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The Drawing Room

English, Social, 1 season, 762 episodes, 1 day, 11 hours, 47 minutes
About
Retire to the eclectic environs of the RN Drive Drawing Room, for music, musings and unexpected conversations. The Drawing Room is equal parts performance space, salon, and kitchen table confessional.
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An afternoon with Small Town Romance

Jim Arneman and Flora Smith of Small Town Romance bring an inherited tradition of love and music - from Australian music royalty. They play one of their songs and a cover of one of their all-time favourites.
6/14/202417 minutes
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A look inside a domestic violence court

Day after day, Magistrate Megan Greenwood presides over an increasing number of domestic violence matters.  She must pick her way carefully through entangled traumas, look at the facts and apply the law. 
6/12/202421 minutes, 27 seconds
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How Leandre Sanders became 'Skategoat'

A new documentary tells the story of an 11-year-old from Venice Beach, California, who survived his troubled upbringing to become one of the world’s best skateboarders.
6/12/202412 minutes
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Is 'Crime and Punishment' the greatest crime story ever written?

Actors Christopher Samuel Carroll and PJ Williams discuss their roles in a new adaptation of Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment and perform an excerpt. 
6/11/202413 minutes
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The science of taste and art of belonging

The way we taste - what comfort foods we love and what vegetables we can’t stand to eat - can tell us a lot about who we are and even who we love.
6/10/202419 minutes, 19 seconds
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Molly Lewis is bringing the glamour back to whistling

Meet a professional whistler - Australian Molly Lewis. She's created a niche for herself and is whistling with the big guns now. 
6/7/202418 minutes
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Whatever will be, will be: Our changing attitudes to fate

It’s written in your fate that today you are to learn more about the concept of fate - philosophically, morally and practically. A new book exploring fate promises to teach you just how universal it is.
6/6/202412 minutes
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Whatever will be, will be: Our changing attitudes to fate

It’s written in your fate that today you are to learn more about the concept of fate - philosophically, morally and practically. A new book exploring fate promises to teach you just how universal it is.
6/6/202412 minutes
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Does democracy begin with children's rights?

Should the voting age be lowered to battle the nihilism and the impending sense of doom in today’s younger generation coming of age? 
6/5/202413 minutes
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An autograph book, an artist and the Australian Army

Sir John Monash's great-grandson shares some of his family's favourite stories of the Lieutenant General through some of his personal belongings. 
6/4/202416 minutes
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Brain Power: Exploring the purpose and the possibilities of brain-computer interfaces

Elon Musk's company Neuralink is in a race with China to dominate the next frontier of artificial intelligence - a brain-computer interface or BCI. 
6/3/202417 minutes
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Marlon Williams on free will and certainty

New Zealand singer-songwriter Marlon Williams joins the show to discuss how he incorporates Maori into his songs, his views on free will and certainty and how they've changed since we last spoke to him pre-pandemic. 
5/31/202413 minutes
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Did Ayn Rand ruin Lexi Freiman’s attempt at enlightenment at an ego-killing sect on Lesbos?

Our culture’s hyper-sensitivity, cancel culture and the fine line between altruism and narcissism are ripe for satire in Lexi Freeman’s new book The Book of Ayn
5/29/202416 minutes
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Jennifer Croft: The art of translation

What does it mean to translate another person's work? Are you translating just the words or the meaning? Jennifer Croft, a prize-winning translator shares her thoughts.
5/29/202415 minutes
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Claudia de Rham's life in pursuit of gravity

A person or a planet, a black hole or a balloon, a hammer, a feather, a piece of cheese, or a pumpkin seed… everything and everyone experiences gravity in the same way. Theoretical physicist Claudia de Rham is excited about the future of gravity.
5/28/202417 minutes
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500 years on: Uncovering the life and work of Vicente Lusitano

Find out how a name on a protest sign sparked a whole line of inquiry into classical music's first published Black composer from the 16th century, Vicente Lusitano. 
5/27/202412 minutes
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Freya Hollick and The Counterfeit on the guts and glory of Spaghetti Western music

Spaghetti Westerns films are full of strong tropes but none are as strong as the dramatic music that underpinned them, you'll learn and hear more with Freya Hollick and The Counterfeit.
5/24/202416 minutes
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'Flathead', a depiction of the man you recognise from the end of the bar

'Flathead’ is a love letter to regional working-class Australia - a work of docufiction that cleverly weaves its redemption narrative, using its septuagenarian lead and the great real characters of Bundaberg, Queensland.
5/23/202412 minutes
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Piracy in the Caribbean and the tale of Mary Read

The (mostly) true untold story of the female pirates of the Caribbean, with author Francesca De Tores.
5/22/202416 minutes
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Caliban Shrieks: A Story of Two Jacks

World War Two and his publisher going bust almost ended Jack Hilton's promising career, long forgotten until a curious reader rediscovered and revived Hilton's work Caliban Shrieks
5/21/202416 minutes
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What's behind the Coalition's push towards nuclear energy

Investigative journalist Marian Wilkinson sheds some light on a possible source behind the Coalition’s enthusiasm for nuclear energy.
5/20/202418 minutes
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Eric Bibb on making music with his father and his friends.

Blues and Roots artist Eric Bibb plays for us live in the studio. He’ll speak about his blues heritage - his father, Leon Bibb and godfather Paul Robeson - and play songs close to his heart.
5/17/202421 minutes
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Bad behaviour: How should teachers reclaim control of the classroom?

Australia ranks below average in classroom orderliness compared to fellow OECD countries, so how can teachers take back control, and is that really what kids need? 
5/16/202418 minutes
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Paul Keating: The politics and the person

Jonathan Biggins reflects on PJK, the politics and the person, in The Gospel According to Paul.
5/15/202413 minutes
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Ireland: The land of saints, scholars, storytelling and the supernatural

Irish novelist Sinéad Gleeson explores the supernatural and creates new lore by weaving in folklore through her new book Hagstone.
5/14/202412 minutes
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Arbour Love: The trees that shape us

How one council's idea of giving every tree an email address led to “treemails” and an outpouring of love and prose to their city's 77,000 trees.
5/13/202412 minutes
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Checkerboard Lounge: From seven hour sessions in Melbourne to Sun studios in Memphis

In the nineties, the place to be in Melbourne was the Great Britain Hotel in Richmond for a parma and a beer as local blues and roots band Checkerboard Lounge played into the evening.
5/10/202413 minutes
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Eurovision at 68: Power ballads, politics and pyrotechnics

It's been 68 years of boycotts and controversies, highs and lows. We speak to the world's foremost Eurovision academic and dig into the socio-political history of the famed song contest.
5/9/202419 minutes
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What if police and acute mental health care worked together?

How do other countries respond to mental health callouts? One US state is leading the way - now with police but with mental health first responders.
5/8/202411 minutes
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Anaplastology: Helping people feel whole again

Sometimes in life you pick up a skill in one place and years later it remerges in a totally different field. Take Anaplastologist Sophie Fleming; she spent her early career working on Hollywood special effects making prosthetics from silicone on the set of blockbusters like Wolverine and Star Wars. Now she’s one of the foremost experts in reconstructing people's faces after they lose a nose or an ear to cancer.
5/7/202419 minutes
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Aliens on Earth: Secrets of the Octopus

Humans have always been fascinated by Octopus. They're littered through cultural history and yet we still don't fully understand them and their intelligence. A new docu-series aims to understand a little bit more.
5/6/202411 minutes
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Trumpeter Jeremy Pelt on his favourite questions to ask other musicians

Trumpeter Jeremy Pelt has interviewed today's crop of top black jazz musicians, repeating an experiment by drummer Art Taylor in the 70s.
5/3/202413 minutes
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So you want to write True Crime? A lesson with Mark Dapin

If you’ve ever fancied yourself as a crime writer, exploring crime scenes, jailhouses and courthouses, crime writer Mark Dapin can teach you a thing or two. 
5/2/202412 minutes
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The Australian's who changed the course of the Korean War

With the reunification of the two Koreas further away than ever, you might not know that Australian soldiers were there in a key battle when they first broke apart in the 1950s.
5/1/202412 minutes
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What chaos and risk means to Dominic Gordon

Dominic Gordon's memoir Excitable Boy charts how a loved, middle-class boy went so far off the rails, a cautionary tale for anyone dealing with a teenager’s appetite for danger and mischief.
4/30/202415 minutes
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Looking for a life beyond utopia

The documentary Beyond Utopia follows the harrowing journey of several families trying to find a better life for themselves in a world they can't even really comprehend.
4/29/202416 minutes
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A Still Small Voice: A film of faces

The documentary A Still Small Voice follows Mati, a chaplain in residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York and the highs and lows of providing support and care for those in hospital. 
4/26/202418 minutes
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Long way to the middle: Fred Smith on his sky rocketing career as a folk singer

Diplomat and singer-songwriter Fred Smith on what music means and gives to him, and how his time in Afghanistan informs his music today.
4/25/202421 minutes
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How to heal and reconcile Australia's history of blackbirding

Australia’s history of blackbirding - the practice of kidnapping Pacific Islanders and using them in forced labour is a lesser-known part of our story.
4/23/202413 minutes
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Beth Orton on the joy of collaboration in music

For the past three decades, UK Singer-Songwriter Beth Orton has refused to be boxed in or bow to commercial binaries.
4/23/202421 minutes
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You can expect more than Swan Lake from the new Australian Ballet Resident Choreographer Stephanie Lake

Stephanie Lake might have failed third year ballet but that hasn't stopped her becoming one of the nation’s most exciting choreographers, for The Australian Ballet. 
4/22/202418 minutes
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Agatha's Cantata

What did an orphan in Venice with no fingers on her left hand, have to do with the great composer Antonio Vivaldi? 
4/19/202413 minutes
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Should we be playing God to save a species from extinction?

What is assisted evolution or genetic rescue and could it save the projected one-third of plants and animals that face extinction by 2070.
4/18/202412 minutes
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Shaken not stirred: The history of the Martini

The martini a drink that never seems to go out of style. It’s tuxedos, sophistication, it’s the Great Gatsby … and of course James Bond. How has this drink managed to retain its iconic status after all this time?
4/17/202412 minutes
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Rhetoric Rules: The art of arguing

Where arguing was once an art form, today it seems more like a free-for-all pub brawl. So is it time we go back to basics? Can ancient rhetoricians teach us how to get along again? Professor Robin Reams on 'The Ancient Art of Thinking for Yourself '
4/16/202425 minutes
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Everything you didn't know about Dr. Kerryn Phelps

Did you know Dr Kerryn Phelps was an aerobics instructor? … or that such was her voracious appetite for learning, her favourite school holiday reading was the World Book Encyclopedia? Her new memoir Power of Balance reveals all.
4/15/202416 minutes
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Jess Ribeiro thinks we need a summer of love

Jess Ribeiro grew up in country Chinese restaurants where her father socialised and she uses memories of these times to inform her songwriting and music videos.
4/12/202413 minutes
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Feminism in the Algorithm Age

It used to be said that men were from Mars and women were from Venus. Well, in the digital age perhaps it’s more like men are from YouTube and women are from Instagram. So what do our different digital habits mean for feminism and sexism in the algorithm age? 
4/11/202414 minutes
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Is ‘progressive separatism’ just ‘woke’ segregation?

Identity labels are often a way for people to find community, but is there a downside to these otherwise good intentions? And how has identity politics been conflated with social justice?
4/10/202416 minutes
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Shooting the storm

How far would you go to get the shot? Would you … climb a rock face … learn to base jump … run towards the eye of a storm? Photographer Krystle Wright is willing to go to extremes for her art. 
4/9/202412 minutes
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The ordinary couple behind the extraordinary art heist

Imagine cleaning out the house of a loved one after their death and finding a priceless famously stolen artwork amongst their things. This is how a 35 year old mystery was solved ... or was it?
4/8/202414 minutes
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Claire Anne-Taylor on loosing her marbles

Claire Anne Taylor’s voice grew out of the Tarkine region of Tasmania. It has a deep raspy, woody texture just like the Huon pine trees or myrtle beech trees that grow there.
4/5/202419 minutes
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How much is your life worth?

The brutal calculations of the value of your life are happening all around you every day - from the cost of lifeboats to the cost of IVF. Jenny Kleeman has investigated how much we're worth.
4/4/202418 minutes
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Whats behind the beady eyes of those swoopy boys?

Did you know that new research has indicated one of those Magpie population’s is smarter than the other? And that the more aggressive the swooping the less intelligent the bird?
4/3/202417 minutes
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A clan of rebels: Impressionism celebrates 150 years

The marvellous art critic and curator Julie Ewington regales us with tales of those artists who began the Impressionist art movement and the women and Australians among their ranks.
4/2/202415 minutes
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PJ Morton on soul, sermons and Stevie Wonder

With five Grammy awards under his belt, he’s written music for Disney and sung and performed with Stevie Wonder … New Orleans-born PJ Morton drops by on his way to play the Byron Bay Blues Festival.
3/28/202415 minutes
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Is the whole housing system a hoax?

One of Australia’s leading housing economists has taken a deep look at the way we do housing and believes the whole system is a hoax and a myth.
3/27/202416 minutes
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New series celebrates Bush Tukka cuisine in FNQ

Bush food is diverse and plentiful in Far North Queensland, and in a new series premiering on SBS, Samantha Martin, the Bush Tukka Woman, embarks on a hunt and forage through this extraordinary region for fresh local ingredients from the sea to the trees and the land.
3/26/202412 minutes
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Kyle Chayka: How the algorithm filters our world

Kyle Chayka's new book Filterworld asks the question, are you really thinking for yourself or are the algorithms doing it for you?
3/25/202416 minutes
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Is West Side Story just an opera with dancing?

Soprano singer Nina Korbe is playing Maria in Opera Australia's production of West Side Story, she speaks with us about what the character means to her.
3/22/202412 minutes
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Mona Lisa: Representation of a mother

You may have seen The Mona Lisa, but few have been as up close and personal as Optical Engineer and consultant to The Louvre Museum, Pascal Cotte who was given unprecedented access to the painting by the French Ministry of Culture. 
3/21/202412 minutes
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Baroque and beyond!

The Baroque opera movement had it all celebrity, money and bad behaviour. Find out more about the origins of this era of opera. 
3/20/202418 minutes
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How the World Made the West

What exactly is the West? Is it a Big Mac, the Magna Carta, the Christian cross, or the Statue of Liberty? One Professor of Classics at Oxford University argues the West is a sum of its parts, borrowed, stolen and traded from the East.
3/19/202415 minutes
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From shipwreck to shore: Maritime archaeology with Maddy McAllister

There are around 900 shipwrecks off the east coast of Australia and it's Maddy McAllister's very job as a Maritime archaeologist to find and study them. 
3/18/202412 minutes
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Deborah Cheetham Fraillon on wearing pajamas in church, ABBA and the power of Opera

The renowned opera singer is giving talks on selected works and she revives her love of the alternative lyrics for the Australian anthem, which she wrote with Judith Durham.
3/15/202420 minutes
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Circa: What Will Have Been

Contemporary circus is no longer about animals, strongmen and clowns. It's a new kind of tradition, one that comes with arguably more intellectualism. 
3/13/202411 minutes
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'Uncuffed': A podcast made on the inside, for the outside world to hear

The California prison system is a tough place, overcrowded and violent, but a small group of prisoners get together and record their stories. Uncuffed is a podcast made on the inside, for the outside world to hear.
3/12/202415 minutes
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Ondara finds pockets of home all around the world

Ondara joins Andy in the studio for a chat about the reason he listens to songs without words, and his use of falsetto in his music. He plays his songs 'Seminar in Tokyo' and 'Lebanon'.
3/11/202415 minutes
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Kristian Bezuidenhout on what Beethoven might have been like to work with

Ludwig van Beethoven was in the middle of composing some of his most popular works and those works provide the score to wartime. Find out his work reflected the time he lived in.
3/8/202418 minutes
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Will the makers of Oppenheimer acknowledge the victims they didn’t include in the movie?

You’ve seen Oppenheimer the movie about the Manhattan Project and the creation of the world’s first atomic bomb, known as the Trinity test. What you didn't see was that the desert where the bomb was detonated was not deserted.
3/7/202421 minutes
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Konstantin Kisin: Why the West is a bigger threat to itself than Putin is

Russian-born British satirist and author, Konstantin Kisin is in Australia for the first time. 
3/6/202415 minutes
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What a 2,000 year old papyrus scroll said

Over two thousand years ago Mount Vesuvius destroyed everything in its path, including a town called Herculaneum. Miraculously papyrus scrolls in a library survived enough to be read by new A. I technology.
3/5/202418 minutes
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Tim Thomas: The benefits of breathework

Former Australian Special Forces Commando Tim Thomas knows all too well the devastating lived experience of PTSD - having been debilitated for years by distressing symptoms, sleeplessness and a reliance on pills to simply function.
3/3/202416 minutes
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PJ Harding on Paul Kelly and preferring not to perform

Some people are born to be stars ... but what happens if you climb the ladder in your chosen performative field and suddenly realise you don't want to be the leading light? That happened to Australian singer-songwriter PJ Harding. 
3/1/202418 minutes
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Gillian Triggs on her life, her legacy and Australia's legal landscape

What do you think of when you hear the name Gillian Triggs? On her return to Australia, she takes a moment to reflect on her career.
2/29/202413 minutes
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What the year ahead looks like for news media and journalism

The news business feels like it's at a crossroads yet again, having survived into the digital age, journalism is now facing threats from artificial intelligence and a rising trend in news avoidance.
2/28/202413 minutes
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What a 135-year-old note, hidden in the pocket of an antique dress said

Find out why this code was considered one of the top 50 unsolvable codes in the world and meet the person who finally cracked it.
2/27/202410 minutes
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Has the sun finally set on the British empire?

Sathnam Sanghera's new book Empireword explores the contrasting dichotomies of the empire's lasting legacy.
2/26/202411 minutes
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Idomeneo: Why you should never make a deal with Neptune

We’ve all looked to the heavens in a moment of panic and made a deal with whoever is up there to get out of a pickle that we’re in. Mozart must've known that feeling when he wrote the opera Idomeneo at the age of 25.
2/16/202414 minutes
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Tartan: The Cloth of Contradiction

It’s as Scottish as haggis, smoked kipper and single malt whiskey - or is it? You’re about to learn that Tartan has a story far wider and perhaps older than Vivienne Westwood or the Punks, far older than William Wallace and Scotland the Brave as we know it.
2/15/202415 minutes
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The enduring appeal of romance novels

A tall, dark and handsome man with his shirt half unbuttoned, stands holding a woman in his muscular embrace. She is also in a state of undress looking up at her saviour, swooning. There’s a rugged landscape behind them …. even the horse is looking lusty and brooding. 
2/14/202415 minutes
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Where in the world is Alexander Campbell?

This time last year Alexander Campbell, walked out his front door and just kept walking. He walked through Sydney to Katoomba, up through Lithgow, Muswellbrook and Toowoomba through to Karumba then Katherine and Darwin. 
2/12/202411 minutes
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Eve: 200 million years of the female role in procreation

In the beginning, there was Adam and Eve. This is where humans and their reproduction systems began, fully formed and ready to go. So says the big book anyway. Author and researcher Cat Bohannon has other ideas about who Eve is and how her body contributed to the continuation of humanity. 
2/8/202421 minutes
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7 Captiva Road: Hell isn’t other people, it’s your family.

Before critically acclaimed actor Phillip Seymour Hoffman died, he developed a play called  ‘7 Captiva Road’ and before it’s world premiere in Melbourne, two of the actors will bring a scene to life here in the studio.
2/8/202411 minutes
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Nest of Traitors: Spies, moles and peroshki

Spies, Russian moles, stolen documents, double agents and a case never properly solved - all the hallmarks of your dad's favourite spy novel ... the incredible true story of how ASIO was infiltrated by the KGB in the new podcast 'Secrets We Keep: Nest of Traitors'.Guest: Joey Watson, podcast host 
2/7/202413 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ludovico Einaudi on what it's like to play the piano on a floating stage in the Artic

Imagine what it would be like playing a grand piano on an iceberg in the Arctic ... composer and musician Ludovico Einaudi can tell you, he's done it. 
2/6/202416 minutes
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'The World is Family': A portrait of a family and a nation

Imagine finding out that your parents, their extended family and friends played a major part in India’s fight for independence and acquaintances of a leader like Mahatma Gandhi.
2/5/202412 minutes
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Amanda Palmer on the life changing experience of being stuck in New Zealand

The American singer-songwriter and creative force, Amanda Palmer wears many hats... she's a  musician, has presented a Ted talk, she's a New York Times best-seller, and a former street performer.
2/2/202419 minutes
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Suite mágica: The heavenly combination of harp and classical guitar

Andrew Blanch and Emily Granger are a pioneering guitar and harp duo. Both celebrated soloists in their own right the two combine forces in this dreamy instrumental album Suite mágica which celebrates Australian composers.
2/1/202415 minutes
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Stuart Braithwaite reflects on the past, present and future of Mogwai

Forming in 1995, at a time when Brit Pop was king, Mogwai was an Indie Scottish post-rock band and everything about them was a rebellion - against being considered ‘British’, against pop music, against having lyrics for lyrics sake, and against big record labels.
1/31/202411 minutes
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Crime and punishment: Is there still a role for parole?

It’s common to see court cases depicted on TV and in movies or written up in the news; a guilty or not guilty verdict is often where the story ends but we rarely get to see and hear about another part of the prison system... parole.
1/30/202414 minutes
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A Compassionate Spy

The documentary A Compassionate Spy explores the life and love story behind the youngest scientist on the team behind the atomic bomb Ted Hall, who risked everything to do what he thought was right.
1/29/202415 minutes
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Oh Lordy! It's Mo Laudi!

When Mo moved across the seas to Europe he brought South Africa’s AfroHouse music with him. Running Afroelectronic club nights and inviting all sorts of African DJ’s to play bringing sounds and communities together in Paris and London.
1/26/202413 minutes
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Is cinema a language about to die, an art about to be lost?

What happens when you sit down with 16 directors and ask them about the future of cinema and do the answers differ when you revisit that same question 40 years later?We speak to the director of a documentary, about a documentary, about film.
1/25/202410 minutes
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Enjoying a snoop. Why we love looking at 'Other Peoples Homes'

We're a nation obsessed by houses and one woman has tapped into our fascination with ‘other people's homes' with her passion project and new book.
1/24/202414 minutes
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Surrogacy: Deplorable or desirable?

At a time of growing concern about plummeting birth rates, the number of babies born to surrogates is rising globally.But what kind of woman is willing to give over her body to create another human life out of the goodness of her heart?
1/23/202412 minutes
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Voice Activated

Imagine trying to use voice activation like Siri with a stutter. It’s just another reminder of the aspects of modern life that aren't made for everyone.
1/22/202413 minutes
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Some Christmas cheer with the Australian Girls Choir

A selection of the choristers from The Australian Girls Choir joined Andy in the studio to sing some Christmas songs. They sang Jingle Bell Rock, The Man With The Bag and Carol of the Bells.Guests:Tanya RomeoIsabelle OgierMiranda ChargeLucy ChisholmSophie CrookshanksAlannah DundasApril FordSarah FyvieSienna HazellMelanie HigginsLauren HirstEmily LathamIsabelle OgierIsabel OsbonReya Ramanujachari
12/15/20239 minutes
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How copyright law can improve artificial intelligence

In the 1890’s the pianola was the biggest case in copyright law. Musicians and writers were worried it would make them redundant. Well, there’s another similar copyright case underway at the moment that will have a huge effect on the way we use generative A.I platforms from music and art to coding.Guest:Matthew Butterick, lawyer
12/14/202315 minutes
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Long live The Brutes: Brutalist buildings in Sydney

They’re often derided, ignored, and under-loved. They’re in almost every city, they are buildings in the Brutalist architectural style - affectionately known as 'The Brutes'.A chance encounter outside Sydney’s famous Sirius building, led author Heidi Dokulil to investigate everything about this architectural style for her new book, Sydney Brutalism.Guest:Heidi Dokulil, design writer and author
12/13/202315 minutes
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Track Works: A pastiche of opera's greatest hits

Opera is often as much about the venue and the occasion as the music. Think of the sumptuous opera houses of Europe filled with black ties, dainty ladies with binoculars, and the chink of champagne flutes. But one opera company has broken the rules by performing in the public toilets in the Queen Victoria Building.Their new performance Track Works goes even further, taking up a wonderfully historical building normally associated with death. Very operatic indeed.Guest: Thomas De Angelis, Artistic DirectorEden Shifroni, Soprano
12/12/202312 minutes
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Where did all the hominins go?

Why have you got a chin? Why can you dance, when other bipeds can’t? Did you know that your DNA has fragments of ghostly code from early hominids for whom we haven't found any other physical evidence?Go back in time to when there were at least nine different hominins roaming the earth at the same time ... Human Origins: A Short History outlines our fellow hominins and thinks about how we became the last ones standing.Guest: Sarah Wild, author and journalist
12/11/202312 minutes
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Ten Tenors

The Ten Tenors join Andy live in the studio to chat about what makes a Tenor, life with the group, and sing a couple of their favourite tunes. Guests: Michael EdwardsCameron BarclayBoyd OwenJared NewallAdrian LiDonniJoseph NaimAmmon BennettJesse LaytBenjamin Clark
12/8/202313 minutes
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Why we find cute things so irresistible

Maybe you’ve heard the expression “being a bit too cute”? Someone pushing the boundaries, going a bit far, maybe even being a bit pushy or cunning.Joshua Paul Dale studies the psychological and biological reactions to cute things like puppies and babies and how the digital world and AI is preying on your very human reaction to these stimuli in his new book Irresistible: How Cuteness Wired our Brains and Conquered the World'
12/7/202311 minutes
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Boris Frankel: From Capitalism to Communism and back again

How strongly do you believe in your political convictions? Strong enough to whisk your family away to the other side of the world to pursue your communist ideals?Boris Frankel was ten when his dad decided to move to the Soviet Union - they were already on an ASIO watch list at the time due to their red-coloured friends in the 1950s. But did the Frankel’s find a perfect communist dream in Russia?Boris tells the tales of the cast of characters and the challenges they came across in his new book 'No Country for Idealists'Guest:Boris Frankel, author 
12/6/202315 minutes
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Taking a trip down 'Meth Road'

You’ve probably never heard of Dale Francis Drake. Still, just like in the hit series Breaking Bad, his entrepreneurialism not only went unnoticed by law enforcement but became a blueprint for the methamphetamine business worldwide…Australia's obsession with the drug is the focus of the new book Meth Road.Guest:Conor Woodman, Author and journalist
12/5/202315 minutes, 44 seconds
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Taking a trip down 'Meth Road'

Like in the hit series Breaking Bad, Dale Francis Drake's entrepreneurialism not only went unnoticed by law enforcement but became a blueprint for the methamphetamine business worldwide.Australia's obsession with the drug is the focus of the new book Meth Road.Guest:Conor Woodman, Author and journalist
12/5/202315 minutes, 44 seconds
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Cracking the glass mystery

Look around you right now ... wherever you are, you're likely to be surrounded by glass ... windows, reading glasses, device screens, drinking glass or maybe a vase.Despite making glass for thousands of years, we still don’t fully understand what type of material it is and what happens to it over time.Guest:Peter Harrowell, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Sydney
12/4/202313 minutes
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Foy Vance finds his guiding light

Foy Vance is known for his gravelly voice and eclectic musical style that blends elements of folk, soul, and blues.His emotive music is regularly used to tug at heart your heartstrings in television and films and you’ll get to hear why when he plays his hits Guiding Light and She Burns live in the studio. Guest: Foy Vance, musician 
12/1/202321 minutes
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'Empty Nets': A quiet tragedy

If you know even the slightest thing about Iranian cinema, it’s consumed by love and subtlety … love because, well all cinema is about love, but subtlety out of necessity.Iranian state censors won’t permit anything overt so directors like Behrooz Karamizade need to get creative. He talks about how he got around censorship in his new film Empty Nets.Guest:Behrooz Karamizade, Director
11/30/202313 minutes
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Four nights and 15 hours: Performing Wagner's epic 'Ring Cycle'

It's a story based on Norse mythology involving dragons and maidens, Gods and gold. The struggle of choosing between power and love … two human but ultimately incompatible pursuits. It could only be Wagner's The Ring Cycle.Often described using words like epic the roughly 15-hour performance spread over four operas may seem daunting to some, but Opera singer Daniel Sumegi who’s playing the protagonist Wotan or The Wanderer, King of the Gods says not to overthink it.You can see him in Opera Australia's performance in Brisbane.Guest:Daniel Sumegi, Bass-baritone Opera Singer
11/29/202313 minutes
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Uncovering Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock more than any other auteur in the 20th century understood the combination of sound when paired with emotion and suspense.Added to that was his uncanny understanding of branding and marketing for example he once locked the doors of the cinema during the premiere of Psycho. If you don't love Hitchcock, you're about to, as the new documentary My Name is Alfred Hitchcock explores the sometimes malevolent art of Hitchcockian cinema. Guest: Dr Wendy Haslem, Associate Professor in Screen Studies at the University of Melbourne
11/28/202316 minutes
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It's the hackers versus the hunters in the ransomware war

Right now, a secretive war is being waged, pitting hackers against their hunters, in a game in which no one fully knows the true cost, but it's likely in the tens of billions of dollars.The world's most sought-after ransomware hunter gets more requests than the FBI each day, and it turns out he lives in relative poverty in the town of Normal, Illinois, with 8 cats, two dogs and a bunny rabbit.Welcome to the world of The Ransomware Hunting TeamGuest:Renee Dudley, author
11/27/202325 minutes
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A German composer writes an Italian opera for an English stage

Rinaldo by Handel tells the story of love, war and redemption, set at the time of the First Crusade.It was the first Italian language opera written for the London stage and enjoyed great popularity until it was forgotten for two hundred years. It is the latest offering from Pinchgut Opera. Guests:Alexandra Oomens, SopranoErin Helyard, Artistic Director
11/24/202313 minutes
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Michael McQueen on the art of changing hearts and minds

Do you sometimes wish you could be more persuasive in the workplace ... or the family home?The art of persuasion is often painted as Machiavellian but author Michael McQueen's new book Mindstuck: Mastering the Art of Changing Minds argues that in our ideology-driven and polarised age, certainty has taken the place of curiosity and open-mindedness has given way to stubbornness. Guest: Michael McQueen, Author
11/23/202315 minutes
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Jana Monroe on dealing with sexism and serial killers in the FBI

There's one industry that has been portrayed in film and books more than any other and yet very few people ever have first-hand contact with it. Jana Monroe is a trailblazing female agent and criminal profiler of serial killers in the famous behavioural science unit at the FBI.She is also the one who trained Jodie Foster in her role for The Silence of the Lambs to understand what it's like to deal with serial killers as your day job. She's written about her experiences in Hearts of DarknessGuest:Jana Monroe, Author
11/22/202313 minutes
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Celebrating a brilliant life

There’s a certain mystery that parents have. Who were they before you? What did they do? How did they think?Journalist Rachelle Unreich thought she knew her mother Mira’s life well - her upbringing in Czechoslovakia, her time in concentration camps during World War 2 and the life she created after migrating to Australia. She ended up finding out much more through interviews with her shortly before her death which formed her book A Brilliant Life. Guest:Rachelle Unreich, Author 
11/21/202313 minutes
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What role does insecurity play in democracy?

What does democracy mean to you? It's a simple enough question but the answer is often a lot more difficult. Astra Taylor realised that looking at insecurity within the American democratic system could be a way of uniting people and co-founded The Debt Collective. Her new book The Age of Insecurity explores that idea in detail.Guest:Astra Taylor, Author and Organiser
11/20/202318 minutes
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Katie Noonan on playing poetry

There was a time when you could not walk past a work desk or notice board, nor newspaper or wall calendar, without seeing simple squiggly in cartoons, perhaps a little man with a curly head, tenderly cradling a duck. Such was the pervasiveness and power of Micheal Leunig's drawings.Singer-songwriter Katie Noonan is also connected with Leunig’s cartoons and has now made a new album with her band Elixir based on Leunig’s poetry. She’s here in the studio to play On a Hill and Boyhood Poem from that new album A Small Shy Truth.Guest:Katie Noonan, Musician
11/17/202315 minutes
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'Shot': Australia through a camera lens

You carry around a camera in your pocket every day. Documenting both the important and mundane moments - from weddings to a receipt you might need later. It’s your story but also our story.Now, these collections are digital, but over the last decades, people have donated their photos from shoe boxes, mantel pieces, photo albums and negatives to the New South Wales State Library.The library’s new ‘Shot’ exhibition showcases 400 photos taken between 1845 and 2022 giving us a history of Australia and the art form itself.Guest:Geoffrey Barker, Curator of 'Shot'
11/16/202315 minutes
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Linguist Rob Drummond on why our attitudes to accents matter

Studies show that we really do like the sound of our own voice, with people rating the sound of their own accents highly on a list of ‘social attractiveness’, but it also helps us project our sense of identity and relate to others.Rob Drummond’s own accent has been described as ‘vanilla’ - an admission he makes in his new book You’re All Talk: Why We Are What We Speak.Guest:Rob Drummond, author and linguist
11/15/202316 minutes
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How Dara Ó Briain learnt to speak Spanish

In 2009 comedian Dara Ó Briain was described as “television broadcaster Sir Terry Wogan's heir apparent as Britain's favourite Irishman…”Conversely, and as a testament to his own modesty, he once described himself as looking like "one of Tony Soprano's henchmen, on a bad day"... I don’t know which one comes with more pressure.He is in Australia on tour at the moment and he’s picking up where he left off before the pandemic with his show ‘So Where Were We’.Guest:Dara Ó Briain, Comedian
11/14/202317 minutes
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David McBride on his belief in democracy

David McBride was a lawyer in the Australian army who leaked classified information to the ABC that revealed allegations of war crimes by special forces in Afghanistan. But who was he before that? and what makes a man willing to risk everything, to tell the truth. His autobiography  ‘The Nature of Honour’ is out now. Guest: David McBride, Author
11/13/202313 minutes
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From sea to shining sea with Charley Crockett

American blues country Americana man Charley Crockett last came by in January and spoke about growing up in a trailer park in South Texas … about country music being exclusionary at its worst and unifying at its best. You can listen to our previous interview with Charley here. He's back to talk about his favourite parts of the American landscape and his passion for telling the story from Osage County. He'll be back here in Australia touring next year. Guest: Charley Crockett, Musician 
11/10/202311 minutes
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Return to the simple life with Mother the Mountain

Cottagecore is an aesthetic that celebrates simple living … an escapist movement that developed a following during the pandemic. Anastasia Vanderbyl and her sister Julia have tapped into this movement by documenting their life living on a rural property in Northern NSW with a new book Mother the Mountain. Guest: Anastasia Vanderbyl
11/9/202310 minutes
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Chris Taylor on making Australian stories into musicals

Were you watching when Steven Bradbury came from the back of the pack to win gold at the 2002 Winter Olympics?  I remember the story absolutely gripped Australia and we've seen countless retelling of that moment both in musical and documentary forms. Still, I haven't even seen it as a combination of both…  Chris Taylor and Andrew Hansen decided it was long overdue and have written a new musical-comedy-docuseries that looks at six critical events in recent Australian history and re-tells them through interviews and songs in Australian Epic. Guest: Chris Taylor
11/8/202315 minutes
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Andrew Kerec and the spine-tingling ride

What would you be willing to do to raise money for charity? Share a post on Facebook? Door knock? A fun run?  How about a solo bike ride of thousands of kilometres across Australia … twice. Andrew Kerec has done exactly that to raise money for charities supporting people with spinal cord injuries after his father Ludvig became a quadriplegic. Andrew has just completed his second solo trip The Spine-tingling Ride Guest: Andrew Kerec
11/7/202313 minutes
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How to rebuild a French Château

What does retirement look like to you? Is it putting your feet up, and enjoying the fruits of your labour by travelling or spending time with your grandkids?  What about buying and restoring a French Chateau that has fallen into disrepair and will probably cost millions and never be quite finished? Well, former Victorian labour water and tourism minister Tim Holding has done precisely that and written a book about it - Château Reawakening.  Guest: Tim Holding, author
11/6/202312 minutes
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Jeff Tweedy on what he's learned from having migraines

Grammy award-winning band WILCO's music is characterised by lead singer Jeff Tweedy's introspective, poetic and heartfelt vocals. Again a signature on their new record “Cousin” as they prepare to tour Australia early next year. Guest: Jeff Tweedy, Musician WILCO
11/3/202316 minutes
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How Bollywood taught Australia to embrace joyful chaos

The colour and movement of Bollywood seem almost the antithesis of Australia's smaller, perhaps more serious film industry. Anupam Sharma's new documentary Brand Bollywood Downunder explores the links between the two nations' film industries. Guest: Anupam Sharma, Filmmaker 
11/2/202315 minutes
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Juan Diego Flórez from singing in a pub to the Opera House

You might be familiar with Rossini’s charming opera The Barber of Saville or the dramatic overture in William Tell but listen a little closer and you might notice the wit and humour of the characters he paints in his opera and his expert use of crescendo to build tension and excitement... Everywhere you look there’s more to be found in Rossini… Peruvian Tenor Juan Diego Flórez is a fan and will be singing his music on his tour of Australia. Guest:  Juan Diego Flórez, Singer
11/1/202312 minutes
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Elizabeth Day talks about the 'F' words

Friendship and failure are the two big “F words” that loom large in the work of podcaster and writer Elizabeth Day. In her podcast How To Fail she interviews successful, high-profile people about how they’ve overcome failure and she talks about the complexities of friendship in modern life in her book Friendaholic: Confessions of a Friendship Addict Guest: Elizabeth Day, Podcast host and author
10/31/202317 minutes
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Andrew Quilty captured the fall of Kabul

When photographer Andrew Quilty landed in Kabul for the first time in 2013 to cover the Afghanistan cricket team as they prepared for the cricket World Cup, he admits his motivation at first wasn't noble story-telling, but more ‘ego-driven’... being able to say he’d worked in a ‘conflict zone’. His two-week stay finally ended nearly a decade later, his new book of photographs “This is Afghanistan” captures the country during the draw down and withdrawal of Allied troops and the return of the Taliban. Welcome to you, Andrew 
10/30/202317 minutes
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'Minor Gold' have a way with words

You often hear interviews with bands that are well-established … that have been on tour a couple of times … they have a trademark ‘sound’. But it’s rare to witness the unfurling of something new.  Officially formed last year in August, Minor Gold has just returned from touring in the US and they are now on their Australian tour having just released their self-titled debut album. It’s certainly been a busy first year.  Guests: Tracy McNeil, Musician Dan Parsons, Musician
10/27/202314 minutes
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How to heal humans and horses

Humans and horses have shared a special connection for thousands of years. More recently, their calming nature has been shown to be beneficial for our mental health. Scott Brodie knows this well working to rehabilitate both ex-servicemen and servicewomen and ex-racehorses. His program is the focus of the new documentary The Healing, directed by Nick Barkla.
10/26/202314 minutes
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'Love Police' will hold your hand through a musical journey

If you’ve been to a concert in the past 20 years and bought a T-shirt then chances are it was Brian Taranto’s (BT) business that you bought it off. As a one-man band, BT’s company, Love Police, also organises tours - in fact, he’s been involved behind the scenes with many of the artists who have appeared in our very own Studio 240. Guest: Brian Taranto
10/25/202314 minutes
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British humour: The comedy and the tragedy

When it comes to humour do you prefer the simplicity of slapstick … Mister Bean fiddling with the reclining chair at his dentist. Or the biting political satire of The Thick of It that perfectly skewers the business of politics? Or maybe it's following the ludicrous escapades of Edina and Patsy in Absolutely Fabulous. Whatever you prefer there's a British comedy for everyone. The new book Different Times chronicles the history of the television genre.  Guest: David Stubbs, author
10/24/202317 minutes
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The comedy and the tragedy of British humour

When it comes to humour do you prefer the simplicity of slapstick … Mister Bean fiddling with the reclining chair at his dentist. Or the biting political satire of The Thick of It that perfectly skewers the business of politics? Or maybe it's following the ludicrous escapades of Edina and Patsy in Absolutely Fabulous. Whatever you prefer there's a British comedy for everyone. The new book Different Times chronicles the history of the television genre.  Guest: David Stubbs, author
10/24/202317 minutes
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Ben Folds does indeed play piano

Mention Ben Folds to most people and they might know ‘Rocking The Suburbs’ or maybe ‘Brick’. But mention Ben Folds to a true music nerd and they’ll tell you about the acoustic version of Emaline and how it was one of the first songs he was proud of writing … or the fact that the gentle love song The Luckiest was originally written for a scene in the teen movie ‘Loser’ which incredibly ended up being cut. Whatever you do know about Ben Folds, I can guarantee there is always more to find out. The new documentary directed by Scott Hicks is 'MY NAME'S BEN FOLDS I play piano' Guest: Ben Folds, Musician
10/23/202313 minutes
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Year one at The People's House: Mr Universe, Les Girls and ACDC

In early 70’s Australia, Gough Whitlam was elected riding a wave of protest and demands for change. We withdrew from Vietnam … removed The White Australia policy … Germaine Greer published The Female Eunuch. We were grappling with our sense of identity and needed something to unify us and represent our diverse cultural and national identity. We found it in The Opera House. It turns 50 today. 
10/20/202315 minutes
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Dan Box and 'The Man Who Wasn't There'

From the sea to the spinifex, the Northern Territory is a kaleidoscope of colour. The weather isn’t just experienced- it is lived. The heat and humidity can be oppressive… stifling… maddening... a place described as a law unto itself.  12 years ago, in Katherine, a murder was committed. The motive was clear and so was the method but was Zak Grieve also there, or did he pull out? Either way, the Northern Territory Mandatory Sentencing laws meant that Zak was locked up with a life sentence. Award-winning journalist Dan Box examines the case and his own response to it, in his new book The Man Who Wasn’t There.
10/19/202318 minutes
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Humans have survived climate change before and can do it again

There’s nothing like history and science to remind us just how precarious our existence on this rotating rock we like to call home, really is.  There were many points in human history where things were touch-and-go for humanity, yet here we are, and this time we’re facing another challenge… this time, of our own creation. Climatologist and author Michael E. Mann's new book Our Fragile Moment: How Lessons from Earth’s Past Can Help Us Survive the Climate Crisis aims to dispel the narrative of despair, by reminding you that humans have survived changes to our climate before and we can do it again.
10/18/202317 minutes
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Competitive Eating: Execrable or Elite Sport?

Humans really do have a bizarre relationship with food. We’re obsessed with talking about food, cooking food, buying food, and eating food. Some love watching people eat spectacular amounts of food in record time and yes, some like competing in these feats. Why? Is it a symbol of modern gluttony or is it a sport that requires endurance and training just like any other? Guest: James Webb, Competitive Eater
10/17/202310 minutes
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Caroline O'Donoghue is sincere about 'Sentimental Garbage'

Sinéad O’Connor, James Joyce, U2, Oscar Wilde … even Derry Girls  For such a small population Ireland has provided some real heavy hitters, culturally speaking…  Some of these could be written off as ‘fluff’ but writer and podcaster Caroline O’Donoghue disputes this idea and embraces the popular not just from Ireland. Her hugely successful podcast Sentimental Garbage takes a deep dive into themes and references from across the pop cultural landscape to find out why they mean so much to us.  Her latest book The Rachel Incident which is set in 2009… a time ripe for these sorts of cultural references.
10/16/202313 minutes
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Hang ten with Ash Grunwald

Why is there such a strong connection between surfing and music?  Is it the downtime waiting for the swell to pick up that gives you time for jotting down sandy lyrics? Is it the rhythm and timing needed to ride that wave?  The Beach Boys sang about surf culture. Jack Johnson started out as a competitive surfer. Jimmy Buffett even enjoyed a surf. Blues and roots musician Ash Grunwald has thought about this deeply - writing, podcasting and singing about it. 
10/13/202324 minutes
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Battler Literature: A poetry movement started by factory workers

A tired, lonely Chinese worker labours on the factory line inserting tiny screws into what will become the smartphone in your pocket.  The unrelenting work conditions have seen 14 of his co-workers die. But in his mind he writes poetry about his life and experience ... a movement is underway Canadian artist Njo Kong Kie came across the poetry of one such worker Xu Lizhi, and has created a performance called ‘I Swallowed A Moon Made of Iron’
10/12/202317 minutes
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Air Alan: Joyce's leadership and legacy at Qantas examined

Peter Harbison's new book ‘Alan Joyce and Qantas: The Trials and Transformation of an Australian Icon’ examines Joyce's time in the top job. The clean out of the top echelons of Qantas leadership today appears almost complete with the chairman of the board, Richard Goyder announcing he’ll retire before the end of next year. It follows the departure of Alan Joyce last month after 15 years as CEO a difficult tenure filled with challenges  Guest: Peter Harbison, author
10/11/202314 minutes
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Why your immune system is the nightclub bouncer for your body

About 30-40% of the world’s population and five million Australians are dealing with food or environmental allergies. Despite this, not a whole lot is actually known about them, in fact, their definition can’t even be agreed upon. A new book, Allergic: How Our Immune System Reacts to a Changing World breaks down the complicated way allergies and the immune system work.  Guest:  Dr. Theresa MacPhail, author
10/10/202319 minutes
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Learning linguistic lessons with 'Writely or Wrongly'

How often do you rely on spellcheck… or autocorrect to tidy up those minor errors in your emails, documents or texts each day? They might do the trick for us mere mortals but for newspapers, it’s a different story. Joanne Anderson is the chief desk editor of  The Age, which means that she is the authority on all the words in all the articles that pass her desk each day. Such is her knowledge of the English language that she has written us plebs a helpful and humorous handbook ‘Writely or Wrongly: An unstuffy guide to language stuff’ Guest: Joanne Anderson, author
10/9/202314 minutes
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Enjoy some sweet synth-wave sounds with Sunglasses Kid

What is it about 80's music that is so recognisable? Is it the pan-pipes, the sax, the synth? You can almost touch the shoulder pads, feel the Miami humidity and see the Palm Trees. Because it's so visceral, it also holds a special place in film history. Edward Gamper aka Sunglasses Kid has found a niche with his nostalgic 1980's tunes and movie themes. 
10/6/202316 minutes
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Inside the writers room with Gary Janetti

Gary Janetti has achieved the dream of many - making a successful career creating TV in Hollywood.  Writer, producer, executive producer, creator, voice actor and author he’s worked on Will & Grace, Family Guy, Vicious and The Prince.  He’s here to bring his witty quips and tales from his books to Australia with his show ‘An Evening(ish) in Oz. With Gary Janetti’
10/5/202313 minutes
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Space and Theology: To infinity and beyond

The year is 1963. Lawrence of Arabia wins the Oscar for Best Picture. Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his ‘I Have a Dream’ speech ... and JFK is shot and killed in Dallas. Valentina Tereshkova the first woman in space, returns to Earth, but it will be six years until we land on the moon. Humanity seems to be largely moving forward… reaching up. In the wake of these advancements five thinkers were asked ‘Has humanity’s conquest of space increased or diminished our stature?’  Sixty years on, as part of World Space Week, the Wheeler Centre is discussing the question.
10/4/202316 minutes
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'Sweet Mama' takes to space to teach us about Type 2 diabetes

Afrofuturism is a genre of music and art and cultural aesthetic that explores the intersection of the African experience with history, science and technology.  It imagines alternative futures; speculative fiction with a black lens. Mixing science, and space to explore something that is disproportionately prevalent in African genetics and a possible future without it, ‘Sweet Mama’ is set in an intergalactic game-like scenario where our hero fights the battle of Type 2 Diabetes within the body. 
10/3/202315 minutes
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Hannah Ferguson wants you to bite back

When Hannah Ferguson landed a job with the Queensland Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions … she was 22 years old and full of ambition and hope ... she found herself sitting in an office cubicle for hours on end transcribing police recordings of interviews with victims and accused perpetrators hearing, in detail, stories of trauma, abuse and violence. It transformed her perception of the justice system and the media’s reporting of it … so she started Cheek Media Co.  She's just written her first book 'Bite Back: Feminism, media, politics and our power to change it all' a scathing critique of the current state of Australian politics, media and feminism… with some ideas on how we might be able to help make change.
10/2/202317 minutes
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Holy Holy live in Studio 241

From meeting at a Thailand Maccas in an age before social media... to having a fan in Liam Gallagher. Tim and Oscar from Holy Holy have managed to create music across time and space, having never lived in the same city... or state. They came into the studio and played their songs 'Rosé and 'Ready' from their new album 'Cellophane'
9/29/202320 minutes
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How to navigate parenting when your kids become adults

There comes a point in everybody's life when the relationship between parent and child changes. When we start to become our own adults, parents no longer need to provide care and advice in the same way.  It used to be when around the age we left school and went to uni but that is beginning to change… which can make the  Dr Laurence Steinberg argues in his new book ‘You And Your Adult Child: How to Grow Together in Challenging Times’  that factors like work and the economy mean that we’re moving through our life stages at about 5 -10 year later than our parents.
9/28/202315 minutes
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Star Trek and Jetpacks: Speculative Design for the future

You may have heard it said… that truly good design is actually design you don’t notice. Clothes that just seem to fit perfectly…  the warm invitation of a beautifully lit room… or the ease of comfortable furniture… the natural flow of highly functional architecture. But some argue that design should also contribute to a bigger conversation… one about ideas… and art... our vision of the future. Speculation: 8 Billion Little Utopias is part of the Design Fringe program and explores this idea. Guest: Dr. Vincent Alessi, Curator and Director of The Linden New Art Gallery 
9/27/202314 minutes
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Transhumanism: Would you live forever if you could?

If you knew your body wasn’t going to fall apart and you could live forever with augmented or even improved body parts… with no need to worry about failing eyesight … that bung knee … heart disease … would that make you more interested? This is Transhumanism … a movement that wants to use science and technology to make humans … better and live forever. Zoltan Istvan has been a journalist, and science fiction writer, worked in Real estate and has been a political candidate and believes in the transhumanist movement. He even drove a coffin-shaped bus around America to promote the ‘longevity movement’. 
9/26/202317 minutes
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Where have all the circuses gone?

When you imagine a circus what do you picture?  A ringmaster … a trapeze artist… Strong-man… clowns… amazing feats of physical stamina and acrobatics... even fleas? While circus arts have progressed from this, our picture of it might not have caught up with the possibilities of this art form. The National Institute of Circus Arts is holding a summit on Circus arts and the industry's issues as part of the Melbourne Fringe Festival.
9/25/202319 minutes
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Ondara: A Troubadour's Spirit

Born in Nairobi, Kenya in the early 90’s, Ondara listened to the family’s battery-operated radio, devouring any sort of music he could cram into his young ears. Eventually he came to folk music, after losing a bet, and finding out that ‘Knockin' On Heaven Door’ wasn't in fact a Guns N Roses Song, but by some guy called Bob Dylan. He won the Green Card Lottery and moved to the States, not LA or New York … but Maple Grove, Minnesota - a place as American as Apple pie and more importantly, Dylan’s home state. Tour info for Ondara can be found here
9/22/202311 minutes
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Photographer Harry Borden shifts his focus to divorce

Most of us have a connection to divorce. Maybe your parents got a divorce… or you’re supporting a friend through a marriage breakdown ... or perhaps you’ve been through one (or more) yourself.  The narrative surrounding divorce is mostly sad … painful … messy.  Photographer Harry Borden illustrates the ripple effect that the breakdown of marriage creates … including the positive outcomes of peace, reflection and re-creation, in his new book On Divorce. 
9/21/202318 minutes
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Tentacular Tentacular! The Octopus versus A.I

Cephalopods make for a perfect canvas to discuss natural intelligence versus Artificial intelligence in ‘Distributed Consciousness’. The technicolour images and distorted voiceovers explore biological and artificial intelligence, distributed computation and cognition, cryptography, evolution, phenomenology, ecological awareness, climate change, and activism. Got it? good. You can see Distributed Consciousness at the Melbourne ACMI Gallery. 
9/20/202313 minutes
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Future proofing the building industry with bamboo

Bamboo is considered one of the most versatile and environmentally friendly materials in the world. It’s long supported all manner of construction in the east, more recently being used to build pavilions in China and even schools in Bali … so why don’t we see more of it used in Western nations? Italian architect Mauricio Cardenas Laverde is in Melbourne as part of the Tools for After Design festival.
9/19/202316 minutes
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The problem with patents

What do polymer bank notes, the electric drill and Zinc sunscreen all have in common? They were all inventions with patents written in Australia. And while these became highly successful, not all patents are.  ‘IP Provocations’ is a new podcast exploring whether patents are facilitating the spread of knowledge and innovation as they were designed to do or whether they’re in fact inhibiting it.
9/18/202312 minutes
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Postcards from Italy

This winter it felt like absolutely every person was overseas for a European summer … and the one place they all seemed to be going was Italy. If your friends did not send you a postcard or bring you back a souvenir, then let the Australian Chamber Orchestra send you a little taste of Italy. Postcards from Italy takes a look at the way five selected works from across four centuries display the cultural influences of Italy ... Music is not necessarily the Italian stereotype you might expect. Principle cellist Timo-Vekko ‘Tipi’ Valve take you on an Vacansa Italiana.
9/15/202316 minutes
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A look at the leaders in the fight against climate change

In a year where the planet has been lashed by non-stop catastrophic weather events ... being reminded of the people who are working towards change gives you hope rather than despair at the amount of work ahead. Professor Tim Flannery’s new documentary ‘Climate Changers’ introduces you to some of the leaders within the climate activist community across the world.
9/14/202311 minutes
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The undoing of Gladys Berejiklian

She was at one time named the “Woman who saved Australia”.  Gladys Berejiklian's political trajectory saw her lead Australia’s largest state through catastrophic times. But one question at a press conference began to unravel that and led to an ICAC investigation which would find that she breached public trust and found her guilty of serious corrupt conduct.  The reporter who asked that question was Paul Farrell, from ABC Investigations. He is the author of a new book Gladys: A Leader’s Undoing. 
9/13/202317 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Villain Edit: Truth, lies and videotape

Imagine seeing your first dates and flirtations with your partner play out on national TV. Your romance is a storyline at the whim of editors and producers. Then imagine your romance, and your personality, being picked apart on the internet, strangers weighing in on you and your actions in forums and social media.  Alisha Aitken-Radburn has written about her time in The Bachelor franchise in her book The Villain Edit.
9/12/202314 minutes
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Finding the comedy in classical music

What's the difference between a viola and an onion? No one cries when you cut up a viola. Brett Yang and Eddy Chen of TwoSet Violin, enjoy a joke about violas as much as the next person … maybe more as they combine classical music appreciation and YouTube culture, in a channel that’s had more than 1.3 billion views. They're currently on a world tour having a chuckle at chamber music.
9/11/202316 minutes
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Exploring the light and shade with Tex Perkins

When you look at photos of the band The Cruel Sea many of them are your typical band picture … what these pictures don’t tell you is how much of a laugh The Cruel Sea loves to have.  And while band members have come and gone, The Cruel Sea have been having a laugh and playing tunes for more than three decades and they’re heading off their 30th-anniversary tour for their award-winning album ‘The Honeymoon Is Over’.
9/8/202314 minutes
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Peeling back the layers with Tim Finn

When you go to a concert what do you wanna see? Do you want to hear your favourite songs you already know every single word to …. or do you want to hear the new songs that may be your new favourites? Every set list by every band has struggled with this idea. Singer-songwriter Tim Finn is giving the people both. After a decade or so off the touring circuit, he’s heading out on tour. The Lives and Times Of Tim Finn will have all the fan faves from Split Enz, Crowded House, his solo work, and everything in between.
9/7/202314 minutes
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Stylebender: The fighter who loves to dance

In Mixed Martial Arts or MMA you win one of two ways - either by punching or kicking your opponent hard enough to render them unconscious or if they tap out … in the ring, there are rules and your enemy and the objective is clear.  However, in life, sometimes the lines are blurred and the rules aren’t clear. Sometimes your opponent is you … and the mistakes you make result in more than just losing points. Nigerian-born New Zealander and current UFC middle-weight champion - Israel ‘Izzy’ Adesanya is the subject of Zöe McIntosh’s documentary Stylebender. 
9/6/202311 minutes
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When lightning strikes thrice.

A bolt of lightning in movies, TV and literature is often portrayed as a message from the heavens, a catalyst for great destruction or transformation.  In real life being struck by lightning usually leads to any number of physical and cognitive symptoms… usually leaving the person irrevocably changed in some way. Cellist Zoë Barry had not 1, not 2 but 3 close encounters with lightning within 6 months. Her work The Nervous Atmosphere explores the after-effects.
9/5/202316 minutes
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Ben Lee's compass is set towards fun

He’s one of those artists that every time you read about him he’s doing something entirely different. From a tour with Ben Kweller and Ben Folds … to becoming a death doula, from a kid's album about Islam to selling essential oils on the internet … even a nominee for World’s Sexiest Vegetarian.  Ben Lee is fun, even his album says so. He's heading on tour to bring the fun to everyone.
9/4/202312 minutes
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Kuya James is bringing Asian psychedelic rock back

In the busy streets of Manilla, you’ll see people getting in and out of what looks like a mix between a Jeep and a Jitney which is a minibus - therefore a Jeepney.  Intricately painted and riotously decorated. The Jeepney is a symbol of Filipino art and culture and so Darwin-based artist Kuya James has found inspiration in them for his new album 'Jeepney Rock'
9/1/202314 minutes
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Snuff Puppets: Big puppets for big ideas

A big, ungainly baby waddles down the road, hands outstretched holding a cigarette. A huge roving eyeball looks out over a hotel balcony. A giant brain lumbers slowly down the stairs, bumping off the handrail. A gigantic disembodied foot treads on a too-slow picnicker, and a severed hand appears out of nowhere to push it off, all the while a nose bounces around behind them. Such is the surreal spectacle of a Snuff Puppets public performance. You might encounter an oversized body part or animal the size of a bus and the beauty of these beasts is their ability to surprise, delight and sometimes even disgust.
8/31/202319 minutes
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Punk Photography: From Mohawks to Mullets

David Cossini calls himself an immersive photographer. He prefers to meet his subjects on their level... even going so far as to inhabit a squat with his subjects for his collection on punks in London.  David's work in Uganda has just won the Art Handlers' Award in the National Photographic Portrait Prize. His latest collection 'Business in the Front, Party in the Back!' is a study of the mullet and those who don them.  
8/30/202316 minutes
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From peak to peak with Allie Pepper

Once you reach 7000 meters above sea level, your body is never warm. No matter how suitable your clothes are, your body isn't burning enough oxygen to trap and heat and you still have 1000 meters to go. 
8/29/202316 minutes
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Bee Miles: A life on and off the rails

This is the astonishing private life of Bee Miles. One of Australia’s most iconic eccentrics known in the 50s and 60s for her Shakespeare recitals and her dangerous obsession with jumping onto moving trains, trams and vehicles. A firebrand even as her decline neared. Rose Ellis has completed a biography of the Sydney personality - Bee Miles: Australia’s famous bohemian rebel, and the untold story behind the legend
8/28/202313 minutes
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The Pleasures: midnigt inspiration, Americana for Australia and the Newcastle music scene

Sometimes you get a stroke of genius at unlikely times
8/25/202314 minutes, 22 seconds
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László Bordos and the possibility of light carrying sound

Do you remember those magic eye picture books?  Hungarian visual artist László Bordos also plays with image and visual tricks creating a kind of trompe l'oeil- projecting onto some of the the most beautiful architecture in the world, plunging them in and out of darkness, so that you’d almost swear that parts of the building disappear. His next canvas is Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance, part of the Now or Never Festival.
8/24/202313 minutes
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Brian Burdekin on a life of service to our most vulnerable

As Australia’s first Human Rights Commissioner, Brian Burdekin has spent a lifetime advocating for the needs of these children, those with disabilities and mental illness.
8/23/202323 minutes
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Your chips are your voice: the work and life skills women can learn from poker

What do you picture when you imagine a poker game? A dimly lit, smokey room with a green felt table? Stacks of chips? decks of cards? I’m willing to bet, you were imagining a group of men playing poker.  It’s a game often depicted as a masculine - where risk, strategy, assertiveness and financial savviness are key. Options trader and businesswoman Jenny Just says she noticed a lack of these traits in her daughter and female employees, so she took a gamble and began teaching women to play poker with her company PokerPower.
8/22/202314 minutes
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Your chips are your voice: What women can learn from poker

What do you picture when you imagine a poker game? A dimly lit, smokey room with a green felt table? Stacks of chips? decks of cards? I’m willing to bet, you were imagining a group of men playing poker.  It’s a game often depicted as masculine - where risk, strategy, assertiveness and financial savvy are key. Options trader and businesswoman Jenny Just says she noticed a lack of these traits in her daughter and female employees, so she took a gamble and began teaching women to play poker with her company PokerPower.
8/22/202314 minutes
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Making Merkel

Using a wealth of archive material and interviews with those who worked with her 'MERKEL' the documentary takes a look at the personal and political life of the previous Chancellor of Germany, Angela Merkel. Director Eva Weber joins the show to discuss what she found out about the leader and her legacy. Guest:  Eva Weber, Director
8/21/202312 minutes
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The guitar that chose Petra Poláĉková

The 9-stringed romantic guitar has a particular kind of sound to it... the extra strings provide a balanced blend of the treble and bass giving it a kind of depth… a richness to it.  Guitarist Petra Poláĉková is one of the very few female 9-string classical guitar players. She discusses her influence and listens as she graces our ears with a romantic piece by Johann Kaspar Mertz. Petra is currently touring Australia performing and running workshops.
8/18/202313 minutes
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What do we lose, if we lose winter?

Summer is such a part of the Australian national identity. But what if there was no longer a winter to counterbalance summer? What if there was no reprieve from the heat? What better way to express and process our anger, sorrow, and worry about the inevitable changes climate change will bring through art? Written in the aftermath of the 2019/2020 bushfires Noëlle Janaczewsk's play The End of Winter grapples with exactly this. Guest:  Jane Phegan, actor
8/17/202316 minutes
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Space on earth: Life at Concordia research station

It’s the closest thing to space we have here on Earth; extreme isolation and confinement, limited communication. No plants or animals to be seen. Months of total darkness and only 12 other people to talk to for a year. It’s the Concordia research station in Antarctica and if you’re feeling claustrophobic, then maybe being an astronaut isn't for you.  But for Dr Meganne Christian spending a year at the research station helped her realise her dream of becoming an astronaut. Guests: Dr Meganne Christian, Reserve Astronaut
8/16/202313 minutes
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Patricia Field's fashion in focus

1966 Greenwich Village, the centre of counter-culture. 23-year-old Patricia Field opens her boutique and it would become a hub for creatives for the next five decades. Today, at 82 years old her costume and styling work has made hit shows like Sex And The City, the Devil Wears Prada and Emily In Paris iconic fashion touchstones. She is the subject of Michael Selditch's new documentary 'Happy Clothes: A Film About Patricia Field' Guest: Michael Selditch, producer/director
8/15/202312 minutes
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The rare books that went down with the Titanic

Old and rare book collections bring to mind the personal libraries of the landed gentry in England. Floor-to-ceiling shelves of dark leather bound books with gold engraved covers. Maybe a little bit dusty… perhaps musty.  What is the future of these books and book collections if they cannot be poured over… shared… handled… enjoyed... it's a question raised - and potentially answered - by digitising old and rare books. History of Books and Shakespeare expert Emma Smith spoke on the topic for the launch of the State Library Victoria's new online exhibition Beyond The Book.
8/14/202313 minutes
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The rare books that went down with the Titanic

Old and rare book collections bring to mind the personal libraries of the landed gentry in England. Floor-to-ceiling shelves of dark leather bound books with gold engraved covers. Maybe a little bit dusty… perhaps musty.  What is the future of these books and book collections if they cannot be poured over… shared… handled… enjoyed... it's a question raised - and potentially answered - by digitising old and rare books. History of Books and Shakespeare expert Emma Smith spoke on the topic for the launch of the State Library Victoria's new online exhibition Beyond The Book.
8/14/202313 minutes
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Yelling, screaming and rocking on. The Screaming Jets are back at it

In 1989 rock was king. On the mid-north coast of NSW, Newcastle was serving up some of Australia’s best new music. 
8/11/202314 minutes
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Yelling, screaming and rocking on. The Screaming Jets are back at it

In 1989 rock was king. On the mid-north coast of NSW, Newcastle was serving up some of Australia’s best new music. 
8/11/202314 minutes
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Unexpected visitors at Hells Gates

There’s nothing more pitiful or senseless than a mass stranding of whales. Around 100 Pilot whales stranded themselves recently on the WEST coast. It’s senseless, largely because we still don't really know WHY whales beach themselves. The largest recorded mass stranding in Australia was in 2020, when almost 500 whales beached, at possibly the most treacherous and infamous inlet in the country - Hells Gates, at Macquarie Harbour on the western coast of Tasmania.  Little did the locals who tried to save them know that whales would beach again exactly two years later TO THE DAY. Their testimonies form the new show, “Hells Gates” by Joel Carnegie, welcome to you.
8/10/202314 minutes
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Unexpected visitors at Hells Gates

There’s nothing more pitiful or senseless than a mass stranding of whales. Around 100 Pilot whales stranded themselves recently on the WEST coast. It’s senseless, largely because we still don't really know WHY whales beach themselves. The largest recorded mass stranding in Australia was in 2020, when almost 500 whales beached, at possibly the most treacherous and infamous inlet in the country - Hells Gates, at Macquarie Harbour on the western coast of Tasmania.  Little did the locals who tried to save them know that whales would beach again exactly two years later TO THE DAY. Their testimonies form the new show, “Hells Gates” by Joel Carnegie, welcome to you.
8/10/202314 minutes
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Surfing legend Owen Wright’s final wave

Banzai Pipeline is the centre of the surfing universe. It's made careers but it has also claimed lives. In 2015 Aussie pro surfer Owen Wright emerged from these frothing blue waves a different version of himself, he was lucky to emerge at all. His new book about his experience is called 'Against the Water'
8/9/202313 minutes
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Surfing legend Owen Wright’s final wave

Banzai Pipeline is the centre of the surfing universe. It's made careers but it has also claimed lives. In 2015 Aussie pro surfer Owen Wright emerged from these frothing blue waves a different version of himself, he was lucky to emerge at all. His new book about his experience is called 'Against the Water'
8/9/202313 minutes
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Wapke Feenstra: The benefit of protecting rural cultures in south Rotterdam

When we think of our culture it’s easy to think of the culture of the big urban cities. 
8/8/202316 minutes
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Wapke Feenstra: The benefit of protecting rural cultures in south Rotterdam

When we think of our culture it’s easy to think of the culture of the big urban cities. 
8/8/202316 minutes
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Soda Jerk samples old favourites to create new stories in 'Hello Dankness'

Much like hip-hop DJs sample a genre-busting variety of music to create something new in itself Australian artistic duo Soda Jerk does so for video. Creating a film HELLO DANKNESS, which skewers the farcical nature of American politics using video and audio samples from over 500 tv shows and movies.
8/7/202313 minutes
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Soda Jerk samples old favourites to create new stories in 'Hello Dankness'

Much like hip-hop DJs sample a genre-busting variety of music to create something new in itself Australian artistic duo Soda Jerk does so for video. Creating a film HELLO DANKNESS, which skewers the farcical nature of American politics using video and audio samples from over 500 tv shows and movies.
8/7/202313 minutes
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Tina Guo: The rebellious cellist

When you think of a cellist, you might think of Jacqueline Du Pre or Yo-Yo Ma, and less about Skrillex, the soundtrack for The Hangover 2 or heavy metal. Cellist Tina Guo is a rebel. She’s created a unique brand for herself and her stringed instrument, bringing the cello into all sorts of places across different musical genres and projects you may not expect. 
8/4/202310 minutes
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Tina Guo: The rebellious cellist

When you think of a cellist, you might think of Jacqueline Du Pre or Yo-Yo Ma, and less about Skrillex, the soundtrack for The Hangover 2 or heavy metal. Cellist Tina Guo is a rebel. She’s created a unique brand for herself and her stringed instrument, bringing the cello into all sorts of places across different musical genres and projects you may not expect. 
8/4/202310 minutes
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Hayley Mary: How The Who's rock opera 'Tommy' explains the empty promise of fame

Considered one of the top rock operas of all time and The Who’s Magnum Opus Tommy is getting a new lease on life.  Legendary Australian band You Am I is taking Tommy on tour with special guest vocals from Sarah McLeod and Hayley Mary. It’s a delicious rock’n’roll layer dip. 
8/3/202312 minutes
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Hayley Mary: How The Who's rock opera 'Tommy' explains the empty promise of fame

Considered one of the top rock operas of all time and The Who’s Magnum Opus Tommy is getting a new lease on life.  Legendary Australian band You Am I is taking Tommy on tour with special guest vocals from Sarah McLeod and Hayley Mary. It’s a delicious rock’n’roll layer dip. 
8/3/202312 minutes
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'Constellations' explores the panoply of parallel universes

Ever wondered what your life might look like if you hadn’t made a particular decision? The Sydney Theatre Company ‘Constellations’ uses the idea of the multiverse taken from quantum physics to explore the concept of infinite outcomes. It follows Roland, a beekeeper and Marianne, a physicist through their romantic relationship, depicting moments and possibilities.
8/2/20230
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'Constellations' explores the panoply of parallel universes

Ever wondered what your life might look like if you hadn’t made a particular decision? The Sydney Theatre Company ‘Constellations’ uses the idea of the multiverse taken from quantum physics to explore the concept of infinite outcomes. It follows Roland, a beekeeper and Marianne, a physicist through their romantic relationship, depicting moments and possibilities.
8/2/20230
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Adrian Sutton composed concertos during chemo

Not many people get to control their legacy. Even fewer of those get to do it with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. 
8/1/202313 minutes
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Adrian Sutton composed concertos during chemo

Not many people get to control their legacy. Even fewer of those get to do it with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. 
8/1/202313 minutes
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Peter Rees on the politics, personality and passions of Tim Fischer

A soldier, farmer, diplomat, advocate, father… and politician - he was the leader of the National Party and Deputy Prime Minister. Tim Fischer was one of those rare politicians who was well-liked and respected across the political spectrum by colleagues and constituents. Peter Rees has just completed a biography on Tim Fisher called ‘I Am Tim: Life, Politics and Beyond’. 
7/31/202317 minutes
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Peter Rees on the politics, personality and passions of Tim Fischer

A soldier, farmer, diplomat, advocate, father… and politician - he was the leader of the National Party and Deputy Prime Minister. Tim Fischer was one of those rare politicians who was well-liked and respected across the political spectrum by colleagues and constituents. Peter Rees has just completed a biography on Tim Fisher called ‘I Am Tim: Life, Politics and Beyond’. 
7/31/202317 minutes
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Busby Marou on the importance of positivity in music

There's a rich history of country duos but not many from Queensland let alone the town of Rockhampton. Busby Marou talk about shifting genre but always coming back to country music. Tom and Jeremy make up Busby Marou and their new album Blood Red is out now. They'll be touring nationally in August.
7/28/202315 minutes
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Busby Marou on the importance of positivity in music

There's a rich history of country duos but not many from Queensland let alone the town of Rockhampton. Busby Marou talk about shifting genre but always coming back to country music. Tom and Jeremy make up Busby Marou and their new album Blood Red is out now. They'll be touring nationally in August.
7/28/202315 minutes
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The Invisible Extinction Of Our Microbes

At this very minute, microorganisms in your gut are impacting your how you think and behave. Think about that before blaming others for being on your nerves. Bowel health. Probiotics. Faecal transplants; Gut health is certainly not the sexy side of medicine, but it is an increasingly important one, impacting everything from your allergies to obesity. Sarah Schenck and Steven Lawrence produced the documentary The Invisible Extinction to explore the current research around microbiomes.
7/27/202315 minutes
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The Invisible Extinction Of Our Microbes

At this very minute, microorganisms in your gut are impacting your how you think and behave. Think about that before blaming others for being on your nerves. Bowel health. Probiotics. Faecal transplants; Gut health is certainly not the sexy side of medicine, but it is an increasingly important one, impacting everything from your allergies to obesity. Sarah Schenck and Steven Lawrence produced the documentary The Invisible Extinction to explore the current research around microbiomes.
7/27/202315 minutes
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Dave Graney reflects on 30 years of 'Night of the Wolverine'

It’s 1993. Paul Keating is the Prime Minister. Sydney has won the bid to host the 2000 Olympics, Newcomer Shane Warne delivers the ball of the century in the Ashes and on the radio amongst the wall of Oz rock in the Triple J hottest 100 that year, this smooth, Lou Reed-esque tune leaps out at you... it's 'Night of the Wolverine' by Dave Graney and The Coral Snakes. On the 30th anniversary of the hit record, the band are taking it back on tour. 
7/26/202314 minutes, 45 seconds
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Dave Graney reflects on 30 years of 'Night of the Wolverine'

It’s 1993. Paul Keating is the Prime Minister. Sydney has won the bid to host the 2000 Olympics, Newcomer Shane Warne delivers the ball of the century in the Ashes and on the radio amongst the wall of Oz rock in the Triple J hottest 100 that year, this smooth, Lou Reed-esque tune leaps out at you... it's 'Night of the Wolverine' by Dave Graney and The Coral Snakes. On the 30th anniversary of the hit record, the band are taking it back on tour. 
7/26/202314 minutes, 45 seconds
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Caribbean nations consider seeking compensation from colonising countries

Should former slave-holding countries pay for their past wrongs? That’s what a group of Caribbean nations are looking to do.  The Caribbean group says reparations are not only about monetary compensation for enslaved people’s descendants… but a wider recognition of the continuing effects of colonisation.
7/25/202313 minutes, 53 seconds
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Caribbean nations consider seeking compensation from colonising countries

Should former slave-holding countries pay for their past wrongs? That’s what a group of Caribbean nations are looking to do.  The Caribbean group says reparations are not only about monetary compensation for enslaved people’s descendants… but a wider recognition of the continuing effects of colonisation.
7/25/202313 minutes, 53 seconds
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Finding hope after a nuclear war in 'On the Beach'

At one time considered Australia’s most important book - Nevil Shute’s novel On the Beach follows a group of friends and colleagues in 1960’s Melbourne after the fallout of a short but disastrous nuclear war which has wiped out humanity north of the equator.  The characters are living on borrowed time, speculating wildly about the direction of the deadly radiation clouds, desperately grasping at scientific theories about its toxicity and the possibility of survival. Australian playwright Tommy Murphy has adapted the novel for a first-ever stage version for the Sydney Theatre Company. Guest: Tommy Murphy, playwright
7/24/202313 minutes, 18 seconds
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Finding hope after a nuclear war in 'On the Beach'

At one time considered Australia’s most important book - Nevil Shute’s novel On the Beach follows a group of friends and colleagues in 1960’s Melbourne after the fallout of a short but disastrous nuclear war which has wiped out humanity north of the equator.  The characters are living on borrowed time, speculating wildly about the direction of the deadly radiation clouds, desperately grasping at scientific theories about its toxicity and the possibility of survival. Australian playwright Tommy Murphy has adapted the novel for a first-ever stage version for the Sydney Theatre Company. Guest: Tommy Murphy, playwright
7/24/202313 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Spooky Men's Chorale

Their angelic voices belie their rugged and hairy visage. The Spooky Men are a choir made up of men, but they want you to know they are definitely NOT a men's group. 
7/21/202317 minutes, 37 seconds
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The Spooky Men's Chorale

Their angelic voices belie their rugged and hairy visage. The Spooky Men are a choir made up of men, but they want you to know they are definitely NOT a men's group. 
7/21/202317 minutes, 37 seconds
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The U.S. 7th Fleet Band arrives to welcome USS Canberra

Canberra is a landlocked city. But that hasn't stopped naval ships being named after our bush capital. There's of course the HMAS Canberra. But this Saturday a new ship will be officially commissioned at Garden Island in Sydney Harbour: The USS Canberra.  It's a US naval ship and to mark the occasion the U.S. 7th Fleet Band - based in Japan - is here to perform this weekend.  
7/20/202314 minutes, 25 seconds
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The U.S. 7th Fleet Band arrives to welcome USS Canberra

Canberra is a landlocked city. But that hasn't stopped naval ships being named after our bush capital. There's of course the HMAS Canberra. But this Saturday a new ship will be officially commissioned at Garden Island in Sydney Harbour: The USS Canberra.  It's a US naval ship and to mark the occasion the U.S. 7th Fleet Band - based in Japan - is here to perform this weekend.  
7/20/202314 minutes, 25 seconds
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John Safran: Who The Bloody Hell Are We?

Did you know that The Kimberley in WA was at one time seriously considered as an option for the Jewish Homeland? That’s according to SBS’s new docu-series Who The Bloody Hell Are We, a three-part series uncovering the unknown histories of the Jewish, New Zealand and Chinese communities in Australia. John Safran discusses delving into Australia's Jewish history in the first episode.
7/19/202312 minutes, 45 seconds
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John Safran: Who The Bloody Hell Are We?

Did you know that The Kimberley in WA was at one time seriously considered as an option for the Jewish Homeland? That’s according to SBS’s new docu-series Who The Bloody Hell Are We, a three-part series uncovering the unknown histories of the Jewish, New Zealand and Chinese communities in Australia. John Safran discusses delving into Australia's Jewish history in the first episode.
7/19/202312 minutes, 45 seconds
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Terra-Therma: An ethereal icy Holocene

What does a glacier sound like? Internationally acclaimed visual artist Benjamin Knock went to Iceland with a sound recordist and captured recordings of the glaciers and the surrounding volcanically active areas with bizarre things called hydrophones, Seizmaphones and Geophones for his exhibition Terra-Therma. He's compiled a multi-disciplinary exhibition to bring the sights and sounds of Iceland to Melbourne.
7/18/202312 minutes, 18 seconds
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Terra-Therma: An ethereal icy Holocene

What does a glacier sound like? Internationally acclaimed visual artist Benjamin Knock went to Iceland with a sound recordist and captured recordings of the glaciers and the surrounding volcanically active areas with bizarre things called hydrophones, Seizmaphones and Geophones for his exhibition Terra-Therma. He's compiled a multi-disciplinary exhibition to bring the sights and sounds of Iceland to Melbourne.
7/18/202312 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Exploding Universe of Ed Kuepper

Fresh from releasing reissues of classic albums Electrical Storm and Honey Steel’s Gold, the legendary punk pioneer and co-founder of The Saints, The Aints and Laughing Clowns, Ed Kuepper has announced a national tour in September. He reflects on his influences, inspirations and how his grandkids interact with his music.
7/17/20238 minutes
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The Exploding Universe of Ed Kuepper

Fresh from releasing reissues of classic albums Electrical Storm and Honey Steel’s Gold, the legendary punk pioneer and co-founder of The Saints, The Aints and Laughing Clowns, Ed Kuepper has announced a national tour in September. He reflects on his influences, inspirations and how his grandkids interact with his music.
7/17/20238 minutes
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Julie Byrne on why real love means the ability to stay new to someone

Singer-songwriter Julie Byrne’s folk songs may sound gentle and ethereal, but they carry the weight of immense emotional heft. Following the sudden passing of her long-term collaborator and producer, Eric Littmann, her new album “The Greater Wings” moves through shared experiences that are both timeless and life-affirming.
7/14/202310 minutes, 45 seconds
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Julie Byrne on why real love means the ability to stay new to someone

Singer-songwriter Julie Byrne’s folk songs may sound gentle and ethereal, but they carry the weight of immense emotional heft. Following the sudden passing of her long-term collaborator and producer, Eric Littmann, her new album “The Greater Wings” moves through shared experiences that are both timeless and life-affirming.
7/14/202310 minutes, 45 seconds
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Kyiv Eternal: Heinali's musical love letter to his home city

Ukrainian composer and electronic musician Heinali has transformed years of pre-war audio recordings of the Ukrainian capital Kyiv into a time capsule of ambient sound and memories of a city now besieged in his album 'Kyiv Eternal'.
7/13/202310 minutes, 54 seconds
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Kyiv Eternal: Heinali's musical love letter to his home city

Ukrainian composer and electronic musician Heinali has transformed years of pre-war audio recordings of the Ukrainian capital Kyiv into a time capsule of ambient sound and memories of a city now besieged in his album 'Kyiv Eternal'.
7/13/202310 minutes, 54 seconds
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Scott Patterson on the Wall Street investors making billions off of catastrophes

Scott Patterson's new book “Chaos Kings: How wall street traders make billions in the new age of crisis” looks into the world of the doom-mongers making a fortune from the worst-case scenarios.
7/12/202327 minutes, 16 seconds
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Scott Patterson on the Wall Street investors making billions off of catastrophes

Scott Patterson's new book “Chaos Kings: How wall street traders make billions in the new age of crisis” looks into the world of the doom-mongers making a fortune from the worst-case scenarios.
7/12/202327 minutes, 16 seconds
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Vidya Madabushi on the migrant experience in Australia and her new novel 'The Days Toppled Over'

‘The Days Toppled Over’ unravels the complex systems that lead to the exploitation of international students in Australia, through a heartening story about family, success and the migrant experience.
7/11/202319 minutes
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Vidya Madabushi on the migrant experience in Australia and her new novel 'The Days Toppled Over'

‘The Days Toppled Over’ unravels the complex systems that lead to the exploitation of international students in Australia, through a heartening story about family, success and the migrant experience.
7/11/202319 minutes
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Life after lights, camera, action: Margie Ratliff on the experiences of documentary subjects

A new film asks if our drive to tell stories is overriding our ability to put the subjects of documentaries first?
7/9/202313 minutes, 59 seconds
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Life after lights, camera, action: Margie Ratliff on the experiences of documentary subjects

A new film asks if our drive to tell stories is overriding our ability to put the subjects of documentaries first?
7/9/202313 minutes, 59 seconds
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'The pain's still there': Kutcha Edwards on surviving the Stolen Generation and reconnecting to his Mother Tongue

Mutti Mutti man Uncle Kutcha Edwards is a highly respected elder and survivor of the Stolen Generations who has been combining songwriting and activism since 1991. 
7/7/202324 minutes, 44 seconds
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'The pain's still there': Kutcha Edwards on surviving the Stolen Generation and reconnecting to his Mother Tongue

Mutti Mutti man Uncle Kutcha Edwards is a highly respected elder and survivor of the Stolen Generations who has been combining songwriting and activism since 1991. 
7/7/202324 minutes, 44 seconds
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How to build a home: Uncle Thomas Slockee on a lifetime of housing his community

Aboriginal Elder Uncle Thomas Slockee has spent the last four decades championing his community and advocating for housing justice for Indigenous people.
7/6/202315 minutes, 23 seconds
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How to build a home: Uncle Thomas Slockee on a lifetime of housing his community

Aboriginal Elder Uncle Thomas Slockee has spent the last four decades championing his community and advocating for housing justice for Indigenous people.
7/6/202315 minutes, 23 seconds
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Cultural Astronomer Peter Swanton on the stories of the night sky

Did you know that the Southern Cross constellations tells the story of the first man who died on earth? 
7/5/202323 minutes, 58 seconds
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Cultural Astronomer Peter Swanton on the stories of the night sky

Did you know that the Southern Cross constellations tells the story of the first man who died on earth? 
7/5/202323 minutes, 58 seconds
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'Aboriginal art, it's a white thing': Richard Bell on a life of activism through art

A new documentary from Indigenous filmmaker Professor Larissa Behrendt, ‘You Can Go Now’ explores Richard Bell's life, art and activism.
7/4/202323 minutes, 14 seconds
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'Aboriginal art, it's a white thing': Richard Bell on a life of activism through art

A new documentary from Indigenous filmmaker Professor Larissa Behrendt, ‘You Can Go Now’ explores Richard Bell's life, art and activism.
7/4/202323 minutes, 14 seconds
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Brenda Matthews: The Last Daughter

Author, filmmaker and proud Wiradjuri woman Brenda Matthews is part of the Stolen Generation. But her story is unlike anything we’ve heard before -  she was taken not once but twice from families who loved and cared for her deeply.
7/3/202320 minutes, 10 seconds
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Brenda Matthews: The Last Daughter

Author, filmmaker and proud Wiradjuri woman Brenda Matthews is part of the Stolen Generation. But her story is unlike anything we’ve heard before -  she was taken not once but twice from families who loved and cared for her deeply.
7/3/202320 minutes, 10 seconds
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Jason Isbell on growing up in America's south, masculinity and Killers of the Flower Moon

Growing up in northern Alabama, Musician Jason Isbell’s grandfather taught him to play music and a love of Blues music, leading him to a massively successful career.
6/30/202319 minutes, 25 seconds
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Jason Isbell on growing up in America's south, masculinity and Killers of the Flower Moon

Growing up in northern Alabama, Musician Jason Isbell’s grandfather taught him to play music and a love of Blues music, leading him to a massively successful career.
6/30/202319 minutes, 25 seconds
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Chef Mark 'Black' Olive and the art of cooking with native ingredients

The Sydney opera house is about to launch a new restaurant with a never before seen range of native ingredients on the menu.
6/29/202311 minutes, 28 seconds
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Chef Mark 'Black' Olive and the art of cooking with native ingredients

The Sydney opera house is about to launch a new restaurant with a never before seen range of native ingredients on the menu.
6/29/202311 minutes, 28 seconds
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'The truth won': Investigative journalist Nick McKenzie recalls the Ben Roberts-Smith defamation case

Investigative reporter Nick McKenzie's new book ‘Crossing the Line’ details the journey from the alleged war crimes in Afghanistan to the ultimate triumph in the Federal Court earlier this month.
6/28/202315 minutes, 3 seconds
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'The truth won': Investigative journalist Nick McKenzie recalls the Ben Roberts-Smith defamation case

Investigative reporter Nick McKenzie's new book ‘Crossing the Line’ details the journey from the alleged war crimes in Afghanistan to the ultimate triumph in the Federal Court earlier this month.
6/28/202315 minutes, 3 seconds
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Sugarcane mafia: Adam Grossetti explores the history of The Black Hand in Queensland

A new documentary investigates the history of an organised crime group with links to the Calabrian mafia, that wreaked terror in the sugarcane fields of north Queensland.
6/27/202312 minutes, 33 seconds
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Sugarcane mafia: Adam Grossetti explores the history of The Black Hand in Queensland

A new documentary investigates the history of an organised crime group with links to the Calabrian mafia, that wreaked terror in the sugarcane fields of north Queensland.
6/27/202312 minutes, 33 seconds
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Lucinda Williams on health, her father and finding her muse

Lucinda Williams forged her own way through the predominantly male business side of country music, but in 2020, she was dealt not one, but a trio of crises.
6/23/202315 minutes, 45 seconds
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Lucinda Williams on health, her father and finding her muse

Lucinda Williams forged her own way through the predominantly male business side of country music, but in 2020, she was dealt not one, but a trio of crises.
6/23/202315 minutes, 45 seconds
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Antony Loewenstein: The Palestine Laboratory

When it comes to the weapons of war and conflict, it’s ultimately humans from the other side who are the guinea pigs.
6/22/202314 minutes, 13 seconds
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Antony Loewenstein: The Palestine Laboratory

When it comes to the weapons of war and conflict, it’s ultimately humans from the other side who are the guinea pigs.
6/22/202314 minutes, 13 seconds
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Frida & Diego: Love & Revolution

In 1920's post-revolution Mexico, the country is rebuilding and stabilising itself after ousting authoritarian rule and giving way to the so-called ‘Mexican Renaissance’.
6/21/202314 minutes
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Frida & Diego: Love & Revolution

In 1920's post-revolution Mexico, the country is rebuilding and stabilising itself after ousting authoritarian rule and giving way to the so-called ‘Mexican Renaissance’.
6/21/202314 minutes
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With a little help from A.I

The famous and gruelling 24-hour Le Mans car race has drivers working around the clock, taking turns to push their machines in the ultimate test of endurance and continuity. Charlie Chan is about to attempt the same on the piano, find out how they plan to do with a little help from some friends and a counterpart called... chAI.
6/20/202314 minutes
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With a little help from A.I

The famous and gruelling 24-hour Le Mans car race has drivers working around the clock, taking turns to push their machines in the ultimate test of endurance and continuity. Charlie Chan is about to attempt the same on the piano, find out how they plan to do with a little help from some friends and a counterpart called... chAI.
6/20/202314 minutes
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Konstantin: Grandmother's Tongue

Humans have long looked to the animal world to help explain our own. Think George Orwell's Animal Farm; a mirror of our own complexity with simple and deeply sardonic animal metaphors. Slavic folklore and storytelling traditions also echo this dark humour and anthropomorphism — a new performance looks at human history and migration through the lens of a chicken — a character almost never cast as a hero.
6/19/202313 minutes, 17 seconds
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Konstantin: Grandmother's Tongue

Humans have long looked to the animal world to help explain our own. Think George Orwell's Animal Farm; a mirror of our own complexity with simple and deeply sardonic animal metaphors. Slavic folklore and storytelling traditions also echo this dark humour and anthropomorphism — a new performance looks at human history and migration through the lens of a chicken — a character almost never cast as a hero.
6/19/202313 minutes, 17 seconds
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Why audiences still love Rigoletto

Verdi claimed Rigoletto was his best opera, saying he would never write any better. With themes of greed, betrayal, revenge and misogyny - it’s a much-loved Opera and one of the most popular of all time. Soprano Stacey Alleaume discusses her role as Gilda in Opera Australia’s Rigoletto.
6/16/202311 minutes
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Why audiences still love Rigoletto

Verdi claimed Rigoletto was his best opera, saying he would never write any better. With themes of greed, betrayal, revenge and misogyny - it’s a much-loved Opera and one of the most popular of all time. Soprano Stacey Alleaume discusses her role as Gilda in Opera Australia’s Rigoletto.
6/16/202311 minutes
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Richard Tognetti on Mozart's effervescence

In Europe, around 1780 there was a bold and wild new idea in popular music which has shaped the concerts you see to this very day. Up until then, orchestras were background music for entertaining in small rooms in private homes salons while everyone tittered, japed and drank. Along came Joseph Haydn, who wrote music for grander spaces, where a larger orchestra was the main event, in turn, inspiring a young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to pen a rapid-fire flurry of ‘Joyous’ and ‘energising’ symphonies all within a five-year period. 
6/15/202313 minutes, 25 seconds
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Richard Tognetti on Mozart's effervescence

In Europe, around 1780 there was a bold and wild new idea in popular music which has shaped the concerts you see to this very day. Up until then, orchestras were background music for entertaining in small rooms in private homes salons while everyone tittered, japed and drank. Along came Joseph Haydn, who wrote music for grander spaces, where a larger orchestra was the main event, in turn, inspiring a young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to pen a rapid-fire flurry of ‘Joyous’ and ‘energising’ symphonies all within a five-year period. 
6/15/202313 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Matilda Effect: how our female footballers have taken centre stage

They were the first Australian sports team to ever visit North Korea, they were also the first side to pose nude for a calendar and they're the first Australian team – male or female – to reach the quarter finals of a FIFA World Cup, not once but three times.  This team is the Matildas. Their journey to global success hasn't been easy. Like women's football around the world, male football associations denied their existence for decades. 
6/14/202317 minutes
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The Matilda Effect: how our female footballers have taken centre stage

They were the first Australian sports team to ever visit North Korea, they were also the first side to pose nude for a calendar and they're the first Australian team – male or female – to reach the quarter finals of a FIFA World Cup, not once but three times.  This team is the Matildas. Their journey to global success hasn't been easy. Like women's football around the world, male football associations denied their existence for decades. 
6/14/202317 minutes
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Exploring vulnerability with 'Exposed'

Restless Dance Theatre's latest show is ‘Exposed'. It explores the way we deal with our vulnerabilities and how we react when we are challenged. Artistic Director Michelle Ryan joins us to discuss the dance company's mission and methods for bringing the concept to life.
6/13/202312 minutes, 49 seconds
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Exploring vulnerability with 'Exposed'

Restless Dance Theatre's latest show is ‘Exposed'. It explores the way we deal with our vulnerabilities and how we react when we are challenged. Artistic Director Michelle Ryan joins us to discuss the dance company's mission and methods for bringing the concept to life.
6/13/202312 minutes, 49 seconds
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Creswick finds and films fatherhood

Whatever Fatherhood is, it’s not what it used to be. And probably not what it will be in the future. In fact, it largely mirrors what it is to be a man itself. And for some men, the inability to talk about these two factors, we know, leads to much higher rates of suicide.  When Liam Budge, aka “Creswick” became a father in 2018 it was a profound transition and source of creative inspiration. In his first multi-disciplinary live performance, he takes the real experiences of men and combines them with song. 
6/12/202314 minutes, 46 seconds
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Creswick finds and films fatherhood

Whatever Fatherhood is, it’s not what it used to be. And probably not what it will be in the future. In fact, it largely mirrors what it is to be a man itself. And for some men, the inability to talk about these two factors, we know, leads to much higher rates of suicide.  When Liam Budge, aka “Creswick” became a father in 2018 it was a profound transition and source of creative inspiration. In his first multi-disciplinary live performance, he takes the real experiences of men and combines them with song. 
6/12/202314 minutes, 46 seconds
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How 'The Cape' captures a community

In Pormpuraaw Western Cape York, Far North Queensland, we see a tropical landscape - crystal clear waters, green mangroves and hot sun. A picture of paradise. But in the deep north - the communities are small, remote, and almost impenetrable. When the law breaks, nobody is around to hear it. The documentary The Cape investigates the life and law of the fisherman, the true story of two family clans- the Gaters, and the Wards - and the disappearance of a father and son in 2003.
6/9/202314 minutes, 37 seconds
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How 'The Cape' captures a community

In Pormpuraaw Western Cape York, Far North Queensland, we see a tropical landscape - crystal clear waters, green mangroves and hot sun. A picture of paradise. But in the deep north - the communities are small, remote, and almost impenetrable. When the law breaks, nobody is around to hear it. The documentary The Cape investigates the life and law of the fisherman, the true story of two family clans- the Gaters, and the Wards - and the disappearance of a father and son in 2003.
6/9/202314 minutes, 37 seconds
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Roger Stone: A 'showman' and 'a political animal'

Director, Christoffer Guldbrandsen speaks with Andy about the attraction of the politician for a documentary maker and the man he found behind Trump. 
6/8/202316 minutes, 32 seconds
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Roger Stone: A 'showman' and 'a political animal'

Director, Christoffer Guldbrandsen speaks with Andy about the attraction of the politician for a documentary maker and the man he found behind Trump. 
6/8/202316 minutes, 32 seconds
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Tim Ross: Designing A Legacy

Across this expansive land, our great range of landscapes and environs play host to the buildings in which we live, work, learn, worship, and play.  Self-professed ‘architecture nerd’ Tim Ross explores examples of Australia’s built environment, both historical and contemporary, and how they inform our sense of culture and community in the second series of 'Designing A Legacy'
6/7/202315 minutes, 36 seconds
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Tim Ross: Designing A Legacy

Across this expansive land, our great range of landscapes and environs play host to the buildings in which we live, work, learn, worship, and play.  Self-professed ‘architecture nerd’ Tim Ross explores examples of Australia’s built environment, both historical and contemporary, and how they inform our sense of culture and community in the second series of 'Designing A Legacy'
6/7/202315 minutes, 36 seconds
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Has our perception of D-Day changed?

On June 6, 1944, in Normandy, the Allies launched the largest seaborne invasion in history known as D-day or Operation Overlord. 79 Years later and another war is still raging in Europe. It can be hard to connect to something that is happening so far away and so long ago. So, what is our connection to war and peace … and why does history repeat itself?
6/6/202321 minutes, 45 seconds
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Has our perception of D-Day changed?

On June 6, 1944, in Normandy, the Allies launched the largest seaborne invasion in history known as D-day or Operation Overlord. 79 Years later and another war is still raging in Europe. It can be hard to connect to something that is happening so far away and so long ago. So, what is our connection to war and peace … and why does history repeat itself?
6/6/202321 minutes, 45 seconds
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Daan Roosegaarde: Designing for the 'me' and the 'we'

Our fascination with the intersection of light and nature and rituals around painting the night sky is something that designer, innovator, architect poet, and educator Daan Roosegaarde is delving into - in his latest exhibition SPARK, a new sustainable celebration at Federation Square in Melbourne for Rising Festival.
6/5/202317 minutes, 36 seconds
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Daan Roosegaarde: Designing for the 'me' and the 'we'

Our fascination with the intersection of light and nature and rituals around painting the night sky is something that designer, innovator, architect poet, and educator Daan Roosegaarde is delving into - in his latest exhibition SPARK, a new sustainable celebration at Federation Square in Melbourne for Rising Festival.
6/5/202317 minutes, 36 seconds
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Heavenly harmonies with Folk Bitch Trio

Folk Bitch Trio started as a joke when three teenagers were 17, now they're living together and sharing the stage with names like Julia Jacklin and King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard. Their three-part harmony has been described as heavenly and while the band is making serious moves Gracie, Jeanie, and Heide are making sure they still have fun. Chain mail included, of course. 
6/2/20239 minutes, 2 seconds
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Heavenly harmonies with Folk Bitch Trio

Folk Bitch Trio started as a joke when three teenagers were 17, now they're living together and sharing the stage with names like Julia Jacklin and King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard. Their three-part harmony has been described as heavenly and while the band is making serious moves Gracie, Jeanie, and Heide are making sure they still have fun. Chain mail included, of course. 
6/2/20239 minutes, 2 seconds
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Libby Angel is deconstructing the romanticism around being a struggling artist

Could there be anything more romanticised than the bohemian share houses of your youth, with a cast of random characters, perhaps painters, activists, addicts, the odd petty criminal, all floating around on the philanthropy of couches and begged cigarettes? Where I Slept by Libby Angel is autofiction, blending autobiography and fiction about living on the fringes of Melbourne society in the 1990's.
6/1/202314 minutes, 56 seconds
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Libby Angel is deconstructing the romanticism around being a struggling artist

Could there be anything more romanticised than the bohemian share houses of your youth, with a cast of random characters, perhaps painters, activists, addicts, the odd petty criminal, all floating around on the philanthropy of couches and begged cigarettes? Where I Slept by Libby Angel is autofiction, blending autobiography and fiction about living on the fringes of Melbourne society in the 1990's.
6/1/202314 minutes, 56 seconds
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The importance of curiosity and living a full life with actor Philip Quast

Dylan Thomas's famous poem 'Do Not Go Gentle Into The Night' is befitting of the story of Captain Robert Scott’s historic attempt to reach the south pole in 1912, in the latest play from Patricia Cornelius.  Combing Thomas's words and themes and Scott's legendary journey, Sydney Theatre Company’s new production Do Not Go Gentle explores the importance of living to the fullest, ageing, and dying.
5/31/202315 minutes, 33 seconds
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The importance of curiosity and living a full life with actor Philip Quast

Dylan Thomas's famous poem 'Do Not Go Gentle Into The Night' is befitting of the story of Captain Robert Scott’s historic attempt to reach the south pole in 1912, in the latest play from Patricia Cornelius.  Combing Thomas's words and themes and Scott's legendary journey, Sydney Theatre Company’s new production Do Not Go Gentle explores the importance of living to the fullest, ageing, and dying.
5/31/202315 minutes, 33 seconds
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Mo'Ju on learning radical vulnerability

Oral traditions often provide a rich and incontestable foundation for artists … but what do you do if that heritage is a combination of Filipino, Wiradjuri, and European origins, in a family packed to the rafters with musicians?  Mo’Ju uses a mixture of soul, blues, and R&B to explore and make sense of their histories.
5/30/20231 minute, 12 seconds
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Mo'Ju on learning radical vulnerability

Oral traditions often provide a rich and incontestable foundation for artists … but what do you do if that heritage is a combination of Filipino, Wiradjuri, and European origins, in a family packed to the rafters with musicians?  Mo’Ju uses a mixture of soul, blues, and R&B to explore and make sense of their histories.
5/30/20231 minute, 12 seconds
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From Australia to Austin: Jess Pryles is a self-professed 'meat nerd'

Could there be any other domain, more male or more Australian, than the barbecue. But Australian born cook, author and influencer Jess Pryles has come to challenge both those stereotypes, and living in Texas, has become a sensation even in American barbecue culture.
5/29/202316 minutes, 27 seconds
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From Australia to Austin: Jess Pryles is a self-professed 'meat nerd'

Could there be any other domain, more male or more Australian, than the barbecue. But Australian born cook, author and influencer Jess Pryles has come to challenge both those stereotypes, and living in Texas, has become a sensation even in American barbecue culture.
5/29/202316 minutes, 27 seconds
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Anthony Joseph: Is Calypso rhythm the missing link between poetry and music?

Anthony Joseph was born on the warm, spiced trade winds of Trinidad and Tobago. Before he moved to the rainy doldrums of England at the age of 22 and becoming the lead singer of a heavy rock band. Cut to earlier this year and the poet, writer, and academic won the T. S Eliot Prize for his book ‘Sonnets for Albert’. 
5/26/202314 minutes, 58 seconds
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Anthony Joseph: Is Calypso rhythm the missing link between poetry and music?

Anthony Joseph was born on the warm, spiced trade winds of Trinidad and Tobago. Before he moved to the rainy doldrums of England at the age of 22 and becoming the lead singer of a heavy rock band. Cut to earlier this year and the poet, writer, and academic won the T. S Eliot Prize for his book ‘Sonnets for Albert’. 
5/26/202314 minutes, 58 seconds
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Alone Australia: Why meeting challenges makes the best of people

Some of us, like me, adore camping, the great outdoors, getting away from it all. But usually we’d have a tent, sleeping bag, maybe a portable burner, perhaps a double pronged telescopic marshmallow fork, for the camping maximalist. But the winner of the Australian series of ALONE, the successful TV import from the US and Canada, survived in the wilderness longer than anyone else… completely alone and unequipped.
5/25/202321 minutes, 59 seconds
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Alone Australia: Why meeting challenges makes the best of people

Some of us, like me, adore camping, the great outdoors, getting away from it all. But usually we’d have a tent, sleeping bag, maybe a portable burner, perhaps a double pronged telescopic marshmallow fork, for the camping maximalist. But the winner of the Australian series of ALONE, the successful TV import from the US and Canada, survived in the wilderness longer than anyone else… completely alone and unequipped.
5/25/202321 minutes, 59 seconds
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Is the truth recognisable in the age of 'alternative facts'?

Mis and disinformation or 'alternative facts' have become a mainstay of our modern world. As trust in journalism is eroded, how do we protect the truth?
5/24/202317 minutes, 51 seconds
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Is the truth recognisable in the age of 'alternative facts'?

Mis and disinformation or 'alternative facts' have become a mainstay of our modern world. As trust in journalism is eroded, how do we protect the truth?
5/24/202317 minutes, 51 seconds
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José González On Why He Chose To Cover Kylie Minogue

He hails from Sweden, sings mostly in English but has been described as having ‘the soul of an Argentine troubadour’. José González is a singer-songwriter whose vocals and intricate guitar melodies simultaneously blend of folk, indie rock, and classical influences. González first captured the hearts of listeners worldwide with his debut album ‘Veneer’.
5/23/202314 minutes, 24 seconds
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José González On Why He Chose To Cover Kylie Minogue

He hails from Sweden, sings mostly in English but has been described as having ‘the soul of an Argentine troubadour’. José González is a singer-songwriter whose vocals and intricate guitar melodies simultaneously blend of folk, indie rock, and classical influences. González first captured the hearts of listeners worldwide with his debut album ‘Veneer’.
5/23/202314 minutes, 24 seconds
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The Dreamy, Moody Soundscapes of Weyes Blood

Weyes Blood, the musical persona of Natalie Mering, filters the best of pop’s history into a sound that’s timeless and uniquely her own. The latest album, And In The Darkness, Hearts Aglow, is the second in a trilogy of sorts…  following on from the critically acclaimed Titanic Risen.
5/22/202310 minutes, 55 seconds
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The Dreamy, Moody Soundscapes of Weyes Blood

Weyes Blood, the musical persona of Natalie Mering, filters the best of pop’s history into a sound that’s timeless and uniquely her own. The latest album, And In The Darkness, Hearts Aglow, is the second in a trilogy of sorts…  following on from the critically acclaimed Titanic Risen.
5/22/202310 minutes, 55 seconds
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Slava Grigoryan composed his new music with gratitude

Sony music gave him his first record deal when he was 16. He wasn't a pop star or the lead in a boy band. He's a classical guitarist and according to some ‘The King of Strings’.   You might think he might have a big head after all that but Slava Grigoryan's new album is all about gratitude.
5/19/202315 minutes, 11 seconds
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Slava Grigoryan composed his new music with gratitude

Sony music gave him his first record deal when he was 16. He wasn't a pop star or the lead in a boy band. He's a classical guitarist and according to some ‘The King of Strings’.   You might think he might have a big head after all that but Slava Grigoryan's new album is all about gratitude.
5/19/202315 minutes, 11 seconds
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Cash Savage And The Last Drinks

If the past couple of years have taught us anything it’s that what we previously thought was rock solid (our health, our jobs, relationships… the economy) might actually crumble at any moment. And with live music, we certainly didn’t know what we had until it was gone.  Lead singer of The Last Drinks,  Cash Savage talks about her experience of performing without an audience at Hamer Hall and her new appreciation for the fragility of mental health. 
5/18/202312 minutes, 25 seconds
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Cash Savage And The Last Drinks

If the past couple of years have taught us anything it’s that what we previously thought was rock solid (our health, our jobs, relationships… the economy) might actually crumble at any moment. And with live music, we certainly didn’t know what we had until it was gone.  Lead singer of The Last Drinks,  Cash Savage talks about her experience of performing without an audience at Hamer Hall and her new appreciation for the fragility of mental health. 
5/18/202312 minutes, 25 seconds
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Pinchgut Opera Goes For Baroque With Giustino

The Venetian opera Giustino by Giovanni Legrenzi was THEE smash hit of the 1680’s’. It tells the story of a shepherd who, through a series of quests and magical interventions, ultimately becomes the Emperor of Rome. Giustino is notoriously action packed for a baroque opera, involving sea monsters, elephants, ghosts, bear fights, damsels - you name it, Giustino pretty much has it.  Pinchgut Opera is preparing this production directed by Dean Bryant with Guistino played by Nicholas Tamagna.
5/17/202316 minutes, 15 seconds
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Pinchgut Opera Goes For Baroque With Giustino

The Venetian opera Giustino by Giovanni Legrenzi was THEE smash hit of the 1680’s’. It tells the story of a shepherd who, through a series of quests and magical interventions, ultimately becomes the Emperor of Rome. Giustino is notoriously action packed for a baroque opera, involving sea monsters, elephants, ghosts, bear fights, damsels - you name it, Giustino pretty much has it.  Pinchgut Opera is preparing this production directed by Dean Bryant with Guistino played by Nicholas Tamagna.
5/17/202316 minutes, 15 seconds
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Kate Ceberano On How Her Life Is A Symphony

Everyone's life could benefit from a soundtrack sometimes. A swelling score to emphasise the highs and the lows.  One of Australia's best loved artists Kate Ceberano has been able to do just this. She joins us to talk about her 30th album My Life Is A Symphony, which re-imagines some of her biggest hits and her personal favourites with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. She'll be touring nationally with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra from May 27th, you can find more info on her website here
5/15/202312 minutes, 4 seconds
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Kate Ceberano On How Her Life Is A Symphony

Everyone's life could benefit from a soundtrack sometimes. A swelling score to emphasise the highs and the lows.  One of Australia's best loved artists Kate Ceberano has been able to do just this. She joins us to talk about her 30th album My Life Is A Symphony, which re-imagines some of her biggest hits and her personal favourites with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. She'll be touring nationally with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra from May 27th, you can find more info on her website here
5/15/202312 minutes, 4 seconds
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No Laughing Matter: Bringing Light To A Subject In The Shadows

When Tanya Lee was nine, she was sexually abused by her father in secret, that would go on for five years. She’s now turning this taboo inside out in her podcast, No Laughing Matter.
5/14/202314 minutes, 3 seconds
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No Laughing Matter: Bringing Light To A Subject In The Shadows

When Tanya Lee was nine, she was sexually abused by her father in secret, that would go on for five years. She’s now turning this taboo inside out in her podcast, No Laughing Matter.
5/14/202314 minutes, 3 seconds
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Dan Sultan on his path to peace and his new album

Dan Sultan has captivated audiences since his debut album in 2006, been an ARIA musician of the year and has a string of other awards and nominations hanging from his belt.  But his life hasn’t been without its challenges…and through some of the darkest times has come hope, bound together with the love and support from those around him. This journey has set the tone for his latest studio album, self titled Dan Sultan
5/12/202316 minutes, 8 seconds
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Dan Sultan on his path to peace and his new album

Dan Sultan has captivated audiences since his debut album in 2006, been an ARIA musician of the year and has a string of other awards and nominations hanging from his belt.  But his life hasn’t been without its challenges…and through some of the darkest times has come hope, bound together with the love and support from those around him. This journey has set the tone for his latest studio album, self titled Dan Sultan
5/12/202316 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Plant Thieves: Secrets of the herbarium

The National Herbarium of New South Wales, houses a growing collection of over 1 point 4 million plant specimens… It's here that author and research academic Dr Prue Gibson learnt about the plant naming wars, and the fascinating keepers of this knowledge for her book The Plant Thieves: Secrets of the herbarium.
5/11/202318 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Plant Thieves: Secrets of the herbarium

The National Herbarium of New South Wales, houses a growing collection of over 1 point 4 million plant specimens… It's here that author and research academic Dr Prue Gibson learnt about the plant naming wars, and the fascinating keepers of this knowledge for her book The Plant Thieves: Secrets of the herbarium.
5/11/202318 minutes, 50 seconds
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Friendship, love and family violence: Virginia Gay on new show Safe Home

"When you don't know what you're looking at, you can't see the red flags until it's too late".   It’s a hard reality for many trapped in abusive relationships. Sometimes it’s safer to stay, sometimes it’s impossible to escape. But do we really understand just how high the stakes are for women, children and those trying to save them? SBS’s new drama series Safe Home opens up some of the stories behind family violence.
5/10/202319 minutes, 13 seconds
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Friendship, love and family violence: Virginia Gay on new show Safe Home

"When you don't know what you're looking at, you can't see the red flags until it's too late".   It’s a hard reality for many trapped in abusive relationships. Sometimes it’s safer to stay, sometimes it’s impossible to escape. But do we really understand just how high the stakes are for women, children and those trying to save them? SBS’s new drama series Safe Home opens up some of the stories behind family violence.
5/10/202319 minutes, 13 seconds
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A new automatism

From photography to photoshop, technology has a long history of changing the way that artists approach their work. But is AI part of that same lineage? Or something else entirely? In his new exhibition, GEN, Ry David Bradley combines AI generated fields with a traditional artist's brush, to create something entirely unique.
4/27/20237 minutes, 14 seconds
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A new automatism

From photography to photoshop, technology has a long history of changing the way that artists approach their work. But is AI part of that same lineage? Or something else entirely? In his new exhibition, GEN, Ry David Bradley combines AI generated fields with a traditional artist's brush, to create something entirely unique.
4/27/20237 minutes, 14 seconds
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The New Pornographers: Continue As A Guest

Pulling together a handful of brilliant singer-songwriters for one acclaimed album seems tricky enough, but keeping it going for decades is something else entirely. That's just another day at the office for The New Pornographers — whose ninth album, Continue As A Guest, continues their tradition of catchy hooks and clever lyrics. In the Drawing Room, A.C. Newman talks about the ideas behind the new release.
4/21/202315 minutes, 49 seconds
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The New Pornographers: Continue As A Guest

Pulling together a handful of brilliant singer-songwriters for one acclaimed album seems tricky enough, but keeping it going for decades is something else entirely. That's just another day at the office for The New Pornographers — whose ninth album, Continue As A Guest, continues their tradition of catchy hooks and clever lyrics. In the Drawing Room, A.C. Newman talks about the ideas behind the new release.
4/21/202315 minutes, 49 seconds
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Among the giants

He was the first elected representative for the Greens in Australia, and helped build the party into the force it is today. But Bob Brown's actions have never been limited to the halls of power. From the campaign to stop the Franklin dam, to his protests against logging, Brown has been arrested multiple times for standing up for his beliefs, and its that conviction that's helped to create enduring movements. A new film, The Giants, not only looks at Brown's life, but in parallel, the magical ecosystems he's dedicated that life to protecting.
4/20/202321 minutes, 53 seconds
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Among the giants

He was the first elected representative for the Greens in Australia, and helped build the party into the force it is today. But Bob Brown's actions have never been limited to the halls of power. From the campaign to stop the Franklin dam, to his protests against logging, Brown has been arrested multiple times for standing up for his beliefs, and its that conviction that's helped to create enduring movements. A new film, The Giants, not only looks at Brown's life, but in parallel, the magical ecosystems he's dedicated that life to protecting.
4/20/202321 minutes, 53 seconds
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Over the hill and up the wall

Growing up and growing old can lead to some significant changes in our family relationships. Where once the children were the ones in need of care and attention, they sometimes need to become the carers in turn. But what do those changes mean for our relationships with each other?And what is it like when you realise that you share the same traits that drive you to distraction? Todd Alexander talks about his own experience and his new book, Over the Hill & Up the Wall.
4/18/202315 minutes, 48 seconds
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Over the hill and up the wall

Growing up and growing old can lead to some significant changes in our family relationships. Where once the children were the ones in need of care and attention, they sometimes need to become the carers in turn. But what do those changes mean for our relationships with each other?And what is it like when you realise that you share the same traits that drive you to distraction? Todd Alexander talks about his own experience and his new book, Over the Hill & Up the Wall.
4/18/202315 minutes, 48 seconds
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Bluey: A family on-screen and off

The tales of Bluey Heeler and her family have captured children and parents alike and it isn't just an Australian phenomenon — it's become perhaps the country's biggest cultural export since The Wiggles. In the Drawing Room, the show's executive producer, Daley Pearson, and director, Richard Jeffery, talk about how the show comes to life.
4/17/202320 minutes, 42 seconds
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Bluey: A family on-screen and off

The tales of Bluey Heeler and her family have captured children and parents alike and it isn't just an Australian phenomenon — it's become perhaps the country's biggest cultural export since The Wiggles. In the Drawing Room, the show's executive producer, Daley Pearson, and director, Richard Jeffery, talk about how the show comes to life.
4/17/202320 minutes, 42 seconds
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Learning from the leadership of First Nations people

The leadership of a business can make a huge difference, not just to the bottom line, but to the happiness of the people who work there and the culture that they create. But in his latest book, First Leaders, Andrew O'Keeffe wanted to move away from the traditions of the big Western companies and look instead to the lessons of First Nations societies around the world. He visited twelve different societies looking at how they've worked together for centuries, building sustainable bonds with each other and the world around them.
4/12/202322 minutes, 53 seconds
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Learning from the leadership of First Nations people

The leadership of a business can make a huge difference, not just to the bottom line, but to the happiness of the people who work there and the culture that they create. But in his latest book, First Leaders, Andrew O'Keeffe wanted to move away from the traditions of the big Western companies and look instead to the lessons of First Nations societies around the world. He visited twelve different societies looking at how they've worked together for centuries, building sustainable bonds with each other and the world around them.
4/12/202322 minutes, 53 seconds
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Toby Spence: "The message is in the music and the text"

"My subject is War, and the pity of War. The poetry is in the pity… All a poet can do today is warn" Those are the words of Wilfred Owen that Benjamin Britten quoted on the score of his War Requiem: one of the great pieces of sacred music and one of the great warnings. The British tenor Toby Spence is lending his voice to the requiem when he performs with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, and in the Drawing Room he discusses the work, his battle back to the stage, and the importance of sound imagination.
4/11/202319 minutes, 23 seconds
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Toby Spence: "The message is in the music and the text"

"My subject is War, and the pity of War. The poetry is in the pity… All a poet can do today is warn" Those are the words of Wilfred Owen that Benjamin Britten quoted on the score of his War Requiem: one of the great pieces of sacred music and one of the great warnings. The British tenor Toby Spence is lending his voice to the requiem when he performs with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, and in the Drawing Room he discusses the work, his battle back to the stage, and the importance of sound imagination.
4/11/202319 minutes, 23 seconds
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Dispossession and Defiance in Hong Kong

Hong Kong: where a protest movement has clashed with an increasingly authoritarian regime and a man who claimed to be the King of Kowloon became the city's most collected artist. In Louisa Lim's latest book, Indelible City: Dispossession and Defiance in Hong Kong, she dives back into the history of the Island and her own relationship with the city she grew up in, before returning to the protests and what it means to be an ethical journalist. Indelible City has been shortlisted for the Stella Prize.
4/10/202316 minutes, 38 seconds
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Dispossession and Defiance in Hong Kong

Hong Kong: where a protest movement has clashed with an increasingly authoritarian regime and a man who claimed to be the King of Kowloon became the city's most collected artist. In Louisa Lim's latest book, Indelible City: Dispossession and Defiance in Hong Kong, she dives back into the history of the Island and her own relationship with the city she grew up in, before returning to the protests and what it means to be an ethical journalist. Indelible City has been shortlisted for the Stella Prize.
4/10/202316 minutes, 38 seconds
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You Never Know what Flyying Colours will do next

Mixing wall-of-sound guitars with an ear for a good hook, Melbourne band Flyying Colours have continued the proud tradition of shoe-gaze, and won an international fan base along the way. In the Drawing Room, Brodie J Brummer talks about international tours, opening his own venue, and the band's third album, You Never Know.
3/31/202312 minutes, 54 seconds
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You Never Know what Flyying Colours will do next

Mixing wall-of-sound guitars with an ear for a good hook, Melbourne band Flyying Colours have continued the proud tradition of shoe-gaze, and won an international fan base along the way. In the Drawing Room, Brodie J Brummer talks about international tours, opening his own venue, and the band's third album, You Never Know.
3/31/202312 minutes, 54 seconds
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Nicolas Rothwell's Red Heaven

In the grand hotels of Europe, a young boy spends his days around the rich, the influential, and the exiled. His mother is absent, away on some unnamed journeys, but in her place are two powerful women who take him under their wings. Around him are conversations of art and philosophy, politics and war. It's a rare grounding in the world, which leads to a rare book. Red Heaven is the latest work by Nicolas Rothwell and it was recognised with the Prime Minister's Literary Award for Fiction.
3/30/202321 minutes, 52 seconds
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Nicolas Rothwell's Red Heaven

In the grand hotels of Europe, a young boy spends his days around the rich, the influential, and the exiled. His mother is absent, away on some unnamed journeys, but in her place are two powerful women who take him under their wings. Around him are conversations of art and philosophy, politics and war. It's a rare grounding in the world, which leads to a rare book. Red Heaven is the latest work by Nicolas Rothwell and it was recognised with the Prime Minister's Literary Award for Fiction.
3/30/202321 minutes, 52 seconds
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Marco Pierre White on life outside the kitchen

In an era of food that's seen chefs with larger than life personalities arrive as celebrities — in the kitchen and on the screen — Marco Pierre White is one of the biggest names. Marco was, at the time, the youngest chef to ever be awarded three Michelin Stars, and has hosted a range of shows, including Hell's Kitchen. He's set to tour Australia, telling his story in a new show, Out Of The Kitchen, and in the Drawing Room he talks about what makes a good meal and what he's made of his adventures so far.
3/29/202317 minutes, 41 seconds
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Marco Pierre White on life outside the kitchen

In an era of food that's seen chefs with larger than life personalities arrive as celebrities — in the kitchen and on the screen — Marco Pierre White is one of the biggest names. Marco was, at the time, the youngest chef to ever be awarded three Michelin Stars, and has hosted a range of shows, including Hell's Kitchen. He's set to tour Australia, telling his story in a new show, Out Of The Kitchen, and in the Drawing Room he talks about what makes a good meal and what he's made of his adventures so far.
3/29/202317 minutes, 41 seconds
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Australian screenwriters are running the show

Showrunners are the figures who guide and build the current age of prestige television — often starting out from the director's chair or the writers' room. But do those opportunities exist on Australian shows? And, when it does, how does it change what audiences see on the screen? A new program, called The Creators, is taking some of Australia's top writers to the US to talk to their American colleagues about showrunning In the Drawing Room, Suzie Miller and Jane Allen, talk about their experience on the stage and the screen.
3/28/202316 minutes, 46 seconds
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Australian screenwriters are running the show

Showrunners are the figures who guide and build the current age of prestige television — often starting out from the director's chair or the writers' room. But do those opportunities exist on Australian shows? And, when it does, how does it change what audiences see on the screen? A new program, called The Creators, is taking some of Australia's top writers to the US to talk to their American colleagues about showrunning In the Drawing Room, Suzie Miller and Jane Allen, talk about their experience on the stage and the screen.
3/28/202316 minutes, 46 seconds
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The suite sounds of Counting Crows

The Counting Crows burst onto the scene in the early nineties when their first album, August and Everything After, became a huge success, with multiple hit singles and record sales that most bands can only dream of. Over the decades since, they've built a back catalogue of beloved songs, toured the world many times, and even received an Oscar nomination for the song they wrote for Shrek 2. In the Drawing Room Adam Duritz and David Immerglück talk inspiration, tour buses, and Butter Miracle Suite One.
3/24/202319 minutes, 52 seconds
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The suite sounds of Counting Crows

The Counting Crows burst onto the scene in the early nineties when their first album, August and Everything After, became a huge success, with multiple hit singles and record sales that most bands can only dream of. Over the decades since, they've built a back catalogue of beloved songs, toured the world many times, and even received an Oscar nomination for the song they wrote for Shrek 2. In the Drawing Room Adam Duritz and David Immerglück talk inspiration, tour buses, and Butter Miracle Suite One.
3/24/202319 minutes, 52 seconds
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Breaking down Abi Damaris Corbin's approach to film

One morning in 2017, a 33-year-old Iraq War veteran, Brian Brown-Easley, walked into a bank in the US state of Georgia and informed the tellers that he had a bomb. But Brian wasn't robbing the bank. He had two demands: he wanted the Department of Veterans Affairs to return his paycheck and he wanted people to know his story. Abi Damaris Corbin is making sure the second part comes true. She's the director and co-writer of a new film Breaking, starring John Boyega, which takes audiences into the bank that day.
3/21/202313 minutes, 24 seconds
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Breaking down Abi Damaris Corbin's approach to film

One morning in 2017, a 33-year-old Iraq War veteran, Brian Brown-Easley, walked into a bank in the US state of Georgia and informed the tellers that he had a bomb. But Brian wasn't robbing the bank. He had two demands: he wanted the Department of Veterans Affairs to return his paycheck and he wanted people to know his story. Abi Damaris Corbin is making sure the second part comes true. She's the director and co-writer of a new film Breaking, starring John Boyega, which takes audiences into the bank that day.
3/21/202313 minutes, 24 seconds
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Lessons still to be learnt from the Iraq war

It has been twenty years since Australia joined the coalition of the willing and the US President, George W Bush, launched Operation Iraqi Freedom. The choice drew mass protests around Australia and, while the war itself was relatively brief, it was years before troops were permanently withdrawn. Donna Mulhearn is a writer and activist, and in 2003 she traveled to Iraq as a human shield. Mulhearn has written about her experiences in two books, and in the Drawing Room she looks back on her experience and on the lessons she feels still need to be learnt two decades later.
3/20/202315 minutes, 52 seconds
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Lessons still to be learnt from the Iraq war

It has been twenty years since Australia joined the coalition of the willing and the US President, George W Bush, launched Operation Iraqi Freedom. The choice drew mass protests around Australia and, while the war itself was relatively brief, it was years before troops were permanently withdrawn. Donna Mulhearn is a writer and activist, and in 2003 she traveled to Iraq as a human shield. Mulhearn has written about her experiences in two books, and in the Drawing Room she looks back on her experience and on the lessons she feels still need to be learnt two decades later.
3/20/202315 minutes, 52 seconds
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The music and empathy of Billy Bragg

Over his ten albums, Billy Bragg has been a voice of conscience, of anger, and of empathy. He's merged politics with music in a way that very few artists have managed and become a voice that's connected generations of fans In the Drawing Room, Billy talks about his latest album The Million Things That Never Happened.
3/17/202316 minutes, 53 seconds
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The music and empathy of Billy Bragg

Over his ten albums, Billy Bragg has been a voice of conscience, of anger, and of empathy. He's merged politics with music in a way that very few artists have managed and become a voice that's connected generations of fans In the Drawing Room, Billy talks about his latest album The Million Things That Never Happened.
3/17/202316 minutes, 53 seconds
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Nick Mason unveils Pink Floyd's saucerful of secrets

The Dark Side of the Moon catapulted Pink Floyd to heights that very few bands have reached, but it didn't come out of nowhere. This was a group that had already put out seven albums and set a standard for progressive and psychedelic music that would inspire generations of artists. Nick Mason, the band's drummer and one of the founding members, was there from the beginning, and it's those early days that lie at the heart of his latest project, Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets. On the Drawing Room, Nick talks about heading into Abbey Road Studios, the joys of improvisation, and getting back on the road.
3/16/202313 minutes
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Nick Mason unveils Pink Floyd's saucerful of secrets

The Dark Side of the Moon catapulted Pink Floyd to heights that very few bands have reached, but it didn't come out of nowhere. This was a group that had already put out seven albums and set a standard for progressive and psychedelic music that would inspire generations of artists. Nick Mason, the band's drummer and one of the founding members, was there from the beginning, and it's those early days that lie at the heart of his latest project, Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets. On the Drawing Room, Nick talks about heading into Abbey Road Studios, the joys of improvisation, and getting back on the road.
3/16/202313 minutes
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Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran makes his mark

The sculptures of Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran are bright, colourful, sometimes provocative, and always recognisable. It's seen him collected by some of Australia's top institutions and selected as GQ's artist of the year. In the Drawing Room, he talks about leaving the mark of humanness in his art, the melting pot of history, and his new exhibition, Undergod.
3/15/202320 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran makes his mark

The sculptures of Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran are bright, colourful, sometimes provocative, and always recognisable. It's seen him collected by some of Australia's top institutions and selected as GQ's artist of the year. In the Drawing Room, he talks about leaving the mark of humanness in his art, the melting pot of history, and his new exhibition, Undergod.
3/15/202320 minutes, 46 seconds
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Kurt Vile: lo-fi love

Between albums, EPs, collaborations, documentaries, and tours, Kurt Vile sets a relentless pace for someone who sounds so laid back. In The Drawing Room, Kurt talks about his love for lo-fi instruments, covering The Boss, and his latest album (watch my moves).
3/14/202316 minutes, 15 seconds
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Kurt Vile: lo-fi love

Between albums, EPs, collaborations, documentaries, and tours, Kurt Vile sets a relentless pace for someone who sounds so laid back. In The Drawing Room, Kurt talks about his love for lo-fi instruments, covering The Boss, and his latest album (watch my moves).
3/14/202316 minutes, 15 seconds
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Mary Coughlan sings her life stories

It was the pain in Billie Holiday's voice that first drew Mary Coughlan to her songs. That shared pain has been an inspiration over the years, as Coughlan took her own experience of addiction and childhood abuse and became one of the most revered jazz and blues singers in her home of Ireland, covering Holiday's songbook along the way. In the Drawing Room, Coughlan looks back at the moments of joy, sorrow, and forgiveness that have made up her life so far.
3/10/202320 minutes, 33 seconds
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Mary Coughlan sings her life stories

It was the pain in Billie Holiday's voice that first drew Mary Coughlan to her songs. That shared pain has been an inspiration over the years, as Coughlan took her own experience of addiction and childhood abuse and became one of the most revered jazz and blues singers in her home of Ireland, covering Holiday's songbook along the way. In the Drawing Room, Coughlan looks back at the moments of joy, sorrow, and forgiveness that have made up her life so far.
3/10/202320 minutes, 33 seconds
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Laura Poitras shows us the beauty and the bloodshed

The photographs of Nan Goldin bear witness to the communities that she's been a part of, providing a loving tribute to those around her and scandalising those who would rather ignore the truths that she presents. It's work that has been collected by many of the world's great museums. But more recently, Nan has turned her gaze on those museums, campaigning to have the Sackler name removed from their walls and their collections, because of the family's involvement with Oxycontin and the opioid crisis. Documentary maker Laura Poitras takes audiences into Nan's campaign, her life and her career in the new film All the Beauty and the Bloodshed.
3/9/202316 minutes, 26 seconds
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Laura Poitras shows us the beauty and the bloodshed

The photographs of Nan Goldin bear witness to the communities that she's been a part of, providing a loving tribute to those around her and scandalising those who would rather ignore the truths that she presents. It's work that has been collected by many of the world's great museums. But more recently, Nan has turned her gaze on those museums, campaigning to have the Sackler name removed from their walls and their collections, because of the family's involvement with Oxycontin and the opioid crisis. Documentary maker Laura Poitras takes audiences into Nan's campaign, her life and her career in the new film All the Beauty and the Bloodshed.
3/9/202316 minutes, 26 seconds
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Mass migration in a warming world

Large parts of the world's most populous countries could become uninhabitable. That's the stark warning behind Gaia Vince's new book, Nomad Century, which looks at what could happen if temperatures rise to four degrees above pre-industrial levels, a possibility that she says is far more likely than we want to believe. That would mean billions of people affected, and many of them on the move — an era of climate refugees. But Vince believes that migration can be a solution instead of a problem, and that beginning to plan now will prevent much worse upheaval in the long term.
3/8/202324 minutes, 36 seconds
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Mass migration in a warming world

Large parts of the world's most populous countries could become uninhabitable. That's the stark warning behind Gaia Vince's new book, Nomad Century, which looks at what could happen if temperatures rise to four degrees above pre-industrial levels, a possibility that she says is far more likely than we want to believe. That would mean billions of people affected, and many of them on the move — an era of climate refugees. But Vince believes that migration can be a solution instead of a problem, and that beginning to plan now will prevent much worse upheaval in the long term.
3/8/202324 minutes, 36 seconds
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Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn: Echo of harmony

Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn are two of the world's greatest banjo players. Both Grammy Award winners, who have worked across many different styles and collaborations. In the Drawing Room they talk about the history of the banjo, their different styles, and how working together has impacted their relationship.
3/7/202320 minutes, 8 seconds
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Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn: Echo of harmony

Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn are two of the world's greatest banjo players. Both Grammy Award winners, who have worked across many different styles and collaborations. In the Drawing Room they talk about the history of the banjo, their different styles, and how working together has impacted their relationship.
3/7/202320 minutes, 8 seconds
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Inside the millionaires' factory

Macquarie Bank is one of Australia's great success stories, with thousands of employees around the globe and a position at the top of the field when it comes to infrastructure asset management. And it's a company known for rewarding its employees. In their new book, The Millionaires' Factory, Joyce Moullakis and Chris Wright, talked to more than a hundred people to bring together an examination of the company's past and its future.
3/6/202318 minutes, 13 seconds
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Inside the millionaires' factory

Macquarie Bank is one of Australia's great success stories, with thousands of employees around the globe and a position at the top of the field when it comes to infrastructure asset management. And it's a company known for rewarding its employees. In their new book, The Millionaires' Factory, Joyce Moullakis and Chris Wright, talked to more than a hundred people to bring together an examination of the company's past and its future.
3/6/202318 minutes, 13 seconds
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Christopher Makos: Intimacy and Andy Warhol

Christopher Makos first made his name capturing New York's music scene in the 1970s, as glam rock and punk brought a visual kick to the city. That scene led him to a long friendship and collaboration with Andy Warhol, and to a body of work that's been exhibited everywhere from the Guggenheim to the Whitney. Makos' work is part the Art Gallery of South Australia's exhibition, Andy Warhol and Photography: A Social Media, and in the Drawing Room he talks about Warhol, candlelit blackouts with Debbie Harry, and how he creates a sense of intimacy in his images.
3/2/20230
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Christopher Makos: Intimacy and Andy Warhol

Christopher Makos first made his name capturing New York's music scene in the 1970s, as glam rock and punk brought a visual kick to the city. That scene led him to a long friendship and collaboration with Andy Warhol, and to a body of work that's been exhibited everywhere from the Guggenheim to the Whitney. Makos' work is part the Art Gallery of South Australia's exhibition, Andy Warhol and Photography: A Social Media, and in the Drawing Room he talks about Warhol, candlelit blackouts with Debbie Harry, and how he creates a sense of intimacy in his images.
3/2/20230
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Brendan Cowell enters The Crucible

In the town of Salem, a madness has swept the village and allegations of witchcraft, born of greed and vengeance, see the townsfolk brought before the court and hanged. The Crucible by Arthur Miller is a classic of the stage, both a telling of history and a parable for Miller's time, and perhaps our own. In the recent production of The Crucible by the London's National Theatre, Brendan Cowell takes on the role of John Proctor, and, in the Drawing Room, Cowell shares his own feelings on authority and the madness of the mob.
3/1/202320 minutes, 6 seconds
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Brendan Cowell enters The Crucible

In the town of Salem, a madness has swept the village and allegations of witchcraft, born of greed and vengeance, see the townsfolk brought before the court and hanged. The Crucible by Arthur Miller is a classic of the stage, both a telling of history and a parable for Miller's time, and perhaps our own. In the recent production of The Crucible by the London's National Theatre, Brendan Cowell takes on the role of John Proctor, and, in the Drawing Room, Cowell shares his own feelings on authority and the madness of the mob.
3/1/202320 minutes, 6 seconds
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Songs For Freedom

For more than a decade, the people of Roeburn, a small town in the Pilbara, have been coming together to create songs, stories and theatre. That work has led to a new album, Songs For Freedom, which is also a call to end the disproportionate levels of incarceration of Indigenous children. In the Drawing Room, Fred Ryan and Lucky Oceans talk about the lead single, prisons as a part of the community, and how they became part of the project.
2/28/202311 minutes, 26 seconds
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Songs For Freedom

For more than a decade, the people of Roeburn, a small town in the Pilbara, have been coming together to create songs, stories and theatre. That work has led to a new album, Songs For Freedom, which is also a call to end the disproportionate levels of incarceration of Indigenous children. In the Drawing Room, Fred Ryan and Lucky Oceans talk about the lead single, prisons as a part of the community, and how they became part of the project.
2/28/202311 minutes, 26 seconds
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Prisoners of the castle

Behind the imposing walls of Colditz Castle, during the second world war, hundreds of foreign officers were kept under lock and key. But despite the impressive facade, it wasn't the most successful prison: dozens of successful escapes were made by the prisoners there, and many more were attempted. The myth around the camp is of British derring-do, but the people in the camp were far more diverse than the legends suggest. In his new book, Colditz: Prisoners of the Castle, Ben Macintyre sets out to widen the narrative.
2/27/202317 minutes, 55 seconds
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Prisoners of the castle

Behind the imposing walls of Colditz Castle, during the second world war, hundreds of foreign officers were kept under lock and key. But despite the impressive facade, it wasn't the most successful prison: dozens of successful escapes were made by the prisoners there, and many more were attempted. The myth around the camp is of British derring-do, but the people in the camp were far more diverse than the legends suggest. In his new book, Colditz: Prisoners of the Castle, Ben Macintyre sets out to widen the narrative.
2/27/202317 minutes, 55 seconds
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Michael Franti: finding light in the darkness

Michael Franti's music operates as a place of hope. His songs choose optimism over pessimism and reminds us that the world can be good, even when he's pointing out the big problems. His latest album, Follow Your Heart, comes in the wake of the challenges we all faced during Covid, but also the personal loss Michael experienced when his father passed. So how does a musician find hope in the dark moments and use it to uplift us all?
2/24/202318 minutes, 15 seconds
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Michael Franti: finding light in the darkness

Michael Franti's music operates as a place of hope. His songs choose optimism over pessimism and reminds us that the world can be good, even when he's pointing out the big problems. His latest album, Follow Your Heart, comes in the wake of the challenges we all faced during Covid, but also the personal loss Michael experienced when his father passed. So how does a musician find hope in the dark moments and use it to uplift us all?
2/24/202318 minutes, 15 seconds
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Reggie Watts on the element of surprise

Reggie Watts is a beat-boxer and musician, using loops of his voice to craft live improvised works that sound like tracks from the best album you've never heard. He's also a comedian, one half of the electronica group Wajata, a television host, actor, and the bandleader on the Late Late Show with James Cordern. In the Drawing Room, Reggie talks about putting a band together, the power of absurdism, and how improv allows him to surprise everyone — even himself.
2/23/202316 minutes, 30 seconds
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Reggie Watts on the element of surprise

Reggie Watts is a beat-boxer and musician, using loops of his voice to craft live improvised works that sound like tracks from the best album you've never heard. He's also a comedian, one half of the electronica group Wajata, a television host, actor, and the bandleader on the Late Late Show with James Cordern. In the Drawing Room, Reggie talks about putting a band together, the power of absurdism, and how improv allows him to surprise everyone — even himself.
2/23/202316 minutes, 30 seconds
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Tim Rogers rewrites a classic

What Rhymes With Cars and Girls, Tim Rogers' first album away from You Am I, was a triumphant release that was eventually turned into a stage musical, and saw Tim pick up an ARIA Award. But it seems that Rogers has unfinished business. His new album with The Twin Set, Tines of Stars, Unfurled, is more than a sequel: it's an album in conversation with the original, with each song talking back to one of those earlier tracks.
2/22/202315 minutes, 51 seconds
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Tim Rogers rewrites a classic

What Rhymes With Cars and Girls, Tim Rogers' first album away from You Am I, was a triumphant release that was eventually turned into a stage musical, and saw Tim pick up an ARIA Award. But it seems that Rogers has unfinished business. His new album with The Twin Set, Tines of Stars, Unfurled, is more than a sequel: it's an album in conversation with the original, with each song talking back to one of those earlier tracks.
2/22/202315 minutes, 51 seconds
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A Ceremony for Tiny Ruins

Olympic Girls, the last album by New Zealand band Tiny Ruins, took them around the world and solidified Hollie Fullbrook's reputation as one of the best songwriters around. Now a new album, Ceremony, is on the way, and in the Drawing Room, Fullbrook shares the inspirations behind the record, and how she collaborated on a very unusual project with the novelist David Mitchell.
2/21/202317 minutes, 24 seconds
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A Ceremony for Tiny Ruins

Olympic Girls, the last album by New Zealand band Tiny Ruins, took them around the world and solidified Hollie Fullbrook's reputation as one of the best songwriters around. Now a new album, Ceremony, is on the way, and in the Drawing Room, Fullbrook shares the inspirations behind the record, and how she collaborated on a very unusual project with the novelist David Mitchell.
2/21/202317 minutes, 24 seconds
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Robert Forster's Tender Years

From The Go-Betweens to his own solo albums, Robert Forster is one of the great figures of Australian music. His latest album, The Candle and the Flame, is another triumph. It's also an intensely personal record, recorded in the wake of his wife's diagnosis with ovarian cancer.
2/20/202316 minutes, 46 seconds
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Robert Forster's Tender Years

From The Go-Betweens to his own solo albums, Robert Forster is one of the great figures of Australian music. His latest album, The Candle and the Flame, is another triumph. It's also an intensely personal record, recorded in the wake of his wife's diagnosis with ovarian cancer.
2/20/202316 minutes, 46 seconds
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Henry Wagons finds himself South of Everywhere

The master of Australian Americana, Henry Wagons, has just released a new solo album, South of Everywhere, and is heading off to stages around the country. On RN Drive, Henry talks about finding inspiration after lockdown, LA writers rooms, and whether we need a better term for international flavours of Americana.
2/17/202319 minutes, 18 seconds
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Henry Wagons finds himself South of Everywhere

The master of Australian Americana, Henry Wagons, has just released a new solo album, South of Everywhere, and is heading off to stages around the country. On RN Drive, Henry talks about finding inspiration after lockdown, LA writers rooms, and whether we need a better term for international flavours of Americana.
2/17/202319 minutes, 18 seconds
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Lauren Fleshman: Good For A Girl

Sport is meant to be the healthiest thing in the world, and professional athletes operate at the top levels of fitness. So why do women at the top level face stress fractures at three times the rate of their male peers? And why is disordered eating so common among this cohort? Lauren Fleshman was a professional runner: a college phenomenon and a multiple-time National Champion in the 5000m race. Now, in her new book, Good For A Girl: A Woman Running In A Man's World, she looks back on her career, and examines what needs to change so that sport is healthy for women: in body and mind.
2/16/202316 minutes, 28 seconds
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Lauren Fleshman: Good For A Girl

Sport is meant to be the healthiest thing in the world, and professional athletes operate at the top levels of fitness. So why do women at the top level face stress fractures at three times the rate of their male peers? And why is disordered eating so common among this cohort? Lauren Fleshman was a professional runner: a college phenomenon and a multiple-time National Champion in the 5000m race. Now, in her new book, Good For A Girl: A Woman Running In A Man's World, she looks back on her career, and examines what needs to change so that sport is healthy for women: in body and mind.
2/16/202316 minutes, 28 seconds
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Art and thought in The Free World

A professor of English at Harvard, a Pulitzer prize winner and a staff writer at The New Yorker, Louis Menand brings a careful eye to the big picture of history. In his latest book, The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War, he's looking back at a time when the US became the cultural force in the world — and at the figures who helped to shape that time A professor of English at Harvard, a Pulitzer prize winner and a staff writer at The New Yorker, Louis Menand brings a careful eye to the big picture of history. In his latest book, The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War, he's looking back at a time when the US became the cultural force in the world — and at the figures who helped to shape that time
2/15/202316 minutes, 23 seconds
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Art and thought in The Free World

A professor of English at Harvard, a Pulitzer prize winner and a staff writer at The New Yorker, Louis Menand brings a careful eye to the big picture of history. In his latest book, The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War, he's looking back at a time when the US became the cultural force in the world — and at the figures who helped to shape that time A professor of English at Harvard, a Pulitzer prize winner and a staff writer at The New Yorker, Louis Menand brings a careful eye to the big picture of history. In his latest book, The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War, he's looking back at a time when the US became the cultural force in the world — and at the figures who helped to shape that time
2/15/202316 minutes, 23 seconds
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Chokepoint Capitalism

This is meant to be an age of amazing potential for artists. Global streaming promised access to huge audiences and self-publishing the potential for personal control. So why are artists earning less than they used to? And how have a smaller and smaller number of companies come to control the distribution of books, movies, and music? Rebecca Giblin is a professor at Melbourne Law School and the Director of the Intellectual Property Research Institute of Australia. Cory Doctorow is a best-selling author and activist Together they're the authors of Chokepoint Capitalism, which looks at why these promises have never been realised, and what we can do to change the system.
2/14/202322 minutes, 54 seconds
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Chokepoint Capitalism

This is meant to be an age of amazing potential for artists. Global streaming promised access to huge audiences and self-publishing the potential for personal control. So why are artists earning less than they used to? And how have a smaller and smaller number of companies come to control the distribution of books, movies, and music? Rebecca Giblin is a professor at Melbourne Law School and the Director of the Intellectual Property Research Institute of Australia. Cory Doctorow is a best-selling author and activist Together they're the authors of Chokepoint Capitalism, which looks at why these promises have never been realised, and what we can do to change the system.
2/14/202322 minutes, 54 seconds
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Understanding Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt was one of the foremost political theorists of the 20th Century. Perhaps best known for the phrase 'the banality of evil', Arendt wrote extensively on power, freedom, and the importance of individual action, and she remains a key figure of moral philosophy. In her book, Hannah Arendt, Samantha Rose Hill has taken a fresh and fascinating look back at Arendt's life and work. She's also published a collection of Arendt's poetry. Ahead of her appearance at Adelaide Writers Week, Hill talks about the importance of experience, the meaning of 'understanding', and Arendt's significant sense of humour.
2/13/202322 minutes, 14 seconds
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Understanding Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt was one of the foremost political theorists of the 20th Century. Perhaps best known for the phrase 'the banality of evil', Arendt wrote extensively on power, freedom, and the importance of individual action, and she remains a key figure of moral philosophy. In her book, Hannah Arendt, Samantha Rose Hill has taken a fresh and fascinating look back at Arendt's life and work. She's also published a collection of Arendt's poetry. Ahead of her appearance at Adelaide Writers Week, Hill talks about the importance of experience, the meaning of 'understanding', and Arendt's significant sense of humour.
2/13/202322 minutes, 14 seconds
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Eric Bibb is still Ridin' on

With decades in the business and multiple Grammy nominations, Eric Bibb is one of the enduring voices of the blues — and what a voice. Over his latest two albums, Dear America and Ridin', he's looking at America and what it means to be a part of the history of that country.
2/10/202318 minutes, 3 seconds
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Eric Bibb is still Ridin' on

With decades in the business and multiple Grammy nominations, Eric Bibb is one of the enduring voices of the blues — and what a voice. Over his latest two albums, Dear America and Ridin', he's looking at America and what it means to be a part of the history of that country.
2/10/202318 minutes, 3 seconds
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Geoff Dyer and the ending of things

What makes for a good ending? Of a work of art; of a career; of a life? And does the ending matter, if what's happened before it has been a grand success? Geoff Dyer has written about photography, jazz, travel, cinema, service and anything else that captures his attention, and taken home a bushel of prizes along the way. And in his latest work, The Last Days of Roger Federer, he's turned his eye to endings.
2/9/202320 minutes, 12 seconds
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Geoff Dyer and the ending of things

What makes for a good ending? Of a work of art; of a career; of a life? And does the ending matter, if what's happened before it has been a grand success? Geoff Dyer has written about photography, jazz, travel, cinema, service and anything else that captures his attention, and taken home a bushel of prizes along the way. And in his latest work, The Last Days of Roger Federer, he's turned his eye to endings.
2/9/202320 minutes, 12 seconds
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Aurora's Sunrise

Aurora Mardiganian became a surprising sensation in America in the late 1910s. A survivor of the massacre and exile of the Armenian people, her story became a cause celebre and was turned into a movie: Auction of Souls. Following the first World War, President Wilson sought an American mandate for Armenia, but his plan was defeated in Congress and, shortly afterwards, copies of the film vanished. A new documentary, Aurora's Sunrise, uses recovered scenes from the film, archival testimony, and animation, to tell Aurora's story. Inna Sahakyan is the film's director and co-writer and in the Drawing Room she explores the story around the film, which won Best Animated Film at the Asian Pacific Screen Awards, and was the Armenian entry for the Oscars this year.
2/8/202314 minutes, 8 seconds
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Aurora's Sunrise

Aurora Mardiganian became a surprising sensation in America in the late 1910s. A survivor of the massacre and exile of the Armenian people, her story became a cause celebre and was turned into a movie: Auction of Souls. Following the first World War, President Wilson sought an American mandate for Armenia, but his plan was defeated in Congress and, shortly afterwards, copies of the film vanished. A new documentary, Aurora's Sunrise, uses recovered scenes from the film, archival testimony, and animation, to tell Aurora's story. Inna Sahakyan is the film's director and co-writer and in the Drawing Room she explores the story around the film, which won Best Animated Film at the Asian Pacific Screen Awards, and was the Armenian entry for the Oscars this year.
2/8/202314 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ruva Ngwenya takes on the role of Tina Turner

Tina Turner is a true superstar, with decades of hits, so what's it like to take to the stage and become the legend? Ruva Ngwenya has be playing the role of Tina Turner in the Australian production of the musical, Tina, and in the Drawing Room she talks high school musicals, training regimes, and channeling the spirit of Tina Turner
2/6/202311 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ruva Ngwenya takes on the role of Tina Turner

Tina Turner is a true superstar, with decades of hits, so what's it like to take to the stage and become the legend? Ruva Ngwenya has be playing the role of Tina Turner in the Australian production of the musical, Tina, and in the Drawing Room she talks high school musicals, training regimes, and channeling the spirit of Tina Turner
2/6/202311 minutes, 45 seconds
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Simone Young knows the score

Simone Young is a world-renowned conductor who has led symphony orchestras and opera companies across the globe and shattered more than a few glass ceilings along the way. She's returned home as the chief conductor of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and is the centre of a new documentary, Knowing The Score. In the Drawing Room, Simone discusses music, Tár, and what real life is actually like for one of the world's elite conductors.
2/3/202327 minutes, 11 seconds
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Simone Young knows the score

Simone Young is a world-renowned conductor who has led symphony orchestras and opera companies across the globe and shattered more than a few glass ceilings along the way. She's returned home as the chief conductor of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and is the centre of a new documentary, Knowing The Score. In the Drawing Room, Simone discusses music, Tár, and what real life is actually like for one of the world's elite conductors.
2/3/202327 minutes, 11 seconds
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Michael Fabiano follows his passion and duty in opera

When Michael Fabiano's music teacher, the legendary tenor George Shirley, told him he had a moral duty to share his voice, everything changed. Michael abandoned his plans for business or law and went home to map out in extraordinary detail what it would take to become one of the world's premiere opera singers. Now he's performing on the world's biggest stages, with a foundation that brings music education to a new generation.
1/31/202322 minutes, 33 seconds
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Michael Fabiano follows his passion and duty in opera

When Michael Fabiano's music teacher, the legendary tenor George Shirley, told him he had a moral duty to share his voice, everything changed. Michael abandoned his plans for business or law and went home to map out in extraordinary detail what it would take to become one of the world's premiere opera singers. Now he's performing on the world's biggest stages, with a foundation that brings music education to a new generation.
1/31/202322 minutes, 33 seconds
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Charley Crockett and The Man From Waco

Named as the Americana Music Emerging Act of the Year in 2021 — about the same time as his 8th release — Charley Crockett has built a career on his own terms. With a sound that recalls the greats of blues, folk and country music, and a personal story better than any song could contain, it's no surprise that he's getting people's attention.