Leila de Lima describes in graphic and terrifying detail the day in prison when she was held captive by an Abu Sayyaf inmate known for beheading hostages. She reveals that after the hostage taker was shot dead and she was rescued, she received a concerned call from President Marcos, an early sign that his alliance with the Dutertes could be cracking. That was her scariest moment, she says, but not among her darkest, which were the times she wasn't allowed a furlough from jail to attend the wakes of close friends, including PNoy. For the alleged crimes of former President Rodrigo Duterte, she says the only recourse is the International Criminal Court because there is a "clear demonstration of the unwillingness and inability" of the Philippine justice system to investigate. "That's one of the reasons why nagwawala na si Duterte. Out na ang antagonism niya kay President Marcos because I think he suspects the BBM administration is really cooperating with the ICC." Meanwhile, as she vows to assist the ICC gather evidence, de Lima is back to teaching law and spending time with her aged mother, who was never told by her protective family what her famous daughter went through. The Howie Severino Podcast reached out to former President Rodrigo Duterte’s camp. As of posting, there is no comment yet from his office. Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
2/23/202436 minutes, 49 seconds
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Leila de Lima’s long and peculiar prison solitude | Part 1

Not originally a cat lover, Leila de Lima adopted stray cats in prison to keep her company. She took several home after her release and one of them insisted on joining her for this interview. Otherwise, she was in solitude for nearly seven years while imprisoned in Camp Crame and one of the rare VIP inmates without a mobile phone. "I wanted to follow the rules," she tells Howie Severino. She also was not allowed access to the Internet, so she kept up with the outside world through print newspapers and printouts of online articles delivered by her senate staff. She says she never lost faith in the judicial system, which she's confident will vindicate her and declare her innocent of all charges. Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
2/22/202417 minutes, 36 seconds
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We’re not allowed to use TikTok —AFP spokesperson Col. Francel Padilla

The military has banned TikTok among its personnel, according to the new AFP spokesperson, Col. Francel Padilla, an expert on cybersecurity. While being vague about how the AFP intends to enforce its directive, Col. Padilla explains how Filipinos' immersion in social media has made the country vulnerable to "social engineering" tactics by adversaries. She cautions her audiences to be wary of platforms that request access to their cameras, microphones, and contacts, especially Tiktok which is allegedly owned by China. She explains what it means to be a "certified ethical hacker," one of her credentials as the nation's first woman spokesperson of the armed forces. --- Producer: Ivy Andrada Bautista Researcher: Jenica Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
2/15/202416 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Army embraces inclusivity — AFP’s first woman spokesperson

Col. Francel Padilla is accustomed to being a pioneer. She was among the first women to graduate from the Philippine Military Academy. Now as the armed forces' first woman spokesperson, she has seen many barriers fall as women soldiers are now serving even in combat roles. Col. Padilla has become the most visible face of the Philippine military at a crucial time, when the country is pivoting from the insurgency to the external threat of China. As an expert on cybersecurity, she brings an uncommon skill set to her new role. She talks to Howie Severino about the challenges of being a woman in a male-dominated institution. She opens up about having to start a sensitive mission guarding a visiting head of state just after losing her husband, a fellow PMA graduate, in a helicopter crash. "Grieving is a lifelong journey," she says in a candid moment, sharing how she raised two young sons in the wake of their loss. Soon after assuming her position as spokesperson, Col. Padilla had to field questions about former President Duterte's effort to rile up the military against the current administration. "We are professional, united, and non-partisan," she assures. "We do not want to break the trust of the people." --- Producer: Ivy Andrada Bautista Researcher: Jenica Villanueva Editor: Jayr Magtoto
2/15/202425 minutes, 7 seconds
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Is self-love necessary before being in a relationship? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Psychologist Dr. Anna Tuazon says self-love is non-negotiable–citing the significance of finding happiness in oneself before sharing it with someone else. Catch the full episode here:  https://open.spotify.com/episode/0DXduVHN9aWQ5WoyS9d2t3?si=b68bd63a77a047cd 
2/13/20243 minutes, 42 seconds
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What does Kung Hei Fat Choi actually mean? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Chinoy Ivan Man Dy debunks this famous Chinese New Year greeting and offers alternatives. Listen to the full episode here:  https://open.spotify.com/episode/0YvITGvqiLPV8p8ukZkRa4?si=180eaea8106e4276  
2/10/20243 minutes, 38 seconds
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How should BBM handle Digong? – UP political scientist Aries Arugay | Part 2

The exchange of drug bombshells between former President Rodrigo Duterte and current President Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. represents a high-stakes gambit: how much will Marcos tolerate verbal abuse and threats from his predecessor? Is Duterte risking irrelevance by making threats that no longer resonate beyond his Davao base? Dr. Aries Arugay analyzes the political chess match and the various other players involved. Links: https://polisci.upd.edu.ph/faculty/arugay/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/aries-arugay-a6a2a629a/?originalSubdomain=ph https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=nKU50MQAAAAJ&hl=en -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
2/8/202430 minutes
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What’s happening to the Marcos-Duterte alliance? — UP political scientist Aries Arugay | Part 1

“Ilabas na ang popcorn,” many exclaimed online as the Marcos-Duterte feud blew up. But is this more than just entertainment? Professor Aries Arugay unpacks the current political brouhaha and its possible impact on the country’s political alignments. He also points out what he sees as the real existential threat to the democratic system – charter change – and breaks down the camps on both sides, while highlighting the absence of a “third force,” an opposition strong enough to challenge what he calls the “dynasty cartel.” Links: https://polisci.upd.edu.ph/faculty/arugay/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/aries-arugay-a6a2a629a/?originalSubdomain=ph https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=nKU50MQAAAAJ&hl=en -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
2/7/202426 minutes, 44 seconds
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The worst part of having cancer… — survivor Kara Magsanoc-Alikpala | ICYMI

After being misdiagnosed and enduring a long journey to healing, breast cancer survivor Kara Magsanoc-Alikpala says what troubled her most was not the pain or even the prospect of dying young. She tells Howie Severino there was something even worse. But there were also blessings. As we mark World Cancer Day on February 4, we revisit Kara’s inspiring message about surviving cancer and the need for her to give back after defying the odds.
2/6/20244 minutes, 22 seconds
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The Sagada of 40 years ago

Long before the Internet, one could disconnect completely by going to places like Sagada, an alluring mountain town nestled in sublime vistas. Howie Severino remembers the many trips he made to that Sagada, sometimes alone.
1/31/20243 minutes, 9 seconds
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Jeepney drivers are a microcosm of society — Toym Imao | ICYMI

Unconsolidated PUV operators and drivers will be banned from plying their traditional routes soon, in line with the PUV Modernization Program. In case you missed it, Toym Imao describes his 2020 installation art that reflected the plight of jeepney drivers. Catch the full episode here:  https://open.spotify.com/episode/03b5s6bZOU9hM0n9PefTS3?si=ea0537b06a1949be
1/29/20244 minutes, 40 seconds
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[VIDEO] Hya Bendaña— driver’s daughter, Ateneo valedictorian

Her father’s jeepney is exactly her age and named after her. All of her young life, it was the same jeepney that sustained the family through her father’s long days and nights driving polluted routes, before catching a few hours of sleep inside the jeepney. All of her father’s hard work enabled Hya Bendaña to focus on school and graduate college valedictorian of Ateneo de Manila University in 2019. Now she’s paying it forward by speaking out on behalf of jeepney drivers as the government phases out jeepneys as part of its contentious modernization program. Hya talks to Howie Severino about the challenge to achieve despite her poverty and offers an insider’s view of the world of the iconic jeepney.
1/28/202435 minutes
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Hya Bendaña: driver’s daughter, Ateneo valedictorian

Her father’s jeepney is exactly her age and named after her. All of her young life, it was the same jeepney that sustained the family through her father’s long days and nights driving polluted routes, before catching a few hours of sleep inside the jeepney. All of her father’s hard work enabled Hya Bendaña to focus on school and graduate college valedictorian of Ateneo de Manila University in 2019. Now she’s paying it forward by speaking out on behalf of jeepney drivers as the government phases out jeepneys as part of its contentious modernization program. Hya talks to Howie Severino about the challenge to achieve despite her poverty and offers an insider’s view of the world of the iconic jeepney. -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
1/25/202433 minutes, 29 seconds
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What happens in a progressive school? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Raya School Director Ani Almario breaks down some key features of progressive education. Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7HhbhDqFeR3HR7Ev09537K?si=43e624fe61014f29 
1/22/20244 minutes, 17 seconds
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[VIDEO] DOTr Secretary Jaime Bautista on modernizing the jeepney

If the Department of Transportation has its way, more than 30 percent of jeepneys will be off the road starting this year. Those are the vehicles that private operators did not include in new jeepney cooperatives and corporations required by the DOTr. That will be the first stage of the government’s controversial jeepney modernization program. The older, decrepit vehicles will then be replaced by newer models, some no longer resembling the iconic back-entry designs of the traditional jeepney. Modernization is more than new vehicles, Transportation Secretary Bautista is quick to emphasize in his conversation with Howie Severino. Public transport routes will be studied and “rationalized,” so that the number of public utility vehicles will be adjusted according to the volume of commuters along those routes. Despite the reduction of jeepneys plying existing routes, Bautista assures that there will be no commuter crisis, as he says the remaining jeepneys will be more than enough to handle the demand. Even with the modern jeepneys, Bautista asserts that the future of public transport lies not in road vehicles but in trains, as he gives us an overview of the rail projects in the pipeline. Isn’t it a disadvantage for chauffeur-driven officials like him to be making decisions about public transport? Secretary Bautista has a ready answer.
1/21/202432 minutes, 4 seconds
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What does our faith say about social responsibility? | ICYMI

January 9th saw close to 6 million devotees joining the Traslacion 2024. Truckloads of garbage were collected in the aftermath. In case you missed it, Fr. Edu Gariguez talks about being a priest environmentalist and the role of Christians in taking care of the environment. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/0jBQRhyLHOyq3sPOSGsIE1?si=5a3b0618a0274af7
1/18/20243 minutes, 8 seconds
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DOTr Secretary Jaime Bautista on modernizing the jeepney

If the Department of Transportation has its way, more than 30 percent of jeepneys will be off the road starting this year. Those are the vehicles that private operators did not include in new jeepney cooperatives and corporations required by the DOTr. That will be the first stage of the government’s controversial jeepney modernization program. The older, decrepit vehicles will then be replaced by newer models, some no longer resembling the iconic back-entry designs of the traditional jeepney. Modernization is more than new vehicles, Transportation Secretary Bautista is quick to emphasize in his conversation with Howie Severino. Public transport routes will be studied and “rationalized,” so that the number of public utility vehicles will be adjusted according to the volume of commuters along those routes. Despite the reduction of jeepneys plying existing routes, Bautista assures that there will be no commuter crisis, as he says the remaining jeepneys will be more than enough to handle the demand. Even with the modern jeepneys, Bautista asserts that the future of public transport lies not in road vehicles but in trains, as he gives us an overview of the rail projects in the pipeline. Isn’t it a disadvantage for chauffeur-driven officials like him to be making decisions about public transport? Secretary Bautista has a ready answer. -- Links: https://ltfrb.gov.ph/puv-modernization-program/ https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hW1z2RWzyC2PqwGwh3s_obsf3zRCqe2g/view Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
1/16/202431 minutes, 10 seconds
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[VIDEO] Gomburza was a little fire that became a revolution — Pepe Diokno

Metro Manila Film Festival Best Director awardee for the film “Gomburza,” Pepe Diokno, shares his surprise at how a serious movie about history has drawn mainstream audiences. He talks to Howie about researching how the idea of a Filipino nation was born and how faithfully his movie tries to portray history. They discuss the challenge of dramatizing historical events without battlefield heroes and the need to set the record straight about what happened in the 1872 Cavite Mutiny which led to the martyrdom of the three priests Gomes, Burgos and Zamora. The executions inspired Jose Rizal’s life work. Pepe addresses the Majoha reality-show brouhaha sympathetically and what it says about the way history is taught. Howie asks him how coming from the illustrious Diokno family influences his choice of subject. “Gomburza” is the 36-year-old Pepe’s first film in eight years, after a period of self-doubt about his career. Audience response in recent weeks seems to have restored his faith.
1/15/202444 minutes, 36 seconds
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Gomburza was a little fire that became a revolution — Pepe Diokno

Metro Manila Film Festival Best Director awardee for the film “Gomburza,” Pepe Diokno, shares his surprise at how a serious movie about history has drawn mainstream audiences. He talks to Howie about researching how the idea of a Filipino nation was born and how faithfully his movie tries to portray history. They discuss the challenge of dramatizing historical events without battlefield heroes and the need to set the record straight about what happened in the 1872 Cavite Mutiny which led to the martyrdom of the three priests Gomes, Burgos and Zamora. The executions inspired Jose Rizal’s life work. Pepe addresses the Majoha reality-show brouhaha sympathetically and what it says about the way history is taught. Howie asks him how coming from the illustrious Diokno family influences his choice of subject. “Gomburza” is the 36-year-old Pepe’s first film in eight years, after a period of self-doubt about his career. Audience response in recent weeks seems to have restored his faith.
1/12/202440 minutes, 30 seconds
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[VIDEO] Pay up, 17-year-old climate activist tells rich countries

Javea Estavillo, the Philippines' youth delegate to the recent climate change conference in Dubai, delivered a speech calling for developed nations to compensate smaller countries for damage caused by climate change. Raised in Pasig and bound for Stanford University, Javea shares with Howie Severino her impressions of being one of the youngest among tens of thousands of attendees in Dubai. While noting the "small steps" that gave her hope, she acknowledged feeling annoyed by the adults in the room who "kept talking and talking, and a lot of the time I'm sitting there, like, 'Yeah, you're saying that but you're not going to change.'" Before representing the country's youth, Javea spent time on a remote island in Mindanao without electricity getting to know young people there. Afterwards, she helped raise money for solar panels for the community. At Stanford, she intends to study climate science on the road to becoming an environmental lawyer. "Hopefully in the future I'll participate in climate negotiations as a delegate instead of a youth delegate”. -- Links: ⁠ http://arehnaflourpower.com/⁠ ⁠https://www.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10161760003511967&id=609776966⁠ ⁠https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/scitech/science/890857/cop28-ph-youth-delegate-make-climate-financing-a-reality/story/⁠
1/9/202424 minutes, 2 seconds
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Pay up, 17-year-old climate activist tells rich countries

Javea Estavillo, the Philippines' youth delegate to the recent climate change conference in Dubai, delivered a speech calling for developed nations to compensate smaller countries for damage caused by climate change.  Raised in Pasig and bound for Stanford University, Javea shares with Howie Severino her impressions of being one of the youngest among tens of thousands of attendees in Dubai. While noting the "small steps" that gave her hope, she acknowledged feeling annoyed by the adults in the room who "kept talking and talking, and a lot of the time I'm sitting there, like, 'Yeah, you're saying that but you're not going to change.'" Before representing the country's youth, Javea spent time on a remote island in Mindanao without electricity getting to know young people there. Afterwards, she helped raise money for solar panels for the community.  At Stanford, she intends to study climate science on the road to becoming an environmental lawyer. "Hopefully in the future I'll participate in climate negotiations as a delegate instead of a youth delegate”. -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto Speech file courtesy of Atty. Antonio La Viña  Links: ⁠ http://arehnaflourpower.com/⁠ ⁠https://www.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10161760003511967&id=609776966⁠ ⁠https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/scitech/science/890857/cop28-ph-youth-delegate-make-climate-financing-a-reality/story/⁠
1/4/202422 minutes, 38 seconds
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Audio Essay — Firefly is a movie journey full of longing

Howie Severino reflects on the adventure tale and stunning visual feast that begins in a Manila slum and descends on a magical island. The movie received multiple awards in the 2023 Metro Manila Film Festival including Best Screenplay and Best Picture.
12/27/20233 minutes, 33 seconds
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Jose Rizal's last signature and what it says about nationalism | ICYMI

In case you missed ti, curator Marian Pastor reveals the stunning story behind Rizal's last signature before he was to be executed. Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/6csUGLWqT6rQqQKIbLn2Qi?si=27cd5499ab1a4652&nd=1&dlsi=e8bd47e4cebe4c57
12/25/20234 minutes, 13 seconds
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Erwan Heussaff is helping put Filipino food on the world map

Suave, American-accented and half-French, Erwan Heussaff stuck out in Basilan and Tawi-tawi, just two of the places off the beaten track he's gone to explore the world of Philippine cuisine. "I get frustrated sometimes with the monochromatic view that we have of Filipino food and culture," the food vlogger tells Howie Severino, explaining his travels to remote corners of the archipelago to experience unfamiliar flavors and meet locals who cook. Unlike celebrated chefs who introduce Filipino food to international audiences through their fusion creations, Heussaff does it through stories. From the "Erwan-centric" food vlogs typical of this personality-driven genre, his work has evolved to become deeply researched documentaries on such topics as the making of artisanal salt in Bohol, the subtle differences between varieties of ube, and the preparation of a wedding feast in a Cordillera mountain village. His stories have informed legislation to preserve heirloom salts and created so-called "Erwan effect" on local establishments he features. The prestigious James Beard Foundation took notice of his approach to food stories and gave Heussaff its top award this year for social media, beating food content creators from around the world. In a candid and wide-ranging conversation, Erwan and Howie talk about Christmas overeating, a myth about taho, and the three dishes he would recommend to a newbie to Filipino food. And he shares how he feels when people on the street forget his name and refer to him simply as "asawa ni Anne Curtis." Producer: Ivy Andrada Bautista Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
12/20/202347 minutes, 13 seconds
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I don't relate to the word "widow" — Writer Lissa Romero de Guia on losing her husband

After a ten-year career as a theater actress in Miss Saigon and other international productions, Lissa Romero de Guia was living a joyful family life in Baguio with two young children when she suddenly lost her husband, the filmmaker Kidlat de Guia, who died in his sleep while visiting Spain in 2022. When he died, Lissa had just taken a workshop on grieving after losing a close friend. She had also been doing yoga and meditation, and had experience counseling traumatized typhoon victims. A newspaper columnist and author, she has been writing openly about her grief and offers an example of how to deal with such a devastating loss. "I don't cope, I just allow," she tells Howie Severino. "You should allow that crucible of pain, that experience to shape you, to change you... I feel like that is the gift." She and her two children, now 10 and 8, remember Kidlat every day, so they still feel his presence. "My joke is that Kidlat couldn't have died at a better time in my life because in my 50 years here on earth, I've gravitated towards practices that are really about soothing the highly anxious child inside." In this revealing conversation, de Guia talks about those practices, but also about the importance of writing to "right things" and adjusting to life as a single parent. She shares advice on how to talk to people going through loss. She quotes another writer who said, "Every love story is a ghost story." She explains what that means in this episode.
12/20/202342 minutes, 21 seconds
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How do we deal with rude relatives at family gatherings? | ICYMI

Do relatives really mean well when they ask certain questions during gatherings? In case you missed it, trauma therapist and mental health clinician Gang Badoy answers. Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7Acmz5ST3dv2NRFZLgkL7a?si=dd5c04b9853246c3&nd=1&dlsi=20a9ec8e7cbb4ede
12/18/20234 minutes, 6 seconds
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"Siargao has magic" — Queenmelo Esguerra, gender equality activist

After living in New York, London, and Manila, the former TV producer and now LGBT advocate Queenmelo Esguerra has resettled in Siargao, which has evolved from remote provincial backwater to a trendy, cosmopolitan surfing hot spot. Queenmelo, or Melo for short, tells Howie Severino what makes Siargao magical: the combination of natural beauty and an egalitarian vibe where rich and poor, native and foreign can freely play and socialize together. "When surfers go to the water, everyone is equal. It's just you and your relationship with nature," she says while dressed in her typical flowing kaftan and flamboyant shades. "They carry that attitude when they're on the ground." Queenmelo asserts that Siargao is one of the most open places in the country for the LGBT community. But she says the Philippines still has a long way to go in gender equality, citing the sleeping status of the SOGIE bill. Shortly after she moved to Siargao in 2021, Typhoon Odette struck. Queenmelo and a friend survived by taking shelter in a fire station. The next day, she swung into action, mobilizing friends to set up a relief kitchen that prepared hot meals for beleaguered islanders. Queenmelo has also helped rebuild homes and start community food gardens. Siargao people's response to their plight demonstrated their community spirit and further deepened their roots in their adopted home. As they rebuild, they have a chance to create a model for the rest of the country — in sustainable tourism and in socially just ways of relating to each other.
12/15/202328 minutes, 1 second
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I don't relate to the word "widow" — Writer Lissa Romero de Guia on losing her husband

After a ten-year career as a theater actress in Miss Saigon and other international productions, Lissa Romero de Guia was living a joyful family life in Baguio with two young children when she suddenly lost her husband, the filmmaker Kidlat de Guia, who died in his sleep while visiting Spain in 2022. When he died, Lissa had just taken a workshop on grieving after losing a close friend. She had also been doing yoga and meditation, and had experience counseling traumatized typhoon victims. A newspaper columnist and author, she has been writing openly about her grief and offers an example of how to deal with such a devastating loss. "I don't cope, I just allow," she tells Howie Severino. "You should allow that crucible of pain, that experience to shape you, to change you... I feel like that is the gift." She and her two children, now 10 and 8, remember Kidlat every day, so they still feel his presence. "My joke is that Kidlat couldn't have died at a better time in my life because in my 50 years here on earth, I've gravitated towards practices that are really about soothing the highly anxious child inside." In this revealing conversation, de Guia talks about those practices, but also about the importance of writing to "right things" and adjusting to life as a single parent. She shares advice on how to talk to people going through loss. She quotes another writer who said, "Every love story is a ghost story." She explains what that means in this episode. Producer: Aubrey delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto https://thebaguiochronicle.com/author/lissa/?fbclid=IwAR3X5QAmnvW0xUAw-HtK85KaJScH2C6Y-9sI5WP16HE5ScvJ-Hoqcd5aEMs https://atmaprema.global/blogs/self-love-teachers/lissa?fbclid=IwAR2Idbe-ijrc1jU3wORTIOvinc29cVpLzmLXzGTOHE9ZhLighdvPddLSDPw https://peopleihavebeen.blogspot.com/?view=mosaic&fbclid=IwAR16kVWNICJHS5S9aK1jUyT0lsv44zPGJY1PF7jmqVTAwnPb3-_VxONWKuc https://artbooks.ph/products/people-i-have-been?fbclid=IwAR0mcDqXrfz-qrrEPgVp861nRscxeuEIJnQrpYx78b70KedVXuguycV3g1E
12/14/202339 minutes, 38 seconds
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Chef Claude Tayag on what makes the best lechon experience | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Chef Claude Tayag shares tips on how to get the best out of feasting on the Philippines' popular holiday offering. Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5QxMRyM4hOzJDqir6n2T6b?si=0a678d7ca85a49d2&nd=1&dlsi=6f2789b980bb486d
12/11/20234 minutes, 12 seconds
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[VIDEO] What's wrong with the opposition? — activist Edna Aquino's take

Drawing on her five decades as advocate and organizer, Edna Aquino talks about the Marcos comeback, the release of Leila de Lima, and what ails current social movements and human rights education. She and Howie discuss how a traditional respect for women won't stop many from voting for a misogynist. The former campaigner for Amnesty International assesses the prospects of justice for Filipino victims through the International Criminal Court.
12/11/20231 hour, 17 minutes, 17 seconds
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Acclaimed author Patricia Evangelista on being a "trauma journalist" | Part 2

In the second part of their conversation, Patricia Evangelista discusses with Howie a thought-provoking aspect of her approach: unpacking the peculiar language used in the Philippines to cloak, justify and record violence by the state, from the origins of "salvage" to mean extrajudicial killing to the refrain of "nanlaban" (resisting arrest) to the clinical coldness of absurdly fantastical police reports. Evangelista did not come out of nowhere. Her book is part autobiographical, including her wunderkind years when she became a teen-age public speaking world champion. She talks about her famous grandfather, the journalist Mario Chanco, and the big reveal she makes about him in the book; and her turning point when she stopped being a carefree youth and began to care about the forced disappearances of other youths. She offers advice for would-be book writers ("if you're going to sit with a story for four or five years, you better very much care about it."), and for those who want to follow her path as a "trauma journalist." When interviewing victims, she instructs, "try to make it as easy as possible. We ask for facts, not for feelings. Hindi 'yung 'anong pakiramdam mo?'... I try to be as respectful as possible. It doesn't mean I'm always successful. But I try." (Please be advised that this conversation contains sensitive content and some profanity.) Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto Links: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2023/11/06/some-people-need-killing-the-boy-from-kyiv-wound-and-this-is-salvaged?fbclid=IwAR1NNVsChgKAE722ur4MoD-Oda4uvCWy9ddpfh4N5Vr6zgzOH41MclKYTXI https://time.com/collection/must-read-books-2023/6332496/some-people-need-killing/?fbclid=IwAR3JAoXwYyviMPlhN4D56KZb3usKilNwNRNxxP5zreUCWnGzn2NLuVBODt0 https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/18/books/review/some-people-need-killing-patricia-evangelista.html?fbclid=IwAR3oO5J4mu9MrdYxFAw9rebQvpNkoIdYjEWgAJUCYwAyzLyg5DVubmPozY4 https://cseas.yale.edu/patricia-evangelista?fbclid=IwAR2yd-De8BwUTseHaZewt6jMzZjg04nFf0UgKgoW3lr7LteiKjfGI1W15FE https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/authors/2200743/patricia-evangelista/?fbclid=IwAR2tuT9ogrwKXZWw-5axDXONtDdKfKKvZp0_9StkgX62CTMcTjLKO3_22Ok
12/7/202315 minutes, 12 seconds
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Patricia Evangelista on her first book, a surprise critical hit | Part 1

Newly published in the United States, Patricia Evangelista's book, "Some People Need Killing: A Memoir of Murder in my Country," has been appearing on prestigious lists of best books of the year. The editor of the esteemed New Yorker magazine called it a "journalistic masterpiece." When Patricia spoke to Howie Severino, she sounded more relieved than elated, having finished a four-year struggle to write a book that failed to meet various deadlines. She talks about the weight of processing the trauma of many victims' families, the risks of naming names, and the obsessive fact-checking and due diligence required of a book about a state-sponsored drug war that shocked the world. What was shocking as the dead bodies, she says, was the approval of many. "The terrible became ordinary with applause," she tells Howie. The author acknowledges that she never expected her reportage to change anything and only wanted to create a record of the heinous events. Yet her book's recent acclaim shows that "this one story that I thought might not matter in the context of many things happening in the world does matter." (Please be advised that this conversation contains sensitive content and some profanity.) Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2023/11/06/some-people-need-killing-the-boy-from-kyiv-wound-and-this-is-salvaged?fbclid=IwAR1NNVsChgKAE722ur4MoD-Oda4uvCWy9ddpfh4N5Vr6zgzOH41MclKYTXI https://time.com/collection/must-read-books-2023/6332496/some-people-need-killing/?fbclid=IwAR3JAoXwYyviMPlhN4D56KZb3usKilNwNRNxxP5zreUCWnGzn2NLuVBODt0 https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/18/books/review/some-people-need-killing-patricia-evangelista.html?fbclid=IwAR3oO5J4mu9MrdYxFAw9rebQvpNkoIdYjEWgAJUCYwAyzLyg5DVubmPozY4 https://cseas.yale.edu/patricia-evangelista?fbclid=IwAR2yd-De8BwUTseHaZewt6jMzZjg04nFf0UgKgoW3lr7LteiKjfGI1W15FE https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/authors/2200743/patricia-evangelista/?fbclid=IwAR2tuT9ogrwKXZWw-5axDXONtDdKfKKvZp0_9StkgX62CTMcTjLKO3_22Ok
12/7/202326 minutes, 35 seconds
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What is seasonal affective disorder? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, psychologist and life coach Ali Gui defines seasonal affective disorder and gives advice on how to help people experiencing it during the holidays. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2CiLExLxBNMIrMqoKmuEAZ?si=757d257d5d994fe6&nd=1&dlsi=cdf2f9207ff6428b
12/5/20233 minutes, 43 seconds
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Activist Edna Aquino on #BabaeAko and Martial Law in the 70s | Part 2

Drawing on her five decades as advocate and organizer, Edna Aquino talks about the Marcos comeback, the release of Leila de Lima, and what ails current social movements and human rights education. She and Howie discuss how a traditional respect for women wont stop many from voting for a misogynist. The former campaigner for Amnesty International assesses the prospects of justice for Filipino victims through the International Criminal Court. Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
12/1/202333 minutes, 39 seconds
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What's wrong with the opposition? — activist Edna Aquino's take | Part 1

Drawing on her five decades as advocate and organizer, Edna Aquino talks about the Marcos comeback, the release of Leila de Lima, and what ails current social movements and human rights education. She and Howie discuss how a traditional respect for women won't stop many from voting for a misogynist. The former campaigner for Amnesty International assesses the prospects of justice for Filipino victims through the International Criminal Court. https://bitly.ws/33Rd2 https://bitly.ws/33Rdk https://bitly.ws/33RdD https://bitly.ws/33RdS Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
11/30/202340 minutes, 18 seconds
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[VIDEO] After Mang Tani, Aling Amor? GMA's millennial weather anchor

An era ended when Mang Tani retired. In his place are four young presenters, the most seasoned of whom is Amor Larrosa. An occasional campus speaker, Amor explains climate change to listeners in layman's terms. And will she one day be known as Aling Amor? Still a bit too young for the moniker, she's focused on making the science of weather accessible to ordinary people. So whatever she's eventually called, it will be earned.
11/29/202334 minutes, 29 seconds
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Who was Andres Bonifacio's hero? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, historian Ambeth Ocampo reveals the hero of revolutionary leader Andres Bonifacio.
11/28/20232 minutes, 36 seconds
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After Mang Tani, Aling Amor? — GMA's millennial weather anchor

An era ended when Mang Tani retired. In his place are four young presenters, the most seasoned of whom is Amor Larrosa. She talks to Howie Severino about succeeding an industry icon, the life-and-death responsibility of forecasting typhoons, and how supertyphoon Yolanda changed weather communications (there's now a signal no. 5). An occasioinal campus speaker, Amor explains climate change to listeners in layman's terms. And will she one day be known as Aling Amor? Still a bit too young for the moniker, she's focused on making the science of weather accessible to ordinary people. So whatever she's eventually called, it will be earned. Producer: Ivy Andrada Bautista Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
11/22/202333 minutes, 55 seconds
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Leave Gaza — PHL Envoy tells Filipinos in war zone

Over a hundred Filipinos have already been evacuated with their families from Gaza, but 25 are still known to be remaining as the bombing and ground invasion of the Israeli military continue. Howie Severino speaks with Ambassador Ezzedin Tago, the Philippine envoy to Egypt, who is handling Filipinos' evacuation from Gaza through the Egyptian border, the only exit allowed by Israel. But that window may be closing as the war spreads in Gaza. Amb. Tago describes the danger facing Filipinos in Gaza, and the tension and uncertainty of his mission, especially as communications are spotty at best. He explains that some Filipinos still in Gaza may be hoping for a ceasefire but that prospect is fading fast. In this interview, Amb. Tago makes a call to the remaining Filipinos to leave as soon as possible while embassy personnel in Egypt stand ready to assist them with their journey back to the Philippines. He says some evacuees are third-generation Filipinos in Gaza who know no other home and will receive assistance in their difficult adjustment in the Philippines after their repatriation.
11/21/202344 minutes, 3 seconds
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The power of creating comics inspired by current events | ICYMI

In case you missed it, artist Manix Abrera talks about the power of comics as a platform for the underrepresented.
11/20/20233 minutes, 31 seconds
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Leave Gaza — PHL Envoy tells Filipinos in war zone

Over a hundred Filipinos have already been evacuated with their families from Gaza, but 25 are still known to be remaining as the bombing and ground invasion of the Israeli military continue. Howie Severino speaks with Ambassador Ezzedin Tago, the Philippine envoy to Egypt, who is handling Filipinos' evacuation from Gaza through the Egyptian border, the only exit allowed by Israel. But that window may be closing as the war spreads in Gaza. Amb. Tago describes the danger facing Filipinos in Gaza, and the tension and uncertainty of his mission, especially as communications are spotty at best. He explains that some Filipinos still in Gaza may be hoping for a ceasefire but that prospect is fading fast. In this interview, Amb. Tago makes a call to the remaining Filipinos to leave as soon as possible while embassy personnel in Egypt stand ready to assist them with their journey back to the Philippines. He says some evacuees are third-generation Filipinos in Gaza who know no other home and will receive assistance in their difficult adjustment in the Philippines after their repatriation. Producer: Aubrey delos Reyes Researcher: Lilian Tiburcio Editor: Jayr Magtoto
11/16/202342 minutes, 40 seconds
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"Fake news" is an oxymoron — Prof. Fatima Gaw | ICYMI

In case you missed it, digital media researcher Prof. Fatima Gaw explains the criteria that constitute disinformation, and why the term "fake news" is an oxymoron.
11/14/20233 minutes, 52 seconds
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[VIDEO] Yolanda survivor turns climate activist

Joanna Sustento-Bacsa lost five members of her family during supertyphoon Yolanda, holding on to her mother before the storm surge forced her to let go. A traumatized survivor, Joanna decided to devote her life to making people aware of the effects of climate change. In one of the most riveting episodes of this podcast, Joanna recalls that tragic day in Novembr 2013 when the water suddenly entered their home and engulfed her family. She surprises Howie by telling him that watching his documentary, "Climate Justice," turned her into a climate activist, the kind who would protest alone in front of the office of a major oil company. She wielded a poster of her young nephew, still missing after being swept away by the storm, until police led her away. Joanna and Howie talk about what still needs to be learned about one of the worst calamities of our time. An infant's mother, she says the joy of motherhood was mixed with guilt about bringing life into this kind of world. "I was sad because climate change took away my family, and it was discouraging me to have my own. But I wasn't to blame for this mess. It was unfair," she shares. "So when my husband and I decided to have a child, it was an important decision because a child means hope. A child symbolizes hope in the future."
11/14/202346 minutes, 37 seconds
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Moving on with courage after life-changing disaster | Part 2

Joanna Sustento-Bacsa and Howie talk about what still needs to be learned about one of the worst calamities of our time. An infant's mother, she says the joy of motherhood was mixed with guilt about bringing life into this kind of world. "I was sad because climate change took away my family, and it was discouraging me to have my own. But I wasn't to blame for this mess. It was unfair," she shares. "So when my husband and I decided to have a child, it was an important decision because a child means hope. A child symbolizes hope in the future." Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
11/9/202316 minutes, 2 seconds
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The gripping story of a Yolanda survivor who turned activist | Part 1

Joanna Sustento-Bacsa lost five members of her family during super typhoon Yolanda, holding on to her mother before the storm surge forced her to let go. A traumatized survivor, Joanna decided to devote her life to making people aware of the effects of climate change. In one of the most riveting episodes of this podcast, Joanna recalls that tragic day in November 2013 when the water suddenly entered their home and engulfed her family. She suprises Howie by telling him that watching his documentary, "Climate Justice," turned her into a climate activist, the kind who would protest alone in front of the office of a major oil company. She wielded a poster of young nephew, still missing after being swept away by the storm, until police led her away. Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
11/8/202321 minutes
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On crocodiles and politicians — Nielsen Donato debunks animal myths | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Born to be Wild host and veterinarian Doc Nielsen Donato debunks animal myths, including the famous comparison of crocodiles to corrupt politicians.
11/7/20233 minutes, 17 seconds
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Spirit of A Cameraman

In my line of work, you tend to spend almost as much time with a cameraman as with your spouse. I worked with the same cameraman, Egay Navarro, for more than 10 years. If he didn’t get sick and pass away in 2013, we’d probably still be shooting together. Ten years later, I think about him whenever — whenever I need motivation to keep shooting after three decades of documentary-making, whenever I want to smile to myself (because he was amusing in his childlike demeanor), and just whenever, like these days at the end of October and early November when we think about those who have gone ahead. Egay taught me a lot of things, but most of all he showed me how to lead an interesting life.
11/2/20232 minutes, 17 seconds
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[VIDEO] "I feel survivor's guilt" – Z Saldua, Palestinian-Filipina beauty queen

Zahra Bianca "Z" Saldua was second runner-up in the Miss World Philippines pageant in 2013 and living a beauty queen's life with hosting gigs and product sponsorships. But after the war in Israel erupted on October 7, she stopped posting about products and devoted herself to the Palestinian cause. The child of an OFW and a Palestinian woman who met in Kuwait, Z is the product of two diasporas who said she joined beauty pageants to have a larger platform for what she cared about.  She's endured online hate for her views and suffers from what she says is "survivor's guilt" by living a safe, comfortable life in the Philippines, while the people she identifies with are being bombed. She explains to Howie Severino that her mission is to provide a human face to a misunderstood cause and explain the roots of a conflict that go back to 1948.
11/1/202356 minutes, 18 seconds
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Tony La Viña on democracy & disinformation | ICYMI

In case you missed it, lawyer and educator Tony La Viña explains the effects of disinformation during elections. Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7KaNhB7ty5Ocn3ndEK0Q43?si=d9dcb087ed4c49f4
10/30/20235 minutes, 57 seconds
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"I feel survivor's guilt" – Z Saldua, Palestinian-Filipina beauty queen

Zahra Bianca "Z" Saldua was second runner-up in the Miss World Philippines pageant in 2013 and living a beauty queen's life with hosting gigs and product sponsorships. But after the war in Israel erupted on October 7, she stopped posting about products and devoted herself to the Palestinian cause. The child of an OFW and a Palestinian woman who met in Kuwait, Z is the product of two diasporas who said she joined beauty pageants to have a larger platform for what she cared about.  She's endured online hate for her views and suffers from what she says is "survivor's guilt" by living a safe, comfortable life in the Philippines, while the people she identifies with are being bombed. She explains to Howie Severino that her mission is to provide a human face to a misunderstood cause and explain the roots of a conflict that go back to 1948. -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto 
10/26/202354 minutes, 37 seconds
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[VIDEO] Mikey Bustos on his unlikely comedy career

YouTube comedy sensation Mikey Bustos grew up in Canada wanting to be a veterinarian. Then after success on Canadian Idol, he decided to become a singer. But he soon discovered what entertained his audiences the most were his funny videos about the Filipino culture of his immigrant parents, such as his viral musical parody about the common, indispensable tabo.  Howie Severino talks to Mikey about his childhood in Canada as often the only Filipino kid in class, resettling in the Philippines, and coming out with his partner RJ, with whom he shares a new, art-filled home.  Mikey never forgot his childhood love for animals and retained his obsession with ants. He even recently made news as the discoverer of an ant species in his yard that was not known to exist in the Philippines. He tells Howie how his passion for ants became a business with international operations.  With millions of followers on multiple platforms, Mikey shares tips on how to earn from creating online content. But it all starts with developing your talent and being ready for that “curveball from the universe.” 
10/26/202338 minutes, 20 seconds
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Raffy Tima on war reporting | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Raffy Tima explains how covering wars affected his personal life and shaped his faith in humanity. Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/0dPKy7GYSrtOBHgN1iGQjf?si=6b3d979eee9c41a5 
10/24/20234 minutes, 1 second
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“A curveball from the universe” — Mikey Bustos on his unlikely comedy career

YouTube comedy sensation Mikey Bustos grew up in Canada wanting to be a veterinarian. Then after success on Canadian Idol, he decided to become a singer. But he soon discovered what entertained his audiences the most were his funny videos about the Filipino culture of his immigrant parents, such as his viral musical parody about the common, indispensable tabo.  Howie Severino talks to Mikey about his childhood in Canada as often the only Filipino kid in class, resettling in the Philippines, and coming out with his partner RJ, with whom he shares a new, art-filled home.  Mikey never forgot his childhood love for animals and retained his obsession with ants. He even recently made news as the discoverer of an ant species in his yard that was not known to exist in the Philippines. He tells Howie how his passion for ants became a business with international operations.  With millions of followers on multiple platforms, Mikey shares tips on how to earn from creating online content. But it all starts with developing your talent and being ready for that “curveball from the universe.”  Links: https://youtu.be/MFHISwnlzG8?si=o0YEQQbaGQqKb6Wy https://youtu.be/Vzb98tQp53I?si=CQVHAffz3PnVBlbZ -- Producer: Arla Fabella Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
10/19/202337 minutes, 8 seconds
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How does the Cultural Center of the Philippines fight for freedom of expression? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, former CCP vice president Chris Millado talks about a controversy faced by the cultural center and how it upheld the freedom of expression. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2ANhtTRoCNSVYNoYfFdeCF?si=f8bdded4a4e0478c
10/17/20235 minutes, 2 seconds
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[VIDEO] The conflict in Israel, as explained by UP prof Herman Kraft

The Hamas attack on Israel was the latest and one of the bloodiest episodes in a long history of war between Arabs and the Jewish state.  UP political scientist Herman Kraft tells Howie Severino that the tensions began in 1948 when, backed by the United Nations but opposed by Arab states, Israel established itself as a state in what was then the territory of Palestine. As Israel, mostly a nation of European immigrants, won wars and became a military and economic power, Arab states sought peace, sidelining the nationalist interests of their Palestinian allies.  As Israel prepares for a bloody occupation of Gaza, Kraft advises Filipinos to postpone any travels to Israel, even pilgrimages to Jerusalem, as the war could widen and drag on.
10/17/202344 minutes, 48 seconds
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[VIDEO] What makes the Oct 30 polls unique? Election watchdog explains

There’s a reason why there’s not much buzz about the barangay and SK elections this month — candidates are generally avoiding premature campaigning. Our podcast guest Atty. Ona Caritos of LENTE, a prominent election watchdog, says the Comelec has shortened the campaign period and warned against campaigning before or after it. Make no mistake, says Atty. Caritos, the barangay elections are important because the barangay is where most citizens experience government and public service. In many places, it’s also where bases of power are formed for higher office. The Sangguniang Kabataan elections on the same day are unique in at least one major way — it’s the only elections where members of political dynasties are disqualified from running. The application of a ban on dynasties in the SK elections may provide a template for other elections. The October 30 elections will be manual. Could its successful conduct return us to the pre-automated system for the next elections? Atty Caritos weighs in. Vote buying has become easier with mobile and online payment systems. That hasn’t deterred watchdog groups like LENTE from trying to stop it, now with the help of the PNP.
10/14/202340 minutes, 18 seconds
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The conflict in Israel, as explained by UP prof Herman Kraft

The Hamas attack on Israel was the latest and one of the bloodiest episodes in a long history of war between Arabs and the Jewish state. UP political scientist Herman Kraft tells Howie Severino that the tensions began in 1948 when, backed by the United Nations but opposed by Arab states, Israel established itself as a state in what was then the territory of Palestine. As Israel, mostly a nation of European immigrants, won wars and became a military and economic power, Arab states sought peace, sidelining the nationalist interests of their Palestinian allies. As Israel prepares for a bloody occupation of Gaza, Kraft advises Filipinos to postpone any travels to Israel, even pilgrimages to Jerusalem, as the war could widen and drag on. Links: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8DwCl5uEL8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRYZjOuUnlU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0uLbeQlwjw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGVgjS98OsU https://www.aljazeera.com/news/liveblog/2023/10/11/israel-hamas-war-live-gaza-faces-growing-humanitarian-catastrophe https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2023/10/11/hamas-israel-conflict-war-explained/71133876007/ https://edition.cnn.com/2023/10/09/middleeast/israel-hamas-gaza-war-explained-mime-intl/index.html https://www.britannica.com/event/Arab-Israeli-wars -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
10/13/202340 minutes, 21 seconds
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Robert Alejandro on why self-love is important | ICYMI

In case you missed it, award-winning artist Robert Alejandro shares how his cancer diagnosis made him realize the value of self-love. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7faZEjus6rDiDas2xMUbL0?si=5d0871e5cd7c416b
10/9/20233 minutes, 17 seconds
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What makes the Oct 30 polls unique? Election watchdog explains

There’s a reason why there’s not much buzz about the barangay and SK elections this month — candidates are generally avoiding premature campaigning. Our podcast guest Atty. Ona Caritos of LENTE, a prominent election watchdog, says the Comelec has shortened the campaign period and warned against campaigning before or after it. Make no mistake, says Atty. Caritos, the barangay elections are important because the barangay is where most citizens experience government and public service. In many places, it’s also where bases of power are formed for higher office. The Sangguniang Kabataan elections on the same day are unique in at least one major way — it’s the only elections where members of political dynasties are disqualified from running. The application of a ban on dynasties in the SK elections may provide a template for other elections. The October 30 elections will be manual. Could its successful conduct return us to the pre-automated system for the next elections? Atty Caritos weighs in. Vote buying has become easier with mobile and online payment systems. That hasn’t deterred watchdog groups like LENTE from trying to stop it, now with the help of the PNP. Links: https://www.lente.org.ph/ https://comelec.gov.ph/?r=home THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE OF THE PHILIPPINES - Official Gazette https://www.officialgazette.gov.ph/downloads/1991/10oct/19911010-RA-7160-CCA.pdf -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
10/5/202338 minutes, 21 seconds
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How can teachers bring out the best in their students? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, TOYM awardee and public school teacher Sabrina Ongkiko talks about the difference between “matalino” and “magaling." Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/6mESdr7UDFBepmxAoPd2wx?si=ca57a29aa08442d6 
10/3/20234 minutes, 5 seconds
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[VIDEO] What’s to love about Manila? - Heritage advocate Diego Torres explains

In a time of floods and traffic, Manila gives its residents much to complain about. But Diego Torres loves it enough to give free walking tours to show what history and beauty in the city remain and must be preserved. Efforts by heritage activists like Torres have stopped demolitions and restored the grand dame of Manila, the Metropolitan Theater, an art deco marvel. He also shares personal connections to the city, like how his grandparents met while both were working in Escolta when his future lolo spied his future lola through an office window. He explains why the proposed Pasig River Expressway could rob the city of its famous vistas and offers an alternative vision — one that is pedestrian-friendly with a revived streetcar network called the tranvia and museums devoted to Manila’s fashion, architecture, and military history.
10/2/202345 minutes, 7 seconds
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What’s to love about Manila? - Heritage advocate Diego Torres explains

In a time of floods and traffic, Manila gives its residents much to complain about. But Diego Torres loves it enough to give free walking tours to show what history and beauty in the city remain and must be preserved. Efforts by heritage activists like Torres have stopped demolitions and restored the grand dame of Manila, the Metropolitan Theater, an art deco marvel. He also shares personal connections to the city, like how his grandparents met while both were working in Escolta when his future lolo spied his future lola through an office window. He explains why the proposed Pasig River Expressway could rob the city of its famous vistas and offers an alternative vision — one that is pedestrian-friendly with a revived streetcar network called the tranvia and museums devoted to Manila’s fashion, architecture, and military history. Links: https://www.facebook.com/RebirthManila?mibextid=ZbWKwL https://instagram.com/rebirth.manila?igshid=MmU2YjMzNjRlOQ== https://youtube.com/@RenacimientoManila?si=HsKOTKKIeY34k33T https://www.tatlerasia.com/lifestyle/arts/renacimiento-manila-everything-to-know -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
9/28/202345 minutes, 46 seconds
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Christmas in Our Hearts was a surprise hit | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Christmas hitmaker Jose Mari Chan reveals that Christmas in Our Hearts was initially tagged “too Christian” and was not projected to be a hit. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5zwp2dFiuI4KfSFDxjuPIQ?si=8848e739bcea4ae4 
9/25/20234 minutes, 49 seconds
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“Siargao has magic” – Queenmelo Esguerra, gender equality activist

After living in New York, London, and Manila, the former TV producer and now LGBT advocate Queenmelo Esguerra has resettled in Siargao, which has evolved from remote provincial backwater to a trendy, cosmopolitan surfing hot spot.  Queenmelo, or Melo for short, tells Howie Severino what makes Siargao magical: the combination of natural beauty and an egalitarian vibe where rich and poor, native and foreign can freely play and socialize together.  “When surfers go to the water, everyone is equal. It’s just you and your relationship with nature,” she says while dressed in her typical flowing kaftan and flamboyant shades. “They carry that attitude when they’re on the ground.”  Queenmelo asserts that Siargao is one of the most open places in the country for the LGBT community. But she says the Philippines still has a long way to go in gender equality, citing the sleeping status of the SOGIE bill.  Shortly after she moved to Siargao in 2021, Typhoon Odette struck. Queenmelo and a friend survived by taking shelter in a fire station. The next day, she swung into action, mobilizing friends to set up a relief kitchen that prepared hot meals for beleaguered islanders. Queenmelo has also helped rebuild homes and start community food gardens.  Siargao people’s response to their plight demonstrated their community spirit and further deepened their roots in their adopted home. As they rebuild, they have a chance to create a model for the rest of the country — in sustainable tourism and in socially just ways of relating to each other.  For more information: https://www.tatlerasia.com/power-purpose/philanthropy/after-the-storm-typhoon-odette-queenmelo-esguerra https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/lifestyle/content/815454/siargao-after-its-worst-hit-with-odette-from-the-eyes-of-a-typhoon-survivor/story/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/topstories/regions/815052/almost-99-of-population-in-siargao-including-tourists-affected-by-odette-matugas/story/ -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
9/21/202327 minutes, 37 seconds
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[VIDEO] Regine Cabato on being a young journalist during the Duterte admin

“Baptism of fire right after college" At just 28, Regine Cabato is one of the most influential, if relatively unknown, journalists in the Philippines. Covering both the Duterte and Marcos governments for the Washington Post, Cabato is read by political leaders around the world, not to mention embassies and key institutions that affect the Philippines. Cabato talks to Howie Severino about her recent blockbuster reports, on the so-called “digital sweatshops” in the Philippines that service the booming Artificial Intelligence industry and the century-old remains of a Filipina teen-ager secretly used for controversial research in Washington DC.  She recalls the harassment she endured during her coverage of the drug war, and explains what it will take for journalists to push back the tsunami of falsehoods reaching ordinary people.  Cabato is also a Palanca awardee for her poetry, where she expresses emotions triggered by her reporting.  Even in a hostile environment for journalists, Cabato says, “I'm not sure that I can picture myself doing anything else. I've always wanted to be a journalist.” 
9/20/202348 minutes, 50 seconds
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Aries Arugay on making a stand in the Russia-Ukraine war | ICYMI

In case you missed it, political scientist Aries Arugay explains why the PH should not be neutral in the Ukraine-Russia war. Listen to the full episode: https://open.spotify.com/episode/60AJ3n3u4fqdk0DCJHKYf1?si=bc93be5908c4428a 
9/19/20235 minutes, 8 seconds
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“Baptism of fire right after college” — Regine Cabato on being a young journalist during the Duterte administration 

At just 28, Regine Cabato is one of the most influential, if relatively unknown, journalists in the Philippines. Covering both the Duterte and Marcos governments for the Washington Post, Cabato is read by political leaders around the world, not to mention embassies and key institutions that affect the Philippines. Cabato talks to Howie Severino about her recent blockbuster reports, on the so-called “digital sweatshops” in the Philippines that service the booming Artificial Intelligence industry and the century-old remains of a Filipina teen-ager secretly used for controversial research in Washington DC.  She recalls the harassment she endured during her coverage of the drug war, and explains what it will take for journalists to push back the tsunami of falsehoods reaching ordinary people.  Cabato is also a Palanca awardee for her poetry, where she expresses emotions triggered by her reporting.  Even in a hostile environment for journalists, Cabato says, “I'm not sure that I can picture myself doing anything else. I've always wanted to be a journalist.”  Links to her stories: https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/interactive/2023/maura-philippines-smithsonian-brain-collection/ http://tldtd.org/poet/regine-cabato/ https://anmly.org/ap32/neighbor-species-32/regine-cabato/ https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/news/seven-journalists-five-continents-join-institute-journalist-fellows-term https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2023/08/28/scale-ai-remotasks-philippines-artificial-intelligence/ https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/saturday/audio/2018841930/regine-cabato-how-the-marcos-dynasty-regained-power-in-philippines https://youtu.be/xeHPmTeeKfI https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1413379452187655 --Produced by Arla FabellaResearched by MJ CerilloEdited by Jayr Magtoto
9/14/202345 minutes, 59 seconds
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[VIDEO] From Baguio to Mongolia for the world’s toughest horse race

Young Baguio horsewoman Solana Perez’s dream to race in the 1000-kilometer Mongol Derby was postponed by the pandemic.  But she finally made it last month as the event’s very first rider from the Philippines.  She spoke to Howie Severino about the highs and lows, from the adrenaline rush to the meditative pace with which she finished.  Solana learned to ride horses in her native Baguio, and said she was racing not just for herself but for all the Baguio pony boys who taught her to ride from a young age.  She experienced more than a race but a unique Mongolian frontier culture that took her in like she was one of their own.
9/13/202350 minutes, 19 seconds
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Can bike lanes reduce accidents? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, cycling advocate Lester Babiera talks about the importance of protected bike lanes for more equitable and safer roads. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/6axPyV65pCao6Mzd1UcSbC?si=77225d8bc1b84793
9/12/20236 minutes, 24 seconds
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From Baguio to Mongolia for the world’s toughest horse race

Young Baguio horsewoman Solana Perez’s dream to race in the 1000-kilometer Mongol Derby was postponed by the pandemic. But she finally made it last month as the event’s very first rider from the Philippines. She spoke to Howie Severino about the highs and lows, from the adrenaline rush to the meditative pace with which she finished. Solana learned to ride horses in her native Baguio, and said she was racing not just for herself but for all the Baguio pony boys who taught her to ride from a young age. She experienced more than a race but a unique Mongolian frontier culture that took her in like she was one of their own. Links: https://equestrianists.com/mongol-derby/the-riders/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5HeLnD_BN4 https://www.facebook.com/easterncommph/videos/990508204755476/ https://www.gridmagazine.ph/watch-listen/grid-eastern-communications-vol-09-solana-perez https://whenisnow.org/portfolio/horse-on-a-high-cliff-by-solana-l-perez/ -- Produced by Aubrey Delos Reyes Researched by MJ Cerillo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
9/7/202342 minutes
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Audio Essay: Farewell to Mike Enriquez, colleague and friend

In this audio essay, Howie Severino traces the career of Mike Enriquez from his mellow days as the English-speaking DJ Baby Michael all the way to his years as TV news anchor and a pillar of the broadcast industry. Howie also knew another side of Mike as a colleague on a hazardous assignment in Iraq 20 years ago, and as a friend who appreciated the work of cameramen and others who worked with him. Mike died last August 29, 2023 at the age of 71. 
9/6/20238 minutes, 21 seconds
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[VIDEO] Curator Marian Pastor Roces on building back our culture

I make museums, that's how Marian Pastor Roces often matter-of-factly describes her work. An art and museum curator of almost 50 years, Roces considers museums an essential part of understanding a culture and reversing the harmful misconceptions that have dragged Philippine society down. "Curation is about dealing with moral questions," she says. Why do Filipinos cannot solve large social problems, why do we have confused notions about our identity, and what should a new museum a hundred years from now contain about our present time? Watch the full interview in the video.
9/5/20231 hour, 12 minutes, 38 seconds
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“Our brains got fried.” – Curator Marian Pastor Roces | Part 2

Demonstrating the wide scope of her interests, Roces talks about Rizal as both mestizo and indio, and why the government's Martial Law museum should not be about any golden age.  She argues that Martial Law distorted culture and fried Filipinos' brains, the effects of which are still being felt.  As a final question, Howie asks her, what should a new museum a hundred years from now contain about our present time? For more information: https://21am.culturalcenter.gov.ph/enhttps://philippinestudies.uk/mapping/tours/show/2https://philippinestudies.uk/mapping/tours/show/3https://philippinestudies.uk/mapping/tours/show/4 -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
8/31/202331 minutes, 41 seconds
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Curator Marian Pastor Roces on building back our culture | Part 1

I make museums, that's how Marian Pastor Roces often matter-of-factly describes her work. An art and museum curator of almost 50 years, Roces considers museums an essential part of understanding a culture and reversing the harmful misconceptions that have dragged Philippine society down. "Curation is about dealing with moral questions," she says.  She explains to Howie Severino why she thinks Filipinos cannot solve large social problems and why we have confused notions about our identity, including the way the word "indigenous" can exclude and discriminate as much as it affirms. For more information: https://21am.culturalcenter.gov.ph/enhttps://philippinestudies.uk/mapping/tours/show/2https://philippinestudies.uk/mapping/tours/show/3https://philippinestudies.uk/mapping/tours/show/4 -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
8/31/202339 minutes, 39 seconds
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Rice, sugar, meat… What’s the solution to rising prices of basic commodities? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, economist and IBON Foundation research director Rosario Guzman breaks down the role of government in lowering the prices of basic commodities. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7AFuJH7GMAMtJubkshsEGW?si=01179cbc1dbe4afa
8/29/20236 minutes, 55 seconds
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[VIDEO] War in Ukraine: Why we should care – Denys Mykhailiuk, Ukrainian Envoy

Russia invaded Ukraine nearly 600 days ago. Resistance by Ukrainians led by a charismatic president captured the world’s attention. Who’s winning the war, how’s the Ukraine counteroffensive?  How is the war affecting the world’s food security? Why is China watching the war closely? Seasoned Ukrainian diplomat Denys Mykhailiuk talks geopolitics with Howie Severino.  Howie also recalls a Filipina traveler in Ukraine, and previous podcast guest, who stayed to help in the resistance. 
8/27/202325 minutes, 57 seconds
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War in Ukraine: Why we should care – Denys Mykhailiuk, Ukrainian Envoy 

Russia invaded Ukraine nearly 600 days ago. Resistance by Ukrainians led by a charismatic president captured the world’s attention. Who’s winning the war, how’s the Ukraine counteroffensive?  How is the war affecting the world’s food security? Why is China watching the war closely? Seasoned Ukrainian diplomat Denys Mykhailiuk talks geopolitics with Howie Severino.  Howie also recalls a Filipina traveler in Ukraine, and previous podcast guest, who stayed to help in the resistance.  -- Produced by: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researched by: MJ Cerillo Edited by: Jayr Magtoto  Links:  https://www.hrw.org/europe/central-asia/ukraine https://news.un.org/en/focus/ukraine https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-60506682 https://www.aljazeera.com/where/ukraine/ https://www.theguardian.com/world/ukraine https://war.ukraine.ua/support-ukraine/ https://eu-solidarity-ukraine.ec.europa.eu/helping-ukrainians-how-you-can-donate-and-engage_en
8/24/202324 minutes, 49 seconds
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The analogy between science and journalism by Atom Araullo | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Atom Araullo explains the application of his physics background in journalism. Catch the full episode here:https://open.spotify.com/episode/5qVvzHhkiy9i3JYeseoawL?si=42d0b7886f6e4127&nd=1
8/21/20232 minutes, 55 seconds
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[VIDEO] Making a difference through documentaries — Kara Magsanoc-Alikpala

After surviving cancer, Kara Magsanoc-Alikpala found her calling in producing cause-oriented non-fiction films. One of her latest, Delikado, made the finals of this year’s Emmy Awards for US television. The film follows a small group of daring land defenders in Palawan who make citizen arrests and confiscate chainsaws in the forests around the resort town of El Nido. One of them was killed before the film was finished. Kara has produced numerous history films, including two on martial law in the Philippines — Batas Militar and the more recent 11,103, about martial law survivors. She also talks to Howie about her cancer journey and the support group she established, and what it was like to be the daughter of legendary newspaper editor Letty Jimenez-Magsanoc.
8/19/202342 minutes, 15 seconds
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Making a difference through documentaries — Emmy award finalist Kara Magsanoc-Alikpala

After surviving cancer, Kara Magsanoc-Alikpala found her calling in producing cause-oriented non-fiction films. One of her latest, Delikado, made the finals of this year’s Emmy Awards for US television. The film follows a small group of daring land defenders in Palawan who make citizen arrests and confiscate chainsaws in the forests around the resort town of El Nido. One of them was killed before the film was finished.  Kara has produced numerous history films, including two on martial law in the Philippines — Batas Militar and the more recent 11,103, about martial law survivors.  She also talks to Howie about her cancer journey and the support group she established, and what it was like to be the daughter of legendary newspaper editor  Letty Jimenez-Magsanoc. -- Producer: Arla Fabella Researcher: MJ Cerillo  Editor: Jayr Magtoto
8/16/202340 minutes, 41 seconds
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[VIDEO] Plays, politics and culture with Floy Quintos

Floy Quintos talks to Howie Severino about the role of art as an expression of dissent through the ages. As he tries to bridge a political divide with his latest work, “Reconciliation Dinner,” The playwright and theater luminary explains why he writes plays that reflect our current politics.  Also an expert on pre-colonial artifacts and culture, he explains why old cultural objects matter, why traditional fabrics reflect a wealth of information, and which tribal tattoos should not be worn, or appropriated, by people outside of the culture.
8/15/202355 minutes, 42 seconds
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Gen-Z, millennial, boomer... Are generational labels useless? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, sociologist and professor Dr. Jayeel Cornelio debunks generational labels and stereotypes. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7lnIe4sPsZgp3Xr5APwLlo?si=2sVxxHV6SOOtgrBuet-aQg
8/14/20234 minutes, 18 seconds
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On Whang-od tattoos and Ifugao rice gods - Floy Quintos talks about his passion for pre-colonial art | Part 2

In addition to his work in theater, Floy Quintos is a recognized expert on pre-colonial artifacts and culture. He talks to Howie Severino about why old cultural objects matter, why traditional fabrics reflect a wealth of information, and which tribal tattoos should not be worn, or appropriated, by people outside of the culture. For further information: https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/386531/from-repulsive-icons-to-anting-anting-floy-quintos-and-his-quest-for-artifacts/https://www.ayalamuseum.org/events/ifugao-bulul-lecture-floy-quintoshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikLIB9YOQqkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZytl65HOYc -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
8/10/202322 minutes, 18 seconds
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“We’re on the edge of forgetting” — Floy Quintos | Part 1

The playwright and theater luminary explains why he writes plays that reflect our current politics.  He tries to bridge a political divide with his latest work, “Reconciliation Dinner.”  Asked if theater can still make an impact, Floy replies: “We need to rid ourselves of the burden of popularity and just do the good work.” He cites the role of art as an expression of dissent through the ages, including the kundiman.  For further information:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlVCr2Qmsas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3izypnAyyE https://www.facebook.com/TRD2023/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/lifestyle/artandculture/870722/the-reconciliation-dinner-a-new-play-that-makes-us-face-our-toxic-politics/story/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/lifestyle/artandculture/652767/an-ode-to-the-power-of-art-a-review-of-lsquo-the-kundiman-party-rsquo/story/ -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
8/9/202334 minutes, 54 seconds
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“Go for the Filipino.” – Kara David advocates the use of mother tongue | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Kara David explains the importance of teaching and using the Filipino language. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/6HNbiv1CWBCGgVY2FPYm54?si=d4d377a0579a4880&nd=1 
8/7/20234 minutes, 21 seconds
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Audio Essay: What is a Filipino?

An audio essay prompted by the Filipinas’ surprising play at football’s World Cup and questions raised by some about their authenticity as Filipinos. Being Filipino is more than a matter of citizenship, Howie says, and no longer defined by where you live and even where you were born. Howie includes his own journey to Filipino identity after a childhood in America.
8/3/20235 minutes, 57 seconds
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“Pole vaulting is mine.” – EJ Obiena on his chosen sport | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Olympian and World Number 2 pole vaulter EJ Obiena shares the story behind his chosen sport. Catch the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/1pGHvtwA5sJFXii7cObH97?si=MCXR6dZXT_uaDl7X1i037A
7/31/20234 minutes, 33 seconds
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[VIDEO] MIT astrophysics grad Hillary Andales looks to the stars for life's answers

Hillary Andales of Abuyog, Leyte won the “Oscars of science” in 2017 as a high school student before enrolling at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she recently graduated with an array of honors. The 23-year-old Pisay alumna talks to Howie Severino about her academic interest in “galactic archeology,” why she wants to come home and be part of the scientific community, why scientists must be politically engaged, and why at one point she said she was burning out. -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
7/30/202348 minutes, 34 seconds
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MIT astrophysics grad Hillary Andales looks to the stars for life’s answers

Hillary Andales of Abuyog, Leyte won the “Oscars of science” in 2017 as a high school student before enrolling at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she recently graduated with an array of honors. The 23-year-old Pisay alumna talks to Howie Severino about her academic interest in “galactic archeology,” why she wants to come home and be part of the scientific community, why scientists must be politically engaged, and why at one point she said she was burning out. -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
7/27/202347 minutes, 46 seconds
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Direk Mark Reyes reveals his fave ‘Voltes V’ scene | ICYMI

In case you missed it, award-winning director Mark Reyes, shares his favorite scenes from ‘Voltes V Legacy.’ Check out the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/4DnjN0Bqz8PnLDzpRyse66?si=oy1ajwUXTf-r3i_FmCH89A
7/24/20232 minutes, 46 seconds
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[VIDEO] Young analyst Ken Abante wants to move people, not just cars

Former Ateneo college valedictorian Kenneth Abante has been using his numbers expertise for public causes. He has dissected the national budget to show just how biased government transport policy is in favor of private vehicles. The expansion of the bike lane network during the pandemic can be credited to Abante and other advocates of inclusive mobility. He talks to Howie about what motivates idealists like him in the face of huge odds. 
7/21/202323 minutes, 46 seconds
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Young analyst Ken Abante wants to move people, not just cars

Former Ateneo college valedictorian Kenneth Abante has been using his numbers expertise for public causes. He has dissected the national budget to show just how biased government transport policy is in favor of private vehicles. The expansion of the bike lane network during the pandemic can be credited to Abante and other advocates of inclusive mobility. He talks to Howie about what motivates idealists like him in the face of huge odds. Links:https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ken-Abantehttps://www.youtube.com/@kenabante6218https://www.moveasoneph.org/https://www.facebook.com/MoveAsOneCoalition https://wesolve.ph/https://www.facebook.com/wesolveph -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Sanaf Marcelo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
7/19/202321 minutes, 8 seconds
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Michael V. talks about comedy in the digital age | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Michael V. talks about pushing the boundaries of comedy in the digital age. Check out the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/4DnjN0Bqz8PnLDzpRyse66?si=oy1ajwUXTf-r3i_FmCH89A
7/17/20233 minutes, 47 seconds
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[VIDEO] Toym Imao on mixing art and politics

A longtime UP Fine Arts teacher, the activist-artist talks about his jeepney made of yarn, body bags that contained gardens, the surprising origin of his name, and why these are the best of times to be an artist. Toym also gives wise advice for young people aspiring to artistic careers.
7/15/202353 minutes, 29 seconds
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Toym Imao on mixing art and politics | Part 2

A longtime UP Fine Arts teacher, the activist-artist talks about his jeepney made of yarn, body bags that contained gardens, the surprising origin of his name, and why these are the best of times to be an artist. Toym also gives wise advice for young people aspiring to artistic careers.
7/13/202324 minutes, 49 seconds
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Toym Imao on mixing art and politics | Part 1

A longtime UP Fine Arts teacher, the activist-artist talks about his jeepney made of yarn, body bags that contained gardens, the surprising origin of his name, and why these are the best of times to be an artist. Toym also gives wise advice for young people aspiring to artistic careers.
7/12/202329 minutes, 44 seconds
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Why are the Philippines’ maritime territories strategic? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, veteran journalist Marites Vitug breaks down the importance of our country's maritime territories. Listen to the full episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5hnPERo0VvwfYOkcFpkh7N?si=lvdhMfY4TdSyIHQDUqQNjQ 
7/10/20233 minutes, 8 seconds
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[VIDEO] Candy Gourlay: Filipina literary star in the UK

Candy Gourlay's YA novels “Tall Story” and “Bone Talk” were unlikely hits about Filipino teens facing unique struggles. This year’s “Wild Song” is the heart-wrenching story of Igorot youths shipped to America to be exhibited in the 1904 World’s Fair.  But before the fame and glory, she endured nine years of rejections. Gourlay talks to Howie about why she persisted, the struggles of an author of color in a White-dominated world, and how she started writing from a Filipina perspective.
7/9/202358 minutes, 34 seconds
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Candy Gourlay: Filipina literary star in the UK

Candy Gourlay's YA novels “Tall Story” and “Bone Talk” were unlikely hits about Filipino teens facing unique struggles. This year’s “Wild Song” is the heart-wrenching story of Igorot youths shipped to America to be exhibited in the 1904 World’s Fair. But before the fame and glory, she endured nine years of rejections. Gourlay talks to Howie about why she persisted, the struggles of an author of color in a White-dominated world, and how she started writing from a Filipina perspective. Learn more: • https://www.candygourlay.com/p/about.html • https://www.candygourlay.co.uk/ • https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/childrens-book-of-the-week-bone-talk-by-candy-gourlay • https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wild-song-by-candy-gourlay-review-an-eye-opening-adventure • https://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jan/18/shine-candy-gourlay-review • https://www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site/2011/dec/02/tall-story-candy-gourlay-review -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Sanaf Marcelo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
7/5/20231 hour, 2 minutes, 38 seconds
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Audio Essay: Comma power

An audio essay by Howie Severino on how a tourism slogan can change, just by adding that prince of punctuation. Love the Philippines vs Love, the Philippines
7/3/20235 minutes, 2 seconds
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LGBTQ+ representation in film | ICYMI

In case you missed it, award-winning filmmaker Jun Robles Lana talks about the importance of LGBTQ+ representation in movies.
6/26/20233 minutes, 39 seconds
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[VIDEO] AI: Dangers and opportunities – A conversation with Mohanbir Sawhney, tech expert and business school professor

The speed at which Artificial Intelligence is advancing is "mind-boggling," says the Indian-born Prof. Sawhney, who teaches AI business applications at Northwestern University in the US. Citing the need for guardrails and ethical guidelines to manage its dangers and harness its potential, he compares the advent of AI to splitting the atom, with its enormous benefits coupled with the risk of “blowing ourselves up spectacularly.”  He explains to Howie how he sees AI affecting journalism, the call center industry, and Filipino nurses in online support roles. As a teacher, he expects students to “cheat” using AI, so he has adapted his methodology to incorporate AI inputs into his exams. He also shares lessons from the pandemic – “a period of tremendous forced innovation.” “We learned so many things during the pandemic. Let us not forget those. Let's retain the best of digital and the best of physical, and bring it together to create true omni-channel experiences, whether it's learning experiences, or shopping experiences, or working experiences.” Prof. Mohan is coming to the Philippines to give a lecture on Artificial Intelligence on July 17, 2023.
6/23/202344 minutes, 42 seconds
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AI: Dangers and opportunities – A conversation with Mohanbir Sawhney, tech expert and business school professor

The speed at which Artificial Intelligence is advancing is "mind-boggling," says the Indian-born Prof. Sawhney, who teaches AI business applications at Northwestern University in the US. Citing the need for guardrails and ethical guidelines to manage its dangers and harness its potential, he compares the advent of AI to splitting the atom, with its enormous benefits coupled with the risk of “blowing ourselves up spectacularly.” He explains to Howie how he sees AI affecting journalism, the call center industry, and Filipino nurses in online support roles. As a teacher, he expects students to “cheat” using AI, so he has adapted his methodology to incorporate AI inputs into his exams. He also shares lessons from the pandemic – “a period of tremendous forced innovation.” “We learned so many things during the pandemic. Let us not forget those. Let's retain the best of digital and the best of physical, and bring it together to create true omni-channel experiences, whether it's learning experiences, or shopping experiences, or working experiences.” Prof. Mohan is coming to the Philippines to give a lecture on Artificial Intelligence on July 17, 2023. -- Producer: Eumer Yanga Researcher: MJ Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
6/21/202345 minutes, 12 seconds
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Was Jose Rizal a cyclist? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, historian Xiao Chua explains the role of trivia in history, citing our national hero Dr. Jose Rizal and the many tidbits about his life as an example.
6/19/20235 minutes, 6 seconds
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[VIDEO] The future of digital media and journalism with Jaemark Tordecilla

After serving as head of GMA News and Public Affairs’ multiawarded digital team, Jaemark is off to Harvard to study the future of media—in particular, how to regain public trust. Technology has created countless echo chambers where people just hear what they agree with, while avoiding alternative points of view through the mass media.A Pisay grad who majored in computer science in UP, Jaemark believes his diverse background has been an advantage in journalism. The former sports blogger also gives his take on Philippine sports media and culture. With digital media and AI evolving at breakneck speeds, what awaits young aspiring journalists? Jaemark shares his thoughts, as well as some sound advice. 
6/16/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 20 seconds
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Blogging pioneer Jaemark Tordecilla a.k.a. Fire Quinito on Pinoy sports culture

A former sports blogger, Jaemark gives his take on Philippine sports, and fielding naturalized athletes from other countries. He also talks about the awkward time he worked in the same place as the namesake of his blog, Fire Quinito. Listen to Part 2 of his conversation with Howie. -- Producer: Shai Lagarde Editor: Jayr Magtoto
6/15/202321 minutes, 37 seconds
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Journalism needs people from diverse backgrounds – Jaemark Tordecilla, computer programmer-turned-journalist

Jaemark and Howie have been having conversations about the future of media for almost 20 years. After nine years as editor-in-chief of GMA News Online where he succeeded Howie, Jaemark is off to Harvard to study… the future of media. In particular, how to regain public trust. Technology has created countless echo chambers where people just hear what they agree with, while avoiding alternative points of view through the mass media. A Philippine Science High School grad who majored in computer science in UP, Jaemark believes his tech background has been an advantage in journalism. With digital media and AI evolving at breakneck speeds, what awaits young aspiring journalists? Jaemark gives his take, as well as some sound advice. -- Producer: Shai Lagarde Editor: Jayr Magtoto
6/15/202339 minutes, 1 second
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Patriotism and nationalism, what’s the difference? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Manolo Quezon, President Manuel L. Quezon’s grandson, breaks down what patriotism and nationalism mean in light of the 125th anniversary of Philippine Independence.
6/12/20233 minutes
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[VIDEO] Malakas na malakas ang patriotism ng Pilipino – Manolo Quezon

In time for the 125th anniversary of June 12, 1898, public intellectual Manuel L. Quezon III, grandson of the country's second president Manuel L. Quezon, questions whether that is even the right date to mark the nation's independence. Howie and Manolo discuss Filipino victories over Spanish forces in many provinces that led to a short-lived independence, before the US arrived to occupy and colonize the country. Manolo reminds listeners that even after defeat in the Philippine-American War, Apolinario Mabini wrote that the struggle for independence would continue through other means, which did happen through lobbying and advocacy when the United States granted the country its independence on July 4, 1946.  Manolo connects the dots from 1946 to the fall of dictatorship in 1986 to, finally, what he asserts was the rise of a new national consensus in the 2022 elections.  In saying that Filipino patriotism is strong, he distinguishes it from nationalism, which is less so. In this view, "patriotism" or the state of being "makabayan" is a love for one's native land, community, and culture, as opposed to the "nation" that includes its form of government and how it is being run. Families can appreciate history better, Manolo advises, by doing pilgrimages together to historical sites, and searching out and eating our heroes' favorite food.
6/9/20231 hour, 10 minutes, 14 seconds
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MLQ's legacy, the fate of the EDSA consensus, and the cycles of history

In part 2 of the Manolo Quezon episode, he connects the dots from the independence in 1946 that his grandfather Manuel L. Quezon did not live to see, to the fall of dictatorship in 1986 to, finally, what he asserts was the rise of a new national consensus in the 2022 elections. Manolo and Howie tackle the meaning of one of MLQ's most famous quotes: "I prefer a government run like hell by Filipinos than a government run like heaven by Americans, because however bad a Filipino government might be, we can always change it." Families can appreciate history better, Manolo advises, by doing pilgrimages together to historical sites, and searching out and eating our heroes' favorite food. -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Sanaf Marcelo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
6/8/202327 minutes, 9 seconds
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Malakas na malakas ang patriotism ng Pilipino. – Manolo Quezon

("Filipino patriotism is very strong.") In time for the 125th anniversary of June 12, 1898, public intellectual Manuel L. Quezon III, the grandson of the country's second president Manuel L. Quezon, questions whether that is even the right date to mark the nation's independence. August 1896 was when Filipinos declared they desired to be free, and July 4, 1946 was when the United States granted the country its independence. In part 1 of this episode, Howie and Manolo discuss Filipino victories over Spanish forces in many provinces in 1898 that led to a short-lived independence, before the US arrived to occupy and colonize the country. Manolo reminds listeners that even after defeat in the Philippine-American War, Apolinario Mabini wrote that the struggle for independence would continue through other means, which did happen through lobbying and advocacy that eventually won Filipinos their independence in 1946. In asserting that Filipino patriotism is strong, Manolo distinguishes it from nationalism, which is less so. In this view, "patriotism" or the state of being "makabayan" is a love for one's native land, community, and culture, as opposed to the "nation" that includes its form of government and how it is being run. -- Producer: Aubrey Delos Reyes Researcher: Sanaf Marcelo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
6/7/202335 minutes, 2 seconds
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[VIDEO] Meet disaster scientist Dr. Mahar Lagmay of the UP Resilience Institute

Our guest studied overseas to be a geologist specializing in volcanos, and realized the skills he learned could be applied to disaster analysis and preparedness. He cites examples where disaster was averted because of new tools, but also bemoans the outdated hazard maps that underestimated the storm surge in Leyte that killed thousands during super typhoon Yolanda. What we need, Lagmay explains, are hazard maps that project the impact of climate change, which makes predictions based on the historical record irrelevant and potentially catastrophic, such as what happened in Leyte. The Philippines is so disaster-prone, Dr. Lagmay says, that an army of “citizen scientists” is needed to gather data for disaster prevention. He recalls the government’s groundbreaking Project Noah that produced “hazard-specific, area-focused, and time-bound warnings” that saved many lives, yet was terminated several years ago with the change in administrations. Science should be above politics, Lagmay asserts, but political meddling plagues scientific work and disaster preparedness. For more information: https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/10/31/22/bring-back-up-noah-in-ndrrmc-were-ready-says-hazard-expert-group https://www.sunstar.com.ph/article/1831387/davao/local-news/up-scientist-pushes-for-department-of-disaster-resilience https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeHtl64ANJI&ab_channel=UPResilienceInstitute
6/5/20231 hour, 7 minutes, 34 seconds
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Meet disaster scientist Dr. Mahar Lagmay of the UP Resilience Institute

Our guest studied overseas to be a geologist specializing in volcanos, and realized the skills he learned could be applied to disaster analysis and preparedness. He cites examples where disaster was averted because of new tools, but also bemoans the outdated hazard maps that underestimated the storm surge in Leyte that killed thousands during super typhoon Yolanda. What we need, Lagmay explains, are hazard maps that project the impact of climate change, which makes predictions based on the historical record irrelevant and potentially catastrophic, such as what happened in Leyte. The Philippines is so disaster-prone, Dr. Lagmay says, that an army of “citizen scientists” is needed to gather data for disaster prevention. He recalls the government’s groundbreaking Project Noah that produced “hazard-specific, area-focused, and time-bound warnings” that saved many lives, yet was terminated several years ago with the change in administrations. Science should be above politics, Lagmay asserts, but political meddling plagues scientific work and disaster preparedness. For more information: https://news.abs-cbn.com/news/10/31/22/bring-back-up-noah-in-ndrrmc-were-ready-says-hazard-expert-group https://www.sunstar.com.ph/article/1831387/davao/local-news/up-scientist-pushes-for-department-of-disaster-resilience https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeHtl64ANJI&ab_channel=UPResilienceInstitute -- Producer: John Eumer Yanga Researcher: Mary Joy Cerillo Editor: Jayr Magtoto
6/1/202355 minutes, 53 seconds
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Time to rethink Manila — Dr. Ivan Henares, UNESCO PHL SecGen

The burning of the iconic Manila Post Office building is a chance to imagine it restored as a public arts hub, and not as a commercial establishment, according to heritage advocate Ivan Henares who now heads UNESCO’s National Commission of the Philippines. In addressing rumors of arson, Henares said the government would never allow the now-gutted Manila Post Office to be demolished. Instead, it could have a future as the heart of a revitalized Manila civic center. That would require the removal of unsightly flyovers, a shift to pedestrian-friendly streets, and the conversion of the Intramuros golf course into a public park. Henares urges listeners to look no further than Iloilo City as an example of effective urban transformation with its riverside esplanade and bike accessibility.
5/24/202342 minutes, 38 seconds
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[VIDEO] Inside the mind of a crack crime reporter

GMA reporter and now I-Witness documentarist John Consulta reveals some tricks of a dangerous trade, telling stories about police raids, body cameras, and surprise tipsters. Known for his scoops and deep contacts in law enforcement, Consulta shares how he uses “pan de sal diplomacy” to bond with informants, provides ad hoc counseling to crime suspects, and tactfully declines money in envelopes from friendly officials. Links to John Consulta’s I-Witness documentaries and other stories: "Alyas Luffy," dokumentaryo ni John Consulta | I-Witness https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWb1Hu-yqhQ&t=29s '14 Minutes - The Search For Rosemary Martell', dokumentaryo ni John Consulta (Full Ep) | I-Witness https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2GM7kW5sqo John Consulta reports on drug mules for Brigada https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmrkPek-Ltc
5/20/20231 hour, 18 minutes, 14 seconds
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Inside the mind of a crack crime reporter

GMA reporter and now I-Witness documentarist John Consulta reveals some tricks of a dangerous trade, telling stories about police raids, body cameras, and surprise tipsters. Known for his scoops and deep contacts in law enforcement, Consulta shares how he uses “pan de sal diplomacy” to bond with informants, provides ad hoc counseling to crime suspects, and tactfully declines money in envelopes from friendly officials. Links to John Consulta’s I-Witness documentaries and other stories: "Alyas Luffy," dokumentaryo ni John Consulta | I-Witness https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWb1Hu-yqhQ&t=29s '14 Minutes - The Search For Rosemary Martell', dokumentaryo ni John Consulta (Full Ep) | I-Witness https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2GM7kW5sqo John Consulta reports on drug mules for Brigada https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmrkPek-Ltc -- Produced by Meg Pamiloza Researched by Mary Joy Cerillo Edited Jayr Magtoto
5/18/202358 minutes, 11 seconds
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Can we control our dreams? Psychiatrist Dr. Joan Perez-Rifareal says we can

Sigmund Freud changed the way we thought about dreams by asserting what they can tell us about ourselves and our innermost feelings. Psychiatrists like Dr. Rifareal today use dreams to understand what their patients are going through. Then there are “lucid dreams,” dreams that seem so real that you know these are dreams even if you’re asleep. She explains to Howie Severino that you can influence how you dream so it helps address mental health conditions and even enhance creativity. Lucid dreams are such a fascinating phenomenon that it’s the premise of a new digital series on GTV aimed at Gen Z audiences called “In My Dreams.” In My Dreams, a romance-magic realism digital series starring Sofia Pablo and Allen Ansay, is a story that deals with lucid dreaming and a love story for people with depression. In My Dreams will be launched on May 18 on GMA Public Affairs' Facebook and YouTube page. Dr. Rifareal addresses as well what many believe about certain nightmares called bangungot. Can they really kill? She unlocks that mystery. DOH Mental Health Hotlines: Dial 1-5-5-3 for Luzon-wide landline For Globe and TM subscribers, you can dial 0966-351-4518 or 0917-899-8727. For Smart, Sun and TNT subscribers, you can dial 0908-639-2672 References: On Sigmund Freud: https://www.freud.org.uk/education/resources/who-was-sigmund-freud/ On Dr. Joan Rifareal: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbnHaDofInYGWmqr3d4W9Yg/videos?app=desktop https://www.facebook.com/healthymindclinic.ph/ https://philippinepsychiatricassociation.org/psychiatrist/joan-mae-g-perez-rifareal/ -- Produced by Aubrey Delos Reyes Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
5/10/202343 minutes, 16 seconds
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A winding road to TV chef - the JR Royol story

He was a singer in a band when he won a cooking competition. That led to a career shift not just to culinary arts but to hosting a food show that highlights the full variety in native cuisine, from flowers to bats. JR Royol talks to Howie Severino about his travels, planting rice in his ancestral village in the Cordillera, the sex life of kalabasa, and other offbeat topics. -- Produced by Eumer Yanga Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
5/3/202347 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ang pagiging kuwentista, sumusugal ka – Filmmaker Jun Robles Lana

Kakaiba ang pinakahuling pelikula ni Direk Jun Robles Lana, ang “About Us But Not About US,” na may dalawang karakter lang na nag-uusap sa restaurant, ngunit naghakot na ng mga award. Nagbunga raw ang kuwento sa isang masakit na pangyayari sa buhay niya at nung una ayaw niyang ipalabas sa sinehan. Ibinahagi rin ng direktor kay Howie Severino kung bakit malaking sugal ang ilan sa kanyang mga obra na minsan may matatapang na tema, tulad ng “Big Night,” isang komedy tungkol sa drug war ng dating Pangulong Duterte, at yung “Mga Kuwentong Barbero” ukol sa panahon ng martial law. Kinuwento rin niya kung bakit mahalaga para sa kanya ang gumawa ng “queer movies,” kasama na ang malaki niyang hit na “Die Beautiful.” Sa kabila ng mga balakid sa pagawa ng “artistic” o “literary” films, malaki raw ang nakikita niyang pag-asa sa mga batang manililikha na nakakasalamuha niya. -- Produced by Arci Formales Researched by Mary Joy Cerillo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
4/27/202357 minutes, 48 seconds
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[VIDEO] What makes a priest an activist? Fr. Edu Gariguez, on the front lines in Mindoro

Fr. Edwin “Edu” Gariguez has long been on the frontlines of environmental struggles in Mindoro, the latest being community responses to the Mindoro oil spill last February 28.   Winner of the prestigious international Goldman Environmental Prize, Fr. Edu talks to Howie Severino about the dangers he’s faced, including being red-tagged and put on a hit list, and what he calls an ecological spirituality, a return to the belief long held by indigenous peoples that the environment is sacred. While other priests limit themselves to the more traditional role of performing sacraments and saying Mass, Fr. Edu explains why some choose to engage with the larger world and even put their lives on the line. 
4/22/202342 minutes, 49 seconds
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What makes a priest an activist? Fr. Edu Gariguez, on the front lines in Mindoro

Fr. Edwin “Edu” Gariguez has long been on the frontlines of environmental struggles in Mindoro, the latest being community responses to the Mindoro oil spill last February 28.   Winner of the prestigious international Goldman Environmental Prize, Fr. Edu talks to Howie Severino about the dangers he’s faced, including being red-tagged and put on a hit list, and what he calls an ecological spirituality, a return to the belief long held by indigenous peoples that the environment is sacred.   While other priests limit themselves to the more traditional role of performing sacraments and saying Mass, Fr. Edu explains why some choose to engage with the larger world and even put their lives on the line.  -- Produced by Shai Lagarde Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
4/19/202339 minutes, 50 seconds
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Audio essay: When Philippine divorce was legal

Howie Severino digs deep into history to find a more enlightened time in this aspect of social relations. A passing reference in a book led Howie on a quest to know about a little known divorce case that also showed the legal system to be swift and fair. Today, the Philippines is one of only two countries in the world where divorce is still illegal, the other being the Vatican.
4/13/20234 minutes, 7 seconds
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[VIDEO] Why is the Mindoro oil spill a threat to the planet?

After devoting his career to protecting the country’s marine environment, diver and underwater filmmaker Robert Suntay is grappling with one of the worst marine disasters in history, the February 28 oil spill off Mindoro that is threatening the world’s most diverse ocean environments. Suntay explains to Howie the high stakes while sharing his exasperation at the government’s slow action. Even after this crisis ebbs, the Philippines faces the longer-term challenge of weaning itself from an addiction to single-use plastic, which has long been killing sea life and ruining coastal environments. Suntay also shares advice on how to be good beach users this summer, how to reverse apocalyptic trends, and how to be hopeful amid dreadful scenarios. He also wades into the thorny debate on how humans should interact with the giant whale sharks, which have become a major tourist attraction. For more information: https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/topstories/nation/865892/up-msi-satellite-image-shows-possible-oil-spill-traces-near-coron-island/story/?amp https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/topstories/nation/865423/fishermen-struggle-as-mindoro-oil-spill-keeps-them-ashore/story/ https://www.ecowatch.com/verde-island-passage-2097012926.html http://www.positivelyfilipino.com/magazine/robert-suntay https://www.esquiremag.ph/long-reads/profiles/robert-suntay-s-inconvenient-race-to-save-the-verde-island-passage-a1521-20180810-lfrm2
4/12/202346 minutes, 53 seconds
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Why is the Mindoro oil spill a threat to the planet?

After devoting his career to protecting the country’s marine environment, diver and underwater filmmaker Robert Suntay is grappling with one of the worst marine disasters in history, the February 28 oil spill off Mindoro that is threatening the world’s most diverse ocean environments. Suntay explains to Howie the high stakes while sharing his exasperation at the government’s slow action. Even after this crisis ebbs, the Philippines faces the longer-term challenge of weaning itself from an addiction to single-use plastic, which has long been killing sea life and ruining coastal environments. Suntay also shares advice on how to be good beach users this summer, how to reverse apocalyptic trends, and how to be hopeful amid dreadful scenarios. He also wades into the thorny debate on how humans should interact with the giant whale sharks, which have become a major tourist attraction. For more information: https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/topstories/nation/865892/up-msi-satellite-image-shows-possible-oil-spill-traces-near-coron-island/story/?amp https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/topstories/nation/865423/fishermen-struggle-as-mindoro-oil-spill-keeps-them-ashore/story/ https://www.ecowatch.com/verde-island-passage-2097012926.html http://www.positivelyfilipino.com/magazine/robert-suntay https://www.esquiremag.ph/long-reads/profiles/robert-suntay-s-inconvenient-race-to-save-the-verde-island-passage-a1521-20180810-lfrm2 -- Produced by Aubrey Delos Reyes Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
4/5/202343 minutes, 6 seconds
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[VIDEO] What do millennials want? Reporter Mav Gonzales gives her hot takes

Howie Severino catches up with his colleague Mav while she’s traveling solo, by accident, in Europe. In a wide-ranging convo, Mav shares what it’s like to be a young woman reporting on male athletes, a rising journalist who has finally attained her dream of producing documentaries, and a millennial constantly badgered about being single. She talks about her first taste of TV journalism as an eight-year-old host of Chikiting Patrol, her proudest moment as a reporter, and how she’s dealt with stalkers. “Considering all the sacrifices a journalist makes — the dangers, the trolls, the effect on your social life, the missing out on so many family events because of assignments,” Howie asks near the end of their conversation, “is journalism worth it?” Mav gives an honest, moving answer. I-Witness documentaries by Mav Gonzales: ⁠Swipe right, swipe wrong⁠ ⁠Pugad ng Anghel ⁠ ⁠Transnene⁠
4/5/202353 minutes, 26 seconds
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What do millennials want? Reporter Mav Gonzales gives her hot takes

Howie Severino catches up with his colleague Mav while she’s traveling solo, by accident, in Europe. In a wide-ranging convo, Mav shares what it’s like to be a young woman reporting on male athletes, a rising journalist who has finally attained her dream of producing documentaries, and a millennial constantly badgered about being single. She talks about her first taste of TV journalism as an eight-year-old host of Chikiting Patrol, her proudest moment as a reporter, and how she’s dealt with stalkers. “Considering all the sacrifices a journalist makes — the dangers, the trolls, the effect on your social life, the missing out on so many family events because of assignments,” Howie asks near the end of their conversation, “is journalism worth it?” Mav gives an honest, moving answer. I-Witness documentaries by Mav Gonzales: Swipe right, swipe wrong Pugad ng Anghel Transnene -- Produced by Arci Formales Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
3/29/202348 minutes, 28 seconds
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[VIDEO] Nang tumindig si Tarantadong Kalbo

AKA Kevin Eric Raymundo, the famed political cartoonist now goes by the nickname TK, the initials of his viral character. He tells Howie Severino how his life changed after he became political in his comics and he required armed guards at a book-signing event, probably the first Filipino cartoonist to need security. He also talks about his other craft of animation and how it's different from, and similar to, comics. He reveals that he hasn't been allowed to trademark his brand because it "makes fun of bald people," even if he's the "kalbo" in the trademark. Tarantadong Kalbo is just the latest proof of the power of cartooning, and how inflammatory it can be in the age of social media. For more TK content and information: https://www.instagram.com/tarantadongkalbo/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/lifestyle/artandculture/796248/viral-illustration-sparks-solidarity-among-pinoy-artists-to-stand-in-dissent/story/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/tracking/tarantadong_kalbo/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/tracking/tarantadong_kalbo/ https://www.spot.ph/arts-culture/arts-culture-peopleparties/82236/tarantadong-kalbo-comics-a833-20200521 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lo81-2c1_lY
3/28/202357 minutes, 22 seconds
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Nang tumindig si Tarantadong Kalbo

AKA Kevin Eric Raymundo, the famed political cartoonist now goes by the nickname TK, the initials of his viral character. He tells Howie Severino how his life changed after he became political in his comics and he required armed guards at a book-signing event, probably the first Filipino cartoonist to need security. He also talks about his other craft of animation and how it's different from, and similar to, comics. He reveals that he hasn't been allowed to trademark his brand because it "makes fun of bald people," even if he's the "kalbo" in the trademark. Tarantadong Kalbo is just the latest proof of the power of cartooning, and how inflammatory it can be in the age of social media. For more TK content and information: https://www.instagram.com/tarantadongkalbo/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/lifestyle/artandculture/796248/viral-illustration-sparks-solidarity-among-pinoy-artists-to-stand-in-dissent/story/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/tracking/tarantadong_kalbo/ https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/tracking/tarantadong_kalbo/ https://www.spot.ph/arts-culture/arts-culture-peopleparties/82236/tarantadong-kalbo-comics-a833-20200521 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lo81-2c1_lY -- Produced by Eumer Yanga Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
3/22/202357 minutes, 44 seconds
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[VIDEO] Who else gains from bike lanes?

Ayala Avenue in Makati is the gold standard for protected bike lanes in the country. So when the announcement came that these would now be shared with public utility vehicles, cyclists came out in force to protest. Ayala Land and the Makati LGU backed down and canceled their plan. Howie Severino talks to Lester Babiera, cycling advocate and a leader of the movement to protect bike lanes. Lester explains how the boom in biking is one of the silver linings of the pandemic, why bike lanes are important and why they make the streets safer for everyone and not just for bikers. For more information: http://bit.ly/3LsyY2Q How Bike Lanes Affect Traffic: http://bit.ly/3TlbUFa Make It Makati: https://bit.ly/3yDKcd2 First Bike Ride on Instagram: https://bit.ly/3Jc3Ql6 "The Battle Over Bike Lanes Needs a Mindset Shift." WIRED, http://bit.ly/3JkHH49
3/22/202348 minutes, 11 seconds
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Who else gains from bike lanes?

Ayala Avenue in Makati is the gold standard for protected bike lanes in the country. So when the announcement came that these would now be shared with public utility vehicles, cyclists came out in force to protest. Ayala Land and the Makati LGU backed down and canceled their plan. Howie Severino talks to Lester Babiera, cycling advocate and a leader of the movement to protect bike lanes. Lester explains how the boom in biking is one of the silver linings of the pandemic, why bike lanes are important and why they make the streets safer for everyone and not just for bikers. For more information: http://bit.ly/3LsyY2Q How Bike Lanes Affect Traffic: http://bit.ly/3TlbUFa Make It Makati: https://bit.ly/3yDKcd2 First Bike Ride on Instagram: https://bit.ly/3Jc3Ql6 "The Battle Over Bike Lanes Needs a Mindset Shift." WIRED, http://bit.ly/3JkHH49 -- Produced by Meg Pamiloza Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
3/15/202345 minutes, 16 seconds
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Stage 4 prostate cancer made Atty. Tony La Viña focus

A near-death experience in the ICU forced this renowned public interest lawyer to sort out his priorities. He talks to Howie Severino about why he needed to go public with his prostate cancer, which very few men want to talk about. Then they tackle some of those issues that he thinks about the most: how climate change is causing typhoons in the Philippines to jump around; why the government needs to heavily subsidize public transport, including the much lamented jeepneys; and why he thinks the day of reckoning is coming for those responsible for killings during the drug war, despite the government's refusal to cooperate with the International Criminal Court.  Finally, he offers a mission statement to young people who are considering a law career. "Lawyers are needed for even basic things in the countryside. But it's also about making a difference for society. Make use of your gifts to do things where you are needed. Work for big causes because small causes like yourself and your family alone will not make you happy. Happiness comes from making a difference in a big way to the extent that you can wherever your world is."  Here are some links to Atty. Tony La Viña's columns and ideas:  https://tonylavina.com/ https://tonylavina.com/2023/01/07/new-year-new-life/ https://opinion.inquirer.net/byline/tony-la-vina https://manilastandard.net/category/opinion/columns/eagle-eyes-by-tony-la-vina -- Produced by Aubrey Delos Reyes and Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
3/10/202345 minutes, 12 seconds
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Why Benjamin de la Peña calls EDSA Crousel “hilaw”? ICYMI

In case you missed it, urban transport expert Benjamin de la Peña talks about Bus Traffic Transit in the Metro and how carefully it should have been planned.
3/3/20233 minutes, 32 seconds
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Audio Essay: The Virtue of Slow

In a faster and faster world, can being slow be a positive trait?  Yes, if it’s coupled with mindfulness. In this episode, Howie Severino shares a personal essay.
3/1/20234 minutes, 43 seconds
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Dr. Margie Holmes: Men cheat more than women | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Dr. Margie Holmes talks about how culture and gender affects perspectives on cheating.
2/27/20232 minutes, 15 seconds
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[VIDEO] Is being neutral safer in war?

Pres. Marcos abandoned his predecessor’s neutrality in the Ukraine war. Is the  Philippines better off? What are the chances of war in Asia? What is China’s game plan? Political scientist Aries Arugay discusses with Howie Severino.
2/25/202358 minutes, 12 seconds
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Rizal’s novels for Gen Z viewers | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Suzette Doctolero talks about her motivations in incorporating the Gen Z lens in Jose Rizal’s novels for television.
2/23/20233 minutes, 26 seconds
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Is being neutral safer in war?

Pres. Marcos abandoned his predecessor’s neutrality in the Ukraine war. Is the  Philippines better off? What are the chances of war in Asia? What is China’s game plan? Political scientist Aries Arugay discusses with Howie Severino. -- Produced by Arci Formales Researched by Sanafe Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
2/22/202356 minutes, 19 seconds
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Mighty Magulang on tsismis and history | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Mighty Magulang talks about differentiating “tsismis” (gossip) and history.
2/21/20234 minutes, 33 seconds
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Food inflation – anong sanhi at solusyon?

Digmaan sa Ukraine lang ba ang nagpapataas ng presyo ng pagkain? May pakinabang ba ang pagiging kalihim ng agrikultura rin ang pangulo ng bansa? Sa imports nalang ba tayo dapat umasa? Ano ba ang susi ng food security? Tinalakay ang mga yan ng ekonomistang si Rosario Guzman kasama si Howie Severino. -- Produced by Eumer Yanga and Sanaf Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
2/16/202355 minutes, 51 seconds
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[VIDEO] Dr. Margie Holmes on pandemic love

The clinical psychologist and longtime advice columnist shares her hot takes on how the long lockdown tested partnerships, what online dating misses, the differences between immature and mature love, and how virginity is overrated as a marriage requirement.
2/14/202325 minutes, 46 seconds
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Dr. Margie Holmes on pandemic love

The clinical psychologist and longtime advice columnist shares her hot takes on how the long lockdown tested partnerships, what online dating misses, the differences between immature and mature love, and how virginity is overrated as a marriage requirement.   -- Produced by Shai Lagarde  Edited by Jayr Magtoto
2/8/202326 minutes, 23 seconds
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[VIDEO] The Bikol bookshop Savage Mind and its entrepreneur

When Naga-based poet and filmmaker Kristian Sendon Cordero went abroad for writers' workshops, he noted independent bookshops being the cultural hearts of their communities. So he and his friends decided to start one in Naga with the intriguing name, "Savage Mind." In this conversation, he explains the origin of the name, how the bookshop survived the pandemic, its essential service to the community, and why he has no plan to live anywhere else but Bikol. 
2/6/202349 minutes, 19 seconds
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The Bikol bookshop Savage Mind and its entrepreneur

When Naga-based poet and filmmaker Kristian Sendon Cordero went abroad for writers' workshops, he noted independent bookshops being the cultural hearts of their communities. So he and his friends decided to start one in Naga with the intriguing name, "Savage Mind." In this conversation, he explains the origin of the name, how the bookshop survived the pandemic, its essential service to the community, and why he has no plan to live anywhere else but Bikol. -- Produced by Eumer Yanga, Zay Arguelles and Sanaf Marcelo Edited by Jayr Magtoto
2/1/202350 minutes, 1 second
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Ivan Man Dy on being Chinoy

The famed Binondo food tour guide talks about what it means to be a Filipino of Chinese heritage, the wide variety of lumpia and how it's just as Filipino now as it is Chinese, and how the Chinese New Year in the Philippines became such a big deal.
1/26/202347 minutes, 59 seconds
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Urban planner Benjamin de la Peña: "Our leaders don't experience public transportation."

Leading urban transport expert Benjie de la Peña lauds recent improvements in Metro Manila, but advocates for a coordinated system of public transport as he discusses ways to connect buses, trains, jeepneys and even ferries on the Pasig River. Popular transport like tricycles and pedicabs all have a place in the system as long as their roles and routes are clear. And he's urging policy makers to occasionally get out of their cars, which he says have "colonized our roads."
1/19/202338 minutes, 31 seconds
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Writer Rafe Bartholomew on playing playground basketball in the Philippines

A.k.a. Paeng Bartolome to his Filipino friends, our guest is an American sports journalist who fell in love with the Philippines and wrote "Pacific Rims," which covers a season with eventual PBA champs Alaska Aces as well as bizarre matches on barangay courts. He also talks about the downside of Filipinos' obsession with a tall man's sport and the chances of a home-grown Filipino ever playing in the NBA.
1/17/202324 minutes, 56 seconds
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Tagalog-speaking US author Rafe Bartholomew returns to the Philippines

The New Yorker Bartholomew was also known as Paeng to other players on QC courts when he was researching his remarkable book on basketball in the Philippines. He opens up about what drew him to the country, what bothered him, and why he ended up writing a "love letter to the Philippines."
1/16/202339 minutes, 46 seconds
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Audio Essays: Why Baybayin?

Howie Severino explains the relevance of the Filipino native writing system, Baybayin, to present generations, in this audio version of an essay first published on GMA News Online.
1/12/20233 minutes, 19 seconds
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[VIDEO] TV writer Suzette Doctolero speaks candidly about love, soap operas, and her disappointments

Her views often trending on social media, teleserye writer and creator Suzette Doctolero speaks candidly about her disappointments and shares her joy about the public’s response to her current project, the historical fantaserye “Maria Clara at Ibarra.”  She talks to Howie Severino about her other ground-breaking shows, her past career as romance novelist, the transformation of Maria Clara into an empowered woman, and why history matters.
1/7/202347 minutes, 57 seconds
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TV writer Suzette Doctolero speaks candidly about love, soap operas, and her disappointments

Her views often trending on social media, teleserye writer and creator Suzette Doctolero speaks candidly about her disappointments and shares her joy about the public’s response to her current project, the historical fantaserye “Maria Clara at Ibarra.”  She talks to Howie Severino about her other ground-breaking shows, her past career as romance novelist, the transformation of Maria Clara into an empowered woman, and why history matters.
1/4/202347 minutes, 25 seconds
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Is a green future for Filipinos possible?

In this special episode of The Howie Severino podcast, we explore the dire effects of climate change and how individuals and businesses can take steps for a greener, more regenerative future.
12/20/202211 minutes, 25 seconds
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[VIDEO] Chef Claude Tayag on the best lechon experience and the uniqueness of Filipino cuisine

The Kapampangan chef shares the best way to enjoy the popular Filipino food, lechon, and recommends Filipino dishes to serve foreign friends.  He also reminisces his memories with the late American chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain.
12/17/20221 hour, 25 minutes, 34 seconds
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Claude Tayag: “Filipino cuisine is like a symphony of sweet-sour-salty in a single bite”

The Kapampangan chef recommends Filipino dishes to serve foreign friends, reveals what he will prepare for Noche Buena, and why Pampanga is often called, but not without dispute, the culinary capital of the Philippines.
12/16/202230 minutes, 1 second
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Chef Claude Tayag on how to get the best lechon experience

The Kapampangan culinary artist tells rollicking tales of eating papaitan with Anthony Bourdain and explains why some think sisig will set the world on fire.
12/15/202249 minutes, 16 seconds
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[VIDEO] Gang Badoy Capati on surviving holiday blues, achieving growth after trauma

Mental health clinician and former radio show host Gang Badoy Capati talks about dealing with "toxic" family members during get-togethers. She also explains trauma and how to achieve growth after a traumatic experience.
12/12/20221 hour, 41 minutes, 18 seconds
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Gang Badoy Capati talks about growth after trauma

Mental health clinician Gang Badoy Capati offers tips on how to attain growth even after trauma. She also explains why she chooses to work with convicted criminals in Bilibid, and how she dealt with her anger and grief after two close friends were murdered. She guides listeners on how to use their breathing to relieve stress. She has a new project in the coming year, Barangay Sansino, that aims to crowd source safety information at the barangay level. Barangaysansino is on IG.
12/8/202235 minutes, 21 seconds
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Gang Badoy Capati on surviving the holiday blues

Gang Badoy Capati has worn many hats. A former radio show host and founder of volunteer group Rock Ed, she currently offers private and public advice on how to navigate through trauma, anxiety, and in this usually joyful season, the holiday blues. She also shares strategies on how to handle relatives who ask uncomfortable questions during reunions. Many of her insights have come from her own uncommon family background, which she discusses in their conversation with a rare candidness.
12/7/202249 minutes, 7 seconds
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St. Benilde coach Charles Tiu: “We’re here to compete, not to hurt anybody.”

College coach Charles Tiu gives his take on the now infamous assault on his team by an opposing player, why his team didn’t gang up on him, and why the offender should eventually be allowed to play again.  Charles puts on his basketball analyst hat and discusses what’s wrong with the way Filipinos play the sport, why foreign coaches elevate the local game, what Kai Sotto needs to do to make it to the NBA, and which NBA team has surprised him the most.
11/28/202238 minutes, 14 seconds
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[VIDEO] Public historian Xiao Chua: "Historians really need to judge, we have to decide kung ano ang tama at mali."

Outspoken and controversial, Xiao is trying to make history viral on Tiktok. He was alarmed when he noticed people were believing the myth of Tallano Gold, and historical facts were losing out to lies. He talks to Howie Severino about other urban legends in history, like Rizal fathering Hitler. Listen to his surprising verdicts on the nation's best president ever, the country's greatest generation, and why the historical teledrama "Maria Clara at Ibarra" is a hit.
11/25/20221 hour, 31 minutes, 49 seconds
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Public historian Xiao Chua: "Walang episode ng Maria Clara at Ibarra na hindi ako umiiyak."

Xiao explains why this latest TV drama clicks, what other eras in PHL history need to be popularized, who he thinks was the Philippines' greatest president, and why Andres Bonifacio should be considered the nation's first president.
11/25/202251 minutes, 56 seconds
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Public historian Xiao Chua: "There's a part of me that admires Marcos and Imelda."

Xiao explains why the first Marcos regime was a wasted opportunity, why talk of a "golden age" is not useful, and why historians need to judge who was right and wrong in the past.
11/23/202234 minutes, 31 seconds
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[VIDEO] Jonathan Ong on "trolls," disinformation

US-based professor Jonathan Ong has co-authored a new study on the online tactics used during the 2022 Philippine election campaign. Ong explains to Howie Severino such practices as "brigading," or coordinated mass reporting, that have shut down opposing and critical voices. And in the current context, what is a troll?
11/22/20221 hour, 29 minutes, 40 seconds
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Disinformation scholar Jonathan Ong: "Satire by a sitting senator was a real campaign innovation."

Howie Severino asks Prof. Ong how 2022 political satire is different from satire used by Rizal in the 1880s, how important online operations actually were in the recent electoral outcomes versus traditional campaign methods, and what the role of legacy or mainstream media can be now that it is no longer the gatekeeper of public information.
11/20/202245 minutes, 14 seconds
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Disinformation scholar Jonathan Ong: "Shady influence operations are not just about falsehoods."

US-based professor Jonathan Ong has co-authored a new study on the online tactics used during the 2022 Philippine election campaign. Ong explains to Howie Severino such practices as "brigading," or coordinated mass reporting, that have shut down opposing and critical voices. And in the current context, what is a troll?
11/17/202243 minutes, 4 seconds
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[VIDEO] Medical anthropologist Dr. Gideon Lasco: “Our drug policies are actually doing more harm than the drugs themselves.”

Gideon Lasco occupies a unique space as a millennial intellectual, influencing wide audiences with newspaper columns and tweets informed by his deep academic research. His decade-long study of drug policy made him a credible critic of the Duterte drug war, and led him and a colleague to coin a term, medical populism, that became known around the world to describe leaders who use public health crises such as drug addiction and the pandemic to justify punitive, often violent responses.  Dr. Lasco has diverse interests and writes well-researched, insightful essays on everyday trends, such as the pandemic plant craze, global coffee culture, and the changing image of "askals." He’s written an award-winning book, “The Philippines is not a Small Country,” that explains to an emerging generation what being Filipino could mean in a globalized world.  In a wide-ranging conversation with Howie Severino, Lasco also offers tips on time management and what you can do to achieve more every day.
11/15/20221 hour, 7 seconds
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Medical anthropologist Dr. Gideon Lasco: “Our drug policies are actually doing more harm than the drugs themselves.”

Gideon Lasco occupies a unique space as a millennial intellectual, influencing wide audiences with newspaper columns and tweets informed by his deep academic research. His decade-long study of drug policy made him a credible critic of the Duterte drug war, and led him and a colleague to coin a term, medical populism, that became known around the world to describe leaders who use public health crises such as drug addiction and the pandemic to justify punitive, often violent responses.  Dr. Lasco has diverse interests and writes well-researched, insightful essays on everyday trends, such as the pandemic plant craze, global coffee culture, and the changing image of "askals." He’s written an award-winning book, “The Philippines is not a Small Country,” that explains to an emerging generation what being Filipino could mean in a globalized world.  In a wide-ranging conversation with Howie Severino, Lasco also offers tips on time management and what you can do to achieve more every day.
11/9/202256 minutes, 6 seconds
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Jim Paredes on how APO Hiking Society redefined Manila sound | ICYMI

In this episode recorded in September 2021, Jim Paredes talks about the early days of APO Hiking Society and the rise of OPM — a term coined by the late Danny Javier.
11/3/20229 minutes, 44 seconds
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[VIDEO] Manila murder tour guide Benjamin Canapi: “People are looking for more excitement.”

As city tours move from virtual to face-to-face, Benjamin Canapi has found that tours with scary stories have a big market. He talks about the impact of Carlos Celdran on his profession, the need for a tour about martial law history, and what's there to love about Manila.
11/1/202242 minutes, 47 seconds
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Manila murder tour guide Benjamin Canapi: “People are looking for more excitement.”

As city tours move from virtual to face-to-face, Benjamin Canapi has found that tours with scary stories have a big market. He talks about the impact of Carlos Celdran on his profession, the need for a tour about martial law history, and what's there to love about Manila.
11/1/202238 minutes, 55 seconds
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[VIDEO] Zy-za "Budget Babe" Suzara: "Ang problema talaga 'yung prioritization. Saan napupunta itong malalaking pera na ito?"

Former national budget official Zy-za Suzara talks about Vice President Sara Duterte's extraordinary budget proposals, why government's confidential funds need to be secret but not unaccountable, why the peso is weak and the dollar is strong, and all the urgent tasks that the new administration should have done in its first 100 days.
10/30/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 12 seconds
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Zy-za "Budget Babe" Suzara: "Ang problema talaga 'yung prioritization. Saan napupunta itong malalaking pera na ito?"

Former national budget official Zy-za Suzara talks about Vice President Sara Duterte's extraordinary budget proposals, why government's confidential funds need to be secret but not unaccountable, why the peso is weak and the dollar is strong, and all the urgent tasks that the new administration should have done in its first 100 days.
10/26/20221 hour, 37 seconds
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[VIDEO] Pole vault champion EJ Obiena: "There should be no space for politics in sports."

Currently SEA Games pole vault champion and number three in the world, 26-year-old EJ Obiena is training to be a gold medalist at the next Olympics, despite paltry government support and a sports bureaucracy that mired him in a dispute at the peak of his career. But despite opportunities to change nationalities and compete for another country, Obiena told Howie Severino that he will always be a Filipino seeking to inspire younger athletes. Obiena revealed that hours before his flight to Tokyo for the 2020 Olympics, he still didn't know if he would have poles to compete in his event. Sports politics and a major injury threatened to derail his career, but he persevered until he became number 3 in the world in 2022, with two years to prepare for the next Olympics in Paris. He has even beaten world record holder Armand Duplantis of Sweden at a meet this year. Howie spoke to EJ during his first visit home to the Philippines in three years, accompanied now by his girlfriend, the German triple jumper Caroline Joyeux, who was visiting the country for the first time.
10/23/202246 minutes, 56 seconds
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Pole vault champion EJ Obiena: "There should be no space for politics in sports."

Currently SEA Games pole vault champion and number three in the world, 26-year-old EJ Obiena is training to be a gold medalist at the next Olympics, despite paltry government support and a sports bureaucracy that mired him in a dispute at the peak of his career. But despite opportunities to change nationalities and compete for another country, Obiena told Howie Severino that he will always be a Filipino seeking to inspire younger athletes. Obiena revealed that hours before his flight to Tokyo for the 2020 Olympics, he still didn't know if he would have poles to compete in his event. Sports politics and a major injury threatened to derail his career, but he persevered until he became number 3 in the world in 2022, with two years to prepare for the next Olympics in Paris. He has even beaten world record holder Armand Duplantis of Sweden at a meet this year. Howie spoke to EJ during his first visit home to the Philippines in three years, accompanied now by his girlfriend, the German triple jumper Caroline Joyeux, who was visiting the country for the first time.
10/19/202242 minutes, 53 seconds
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[VIDEO] Zig Dulay, direktor ng Maria Clara at Ibarra: “Inilalapit nito ang dalawang nobela ni Rizal sa panibagong henerasyon.”

Ayon kay Zig, may takot siya na hindi panonoorin ang teleseryeng ito dahil mataas ang Noli at Fili. Ngunit dahil sa twists sa kuwento at GenZ karakter na bumalik sa kasaysayan, nagkaroon ito ng malaking audience.  Idiniin ni Zig na hindi lang mang-aliw ang pakay nila kundi magmulat tungkol sa halaga ng kasaysayan at kalagayan ng kababaihan.  Ang panibagong Maria Clara ay palaban at hindi mahinhin na dalaga.
10/18/202252 minutes, 8 seconds
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Zig Dulay, direktor ng Maria Clara at Ibarra: “Inilalapit nito ang dalawang nobela ni Rizal sa panibagong henerasyon.”

Ayon kay Zig, may takot siya na hindi panonoorin ang teleseryeng ito dahil mataas ang Noli at Fili. Ngunit dahil sa twists sa kuwento at GenZ karakter na bumalik sa kasaysayan, nagkaroon ito ng malaking audience.  Idiniin ni Zig na hindi lang mang-aliw ang pakay nila kundi magmulat tungkol sa halaga ng kasaysayan at kalagayan ng kababaihan.  Ang panibagong Maria Clara ay palaban at hindi mahinhin na dalaga.
10/13/202249 minutes, 45 seconds
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"Kung mabigyan ng pagkakataon, kayang sumabay ang mga katutubo." – Norman King, first Ayta graduate ng UP Manila

Following his graduation from UP in 2017, Norman King became a symbol of Ayta achievement, appeared as an Ayta character in a teleserye starring Dingdong Dantes, and even starred in his own commercial. Following this rise to fame, he returned to his community in Porac, Pampanga to help his father, an Ayta chieftain, in their struggle for land rights. Last May, their tribe achieved its dream of acquiring the title to their ancestral domain. Norman talks to Howie Severino about how they did it, the challenge of dealing with non-indigenous occupants of their domain, and what indigenous peoples deserve everywhere. He also has some practical advice for young people ("don't get married young").  Note: The NCIP mentioned several times in the conversation is the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples, the government agency mandated to "protect and promote the interest and well-being of indigenous peoples."
10/5/202241 minutes, 54 seconds
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"No longer any debate that solar energy is cheaper than coal." – 29-year-old entrepreneur Leandro Leviste

The son of prominent politicians, Leviste dropped out of Yale University to pursue a dream: to make solar compete with fossil fuels in the Philippines. Now he wants to build the biggest solar farm in the world and make coal obsolete.
9/29/202227 minutes, 40 seconds
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"Like living in a modern-day Game of Thrones..." – Chel Diokno on Martial Law

The human rights lawyer recalls the day when he was 11 years old and soldiers took away his father, Sen. Jose W. Diokno. He explains what one-man rule was like and what we must remember today, 50 years after the proclamation of Martial Law.
9/22/202234 minutes, 29 seconds
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"Solar energy makes economic sense." – Climate campaigner Yeb Saño, whose home is solar-powered

The former climate change commissioner and now Greenpeace leader talks to Howie Severino about extreme weather, the nation's addiction to coal, the prospects for renewable energy, and the growing popularity of bicycle transport.
9/20/202257 minutes, 19 seconds
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"Truth must be competitive with lies." — Martial Law archivist Chuck Crisanto

Howie Severino speaks to a man with a tough job, Chuck Crisanto, the executive director of the government agency tasked with memorializing human rights violations during the martial law era. Crisanto explains the challenge of educating the youth and building a museum mandated by law but may not receive any public funding.
9/15/202257 minutes, 57 seconds
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"My main goal was affordable air-con." – young inventor Angel Palma

As a mechanical engineering student, Angel Palma was granted a US patent for her potentially revolutionary invention, an air-conditioner that uses no harmful refrigerants and less electricity than conventional air-con. She tells Howie Severino how she got on the path to becoming a scientist.
9/13/202246 minutes, 5 seconds
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"Doon tayo sa totoo, that's my battle cry." — Mighty Magulang, popular TikTok creator

On youth-oriented, no-holds-barred Tiktok, an older user is creating waves with amusing, well-researched content that serves to counter a sea of falsehoods. "There is power in short-form video and the kids are watching that," says genealogist Mona Magno-Veluz, the real name of Mighty Magulang.   
9/7/202235 minutes, 36 seconds
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"Data is the new oil, but also the new pollution." – data scientist Doc Ligot

Howie Severino talks to Dominic "Doc" Ligot, the co-developer of an award-winning dengue hotspot prediction tool, about the opportunities and dangers of the digital transformation of nearly everything, from retail to fighting pandemics to news to agriculture.
9/7/202250 minutes, 57 seconds
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“I am not Mr. Christmas.” – Jose Mari Chan

The holiday crooner says his most famous Christmas song was originally composed for a school reunion. Jose Mari Chan occasionally breaks out into song as he talks about his earliest years as a songwriter, and reveals that he created Tagalog ballads popularized by others—as well as a few other tunes you might find familiar. Listen to this conversation recorded on August 11, 2022.
8/31/202248 minutes, 21 seconds
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"I'm an international magbobote." – Illac Diaz, founder of "Liter of Light"

A former model from a showbiz family, Illac Diaz shifted careers and became a global leader in grassroots renewable energy, bringing solar lights in plastic bottles to rural communities.
8/30/202245 minutes, 37 seconds
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“Find your allies." — Martika Escobar’s advice to aspiring filmmakers| ICYMI

In case you missed it, Martika Escobar talks about the importance of collaborative work in the film industry. 
8/29/20221 minute, 31 seconds
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“I thought she was a diva, but she was just defiant.” – actor Bart Guingona on close friend Cherie Gil

When he’s not on stage or on screen, Bart Guingona is tweeting provocations, battling haters, and standing up for the rights of entertainers. He talks to Howie Severino about what motivates him and answers the question: what kind of government support should artists accept? Listen to this episode recorded on August 23, 2022.
8/25/202245 minutes, 30 seconds
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What is the essence of Filipino resilience? Michael Tan answers| ICYMI

In case you missed it, Michael Tan talks about the relevance of resilience in facing crises.
8/22/20221 minute, 36 seconds
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Lila Ramos Shahani on her uncle, former Pres. Fidel V. Ramos | Part 2

In part 2 of our conversation, Lila Shahani talks about the controversial open letter she wrote to her Uncle Ed in 2009 and how it affected her family relationships. FVR was always congenial with her yet evaded critical questions whose answers he might have brought to his grave.  Listen to this episode recorded on August 17, 2022.
8/18/202241 minutes, 43 seconds
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Lila Ramos Shahani, FVR's outspoken niece, talks about the legacy of her "Uncle Ed" | Part 1

Was he a better military man or politician?  Lila Ramos Shahani discusses FVR's long and storied career, as well as her memories of him as her doting tito who became her father figure when her own father died when she was very young. She describes him as brilliant yet, like many men of his generation, he possessed a machismo that did not allow him to see women as equals. He was a constitutionalist who staunchly opposed political dynasties which discouraged talented members of his own family from seeking public office.  Learn more about the democracy icon through Lila’s unique lens in this conversation recorded on August 17, 2022.
8/18/202242 minutes, 8 seconds
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Randy David on the early days of Philippine television post-martial law | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Randy David recalls the time they shifted from the English language to Filipino for serious talk shows on primetime TV. 
8/15/20227 minutes, 18 seconds
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Inflation will make Filipinos more sickly and less smart. Money expert and lawmaker Joey Salceda explains.

In this convo with Howie, Cong. Joey Salceda covers a lot of ground, from what he learned from FVR to his ideas about taxing Facebook and Netflix, and what he thinks about President Bongbong Marcos’ promise to halve the price of rice.   Listen to this episode recorded on August 8, 2022.
8/11/202249 minutes, 18 seconds
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Ricky Lee: “Lahat ng tao sa palibot natin broken.” | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Ricky Lee talks about turning misery and pain into a compelling story.
8/9/20222 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Howie Severino Podcast is on break. We'll be back next week, Podmates!

Hi, Podmates! The Howie Severino Podcast will be taking a break this week. Tune in next week for a new episode. 
7/28/202223 seconds
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Ambeth Ocampo on history amidst fake news | ICYMI

In this episode recorded on June 10, 2021, Ambeth Ocampo talks about the importance of historians educating the public amidst the prevalence of unreliable sources on social media.
7/12/20224 minutes, 6 seconds
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How should we remember PH colonization? Ambeth Ocampo answers. | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Ambeth Ocampo talks about his views on colonization in the Philippines.
6/28/20222 minutes, 6 seconds
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‘Being true to who you are:’ Isabel Sandoval on her success | ICYMI

In case you missed it—award winning director, Isabel Sandoval,  talks about her struggles in the film industry as a transgender woman.
6/27/20222 minutes, 4 seconds
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Drew Arellano got his humor from his dad | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Drew Arellano talks about how it was like growing up.
6/21/20221 minute, 38 seconds
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Alon interviews his dad, Howie | ICYMI

In case you missed it—Howie’s son, Alon Severino, takes this chance to be the interviewer.
6/21/20221 minute, 5 seconds
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Historian Vicente Rafael on Rodrigo Duterte’s legacy

The drug war for the past six years made the Philippines notorious around the world. So why is President Rodrigo Duterte ending his presidency with such high popularity? Dr. Vicente Rafael, history professor at the University of Washington, tries to explain why in this interview and in his new book, "The Sovereign Trickster: Death and Laughter in the Age of Duterte." This episode was recorded on May 17, 2022
6/8/202239 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ricky Lee on historical revisionism: Para akong binubura | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Ricky Lee talks about his experiences during the martial law period and his take on historical revisionism.
5/30/20223 minutes, 20 seconds
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Sheila Coronel on the return of the Marcoses | ICYMI

In case you missed it, journalist Sheila Coronel talks about the impact of the Marcoses returning to power.
5/23/20223 minutes, 18 seconds
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Leloy Claudio talks about the reality of the “Golden Age” | ICYMI

In case you missed it,  Leloy Claudio talks about the reality behind the “Golden Age” under the past Marcos regime.
5/16/20222 minutes, 22 seconds
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Sheila Coronel on the state of press freedom in the Philippines

As Women’s Month comes to a close, the podcast has a special guest: Sheila Coronel, investigative journalist & former academic dean of Columbia Journalism School.  Sheila co-founded the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism in 1989 and began her career on the cusp of Ferdinand Marcos’ ouster. She often highlights the power of the media to make the powerful accountable and the importance of the press in a democracy. In this interview, Sheila reminds us that despite the vilification of journalists and the scourge of disinformation, now is the best time to be a journalist. Listen more in this conversation recorded on March 26, 2022.
4/1/202249 minutes, 45 seconds
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Women leaders and their impact in the pandemic, Winnie Monsod| ICYMI

In case you missed it, economist and professor Solita “Winnie” Monsod talks about how women are better at responding to crisis.
3/8/20221 minute, 59 seconds
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Howie Severino on break, stay tuned for our guest host

Hi, podmates! Howie Severino is just on break. But don't fret! Stay tuned for our guest host. Listen to new episodes of The Howie Severino Podcast every Thursday.
1/13/202224 seconds
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Introducing: Child Bride Tragedies

Hi, podmates! Because we want you to learn about new podcasts from the wonderful people of GMA News and Public Affairs Digital, check out this timely special report on child brides and the lifelong tragedies of this practice. On January 6, 2021, President Rodrigo Duterte signed into law a bill that will end child marriage in the Philippines, or the Republic Act 11596. "Child Bride Tragedies" is produced by Mikkel Bolante and Consuelo Marquez and narrated by Ria Garcia and Mikkel Bolante. ----- In the Philippines, thousands of girls each year are forced to marry, often in an effort to escape poverty. But their stories tell of even greater tragedies for these child brides.
1/6/202217 minutes, 52 seconds
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Atty. Lucille Sering talks about how poverty affected Siargao residents | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Atty. Lucille Sering talks about the migration problems faced by one of the most beautiful places known and the Surfing capital of the Philippines, Siargao Island.
1/4/20221 minute, 40 seconds
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Ambeth Ocampo: Is Rizal still relevant today? | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Ambeth Ocampo talks about the impact of Jose Rizal in the lives of Filipinos today.
12/27/20211 minute, 57 seconds
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How Kim Atienza became “Kuya Kim” | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Kim Atienza talks about how he earned his nickname and iconic look.
12/22/20211 minute, 53 seconds
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Forensic pathologist Raquel Fortun on the Maguindanao Massacre | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Dr. Raquel Fortun weighed in on how first responders should handle mass disasters such as the Maguindanao Massacre. Warning: Graphic content
11/23/20213 minutes, 50 seconds
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Michael Tan and what true Filipino resilience means

Rarely do we get a chance to talk to someone like Dr. Michael Tan, a medical anthropologist and professor emeritus, about almost everything under the sun.  In this conversation, he shared with us his observation about the famous Pinoy value – resiliency. Are Pinoys really resilient or do we just accept our fate no matter what? He also talked about the dangerous effects of social media on our culture and political scene, Pinoy’s hesitancy to get tested for COVID, plus his view on ‘cliteracy’ and the power of women’s sexuality. This episode was recorded on Nov. 16, 2021.
11/17/202150 minutes, 50 seconds
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Do biases compromise journalism?

Howie Severino discusses the delicate balance between biases and fairness in journalism.
11/16/20214 minutes, 38 seconds
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Alyx Arumpac on her documentary film, ‘Aswang’

Alyx Arumpac’s film ‘Aswang’ made history as the first documentary to win Best Picture at the 44th Gawad Urian Awards. In this interview, she shares the power of documentaries in showing the truth amidst the proliferation of misinformation. She talks about her laborious three-year journey and looks back on the emotional toll and horrific encounters she went through while producing the film. This episode was recorded on November 7, 2021 and contains discussions of graphic imagery and violence.
11/10/202157 minutes, 43 seconds
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Howie Severino's tips for aspiring feature reporters #AskHowie

Want to be a good feature reporter? Veteran journalist Howie Severino shares some tips. 
11/9/20212 minutes, 19 seconds
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Robert Alejandro on art and healing

In one of our most honest & open interviews to date, we talk to visual artist and teacher Robert Alejandro. He talks about how he feels like “a walking miracle” in his healing journey against cancer and why he chooses to be an inspiration despite the challenges he's facing. He also tells us how art has helped him. Be inspired by Robert's story in this interview recorded last October 14, 2021.
10/20/202136 minutes, 48 seconds
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Kuya Kim on the lessons he learned from his near-death experiences | Part 2

In part 2 of our interview, Kuya Kim Atienza talks about how he overcame his near-death experiences. He also shared the many lessons he learned in his colorful television career. So, what's next for Kuya Kim? Learn more in this episode recorded on October 12, 2021!
10/14/202131 minutes, 45 seconds
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Kuya Kim Atienza on his big career move to the Kapuso network | Part 1

There was a lot of excitement when Kuya Kim Atienza finally announced that he is now a Kapuso. Now, he's back on primetime TV with a new segment on 24 Oras and a new show called "Dapat Alam Mo!"  In part 1 of this interview, we talked to Kuya Kim about this big career move and his overall journey as a television personality. How did he start on TV? And yes, there will be lots and lots of trivia! Listen to this episode recorded on October 12, 2021.
10/13/202128 minutes, 10 seconds
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Q&A with Howie Severino #AskHowie

Happy six months to our podcast! To celebrate this milestone, here's a fun episode with our host Howie Severino. In this episode, Howie will answer questions submitted by our listeners. How did Howie become a journalist? Who is his dream interview? What is his favorite Netflix show? Let's find out in this fun #AskHowie episode!
10/6/202140 minutes, 17 seconds
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Jessica Soho on millennials: I believe they can make things better | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Jessica Soho talked about the youth and how they can make our world a better place.  Know more about Jessica's thoughts in this excerpt. For the full episode, click here: https://spoti.fi/3Aclb74
10/4/20212 minutes, 55 seconds
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Johnny Manahan on what makes a star

Johnny Manahan, also known as Mr. M, is the man that launched the most important showbiz personalities in the Philippines. His eye for stardom is legendary and now he's bringing his talent to the Kapuso network. In this episode, he talks about the x-factor and what makes a superstar. Listen to this episode recorded on September 22, 2021.
9/29/202136 minutes, 58 seconds
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Dingdong Dantes on his interesting nickname "Dingdong" | ICYMI

In case you missed it, Dingdong Dantes talked fondly about his interesting nickname and how it helped him become the superstar he is today. Listen to the full episode here: https://spoti.fi/34ljird
9/27/20213 minutes, 11 seconds
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Never Forget: Jim Paredes on how music inspired the protest movement during Martial law

Jim Paredes joins us in the second part of our Martial law special. He recalls his days as an idealistic youth whose parents were both political detainees.  He tells us how the APO Hiking society was formed amidst turbulent times and how their music and popularity inspired a nation under a newly declared Martial Law.
9/23/202143 minutes
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Never forget: Remembering Martial law with Ed dela Torre, activist and former priest

September 21 marks the anniversary of the declaration of Martial law, one of the darkest times in our nation's history.  In this special episode, we talk to personalities who experienced what it is like to live during the Marcos regime. For Part 1, former priest and political detainee Ed dela Torre reflects on the effects of Martial law, the prevalent historical revisionism today, and why it is important for the youth to participate in nation-building.  Listen to this interview recorded on September 15, 2021.
9/22/202153 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ricky Lee, award-winning writer and icon of Philippine cinema

What's on the mind of the great Ricky Lee? With almost 200 films under his belt including the classics Himala, Jaguar, and Anak, Ricky Lee is no doubt an icon of Philippine cinema.  In this episode, we learn more about his creative process and why he thinks being kind is important in order to be a good writer. Listen to this episode recorded on September 13, 2021. 
9/15/202153 minutes, 19 seconds
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Raffy Tima on covering Afghanistan

Raffy Tima is one of the very few Filipino journalists who was able to cover Afghanistan on the cusp of change. He takes us back to his most unforgettable war coverages and tells us how he became one of the pioneers of drone journalism in the Philippines. This interview was recorded on August 31, 2021.
9/8/202146 minutes, 9 seconds
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Elijah Canlas and Director Ivan Payawal talk about "Gameboys" Boys' Love series

Nobody expected "Gameboys" to be a massive success. The IdeaFirst Company, the team behind the show, only wanted to give jobs to their employees by making quality content during the pandemic. But it became a hit. After its successful run online, it was picked up by Netflix, it made its TV premiere on GMA's Heart of Asia channel, and now it has a movie and an upcoming second season.  Elijah Canlas and Director Ivan Payawal join us in this episode to talk about the show's success, the struggles they faced during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the reasons why the Boys' Love genre is here to stay. This interview was recorded on August 13, 2021. 
8/18/202145 minutes, 16 seconds
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Let's talk about animals with Doc Nielsen Donato

Veterinarian Nielsen Donato grew up living with animals but was frustrated because he was not allowed to touch them as a child. He eventually followed his passion and became a veterinarian. Now he is one of the hosts of the wildlife documentary show, Born to be Wild.  In this episode, he tells us about his close encounter with a python & his love for animals. He also answered some questions from netizens! Listen to this episode recorded on August 11, 2021.
8/12/202152 minutes, 9 seconds
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Hidilyn Diaz on how her mantra 'one motion' changed her Tokyo Olympics journey

Hidilyn Diaz shares how one second of doubt can make or break your game. The first ever Olympic gold medalist of the Philippines, Hidilyn walks us through her physical and mental training with Team HD — even using yoga to strengthen her concentration. How did "one motion" change her fate in the Tokyo Olympics? Listen to this interview recorded on August 3, 2021.
8/4/202133 minutes, 11 seconds
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Catching up with Kara David (Part 2)

Kara David talks about how her career started, her thoughts on social media and the beauty of the Filipino language, and why journalism is important. Listen to the second part of her conversation with Howie Severino recorded on July 23, 2021. 
7/29/202132 minutes, 24 seconds
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Catching up with Kara David

What keeps Kara David busy nowadays? Aside from her award-winning documentaries for I-Witness and her foundation Project Malasakit, she has added a new feather in her cap: teaching the new generation of journalists as a professor in UP Diliman and through her vlogs!  Let's catch up with Kara David in this episode recorded on July 23, 2021.  
7/28/202135 minutes, 57 seconds
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Nagparehistro ka na ba? Eleksyon 2022 talk with COMELEC's James Jimenez

COMELEC spokesperson James Jimenez talks about Blackpink, the danger of misinformation on election season, and hopes for high voter turnout in Eleksyon 2022. This interview was recorded on July 15, 2021.
7/21/202150 minutes, 43 seconds
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Dr. Renato Solidum Jr. of PHIVOLCS

On July 1, 2021, Alert Level 3 was raised in Taal Volcano after a phreatomagmatic eruption at the main crater. Under this alert level, an explosive eruption is possible. We talked to PHIVOLCS Director Renato Solidum Jr. to know more about the situation in Taal. This interview was recorded on July 12, 2021. 
7/14/202157 minutes, 44 seconds
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Marites Vitug on the Philippines' arbitral tribunal win vs China

On July 12, the Philippines will mark the fifth anniversary of the 2016 arbitral tribunal ruling on the maritime dispute on the West Philippine Sea. In this episode, we look back at this historic victory against China with Marites Vitug, veteran journalist and author of the book "Rock Solid: How the Philippines Won Its Maritime Case against China." How should Filipinos remember this decision? Listen to the discussion in this interview recorded on July 5, 2021.
7/8/202141 minutes, 18 seconds
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Remembering PNoy with Raf Ignacio

Few people have had the opportunity to be close to President Benigno Aquino III. Raf Ignacio, his former close-in assistant, was one of those lucky people. In this episode, we remember PNoy through the stories of Raf Ignacio. This interview was recorded on June 29, 2021. 
7/1/202153 minutes, 50 seconds
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Lei Alviz, Tina Panganiban-Perez, and Sandra Aguinaldo on covering PNoy

GMA News reporters Sandra Aguinaldo, Lei Alviz, and Tina Panganiban-Perez join us in this episode to remember former President Benigno Aquino III. As beat reporters, they witnessed PNoy's career up-close. Listen to their stories in this interview recorded on June 29, 2021. 
6/30/202155 minutes, 10 seconds
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Budjette Tan on Trese

Budjette Tan, the co-creator of the Trese comics once worked for an ad agency, and now works for Lego in Denmark. He joins us to talk about the inspiration behind Trese, its journey from being a passion project to becoming the first Filipino Netflix original animated series, and its overall impact on pop culture. This interview was recorded on June 14, 2021. 
6/16/202155 minutes, 29 seconds
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Ambeth Ocampo on Philippine History | Part 2

Ambeth Ocampo talks about newly discovered aspects of Jose Rizal, Lapulapu and Magellan and the reasons why he believes that there is still so much to explore in our nation's history. This interview was recorded on June 4, 2021.
6/10/202136 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ambeth Ocampo on Philippine History | Part 1

With his unique style, Ambeth Ocampo brings Philippine history closer to Filipinos. In this episode, he uncovers untold facts that shaped our nation, that is literally one for the books! Who is his favorite Pinoy hero? Ambeth tells us more in this interview last June 4, 2021.
6/9/202152 minutes, 6 seconds
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Manix Abrera

Growing up, Manix Abrera was known as the son of legendary editorial cartoonist Jess Abrera of the Philippine Daily Inquirer. Slowly, he developed his own identity over the years with his popular works Kikomachine, News Hardcore, and Silent Comics. What is his idea of being an artist? We talked to Manix on May 25, 2021 to know more.
6/2/202138 minutes, 5 seconds
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Dingdong Dantes | Part 2

In part 2, Dingdong Dantes goes personal as he talks about life outside showbiz, his nickname Dingdong, and his many advocacies. Is politics part of his plan?  We interviewed Dingdong on May 21, 2021.
5/27/202133 minutes, 2 seconds
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Dingdong Dantes | Part 1

Dingdong Dantes talks about his multi-hyphenate life — from his showbiz career, to his advocacies, his newly launched business, and how he thrives in the pandemic. This interview was recorded on May 21, 2021.
5/26/202137 minutes, 38 seconds
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Rosem Morton

Rosem Morton is a Filipina nurse based in Baltimore, Maryland who takes photographs for the National Geographic. She talks about the challenges of being a frontliner in the US and the painful reason why she chose to pick up a camera. We interviewed Rosem on April 23, 2021.
5/19/202131 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ana Patricia Non

Ana Patricia Non, or Patreng, talks about the revolution of kindness through the community pantries and the unexpected fame and harassment that came with it. This interview was recorded on May 5, 2021. 
5/12/202141 minutes, 13 seconds
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Atom Araullo | Part 2

In the second part of our episode with Atom Araullo, he shares his thoughts on being opinionated on social media and how he balances the glamour of celebrity with his role as a journalist. This interview was recorded on April 29, 2021.
5/6/202119 minutes, 41 seconds
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Atom Araullo | Part 1

Atom Araullo shares his TV beginnings, his interest in science and storytelling, and his belief about journalism being a form of activism. This interview was recorded on April 29, 2021. 
5/5/202138 minutes, 36 seconds
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Gabe Norwood

Gilas Pilipinas veteran Gabe Norwood chats with Howie Severino about his love for basketball, the prospects of a full-blooded Filipino in the NBA, and why Pinoy basketball is unique. This interview was recorded on April 13, 2021.
4/28/202138 minutes, 36 seconds
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Isabel Sandoval

'Lingua Franca' director Isabel Sandoval is the first trans woman of color to direct and star in a film that competed in the prestigious Venice Film Festival. She discusses with Howie her life abroad and film influences and shares her thoughts on racial and gender discrimination. This interview was recorded on March 24, 2021.
4/21/202144 minutes, 17 seconds
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Dr. Jonas del Rosario

Howie spoke to Dr. Jonas del Rosario on the day he was vaccinated. He shares his realizations after surviving COVID-19 twice and why he refused to be prioritized in the vaccination roll-out. This interview was recorded on March 19, 2021.
4/14/202138 minutes, 57 seconds
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Jessica Soho

Jessica Soho talks baby-switching, body shaming, and her broadcast journalism career in our pilot episode. This interview was recorded on March 4, 2021.
4/7/202151 minutes, 4 seconds
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Welcome to The Howie Severino Podcast!

Welcome to The Howie Severino Podcast! New episodes stream every Thursday! 
3/31/202128 seconds