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The Decibel

English, News, 1 season, 764 episodes, 3 days, 14 hours, 7 minutes
About
Context is everything. Join us Monday to Friday for a podcast from The Globe and Mail newsroom, hosted by Tamara Khandaker. Explore a story shaping our world, in conversation with reporters, experts, and the people at the centre of the news.
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Introducing: Machines Like Us

In the last few years, artificial intelligence has gone from a novelty to perhaps the most influential technology we’ve ever seen. The people building AI are convinced that it will eradicate disease, turbocharge productivity, and solve climate change. It feels like we’re on the cusp of a profound societal transformation. Fifteen years ago, there was a similar wave of optimism around social media: it was going to connect the world, catalyze social movements and spur innovation. It may have done some of these things. But it also made us lonelier, angrier, and occasionally detached from reality.Few people understand this trajectory better than Maria Ressa. Ressa is a Filipino journalist, and the CEO of a news organization called Rappler. Like many people, she was once a fervent believer in the power of social media. Then she saw how it could be abused. In 2016, she reported on how Rodrigo Duterte, then president of the Philippines, had weaponized Facebook in the election he’d just won. After publishing those stories, Ressa became a target herself, and her inbox was flooded with death threats. In 2021, she won the Nobel Peace Prize.As novel as AI is, it has undoubtedly been shaped by the technologies, the business models, and the CEOs that came before it. And Ressa thinks we’re about to repeat the mistakes we made with social media all over again.
5/21/202445 minutes, 17 seconds
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Alice Munro, remembered

The celebrated Canadian author Alice Munro died on May 13. She was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2013 as a “master of the contemporary short story,” and the Man Booker International Prize in 2009.On today’s show, members of The Globe newsroom share their reflections on Alice Munro’s life and work, and columnist Marsha Lederman joins to talk about Munro’s impact and legacy.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/18/202423 minutes, 18 seconds
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How Ottawa is preparing for a possible second Trump term

As the U.S. election looms, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s team is getting ready for both possible outcomes: a Biden re-election and a second Trump term. They are assembling a team of officials to remind American politicians about the importance of free trade across our borders.Adrian Morrow is The Globe’s U.S. correspondent based in Washington, D.C., and he explains who is on this so-called Team Canada, and how their strategy works.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/17/202421 minutes, 4 seconds
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Hydrogen trains might be the future of Canadian rail

Hydrogen fuel is sometimes called the fuel of the future, and it’s being used in a number of ways around the world. The rail giant CPKC is trialling a new hydrogen train in Alberta, that it hopes can replace diesel-fuelled freight locomotives in delivering goods across the continent.The Globe’s Alberta and energy reporter, Kelly Cyderman, joins us to discuss hydrogen trains, how they work, and how this development might lead toward a greener Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/16/202420 minutes, 36 seconds
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How nurse practitioners could help Canada’s primary care crisis

Canada is in the midst of a primary-care crisis. 6.5 million Canadians don’t have reliable access to a family doctor, and some jurisdictions are turning to nurse practitioners to fill the gap. Alberta recently announced a program that would make it possible for nurse practitioners to receive public funding to establish a practice, although it comes with its conditions and concerns from other organizations.The Globe’s national health reporter, Kelly Grant, walks us through the role nurse practitioners have in providing primary care, how they’re funded, and Alberta’s new plan to address the shortage of primary-care providers.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/15/202421 minutes, 39 seconds
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The problem with Canada’s affordable housing

The housing affordability problem in Canada continues, and people are desperate for solutions. The federal government is handing out billions of dollars as part of the Apartment Construction Loan Program intending to create more affordable housing. But, a Globe analysis found a disconnect between what’s considered affordable in this program, and what renters can actually afford.The Globe’s real-estate reporter Rachelle Younglai explains why these units aren’t actually attainable to many Canadian renters and looks at the concerns with the program’s definition of affordability.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/14/202417 minutes, 24 seconds
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The $34-billion bet on boosting Canada’s economy

After more than a decade, the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project (TMX) has finally been completed. One of the country’s biggest infrastructure projects is seen as a major win for Albertan oil producers, with nearly 600,000 extra barrels shipped daily, ready for international buyers.But the future ownership of the pipeline remains up in the air. Many of the issues and questions that delayed the project – concerns over its safety and the environment, fights over Indigenous land rights, long-term economic risks – remain.Jeffrey Jones, The Globe’s sustainable finance reporter, explains the ballooning costs of the TMX and why one of Canada’s top exports is creating tension with its future climate targets.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/13/202419 minutes, 30 seconds
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Understanding Israel’s push into Rafah during ceasefire talks

Tension is ratcheting up in the Gaza Strip as the Israeli military descends on the southern city of Rafah. This move has forced hundreds of thousands of Palestinians sheltering there to flee yet again. All of this has been happening this week against the backdrop of ceasefire negotiations between Hamas and the Israeli government and souring relations between Benjamin Netanyahu and U.S. President Joe Biden.The Globe’s Senior International Correspondent Mark MacKinnon brings us up to speed on the many developments, breaks down what happened in the ceasefire talks this week, and what this means for the people in Gaza and the remaining Israeli hostages.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/10/202423 minutes, 54 seconds
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TD Bank caught up in drug money-laundering scheme

TD Bank has been plagued by concerns about its anti-money-laundering capabilities for over a year. In March 2023, they tried to acquire the U.S. based bank First Horizon Corp. Regulatory issues delayed the acquisition, and in May 2023, the deal fell through.The extent of TD’s anti-money-laundering issues weren’t clear until now, when it’s revealed that TD is involved in a U.S. investigation of a US$653 million money-laundering and drug-trafficking operation. Tim Kiladze, financial reporter and columnist for the Globe, is on the show to talk about TD’s alleged lack of oversight and what this means for the bank – and its customers – going forward.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/9/202422 minutes, 53 seconds
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How do we solve our global plastic problem?

175 countries are in the midst of tense discussions around a UN treaty to reduce plastic pollution. The second-last negotiation session wrapped up in Ottawa last week, but there are still significant hurdles to getting it done, including disagreements about whether to include a production cap.Today, The Globe’s environment reporter Wendy Stueck joins to explain what this treaty could change, and how countries are thinking about how to balance our reliance on plastic with its effects on our environment.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/8/202422 minutes, 39 seconds
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Police, campus unrest and the power of student protests

Campus protests are spreading across Canada including at the University of Toronto and McGill. It comes after high profile demonstrations in the United States where students are demonstrating against the war in Gaza. And when police were called in to disband these protests, sometimes things got violent.The protests and tensions with police call back to student movements of the past. Dr. Roberta Lexier is an associate professor at Mount Royal University, and her research focuses on social and student movements. She’s on the show to explain the tensions between campus protesters and police and what history tells us about the protests today.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/7/202422 minutes, 33 seconds
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The ‘stain’ of foreign interference on Canadian elections

The public inquiry into foreign interference aimed to provide answers critical to Canada’s democracy: who are the main perpetrators of the threats against the country’s electoral system? What, if any, role did they play in the 2019 and 2021 federal elections? The first report from the inquiry has now been released – detailing the “pervasive, insidious and harmful” problems of foreign interference on Canada’s democratic institutions.Robert Fife, The Globe’s Ottawa bureau chief, breaks down the report and explains what comes next, as pressure mounts on the Trudeau government.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/6/202419 minutes, 37 seconds
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‘What I eat in a day’ videos and the new diet culture

Diet culture that celebrates thinness, weight loss and supplements, has been around for decades. But the global reach of social media and influencers talking about nutrition trends and advice is something new. And what they’re telling – and selling – to followers isn’t always safe or fact-based.Christy Harrison is a registered dietitian, certified intuitive eating counsellor and author. Her most recent book, The Wellness Trap, discusses moving away from diet-culture and sifting through disinformation. She’s on the podcast to discuss diet-culture’s presence on social media, the harms of nutrition trends and how to maintain a safe relationship with food today.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/3/202421 minutes, 50 seconds
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How the politics of decriminalization played out in B.C.

Last year, British Columbia’s government began an experiment in drug policy by decriminalizing illicit drug use, up to a certain amount. The pilot program was meant to address the worsening opioid crisis that killed thousands of people in B.C. in 2023. But now, the provincial government has made a major reversal on that cornerstone policy, after reports from mayors of urban centres, residents and health care workers of rampant open drug use.Justine Hunter, The Globe’s B.C. politics reporter joins the podcast to talk about the politics of decriminalization and what this means for harm reduction policies across Canada in the future.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/2/202422 minutes, 14 seconds
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Why running is more popular than ever

Distance running, once a relatively niche sport, has exploded in popularity. The trend has been ongoing for at least a decade, but 2024′s running season may be the biggest one yet. Marathon race organizers are expecting record participation in races this year, both in Canada and in cities around the world.Today, Ben Kaplan, general manager of iRun Magazine, Allison Hill, co-founder of Hill Run Club, and members of The Decibel’s own running club explain how the sport has grown more inclusive and diverse, drawing in a whole new generation of runners.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/1/202423 minutes, 13 seconds
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Sudan and the neglected wars

Sudan is facing a dire humanitarian crisis. Nearly 9 million people are displaced from their homes and millions face severe hunger, all stemming from a conflict that broke out just over a year ago. But there are widespread concerns that the world is turning a blind eye to Sudan – and to other African countries facing conflicts.Today, The Globe’s Africa Bureau Chief Geoffrey York explains what’s been going on in Sudan, why so little attention is being paid to this conflict among others, and what that means for the people on the ground.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/30/202422 minutes, 7 seconds
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The biggest EV investment in Canada yet

By 2030, the federal government is hoping 60 per cent of new car sales will be zero-emission. By 2035, they want that number to be 100 per cent. To help with that goal, Canada and a number of provinces have been courting auto manufacturers to set up shop here. And just last week, Honda announced a $15-billion investment in EV production in Ontario – the biggest deal Canada has ever landed.Adam Radwanski, The Globe’s climate policy columnist, is on the show to talk about a few of these Canadian deals and the future of the EV industry – both the prospect and obstacles ahead.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/29/202421 minutes, 42 seconds
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City Space: Vancouver’s Chinatown fights gentrification

Canada’s largest Chinatown has been under siege for over a century: first by race riots, then by poverty and most recently by the threat of development. We’re telling the story of why Chinatown, Vancouver, is one of Canada’s most resilient neighbourhoods, forced to evolve and adapt in the face of horrific racism. The future of Chinatowns everywhere should be in the hands of the people who live, work and find community there. So what does the future hold for a neighbourhood constantly in flux?This episode of The Globe and Mail’s City Space podcast is available to stream wherever you get your podcasts.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/26/202441 minutes, 42 seconds
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The call to disband the Thunder Bay police

This week, a group of First-Nations leaders called for the Thunder Bay Police Service to be disbanded for the second time – following charges against high ranking members of the service and board, and several reports accusing the police service of racism, discrimination and misconduct, specifically in the cases involving Indigenous people.The Globe’s Willow Fiddler has been covering this story and is on the show to explain the problems with the Thunder Bay Police Service, and what led to this call for the service to be disbanded.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/25/202421 minutes, 49 seconds
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How Hong Kong is cracking down on dissent

The government in Hong Kong recently voted to pass a new national security law, referred to as Article 23. It includes seven new offences related to sedition, treason and state secrets, and is expected to have a chilling effect on protest. A number of countries, including Canada, denounced the law before it was passed, saying it’s too broad and risks undermining human rights.James Griffiths, The Globe’s Asia Correspondent, is on the show to discuss Article 23 – what it is, how it’s affecting people in Hong Kong and who is most at risk.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/24/202420 minutes, 3 seconds
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As conflict rages in Gaza, a ‘silent war’ in the West Bank

The Israel-Hamas war is continuing in Gaza, but tension extends to another Palestinian territory, the West Bank. Five hundred Palestinians have been killed by Israeli settlers or security forces, according to local authorities, and at least nine Israelis have been killed, according to the United Nations. The West Bank is also home to farmland where olive, fig and lemon trees grow. Since Oct. 7, Israeli settlements have expanded and some Palestinian farmers say they’ve lost access to agricultural land.Nathan VanderKlippe, the Globe’s international correspondent, tells us what’s been happening on West Bank farmlands for the past six months and how this is increasing tensions in the region.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/23/202420 minutes, 29 seconds
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The capital gains tax, explained

When the federal government released their 2024 budget last week, they changed the capital gains tax for the first time in a quarter-century. The tax is set to bring in $19.3-billion dollars, and the government says it’ll only impact the wealthiest of Canadians. But many are disputing that.Salmaan Farooqui, a personal finance reporter with the Globe’s Report on Business, is on the show to tell us about the basics of capital gains and how this tax might affect Canadians.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/22/202420 minutes, 23 seconds
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ArriveCan and the government’s outsourcing problem

On Wednesday, Kristian Firth became the first person in over a century held in contempt of Parliament and ordered to answer MP questions. It all has to do with the ArriveCan app, which his company, GC Strategies, was awarded millions of dollars to help develop.An Auditor-General’s report estimates the app cost taxpayers $59.5 million and most of the work was outsourced to companies like GC strategies. Why the app cost so much and who got that money has come under scrutiny.Bill Curry, the Globe’s Deputy Ottawa Bureau Chief, is on the show to tell us about what’s been going on with ArriveCan and what we learned from Kristian Firth’s historic appearance at the House of Commons.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/19/202421 minutes, 51 seconds
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The stakes of India’s election as Modi seeks third term

With nearly one billion eligible voters, India is the world’s biggest democracy. Beginning April 19, with voting staggered over six weeks, they will decide their leader for the next five years. Narendra Modi aims to consolidate power with his third term as prime minister, as a coalition opposition looks to unseat him.Sanjay Ruparelia is an associate professor at Toronto Metropolitan University and Jarislowsky Democracy Chair explains why India’s elections matter for democracy – and the balance of power for the rest of the world.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/18/202418 minutes, 51 seconds
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What the 2024 federal budget means for you

The 2024 Canadian federal budget has been unveiled, with a particular focus on affordability and housing this year. But the 430 page plan covers a wide gamut of other spending details – from defence, tax hikes, generational fairness and much more. Making sense of it all can be overwhelming.We’ll cover all the key points of this year’s budget and explain how it will affect your wallet and financial prospects. A team of Globe and Mail journalists – senior political reporter Marieke Walsh, real estate reporter Rachelle Younglai, Report on Business reporter Mark Rendell and personal finance expert Rob Carrick – join The Decibel to explain what you need to know.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/17/202423 minutes, 1 second
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How a new kind of drug could change the future of Alzheimer’s

There are an estimated 650,000 cases of dementia in Canada right now. The last 20 years of research into the treatment of Alzheimer’s have been, as one expert put it, “agonizing.” But a new drug was approved in the United States and is being tested in Canada to see if it can delay or slow the progression of Alzheimer’s symptoms. And it’s giving researchers and patients some hope that a breakthrough could be on the way.Kelly Grant, health reporter for The Globe, has been looking at this drug more closely. She’s on the show today to tell us what these trials mean for patients and the future of Alzheimer’s research.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/16/202421 minutes, 34 seconds
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City Space: How Halifax’s unhoused crisis got so bad

The Globe and Mail’s City Space podcast takes on the big issues, questions and stories of urban living. What makes a city function? Why was it built that way? How will it change in a tech-powered society? This episode takes a look at the unhoused and encampment crisis in many cities and towns in Canada. In Halifax, the homeless population has tripled in the last three years. Emergency shelters aren’t enough, and building new housing takes time. Real fixes will require money and policy solutions. The city finds itself caught in the middle – between those who just want the problem to disappear and those trying to find long-term answers. Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/15/202440 minutes, 41 seconds
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What we’ve learned from the foreign interference inquiry

After a spate of news stories and immense public pressure, the government of Canada established the Public Inquiry into Foreign Interference to examine allegations that foreign countries like China and Russia interfered in our elections. The inquiry has heard from many high-ranking officials, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, about interference in the 2019 and 2021 elections.Robert Fife, The Globe’s Ottawa bureau chief, is on the show to explain the main points from the public inquiry so far and whether it will answer the lingering questions around foreign interference in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/12/202423 minutes, 36 seconds
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Former health minister Jane Philpott’s plan to save health care

Long wait times and the never ending battle to connect with a healthcare professional is a reality most people know all too well. Especially for the 6.5 million Canadian residents who do not have a family doctor. It’s a problem that has existed for years because it isn’t easy to solve.Dr. Jane Philpott is the Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queen’s University. She is a family doctor, the former Minister of Health and recently published a new book, Health for All: A Doctor’s Prescription for a Healthier Canada. Dr. Philpott is on the show to talk about her ‘hopeful’ vision for primary care in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/11/202425 minutes, 39 seconds
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Why major economies are trying to woo Vietnam

Vietnam is having a moment on the world stage. Last month, Canada sent the largest ever “Team Canada” delegation of business leaders and government officials in a push to strengthen the bond with the country. And Canada isn’t alone – the U.S., Australia and China are all looking to do the same.The Globe’s Asia correspondent, James Griffiths was recently in Vietnam and he’s on the show to explain why the southeast Asian country is so popular right now, what Canada is hoping to gain and what this all means for Vietnam’s future.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/10/202418 minutes, 52 seconds
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How seafood from North Korean forced labour ends up in Canada

Where does your seafood come from? And who, along the supply chain, handled it? An investigation from the non-profit investigative journalism organization, Outlaw Ocean Project, reveals a network of North Korean labourers at Chinese seafood plants – a violation of United Nations sanctions – supplying certain Canadian seafood companies. The workers detail a pattern of hyper-surveillance, poor pay and sexual assault by their employers.Ian Urbina, executive editor of The Outlaw Ocean Project, joins The Decibel to discuss the findings of the investigation, the working conditions inside the processing plants and how products made from forced labour are ending up on Canadian store shelves.VIDEO: Investigation reveals North Korean forced labour in Chinese seafood plantsQuestions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/9/202426 minutes, 58 seconds
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The big business bet on psychedelic drugs

In the last few years, there has been an increase in research around using psychedelic drugs, like LSD and magic mushrooms, as treatments for mental health conditions. And recently, two Canadian companies working in the sphere have gotten a special designation from a big U.S. regulator that could fast-track the development and review of their drugs.Sean Silcoff is a journalist with The Globe’s Report on Business. He has been looking at recent developments in these companies and how that fits into the bigger picture of investor excitement around these drugs.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/8/202419 minutes, 37 seconds
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The deadly challenges of getting aid into Gaza

The deaths of seven World Central Kitchen humanitarian aid workers in Gaza has shone a light on the dangerous conditions facing people delivering essential supplies to Gazans. Some aid organizations have either suspended or modified deliveries in order to protect worker safety. It comes at a time when food and other supplies are desperately needed in Gaza. The UN says that a famine is looming for people living there. Simply put, getting aid into Gaza has long been difficult. But without a ceasefire it is a logistical nightmare.Dr. Sarah Schiffling is an expert in humanitarian logistics. She’s the Deputy Director of the HUMLOG Research Institute at the Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki, Finland. She explains the challenges of getting aid into Gaza and what can be done to make it easier.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/5/202424 minutes, 12 seconds
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School boards take on social media giants

Educators across Canada are worried about the use of cellphones – and in particular social media – in classrooms, saying it’s disrupting class and causing mental health issues. Four school boards in Ontario are suing the companies behind Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Snapchat for billions of dollars, joining a long list of U.S. school districts doing the same.Philip Mai, senior researcher and co-director of the Social Media Lab at Toronto Metropolitan University, explains why this might be a tough case to prove in court, and how it could make an impact on how young people engage with social media.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/4/202420 minutes, 25 seconds
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Canada’s uncertain AI future

Since 2017, Canada has worked to attract the best artificial intelligence research talent in the world. But it hasn’t been investing in the infrastructure that those researchers need to push the limits of AI and the questions it can potentially solve. There are now calls for the government to invest more into building out more powerful supercomputers.Report on Business journalist Joe Castaldo explains why the issue of growing computing power isn’t as simple as buying more high-end computer chips, the potential problems of investing heavily into this tech, and what Canada can do to prevent a brain drain of AI talent.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/3/202423 minutes, 17 seconds
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Four reasons why you can’t afford housing

Buying and owning a home in Canada is an endless source of frustration. Many have been priced out, while competition is high as a lack of housing stock runs up against a rapidly growing population. While more homes are needed to alleviate the stress, getting shovels into the ground isn’t as simple as it sounds.The Globe’s Jason Kirby, Matt Lundy and Mark Rendell recently broke down the reasons behind why most Canadians can’t afford a home right now. Jason Kirby is on the show to explain the not-so-obvious reasons why housing affordability and opportunity is at an all-time low – and whether we’ll be stuck in this expensive loop for generations to come.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/2/202420 minutes, 45 seconds
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What to know about the upcoming total solar eclipse

On April 8, the moon will block out the sun giving many Canadians a chance to witness a total solar eclipse. Cities and towns falling in the path of totality are getting ready for this special day and are expected to experience a big number of visitors.The Globe and Mail’s science reporter Ivan Semeniuk explains the science behind eclipses, what makes the upcoming total eclipse special for Canadians and what are the ways to view it safely.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/1/202420 minutes, 3 seconds
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How sleep affects our brains

There are few more important habits for human health than the hours we spend asleep every night. Research shows sleep – or lack of it – affects everything from our physical and mental health, decision making and ability to fight illness. Despite this, at least one in four Canadians say they’re unhappy with the quality of their sleep.Dr. Rébecca Robillard, neuropsychologist at the University of Ottawa and Co-Chair of the Canadian Sleep Research Consortium, goes deep on the science of sleep and why it’s vital for cognition and brain health.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/28/202422 minutes, 26 seconds
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Amid a housing crisis, students build tiny homes for teachers

Aspen, Colorado is a picturesque mountain town often called a snowy “playground for the rich”. Real estate is also one of the most expensive in the United States, and for the teachers that live there, that means they’ve been priced out. Now, the local high school is trying to solve that problem with student-built tiny homes for their teachers.The Globe’s international correspondent, Nathan VanderKlippe recently spent time in Aspen to find out about this makeshift solution to the affordability crisis, the other cities doing similar projects and what this all says about the effects housing has on our social structures.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/27/202420 minutes, 22 seconds
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What you need to know about your CPP money

For most workers in Canada, there’s a chunk of money deducted from each paycheck that goes toward the Canada Pension Plan. It happens whether you want it to or not. That’s because the CPP was set up to force people to save for their retirement. Canadians become eligible to receive a monthly payment when they reach the age of 60. However, many factors determine how much money an individual will get.Brenda Bouw, a reporter for Globe Advisor, explains how CPP works, what determines how much you get and the debate around what’s the right age to claim it.To visit The Globe’s CPP calculator, click here.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/26/202420 minutes, 51 seconds
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Why single parents are struggling in Canada

The number of single parents in Canada has been steadily growing since the 1970s. Today, one in five children grow up in single-parent homes. However, the increasing cost of living and lack of sufficient financial support is pushing many of these families towards poverty.Dave McGinn, a reporter for the Globe and Mail, dives into the additional struggles that single parents face and explains how Canada’s policies to help families fall short.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/25/202421 minutes, 46 seconds
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The political fight over the carbon tax

The federal price on carbon is set to increase on April 1. This tax is being criticized by many provinces including Saskatchewan. At the end of last year, Premier Scott Moe announced that the province will stop collecting a carbon levy on home heating bills. Then, earlier this year, he said that the province wouldn’t pay part of its carbon bill to the Canada Revenue Agency. Ottawa says this is against the law.The Globe and Mail’s Alberta and energy reporter Kelly Cryderman explains why Saskatchewan made that decision and how the political debate on the carbon tax got so fraught.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/22/202421 minutes, 56 seconds
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Who’s left to oppose Vladimir Putin?

Russian President Vladimir Putin is one of the longest serving leaders of the country, on track to surpass the rule of Joseph Stalin. Over the years, Putin has cracked down on opposition, as seen with Alexey Navalny and many others before him, to the extent that there is little opposition left in Russia.Mark MacKinnon, The Globe’s senior international correspondent, has been speaking with members of the Russian opposition movement, both in prison and in exile. Today, he tells us their fates, how they’re making sense of this moment, and what it means for the future of Russia that Putin has such a firm grip on power.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/21/202421 minutes, 36 seconds
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Why full parole was granted to a multiple murderer

The man who murdered the parents of a former NHL goalie was recently granted full parole. In 2022, a ruling by the Supreme Court struck down the punishment of life without parole for multiple murders. This case has raised questions about what rules and parameters are in place for convicted killers and the potential threat they pose to society.The Globe and Mail’s justice writer Sean Fine explains the details of the case, the mechanism of the parole system and what it can mean for future criminal cases.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/20/202420 minutes, 51 seconds
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The dark side of Bay Street’s hottest finance funds

Private debt funds are one of the hottest commodities in the world of investing. High rates of return and low management fees made them popular among investors. However, some recent redemption freezes and the allegations against Bridging Finance Inc. have put these funds under scrutiny.The Globe and Mail’s finance reporter and columnist Tim Kiladze, explains what these private debt funds are, how they operate and why some investors are reconsidering their big bets.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/19/202425 minutes, 6 seconds
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The challenge with preparing for wildfires in B.C.

Canada went through its most destructive wildfire season in 2023. Wildfire services rely on data, forestry photography and mapping as a way to proactively control forest fires. However, a recent study in B.C. has found that the data being used is inaccurate and insufficient.Jen Baron, lead author of the study and PhD candidate at UBC’s Department of Conservation and Forestry, explains the inaccuracies in the data, the problems it creates and the ways it could be improved.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/18/202419 minutes, 54 seconds
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Why millennial women are so burnt out

Millennial women are feeling burnt out.The responsibilities and pressures of family, work and caregiving are piling up, amidst the lingering fallout of the pandemic and the economic crisis. But what makes this generation’s burnout unique to generations before it?The Globe and Mail’s demographics reporter Ann Hui, explains her own experience with burnout, the reasons why millennial women are feeling it more and how it can be made better.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/15/202421 minutes, 11 seconds
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Where Haiti could go from here

After months of escalating violence, Haiti has descended into chaos. Criminal gangs have largely taken control of the country’s capital as they attack civilians and police. Haitian prime minister Ariel Henry has agreed to step down to allow for a transitional government to take over, while a UN-backed security force from Kenya is being called on to restore order.Chalmers Larose, a Haitian political scientist and lecturer at several Canadian post-secondary institutions, joins the show to unpack the security problems facing Haiti, what can be done about them, and whether international effort could help.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/14/202418 minutes
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The ‘invisible’ opioid crisis in small towns

The dangerous effects of the opioid crisis could be distilled in a single afternoon in February: the town of Belleville, Ont., saw 14 overdose cases in just two hours. The scale of the opioid crisis is often associated with big cities; however, the reality in smaller cities is even worse. Despite smaller cities having higher rates of opioid deaths and hospitalizations, they get less attention.The Globe and Mail’s reporter and feature writer, Shannon Proudfoot explains the situation in some small towns in the country and how they are trying to deal with it despite having far fewer resources.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/13/202420 minutes, 24 seconds
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The debate around using hormone therapy for menopause

A new series published by the medical journal, The Lancet says menopause is being “over-medicalized.” It argues that treating aging like an illness does women a disservice. The medical community’s approach to menopause has changed a lot throughout the years including the use of hormone replacement therapy to treat symptoms associated with it.The Globe and Mail’s health reporter Kelly Grant, explains the history of hormone replacement therapy use, the culture shift around our views on menopause and where this all leaves people dealing with its symptoms.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/12/202422 minutes, 18 seconds
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Building renewables in Alberta just got a lot harder

Alberta Premier Danielle Smith announced new regulations for renewable power developments that started on March 1st. This comes after the province paused all renewable developments in August. And the rules have some people concerned that it will limit this booming industry in a traditional oil-and-gas powered province.The Globe and Mail’s energy reporter, Emma Graney, explains what exactly the rules cover and how it could create a chill for new wind and solar investments in Alberta.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/11/202421 minutes, 17 seconds
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Toxic truths about Agent Orange in Canadian military base

A recent legislative commission in Maine has questioned the 2006 Canadian investigation on the spraying of herbicides that took place in a New Brunswick military base. The latest report says the Canadian government downplayed the effects of Agent Orange on military veterans and their families.Lindsay Jones is The Globe’s Atlantic reporter. In this episode, she tells us more about the investigations into the use of Agent Orange in Canada, and the fight for compensation and answers for those exposed to the toxic chemicals.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected].
3/8/202418 minutes, 57 seconds
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Celebrated Group of Seven sketches revealed to be fakes

In 2015, the Vancouver Art Gallery believed it had made a groundbreaking acquisition. 10 sketches by Group of Seven member J.E.H. MacDonald were unearthed in the mid-1970s and sold off. But experts in the Canadian art world weren’t convinced they were authentic. But it wouldn’t be until late 2023 that the truth was finally revealed to the public.Marsha Lederman is a columnist for the Globe, and has been reporting on this artwork since the Vancouver Art Gallery first announced their acquisition nearly a decade ago. She’s on the show to talk about how the mystery was finally solved, what it means for an art gallery to come clean.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/7/202421 minutes, 1 second
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Why measles infections are surging again

Measles cases have been popping up all over the world, including in Canada. This highly contagious virus can be devastating – and even deadly – to people who haven’t been vaccinated against it.The Globe and Mail’s health columnist André Picard explains why we’re seeing this sudden rise and what can be done about it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/6/202421 minutes, 37 seconds
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Documents reveal fired scientists shared information with China

Newly released documents reveal two scientists who worked at a high-security infectious disease lab in Winnipeg provided confidential scientific information to China. Both scientists were fired back in 2021, but for years the exact reasons why had been a mystery. The CSIS documents now reveal that one of the scientists was “a realistic and credible threat to Canada’s economic security.”Senior parliamentary reporter, Steven Chase explains who these scientists are and the information they were sharing, foreign interference and why the government took so long to release the documents.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/5/202420 minutes, 19 seconds
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What to know about Canada’s new Pharmacare bill

The Liberal-NDP supply-and-confidence deal has passed another test. The two parties managed to table a pharmacare bill before the March 1 deadline. But the compromise legislation is a limited program, supplying universal, single-payer coverage to only two classes of drugs.Marieke Walsh, the Globe’s Senior Political Reporter, explains how the program will work and how much it will cost.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/4/202422 minutes, 13 seconds
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Filling Canada’s trades labour shortage with high school students

There are increasing shortages in the skilled trades in Canada, and provinces and territories are desperate to get people to fill them – so, they’re turning to young people. There are programs across the country to get high school students engaged in the trades, but Ontario has proposed the most radical solution yet – allowing students to leave high school early.Today, The Globe’s education reporter Caroline Alphonso explains how provinces are trying to encourage young people into the trades, and why we might need to rethink the approach to what happens after high school.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/1/202421 minutes, 35 seconds
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Why discount airlines keep going bust in Canada

On Monday, Calgary-based discount airline Lynx Air, which launched a mere two years ago, ceased operations. For customers, that means they’re likely not getting refunds and will have to find alternate and possibly more expensive tickets to their destinations.This is a familiar story in Canada. Discount airlines have come and gone with only a few years of operation under their belt. The Globe’s transportation reporter, Eric Atkins is on the show to explain why discount airlines keep failing in Canada and what that means for flyers looking for a deal.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/29/202422 minutes, 23 seconds
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The rise in exclusive deals between insurers and pharmacies

Exclusive deals struck between insurance companies and pharmacies are increasingly drawing scrutiny from patients, pharmacists and cabinet ministers. The arrangements, known as preferred pharmacy networks (PPNs), are meant to deal with rising prices of pharmaceutical drugs. But detractors say these plans mean less transparency, competition and consumer choice.The Globe’s retailing reporter Susan Krashinsky Robertson and wealth management and insurance reporter Clare O’Hara explain why the blowback against PPNs is rooted in questions about who gets to approve treatment for patients.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/28/202422 minutes, 5 seconds
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The Odysseus lunar landing and a new space race

For the first time ever, a spacecraft built by a private company has landed on the moon. The robotic lander, named Odysseus, touched down in the south polar region on Thursday. But not before a nerve-wracking communications blackout and an off-kilter landing that have scientists racing against time.What is Odysseus’ purpose? What could this mean for future space projects like NASA’s Artemis missions in 2026? Ivan Semeniuk, The Globe’s science reporter, joins the show to explain the historic feat.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/27/202420 minutes, 14 seconds
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The landmark decision on white nationalist terrorism

Since the murder of a Muslim family by a self-described white nationalist in London, Ont. in 2021, debate has raged over whether this crime was an act of terrorism under Canadian law. Last week’s Ontario Superior Court ruling has settled the matter: Nathaniel Veltman’s targeted attacks on the Afzaal family is a ‘textbook’ example of terrorism.Globe reporter Colin Freeze has been covering the case and joins The Decibel to explain the precedent-setting decision, why defining terrorism matters in Canada, and what this means in protecting the victims of terrorist crimes.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/26/202420 minutes, 16 seconds
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On the ground in Kharkiv, two years into the Russian invasion

Two years ago, Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Now, with Russia on the front foot, many towns that have been safe for months are being thrust back onto the frontlines, like Kharkiv in northeastern Ukraine.Today, The Globe’s senior international correspondent Mark MacKinnon, who’s in Kharkiv, tells us about the frontlines of the war two years on, how the soldiers are doing, and what it means for Ukraine’s army that Western support is slowing down.If you’d like to learn more, The Globe is doing a live Q&A with Mark on Saturday, February 24 at 10 a.m. ET, here.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/23/202421 minutes, 11 seconds
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Is Trudeau leading the Liberals to an election day shellacking?

The latest poll numbers are looking grim for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberals. According to an Abacus poll in February, the Trudeau-led Liberals are polling at 24 per cent and the PM himself is deeply unpopular among voters of all ages. More than a year out from the next election, is the incumbent government already doomed?John Ibbitson, The Globe’s Writer-At-Large, explains the factors that have led to the Liberals’ steep decline and whether this is simply the end of a political cycle – as a new one could soon begin.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/22/202419 minutes, 43 seconds
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Investigating Canada’s dependence on for-profit nursing

As health care across Canada struggles with staffing shortages, a Globe investigation has found that provincial use of private nursing agencies has recently skyrocketed – in some cases costing hundreds of millions of dollars.The Globe’s Kelly Grant and Tu Thanh Ha have been investigating these private agencies – and one agency in particular – for months. Today, they tell us how these agencies work, why it’s costing so much, and the concerns with how some of these companies are operating – including some questionable expenses that are being passed onto taxpayers.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/21/202423 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Federal Housing Advocate on the national encampment crisis

Canada’s first federal housing advocate released her first-ever formal review last week: Housing is a human right and that the federal government is failing people who are unhoused and violating a 2019 law by not providing adequate housing. That has led directly to a poverty and encampment crisis affecting cities and towns across Canada, leaving thousands of people struggling to survive.Marie-Josée Houle, Canada’s Federal Housing Advocate, joins the show to explain the full findings of her report and the pressure on governments to act now.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/20/202422 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Alberta credit union betting on gold over government

Worried about total economic collapse because of government mismanagement? Bow Valley Credit Union might be for you. The Alberta credit union is leaning hard into anti-government, anti-regulation rhetoric. And it’s buying up precious metals like gold in a bid to shore up its depositors’ investments.They’re proud of the fact that they’ve run afoul of regulators, using their distrust of authority as a selling point, and recently sponsored Tucker Carlson’s interview with Alberta premier Danielle Smith.The Globe’s Carrie Tait explains how Bow Valley’s CEO has built up the credit union and why they appeal to thousands who’ve invested with them.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/16/202423 minutes, 11 seconds
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Inside the power struggle over Rogers’ telecom empire

Back in the fall of 2021, Canadian news headlines were dominated by the story of the Rogers family battling for control of Rogers Communications Inc. It was a very dramatic, and very public, power struggle that was frequently compared to the TV show Succession.The fallout from that saga is still playing out today. Alexandra Posadzki has been breaking news on this story since it started. She recently published a book, Rogers v. Rogers: The Battle for Control over Canada’s Telecom Empire. Today, she explains the saga that pulled the Rogers family apart, risked a $20-billion deal, and what it all means for Canada’s telecom industry now.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/15/202423 minutes, 3 seconds
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Palestinians fleeing Gaza face hurdles coming to Canada

The Israel-Hamas war has led to a growing humanitarian crisis in Gaza. In January, Canada launched a temporary program for Canadians to bring their family members here from Gaza.Janice Dickson is the Globe’s international affairs reporter. She’s here to talk about what makes bringing people out of Gaza so challenging, and the frustration Canadians are feeling in trying to bring their loved ones here.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
2/14/202418 minutes, 56 seconds
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The rising costs of pet ownership

Life has gotten expensive in a number of ways – from groceries to housing. And so too, have the costs of taking care of furry family members. More than half of Canadian households have a cat or dog and skyrocketing costs have meant some people are finding it hard to keep up with the bills.The Globe’s personal finance reporter, Erica Alini, and independent business reporter, Chris Hannay, looked into the complex web of factors that have caused rising prices. They’re on the show to explain what they learned and what pet owners can do to try and keep costs down.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/13/202422 minutes, 43 seconds
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China sets its sights on the Arctic

A new report about Chinese companies registering in Russia’s Arctic highlights China’s “no limits partnership” with Russia, and its interest in developing mining and shipping in the Arctic that is melting due to climate change.Senior parliamentary reporter Steven Chase explores the implications for Canada, which has its own claims to sovereignty over the North Pole, the Northwest Passage, and the large swaths of the Arctic seabeds that could be mined.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/12/202419 minutes, 21 seconds
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Why the ‘last mile’ of inflation is the hardest

The most recent numbers show that inflation in Canada is at 3.4 per cent. Still above the 2-per-cent target, which is where the Bank of Canada would like it to be. And this last little bit of inflation is a critical period for the Bank in terms of adjusting interest rates.Mark Rendell covers the Bank of Canada for The Globe’s Report on Business and he explains what challenges remain to squeeze that last little bit of inflation out of the economy.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/9/202421 minutes, 7 seconds
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A year of drug decriminalization in B.C.

It’s been a year since B.C. got permission to decriminalize possessing small amounts of some street drugs. At the time, B.C.’s Minister of Mental Health and Addictions said this would “break down the stigma that stops people from accessing life-saving support and services.”But since then, B.C. recorded its highest-ever number of deaths from illicit drugs in 2023. And in response to public outcry, the provincial government has sought to limit drug use in more public areas like beaches and playgrounds.Andrea Woo is a staff reporter at The Globe’s Vancouver bureau, and she’s won a National Newspaper Award for her coverage of the toxic drug crisis. She’ll tell us what we know about how decriminalization works in B.C., and if anyone thinks it’s working out.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
2/8/202421 minutes, 6 seconds
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Fact-checking Alberta’s new gender-affirming care policies

Alberta Premier Danielle Smith unveiled a raft of new policies last week that have healthcare professionals warning of dire consequences for young transgender and non-binary people. The proposals will severely restrict when and what kind of gender-affirming care – ranging from medication to surgery – that young people and their families will have access to.Zosia Bielski, national news reporter specializing in gender, sexuality and sexual health for The Globe, explains what these policies are aiming to achieve and why experts are calling these rules the most restrictive in Canada on issues of gender and identity.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/7/202419 minutes, 49 seconds
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The U.S. states vying for cheaper drugs from Canada

In early January, Florida became the first U.S. state to get approval to import wholesale drugs from Canada. The FDA’s decision overrides decades-long objections from drug companies and could save the state millions of dollars. Now, Colorado is looking to do the same.The Globe’s international correspondent, Nathan VanderKlippe went to Colorado to learn about their plan to bring in cheap drugs from Canada, why drugs are so much more expensive in the U.S., and whether Canadians could be facing a shortage in their medications.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/6/202421 minutes, 26 seconds
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TD Bank’s anti-money-laundering troubles

For months now, TD Bank has been making headlines. First there was the news they were acquiring U.S.-based First Horizon Bank. Then the news that that acquisition wasn’t going through. Then the bank announced it was under investigation.And now, thanks to the reporting of Rita Trichur and Stefanie Marotta, we know that a Canadian regulator is also set to levy a penalty against them. Stefanie, The Globe’s banking reporter, is on the show to explain what is going on inside Canada’s second-largest bank.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/5/202417 minutes, 15 seconds
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Hells Angels, an Iranian drug lord and an alleged murder plot

A U.S. federal indictment is unsealed and within it are explosive allegations. According to court documents released this week, an assassination plot was constructed between a drug lord, two Canadian Hells Angels members and Iran’s armed forces – aimed at silencing Iranian dissidents living in the U.S.The Globe’s U.S. correspondent Adrian Morrow explains what is known about the case, the people allegedly involved and how it all fits into foreign interference and extraterritorial killings.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/2/202420 minutes, 41 seconds
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The five pro hockey players charged with sexual assault

Five hockey players from Canada’s 2018 world junior hockey team have been charged with sexual assault in connection to an event alleged to have taken place in London, Ont., in 2018. Four of them are current NHL players.A woman identified as E.M. sued Hockey Canada in 2022 in relation to the incident, which was settled for $3.55-million. The Globe then reported that Hockey Canada had maintained a reserve, called the National Equity Fund, to pay out sexual assault claims. It was made up, in part, by players’ registration fees.The Globe’s Robyn Doolittle led the reporting on Unfounded, a series examining how police departments across Canada treat sexual assault claims, and she’s been reporting on the alleged incident as details become public. She explains what happened in 2018 and how it led to this week’s charges.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/1/202423 minutes, 33 seconds
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Debate around Israel-Hamas war collides with Canadian theatre

Online petitions. Angry in-person meetings. An ultimatum. These are just a few of the events that lead to a Canadian play being pulled from Victoria’s Belfry Theatre and Vancouver’s PuSh Festival.The Globe’s theatre critic, J. Kelly Nestruck, explains how this play – The Runner – wound up at the centre of a controversy about a war half a world away.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/31/202419 minutes, 20 seconds
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On the new frontlines of Myanmar’s civil war

Myanmar has been embroiled in a bloody civil war for nearly three years, after the military staged a coup in 2021. The war was stuck in a stalemate but that is changing – the resistance forces have been gaining ground, and Siegfried Modola has been there documenting some of the battles.Modola is a photojournalist and documentary photographer who has been reported on the conflict during several trips into Myanmar for The Globe and Mail. Today, he takes us to the new frontlines of the country’s civil war, and explains the toll this conflict is having on the people of Myanmar.You can see Modola’s reporting and photography here: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/world/article-myanmar-civil-war-opposition-photos/Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/30/202420 minutes, 37 seconds
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What you need to know about the foreign interference inquiry

The long-awaited inquiry into foreign interference begins today. The Globe and Mail’s reporting, based on top-secret CSIS documents, of sophisticated strategies by China to disrupt Canada’s democracy and federal elections set off a firestorm. Now, the public is about to learn how the federal government handled this information and what lessons can be learned to fend off actions by foreign states in the future.The Globe’s senior parliamentary reporter, Steven Chase, joins the podcast to explain the stakes of the inquiry, what is being examined and the main players who will dominate the headlines in the months to come.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/29/202422 minutes, 4 seconds
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Federal Court finds Trudeau’s use of Emergencies Act unjustified

Nearly two years on, the federal government’s use of the Emergencies Act against the 2022 convoy protests is still being debated – politically and legally. This week, a Federal Court judge ruled that the Trudeau government’s invocation of the act was unjustified and violated the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.The Globe’s senior political reporter Marieke Walsh explains this latest ruling, how this finding is different from last year’s inquiry findings and what this all means for the Trudeau government.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/26/202422 minutes, 34 seconds
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What’s driving property tax hikes in big cities?

Cities in Canada pay for most of the services they provide with property taxes. What homeowners are charged in property taxes – and how much that goes up or down with each budget – has become a political statement, as well as a rallying cry for affordability.Urban affairs reporter Oliver Moore gets at the numbers behind the latest property tax hikes across the country, telling us what they’re paying for, why they are mostly going up – some, like Toronto’s, way up – and what other tools cities have to raise the money they need for services like garbage pickup and park maintenance.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/25/202420 minutes, 51 seconds
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Turning the tides into renewable energy

Companies around the world are trying to harness the power of the tides to create a renewable energy source. Canada’s Bay of Fundy is a promising place to do it because it has the highest tides in the world. But turning the tides into energy has proven to be challenging and costly.Matthew MClearn is an investigative reporter and data journalist with The Globe and Mail’s Energy, Natural Resources and Environment Team. He’s on the show to explain how tidal power works and where we’re at in its development.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/24/202419 minutes, 49 seconds
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Invasive Group A Strep infections: what you need to know

Cases of Invasive Group A Strep infections are on the rise in Canada. It’s an illness with potentially fatal outcomes – four children under 10 have died in British Columbia since mid-December, and six people under the age of 18 died in Ontario in the last three months of 2023.Carly Weeks is a health reporter for the Globe. She’s on the show to talk about how to recognize Invasive Group A Strep infections and why experts believe they’re on the rise.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/23/202420 minutes, 8 seconds
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What happens when a group of hospitals get hacked

On Oct. 23, 2023, five hospitals in southwestern Ontario realized they were under attack. A cybercrime group was hacking them in order to hold patient and employee information hostage. The hack resulted in all of the hospitals shutting down their systems, causing massive delays in care, backlogging tests and requiring some patients to travel for care.Karen Howlett, an investigative reporter at The Globe, has been looking into how hackers were able to get into the hospitals’ shared IT system and steal over 250,000 patient records.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/22/202418 minutes, 38 seconds
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Baby boomers mourn a future without grandkids

Canada’s birth rate is at an almost 20-year low. People are deciding not to have kids for a variety of reasons and the pandemic has only intensified this drop. While Millennials and GenZ’s are saying no to kids, the declining birth rate is leaving their parents with an identity crisis: Baby boomers coming to terms with a future without grandkids.The Globe’s Zosia Bielski recently looked into the rising trend of grandchildless boomers. She explains what this new normal means for family dynamics and the pressures that come along with it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/19/202421 minutes, 46 seconds
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What’s driving Canada’s ‘population trap’?

Canada is one of the fastest growing countries in the world and in 2023, the population officially reached 40 million people. But economists are warning that there’s a price to pay for that growth – that Canada’s living standards and investments in infrastructure aren’t keeping up.Matt Lundy is an economics reporter for the Globe, and he joins the podcast to explain why Canada’s policies have led to a ‘population trap’ and why Canada’s immigration rates have soared.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/18/202419 minutes, 24 seconds
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The repercussions and fallout from the Steven Galloway case

The case of Steven Galloway caused a firestorm when it was first made public, and it continues to this day. Galloway was fired from the University of British Columbia after allegations of sexual misconduct, which he denies. The situation divided Canadian authors, and the public more broadly. Now, there’s been a development.The Globe’s Marsha Lederman has reported on this extensively. Today, she tells the story of how we got to this moment, the implications of this case, and the effect it’s had on the people involved.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/17/202422 minutes, 4 seconds
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The promise and problems with Ontario’s Ring of Fire

Ontario’s Ring of Fire has long been believed to contain critical minerals like nickel, copper and chromite, purportedly worth tens of billions of dollars. But for more than a decade, there has been no development. This is in part because of a long process of assessments and consultations happening, much of which involve First Nations communities who live on the Ring of Fire land.Niall McGee is the Globe’s mining reporter and he explains how the leader of one First Nation in the area is pushing to allow for the mining of the Ring of Fire and why he sees it as important for reconciliation.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/16/202420 minutes, 22 seconds
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You’re not wrong, snowy winters aren’t like they used to be

Snowy season in many parts of Canada is off to a slow start. At the end of December, fewer than half of Whistler Blackcomb’s trails in British Columbia were open due to the lack of snow. And the Prairie provinces are expected to have a milder winter, with below-normal snowfall. While the amount of snow varies from year to year, a new study says snowpack – the volume of snow that is present on the landscape – in the Northern Hemisphere is on the decline because of climate change.Ivan Semeniuk is The Globe’s science reporter. He’s on the show to explain how this loss will impact not only ski season but also water supplies and agriculture.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/15/202419 minutes, 57 seconds
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Why it feels like everyone is getting sick right now

There seems to be a lot of illness going around right now. Hospitals are struggling with what the Canadian Medical Association called an “avalanche of patients,” and many of you have questions.Today, The Globe’s health reporter Carly Weeks joins us to explain how this year’s respiratory virus season is shaping up, and she answers your questions about COVID, RSV, the flu, and more.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/12/202421 minutes, 19 seconds
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South Africa takes Israel to UN court

On December 29, South Africa submitted an application with the International Court of Justice claiming that Israel’s offensive in Gaza is “genocidal in character.” The UN’s judicial court is hearing South Africa’s request for provisional measures on Thursday and will hear Israel’s response the next day.Geoffrey York is the Globe’s Africa bureau chief, based in Johannesburg. He explains what was in South Africa’s application and what it means for the war in Gaza.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/11/202419 minutes, 46 seconds
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Why Taiwan’s election tests China’s authority

Taiwan, the east Asian country of 24 million people, is ramping up to a pivotal presidential election on January 13. Amidst rising tensions with China, voters are being asked whether their country should have a warmer relationship with Beijing or continue a hardline stance for Taiwanese independence.James Griffiths, The Globe’s Asia correspondent, explains why the answer to that question will test China’s strength and why another superpower is watching closely.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/10/202421 minutes, 31 seconds
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Hard truths about ‘gentle parenting’

There’s a conversation happening amongst parents that is drumming up a lot of controversy. It’s around the idea of gentle parenting, which is a catch-all term that generally refers to parents who try to stay calm, place a lot of importance on their child’s emotions and show a lot of physical affection.Dr. Alice Davidson is a professor of developmental psychology at Rollins College, and is one of the few academics to have actually studied gentle parenting. She shares what she has found out.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/9/202422 minutes, 16 seconds
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What’s in store for Canada’s economy in 2024

Inflation has been rising, interest rates have accelerated at record pace, and the cost of living has been weighing on us all. Canada’s economy has been flirting with a recession since the start of the pandemic, but we may have avoided the worst of it.So what’s in store for 2024? Will there be any reprieve? The Globe’s economics columnist and reporter David Parkinson is on the show today to tell us what this year’s financial forecast looks like.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/8/202420 minutes, 21 seconds
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New attacks threaten to push Israel-Hamas war beyond borders

Tensions in the Middle East have heightened in the last week, not just because the war in Gaza continues, but because of four events that have happened in the last week in the region.The Globe’s Senior International Correspondent, Mark MacKinnon, explains what has happened and how it’s ratcheting up geopolitical pressures.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/5/202421 minutes, 18 seconds
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Has the promise of plant-based meats gone bust?

Plant-based meat has been touted as a way of having our steak and eating it too. The industry had grand plans to remake the way we eat, cut down greenhouse gas emissions in meat and dairy production and address animal welfare concerns. Companies like Beyond Meat and Impossible had a meteoric rise in the late 2010s, with influencers, celebrities and investors backing the companies.But now, it appears the hype over plant-based meat is over. Sales have dropped off and stock prices are worth less than a tenth of its peak.Vox staff writer and journalist Kenny Torrella tells us why the noise around plant-based meat’s potential – and its flop – doesn’t tell the whole story.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/4/202418 minutes, 26 seconds
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Where grief fits into Canada’s healthcare system

There is a universal – but uncomfortable – truth about grief: We will all experience it at some point in our lives. And with the scale of death we witnessed during the pandemic, grief is a lot more present in our lives.And yet, Canada doesn’t have a cohesive network of support for grief. The Canadian Grief Alliance recently received federal funding to look into this. Paul Adams is one of the co-chairs and is on the show to explain what a better system could look like.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/3/202420 minutes, 50 seconds
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It was a rough year for Trudeau – what will 2024 bring?

2023 was a rocky year for Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government. The country was grappling with unaffordable housing and grocery prices, high interest rates, accusations of foreign interference. Trudeau and his government have been sliding in the polls, losing significant ground to Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre.Today, in our first episode of 2024, The Globe’s political columnist and writer-at-large John Ibbitson explains how the events of 2023 impacted Trudeau and his government, and Pierre Poilievre, and what might be in store for 2024.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/2/202421 minutes, 29 seconds
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The story of the world's most premature twins to survive

For the holidays, The Decibel is sharing their favourite stories of the year, with the producers taking you behind-the-scenes on how the episodes were made, what inspired them and all the tidbits that never made it into the original airing.***Adrial and Adiah Nadarajah are the most premature twins ever born to survive to their first birthday – they were born at just 22 weeks, about half of a full term pregnancy. If they had been born just two hours earlier, medical staff would not have tried to resuscitate them. They would have been considered too young to live.Their story is part of the medical and moral challenges that arise when babies are born dangerously early. Kelly Grant spoke with the parents and doctors of the babies – and attended the twins’ first birthday party.This episode originally aired on April 10, 2023Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/29/202328 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ford and the never-ending Ontario Place saga

For the holidays, The Decibel is sharing their favourite stories of the year, with the producers taking you behind-the-scenes on how the episodes were made, what inspired them and all the tidbits that never made it into the original airing.***When Ontario Place first opened in 1971, it was a jewel on Toronto’s waterfront showcasing modern architecture and Ontario culture. But in the 50 years that followed, Ontario Place faced an identity crisis. The space hosted a water park and a night club to name a few. And while a few venues have stayed open much of the park closed in 2012. The Provincial government cited dwindling attendance and soaring costs.Ontario Premier Doug Ford has a new plan that he says will turn the 155-acres of land into a ‘world class’ destination. But the project is already mired in controversy, with critics saying the Premier’s plan is shrouded in secrecy and favouritism.Decibel producer Sherrill Sutherland toured Ontario place with The Globe’s architecture critic, Alex Bozikovic to learn about why so many people are fighting to keep it a public space. Plus, the Globe’s Queen’s Park reporter Jeff Gray explains the politics behind this lucrative piece of land.This episode originally aired on May 4, 2023Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/28/202328 minutes, 12 seconds
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The hunt for dark matter, two kilometres under Sudbury

For the holidays, The Decibel is sharing their favourite stories of the year, with the producers taking you behind-the-scenes on how the episodes were made, what inspired them and all the tidbits that never made it into the original airing.***No one really knows what dark matter is. We just think it exists. And we believe it makes up 85 per cent of all mass in the universe. So how do you solve the mystery of something that is currently unknowable?Enter SNOLAB. This underground, clean lab is located in Sudbury, Ontario, and researchers there are running experiments to try to solve this cosmic query. Decibel producer Madeleine White, along with Globe science reporter Ivan Semeniuk, go two kilometres underground to visit SNOLAB and bring you up to date on the lab’s quest to discover dark matter.This episode originally aired on August 10, 2023Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/27/202326 minutes, 53 seconds
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Butter, sugar and a pinch of family

Food and family are often front and centre during the holidays. These two ingredients also help make up our identities and cultures.So today, The Decibel is sharing stories of finding family through the act of baking.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/22/202319 minutes, 8 seconds
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A wallet was sent to The Globe with a letter from a dying man

Earlier this year, The Globe’s sports editor Jamie Ross got a peculiar package in the mail – a wallet, with a request from a man nearing the end of his life, to help return it to its rightful owner. That piqued the interest of investigative reporter Grant Robertson. And that began the saga of trying to track these people down.Today, Grant Robertson tells us the story of a hockey player, his wallet, and the mystery Grant is trying to solve around it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/21/202320 minutes, 51 seconds
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The lost art of human pinsetting

The Globe’s Carrie Tait recently went to visit a bowling alley in the small town of Kimberley, British Columbia. It’s tucked in the basement of the town’s Elk’s Lodge and has a feature that exists in just a few other locations in North America: the pins are set by humans, not machines. It’s a profession from a bygone era but in Kimberley, this bowling alley from the past, is making a comeback.Carrie is on the show to tell us about this unique space, the people who put it together and how the bowling alley is helping to revive a small town looking toward its future.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/20/202318 minutes, 24 seconds
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The myth and the reality of Newfoundland’s giant squids

A giant squid discovered in Newfoundland in 1873 turned what until then was a mythological creature into the scientifically named Architeuthis dux, or giant squid. In the generations since, more sightings and myth-making have become the stuff of local legend on “The Rock”.Atlantic reporter Lindsay Jones explores how the giant squid has since entwined itself in the history and culture of Newfoundland, even as sightings have dwindled in the 21st century.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
12/19/202318 minutes, 25 seconds
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The complicated art of political cartoons, with Brian Gable

Nearly every day, The Globe published an editorial cartoon. Around 8,000 of those cartoons were drawn by Brian Gable. After 35 years of drawing cartoons for The Globe, Brian Gable has retired.Today, we talk to Brian about the complicated art of political cartoons, how he does it, who his favourite people have been to draw, and why he thinks we need editorial cartoons in today’s world.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
12/18/202320 minutes, 59 seconds
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The man accused of selling toxic substances used for suicide

Earlier this week, a man from Mississauga, Kenneth Law, was charged with 14 counts of second-degree murder. Police allege he helped people end their lives by selling them sodium nitrite online.Today, Globe reporters Mike Hager and Colin Freeze explain what we know about Kenneth Law, the charges against him, and how he defended himself in an interview earlier this year.If you are having thoughts of suicide, call Crisis Service Canada at 1-833-456-4566 or visit crisisservicescanada.ca. Young people can also call Kids Help Phone at 1-800-668-6868, text 686868, or visit kidshelpphone.ca. If it is an emergency, call 911.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/15/202323 minutes, 39 seconds
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What a bad back tells us about Canada’s chronic pain problem

One in five Canadians suffer from chronic pain. According to one estimate, in 2019 the direct and indirect costs of chronic pain totalled $40-billion. And yet, the affliction is poorly understood and accessing treatment through the health care system can be tedious and frustrating.Lara Pingue is an editor at The Globe. In 2018 her life changed when a sneeze sent her spiralling into the world of chronic pain. On her years-long journey, she’s dealt first-hand with the health care system, she’s tried multitudes of treatments to help alleviate her pain and she’s learned about the research currently being done to figure out this mysterious affliction. She’s on the show to explain her experience and what her bad back taught her about the world of chronic pain.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
12/14/202321 minutes, 41 seconds
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School shutdowns, hospital delays and a massive strike in Quebec

There are over a half million public-sector workers on strike in Quebec this week. This comes after an offer from François Legault’s government, which the multiple unions involved in negotiations rejected.The strikes – some of which started weeks ago – seem to have strong public support despite schools being shut down and delays piling up at hospitals. Frédérik-Xavier Duhamel, a staff reporter based in Montreal, discusses whether there’s an end in sight.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/13/202316 minutes, 35 seconds
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Can carbon capture solve emissions problems for oil and gas?

Canada’s oil and gas industry has been facing immense pressure to reduce emissions. Last week, the federal government announced a cap and trade system to help do that, and one of the main ways the industry is planning to cut back on emissions is through carbon capture.Today, The Globe’s energy reporter Emma Graney explains the new cap and trade system, the science behind carbon capture, and the concerns around whether it is a viable option for Canada’s oil and gas sector.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/12/202319 minutes, 52 seconds
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Cervical cancer is on the rise in Canada

A recent report from the Canadian Cancer Society underlines a troubling trend: cervical cancer is on the rise and seeing its most significant increase in nearly 40 years. Despite having a vaccine against HPV – the predominant cause of the cancer – hundreds of Canadian women are dying every year.The Globe’s national health reporter Carly Weeks joins the podcast to explain what experts think should do to help prevent the rise of cervical cancer cases in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
12/11/202319 minutes, 59 seconds
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Why climate change is driving up the cost of your insurance

As storms become more frequent and more severe, insurance claims for damage to homes are piling up. Disaster claims in Canada have more than quadrupled over the past 15 years, accounting for more than $3-billion of insured losses in 2022 – up from just $400-million in 2008, according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada.Clare O’Hara is a journalist with The Globe’s Report on Business and she covers the insurance industry. She explains the relationship between climate change, insurance companies and your growing home insurance bill.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/8/202323 minutes, 5 seconds
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How a Ukrainian teen fought to get her brother back from Russia

Since Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February last year, there have been concerns about Ukrainian children, and the efforts by Russia to send them to summer camps or to foster homes within Russia.The Globe’s senior international correspondent, Mark MacKinnon, brings us the story of two siblings separated by this practice and how a sister travelled more than 1,000 km, crossing borders, to try to bring her brother back home.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/7/202321 minutes, 22 seconds
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Your personal finance questions answered, with Rob Carrick

Managing personal finances while navigating 2023′s economic landscape is stressful, especially for young people. Is now the time for a down payment for a home? How do you even begin saving with sky-high rents? Where is the safest place to begin investing?Listeners asked these questions (and more) to The Globe’s personal finance columnist Rob Carrick, who spoke to Decibel host Menaka Raman-Wilms in a Globe Campus virtual event. We answer the most pressing queries to help you get a better handle on your money.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/6/202324 minutes, 15 seconds
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What Google’s deal with Canada means for the rest of the world

After a very public and heated battle with the federal government, Google has come to an agreement to support Canadian news to the tune of $100 million a year. Countries around the world have been watching this play out in Canada, as they try to tackle the imbalance between tech giants and media outlets.Taylor Owen, founding director of The Centre for Media, Technology and Democracy and an associate professor at McGill University, joins us today. He explains the details of the deal, and what precedent it sets for other places looking to bring in similar legislation.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
12/5/202319 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ranking Canada’s most livable cities

Where is the most livable city in Canada? The Globe and Mail ranked more than 400 cities across the country to find out. Using data to capture qualities that matter most – affordability, safety, education and access to amenities and health care – these rankings will help Canadians find the cities that are best for them, based on their own circumstances.The Globe’s data editor Mahima Singh and personal finance reporter Salmaan Farooqui join the show to explain the methodology behind the project and why a certain city on the west coast takes the top spot.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
12/4/202321 minutes, 7 seconds
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Tensions over Israel-Hamas war and free speech on campus

On Tuesday, a walkout and rally at York University’s campus in Toronto saw 200 faculty and staff protesting the administration’s decision to suspend three employees, including one professor. The employees were charged for their alleged involvement in defacing an Indigo bookstore. It’s the latest incident involving a Canadian university where the Israel-Hamas war has created conflict on campus.The Globe’s post-secondary education reporter Joe Friesen is on the show to explain why university campuses are a flashpoint of spillover tensions from the Israel-Hamas war and why it’s testing how free speech is handled at universities.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
12/1/202319 minutes, 29 seconds
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Money laundering, crypto trading and Canada’s richest man

Binance is the world’s largest crypto trading platform and its founder is the most recent crypto leader to be charged criminally in the U.S. That man – Changpeng Zhao – also happens to be Canada’s richest person.But despite his guilty plea to money-laundering charges, the reaction from the crypto industry has been much more muted than when FTX collapsed and its founder, Sam Bankman-Fried, was charged. Ethan Lou is an editor in The Globe’s Report on Business and explains what’s going on and why multiple crypto bosses have been charged recently.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/30/202319 minutes, 37 seconds
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Europe’s far-right is moving into the mainstream

Last week, a far-right party and its controversial leader in the Netherlands won a surprising election victory. This comes on the heels of several other European countries that are seeing far-right parties become more popular.Today, The Globe’s international affairs columnist Doug Saunders explains why we’re seeing this shift to the far-right and what it will mean for European politics.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/29/202321 minutes, 14 seconds
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The historic rise of rental costs in Canada

The latest Consumer Price Index (CPI) numbers revealed what BMO’s chief economist calls the “new villain” of inflation: rent. While inflation is finally cooling for items such as groceries, the price for renting a place to live has increased 8.2 per cent – the largest increase in more than 40 years.Matt Lundy is an economics reporter with The Globe’s Report on Business. He’s on the show to explain why rents keep climbing and whether there’s any relief in sight.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/28/202321 minutes, 24 seconds
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How an Ontario city is taking a new approach to homelessness

As the number of people experiencing homelessness grows in cities across Canada, so too have encampments – groups of people living in tents in parks, under overpasses, wherever they can find space. Some cities have taken aggressive actions to clear out people dwelling in tents – but London, Ont., is taking a different approach.Marcus Gee is a columnist for the Globe, specializing in reporting on cities and the opioid crisis. Today, he explains why London is bringing city services to encampments, and how a compassionate approach is both a test – and potentially a new model – for other municipalities.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/27/202317 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Canadian scientist at the centre of the OpenAI drama

In the span of a week, OpenAI went from being Silicon Valley’s dominant artificial intelligence company, to teetering on the brink of collapse, to a total board overhaul. And at the centre of the drama were two men: Sam Altman, its CEO, and Ilya Sutskever, its Chief Scientist.Report on Business journalist Joe Castaldo explains who Ilya Sutskever is, what his role was in the past week’s chaotic chain of events, and why he is driving to build even smarter AI, despite the risks.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/24/202322 minutes, 29 seconds
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Gaza’s underground tunnels

Israel and Hamas are negotiating a four-day ceasefire which could see the release of up to 50 prisoners being held in Gaza as well as Palestinians currently imprisoned in Israel. Israel said that for every additional 10 hostages freed by Hamas, the truce would be extended by a day.It is widely believed that hostages in Gaza are being held in a system of tunnels underneath the territory. This subterranean network is believed to have existed under Gaza. But how big and connected the tunnels are remains still unclear.Drew Craig is a consultant geologist and a member of the International Working Group on subterranean warfare, based in England. He’s on the show to tell us what we know about the tunnels and how it’s made the strategy of this war even more complicated.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/23/202321 minutes, 16 seconds
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What’s behind the shakeup of Alberta’s health care system

The Alberta government has been announcing several changes coming to the province’s health care – including dismantling the health authority, and putting more decision-making and responsibility into the hands of government.Today, The Globe’s health columnist Andre Picard explains what changes are being proposed, and why he thinks they might not fix the longstanding issues in Alberta’s health care – and could lead to other problems for the province.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/22/202320 minutes, 6 seconds
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A new twist in the two Michaels saga

Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig – known as the two Michaels – were both detained by Chinese authorities on December 10, 2018. That was the start of their 1,020-day imprisonment, in which Beijing accused the men of procuring and sharing Chinese state secrets.Now, two years after their release, one of the Michaels alleges that he was only detained because of information he provided to the other Michael, that was in turn passed onto the Canadian government.Globe and Mail Ottawa Bureau Chief Robert Fife broke the story with colleague Steven Chase. Robert explains the allegations, what the Canadian government is saying now and what this means in the claims of hostage diplomacy between Canada and China.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
11/21/202318 minutes, 12 seconds
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The newest nicotine product to spark old fears

Health Canada recently approved the sale of Zonnic, a nicotine pouch that you pop into your mouth. Even though its maker – Imperial Tobacco Canada – says it’s meant to help people quit smoking, anti-smoking advocates are worried that it will actually get young people addicted to nicotine. This is in part because of how Health Canada is regulating it.Carly Weeks is a health reporter with The Globe and Mail and she explains the details around the regulation of this product and why it’s not being treated like the last nicotine product that got teens hooked, vaping.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
11/20/202320 minutes, 45 seconds
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After 144 years, bringing home remains from a residential school

The Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania was the first government-run residential school in North America. Earlier this fall, the remains of two boys, who died there more than a century ago, were returned to their tribes in South Dakota, over 2,000 kilometres away. It’s a process that took six years — and has only begun the healing and closure to the people who were part of it.Willow Fiddler, a national reporter for the Globe, visited those tribes to find out what it took to bring their boys home. She’s on The Decibel to talk about how the United States is reckoning with its history of boarding schools, and where Canada stands when it comes to repatriating the remains of Indigenous children who died at residential schools.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/17/202322 minutes, 49 seconds
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The life-or-death limbo of the Afghans who helped Canada

Many Afghans waiting to be resettled in Canada have taken refuge in Pakistan since fleeing their homes when the Taliban took control in 2021. That can be a dangerous and difficult situation for them – and now there’s an added concern. The government of Pakistan has begun deporting thousands of people back to Afghanistan.Today, The Globe’s Janice Dickson shares the stories of people she’s spoken with who are in hiding in Pakistan, or who have been deported already. She explains the dangerous limbo they’re in, and why it’s taking so long to get help from the Canadian government.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/16/202321 minutes, 23 seconds
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Qatar’s behind-the-scenes role in the Israel-Hamas war

The Israel-Hamas war is now in its sixth week and fighting is intensifying inside Gaza. On Tuesday, Palestinians trapped inside Gaza’s biggest hospital dug a mass grave to bury patients who died. Israel is encircling the hospital as they believe it sits atop an underground Hamas headquarters.On Monday Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netenyahu said he’s open to “tactical” fighting pauses but not to a ceasefire until the more than 200 Israeli hostages held by Hamas are released. Behind the scenes, intense negotiations are taking place to facilitate the release of these hostages as well as help civilians trapped inside Gaza and a central figure in these talks is Qatar.Kristian Coates Ulrichsen is the Fellow for the Middle East at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy in Houston Texas. He’s on the show to explain why this tiny Gulf nation is acting as mediator in the Israel-Hamas war.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/15/202320 minutes, 23 seconds
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How climate change clues are frozen in glaciers

There is a glacier that sits a kilometer below the highest peak within B.C.’s border, called Combatant Col. Scientists have been working on its icy surface to pull out ice cores as quickly as they can. Locked within these smooth cylinders are clues about what the region’s climate was like years ago that could help us understand today’s climate challenges.Justine Hunter is a Globe reporter based in B.C. and she explains how researchers get these precious time capsules off the top of the mountain and what scientific secrets they are looking for once the cores are safely stored in a very cold lab in Edmonton, Alta..Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/14/202320 minutes
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Quebec targets out-of-province students with big tuition hikes

The reality of Quebec’s law to protect the French language is setting in, especially for the province’s three English language universities. Out-of-province students are facing a tuition hike that could see their fees go up from about $9,000 a year to $17,000… among the highest fees in the country.Joe Friesen, The Globe’s post-secondary education reporter, joins the podcast to explain what’s driving the province’s push and whether Anglophone schools students are headed for financial disaster.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/13/202318 minutes, 15 seconds
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Canada’s broken information laws keep history in the dark

It can be incredibly frustrating trying to get access to historical records in Canada. There are often lengthy delays and confusing inconsistency. That’s in large part because Canada’s historical records are tied up in our access to information system, which has a lot of problems.The Globe’s investigative reporter Robyn Doolittle has been reporting on the country’s struggling access to information system through the Secret Canada project. Today, she explains why it’s so difficult to access records that are decades – even centuries – old, and why it’s so important that we can see what happened in the past.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/10/202323 minutes, 25 seconds
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What students think about the parents’ rights movement

A movement which first gained traction in Republican States in the U.S. is taking root in Canada. “Parents’ rights” is the idea that parents should have more control over what’s being taught and talked about in Canadian schools – particularly when it comes to gender identity and sexual education.Saskatchewan and New Brunswick have recently adopted policies in which students under 16 would need parental consent to change their pronouns at school. Alberta premier, Danielle Smith and Ontario premier, Doug Ford have also mused about the importance of parental rights inside classrooms. At the heart of this are the students, whose voices are often missed in all the noise of this heated debate.Education reporter, Caroline Alphonso and National news reporter, Zosia Bielski spoke to some students about the movement. We hear from some of them and learn about what’s behind this movement in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/9/202321 minutes
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Canada’s billion-dollar wine industry is changing. Here’s why

Weather in Canada is becoming more erratic thanks to climate change – we’re seeing cold snaps, severe thunder and hail storms, and wildfires. That’s having a big impact on Canada’s wine industry. Today, The Globe’s wine writer Christopher Waters joins us to explain what’s going on in the industry, how that’s impacting the wines themselves, and why it’s such an important industry to pay attention to – and we even try some wines, for research, of course.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/8/202320 minutes, 50 seconds
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Why the ‘lottery’ of Canadian immigration undermines the system

Canadian immigration minister Marc Miller announced the intentions of the government in its new set of targets: while the number of permanent residents being welcomed has grown annually, starting in 2026, there will be a freeze at 500,000. This update comes at same time as the latest polls indicate that Canadians are souring on immigration. But the change may not actually address the heart of the problem of why pressure is being exerted on the immigration system. Campbell Clark, The Globe’s chief political writer, joins the show to explain how the immigration system works – and why the federal government’s policies are failing current and hopeful Canadians.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/7/202322 minutes, 6 seconds
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The battle over the future of the Banff arts centre

There has been turmoil at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, and it recently came to the public’s attention when the Alberta government dismissed the entire board in late October. The whirlwind drama started with the search for a new CEO, which led to arguments of conflict of interest and allegations of bullying and harassment.Today, The Globe’s Alanna Smith and Josh O’Kane, who have been covering this story, explain what led to this moment, and tell us about the battle for the future of the Banff Centre.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/6/202318 minutes, 23 seconds
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A ‘balance of terror’: The geopolitics of the Israel-Hamas war

Israeli tanks and troops that entered Gaza on Friday are now focusing on encircling Gaza City – the population hub of the northern part of the strip. This comes after Benjamin Netanyahu’s announcement on Saturday that Israel had entered a “long and difficult” new stage of the war. He stopped short of calling this new phase an all-out invasion, but airstrikes have escalated along with an advancing ground incursion.This strategy could have further implications for the region, and Israel’s allies in the West – including Canada – will be looking to figure out their parts in this ongoing war.Thomas Juneau is on the show to help us understand this next phase of the war and what it could mean geopolitically. He’s an associate professor at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs whose research focuses on the Middle East as well as Canadian foreign and defence policy.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
11/3/202320 minutes, 29 seconds
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Premiers attack Trudeau after carbon tax carve-out

Last week, Justin Trudeau announced an exemption for the carbon price on home-heating oil. The majority of homes that use home-heating oil are in Atlantic Canada. Premiers in other provinces, like Saskatchewan and Alberta, say that’s not fair – and are demanding carve-outs for heating fuel in their provinces too.Marieke Walsh is a senior political reporter for the Globe. She’s on the show to talk about why Trudeau would soften his signature climate policy and what political machinations are at play behind the scenes.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
11/2/202321 minutes, 1 second
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Voices inside Gaza and Israel, in the ‘second stage’ of war

Over the weekend, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that Israel was entering the “second stage” of the war with Hamas. Since then, the Israeli Defense Forces knocked out communication for people living in Gaza for two days, intensified their airstrikes, and started a sustained ground incursion by sending tanks and infantry into northern Gaza.The escalation has intensified international calls for a ceasefire. Meanwhile, In Israel, families of those taken hostage by Hamas are calling on the Israeli government to bring back their loved ones.In today’s episode, we bring you voices of those surviving inside the Israel-Hamas war and how things have changed in this new phase of the conflict. You’ll hear from civilians in Gaza, emergency workers, aid officials and people in Israel who are mourning their loved ones or pleading for their safe return.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
11/1/202318 minutes, 15 seconds
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Who is Canada’s new Supreme Court justice?

The Supreme Court has been missing a judge ever since Russell Brown resigned in June over allegations of improper conduct. On Oct. 26, Trudeau announced his nomination to replace Justice Brown – Mary Moreau, the Chief Justice of the Alberta Court of King’s Bench.With this pick – Trudeau’s sixth – the Supreme Court of Canada becomes majority women, for the first time. The Globe’s justice reporter Sean Fine joins us to talk about what Moreau will bring to the court, and why it might have taken so long to fill the seat.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/31/202317 minutes, 23 seconds
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Indigo turns to a familiar face after a turbulent year

There have been a lot of challenges for Canada’s biggest book retailer, Indigo. There was a massive cyber attack. The CEO and president left. The board had four directors leave. And now, to turn the page, its founder, Heather Reisman, has returned to be its CEO after her succession plan didn’t work out.Susan Krashinsky Robertson is The Globe’s retailing reporter and she has been closely following all the developments at this company that plays a big part into whether Canadian authors are successful or not.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
10/30/202321 minutes, 6 seconds
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The drama over Alberta’s plan to exit the Canada Pension Plan

Alberta has a controversial idea that is causing a stir with other provinces and the federal government: exiting the Canada Pension Plan. Alberta says if they exit, they’re entitled to more $330-billion of the assets that are collected from every worker and employer in the country outside of Quebec. Ontario’s finance minister says the plan risks “serious harm” for retirees across the country. Deputy Prime Minister and finance minister Chrystia Freeland has agreed to meet with provincial and territorial counterparts to discuss the CPP’s future. Kelly Cryderman is a Globe reporter and columnist based in Calgary and she’s on the show to explain why Alberta wants out, the political ramifications and what it could mean for the rest of Canada. Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/27/202319 minutes, 16 seconds
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Bed bugs are everywhere, here’s why

Bed bugs are pretty much everywhere. They’re being spotted in major cities like Paris, London and even Toronto now. They’ve been found in 135 countries in the world, according to a recent study, and they can live in mattresses, couches, walls, lightswitches, even books. For a while, we were doing well at keeping the bed bugs in check, but not anymore.Murray Isman, a professor and dean emeritus at UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems, explains how bed bugs became so prevalent, and why they’re so good at sticking around.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/26/202319 minutes, 46 seconds
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The Rafah border crossing’s significance for Gaza

The Rafah crossing – the sole entry point between Egypt and Gaza – remains a political, diplomatic and humanitarian tinderbox. While Egypt has kept the border firmly closed to Gazan refugees fleeing from the Israel-Hamas war, it has allowed an aid corridor for several dozen trucks delivering food, water and medical supplies. But relief workers say the aid is ‘insufficient’ for people’s needs in Gaza and Israel is not allowing fuel in despite pleas from aid groups.Geoffrey York, foreign correspondent for The Globe, talks about the crisis developing at the border and why it’s been so difficult to get things through and how Egypt’s relationship with Gaza and Israel plays into the situation.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
10/25/202319 minutes, 40 seconds
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The class and cultural divides from French immersion

French immersion has become a cornerstone in Canadian education. One in 10 Canadian students are now enrolled in the program, as numbers doubled through the 1990s. But it has also inadvertently created a cultural and class divide – with some parents and students feeling like they’re getting left behind.Caroline Alphonso, The Globe’s education reporter, is the parent of two French immersion students and has reported on how the language program is dividing schools, why it exists and how parental power is shaping bilingual education in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/24/202317 minutes, 7 seconds
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Supreme Court sides with Alberta on federal environmental law

As Canada tries to figure out its path forward in combating climate change, the question of which level of government is allowed to do what has become a sticking point in the courts. Most recently, the government of Alberta asked the Supreme Court to rule on whether a piece of federal environmental legislation was offside.The court’s decision was a surprise to both sides. So The Globe’s climate change columnist Adam Radwanski will explain what was in the ruling and why it now has some questioning the power of the federal government to lower greenhouse gas emissions.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/23/202319 minutes, 8 seconds
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How AI influences the food we’re eating

Could your next favourite foods be created by a robot? While artificial intelligence has long been used in the production and assembly lines of food, some companies are now turning to AI to create new kinds of food, recipes and combinations that the human brain hasn’t conceived of before.Ann Hui, the Globe’s demographics reporter and former food reporter, joins the show to talk about this new frontier of food creation and the vital question of: does it taste good?Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/20/202321 minutes
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The threat of Hezbollah joining the Israel-Hamas war

Hezbollah, the Iran-backed militant group based in Lebanon, is seen as a serious threat to the Israel-Hamas war. There are fears the group, considered the most powerful non-state actor in the world, could dramatically escalate the conflict if it joins the fight against Israel.Nathan Vanderklippe, international correspondent for the Globe, is on the show to explain Hezbollah’s influence, its ties to Hamas and how Lebanon factors into potentially being swept up in the war.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/19/202320 minutes, 44 seconds
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High interest rates and The Bank of Canada, explained

With inflation still stubbornly high, it seems like interest rates could remain elevated for quite some time. And the stress of that has some Canadians wondering who gets to make these big economic decisions.Report on Business columnist David Parkinson explains the relationship between the Bank of Canada and the federal government, how interest rates are set and what changes might be worth considering when it comes to changing how Canada’s central bank works.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/18/202320 minutes, 30 seconds
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The controversy over lowering the age of breast cancer screening

In Canada, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. It’s the second leading cause of death from cancer in Canadian women and second most common cancer in the country. Currently, guidelines say that screening should begin at the age of 50, but the task force in charge of these recommendations might lower the age to 40. And that has re-ignited a heated debate. Carly Weeks is the Globe’s health reporter. She’s on the show to explain why there’s advocates for and against this change – why some see it as a way to save more lives and others see it as causing more harm than good. Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected] 
10/17/202319 minutes, 11 seconds
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Inside the Israel-Gaza war zone

Warning: this episode contains descriptions of violenceHundreds of thousands of people have fled south in Gaza after Israel told 1.1 million people living in the northern part of the Gaza Strip to evacuate. Israel is expected to begin a significant ground offensive soon. As of Sunday evening, 150 Canadians are stuck in Gaza, hoping to flee to neighbouring Egypt.Israel has called up more than 360,000 reservists and has amassed tanks and troops at the Gaza border. This comes after Hamas’ surprise deadly attack in areas across Israel on October 7th. Since the conflict began, more than 3,600 have been killed on both sides, many of them civilians.Mark Mackinnon is on the show. He’s the Globe’s Senior International Correspondent and he’s been travelling through the region since the war began.Editor’s note: On this episode of The Decibel, Mark MacKinnon stated that in 2005, Israelis demolished greenhouses in Gaza. A detail omitted from that comment is that half the land occupied by greenhouses remained after Israelis withdrew from the area in the summer of that year. The remaining greenhouses were later damaged and looted by Palestinians.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected] 
10/16/202322 minutes, 13 seconds
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The influence of the U.S. on the Israel-Hamas war

When Hamas attacked Israel on Oct. 7, the U.S. was among the first nations to firmly side with Israel, pledging unequivocal support. The U.S. has historically been a staunch supporter of Israel, but this particular conflict has a different dimension due to the fact that some Americans and Canadians are among the hostages Hamas kidnapped.Adrian Morrow is The Globe’s Washington correspondent and he explains the geopolitical strategy of the Biden administration in response to the ongoing war, as the possibility of a military ground offensive into the Gaza Strip by the Israeli army grows.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
10/13/202321 minutes, 19 seconds
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The Decibel presents: In Her Defence

In Her Defence, a new podcast series from The Globe and Mail, tells the story of Helen Nasland, in her words for the first time. Through a series of jailhouse interviews with The Globe’s Jana G. Pruden, Naslund speaks about the domestic violence she suffered and what led to a fateful night – that led to the murder of her husband. Naslund’s story and harsh sentencing captured the attention and outrage of tens of thousands of Canadians, asking what is fair punishment when a victim becomes the accused. This series dives into her fight for freedom and how the justice and legal systems deal with women who kill their abusers.If you’re experiencing intimate partner violence, you can find resources and your nearest shelterat sheltersafe.ca.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/12/202336 minutes, 26 seconds
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The problems with how government contracts get outsourced

The RCMP has begun an investigation into allegations of misconduct made by two tech entrepreneurs. Their warnings to senior officials and experiences have cast a new light on alleged improper contracting practices and close ties between public services and private consultants.Bill Curry, the Globe’s Deputy Ottawa Bureau Chief, joins the show to break down the allegations that throw into question the accountability of the federal government’s multi-billion dollar practice of outsourcing and where taxpayer money is ending up.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/11/202319 minutes, 10 seconds
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War erupts between Israel and Hamas

Warning: This episode contains descriptions of violenceOn Saturday, Hamas, the Palestinian Islamist group, launched one of the largest and deadliest attacks on Israel in decades. Militants stormed past borders on the Gaza Strip, killed civilians in nearby towns and took an unknown number of Israeli hostages. In retaliation, Israel formally declared war on Hamas and sent airstrikes into Gaza. In a single weekend, 900 are dead in Israel and close to 700 in Gaza have been killed.Emily Rose, Reuters correspondent in Jerusalem, joins the show to break down the attacks as they unfolded, Israel’s response and where the war could be headed next.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/10/202318 minutes, 38 seconds
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How Canadian-made PAW Patrol took over kids’ entertainment

For over a decade now, the rescue pups of PAW Patrol have been an obsession for toddlers around the world. And now, the box office is responding too — last week, its second feature film had the largest opening for a Canadian movie in more than a decade. This kids franchise is a big business. And it’s Canadian.Barry Hertz is the Globe’s deputy Arts editor and Film editor. And he is on the show to talk about the recent success of PAW Patrol: The Mighty Movie and how a Canadian toy company struck gold with this brand.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
10/6/202320 minutes, 22 seconds
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A dropped case and the slow reckoning of the Canadian military

The trial of Lieutenant-General Steven Whelan began in late September. Only a week later, it was over, with the case before a court martial dropped. Two charges of misconduct were brought against Whelan under the National Defence Act in December 2021.Whelan’s case highlights the long reckoning against some of Canada’s top military officials, who have been accused of improper conduct and sexual assault. The Globe’s senior political reporter Marieke Walsh joins the show to talk about the case and why questions over the military’s culture continue with every new trial.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
10/5/202320 minutes, 43 seconds
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Catch and release: the revolving door of violent repeat offenders

In less than a decade, Mohammed Majidpour has racked up more than 30 offences in Vancouver. His crimes include theft, robbery, dangerous driving and numerous violent attacks on strangers. Recently, he pleaded guilty to his 11th assault on a stranger and, after spending almost a year in a pre-trial detention centre, was sentenced to a single day in prison. This is the 14th time he’s received a single-day prison sentence.Mike Hager is a reporter in The Globe’s B.C. bureau in Vancouver. He’s on the show to tell us how common Mohammed’s situation is in B.C. and why critics say it’s a symptom of deeper problems in the province’s corrections system.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
10/4/202320 minutes, 33 seconds
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How a group of Buddhist monks bought up a chunk of PEI

Over the past few years, the Buddhist organization Bliss and Wisdom has been buying up several parcels of land in PEI. So much so, residents have begun to question how their acquisitions are legal in a province with strict rules around how much land individuals and organizations can own. Meanwhile, the monks insist they haven’t broken any rules.Investigative reporter Greg Mercer explains how some legislative loopholes have created a conflict in the eastern part of the province.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
10/3/202320 minutes, 21 seconds
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Ukrainian refugees fled to Poland. Now thousands are leaving

When Russia invaded Ukraine back in February 2022, millions of Ukrainians fled the country. Many went to the neighbouring country of Poland, which welcomed hundreds of thousands of refugees. But now, things are changing, in part because of a contentious election in Poland. Thousands of Ukrainians are now leaving Poland, and setting up their lives somewhere else.Today, The Globe’s European Correspondent Paul Waldie tells us why tensions between Poland and Ukraine are growing and why support for Ukrainians fleeing the war is waning.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
10/2/202321 minutes, 4 seconds
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Can a 4 billion year-old asteroid reveal the origins of life?

A capsule from the NASA spacecraft, Osiris-REx recently landed in a Utah desert after spending seven years in space. Inside the capsule is a sample from a more than 4 billion year-old asteroid named, Bennu. And it could answer some of the biggest questions about our existence.The Globe’s Science Reporter, Ivan Semeniuk is on the show to tell us about why this mission is so important and what this asteroid might tell us about how our solar system was formed and what exactly makes earth habitable.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/29/202320 minutes, 15 seconds
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A Dollarama executive, a luxury home and a World Heritage site

Saint Lucia is known for its natural beauty, but the most iconic part of the island is along its southwest shore. Twin volcanic peaks – called the Pitons – rise up out of the ocean. The UNESCO World Heritage site is featured on postcards, literature, and even the Saint Lucian flag.They are also the site of a controversy involving a Dollarama executive who is trying to expand his luxury home on the mountainside. Investigative reporter Tavia Grant explains how this Canada-based businessman’s development exposed a lack of protections for this iconic site.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/28/202317 minutes, 16 seconds
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Why it’s so hard to bring food prices down

The federal government has been facing intense pressure to reduce the cost of food, as food inflation remains much higher than overall inflation. Some measures have been brought in, but many experts question whether they’ll actually be effective.Michael Von Massow, a food economist and professor at the University of Guelph, joins us to talk about why food prices are still so high, what role the government has, and why this is such a difficult problem to solve.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/27/202320 minutes, 29 seconds
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Will 3.45 million new homes solve Canada’s housing crisis?

A recent report from Canada’s federal housing agency, CMHC says we need 3.45 million new homes built by 2030 in order to reduce skyrocketing housing costs. Supply has long been an issue especially in the expensive markets of Toronto and Vancouver. But, is it possible for Canada to ramp up construction so drastically and what happens if we don’t?The Globe’s Real Estate Reporter, Rachelle Younglai, is on the show today for a reality check on what can fix Canada’s housing crisis.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/26/202316 minutes, 44 seconds
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What’s behind the delays in Canada’s courts?

Canada’s judicial system is a bit of a mess right now. Cases are piling up. Staff aren’t showing up to work. And there aren’t enough judges. Even the Supreme Court of Canada has an unfilled vacancy currently.Sean Fine is The Globe’s justice writer and he explains what factors are contributing to the various delays in courts and how if they aren’t dealt with soon, some people may never face justice.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/25/202321 minutes, 7 seconds
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Introducing: In Her Defence, a new true crime podcast

Follow In Her Defence wherever you get your podcasts. The first two episodes drop Tuesday, October 10th.Everyone knew bad things were happening on the Naslund farm. Then, in the fall of 2017, Miles Naslund’s body was found welded into a box at the bottom of a pond near his family’s property in Alberta, Canada. His wife and son were charged with first-degree murder.The Globe and Mail’s newest podcast In Her Defence brings you Helen Naslund’s story in her own words for the first time. Through a series of jailhouse interviews with reporter Jana G. Pruden, Helen speaks about the domestic violence she suffered, and what led to that fateful night on the farm. Meanwhile, Helen’s friends come to terms with the abuse they suspected had been going on for decades, and the reality that Helen could spend the rest of her life in prison.Tens of thousands of Canadians joined the outcry over Helen’s harsh sentence, asking what is fair punishment when a victim becomes the accused. Now they’ll hear firsthand about Helen’s life, her long fight for freedom, and the way the justice and legal systems deal with women who kill their abusers.
9/22/20232 minutes, 47 seconds
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The view from India after allegations of killing in Canada

Canada’s relationship with India has been rocky for years, but it’s at a particular low point right now after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accused agents of the Indian government this week of killing Sikh activist Hardeep Singh Nijjar in B.C.Today, the Globe’s Asia correspondent James Griffiths joins us from New Delhi, India to discuss how this news is playing out there, why the relationship with Canada – and Trudeau in particular – has struggled, and the power India has in this moment.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
9/22/202321 minutes, 44 seconds
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Your Ontario Greenbelt questions, answered

Ever since Ontario Premier Doug Ford said he would open up parcels of land in the environmentally protected Greenbelt, there’s been drama. From revelations of developers having ties to the Ford government, to probes from Ontario’s auditor-general and integrity commissioner, to resignations including one from Ford’s cabinet.With all the twists and turns of this story, we wanted to answer questions listeners have about what’s going on with this land. Today on the show, The Globe’s Ontario provincial politics reporter, Jeff Gray joins us to answer your burning Greenbelt questions.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
9/21/202321 minutes, 45 seconds
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Trudeau accuses India of involvement in Canadian’s murder

The murder of Hardeep Singh Nijjar left Canada’s Sikh community with a lot of questions. On Monday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gave them a possible answer: he alleged that the Indian government was involved in Mr. Nijjar’s death. India was quick to deny any involvement.Ottawa Bureau Chief Robert Fife discovered this information before the official announcement on Monday. And he is on the show to explain the allegations and how they fit into Canada’s complex relations with India.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/20/202320 minutes, 22 seconds
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Coup contagion – why Africa’s had nine coups in three years

There have been nine coups in seven African countries over the past three years – some analysts have called it a coup contagion, the Secretary-General of the UN called it a coup epidemic. Each country has its own circumstances, but there are common factors linking them.Geoff York, The Globe’s Africa Bureau Chief, joins us to explain why so many countries are facing coups, what it means for the people of those countries, and what role other countries like Russia, China and the US have in what’s going on.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/19/202321 minutes, 20 seconds
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A Trudeau-Poilievre showdown as Parliament resumes

Parliament is back for the fall session and it returns with a surprising shift in the political dynamic. Conservative Leader, Pierre Poilievre is riding high in several polls. And the Liberals are busy making housing announcements to show they are working on the affordability crisis facing so many Canadians today. Meanwhile, the NDP will be looking to push their agenda forward on dental care pharmacare this fall.The Globe’s Deputy Ottawa Bureau Chief Bill Curry joins us on the show. He’ll tell us what’s ahead for the leaders and their parties and three things to pay attention to during the coming session.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
9/18/202319 minutes, 13 seconds
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Lessons from the massive daycare E.Coli outbreak in Calgary

Hundreds of people are sick and dozens are in the hospital in Calgary, after one of Canada’s worst outbreaks of E.Coli in kids ever. Some cases have left children hospitalized, leaving parents scared, frustrated and angry.Dave McGinn has been following the outbreak for The Globe. Today, he’ll tell us what warning signs might have been missed from the kitchen suspected to be at the centre of the outbreak, and how this fits into concerns around childcare in Canada more broadly.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/15/202320 minutes, 46 seconds
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A multi-billion dollar bet on natural gas

Enbridge Inc. has become North America’s largest natural gas utility after acquiring three U.S. utilities for US$9.4-billiondollars. It’s a big bet on the role that natural gas is going to play in the future as governments try to transition the economy off of fossil fuels.Emma Graney is The Globe and Mail’s energy reporter. She has been covering the deal and explains how this fits into the wider picture of the energy industry in Canada, as well as our emission reduction targets.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
9/14/202319 minutes, 37 seconds
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What you need to know about COVID this fall

The COVID-19 fall surge is upon us. But this year it’s different. Cases are rising again in Canada, reversing a trend from when cases were decreasing for most of 2023. And once again, there are new variants circulating.The Globe’s National Health Reporter Kelly Grant explains why we’re seeing a rise, what the Canadian government and public health experts say we should do about it, including when new boosters are available this fall.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/13/202321 minutes, 13 seconds
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Australia resolved its news standoff with Meta. Could Canada?

Most people in Canada haven’t been able to view or post news content on Facebook or Instagram for over a month now. That’s because Meta – the company that owns both platforms – is protesting a new law that aims to get big tech companies to pay for news content appearing on its feeds.But this move isn’t without precedent. In 2021, Meta also blocked news in Australia because of similar legislation. The Australian government came to an agreement with the company – but not without some big concessions.James Meese is a senior lecturer at Melbourne’s RMIT University who researches media law and policy. He’s on the show to tell us what happened in Australia, how the legislation is working two years later and what Canada can learn from Australia’s experience.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/12/202321 minutes
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The first criminal trial for ‘Freedom Convoy’ leaders

Tamara Lich and Chris Barber were at the forefront of the convoy protest that rolled into Ottawa on Jan. 29, 2022. As leaders, they encouraged supporters blocking the downtown to both ‘hold the line’ and protest peacefully. On Feb. 17, 2022, they were arrested. Now they are standing trial for their actions.Kristy Kirkup is a parliamentary reporter for the Globe and she went to the first week of their trial. She explains why this trial is expected to uncover new details about the convoy protest and catches us up on what happened in the opening days.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/11/202320 minutes, 23 seconds
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How international students became big business for schools

In 2012, nine out of 10 students at Kitchener’s Conestoga College were domestic. Today, they have more international students than any institution across the country … almost as many as the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia combined. This year, Canada is on track to bring in 900,000 international students.Globe postsecondary reporter Joe Friesen joins us to discuss how Canada’s international student population has grown so quickly, and why institutions have grown to depend on them – especially in Ontario.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/8/202322 minutes, 25 seconds
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Canada’s wildfires dwarf emissions from all other industries

This year’s wildfire season has broken all kinds of records – including on emissions. Canada’s wildfires have doubled previous records for greenhouse gas emissions – and they’ve caused more emissions than all of Canada’s industries combined.Dr. Werner Kurz, a senior research scientist with the Canadian Forest Service, explains how these wildfires are changing Canada’s forests, what it means for Canada’s emissions and how we can lessen the damage from wildfire seasons in the future.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/7/202321 minutes, 7 seconds
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What are schools doing to help youth mental health?

It’s back-to-school week for young people across the country. And despite bringing back full in-class learning three years since the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, students continue to experience and report mental-health issues.Dr. Deinera Exner-Cortens is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary. She is going to talk to us about how we can be better at a policy level and in schools to help kids needing more mental-health support.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/6/202318 minutes, 35 seconds
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Are small, family-run businesses dying in Canada?

Small business owners are, on average, older than the Canadian population. That means that in the next ten years 75% of them are retiring, according to estimates from the federal government.So what happens to their businesses? Chris Hannay covers small business for the Globe and he joins us to discuss how these retirements could lead to a wave of consolidation of enterprise in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
9/5/202316 minutes, 8 seconds
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The dark side of collagen

Collagen supplements are marketed as a holy grail anti-aging product. Bovine collagen is made from cattle hides, and a new investigation from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism traced the supply chain of some collagen companies all the way to deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon.Elisângela Mendonça is a London-based Brazilian journalist with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. Her reporting pulls back the curtain on the dark side of the booming collagen industry.This episode originally aired on March 27, 2023.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
9/1/202320 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ford government targets school lands to build housing

Ontario Premier Doug Ford has a clear housing goal. He wants to build 1.5 million new homes in 10 years. To accomplish this, his government has been looking at selling off the land under its possession, such as the Greenbelt, which has been engulfed in scandal.Now his government is looking at the lands owned by school boards across the province. Globe and Mail reporter Karen Howlett explains what the plan is and how the Ford government intends to execute it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/31/202319 minutes, 53 seconds
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How a former Libyan dictator’s money ended up in Canada

Moammar Gadhafi, former Libyan dictator, has had billions sitting in Canadian bank accounts for almost 12 years after his death. This has caused further investigations and questions in terms of what this means for the Canadian banking sector.Rita Trichur is The Globe’s Senior Business Writer and Columnist joins us to discuss Gadhafi, his family, and all of his money sitting in Canadian banks.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/30/202320 minutes, 41 seconds
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New details emerge about Montreal’s deadliest fire in decades

On Monday, Montreal police said the Old Montreal fire that killed seven people in March 2023 is now being treated as a criminal investigation. Alongside police looking into persons of interest in the case, the Globe’s Montreal-based reporter Frédérik-Xavier Duhamel reported on the many safety violations in the burned-out building that Montreal and Quebec officials had known about for more than a decade. He uncovered a moratorium on enforcing evacuation route violations that had been in place since 2018, which were quietly lifted in the days after the fire.His investigations are trying to answer: how did this happen and who is ultimately responsible for the deaths of seven victims and the safety of Montrealers?Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/29/202320 minutes, 2 seconds
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What happens for Tibet when the Dalai Lama dies

Tibet used to be a prominent focus of international attention, but that isn’t the case anymore as less and less information comes out of the region. But things are still very difficult for Tibetans as China cracks down. The Dalai Lama – who is the spiritual leader of Tibet – is 88, and there are concerns about what will happen for Tibet and its people when he eventually dies.Today, The Globe’s James Griffiths tells us about the situation in Tibet and those who have fled, and how Tibetans are thinking about the future of their community.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/28/202320 minutes, 38 seconds
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Why storms are more destructive now

There are a lot of serious storms these days, and those storms are causing more and more damage, as residents of California are seeing this week in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Hilary.The storms we are seeing in Canada are changing – but not how you might expect. David Sills, a severe storms specialist and executive director of the Northern Tornadoes Project at Western University, explains what changes he’s seeing in storms, how prepared we are to handle the damage from them, and the connection one of these storms has to a producer here at The Decibel.This episode originally aired on September 14, 2022.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/25/202321 minutes, 34 seconds
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An ex-RCMP officer, a real estate tycoon and Operation Fox Hunt

Back in July, a former RCMP officer was charged with conducting foreign interference on behalf of China. We now know more about what the RCMP is accusing this officer of doing. And it involves a real estate tycoon, a “hired gun”, and a campaign called Operation Fox Hunt.Steven Chase, senior parliamentary reporter for the Globe, explains.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/24/202318 minutes, 54 seconds
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The problem with building more housing

Canada needs a lot of housing – and the Liberal government is making this a priority at their cabinet retreat this week. But there are concerns that if we keep building new homes using current materials and practices, it could lead to a spike in our greenhouse gas emissions.Luigi Ferrara is the chair and CEO of the Brookfield Sustainability Institute, which looked into this issue. Today, he tells us why current building practices cause high emissions, and how homes could be built differently – and retrofitted – to become more sustainable.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/23/202320 minutes, 38 seconds
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What it’s like to escape from wildfires

As wildfires rage on across the country, more than 50,000 people have been forced out of their homes in Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories and West Kelowna in British Columbia within the past week. And each one of those people have had to make life-changing decisions: Should you leave your home? What do you take with you? What might you never see again?Today, we hear those stories from Canadians on the move from fire-afflicted communities, told to the Globe’s reporters, including Alanna Smith, Mark Rendell and Mike Hager.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
8/22/202316 minutes, 53 seconds
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Where’s that recession? Why it’s still too early to celebrate

Fears of a recession have been looming since the worst days of the pandemic. And as inflation continues its slow but steady ascent, central banks around the world have tried to increase interest rates to cool things down. It’s easy to think that all of this means we might actually have avoided the worst.But Report on Business columnist and reporter Tim Kiladze says it’s too early to declare victory: we may not actually have achieved that mythical “soft landing” after all. He’s watching a few warning signs that could spell economic trouble for us later.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
8/21/202318 minutes, 17 seconds
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Connie Walker’s latest investigation: Her own family's history

Journalist Connie Walker has been reporting on Indigenous stories for most of her career. From missing and murdered women to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, she has covered on some of the biggest stories in Canada in the last few decades. But it wasn’t until last year that she decided to look into her own family’s past. The urge to dig into her deceased father’s past appeared after her brother shared a story in the wake of the discovery of 215 unmarked graves at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in B.C. Connie talks about the importance of healing through sharing the truths, what she found out about her own family’s secrets and her new podcast, Stolen: Surviving St. Michael’s.This episode originally aired on May 24, 2022.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/18/202319 minutes, 51 seconds
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A reality check on the fertility promises of egg-freezing

Elective egg freezing is on the rise in Canada. Fertility clinics pitch it as a kind of insurance policy: put your eggs in the bank now, and you can come back for them later, when you’re ready to have a baby. But the procedure is invasive, expensive, and doesn’t guarantee a successful pregnancy later on.Alison Motluk, freelance journalist and writer of the newsletter, Hey Reprotech, is on the show to talk about what’s really involved in egg freezing. Read more about why she’s sounding a note of caution around the procedure here.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/17/202319 minutes, 3 seconds
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Dispatch calls reveal chaos of deadly floods in Nova Scotia

In the early hours of July 22, chaos was erupting in Nova Scotia. Rain was pouring down, causing intense flooding. People were panicked about whether to stay or leave their homes. Emergency crews were overwhelmed. In the end, four people died in the floods.A series of radio calls made between one volunteer fire department and the emergency dispatch provide a glimpse into when and how things unfolded that night. They also raise questions as to why it took officials almost two hours to issue an emergency alert with instructions to shelter in place.Lindsay Jones is the Globe’s Atlantic Canada reporter, based in Halifax. She has gone from covering wildfires to floods and is on the show to go through what we’ve learned in the weeks since the fatal flooding.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/16/202321 minutes, 23 seconds
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The unknown health impacts of cannabis smoke

It has been five years since the legalization of cannabis in Canada but we still know very little about health impacts from cannabis smoke. Almost no research has been done, despite government promises, so scientists and experts say we need more data so consumers can make an informed decision.Jameson Berkow is a reporter for the Globe who has covered the cannabis industry extensively. He’s on the show today to explain why this knowledge gap exists and how we can close it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/15/202318 minutes, 13 seconds
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Ford accused of playing favourites in Greenbelt plans

On Wednesday, Ontario’s Auditor-General, Bonnie Lysyk released an investigative report into the province’s decision to open up 3,000 hectares of its protected Greenbelt area for development. The Ford government claims this will be beneficial for the housing crisis but her report found that they have a different agenda.Jeff Gray is a Queen’s Park reporter for The Globe and Mail and he will be talking to us about the problems around the Greenbelt plan and where the Ford government went wrong.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/14/202317 minutes, 51 seconds
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Why we need parasites

You’re never far from a parasite, no matter where you are. They’re responsible for illnesses like malaria that cause death around much of the world; the word itself is a derogatory term for something freeloading and disgusting.They’re also very important to the health of ecosystems.Parasite ecologist and University of Washington associate professor Chelsea Wood makes her case for parasite conservation, and why they’re actually complex forms of life that need to be protected.This episode originally aired on August 16, 2022.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/11/202314 minutes, 3 seconds
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The hunt for dark matter, two kilometres under Sudbury

No one really knows what dark matter is. We just think it exists. And we believe it makes up 85 per cent of all mass in the universe. So how do you solve the mystery of something that is currently unknowable?Enter SNOLAB. This underground, clean lab is located in Sudbury, Ontario, and researchers there are running experiments to try to solve this cosmic query. Decibel producer Madeleine White, along with Globe science reporter Ivan Semeniuk, go two kilometres underground to visit SNOLAB and bring you up to date on the lab’s quest to discover dark matter.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/10/202323 minutes, 22 seconds
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The evolutionary advantage of curly hair

Curly hair often gets a bad reputation for being too high maintenance but research has shown that it plays an important role in our evolutions – and even our brains.Dr. Tina Lasisi, a biological anthropologist who focuses on studying the evolution and genetics of human hair and skin, will talk to us about the importance of curly hair.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/9/202319 minutes, 37 seconds
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How we search for planets that could host life

The James Webb Space Telescope has been getting some of the most detailed information and images from space since it launched a year and a half ago. And soon, there’s going to be a big boost in research on exoplanets – planets outside of our solar system – particularly ones that might be able to host life.Dr. Heidi White is an astrophysicist and science communicator with the Trottier Institute for Research on Exoplanets at the University of Montreal, which is one of the groups that will be using the telescope to study exoplanets. She tells us about the bizarre and fascinating planets that have already been discovered, and how close we are to finding life beyond Earth.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
8/8/202320 minutes, 1 second
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How two Canadian women were switched at birth

In September 1969, two baby girls were born in a tiny hospital in rural Newfoundland, a few hours apart. A simple accident led to both of their lives being changed forever.Over 50 years later, the truth serendipitously revealed itself and their lives changed again. Journalist Lindsay Jones unravels the mystery of how these two women were switched at birth.This episode originally aired on September 26, 2022.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/4/202319 minutes, 39 seconds
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What we get wrong about bears

Western preconceived notions about bears being deadly have led to dire consequences for bears. But the relationship and safety around bears is different with Indigenous communities and wildlife conservation groups, which have long learned how to coexist with the big mammals.We are joined by Joy SpearChief-Morris, a staff reporter with The Globe and Mail. She’s going to break down bear misconceptions and tell us how to respect bears when you encounter them.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/3/202317 minutes, 51 seconds
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Sex abuse allegations at the Calgary Stampede

An ongoing class-action lawsuit against the Calgary Stampede alleges that for decades the organization did not properly protect children from a sexual predator.Carrie Tait is a reporter for The Globe’s Calgary bureau and she explains what’s behind the case.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/2/202322 minutes, 48 seconds
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Why ticks – and Lyme disease – are spreading further north

Ticks are awful. They can give you Lyme disease, brain swelling, and can make you allergic to red meat. And as the world warms, they’re steadily creeping further north.After Dr. Vett Lloyd contracted Lyme disease from a tick, she made it her mission to study these parasites. She tells us where ticks are, what to look out for, and what to do if you find one.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
8/1/202320 minutes, 45 seconds
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B.C. might become a haven for movie studios using AI

The ongoing actors and writers strikes in the U.S. are having huge implications for film production – including here in Canada, as productions slow to a trickle. Film unions in B.C. just signed an agreement that some worry could lead to ripple effects in the industry as well – because there aren’t any new stipulations around the use of generative AI.Josh O’Kane covers the intersection of arts and business for The Globe. Today, he tells us about this agreement in B.C., and why some are worried it could have long term consequences for the film industry.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
7/31/202319 minutes, 36 seconds
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Why we can’t air condition our way out of extreme heat

The past three weeks on Earth have been the hottest since records began, and the effects of global warming are becoming increasingly deadly as temperatures continue to climb.The 2021 heat dome in B.C. led to the deaths of 619 people — it’s the deadliest weather event in Canadian history. Temperatures rose to above 40 degrees and stayed high even at night. In June 2022, the province’s coroner service released a report with recommendations to prevent deaths in the future.Frances Bula is a frequent Globe contributor who reports on urban issues in British Columbia. She’ll explain how the urban landscape contributes to the deaths, what’s being recommended to help cool B.C. buildings and what the rest of Canada can learn from it all.This episode originally aired June 9, 2022.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/28/202316 minutes, 13 seconds
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What Trudeau’s summer shakeup says about the Liberals’ health

On Wednesday, the Trudeau government unveiled a major cabinet shakeup. The reset comes at a time when the Liberals are facing criticisms over poor communication, Chinese interference in Canadian elections and the handling of a housing affordability crisis facing many Canadians.Ottawa reporter Shannon Proudfoot is on the show to explain what the Liberal government is trying to accomplish with these moves and whether it will have an effect on their recent sagging poll numbers.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
7/27/202321 minutes, 2 seconds
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‘Sound of Freedom’ becomes a controversial blockbuster hit

While conversations about movies are being dominated by ‘Barbie’ and ‘Openheimer’, another movie currently sitting in third place has become a surprise – and controversial – summer blockbuster.‘Sound of Freedom’ has already made US $125-million, despite being a low-budget film from an indie studio. Critics say the movie (about a former government agent’s pursuit to take down child-sex traffickers) is QAnon-adjacent and is stoking political conspiracy theories.The Globe’s Deputy Arts Editor and Film Editor, Barry Hertz is on the show to explain how this movie became a runaway hit and why it’s so controversial.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/26/202320 minutes, 33 seconds
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How government infighting led to a refugee crisis in Toronto

Dozens of asylum seekers have been sleeping on the streets of Downtown Toronto for weeks as a political stand-off between governments took place. While governments have been arguing over jurisdictional responsibility, community groups have stepped in.Toronto’s Revivaltime Tabernacle Church in North York has opened up its doors to over 230 asylum seekers, with volunteers donating their time and resources. We speak to Dustin Cook, The Globe’s Toronto municipal affairs reporter, about what he found out when he visited the church.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
7/25/202322 minutes, 19 seconds
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The people most impacted by wildfire smoke

Cities across Canada have been dealing with the impacts of wildfire smoke this year – the smoggy skies and health effects. And while we’ve been seeing more smoke in big cities, remote Indigenous communities often bear the brunt of the negative effects of wildfires. Since 1982, 98% of smoke-related evacuations have been in Indigenous communities.Dr. Nicole Redvers is an associate professor at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario and an expert on the impact of forest fires on Indigenous communities. She joins us to discuss the consequences of this year’s unprecedented wildfire season.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
7/24/202320 minutes, 59 seconds
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Inside Canada Soccer’s equal pay fight

Canada’s national women’s soccer team is protesting unequal treatment by the sport’s governing body. The players say Canada Soccer is not transparent with its finances, and that they won’t agree to be paid less than the men. The men’s team supports them.Rachel Brady is The Globe’s sports reporter, and she’ll tell us about the dispute, the growing business case for equally funding women’s sport, and how that’s fuelling professional women’s soccer in Canada.This episode originally aired February 17, 2023.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/21/202320 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ozempic's effect on the body positivity movement

Ozempic and other medications for type-2 diabetes have shown to be effective treatments for obesity. But this discovery has led to many people, who do not medically need the drug, using it for vanity reasons.Not only has this led to supply shortages and concern around less discussed long-term effects, but it’s also changing the way we talk about body image and the body positivity movement.Dr. Sarah Nutter, Assistant Professor in Counseling Psychology at the University of Victoria, whose primary research is on weight stigma, explains how this may be harmful in the chase of a so-called ‘ideal’ body and how we treat our bodies as trends.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/20/202319 minutes, 34 seconds
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Why is it so important to get inflation down to two per cent?

We’re all familiar with the cycle now: Inflation is too high, so central banks keep raising interest rates. The hope is to get inflation back down to 2 per cent. But why 2? If we accept that things are going to keep getting more expensive, what difference does it make if it’s 2 or 3 per cent? Or 2.8?Report on Business reporter Mark Rendell explains why we’re aiming for 2-per-cent inflation, whether that target will change and what he learned from a recent interview with Tiff Macklem, Governor of the Bank of Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
7/19/202320 minutes, 19 seconds
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Behind the rise of car thefts in Canada

Car thefts have surged in Canada, with some provinces seeing increases of 50 per cent in a year. And Canada has become particularly popular for this type of crime.Today, The Globe’s wealth management and insurance reporter Clare O’Hara tells us what’s behind the rise of car thefts, and how you can best protect your own car from being stolen.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/18/202319 minutes, 12 seconds
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Why NATO is back to Cold War strength

At the NATO summit in Vilnius, Lithuania, Turkey agreed to support Sweden’s bid to join the alliance. This paves the way for Sweden to become the 32nd member nation following closely behind Finland, which became a member earlier in the spring. The expansion of NATO is something Russia and President Vladimir Putin have used as a key rationale for the war against Ukraine – saying it jeopardizes Russia’s security.Timothy Sayle is an associate professor of history and director of the International Relations Program at the University of Toronto. He’s also the author of Enduring Alliance: A History of NATO and the Postwar Global Order. He’s on the podcast to explain the history and tension between NATO and Russia and what more countries joining the alliance tells us about the current state of global affairs.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
7/17/202320 minutes, 7 seconds
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City Space: Why are ER wait times so bad in Canadian cities?

Burning hours in an ER waiting room has long been a fact of Canada’s public health care system, but that wait time is starting to spike. Now, in Ontario it hovers at around 20 hours on average. And our cities, home to more people and more various determinants of health than anywhere else in the country, bear the brunt of it. In this episode, we’re looking at some issues that impact the growing hospital emergency room wait times: What factors are contributing to the problem? And can anything actually be done to alleviate it or is it a pipe dream?
7/14/202326 minutes, 28 seconds
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When AI decides your pay

App-based ride-share and food delivery companies rely on algorithms that dictate speed, behaviour and the wage of gig workers resulting in different payments for the same work. Labour experts are warning about ‘algorithm wage discrimination’ and concern around protecting workers when it comes to AI.Vanmala Subramaniam, The Globe’s future of work reporter, discusses what we do know about how this works, and the growing trend of AI being in charge of a worker’s pay.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/13/202320 minutes
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The surge of young people dying from opioids

The opioid epidemic is taking young lives – the number of 15-24 year olds dying from opioid overdoses tripled between 2014 and 2021 in Ontario. And young people are shown to be less likely to seek treatment for their addictions. A deadly mix of those factors and a contaminated drug supply are creating lethal outcomes.The Ontario Drug Policy Research Network’s lead investigator, Dr. Tara Gomes is on the show to take us behind the numbers and how the politics around safer supply programs are impacting the people affected by harm reduction.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/12/202320 minutes, 32 seconds
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Canada’s multi-billion dollar bet on the electric vehicle market

After months of negotiations, automaker Stellantis and battery maker LG Energy Solution have reached a deal with the federal and Ontario provincial governments. It’s worth up to $15-billion in subsidies for a plant that’s being built in Windsor, Ont.The plant is part of Canada’s push into the clean energy sector, but with a cost in the billions, it raises questions about whether this specific deal is worth the money.Adam Radwanski, The Globe’s climate change columnist and feature writer, takes us through why this deal could set a precedent for future projects like this.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/11/202317 minutes, 45 seconds
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Why El Niño is a climate wild card

El Niño is back in a big way. This natural weather pattern is known to increase severe weather around the world. And scientists are trying to predict the impacts of this climate wild card – especially on top of global warming impacts.Ivan Semeniuk, The Globe’s science reporter, has been investigating the effects of El Niño. He’ll explain the impacts of El Niños in the past and what to expect this time around.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/10/202319 minutes, 42 seconds
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City Space: Will Canada be able to house all the immigrants it hopes to welcome by 2025?

Last year, the federal government set an ambitious new immigration target — to bring in half a million permanent residents a year by 2025. While the country is already dealing with a pretty profound housing crisis, it’s likely everyone will feel the housing crunch even more as a record number of immigrants move to Canadian cities in the near future. Where will all these newcomers live and whose job is it to make sure the country is prepared? In this episode, we hear from Mike Moffatt, the Senior Director of Policy and Innovation at the Smart Prosperity Institute at the University of Ottawa. We’re also joined by Gregg Lintern, the Chief Planner for the City of Toronto, who discusses how Toronto’s housing goals can be met in time.
7/7/202329 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Nova Scotia coal miners dying of black lung

Coal mining might seem like a job of the past, but global demand for it has actually surged in the past few years. Nearly 7,000 coal miners are still working in the industry. But the job is killing them. Inhalation of coal dust particles is leading to black lung, an incurable condition that workers describe as drowning in their own lung fluid. Worse yet, Canada doesn’t have a tracking system, which makes compensation difficult for many miners.Decades after coal fuelled Canada, miners are now being left behind. Greg Mercer, investigative reporter for The Globe, spoke to the workers fighting to have their labour remembered – and to protect future generations.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/6/202319 minutes, 50 seconds
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Preparing for the decline of oil and gas in Canada

Canada, alongside much of the world, has plans to become net-zero by 2050. And one of their main action-items is to move away from fossil fuels. But does Canada have an economic plan for when the oil and gas sector declines?The Globe’s energy reporter Emma Graney tells us about why Canada is falling behind, and how this may impact our economy if we don’t start making these changes now.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/5/202320 minutes
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Inside the sparkly, hard-core world of competitive cheer

It’s sparkly, athletic and enthusiastic. But it’s grittier than you might think. Competitive cheer is a fast-growing sport in Canada that requires the skills of a gymnast and the agility of a dancer. Recently, almost 8,000 athletes from around the country gathered in Niagara Falls for the national cheer championship.The Globe’s feature writer, Jana Pruden was at the three-day competition where she spent time with athletes, parents and coaches. She’s on the show to explain what she learned and why she thinks we’ll be hearing a lot more about this sport in the coming years.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
7/4/202321 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ukrainian refugee children find a new start in Canada

The Grade 8 students of St. Demetrius Catholic School are in many ways like every other class – they’re nervous about going to high school, but excited for graduation. They’re also mostly refugees from the war in Ukraine, so they are also grappling with learning a new language and culture, and trying to set up a new life without knowing how long they’ll be here.The Globe’s education reporter Caroline Alphonso tells us the stories of some of these students, what they went through to get here and what it’s like starting a new phase of their lives somewhere they never thought they would be.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
6/30/202325 minutes, 25 seconds
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Is multi-generational housing the next big trend?

Multi-generational living in your 20′s and even 30′s has become common as young adults deal with unaffordable housing rates across Canada. And more than half of parents surveyed by the Globe and Mail say their adult kids pay rent while they live at home.Rob Carrick, the Globe and Mail’s personal finance columnist, joins us to discuss his recent survey on parents charging their adult kids for rent and trends we are seeing when it comes to multi-generational homes.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/29/202317 minutes, 39 seconds
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How a mutiny weakened Putin’s strongman image

Over the weekend, a chaotic 36 hours unfolded in the Kremlin. The Wagner Group, a team of Russian military mercenaries created an uprising to challenge the Russian military, before Wagner’s leader, Yevgeny Prigozhin abruptly aborted the mission.But the damage was done – Russian president Vladimir Putin accused Prigozhin of trying to start a civil war. And for the first time in nearly two decades, Putin’s regime appears to be shaken publicly.Mark MacKinnon, The Globe’s senior international correspondent, talks about Putin’s rise to power and what this sudden mutiny says about his control in Russia.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
6/28/202321 minutes, 5 seconds
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A $50-million fine in Canada’s bread price-fixing scandal

Over 20 years later, someone has finally paid the price for Canada’s bread-fixing scandal – other than shoppers that is. Last week, baked-goods producer Canada Bread was fined $50-million for its role in coordinating the price hikes on bread.Susan Krashinsky Robertson is The Globe and Mail’s retail reporter. She explains why it has taken so long for the Competition Bureau to hold a company accountable and whether Canadians will be compensated for years of inflated bread prices.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/27/202317 minutes, 35 seconds
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Is Canada’s waste program trash?

Many municipalities across Canada are choosing profit over the environment when it comes to waste management options. This has left many Canadians questioning the country’s alleged commitment to long-term environmental protection.Dr. Cassandra Kuyvenhoven has a PhD in Environmental Studies with expertise in waste management. She breaks down the systematic issues surrounding Canada’s waste management system and what we could be doing better overall.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/26/202319 minutes, 25 seconds
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Canada’s ministers are missing critical memos

Controversy followed Minister of Public Safety Marco Mendocino after he said he was unaware that notorious serial killer Paul Bernardo was being moved from a maximum security to medium security prison. His explanation follows a pattern of federal ministers saying they’ve missed emails or hadn’t been briefed by their staff on major files.Marieke Walsh, the Globe’s senior political reporter, joins us to break down what’s happening with all these ministers missing crucial communications and what this says about competency in the federal government.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/23/202319 minutes, 25 seconds
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The altercation that led to a Supreme Court Justice resigning

Usually the news coming from Canada’s Supreme Court is about the rulings they make, not about the Justices themselves. But the story of former Justice Russell Brown is unprecedented in many ways. It’s one that started in an Arizona hotel and ended with his resignation nearly six months later.The Globe’s Justice writer Sean Fine reports on what happened, how the investigation unfolded and what this means for Canada’s highest court both in terms of public confidence and its composition going forward.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/22/202317 minutes, 51 seconds
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The sexual assault survivors fighting their own publication bans

Publication bans have become all but automatic in sexual-assault cases across Canada. These bans were put in place to protect survivors who have come forward. But My Voice My Choice, a group of women who are fighting those publication bans, argue that these bans prevent survivors who want to speak openly about their experiences.Molly Hayes and Zosia Bielski are national news reporters for The Globe and Mail. They’re on the show to explain the limits of these publication bans and the group fighting to make their voices heard.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
6/21/202319 minutes, 20 seconds
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China’s control over Canada’s very rare and important mineral

As the world races to mine more critical minerals, China has managed to capture nearly 100 per cent of the cesium market. While not as well known as lithium, cesium is an even rarer mineral. There are only two mines globally, and one of them is in Manitoba.But its owners are based in Beijing. And that is raising a number of national security concerns. The Globe’s mining reporter, Niall McGee, explains why.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/20/202319 minutes, 3 seconds
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B.C. is sending thousands of cancer patients to the U.S.

British Columbia will send cancer patients across the border for radiation therapy to deal with growing wait times and backlog at home.The plan will cost the province three times the amount for treatment at home. Globe and Mail reporter Andrea Woo explains how this will work and what this says about the state of our healthcare system.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/19/202319 minutes
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Secret Canada: The 'black hole' of Canada's immigration system

Canada’s immigration system is overwhelmed. Cases are backlogged and little information is being communicated to applicants. This has led to a surge of access to information requests, which has created another backlog, and has left people trying to settle in Canada in the dark.Tom Cardoso, an investigative reporter with The Globe, explains why people started using this workaround to get information on their immigration cases in the first place, and why things are likely going to get worse.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/16/202320 minutes, 13 seconds
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The reality of how your chocolate gets made

Chocolate may be sweet, but it comes at a steep cost. Labels that claim your favourite treat are sustainable can hide harsh realities for farmers. Millions of cocoa farmers in Africa and Latin America live in hunger and poverty because big corporations refuse to pay a fair price for their cocoa.In the face of this increasingly aggressive price war, some cocoa farmers have joined fair-trade, farmer-owned co-operatives. Together they are pooling their resources to better their communities and futures.Today, The Globe and Mail’s U.S. correspondent Adrian Morrow joins us to explain what he and the Globe’s Africa Bureau Chief Geoffrey York learned about the cost of chocolate.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/15/202320 minutes, 42 seconds
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Here’s why millennials are drowning in debt

Canada’s household debt is really high. In fact, we outrank France, Italy, the UK and even the U.S. And while, the debt load is high for Canadians of every age group, one particular generation stands by owing over $600,000 on average.Rob Carrick is The Globe and Mail’s personal finance columnist. He’s on the show to explain why Canadians owe so much and how over-indebted Canadians should be thinking about their finances.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/14/202318 minutes, 34 seconds
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Helping people escape the world’s harshest anti-LGBTQ laws

In late May, the Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed one of the world’s harshest anti-homosexuality bills into law. It authorizes the death penalty in certain circumstances and a 20-year prison sentence for anyone who “promotes” or “normalizes” homosexuality. The situation was already bad for queer people in Uganda, but this new law makes things much worse.Kimahli Powell is the CEO of Rainbow Railroad, a non-profit organization that helps at-risk LGBTQ people get to safety around the world. He’s on the show to explain what it’s like for LGTBQ people in Uganda right now and what his organization is doing to help them.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/13/202319 minutes, 25 seconds
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Pressure builds for public inquiry after special rapporteur quits

David Johnston resigned as the special rapporteur on Friday after looking into foreign interference in Canadian elections. The former Governor General’s decision to step down came days after he appeared at a parliamentary committee on his work and was grilled by MPs from opposition parties.Steven Chase is The Globe’s Senior Parliamentary Reporter and he has been leading the foreign interference reporting with colleague Robert Fife. Steven joins the podcast to discuss where the investigation in China’s efforts to meddle in Canadian politics goes from here.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/12/202321 minutes, 59 seconds
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Secret Canada: The information laws governments keep breaking

When Canada first passed legislation to create its access-to-information system, it was seen as a world leader in terms of transparency. But fast forward 40 years and that same system is sluggish, overwhelmed and preventing Canadians from their right to government information.Globe and Mail investigative reporters Robyn Doolittle and Tom Cardoso spent more than a year reporting on the state of the system and what’s behind all the bottlenecks. The Globe has also built a website that lets you explore more than 300,000 FOI summaries to help you navigate the system.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected] can access The Globe’s Secret Canada project here: https://www.secretcanada.com/
6/9/202321 minutes, 50 seconds
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How Greece got its economic groove back

The 2007-2008 financial crisis hit countries around the world hard. But, Greece’s economy really faltered. At the peak of Greece’s crisis, unemployment hit 28 per cent, a figure higher than unemployment during the U.S.’ Great Depression. Greece required three hefty bailouts from the European Central Bank, the European Commission and the International Monetary Fund which totalled almost €300-billion. The Greek population suffered under strict austerity measures which cut salaries and closed hospitals.Fast forward to today and the economy is showing remarkable signs of a bounceback. Eric Reguly is The Globe’s European bureau chief. He’s on the show to explain what went wrong in Greece, how they’re turning things around and what other countries can learn from Europe’s surprising comeback kid.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
6/8/202320 minutes, 31 seconds
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Canada’s unprecedented wildfire season

A lot of Canada is on fire right now – fires are burning in nearly every province and territory and the federal government says this season could see the most land burned since we started keeping records.Today, The Globe’s Lindsay Jones joins us from Halifax to talk about the biggest wildfire the province has ever seen, and why fires are so bad there this year. Then, The Globe’s Mike Hager tells us about the wildfires burning across Canada and how prepared the country is to deal with it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/7/202319 minutes, 27 seconds
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What on Earth is going on with consumer spending?

Canadians have been dealing with high inflation for two years now. But, as consumers, we keep spending. However, the picture of where we spend our money and how much of it is a messy one.The Globe’s retailing reporter Susan Krashinsky Robertson explains why some stores are seeing a drop in some areas of spending, even as Canadians are spending at an extremely high rate.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
6/6/202318 minutes, 53 seconds
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Violence is rising in schools. How do we stop it?

The Toronto District School Board – the largest school board in the country – recently reported that more than 300 kids were involved in violent incidents this year. In March, Quebec’s education minister announced he was preparing a strategy to deal with increasing violence in schools. These are just two examples of the more frequent reports of violence in schools across the country, particularly among teenagers.Dr. Tracy Vaillancourt is a professor at the University of Ottawa and Canada Research Chair in Children’s Mental Health and Violence Prevention. She’s on the show to explain why violence in schools is on the rise and what research tells us about how to prevent it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/5/202316 minutes, 47 seconds
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A warning sign from the Big Banks of a possible recession

The six biggest banks in Canada – RBC, Scotiabank, BMO, CIBC, TD, and National Bank recently reported their second-quarter earnings. The majority did not hit target expectations. While banks don’t always meet analyst forecasts, the fact that so many of them had disappointing results in the same period is surprising.Stefanie Marotta reports on banking for The Globe. She’s on the show to explain what’s behind these lower-than-expected profit numbers and what it means for the economy – and Canadians.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
6/2/202319 minutes, 30 seconds
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Inside Kyiv under fire ahead of the Ukrainian counteroffensive

After months of relative quiet in Kyiv, the city has been under attack this week by Russian drones and missiles. There have also been attacks within Russia. Looming over these events is the anticipated, and secretive, Ukrainian counteroffensive to regain territory it has lost to Russia in the war.Today, The Globe’s senior international correspondent Mark MacKinnon joins from Kyiv, Ukraine, to discuss these latest attacks and what a Ukrainian counteroffensive might look like.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
6/1/202322 minutes, 24 seconds
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A divided Alberta: What comes next?

Alberta is a province with a long history of conservative rule. And on Monday, Danielle Smith and the UCP added a new chapter by winning a majority. But it wasn’t a blowout. Rachel Notley and the NDP managed to score 38 seats, up from 23 in the previous sitting of the legislature.This is creating a new political dynamic in the province and Globe reporter and columnist Kelly Cryderman is on the show to explain what it means for the rest of the country.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/31/202319 minutes, 27 seconds
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Emergency rooms in Canada head into another tough summer

Throughout the pandemic, Canadians were warned about the potential collapse of emergency rooms. ERs were stretched to the limit, as surges in patients ran up against labour shortages of doctors and health care workers. But now that the worst of the pandemic is over the situation in ERs hasn’t improved. Patients and doctors now paint a grim picture of a dysfunctional medical care system that remains in crisis, with few long -term fixes on the way.Carly Weeks, health reporter for The Globe and Mail, joins the podcast to explain why ERs are being pushed to the brink and what it says about the health care Canadians receive now.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/30/202319 minutes, 59 seconds
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The pandemic potential of avian flu

Avian influenza is getting more serious each year, as an unprecedented number of birds either succumb to the virus or are culled to prevent spread. After a dog in Ontario and thousands of sea lions died from the flu, there’s growing concern about this strain’s ability to infect mammals.Dr. Samira Mubareka is an infectious diseases physician, medical microbiologist and scientist at Sunnybrook Research Institute. She explains what’s going on with avian flu right now, where it could be headed and what we’re doing to stay ahead of it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/29/202318 minutes, 5 seconds
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What Turkey’s election means for the rest of the world

With a cost-of-living crisis and rampant inflation, there’s a lot on the line for Turkey in the runoff election on Sunday. But this also matters beyond Turkey’s borders. The country is an important – and often challenging – ally for Western countries.Today, Istanbul-based writer and photographer Adnan Khan tells us what issues are at play in this election and what it could mean for Turkey’s role on the world stage.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/26/202319 minutes, 24 seconds
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You’re not wrong, allergies are getting worse

Seasonal allergies are getting worse all across North America, in large part due to changes in pollen driven by climate change. But fear not, there is hope.Dr. Anne Ellis is a professor and division chair in the department of medicine at Queen’s University. She’s on the show today to discuss the effect worsening allergies can have on us and what we can do to live with them.Don't forget to fill out our survey!Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/25/202318 minutes, 37 seconds
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Why there won’t be a public inquiry into Chinese interference

Former governor general David Johnston has ruled out a public inquiry into foreign interference in Canada’s elections, despite ongoing calls for one. Johnston was appointed special rapporteur in March to look into allegations of Chinese interference, driven largely by The Globe and Mail’s reporting.Today, The Globe’s senior parliamentary reporter Steven Chase explains why Johnston decided against a public inquiry, and the significance of that decision.Don't forget to fill out our survey!Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/24/202320 minutes, 4 seconds
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The race to regulate artificial intelligence

Whether you like it or not, AI is everywhere. It unlocks your phone through facial recognition, it manages spam emails in your inbox and it creates realistic photos of the Pope in a puffer jacket. With rapid developments in technology infiltrating our everyday lives, it’s a race for governments to figure out how to regulate it. And Ottawa might be playing catch up.Joe Castaldo is with The Globe’s Report on Business. Today, he explains the federal government’s plan to regulate AI for consumers and data protection, and how this proposed legislation compares to others worldwide.And here's a link to our survey!Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/23/202318 minutes, 25 seconds
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Your upcoming flights might be cancelled, here’s why

Experts are anticipating another chaotic season of air travel in the coming months. Along with ongoing labour disputes, Canadian airlines have scheduled more flights for the summer. There’s a catch though: they might not have the crew to staff them.Today, The Globe’s transportation reporter Eric Atkins explains why airlines still might not have enough staff and what we’re in for in the coming months.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/19/202317 minutes, 44 seconds
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Inside the greenhouse above the Arctic Circle

Two hundred and fifty kilometres above the Arctic Circle is a greenhouse that provides fresh local produce to its community. It’s called Naurvik and it’s located in the Inuit hamlet of Gjoa Haven, Nunavut. Powered primarily by wind- and solar-energy, Naurvik is becoming a new source of food for a region of Canada that suffers chronic food insecurity given how remote it is.Photojournalist Amber Bracken visited Gjoa Haven earlier this year and will take us on a tour inside the greenhouse that is beating the odds.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/18/202320 minutes
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As Alberta burns, an election looms

Wildfires are raging across Alberta with early-season fires forcing thousands to evacuate their homes. Firefighters from across the country and the U.S., as well as the Canadian Armed Forces, are streaming in to battle the flames. Officials are predicting the worst is yet to come with high temperatures and no rain in the forecast.Meanwhile, a provincial election is right around the corner. United Conservative Party Leader Danielle Smith is trying to balance her role as premier with her political campaign for the job. And frustrations amongst some residents are growing.Reporter Carrie Tait from the Globe and Mail’s Calgary bureau is on the show to explain the political impacts of this natural disaster.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/17/202319 minutes, 44 seconds
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Canada looks to India as ties with China fray

China is Canada’s second-largest trading partner, but tensions continue to rise between the two countries over allegations of foreign interference and concerns about human rights. So the Canadian government is trying to expand trade to other places – like India.The Indian and Canadian governments have been negotiating for more than a decade on a trade agreement, but this might finally be the moment we get one. Today, Rita Trichur, The Globe’s senior business writer and columnist, explains why it’s taken so long for an agreement to come through and why it’s so important.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/16/202318 minutes, 35 seconds
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Is COVID over?

On May 5th the World Health Organization declared the end of the COVID-19 emergency. But what does that mean for the pandemic? How should we be thinking about the COVID virus now and what kind of risk are we still exposed to?It’s taken three years of social distancing, mask mandates, and varying degrees of lockdown to get to this stage, but what comes next is still a bit of a mystery. Today, Lisa Barrett, an infectious diseases specialist at Dalhousie University and a practicing clinician, how we can manage COVID now and where the disease could go from here.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/15/202319 minutes, 52 seconds
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Why BlackBerry’s rise and fall still matters

BlackBerry changed our lives when it created the world’s first commercially successful smartphone. But its dominance was disrupted and the Canadian tech giant lost nearly everything. BlackBerry’s dramatic fall from grace is now the topic of a film that is in theaters May 12.The Globe’s technology reporter, Sean Silcoff, who co-authored the book that film is based on, is on the show to discuss how he got the inside access needed to tell the story of BlackBerry’s rise and fall and explains why it is still relevant today.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/12/202321 minutes, 39 seconds
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The view from China on foreign interference in Canada

On Tuesday, the Chinese Foreign Ministry strongly condemned Canada’s expulsion of Chinese diplomat, Zhao Wei for allegations of foreign interference. In response, China expelled a Canadian diplomat in Shanghai.While headlines about Chinese interference have been front and centre in Canada ever since the Globe first reported on China’s interference attempts back in February, this latest row has also hit a nerve in China. Today, The Globe and Mail’s Asia correspondent, James Griffiths, explains how the current escalation in tensions are viewed in China.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/11/202319 minutes, 50 seconds
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Canada’s extraordinary expulsion of a Chinese diplomat

On May 8, Canada expelled Chinese diplomat Zhao Wei in response to China’s interference in Canadian politics. The extraordinary moveis the first expulasion of a Chinese diplomat in decades and could  carry substantial consequences given the size of Canada’s economic and social ties with China.This is the latest development in an ongoing saga around Chinese interference in Canada which broke after The Globe and Mail reported on secret and top-secret CSIS documents alleging a sophisticated strategy by China to disrupt the 2019 and 2021 federal elections. Today, Campbell Clark, The Globe’s chief political writer, explains what has happened to bring us to this moment and how this action will impact Canada’s relationship with China. Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/10/202318 minutes, 38 seconds
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The problems with the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive

In 2019, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to help millennials hoping to buy a first home with a new program, called the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive. It was supposed to help 100,000 Canadians buy their first home but, according to real estate professionals, the program was doomed from the start.To understand what has gone wrong, economics reporter Matt Lundy crunched the numbers. He explains why the program has fallen short of its goal and how it is failing to address the real problem in real estate.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/9/202320 minutes, 49 seconds
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How ‘black swan’ events are ruining economic predictions

Economic predictions can be incredibly important for companies and governments trying to plan for the months and year ahead – and that ripples down to individuals trying to budget as well. But some experts worry that the forecasts are becoming less and less accurate.Todd Hirsch has been an economist for around three decades. Today, he tells us why forecasts aren’t working as well as they used to, how so-called ‘black swan’ events are changing things, and what that means for our ability to plan for the future.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/8/202320 minutes, 29 seconds
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Why Charles III won’t be the last King of Canada

On Saturday, King Charles III will be crowned in a ceremony at Buckingham Palace in London. This is the first coronation of a British monarch in 70 years and it’s brought up questions from Canadians about why a democratic country like Canada still maintains ties with the monarchy. A recent Angus Reid Poll found that 52 per cent of respondents do not want to continue as a constitutional monarchy. But leaving isn’t that easy.Errol Mendes is a lawyer, author and constitutional and international law professor at the University of Ottawa. He’s on the show to explain how Canada’s constitution makes leaving the monarchy almost impossible.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/5/202318 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ford and the never-ending Ontario Place saga

When Ontario Place first opened in 1971, it was a jewel on Toronto’s waterfront showcasing modern architecture and Ontario culture. But in the 50 years that followed, Ontario Place faced an identity crisis. The space hosted a water park and a night club to name a few. And while a few venues have stayed open much of the park closed in 2012. The Provincial government cited dwindling attendance and soaring costs.Ontario Premier Doug Ford has a new plan that he says will turn the 155-acres of land into a ‘world class’ destination. But the project is already mired in controversy, with critics saying the Premier’s plan is shrouded in secrecy and favouritism.Decibel producer Sherrill Sutherland toured Ontario place with The Globe’s architecture critic, Alex Bozikovic to learn about why so many people are fighting to keep it a public space. Plus, the Globe’s Queen’s Park reporter Jeff Gray explains the politics behind this lucrative piece of land.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/4/202323 minutes, 54 seconds
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The missing 2 billion trees Trudeau promised

In 2021, the federal government began a project to plant two billion trees by 2031. The goal of this project was to use these trees to help Canada reach its climate goal. However, a recent audit shows that the government is not on track to hit those numbers.The Globe’s energy and environment reporter Matt McClearn is on the show to walk us through the difficulties of the 2 Billion Trees program, and how its success or failure could impact our other pressing climate goals.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/3/202323 minutes, 11 seconds
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How a new Canadian law will change what’s on your Netflix

The Online Streaming Act is officially law. Now, online streaming services such as Netflix and Spotify have to promote and invest in Canadian content. But there are still questions and concerns – from content creators themselves – over how this law will actually work.Kate Taylor is the arts critic for The Globe and Mail. Today, she tells us about this new law, and how it might change the landscape of content made in Canada and what you’ll end up watching on your streaming platforms in the future.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
5/2/202320 minutes, 7 seconds
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Take Back Alberta and its mission to reshape politics

The Alberta election starts today – and one group in particular is ready for it. It’s called Take Back Alberta and it’s a network of people who share the same values: no vaccine mandates, no pandemic lockdowns – and Christian faith. Together, its members are trying to reshape politics in the province from the ground up.Reporter Carrie Tait spent months going to the group’s meetings and talking to its leader to get a sense of its plans in this very competitive election between Danielle Smith of the United Conservative Party and the NDP’s Rachel Notley, as well as what its goals are once the election is over – both inside Alberta and beyond.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
5/1/202321 minutes, 14 seconds
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The bureaucratic mess that’s left Afghans stranded

Back in September, we told you about some Afghans trying to flee the Taliban in 2021 who had been given Canadian travel documents – but they were not authentic. We now know that a Canadian Senator sent approximately 640 of these documents to Afghans, who are now stranded.Today, The Globe’s senior parliamentary reporter Marieke Walsh tells us what we know about who’s involved in this bureaucratic mess, and the impossible situation for the people who received these documents.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/28/202320 minutes, 52 seconds
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How grocery prices are hitting kids at school

School food programs in Canada are struggling to make ends meet right now. With the high price of food, it’s costing some programs as much as 25 percent more than previous years to keep running. And they’re seeing higher demand too – more children in need of a balanced meal.Caroline Alphonso spoke with programs across the country that are worried their funding won’t make it to the end of the school year. Today, she tells us what’s happening with school food programs, why they’re so important and what might be done to fix the situation.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at  [email protected]
4/27/202320 minutes, 54 seconds
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What we’re getting wrong about climate refugees

Vietnam is in the midst of a dramatic shift caused by climate change. Some of the country’s most fertile land along the Mekong Delta has been devastated by flooding from rising ocean levels.Doug Saunders, a columnist at The Globe, is on the show today to talk about climate migration in Vietnam and what really happens when climate change forces someone from their home.This episode is part two of Undercurrents – The Globe’s year-long series devoted to the global migration crisis. You can find part one here.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/26/202318 minutes, 10 seconds
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The bloody struggle for power in Sudan

Sudan is on the brink of civil war, after fighting broke out between the country’s military and a paramilitary group, the RSF. Hundreds of people have been killed, and thousands more injured. This, on top of an existing humanitarian crisis that is now expected to get much worse.Today, we hear from two Sudanese-Canadians, Esraa Fadul and Ahmed Osman, who are stranded in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, surrounded by warfare. Then we’ll hear from The Globe’s Africa Bureau Chief Geoffrey York about what led to this conflict and what it means for an already-struggling country.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/25/202321 minutes, 45 seconds
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Why fewer people have confidence in childhood vaccines

Since the pandemic, confidence in childhood vaccines has decreased around the world, according to a new report by UNICEF. Before COVID hit, 91 per cent of Canadians believed vaccines are important during childhood. That number is now 82 per cent.So what has caused this drop in the faith in children’s vaccines? The Globe’s health reporter, Carly Weeks explains to us how this happened, how it could affect Canada’s future outbreaks and what can be done to get those rates back up.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/24/202319 minutes, 49 seconds
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After a year of scandal, Hockey Canada gets its funding back

The federal government has restored its funding to Hockey Canada after removing it following the revelation that it settled a lawsuit accusing eight members of the 2018 world juniors hockey team of sexual assault. Since the scandal broke a year ago, Hockey Canada has endured audits, board resignations, and investigations. Its executives and board members have been called to Parliament Hill to testify at hearings, and big sponsors, like Tim Hortons and Canadian Tire, have fled.So, how much has the organization changed within the last year to justify this restored funding? Investigative reporter Grant Robertson explains the recent developments and the current state of Hockey Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/21/202318 minutes, 59 seconds
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The start of one of the largest strikes in Canadian history

The largest public sector union in Canada went on strike on Wednesday after talks broke down with the government over better wages and remote working rules. This strike is expected to cause serious administrative delays for Canadians, from passport processing to filing your taxes. It’s the most recent event in a long string of labour disputes from all over the country in the last two years.The Globe’s future of work reporter Vanmala Subramaniam explains what the significance of this strike is, how we got to this point and the effects it might have on the public, the government and unions going forward.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/20/202321 minutes, 15 seconds
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Why drag performers are the new focus of U.S. culture wars

Last month, Tennessee became the first state to pass-anti drag law and thirteen other U.S. states also have bills looking to ban or restrict drag performances. Over the past decade, drag has become more mainstream with the popularity of shows like RuPaul’s Drag Race, but this past year, drag shows have become the target of a U.S. political culture war.The Globe’s U.S. correspondent, Adrian Morrow is on the show to tell us what it is about this moment that has U.S. states targeting drag. Plus we’ll hear from Brian Hernandez, a performer in San Antonio Texas about their experience living in a state that’s trying to ban what they do for a living.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/19/202321 minutes, 4 seconds
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Behind the Trudeau Foundation controversy

The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation has been coming under fire in the past few weeks over a controversial donation it received back in 2016. The Globe and Mail learned back in February that the donation – which was initially said to be from two Chinese billionaires – was allegedly tied to the Chinese government. Now, there’s even more to the story.Today, The Globe’s Ottawa Bureau Chief Robert Fife is back on the podcast. He and Globe reporter Steven Chase have been breaking this news. He’ll tell us the story of this donation, how the Trudeau Foundation handled it and how this latest controversy ties into the larger web of Chinese interference.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/18/202321 minutes, 1 second
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The federally funded watchdog that hasn’t completed a single review

What happens when a Canadian company is accused of wrongdoing abroad? Well, in 2018, Ottawa announced the creation of a new ombudsperson to investigate these kinds of claims. But since then, the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise – also known as CORE – has yet to complete a single investigation of a complaint.Investigative reporter Tavia Grant – who went to Peru to see the effects of missing Canadian oversight – explains what she has found out about CORE.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/17/202322 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Prime Minister’s rat-infested residence

Since 1951, 24 Sussex Drive has been the Prime Minister’s official residence. Recently, It’s been making international headlines, but for the wrong reasons. The mansion is in such bad shape that rodent carcasses line the walls and are affecting the air quality. There’s a laundry list of problems including mould, asbestos, leaks and a cold winter draft. In the eight years Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been in power, he and his family have never moved in.The Globe’s writer-at-large and political columnist, John Ibbitson is on The Decibel to tell us how the Prime Minister’s residence has fallen into such disrepair and why its fate has become as politically toxic as its insides.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/14/202320 minutes, 27 seconds
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Russian hackers are targeting Canada for supporting Ukraine

Canadian officials have been warning since the war in Ukraine began of potential cyber attacks from Russia as retribution for Canada helping Ukraine. This week, at least two Canadian government websites were down, courtesy of Russian hackers, and claims surfaced that Russian hackers had compromised a Canadian gas company.Steven Chase is The Globe’s senior parliamentary reporter. He’s seen the documents detailing the alleged attack on the Canadian company. He’ll tell us about these attacks, and how they fit into Russia’s broader plan to punish supporters of Ukraine.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/13/202318 minutes, 24 seconds
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How strong is Canada’s job market, really?

For months now, Canada’s unemployment rate has been hovering around 5 per cent – a near historic low. It’s a number that economists are watching closely because they expect it to rise now that the Bank of Canada has hiked interest rates.But it hasn’t. And businesses are still complaining about a shortage of workers. So what’s going on? Economics reporter Matt Lundy explains.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/12/202319 minutes, 33 seconds
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The search for First Nations women in Winnipeg landfills

On April 4, the body of Linda Mary Beardy, a woman from Lake St. Martin First Nation, was discovered at a Winnipeg landfill. It’s the same landfill where, less than a year ago, the victim of an alleged serial killer was found. Police say Ms. Beardy’s death is not being considered a homicide, but it has brought renewed attention and outrage over the deaths of First Nations women in the area.In the last year, the remains of four First Nations women, believed to be victims of a serial killer, have been discovered or are believed to be in Winnipeg landfills. The outrage from the women’s communities is not just over their deaths, but also over what they say is failure and inaction from Winnipeg Police.The Globe’s crime and justice reporter Molly Hayes joins The Decibel to discuss why police have refused to search one of the landfills and the renewed fight for answers from the families and friends of missing and murdered Indigenous women.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/11/202318 minutes, 22 seconds
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The story of the world’s most premature twins to survive

Adrial and Adiah Nadarajah are the youngest twins ever born to survive to their first birthday – they were born at just 22 weeks, about half of a full term pregnancy. If they had been born just two hours earlier, medical staff would not have tried to resuscitate them. They would have been considered too young to live.Their story is part of the medical and moral challenges that arise when babies are born dangerously early. Kelly Grant spoke with the parents and doctors of the babies – and attended the twins’ first birthday party.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/10/202325 minutes, 13 seconds
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City Space: Are smart cities really such a smart idea?

The smart city movement — driven by the idea that we can leverage data and technology to optimize life in our cities — is attractive for many reasons. But critics say that smart cities may not be so wise, and in some cases, they’ve proven to be dangerous for democracy. In the first episode of season three, we’re doing a deep dive into this very concept: What are smart cities, and who are they for? Where has smart-city technology helped, and when does it start to wade into surveillance-capitalism territory ? Adrian speaks to John Lorinc, an urban affairs journalist and the author of Dream States: Smart Cities, Technology, and the Pursuit of Urban Utopias, about how the perception of smart cities has shifted over the years, and how smart city technology can both improve and disrupt our lives. Plus, Globe and Mail reporter Josh O’Kane shares his reporting from his new book, SIDEWAYS: The City Google Couldn’t Buy, which looks at Alphabet’s failed attempt to build a smart city in Toronto and what that high-profile example tells us about citizen engagement and good governance around the world. 
4/9/202326 minutes, 59 seconds
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Medical mystery in New Brunswick leads to life-changing symptoms

Insomnia, dizziness, hallucinations – these are just a few of the life-changing symptoms that dozens of people have reported having in New Brunswick. After several years and a provincial investigation, patients are still left wondering what is going on. They want the federal government to step in and examine their situations further.The Globe’s health reporter Wency Leung joins the podcast to explain the fight patients have on their hands to get answers.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/6/202321 minutes, 57 seconds
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What we’re missing about the Trump indictment

On Tuesday, Donald Trump became the first former U.S. president to be indicted on criminal charges. He faces 34 felony counts of falsifying business records relating to hush money paid to porn star, Stormy Daniels.The scene at the Manhattan courthouse where Mr. Trump appeared was a frenzy of cameras, journalists, protesters and Trump supporters. While this moment is a first in U.S. history, Jared Yates Sexton argues that focusing solely on Trump ignores the underlying factors that brought the country to this point. Jared is a frequent contributor to The Globe and the author of several books including “The Midnight Kingdom: A History of Power, Paranoia, and the Coming Crisis.” He’s on the podcast to tell us about where the MAGA movement that brought Trump to power is at now and how they might shape the current political situation today.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/5/202322 minutes, 16 seconds
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Unscrambling Canada’s wireless industry post Rogers-Shaw merger

About two years after the merger was proposed, Rogers and Shaw are becoming one company. To ensure that this deal doesn’t hurt Canadians, Industry Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne put a number of conditions on the companies involved. But are they enough?Jennifer Quaid is an expert in competition law in Canada. She’s an Associate Professor and Vice-Dean of Research of the Civil Law Section at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law. She explains what these deals mean for telecom competition in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
4/4/202321 minutes, 16 seconds
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How the RCMP failed Nova Scotians during the mass shooting

The inquiry into Canada’s worst mass shooting has ended with the release of its final report. The 3,000 page document condemns the RCMP in how the police force responded to the tragedy where 22 people were killed in Portapique, Nova Scotia, in April 2020. A number of recommendations call for a complete overhaul of Canada’s federal police force in the hopes that a tragedy like this never happens again.The Globe’s Lindsay Jones is a reporter at the Atlantic bureau who was there as the final report was released to survivors, family and community members as well as government and police officials. She joins the podcast to share the main takeaways from the report and whether the RCMP will take these recommendations seriously.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
4/3/202320 minutes, 27 seconds
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What asylum seekers face now at Roxham Road

The change came swiftly. A few hours after being announced by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Joe Biden, the rules at Roxham Road had tightened.Globe reporter Frédérik-Xavier Duhamel went to the popular unofficial border crossing and spoke to migrants trying to make the trek as changes to the Safe Third Country Act now limit who can claim asylum in Canada via that passage.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/31/202318 minutes, 15 seconds
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The little-known document reshaping climate finance in Canada

As Canada races to compete in the clean tech sector as countries work toward their net zero climate goals, investors are trying to figure out where to park huge sums of money to back projects that are a part of this.Enter Canada’s green taxonomy, a guide to assess how green a project requiring investment actually is. Report on Business journalist Jeffrey Jones explains how it works and what it means for Canada’s oil and gas industries.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/30/202317 minutes, 47 seconds
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The 2023 federal budget, in 23 minutes

The Canadian federal government unveiled its 2023 budget on Tuesday, which sets the economic strategy and tone for the next fiscal year. There’s a lot packed into this document, ranging from measures to help with inflation to an expansion of the national dental plan to investment incentives to help us transition to a greener economy. But how will this budget really impact you?The Globe and Mail’s Ottawa bureau – Deputy Ottawa bureau chief Bill Curry, personal finance columnist Rob Carrick, senior political reporter Marieke Walsh and senior Parliamentary reporter Steven Chase – join the podcast, five minutes at a time, to break down the key takeaways of this year’s budget.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/29/202323 minutes, 5 seconds
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Swifties and Drake fans’ beef with Ticketmaster

The price of concert tickets has risen dramatically – with some tickets costing thousands of dollars. Ticketmaster, which controls a huge proportion of the market, has come under fire recently for some of its practices, like dynamic pricing and murky service fees. It’s now the subject of a proposed class action lawsuit in Quebec.The Globe’s Josh O’Kane has been covering concerns around Ticketmaster for years. He’s here to explain what’s going on with the company, how Ticketmaster got such a stranglehold on the market, and what it means for the music industry.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/28/202319 minutes, 36 seconds
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The dark side of collagen

Collagen supplements are marketed as a holy grail anti-aging product. Bovine collagen is made from cattle hides, and a new investigation from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism traced the supply chain of some collagen companies all the way to deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon.Elisângela Mendonça is a London-based Brazilian journalist with the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. Her reporting pulls back the curtain on the dark side of the booming collagen industry.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/27/202319 minutes, 47 seconds
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Stress Test: Why millennials and Gen Z are Alberta-bound for a more affordable life

In 2022, the number of people moving to Alberta hit its highest level in almost a decade. At the same time, a record number of people left Toronto for other provinces. And it all comes down to affordability. In this episode, we’ll delve into the factors contributing to the rise in interprovincial migration and hear from Canadians who made the move - and how it’s worked out for them.
3/26/202326 minutes, 40 seconds
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Former governor-general Michaëlle Jean on Canada’s role in Haiti

Haiti is in crisis, after months of cholera outbreaks, a fuel and energy crisis, and violence. The UN estimates that 500 people have died in gang violence incidents this year alone. And Canada is facing pressure – largely from the US – to intervene.Michaëlle Jean is the former governor-general of Canada, and the former UNESCO Special Envoy to Haiti, where she’s from. Today, she tells us what led Haiti to this crisis, and what role Canada should have in the country.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/24/202321 minutes, 1 second
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Canada races the U.S. on a ‘green economy’

Canada has committed to going net-zero by 2050 and a big part of making that goal a reality is by transitioning the economy from being fossil fuel dependent to a cleaner and low-carbon one. Canada’s Finance Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland calls the change the most “significant economic transformation since the Industrial Revolution”.So what will a ‘green economy’ look like for Canada? And how can it establish itself as a major player as it competes with the United States, its biggest ally and rival? The Globe and Mail’s climate change columnist Adam Radwanski explains.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/23/202319 minutes, 52 seconds
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What’s behind a surge of cheating in universities

Allegations of academic misconduct at Canadian universities have risen sharply in the 2020 to 2021 school year as more and more students turn to hiring people to complete assignments and tests for them. The consequences for the student are clear: a permanent blemish on their academic careers and possible impact on their job prospects if they are caught.But the wider trend is also a concern for Canadian universities as a whole, as their brand depends on maintaining academic integrity. Post-secondary education reporter Joe Friesen explains.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/22/202319 minutes
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The whistleblower on Chinese interference in Canada, in their words

The Globe and Mail has been reporting extensively on China’s interference in Canadian elections. This information came to light, in part, because of a whistleblower who wrote an Opinion piece in The Globe this weekend.The Globe rarely publishes Opinion pieces by confidential sources. Today, David Walmsley, The Globe’s Editor in Chief, explains why he decided to publish this piece, and how he feels it contributes to the broader conversation of China’s interference in Canada. And, you’ll hear the entire piece from the whistleblower, in their own words.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/21/202317 minutes, 53 seconds
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Former ambassador on why Canada needs a foreign agent registry

As revelations about China’s interference continue, so do calls for a foreign agent registry. The U.S. and Australia have registries like this, where anyone acting on behalf of a foreign entity has to disclose it. But the idea has its detractors.David Mulroney, a former Canadian ambassador to China, has been advocating for a foreign agent registry for years. He explains how it might work in Canada, why it’s controversial and how the registry could slow China’s interference campaign in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/20/202320 minutes, 20 seconds
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The sounds of blind hockey

Oversized pucks clanging as they’re shot across the ice, the constant tapping of hockey sticks as players weave through oversized pylons. These are some of the sights and sounds of blind hockey.Canadian Blind Hockey began in 2009 and now has 14 programs across the country. Canada’s winter game adapted for the visually impaired is an auditory experience and so The Decibel hit the ice to find out more about it.The Globe’s sports reporter, Rachel Brady and Decibel producer Sherrill Sutherland laced up their skates and joined a youth Canadian Blind Hockey program to hear from parents, players and coaches.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/17/202316 minutes, 16 seconds
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What Silicon Valley Bank’s collapse means for Canada

The collapse of Silicon Valley Bank came swiftly after a panicked run on deposits. Despite the U.S. government enacting safeguards, there is anxiety in the markets wondering which bank might fall next.But how safe are Canadian banks? Report on Business columnist Tim Kiladze is on the show to explain the fallout and what Canadian regulations are in place to try and contain it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/16/202321 minutes, 38 seconds
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When paying your mortgage doesn’t reduce your loan

Since the Bank of Canada started hiking its benchmark interest rate just over a year ago, there’s a growing number of mortgage-holders with monthly payments that no longer cover the principal or even the interest portion of their loan.Rachelle Younglai covers real estate for The Globe and she recently reported that at CIBC, 20 per cent of mortgage-holders are seeing their loan balances grow instead of shrink. This represents $52-billion worth of mortgages. CIBC isn’t the only bank in this situation but it’s the only one that’s disclosing this information.Rachelle is on the show to explain why this might be a cause for concern and what mortgage-holders should be thinking about.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/15/202316 minutes, 8 seconds
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Why we need to think of health as an ‘us,’ not just a ‘me’

We often think of health as an individual action – drink more water, exercise, eat well. During the pandemic, we thought more about the health of people around us as well – with social distancing, masking and vaccinations. But there’s a lot more that goes into our health.Today, we’re talking to the Globe’s health reporter Wency Leung about why it’s so important to expand our understanding of health beyond our bodies. Then we talk to Indigenous psychologist Dr. Rod McCormick about how he helps people connect with communities and nature to find healing.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/14/202320 minutes, 3 seconds
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Are Canada’s big grocers to blame for your food bill?

Could the rising price of groceries be chalked up to corporate greed? That was the question at a House of Commons committee last week when the executives of Canada’s three biggest grocers testified. Loblaw Cos. Ltd. president Galen Weston, CEO of Empire Co. Michael Medline and CEO of Metro Inc. Eric La Flèche all refuted claims that they were gouging customers under the guise of inflation.Food economist Michael von Massow says blaming Canada’s big grocers doesn’t explain the complex web of factors that have led to sustained food inflation. He helps untangle exactly what’s behind the rise, how much ‘greedflation’ is a part of it and how Canada could make things easier for consumers.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/13/202319 minutes, 56 seconds
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Netflix’s big gamble on its future

Netflix is facing a backlash after announcing it’s cracking down on password sharing in Canada, among other countries. The company says 100 million of its customers worldwide share passwords, which Netflix claims is cutting into its revenue.Kean Birch, director of the Institute for Technoscience and Society at York University, says that Netflix’s business model was bound to run into problems like this, as competition from other streaming services pulls content off the platform and draws users away. But will it work?Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/10/202318 minutes, 29 seconds
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B.C.’s groundbreaking plan to fund birth control

British Columbia revealed its 2023 budget on Feb. 28. It introduced a host of new spending measures including a first in Canada: A plan to make contraception universally available in the province free of charge.Globe health reporter, Carly Weeks explains why reproductive health experts are celebrating the move and what this could mean for funding contraception in the rest of the country.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/9/202317 minutes, 23 seconds
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Trudeau orders probes into Chinese interference of elections

After weeks of resisting pressure from all sides, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has ordered two probes into Chinese election interference. This follows The Globe and Mail reporting on secret and top secret CSIS documents alleging a sophisticated strategy by China to disrupt the 2019 and 2021 federal elections.But criticism is still mounting on Trudeau around how transparent and public these probes will actually be. The Globe’s Ottawa bureau chief Bob Fife is back to tell us why Trudeau is changing his stance and how likely these probes are to shed light on the extent of China’s interference.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/8/202317 minutes, 4 seconds
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What we know about the Alberta oil sands leak

The ground and water near Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation in northern Alberta has become a toxic mess. A nearby oil sands site, run by Imperial Oil, has leaked industrial waste into the hunting and fishing grounds of the Indigenous community.But the First Nation alleges Imperial Oil and the provincial regulators tasked with keeping the companies in line, hid the seriousness of the leak. Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation is only now learning of how badly their food and water could be contaminated. Energy reporter Emma Graney talks about who knew what when and how this major oil leak is destroying any trust between the public, regulators and oil sands companies.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
3/7/202319 minutes, 54 seconds
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The news Google is hiding from your searches

Right now, one in 25 Canadians who use Google can’t find some news sites through its search bar. That’s because the tech giant has purposely blocked these searches in response to legislation put forward by the federal government.The Globe’s Deputy Ottawa bureau chief Bill Curry is on the show to explain the bill taking the fight to Google and other big tech companies and what the government is trying to accomplish with this legislation.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/6/202318 minutes, 43 seconds
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The drug giving new life to cystic fibrosis patients

For years, a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis has often meant an early death for patients. This week, Cystic Fibrosis Canada released its annual data report this week for 2021. A new drug, Trikafta, is keeping patients out of hospitals and off of transplant lists.The Globe’s health reporter Kelly Grant explains why doctors are now talking about cystic fibrosis as a disease in transition and the hope of a new future for thousands of patients.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/3/202319 minutes, 1 second
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Why police are rarely charged after killing or injuring someone

Canada has a high rate of police killings compared to similar countries like England, Germany and Japan. Officers are rarely charged when they kill someone, and they don’t even have to participate in the investigations into their conduct.The Globe’s Nancy Macdonald spent months looking into hundreds of investigations into police officers, how often officers co-operate and the consequences of their silence.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/2/202322 minutes, 42 seconds
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How Canada’s biggest bookshop got hacked

On February 8, Indigo’s website went down and customers couldn’t buy products in-store either. After scrambling to launch a new website with limited e-commerce abilities, the company announced a major breach of personal and financial information of employees.The Globe and Mail’s technology reporter, Temur Durrani, has been speaking to employees about the life-long impacts of this breach, what is being done about it and why ransomware attackers are taking aim at Canadian companies and public institutions.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
3/1/202316 minutes, 21 seconds
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ChatGPT isn’t as smart as we think

Artificial Intelligence and chatbots are having a mainstream moment. In November, the public was introduced to ChatGPT – a chatbot that can have seemingly human-like conversations with users. And after a “creepy” conversation between a New York Times tech columnist and Microsoft’s new Bing chatbot (which called itself “Sydney”) the debate around AI sentience has re-ignited.But, behind all the awe, argues AI researcher, author and data journalist, Meredith Broussard, is a model that’s simply really good at math – and the technology that powers our AI today can often be biased, sexist and racist. She’s on the show to talk about how we should all be thinking about these problems in a tech innovation that isn’t going away anytime soon.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/28/202320 minutes, 12 seconds
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CSIS documents reveal a web of Chinese influence in Canada

Documents from Canada’s spy agency CSIS – viewed by The Globe and Mail – show how China was influencing Canada’s 2021 federal election by promoting candidates favourable to the regime, how it warned “friendly” Canadians about investigations and targeted Canadians with tactics like cyberattacks, bribery and sexual seduction.These documents highlight a troubling web of China’s interference in Canadian political, financial and academic institutions. Robert Fife, The Globe’s Ottawa bureau chief, explains why these documents matter and what we can learn about how China is trying to influence Canadian affairs.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/27/202322 minutes, 32 seconds
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BONUS - In Ukraine with the Globe’s reporters on the ground

In a special bonus episode, The Globe and Mail’s Senior International Correspondent Mark MacKinnon and Europe Correspondent Paul Waldie join The Decibel host Menaka Raman-Wilms for an in-depth conversation on the first anniversary of the war in Ukraine. Mark and Paul share their perspectives, personal stories and insights in a year of covering the war. This episode was recorded as a livestreamed broadcast on theglobeandmail.com and YouTube on February 24, 2023.
2/25/202336 minutes, 15 seconds
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One year later: The stories of Ukrainian refugees

Since Russia invaded one year ago, eight million people have left Ukraine.Olena Tsebenko, Sonya and Oliver Hawes and George Fedorov all left behind their homes on February 24, 2022. From births to deaths and marriages, they share their stories of how their lives have carried on in the wake of the war.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/24/202322 minutes, 28 seconds
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The growing crisis at the unofficial Roxham Road border crossing

An unofficial border crossing between Southern Quebec and New York state is at the center of a heated political debate. In December, almost 5,000 people entered Canada through Roxham Road, a stretch of road between the two countries that has seen an influx of migrants seeking to claim refugee status in Canada.Both official opposition leader Pierre Poilievre and Quebec Premier Francois Legault are calling on Ottawa to close the unofficial border. On Tuesday Prime Minister Trudeau said he’s in talks with the U.S. but declined to get into specifics.The reason why people are choosing this particular route is because of a loophole in an agreement between Canada and the U.S. called the Safe Third Country Agreement. Globe and Mail columnist Konrad Yakabuski explains what this agreement is and what may happen with it.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/23/202319 minutes, 22 seconds
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How people are being cheated out of their new homes

Title fraud happens when someone poses as a homeowner to sell real estate they don’t own to an unsuspecting buyer – and while still rare, it’s on the rise in Canada. For victims, whether the buyer or the legitimate homeowner, the anguish of learning you’ve been defrauded almost always comes with a lengthy legal process to straighten things out. And without title insurance, the buyer may be out the cost of the house.Salmaan Farooqui is the Globe’s personal finance reporter, and he’s explored why title fraud has gotten a boost thanks to the pandemic, despite all the paperwork and checks and balances built into the process of home-buying.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
2/22/202317 minutes, 34 seconds
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Why the Emergencies Act Inquiry says Trudeau was right

Just over a year after the federal government invoked the Emergencies Act, an inquiry has found that the Liberals acted appropriately, even though the Act gave them sweeping powers. This report – by Justice Paul Rouleau – marks the end of a commission that investigated the trucker convoy protest, the breakdown in policing and governing that lead to the Emergency Act being invoked.Political columnist John Ibbitson discusses the importance of this report for our democracy, the political winners and losers and what he hopes will be done with Justice Rouleau’s recommendations.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/21/202320 minutes, 25 seconds
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Inside Canada Soccer’s equal pay fight

Canada’s national women’s soccer team is protesting unequal treatment by the sport’s governing body. The players say Canada Soccer is not transparent with its finances, and that they won’t agree to be paid less than the men. The men’s team supports them.On Thursday, the team was forced to play in the SheBelieves cup under threat of legal action. Federal MPs have noticed, and called for Canada Soccer to explain itself at a parliamentary committee.Rachel Brady is The Globe’s sports reporter, and she’ll tell us about the dispute, the growing business case for equally funding women’s sport, and how that’s fuelling professional women’s soccer in Canada.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/17/202320 minutes, 30 seconds
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How to invest when the economy is on the rocks

Investing your money can grow your wealth faster than just saving it— or shrink it, if you put your money in stocks that fail, or have to withdraw your money from the market while it’s down.Erica Alini, the Globe’s personal finance reporter and author of the newsletter MoneySmart Bootcamp, shares her tips for how to think about investing wisely.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/16/202319 minutes, 21 seconds
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Why mushroom dispensaries are sprouting up across Canada

On Tuesday, Green Party Leader Elizabeth May and NDP MP Alistair MacGregor held a news conference about medical access to psilocybin – better known as magic mushrooms. The psychedelic is illegal in Canada but there’s increased interest in the potential therapeutic benefits of the drug.This is happening while still-illegal magic mushroom dispensaries have begun to pop up in Vancouver, Toronto and Ottawa. The Globe’s Mike Hager went to one, and explores the business behind magic mushrooms.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
2/15/202316 minutes, 59 seconds
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The flying objects being shot down over North America

In the span of nine days, we’ve seen the takedown of four flying objects over North America by U.S. fighter jets. It has both Canada and the U.S. on high alert with speculation of Chinese spying. The White House has had to tamp down questions of whether aliens could be involved. Meanwhile, Prime Minister Trudeau says the search for debris in Yukon, where one of the objects was taken down is currently under way.The Globe’s senior parliamentary reporter, Steven Chase is on the show to tell us what we know so far about the mysterious flying objects and why all of a sudden, they’re being detected.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
2/14/202319 minutes, 37 seconds
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Everything you need to know about fusion energy

Fusion – the act of deriving energy by smashing atoms together – has long been the stuff of science fiction. But thanks to a recent scientific breakthrough, there has been an increase in public excitement that one day, we might be able to use this as a continuous, clean source of energy.The catch? We might not get the technology before our 2050 net-zero climate goals arrive.Science Reporter Ivan Semeniuk explains exactly how fusion works and the Canadian efforts that are working to take this theory and turn it into a viable and widespread energy source.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/13/202318 minutes, 39 seconds
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An impossible offer for Canadian children detained in Syria

The federal government has offered to bring some Canadian children being held in detention camps in Syria to Canada – but their mothers can’t come with them. This is part of an ongoing issue for the government over what to do about men and women who are suspected of joining the Islamic State terrorist organization — and what to do with their children.The Globe’s Janice Dickson has been covering this issue since the Islamic State fell in 2019 and has spoken to one of the mothers facing this difficult decision.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/10/202319 minutes, 2 seconds
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Is $200 billion enough to fix health care?

Ottawa announced Tuesday a proposed $46.2-billion injection in new federal health care funding for the provinces and territories.For years, there have been calls to reform Canada’s health care system. People have died in emergency rooms waiting for care, 15 percent of Canadians don’t have a regular health care provider and there are ongoing issues facing long term care.Will this new money help fix these systemic problems?Health reporter Kelly Grant asked leaders in health care what they make of the deal, and she’ll detangle what this money can and can’t do for our ailing healthcare system.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/9/202320 minutes, 36 seconds
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China’s long reach into Canada’s battery minerals industry

Canada is facing increasing calls to grow its critical mineral industry as the world pivots toward its net-zero goals and batteries are becoming increasingly important. But at the moment, Canada only has one functioning lithium mine and no refineries.Compare that to China, which dominates the entire critical mineral industry globally and has extensive reach into Canada’s current operations. So what can Canada do to get going? Mining reporter Niall McGee explains how Canada has found itself in this position.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/8/202317 minutes, 14 seconds
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A Canadian sniper on the battle for Bakhmut, Ukraine

A Canadian sniper, whose codename is Teflon, was set up in an apartment building in the destroyed city of Bakhmut, Ukraine, shooting waves of Russian soldiers. He says it was almost too easy: “I actually got to a point where I was like, can you stop? I’m tired of killing people ... I shouldn’t be killing people this easily.”Bakhmut, in eastern Ukraine, has seen heavy fighting for months because invading Russian forces see it as strategically important. The Globe’s Mark MacKinnon spoke with the sniper about his role in the war, and how the battle for Bakhmut has been playing out on the ground.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/7/202319 minutes, 50 seconds
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Why investors are flocking to the daycare business

The federal government’s $30-billion pledge to bring daycare costs down to $10/day and to create 250,000 new spaces by 2026 isn’t only attracting families, it’s also getting attention from investors. As the government seeks to make more spaces, for-profit centres are quickly expanding to meet targets.The Globe’s Dave McGinn, and The Globe’s independent business reporter, Chris Hannay, explain the appeal and why child care advocates are concerned.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/6/202320 minutes, 30 seconds
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The McKinsey controversy explained

On Wednesday, Dominic Barton appeared before a parliamentary committee looking into the rise in outsourcing contracts awarded to McKinsey & Company, where Barton was formerly global managing partner. Barton was also a senior policy adviser to the Trudeau government and the Canadian ambassador to China.Since 2015, the Liberal government has paid more than $116 million dollars to the private management consulting firm. That’s more than thirty times what the Conservative government before them paid over their ten years in office.Bill Curry is the Globe’s Deputy Ottawa Bureau Chief and has been following this story for years.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/3/202322 minutes, 59 seconds
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B.C. decriminalizes some drug possession

As of this week, possession of 2.5 grams of some drugs in B.C. is decriminalized. The B.C. government says it is trying to reduce the number of people who die from overdoses in the province. Around six people die every day in B.C. from drugs – but many advocates don’t believe this decriminalization program will actually prevent people from dying.Garth Mullins is an organizer with the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users, and host of the podcast Crackdown. He’ll tell us about B.C.’s plan, about the impact criminalization has had on him and people he knows, and what he thinks would lead to fewer people dying from drugs.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/2/202320 minutes, 51 seconds
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Edmonton spiritual leader charged with sexual assault

John de Ruiter, a spiritual leader known for his piercing stare and who calls himself the ‘embodiment of truth’ was arrested and charged with four counts of sexual assault earlier this month. He’s now out on bail and intends to fight the charges.De Ruiter is a leader of a multimillion dollar organization called The College of Integrated Philosophy. It’s based in Edmonton but has followers all over the world. Some have described the group as a cult.The Globe’s Jana Pruden has been investigating the group for years. She has spoken to former members and attended a meeting to learn more about de Ruiter’s teachings. She’s on the show to explain what she’s learned about this tight-knit community and what these charges could mean for its future.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
2/1/202319 minutes, 35 seconds
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What the Rogers-Shaw deal could mean for your phone bill

On Monday, Rogers Communications Inc., Shaw Communications Inc. and Quebecor Inc. extended a deadline to mid-February that would finalize the largest telecommunications takeover in Canadian history. The deal would see Rogers buy Shaw for $20-billion. In an already concentrated industry, Canada’s Competition Bureau has argued that the deal would be bad for consumers who already pay some of the highest cell phone bills in the world.Telecom reporter, Alexandra Posadzki explains the implications of this deal and why, even though it has cleared significant legal hurdles, Canada’s Federal Industry Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne won’t rush his signoff.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/31/202318 minutes, 32 seconds
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What went wrong with the Liberals’ gun legislation

The Liberal government brought in Bill C-21 last May that would ban certain firearms. Amendments to the legislation have only confused the matter – some types of guns are banned in some of those amendments, but not in others – and the Liberals’ lack of communication is frustrating people on all sides of the issue.The Globe’s senior political reporter Marieke Walsh tells us why these changes have been made to the legislation, why the government has been so quiet on it, and how likely this legislation is to work in reducing gun violence.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/30/202320 minutes, 1 second
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What remains a year after the convoy protests

A year after tens of thousands of people descended on Ottawa, some in their big-rig trucks, a lot has changed. Border restrictions have been lifted. Same for vaccine passports and most masking requirements. But the alienation and anger that lay underneath the movement seems to remain.Ottawa reporter Shannon Proudfoot discusses what some of the participants of the convoy think about it now, and whether another version of this protest could pop up again.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/27/202318 minutes, 47 seconds
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Unicorns, camels and the tech crash

To cope with the rising interest rates and higher-than-normal inflation in the economy, many tech companies are changing how they do business, focusing on turning a profit over growing revenue or market share.Technology reporter Sean Silcoff explains why for many years, forgoing profit was a good bet for startups, why that focus has led to mass layoffs in today’s shakier economic reality, and how some companies are thriving in these tough times.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/26/202320 minutes, 42 seconds
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Arsenic in the air divides a small Quebec city

The residents of Rouyn-Noranda, QC have known about the arsenic emissions coming from the local smelting plant for years. More studies are coming out about health concerns for the residents – but Glencore, the company that owns the plant, is still allowed to emit significantly more arsenic than the rest of the province.The Globe’s Eric Andrew-Gee went to Rouyn-Noranda and spoke with residents about the impact of these emissions and why it’s been allowed to go on for decades.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/25/202317 minutes, 53 seconds
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Western allies debate sending tanks to Ukraine

Ukraine wants tanks – 300 of them to be precise. President Volodymyr Zelensky believes that western battle tanks could be the key to driving Russian troops out of his country. But the allies, including Canada, are still deliberating on whether they should send them.Steven Chase has been covering the developments on this aspect of the war for The Globe. He explains why Canada alone can’t make the decision to send Ukraine our Leopard-2 tanks and why allies are worried this might be the escalation that provokes a Russian backlash.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/24/202317 minutes, 28 seconds
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Why physically disciplining kids is still legal in Canada

In Canada, the criminal code allows for physical discipline of children, in certain circumstances. For almost half a century, advocates have been fighting to repeal the law, saying it violates children’s rights. Seventeen bills have been introduced in Parliament trying to strike the law down – and all of them have died before they could change the criminal code.Now, two bills trying once again are before Parliament. The Globe’s Marsha McLeod explains why the law exists, and the vocal groups who’ve fought to keep it on the books.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/23/202316 minutes, 59 seconds
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Are Alberta and BC good models for private surgery?

Ontario Premier Doug Ford announced this week his government is increasing the use of private clinics for procedures like cataracts, diagnostic imaging and eventually hip and knee replacements. The move sparked a lot of criticism – but Ford says he’s following the lead of other provinces like B.C., Alberta and Quebec that are already doing something similar.First, we’ll talk to The Globe’s provincial politics reporter Jeff Gray about Ontario’s plan. Then, we’ll talk to The Globe’s B.C. reporter Mike Hager about how that strategy is working in other provinces, and why B.C. is now moving away from private health care.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/20/202321 minutes, 24 seconds
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Inside the life-or-death journey of one Venezuelan family

Over 7-million Venezuelans have left their homes since 2017, when Nicholas Maduro seized power and the state started to collapse. Most refugees have tried to start anew in nearby countries, like Colombia, Peru and Ecuador. But an increasing number are headed north on a dangerous trek that will take them to U.S.’s southern border. It’s a journey that is hugely shaped by policy decisions being made continents away.Kerli Vasquez and her family are on this journey and met Doug Saunders, the Globe’s international affairs columnist, on the road. Doug tells us about the years they’ve spent trying to re-establish themselves in multiple different countries, and are now en route to try and reach the U.S.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/19/202318 minutes, 46 seconds
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Canada’s new drinking guidelines

On Tuesday, Canada’s new guidelines for drinking and health were released from the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse and Addiction (CCSA). The guidelines say that three to six standard drinks put you at a moderate health risk— and you might be surprised by how much counts as a “standard drink.”Dr. Catherine Paradis is a sociologist and the interim associate director of research at the CCSA. She’s back on the show addressing some of the questions listeners had after hearing her back in September, and outlining why she thinks labeling alcohol will help Canadians make more informed choices when drinking.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/18/202322 minutes, 10 seconds
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What history can tell us about this economic moment

The economic forecast for 2023 is … less than rosy. Inflation is still running high. Central banks may continue to raise interest rates. And what everyone wants to know is: How long will this last before rates are lowered again?Globe and Mail columnist Tim Kiladze says you can look back in history to get some clues. And they suggest that an investor’s best asset for the next while might be patiences.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/17/202317 minutes, 34 seconds
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Why holiday travel chaos is the new normal

The holiday travel period was incredibly tumultuous – with passengers stranded, bags lost and thousands of flights cancelled. The airlines say the winter storms caused unprecedented disruptions, but The Globe’s transportation reporter Eric Atkins says the problems go beyond that.He tells us the other factors that led to this chaos, how airlines are responding, and whether this is likely to happen again. (Spoiler: It is.)Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/16/202319 minutes, 28 seconds
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The hard-line plans of Israel’s new far-right government

Israel’s new far-right government is looking to overhaul the country’s justice system – going so far as seeking to create a law that would allow parliament to override the Supreme Court. If the changes happen, it could have implications on rights for the LGBTQ community, asylum seekers and also exacerbate tensions with the Palestinians.Josef Federman is the News Director of the Associated Press for Israel, the Palestinian territories and Jordan. He explains why this is happening now and what these proposals signal about the direction the country is headed.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/13/202323 minutes, 10 seconds
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Cheap grocery apps aiming to reduce food waste

There’s a growing demand for food waste apps from both shoppers and grocers. They’ve been touted as a new way for people to score deals as food prices rise, while cutting back on food being thrown out by retailers.Susan Krashinsky Robertson is The Globe and Mail’s retailing reporter and she explains who uses these apps and what evidence there is that they actually help in getting food to people instead of it heading to the landfill.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/12/202317 minutes, 48 seconds
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A virologist on COVID variant XBB 1.5

The XBB 1.5 variant of COVID is quickly becoming the dominant strain in the US, and we’re seeing more cases here in Canada too. The WHO has called it the most transmissible variant of the virus we’ve seen so far.Some people are calling it ‘The Kraken.’ But not Dr. Angela Rasmussen. She’s a virologist at VIDO, the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization at the University of Saskatchewan, and she’ll walk us through what we know about this variant, what we don’t know, and how concerned we should be.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/11/202318 minutes, 26 seconds
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Andrew Coyne looks ahead to politics in 2023

Canada’s facing a stressed health care system, persistent inflation and a fraught geopolitical scene.Globe and Mail columnist Andrew Coyne looks at the big issues that will likely be facing the federal government in 2023 and what this means for leaders Justin Trudeau, Pierre Poilievre and Jagmeet Singh, and the possibility of a federal election.Questions? Comments? Ideas? E-mail us at [email protected]
1/10/202319 minutes, 48 seconds
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Shopify's problems

Shopify began this year announcing to its workers that meetings of more than two employees were banned. Slack channels that were not work-related – the online equivalent of a water cooler and its associated chit-chat – had been deleted.Those changes, along with last year’s sweeping layoffs and the company’s new product offerings, are part of an attempt to bring Shopify back to its glory days, just a few years ago. In 2020, Shopify became the most valuable company in Canada, but that’s no longer the case. In 2022, it lost two-thirds of its stock value.Technology reporter Temur Durrani tells us what went wrong, what Shopify is trying to do about it, and how the tech sector is suffering from uncertain times.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/9/202316 minutes, 33 seconds
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Disaster-proof your finances for 2023

2022 was a pretty turbulent year financially, with sky-high inflation, interest rates and housing prices. So you might be looking at the coming year and thinking about how to protect your finances against whatever 2023 might bring.The Globe’s personal finance reporter, Erica Alini, recently wrote a MoneySmart Bootcamp newsletter to help people get a better handle on their money. Today, we talk to her about how to disaster-proof your finances and discuss budgeting, saving and debt.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/6/202319 minutes, 42 seconds
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Why the surge of COVID in China looks a lot like 2020

Since China abandoned its COVID-zero policies, the country has seen a dramatic outbreak of infections. But exactly how bad things are remains murky, as contradictory reports of cases and deaths emerge.But other countries are reacting nonetheless; Canada and others have put new travel restrictions on people arriving from China. There are fears that the rate of infection and the size of China’s population could make things dramatically worse. The Globe’s Asia Correspondent, James Griffiths, explains.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/5/202318 minutes
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The weight loss drug everyone’s talking about

Ozempic and other semaglutide drugs have been hailed as a very effective treatment for obesity, but shortages, affordability and doctors’ willingness to prescribe it are still keeping people who might benefit from it off the drug.Health reporter Carly Weeks explains how the drug works and how it may force our society to rethink how we perceive obesity.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]
1/4/202319 minutes, 59 seconds
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How organ transplants could be changed by ... frozen frogs

Some animals survive harsh winter conditions by completely freezing and thawing in spring, like the wood frog. Researchers are looking to harness these abilities for humans – particularly for organ transplants.Shannon Tessier is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and an investigator at the Center for Engineering in Medicine and Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital. She tells us how animals freeze over and how it might be harnessed for organ transplants.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected].
1/3/202316 minutes, 49 seconds
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2022: A look back on the year of the ‘freedom convoy’

What started as a protest against vaccine mandates for cross-border truck drivers turned into a catch-all occupation of pent-up pandemic grievances. By the time it was over, hundreds of people were arrested, Ottawa’s police chief resigned, and the Emergencies Act had been invoked for the first time ever.Today, we look back at how this story dominated headlines throughout the year, from the first rumblings in January to the hot tubs and honking in February, the 21-year-old who won against the convoy in court, to the testimony from the Prime Minister in the fall.Questions? Comments? Ideas? Email us at [email protected]