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The Daily

English, News, 1 seasons, 2079 episodes, 6 days 14 hours 48 minutes
About
This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.
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The Sunday Read: ‘How Tom Sandoval Became the Most Hated Man in America’

At the end of a quiet, leafy street in the Valley in Los Angeles, the reality TV star Tom Sandoval has outfitted his home with landscaping lights that rotate in a spectrum of colors, mimicking the dance floor of a nightclub. The property is both his private residence and an occasional TV set for the Bravo reality show “Vanderpump Rules.” After a series of events that came to be known as “Scandoval,” paparazzi had been camped outside, but by the new year it was just one or two guys, and now they have mostly gone, too.“Scandoval” is the nickname for Sandoval’s affair with another cast member, which he had behind the backs of the show’s producers and his girlfriend of nine years. This wouldn’t be interesting or noteworthy except that in 2023, after being on the air for 10 seasons, “Vanderpump” was nominated for an Emmy for outstanding unstructured reality program, an honor that has never been bestowed on any of the network’s “Housewives” shows. It also became, by a key metric, t
03/03/202449 minutes
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Biden, Trump and a Split Screen at the Texas Border

President Biden and Donald J. Trump both made appearances at the southern border on Thursday as they addressed an issue that is shaping up to be one of the most important in the 2024 election: immigration.Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The Times, discusses Mr. Biden’s risky bid to take perhaps Trump’s biggest rallying point and use it against him.Guest: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: In appearances some 300 miles apart, Mr. Biden and Mr. Trump tried to leverage a volatile policy dispute of the 2024 campaign.How visiting the border has become a potent form of political theater.For more information on today’s episode,
01/03/202430 minutes 17 seconds
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How Poisoned Applesauce Found Its Way to Kids

A Times investigation has revealed how applesauce laced with high levels of lead sailed through a food safety system meant to protect American consumers, and poisoned hundreds of children across the U.S.Christina Jewett, who covers the Food and Drug Administration for The Times, talks about what she found.Guest: Christina Jewett, who covers the Food and Drug Administration for The New York Times.Background reading: Lead-tainted applesauce sailed through gaps in the food-safety system.What to know about lead exposure in children.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/theda
29/02/202425 minutes 11 seconds
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An Arms Race Quietly Unfolds in Space

U.S. officials have acknowledged a growing fear that Russia may be trying to put a nuclear weapon into orbit.Eric Lipton, an investigative reporter for The Times, explains that their real worry is that America could lose the battle for military supremacy in space.Guest: Eric Lipton, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The U.S. warned its allies that Russia could put a nuclear weapon into orbit this year.The Pentagon is in the early stages of a program to put constellations of smaller and cheaper satellites into orbit to counter space-based threats of the sort being developed by Russia and China.For m
28/02/202425 minutes 2 seconds
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The Voters Willing to Abandon Biden Over Gaza

In the past few weeks, activists in Michigan have begun calling voters in the state, asking them to protest President Biden’s support for the Israeli military campaign in Gaza by not voting for him in the Democratic primary.The activists are attempting to turn their anger over Gaza into a political force, one that could be decisive in a critical swing state where winning in November is likely to be a matter of the slimmest of margins.Jennifer Medina, a political reporter for The Times, explains how the war in Gaza is changing politics in Michigan.Guest: Jennifer Medina, a political reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Will Biden’s Gaza stance hurt him in 2024? Michigan is the first test.The war in Gaza<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2024/02/26/u
27/02/202435 minutes 2 seconds
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The Alabama Ruling That Could Stop Families From Having Kids

 A surprise ruling from the Alabama Supreme Court has halted fertility treatments across the state and sent a shock wave through the world of reproductive health.Azeen Ghorayshi, who covers sex, gender, and science for The Times, explains what the court case means for reproductive health and a patient in Alabama explains what it is like navigating the fallout.Guests: Azeen Ghorayshi, who covers sex, gender and science for The New York Times; and Meghan S. Cole, who is in the final stages of IVF treatment in Alabama.Background reading: Alabama ruled frozen embryos are children, raising questions about fertility care.Fertility clinics are routinely sued by patients for errors that destroy embryos, as happened in Alabama.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2024/02/22/health/fer
26/02/202428 minutes 35 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘How Do You Make a Weed Empire? Sell It Like Streetwear.’

The closest thing to a bat signal for stoners is the blue lettering of the Cookies logo. When a new storefront comes to a strip mall or a downtown shopping district, fans flock to grand-opening parties, drawn by a love of the brand — one based on more than its reputation for selling extremely potent weed.People often compare Cookies to the streetwear brand Supreme. That’s accurate in one very literal sense — they each sell a lot of hats — and in other, more subjective ones. They share a penchant for collaboration-based marketing; their appeal to mainstream audiences is tied up with their implied connections to illicit subcultures; and they’ve each been expanding rapidly in recent years.All of it is inextricable from Berner, the stage name of Gilbert Milam, 40, Cookies’ co-founder and chief executive, who spent two decades as a rapper with a sideline as a dealer — or as a dealer with a sideline as a rapper. With the company’s success, he is estimated to be one of the we
25/02/202429 minutes 8 seconds
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Trump’s Cash Crunch

Last week, when a civil court judge in New York ruled against Donald J. Trump, he imposed a set of penalties so severe that they could temporarily sever the former president from his real-estate empire and wipe out all of his cash.Jonah Bromwich, who covers criminal justice in New York, and Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The Times, explain what that will mean for Mr. Trump as a businessman and as a candidate.Guests: Jonah E. Bromwich, a criminal justice correspondent for The New York Times; and Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Trump was met with a $450 million blow to his finances and his identity.Here’s<
23/02/202425 minutes 16 seconds
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Putin’s Opposition Ponders a Future Without Aleksei Navalny

Last week, the Russian authorities announced that Aleksei A. Navalny, Russia’s most prominent opposition leader and an unflinching critic of President Vladimir V. Putin, had died in a remote Arctic prison at the age of 47.Yevgenia Albats, his friend, discusses how Mr. Navalny became a political force and what it means for his country that he is gone.Guest: Yevgenia Albats, a Russian investigative journalist and a friend of Mr. Navalny.Background reading: Who was Aleksei Navalny?The sudden death of Mr. Navalny left a vacuum in Russia’s opposition. His widow, Yulia Navalnaya, signaled that she would try to fill the void.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily</
22/02/202431 minutes 31 seconds
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What Happens if America Turns Its Back on Its Allies in Europe

Over the past few weeks, a growing sense of alarm across Europe over the future of the continent’s security has turned into outright panic.As Russia advances on the battlefield in Ukraine, the U.S. Congress has refused to pass billions of dollars in new funding for Ukraine’s war effort and Donald Trump has warned European leaders that if they do not pay what he considers their fair share toward NATO, he would not protect them from Russian aggression.Steven Erlanger, the chief diplomatic correspondent for The Times, discusses Europe’s plans to defend itself against Russia without the help of the United States.Guest: Steven Erlanger, the chief diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: In Europe, there is a dawning recognition that the continent urgen
21/02/202423 minutes 1 second
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Stranded in Rafah as an Israeli Invasion Looms

This episode contains strong language and descriptions of war.After months of telling residents in the Gaza Strip to move south for safety, Israel now says it plans to invade Rafah, the territory’s southernmost city. More than a million people are effectively trapped there without any clear idea of where to go.Two Gazans describe what it is like to live in Rafah right now.Guest: Ghada al-Kurd and Hussein Owda, who are among more than a million people sheltering in Rafah.Background reading: Israel’s allies and others have warned against an offensive, saying that the safety of the civilians who have sought shelter in the far south of Gaza is paramount.Palestinians in Rafah described a “night full of horror” as Israeli strikes pummeled
20/02/202440 minutes 43 seconds
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The Booming Business of Cutting Babies’ Tongues

A Times investigation has found that dentists and lactation consultants around the country are pushing “tongue-tie releases” on new mothers struggling to breastfeed, generating huge profits while often harming patients.Katie Thomas, an investigative health care reporter at The Times, discusses the forces driving this emerging trend in American health care and the story of one family in the middle of it.Guest: Katie Thomas, an investigative health care reporter at The New York Times.Background reading: Inside the booming business of cutting babies’ tongues.What parents should know about tongue-tie releases.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?sm
19/02/202435 minutes 49 seconds
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Sunday Special: Un-Marry Me!

Today we’re sharing the latest episode of Modern Love, a podcast about the complicated love lives of real people, from The New York Times.Anna Martin, host of the show, spoke to David Finch, who wrote three Modern Love essays about how hard he had worked to be a good husband to his wife, Kristen. As a man with autism who married a neurotypical woman, Dave found it challenging to navigate being a partner and a father. Eventually, he started keeping a list of “best practices” to cover every situation that might come up in daily life – a method that worked so well he wrote a best-selling book on it.But almost 11 years into his marriage, Kristen said she wanted to be “unmarried.” Dave was totally thrown off. He didn’t know what that meant, or if he could do it. But he wasn’t going to lose Kristen, so he had to give it a try.For more episodes of Modern Love, search for the show wherever you get your pod
18/02/202427 minutes 3 seconds
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An Explosive Hearing in Trump’s Georgia Election Case

In tense proceedings in Georgia, a judge will decide whether Fani T. Willis, the Fulton County district attorney, and her office should be disqualified from their prosecution of former President Donald J. Trump.Richard Fausset, a national reporter for The Times, talks through the dramatic opening day of testimony, in which a trip to Belize, a tattoo parlor and Grey Goose vodka all featured.Guest: Richard Fausset, a national reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: With everything on the line, Ms. Willis delivered raw testimony.What happens if Fani Willis is disqualified from the Trump case?Read<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2024/02/15/us/politics/trump-georgia-fani-willis-heari
16/02/202436 minutes 24 seconds
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How China Broke One Man’s Dreams

A crisis of confidence is brewing inside China, where the government is turning believers in the Chinese dream into skeptics willing to flee the country.Li Yuan, who writes about technology, business and politics across Asia for The Times, explains why that crisis is now showing up at the United States’ southern border.Guest: Li Yuan, who writes the New New World column for The New York Times.Background reading: Why more Chinese are risking danger in southern border crossings to the United States.More than 24,000 Chinese citizens have been apprehended making the crossing from Mexico in the past year. That is more than in the preceding 10 years combined.</l
15/02/202429 minutes 38 seconds
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The Biden Problem Democrats Can No Longer Ignore

Questions about President Biden’s age sharpened again recently after a special counsel report about his handling of classified information described him as a “well-meaning, elderly man with a poor memory.”Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The Times, explains why Mr. Biden’s condition can no longer be ignored.Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: How Old Is Too Old to Be President? An Uncomfortable Question Arises Again.‘My Memory Is Fine,’ a Defiant Biden Declares After Special Counsel ReportFor more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
14/02/202433 minutes 6 seconds
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Why the Race to Replace George Santos Is So Close

Voters in New York are choosing the successor to George Santos, the disgraced Republican who was expelled from Congress in December.Nicholas Fandos, who covers New York politics and government for The Times, explains how the results of the race will hold important clues for both parties in November.Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a reporter covering New York politics and government for The New York Times.Background reading: What to Know About the Race to Replace George SantosDays before a special House election in New York, Tom Suozzi and Mazi Pilip traded blows in the race’s lone debate.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.co
13/02/202427 minutes 23 seconds
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Why Boeing’s Top Airplanes Keep Failing

When a piece of an Alaska Airlines flight blew out into the sky in January, concern and scrutiny focused once more on the plane’s manufacturer, Boeing.Sydney Ember, a business reporter for The Times, explains what has been learned about the incident and what the implications might be for Boeing.Guest: Sydney Ember, a business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The Alaska Airlines plane may have left the Boeing factory missing bolts, the National Transportation Safety Board said.Facing another Boeing crisis, the F.A.A. takes a harder line.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of
12/02/202421 minutes 57 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Unthinkable Mental Health Crisis That Shook a New England College’

The first death happened before the academic year began. In July 2021, an undergraduate student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute was reported dead. The administration sent a notice out over email, with the familiar, thoroughly vetted phrasing and appended resources. Katherine Foo, an assistant professor in the department of integrative and global studies, felt especially crushed by the news. She taught this student. He was Chinese, and she felt connected to the particular set of pressures he faced. She read through old, anonymous course evaluations, looking for any sign she might have missed. But she was unsure where to put her personal feelings about a loss suffered in this professional context.The week before the academic year began, a second student died. A rising senior in the computer-science department who loved horticulture took his own life. This brought an intimation of disaster. One student suicide is a tragedy; two might be the beginning of a cluster. Some facult
11/02/202442 minutes 4 seconds
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Kick Trump Off the Ballot? Even Liberal Justices Are Skeptical

In December, the Colorado Supreme Court issued a bombshell ruling that said Donald Trump was ineligible to be on the state’s ballot for the Republican presidential primary, saying he was disqualified under the 14th Amendment of the Constitution because he had engaged in insurrection on Jan. 6.The Supreme Court has taken on the case and on Thursday, the justices heard arguments for and against keeping Trump on the ballot.Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, analyzes the arguments, the justices’ responses, and what they can tell us about the likely ruling in a case that could alter the course of this year’s race for president.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times and writes Sidebar, a column on legal developments.Background reading: <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2024/02/08/us/elections/trump-supreme-court-ballot-whats-ne
09/02/202434 minutes 5 seconds
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A Guilty Verdict For a Mass Shooter’s Mother

Warning: this episode contains strong language and descriptions of violence.A few days ago, for the first time, an American jury convicted a parent for a mass shooting carried out by their child.Lisa Miller, who has been following the case since its beginning, explains what the historic verdict really means.Guest: Lisa Miller, a domestic correspondent for The New York TimesBackground reading: From New York Magazine: Will James and Jennifer Crumbley be Found Guilty for Their Son’s Mass Shooting?Mother of Michigan Gunman Found Guilty of ManslaughterA Mom’s Conviction Offers Pro
08/02/202436 minutes 53 seconds
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El Salvador Decimated Gangs. But at What Cost?

El Salvador has experienced a remarkable transformation. What had once been one of the most violent countries in the world has become incredibly safe.Natalie Kitroeff, the New York Times bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, discusses the cost of that transformation to the people of El Salvador, and the man at the center of it, the newly re-elected President Nayib Bukele.Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, the New York Times bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.Background reading: El Salvador Decimated Its Ruthless Gangs. But at What Cost?He Cracked Down on Gangs and Rights. Now He’s Set to Win a Landslide.Fo
07/02/202429 minutes 7 seconds
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The U.N. Scandal Threatening Crucial Aid to Gaza

Late last month, an explosive allegation that workers from a crucial U.N. relief agency in Gaza had taken part in the Oct. 7 attacks stunned the world and prompted major donors, including the United States, to suspend funding.Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The Times, explains what this could mean for the humanitarian crisis in Gaza and how it might complicate Israel’s strategy in the war.Guest: Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: U.N. Agency for Palestinians Imperiled by Terrorism ChargesThe 8 Days That Roiled the U.N.’s Top Agency in Gaza<a href="https://www.nytime
06/02/202431 minutes 44 seconds
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The 1948 Economic Moment That Might Explain Our Own

President Biden has struggled to sell Americans on the positive signs in the economy under his watch, despite figures that look good on paper. That could have important ramifications for his re-election hopes.Nate Cohn, the chief political analyst for The Times, explains why, to understand the situation, it may help to look back at another election, 76 years ago.Guest: Nate Cohn, the chief political analyst for The New York Times.Background reading: Want to Understand 2024? Look at 1948.The Economy Looks Sunny, a Potential Gain for Biden.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made av
05/02/202425 minutes 9 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Great Freight-Train Heists of the 21st Century’

Of all the dozens of suspected thieves questioned by the detectives of the Train Burglary Task Force at the Los Angeles Police Department during the months they spent investigating the rise in theft from the city’s freight trains, one man stood out. What made him memorable wasn’t his criminality so much as his giddy enthusiasm for trespassing. That man, Victor Llamas, was a self-taught expert of the supply chain, a connoisseur of shipping containers. Even in custody, as the detectives interrogated him numerous times, after multiple arrests, in a windowless room in a police station in spring 2022, a kind of nostalgia would sweep over the man. “He said that was the best feeling he’d ever had, jumping on the train while it was moving,” Joe Chavez, who supervised the task force’s detectives, said. “It was euphoric for him.”Some 20 million containers move through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach every year, including about 35 percent of all the imports into the United State
04/02/202449 minutes 21 seconds
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On the Ballot in South Carolina: Biden’s Pitch to Black Voters

The Democratic presidential nomination process begins tomorrow in South Carolina, and President Biden is running largely uncontested. But his campaign is expending significant resources in the race to try to reach a crucial part of his base: Black voters.Maya King, a politics reporter at The Times, explains.Guest: Maya King, a politics reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: In South Carolina, Mr. Biden is trying to persuade Black voters to reject Trump.South Carolina was the home of Mr. Biden’s political resurrection in the primaries four years ago, and it is reaping the rewards.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http
02/02/202429 minutes 36 seconds
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Secure the Border, Say Republicans. So Why Are They Killing a Plan to Do That?

For the past few weeks, Democrats and Republicans were closing in on a game-changing deal to secure the U.S.-Mexico border: a bipartisan compromise that’s unheard-of in contemporary Washington.Karoun Demirjian, who covers Congress for The Times, explains why that deal is now falling apart.Guest: Karoun Demirjian, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Divided Republicans coalesced behind a bit of legislative extortion: No Ukraine aid without a border crackdown. Then they split over how large a price to demand, imperiling both initiatives.Republicans and Democrats have agreed to try to reduce the number of migrants granted parole to stay in the United States, but cementing the compromise <a href="https://www.n
01/02/202426 minutes 41 seconds
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Is the Future of Medicine Hidden in Ancient DNA?

In a major advance in science, DNA from Bronze Age skeletons is providing clues to modern medical mysteries.Carl Zimmer, who covers life sciences for The Times, explains how a new field of study is changing the way we think about treatments for devastating diseases.Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science correspondent who writes the Origins column for The New York Times.Background reading: Ancient Skeletons Give Clues to Modern Medical MysteriesMorning Person? You Might Have Neanderthal Genes to Thank.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of ea
31/01/202424 minutes 35 seconds
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Trump’s Voters vs. Haley’s Donors

Inside the Republican Party, a class war is playing out between the pro-Trump base, which is ready for the nomination fight to be over, and the anti-Trump donor class, which thinks it’s just getting started.Astead Herndon, a political correspondent for The Times and the host of “The Run-Up,” explains the clash.Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a political correspondent and host of The Run-Up for The New York Times.Background: Listen to “The Run-Up” on tensions between big Republican donors and the party base.Former President Donald J. Trump said donors to Nikki Haley, his remaining Republican rival, would be “barred from the MAGA camp.”For more inf
30/01/202430 minutes 6 seconds
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The Failed Promise of Police Body Cameras

This episode contains strong language and audio excerpts of violence.About a decade ago, police departments across the United States began equipping their officers with body cameras. The technology was meant to serve as a window into potential police misconduct, but that transparency has often remained elusive.Eric Umansky, an editor at large at ProPublica, explains why body cameras haven’t been the fix that many hoped they would be.Guest: Eric Umansky, an editor at large at ProPublica.Background reading: The Failed Promise of Police Body CamerasFrom ProPublica: 21 Bodycam Videos Caught the NYPD Wrongly Arresting Black Kids on Halloween. Why Can’t the Public See the Footage?For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="
29/01/202430 minutes 25 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Whale Who Went AWOL’

On April 26, 2019, a beluga whale appeared near Tufjord, a village in northern Norway, immediately alarming fishermen in the area. Belugas in that part of the world typically inhabit the remote Arctic and are rarely spotted as far south as the Norwegian mainland. Although they occasionally travel solo, they tend to live and move in groups. This particular whale was entirely alone and unusually comfortable around humans, trailing boats and opening his mouth as though expecting to be fed.News of the friendly white whale spread quickly. In early May, a video of the beluga went viral, eventually earning a spot on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.” By midsummer, he had become an international celebrity, drawing large groups of tourists. All the while, marine experts had been speculating about the whale’s origin. Clearly this animal had spent time in captivity — but where?In the years since the whale, publicly named Hvaldimir, first entered the global spotlight, the very qualities
28/01/202444 minutes 41 seconds
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The Mother Who Changed: A Story of Dementia

Across the United States, millions of families are confronting a seemingly impossible question: When dementia changes a relative, how much should they accommodate their new personality and desires?Katie Engelhart, a writer for The New York Times Magazine, tells the story of one family’s experience.Guest: Katie Engelhart, a writer for The New York Times Magazine.Background reading: The Mother Who Changed: A Story of DementiaKatie Englehart has reported on dementia for years, and one image of a prisoner haunts her.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode wi
26/01/20241 hour 56 seconds
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The Hybrid Worker Malaise

The era of hybrid work has spawned a new kind of office culture — one that has left many workers less connected and less happy than they have ever been.Emma Goldberg, a business reporter covering workplace culture for The Times, explains how mixing remote and office work has created a malaise, as workers confront new challenges and navigate uncertainty, and employers engage in a wave of experiments.Guest: Emma Goldberg, a business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Emma Goldberg reflects on her evolving beat as tens of thousands of employees return to the office.From March: Office Mandates. Pickleball. Beer. What will make hybrid work stick?
25/01/202430 minutes 16 seconds
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Why the G.O.P. Nomination Fight Is Now (All But) Over

On Tuesday, Donald J. Trump beat Nikki Haley in New Hampshire. His win accelerated a push for the party to coalesce behind him and deepened questions about the path forward for Ms. Haley, his lone remaining rival.Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The Times, discusses the real meaning of the former president's victory.Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Donald Trump’s win in New Hampshire added to an air of inevitability, even as Nikki Haley sharpened the edge of her rhetoric.Here are five takeaways from the New Hampshire primary.For more information on toda
24/01/202425 minutes 50 seconds
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The Shadowy Story of Oppenheimer and Congress

Nominations for the Oscars are announced on Tuesday and “Oppenheimer,” a film about the father of the atomic bomb, is expected to be among the front-runners. Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The Times, explains how the film sent her on a quest to find the secret story of how Congress paid for the bomb, and what it reveals about the inner workings of Washington.  Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Watching “Oppenheimer,” a journalist wondered: How did the president get the $2 billion secret project past Congress?What to expect from the Oscar nominations.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http
23/01/202421 minutes 48 seconds
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The Rules of War

 In the International Court of Justice, South Africa is accusing Israel of committing genocide in Gaza.Amanda Taub, a human rights lawyer-turned-journalist at The Times, walks through the arguments of the case, and the power that the rules of war have beyond any verdict in court.Guest: Amanda Taub, writer of The Interpreter for The New York Times.Background reading: What might happen next in the genocide case against Israel.With its accusations against Israel, South Africa is challenging the Western-led order.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made a
22/01/202437 minutes 27 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Podcasters Took Up Her Sister’s Murder Investigation. Then They Turned on Her’

Liz Flatt drove to Austin, Texas, mostly out of desperation. She had tried talking with the police. She had tried working with a former F.B.I. profiler who ran a nonprofit dedicated to solving unsolved murders. She had been interviewed by journalists and at least one podcaster. She had been featured on a Netflix documentary series about a man who falsely confessed to hundreds of killings.Although she didn’t know it at the time, Flatt was at a crossroads in what she had taken to calling her journey, a path embarked on after a prayer-born decision five years earlier to try to find who killed her sister, Deborah Sue Williamson, or Debbie, in 1975. It was now 2021.She had come to Austin for a conference, CrimeCon, which formed around the same time that Flatt began her quest, at a moment now seen as an inflection point in the long history of true crime, a genre as old as storytelling but one that adapts quickly to new technologies, from the printing press to social media. F
21/01/202448 minutes 50 seconds
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The Fishermen Who Could End Federal Regulation as We Know It

On its surface, the case before the Supreme Court — a dispute brought by fishing crews objecting to a government fee — appears to be routine.But, as Adam Liptak, who covers the court for The Times explains, the decision could transform how every industry in the United States is regulated.Guest: Adam Liptak, a Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: How a fight over a fishing regulation could help tear down the administrative state.The case is part of a long-game effort to sap regulation of business.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each epi
19/01/202426 minutes 43 seconds
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What the Houthis Really Want

Attacks by Houthi militants on shipping in the Red Sea, a crucial global trade route, once seemed like a dangerous sideshow to the war in Gaza. But as the attacks have continued, the sideshow has turned into a full-blown crisis.Vivian Nereim, the Gulf bureau chief for The Times, explains what cause is served by the Houthis’ campaign.Guest: Vivian Nereim, the Gulf bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Undeterred by strikes by American and British forces, the Houthis targeted more ships in the Red Sea.Washington is grappling with how to stop a battle-hardened foe from disrupting shipping lanes critical for global trade.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href=
18/01/202429 minutes 4 seconds
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The Messy Fight Over the SAT

Concerned about the effect on diversity, many colleges have stopped requiring standardized tests. New research suggests that might be a mistake.David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The Times, discusses the future of SATs and why colleges remain reluctant to bring them back.Guest: David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The New York Times.Background reading: The misguided war on the SATFrom Opinion: Can the meritocracy survive without the SAT?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
17/01/202426 minutes 24 seconds
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Trump’s Domination and The Battle For No. 2 in Iowa

At the Iowa Republican caucuses on Monday night, Donald J. Trump secured a runaway victory. The only real drama was the fight for second place.Reid Epstein, who covers politics for The Times, takes us inside one of the caucuses, and Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter, walks us through the final results.Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a politics correspondent for The New York Times, andShane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: A letdown for Ron DeSantis: His campaign is running low on cash and faces tough tests ahead.Why coming in second can be a win in early-state contests.<
16/01/202426 minutes 23 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘How an Ordinary Football Game Turns Into the Most Spectacular Thing on TV’

Arrowhead Stadium, the home of the Kansas City Chiefs, the N.F.L.’s defending champions, is a very loud place. During a 2014 game, a sound meter captured a decibel reading equivalent to a jet’s taking off, earning a Guinness World Record for “Loudest crowd roar at a sports stadium.”Around 11 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 7, Brian Melillo, an audio engineer for NBC Sports’ flagship N.F.L. telecast, “Sunday Night Football,” arrived at Arrowhead to prepare for that evening’s game against the Detroit Lions. It was a big occasion: the annual season opener, the N.F.L. Kickoff game, traditionally hosted by the winner of last season’s Super Bowl. There would be speeches, fireworks, a military flyover, the unfurling of a championship banner. A crowd of more than 73,000 was expected. “Arrowhead is a pretty rowdy setting,” Melillo said. “It can present some problems.”Broadcasting a football game on live television is one of the most complex technical and logistical challenges in entert
14/01/20241 hour 27 seconds
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In Iowa, Two Friends Debate DeSantis vs. Trump

On Monday, Iowa holds the first contest in the Republican presidential nominating process and nobody will have more on the line than Ron DeSantis. The Florida governor staked his candidacy on a victory in Iowa, a victory that now seems increasingly remote.Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The Times, and the Daily producers Rob Szypko and Carlos Prieto explain what Mr. DeSantis’s challenge has looked like on the ground in Iowa.Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A weak night for Donald Trump? A Ron DeSantis flop? Gaming out Iowa.From December: Mr. Trump was gain
12/01/202440 minutes 20 seconds
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The Threat of a Wider War in the Middle East

A recent string of attacks across the Middle East has raised concerns that the war between Hamas and Israel is spreading, and might put pressure on other countries like Iran and the United States to get more involved.Eric Schmitt, who covers national security for The Times, discusses the risk that the conflict is becoming an even wider war, and explains the efforts underway to prevent that.Guest: Eric Schmitt, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Attacks have heightened fears of a wider war for the Middle East and U.S.After a Red Sea barrage by the Houthis, a militant group in Yemen, the U.S. and its allies ar
11/01/202422 minutes 28 seconds
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Trump’s Case for Total Immunity

Donald Trump has consistently argued that as a former president, he is immune from being charged with a crime for things he did while he was in office.Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, explains what happened when Trump’s lawyers made that case in federal court, whether the claim has any chance of being accepted — and why Trump may win something valuable either way.Guest: Adam Liptak, a Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Trump’s immunity claim in court.Analysis: Trump says <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/live/2024/01/09/us/tr
10/01/202427 minutes 40 seconds
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The Afterlife of a Gun

Across the United States, hundreds of towns and cities are trying to get guns off the streets by turning them over to businesses that offer to destroy them.But a New York Times investigation found that something very different is happening.Mike McIntire, an investigative reporter at The Times, explains the unintended consequences of efforts by local officials to rid their communities of guns.Guest: Mike McIntire, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The guns were said to be destroyed. Instead, they were reborn.Gun control, explained.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be m
09/01/202427 minutes 10 seconds
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The Wild World of Money in College Football

Tonight, millions of Americans are expected to tune in to watch one of the biggest sports events of the year, college football’s national championship game. On the field, the game will be determined by the skill of the players and coaches, but behind the scenes, secretive groups of donors are wielding enormous influence over what fans will see.David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The Times, discusses the shadowy industry upending college football, and how it has brought amateur athletics even closer to the world of professional sports.Guest: David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The best teams that money could buy.A shift that allows booster groups to employ student athletes has<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/21/u
08/01/202431 minutes 16 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Ghosts on the Glacier’

Fifty years ago, eight Americans set off for South America to climb Aconcagua, one of the world’s mightiest mountains. Things quickly went wrong. Two climbers died. Their bodies were left behind.Here is what was certain: A woman from Denver, maybe the most accomplished climber in the group, had last been seen alive on the glacier. A man from Texas, part of the recent Apollo missions to the moon, lay frozen nearby.There were contradictory statements from survivors and a hasty departure. There was a judge who demanded an investigation into possible foul play. There were three years of summit-scratching searches to find and retrieve the bodies.Now, decades later, a camera belonging to one of the deceased climbers has emerged from a receding glacier near the summit and one of mountaineering’s most enduring mysteries has been given air and light.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York
07/01/20241 hour 16 minutes 30 seconds
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A Confusing New World for College Applicants

In a landmark ruling last summer, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned nearly 50 years of precedent and banned the use of affirmative action in college admissions.The decision eliminated the most powerful tool for ensuring diversity on America’s college campuses and forced college admission officers and high school seniors to figure out what the college admissions process should look like when race cannot be taken into account.Jessica Cheung, a producer on “The Daily,” explains how, over the past year, both students and college officials have tried to navigate the new rules.Guest: Jessica Cheung, a producer on “The Daily” for The New York Times.Background reading: The first high-school seniors to apply to college since the Supreme Court’s landmark decision h
05/01/202434 minutes 32 seconds
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Why Are So Many More Pedestrians Dying in the U.S.?

A puzzling new pattern has taken hold on American roads: pedestrian traffic deaths, which had been on the decline for years, have skyrocketed.Emily Badger, who covers cities and urban policy for The Upshot at The New York Times, discusses her investigation into what lies behind the phenomenon.Guest: Emily Badger, who covers cities and urban policy for The Upshot at The New York Times.Background reading: Why are so many U.S. pedestrians dying at night?The exceptionally American problem of rising roadway deaths.More theories on the rising pedestr
04/01/202421 minutes 38 seconds
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Biden’s 2024 Playbook

Yesterday, we went inside Donald Trump’s campaign for president, to understand how he’s trying to turn a mountain of legal trouble into a political advantage. Today, we turn to the re-election campaign of President Biden.Reid Epstein, who covers politics for The Times, explains why what looks like a record of accomplishment on paper, is turning out to be so difficult to campaign on.Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a politics correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: In South Carolina, Democrats see a test of Biden’s appeal to Black voters.Political Memo: Should Biden really run again? He prolongs an awkward conversation.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://
03/01/202427 minutes 8 seconds
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Trump's 2024 Playbook

As former President Donald J. Trump enters an election year leading his Republican rivals by wide margins in the polls, multiple court cases are taking up an increasing amount of his campaign schedule. They have been integrated into his messaging and fund-raising efforts, and his campaign staff has been developing a strategy to lock up his nomination, regardless of what happens in court. Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The Times, discusses what Mr. Trump’s campaign will look and feel like amid the many court dates for his cases.Guest: Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Inside Trump’s Backroom Effort to Lock Up the Nomination<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/12/29/us/politics/trump-ballot-c
02/01/202428 minutes 27 seconds
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Baseball’s Plan To Save Itself From Boredom: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.Major League Baseball is putting in effect some of the biggest changes in the sport’s history in an effort to speed up the game and inject more activity.As the 2023 season opens, Michael Schmidt, a Times reporter, explains the extraordinary plan to save baseball from the tyranny of the home run.Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Listen to the original version of the episode here.With three maj
29/12/202322 minutes 34 seconds
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A Mother, a Daughter, a Deadly Journey: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.With mountains, intense mud, fast-running rivers and thick rainforest, the Darién Gap, a strip of terrain connecting South and Central America, is one of the most dangerous places on the planet.Over the past few years, there has been an enormous increase in the number of migrants passing through the perilous zone in the hopes of getting to the United States.Today, we hear the story of one family that’s risking everything to make it across.Guest: Julie Turkewitz, the Andes bureau chief for The New York TimesBackground reading: Listen to the original version of the episode here.</li
28/12/202320 minutes 59 seconds
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Inside Russia’s Crackdown on Dissent: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.Days after Russia invaded Ukraine, the Kremlin made it a crime to oppose the war in public. Since then, it has waged a relentless campaign of repression, putting Russian citizens in jail for offenses as small as holding a poster or sharing a news article on social media.Valerie Hopkins, an international correspondent for The Times, tells the story of Olesya Krivtsova, a 19-year-old student who faces up to 10 years in prison after posting on social media, and explains why the Russian government is so determined to silence those like her.Guest: Valerie Hopkins, an international correspondent for The New York Times, covering Russia and the war in Ukraine.Background reading: Listen to the original version of
27/12/202320 minutes 58 seconds
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How A Paradise Became A Death Trap: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since.Warning: This episode contains descriptions of death.When fires swept West Maui, Hawaii, many residents fled for their lives — but soon discovered they had nowhere to go. Thousands of structures, mostly homes, had been reduced to rubble. Husks of incinerated cars lined the historic Front Street in Lahaina, while search crews nearby made their way painstakingly from house to house, looking for human remains.Ydriss Nouara, a resident of Lahaina, recounts his experience fleeing the inferno, and Mike Baker, the Seattle bureau chief for The Times, explains how an extraordinary set of circumstances turned the city into a death trap.Guest: Mike Baker, the Seattle bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: <l
26/12/202319 minutes 51 seconds
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Biden Supports Israel. Does the Rest of America?

A New York Times/Siena College poll has found that voters disapprove of President Biden’s handling of the war in Gaza, though voters are split on U.S. policy toward the conflict and whether or not Israel’s military campaign should continue. Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The Times, breaks down the poll and what it means for U.S.-Israeli relations and Biden’s 2024 campaign.Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Poll Finds Wide Disapproval of Biden on Gaza, and Little Room to Shift GearsHow Much Is
22/12/202328 minutes 3 seconds
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The Rising Toll of Israel’s War in Gaza

The accidental killing of three hostages by Israel’s military has shocked Israelis and is raising new questions about the way Israel is conducting its war against Hamas. Afterward, Israel’s defense minister appeared to announce a shift in strategy, giving the clearest indication to date that Israel may slow down its military operation in Gaza after weeks of pressure.Patrick Kingsley, Jerusalem bureau chief for The Times, and Hiba Yazbek, a reporter for The Times, discuss Israel’s military campaign and the ensuing humanitarian crisis.Guests: Patrick Kingsley, Jerusalem bureau chief for The Times, and Hiba Yazbek, a reporter for The Times.Background reading: Israel Says 3 Hostages Bore White Flag Before Being Killed by TroopsIsrael’s Allies Urge Restra
21/12/202331 minutes 3 seconds
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Why a Colorado Court Just Knocked Trump Off the Ballot

The Colorado Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that former President Donald J. Trump is barred from holding office under the 14th Amendment, which disqualifies those who engage in insurrection, and directed Mr. Trump’s name to be excluded from the state’s 2024 Republican primary ballot.Adam Liptak, who covers the court for The Times, explains the ruling and why the case is likely headed to the U.S. Supreme Court.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading:Trump Is Disqualified From Holding Office, Colorado Supreme Court RulesColorado Ruling Knocks Trump Off Ballot: What It Means, What Happens Next<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/12/19/us/politic
20/12/202320 minutes 5 seconds
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Football’s Young Victims

Warning: this episode contains mentions of suicide.A recently released study from researchers at Boston University examined the brains of 152 contact-sport athletes who died before turning 30. They found that more than 40 percent of them had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or C.T.E., the degenerative brain disease associated with repeated hits to the head. Most of those athletes played football, and most played no higher than the high school or college level. John Branch, domestic correspondent for The New York Times, spoke to the families of five of these athletes.Background reading:C.T.E. Study Finds That Young Football Players Are Getting the DiseaseAfter the Loss of a Son, a Football Coach Confronts a Terrible TruthFor more information on
19/12/202332 minutes 35 seconds
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The Man Who Counts Every Shooting in America

Warning: this episode contains descriptions of violenceIn 2023, the unrelenting epidemic of gun violence in the United States has claimed the lives of more than 41,000 people. Throughout the year, each and every one of those shootings was chronicled by a website that has become the most authoritative and widely-cited source of data about gun deaths in the country: the Gun Violence Archive.Mark Bryant, the founder of the database, explains why he has dedicated so much of his life to painstakingly recording a problem with no end in sight.Guest: Mark Bryant, the founder of the Gun Violence Archive.Background reading: Mr. Bryant’s website, the Gun Violence Archive.Here is how The New York Times tallies mass shootings.From July, a partial list of<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/article/mas
18/12/202331 minutes 3 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Bariatric Surgery at 16’

Last fall, Alexandra Duarte, who is now 16, went to see her endocrinologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, outside Houston. From age 10, she had been living with polycystic ovary syndrome and, more recently, prediabetes. After Alexandra described her recent quinceañera, the doctor brought up an operation that might benefit her, one that might help her lose weight and, as a result, improve these obesity-related problems.Alexandra, who smiles shyly and speaks softly but confidently, says she was “a little skeptical at first because, like, it’s a surgery.” But her mother, Gabriela Velez, suggested that her daughter consider it. “Ever since I was a toddler, my mom knew that I was struggling with obesity,” Alexandra says.The teasing started in fifth grade. Alexandra couldn’t eat without her classmates staring at and judging her. Though she sought counseling for her sadness and anxiety, these troubles still caused her to leave school for a month. The bullying finally s
17/12/20231 hour 4 minutes 17 seconds
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The Year of Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift grabbed many headlines in 2023. Her widely popular Eras Tour, which proved too much for Ticketmaster to handle, has been both a business and a cultural juggernaut. And Time magazine named her as its person of the year.Taffy Brodesser-Akner, a staff writer for The New York Times, explains why, for her, 2023 was the year of Taylor Swift.Guest: Taffy Brodesser-Akner, a staff writer for The New York Times Magazine.Background reading: Ms. Swift’s greatest gift is for telling her own story — better than any journalist could. But Ms. Brodesser-Akner gave it a shot anyway.Fan demand for Ms. Swift broke Ticketmaster, and that was just the prologue. These are the moments that turned her Er
15/12/202337 minutes 31 seconds
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The Woman Who Fought the Texas Abortion Ban

A major case in Texas this week drew attention to the question of who can get exempted from an abortion ban. Most states that have banned the procedure allow for rare exceptions, but while that might seem clear on paper, in practice, it’s far more ambiguous.Kate Cox, the woman at the center of the case in Texas; and Kate Zernike, a national correspondent for The New York Times, talk about the legal process and its surprising effect.Guest: Kate Zernike, a national correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The Texas Supreme Court is weighing several cases seeking to clarify the limits of medical exceptions to the state’s abortion bans.But the court’s ruling in Ms. Cox’s case has left doctors still unsure about
14/12/202329 minutes 23 seconds
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Antisemitism and Free Speech Collide on Campuses

Warning: this episode contains strong language.Universities across the country strained under pressure to take a public position on the Oct. 7 attack on Israel by Hamas.Nicholas Confessore, a political and investigative reporter for The Times, explains the story behind a congressional hearing that ended the career of one university president, jeopardized the jobs of two others, and kicked off an emotional debate about antisemitism and free speech on college campuses.Guest: Nicholas Confessore, a political and investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Harvard’s governing body said it stood firmly behind Claudine Gay as the university’s president, a stance both praised and condemned by students, faculty and alumni.As fury erup
13/12/202330 minutes 48 seconds
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Ukraine’s Counteroffensive Fizzled. U.S. Funding May Be Next.

Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelensky, is making a rare trip to Washington this week, pleading his case for American military aid, something which has long been a lifeline for his country but is now increasingly in doubt.Julian Barnes, who covers international security for The Times, explains what has brought Ukraine to the most perilous point since the war began nearly two years ago.Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a correspondent covering the U.S. intelligence agencies and international security for The New York Times.Background reading: The U.S. and Ukraine are searching for a new strategy after a failed counteroffensive.The Ukrainian leader will be
12/12/202325 minutes 12 seconds
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Can an ‘Anarcho-Capitalist’ President Save Argentina’s Economy?

Warning: this episode contains strong language.With Argentina again in the midst of an economic crisis, Argentine voters turned to Javier Milei, a far-right libertarian who has drawn comparisons to Donald J. Trump.Jack Nicas, who covers South America for The New York Times, discusses Argentina’s incoming president, and his radical plan to remake the country’s economy.Guest: Jack Nicas, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Argentina’s incoming president is a libertarian economist whose brash style and embrace of conspiracy theories has parallels with those of Donald J. Trump.Argentina braces itself for an “
11/12/202321 minutes 12 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Bodily Indignities of the Space Life’

As an incubator of life, Earth has a lot going for it, something we often fail to appreciate fully from within its nurturing bounds. Merely sending probes and rovers to the moon and Mars won’t do. For various reasons — adventure! apocalypse! commerce! — we insist upon taking our corporeal selves off-world too. Multiple private companies have announced plans to put hotels in space soon. NASA is aiming to 3-D-print lunar neighborhoods within a couple of decades. And while it will probably take longer than that to build and populate an outpost on Mars, preparations are being made: This summer, four NASA crew members began a 378-day stay in simulated Martian housing at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Here’s some of what we know about how Earthlings fare beyond the safety of our home world.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, <a href="https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_me
10/12/202339 minutes 12 seconds
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Biden Is Trying to Rein In Israel. Is It Working?

As the cease-fire in Gaza has ended and the fierce fighting there has resumed, the United States has issued sharper warnings to Israel’s leaders that they have a responsibility to avoid civilian casualties.Peter Baker, The Times’s chief White House correspondent, discusses the public and private ways in which President Biden is trying to influence Israel’s conduct.Guest: Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Analysis: Biden’s strategy faces a test as Israeli forces push into southern Gaza.The U.S. is pressing Israel and Hamas to resume talks, a White House official said.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.
08/12/202337 minutes 21 seconds
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Nikki Haley’s Moment

Over the last few months, Nikki Haley has gained enough in the polls to suggest she is on the verge of surpassing Ron DeSantis as the main threat to Donald J. Trump in the race to become the Republican candidate for 2024.Jazmine Ulloa, a national politics reporter for The Times; and Nate Cohn, The Times’s chief political analyst, discuss her building momentum and examine how far she might go.Guest: Jazmine Ulloa, a national politics reporter for The New York Times.Nate Cohn, The New York Times’s chief political analyst.Background reading: Nikki Haley’s path from Trump critic to defender and back.Why is Ms. Haley’s star rising among the rivals to Mr. Trump?<
07/12/202329 minutes 41 seconds
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Opioid Victims Have a Settlement. Will the Supreme Court Undo It?

The opioid epidemic has been one of the biggest public health disasters in generations. The drug company at the heart of the crisis, Purdue Pharma, maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, agreed to a multibillion-dollar deal to settle thousands of claims against it — but that agreement would also grant the family behind the company, the Sacklers, immunity from additional civil lawsuits.Justices are now set to rule whether that settlement was legal. Abbie VanSickle, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, explains what a decision either way could mean for the victims and for the people responsible.Guest: Abbie VanSickle, a Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading:What to know about the Purdue Pharma case before the Supreme Court.At the core of the matter:<a href="https
06/12/202323 minutes 50 seconds
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The Blurry Line Between Rap Star and Crime Boss

As a racketeering trial begins in Atlanta, much of the focus is on the high-profile defendant, the best-selling rapper Young Thug.Joe Coscarelli, a culture reporter for The New York Times, explains why, in a sense, hip-hop itself is on trial.Guest: Joe Coscarelli, a culture reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: A judge ruled in November that at least 17 specific sets of lines from the Atlanta artist and his collaborators could be used by prosecutors in the racketeering trial of YSL, a chart-topping hip-hop label and collective.Here’s what to know about the trial.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
05/12/202327 minutes 17 seconds
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The Oct. 7 Warning That Israel Ignored

 In the weeks since Hamas carried out its devastating terrorist attack in southern Israel, Times journalists have been trying to work out why the Israeli security services failed to prevent such a huge and deadly assault.Ronen Bergman, a correspondent for The New York Times, tells the story of one of the warnings that Israel ignored.Guest: Ronen Bergman, a staff writer for The New York Times Magazine.Background reading: A blueprint reviewed by The Times laid out the Oct. 7 attack in detail. Israeli officials dismissed it as aspirational.Here’s the latest on the war.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily</
04/12/202333 minutes 50 seconds
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Sunday Special: Elon Musk at 'DealBook'

Tech billionaire Elon Musk has come to define innovation, but he can also be a lightning rod for controversy; he recently endorsed antisemitic remarks on X, formerly known as Twitter, which prompted companies to pull their advertising. In an interview recorded live at the DealBook Summit in New York with Times business reporter and columnist Andrew Ross Sorkin, Musk discusses his emotional state and why he has “no problem being hated.”To read more news about the event, visit https://www.nytimes.com/live/2023/11/29/business/dealbook-summit-news
03/12/20231 hour 33 minutes 50 seconds
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Should You Rent or Buy? The New Math.

For many millennials, buying a home has become almost entirely out of reach. Average 30-year mortgage rates are hovering around 7 percent — the highest they’ve been since 2007 — largely because of the Federal Reserve’s efforts to tame inflation.David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The New York Times, discusses whether it is time to change how we think about buying vs. renting.Guest: David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The New York Times. He writes The Morning, The Times’s flagship daily newsletter, and also writes for Sunday Review.Background reading: Are you ready to buy a home? Should you rent? Take our quiz.From Opinion: Millennials are hitting middle age —<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/03/14/opinion/m
01/12/202327 minutes 38 seconds
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The Bad Vibes Around a Good Economy

The American economy, by many measures, is doing better than it has done in years. But for many Americans, that is not how it feels. Their feelings point to an enduring mystery: Why do Americans feel so bad when the economy is so good?Jeanna Smialek, who covers the Federal Reserve and the U.S. economy for The Times, discusses a new way to understand the disconnect. Guest: Jeanna Smialek, a reporter covering the Federal Reserve and the U.S. economy for The New York Times.Background reading: Video: What’s causing the “bad vibes” in the economy?Consumer spending has been strong in 2023 despite higher prices and waning savings. But some retailers h
30/11/202321 minutes 40 seconds
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Ending Roe Was Supposed to Reduce Abortions. It Didn’t.

From the moment that Roe v. Wade was overturned, the question was just how much the change would reduce abortions across the United States. Now, more than a year later, the numbers are in.Margot Sanger-Katz, who writes about health care for The Upshot, explains why the results are not what anyone had expected.Guest: Margot Sanger-Katz, a domestic correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The first estimate of births since Dobbs found that almost a quarter of women who would have gotten abortions in states that banned it carried their pregnancies to term.The first full-year census of U.S. abortion providers showed significant increases in abortion i
29/11/202322 minutes 8 seconds
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Israel and Hamas’s Fragile Cease-Fire

Hostages are at the heart of the fragile cease-fire between Israel and Hamas, now in its fifth day. As of Monday night, 50 Israeli hostages had been released, as had 150 Palestinian prisoners. More releases were expected on Tuesday, under what Qatari mediators said was a deal to extend the cease-fire by two days.Isabel Kershner, a Jerusalem-based reporter for The New York Times, explains how a grass-roots movement managed to pause the war, and what it will mean for the rest of the conflict.Guest: Isabel Kershner, who covers Israeli and Palestinian politics and society for The New York Times.Background reading: The extension of the cease-fire, and another exchange of hostages and prisoners, raised hopes that more people would be set free and more humanitarian aid wo
28/11/202329 minutes 59 seconds
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Botox, Hermès and OnlyFans: Why This May Be George Santos’s Last Week in Congress

Only five members of the U.S. House of Representatives have ever been expelled from the institution. This week, Representative George Santos, Republican of New York, could become the sixth.In a damning ethics report, House investigators found that the congressman spent tens of thousands of dollars in political contributions on Botox, Ferragamo goods and vacations.Grace Ashford, who covers New York State politics and government for The Times, explains why, after a year in office, so many of Mr. Santos’s colleagues have had enough.Guest: Grace Ashford, a reporter on the Metro desk covering New York State politics and government for The New York Times.Background reading: Representative George Santos faces a new expulsion push led by his own party after a damning report.
27/11/202328 minutes 42 seconds
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'Hard Fork': An Interview With Sam Altman

It was a head-spinning week in the tech world with the abrupt firing and rehiring of OpenAI’s chief executive, Sam Altman. The hosts of “Hard Fork,” Kevin Roose and Casey Newton, interviewed Altman only two days before he was fired. Over the course of their conversation, Altman laid out his worldview and his vision for the future of A.I. Today, we’re bringing you that interview to shed light on how Altman has quickly come to be seen as a figure of controversy inside the company he co-founded.“Hard Fork” is a podcast about the future of technology that's already here. You can search for it wherever you get your podcasts. Visit nytimes.com/hardfork for more.Hear more of Hard Fork's coverage of OpenAI’s meltdown:Emergency Pod: Sam Altman Is Out at Open AIYet Another Emerge
24/11/202359 minutes 24 seconds
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Thanksgiving With 'The Run-Up': Are Black Voters Leaving Democrats Behind?

Polls suggest that they are – and that Black voters’ support for former President Donald J. Trump, especially among men, is rising. Astead W. Herndon, host of "The Run-Up," convened a special Thanksgiving focus group to explore what might be behind those numbers. He spoke with family, friends and parishioners from his father’s church, community members and people he grew up with. It’s a lively conversation with real implications for what might happen if the 2024 presidential race is a Biden-Trump rematch. Because where better to talk politics than over turkey and an ample dessert spread?“The Run-Up” is an essential weekly discussion of American politics. New episodes come out every Thursday, and you can follow it wherever you get your podcasts. To get you started, here are a few highlights from our coverage of the 2024 race so far: An Interview With Kamala Harris
23/11/202354 minutes 43 seconds
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Inside the Coup at OpenAI

The board of OpenAI, the maker of the ChatGPT chatbot and one of the world’s highest-profile artificial intelligence companies, reversed course late last night and brought back Sam Altman as chief executive.Cade Metz, a technology reporter for The Times, discusses a whirlwind five days at the company and analyzes what the fallout could mean for the future of the transformational technology.Guest: Cade Metz, a technology reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: With Mr. Altman’s return, OpenAI’s board of directors will be overhauled, jettisoning several members who had opposed him.Before the ouster, OpenAI’s board was already divided and feuding.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a
22/11/202328 minutes 27 seconds
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A Reporter’s Journey Into Gaza

As the war against Hamas enters a seventh week, Israel finds itself under intense pressure to justify its actions in Gaza, including the raid of Al-Shifa Hospital, which it says is a center of Hamas activity. Hamas and hospital officials deny the accusation.Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The Times, was one of the reporters invited by the Israeli military on an escorted trip into the enclave.Guest: Patrick Kingsley, Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Traveling into Gaza with an Israeli military convoy, Times journalists saw houses flattened like playing cards and a city utterly disfigured.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts o
21/11/202339 minutes 47 seconds
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The New Speaker Avoided a Shutdown. Can He Avoid Being Ousted?

By working with Democrats to avert a government shutdown this past week, Speaker Mike Johnson seemed to put himself on the same path that doomed his predecessor. Or did he?Catie Edmondson, who covers Congress for The Times, explains why things could be different this time.Guest: Catie Edmondson, a reporter in the Washington bureau of The New York Times.Background reading: Congress prevented a shutdown, but the spending fight is far from over.Almost all Democrats and a majority of Republicans overcame the opposition of G.O.P. conservatives to approve the bill under special expedited procedures. But that approach, hatched by Mr. Johnson in his first weeks as speaker, is a gamble.Fo
20/11/202327 minutes 32 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘What Does the U.S. Space Force Actually Do?’

The Space Force, the sixth and newest branch of the U.S. military, was authorized by Congress and signed into law by President Donald Trump in December 2019. The initiative had been shaped within the armed forces and Congress over the previous 25 years, based on the premise that as satellite and space technologies evolved, America’s military organizations had to change as well.From the start, the Space Force had detractors. Air Force officials wondered if it was necessary, while some political observers believed that it signified the start of a dangerous (and expensive) militarization of another realm. What seemed harder to argue against was how nearly every aspect of modern warfare and defense — intelligence, surveillance, communications, operations, missile detection — has come to rely on links to orbiting satellites.The recent battles in Eastern Europe, in which Russia has tried to disrupt Ukraine’s space-borne communication systems, are a case in point. And yet the
19/11/202334 minutes 48 seconds
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Two Superpowers Walk Into a Garden

One of the most highly anticipated diplomatic events of the year took place this week in a mansion outside San Francisco. President Biden and Xi Jinping, China’s top leader, met to repair their countries’ relations, which had sunk to one of their lowest points in decades.Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the effort to bring the relationship back from the brink.Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Both American and Chinese accounts of the meeting indicated scant progress on the issues that have pushed the two nations to the edge of conflict.China’s depiction of Xi Jinping’s U
17/11/202325 minutes 48 seconds
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Biden’s Electric Car Problem

A little over a year ago, at President Biden’s urging, congressional democrats passed a sweeping plan to supercharge the production and sale of electric vehicles.Jim Tankersley, who covers economic policy for The Times, explains whether the law is actually working.Guest: Jim Tankersley, an economic policy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: President Biden’s 2022 climate act spurred big investments in U.S. battery factories, but it has not similarly boosted E.V. sales.Growth is brisk but slower than expected, causing automakers to question their multibillion-dollar investments in new factories and raisin
16/11/202325 minutes 6 seconds
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A Strategy to Treat Big Tech Like Big Tobacco

A historic set of new lawsuits, filed by more than three dozen states, accuses Meta, the country’s largest social media company, of illegally luring children onto its platforms and hooking them on its products.Natasha Singer, who covers technology, business and society for The New York Times, has been reviewing the states’ evidence and trying to understand the long-term strategy behind these lawsuits.Guest: Natasha Singer, a reporter covering technology, business and society for The New York Times.Background reading: Meta was sued by more than three dozen states that accuse it of knowingly using features on Instagram and Facebook to hook children.
15/11/202333 minutes 36 seconds
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Hamas’s Bloody Arithmetic

To much of the outside world, Hamas’s decision to murder hundreds of Israelis and trigger a war that has since killed many thousands of its own people looks like a historic miscalculation — one that could soon result in the destruction of Hamas itself.Hamas’s leaders, however, say that it was the result of a deliberate calculation.Ben Hubbard, the Istanbul bureau chief for The New York Times, has been reporting on their decision, and what went into it.Guest: Ben Hubbard, the Istanbul bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Behind Hamas’s bloody gambit to create a “permanent” state of war.It took American and Qatari diplomacy, and self-interested decisions by Hamas, to<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/21/world/middleeast/us-hostages-rel
14/11/202334 minutes 30 seconds
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The Doctors of Gaza

Warning: This episode contains descriptions of injuries and death.As Israel’s war on Hamas enters its sixth week, hospitals in Gaza have found themselves on the front lines. Hospitals have become a refuge for the growing number of civilians fleeing the violence, but one that has become increasingly dangerous as Israel’s military targets what it says are Hamas fighters hiding inside and beneath them.Today, three doctors working in the Gaza Strip describe what the war looks like from inside their hospitals and what they are doing to keep up with the flood of patients.Guests: Dr. Ghassan Abu-Sittah, Dr. Suhaib Alhamss and Dr. Ebraheem Matar, three doctors working in the Gaza Strip.Background reading: Gazans under bombardment have described a surge of severely injured children entering hospitals, doctors operating with
13/11/202337 minutes 30 seconds
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From Serial: ‘The Kids of Rutherford County’

In April 2016, 11 Black schoolchildren, some as young as 8 years old, were arrested in Rutherford County, Tenn. The reason? They didn’t stop a fight between some other kids. What happened in the wake of those arrests would expose a juvenile justice system that was playing by its own rules. For years, this county had arrested and illegally jailed hundreds, maybe thousands, of children. Why was this happening – and what would it take to stop it? From Serial Productions and The New York Times, in partnership with ProPublica and Nashville Public Radio, “The Kids of Rutherford County” is hosted by Meribah Knight, a Peabody Award-winning reporter based in the South. The full four-part series is out now.
12/11/202328 minutes 56 seconds
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What Adidas Knew About Kanye

Warning: this episode contains some explicit language.When Adidas terminated its multibillion-dollar partnership with Kanye West over his antisemitic and other offensive public remarks, it seemed like a straightforward story of a celebrity’s suddenly imploding. But a New York Times examination has found that, behind the scenes, the collaboration was fraught from the start.Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times, talks about what she discovered when she delved into the meltdown.Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The investigation into Kanye and Adidas: a story of money, misconduct and the price of appeasement.Inside the uneasy relationship: Here are<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/27/business/adida
10/11/202344 minutes 40 seconds
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The Supreme Court Tests Its Own Limits on Guns

A critical gun case was argued before the Supreme Court this week. But instead of opening further freedoms for gun owners — as the court, with its conservative supermajority, did in a blockbuster decision last year — justices seemed ready to rule that the government may disarm people under restraining orders for domestic violence.Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, explains why.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times and writes Sidebar, a column on legal developments.Background reading: The Supreme Court seemed likely to uphold a law disarming domestic abusers.But a decision on the case<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/live/2023/11/07/us/supreme-court-guns-domestic-violence#rahimi-supreme-court-gun
09/11/202326 minutes 49 seconds
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The Trumps Take the Stand

Of all the legal cases that former President Donald J. Trump is facing, perhaps the most personal is playing out in a courtroom in Manhattan: a civil fraud trial that could result in him losing control of his best-known buildings and paying hundreds of millions of dollars in fines.In recent days, Mr. Trump and some of his children have taken the stand, defending the family business and the former president’s reputation as a real-estate mogul.Jonah E. Bromwich, who covers justice in New York for The Times, was inside the courtroom.Guest: Jonah E. Bromwich, a criminal justice correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: This is what it was like inside the courtroom as Mr. Trump testified.And here are<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/11/07/
08/11/202325 minutes 5 seconds
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The Growing Republican Battle Over War Funding

It’s been one month since the attack on Israel, but Washington has yet to deliver an aid package to its closest ally. The reason has to do with a different ally, in a different war: Speaker Mike Johnson has opposed continued funding for Ukraine, and wants the issue separated from aid to Israel, setting up a clash between the House and Senate.Catie Edmondson, who covers Congress for The Times, discusses the battle within the Republican Party over whether to keep funding Ukraine.Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The Republican-led House approved $14.3 billion for Israel’s war with Hamas, but no further funding for Ukraine.Speaker Johnson’s bill put the House <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/10/31/us/p
07/11/202325 minutes 37 seconds
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Swing State Voters Are Souring on Biden

In a major new campaign poll from The New York Times and Siena College, former President Donald J. Trump leads President Biden in five of the six battleground states likeliest to decide the 2024 presidential race. Widespread discontent with the state of the country and growing doubts about Biden’s ability to perform his job as president threaten to unravel the diverse coalition that elected him in 2020.Nate Cohn, The Times’s chief political analyst, explains why the results are less a reflection of Trump’s growing strength than they are of Biden’s growing weaknesses.Guest: Nate Cohn, The New York Times’s chief political analyst.Background reading: In the Times/Siena poll, voters in battleground states said they trusted Mr. Trump over Mr. Biden on the economy, foreign policy and immigr
06/11/202329 minutes 36 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Botched Hunt for the Gilgo Beach Killer’

The beginning of the story was strangely familiar, like the opening scene in a shopworn police procedural: A woman runs screaming down a street in Oak Beach, a secluded gated community on Long Island’s South Shore, only to vanish, it seems, into thin air. It was almost dawn on May 1, 2010. Hours earlier, Shannan Gilbert traveled from New Jersey to see a man who had hired her as an escort from a Craigslist ad. By the time the police arrived, she was gone. They talked to the neighbors, the john and her driver and came up with nothing. A few days later, they ordered a flyover of the area and, again, saw no sign of her. Then they essentially threw up their hands. She went into the ocean, they decided, either hysterical or on drugs.None of this made the news, not at first. A missing sex worker rarely does. Not even when another woman advertising on Craigslist, Megan Waterman, was reported missing a month later.This was, quite obviously, a serial-killer case. The only person
05/11/202354 minutes 35 seconds
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1948

As the Israeli-Palestinian conflict enters its darkest chapter in decades, both sides are evoking the same foundational moment in their past: the events of 1948.David K. Shipler, a former Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times and the author of a Pulitzer Prize-winning book about the conflict, discusses the meaning and reality of what happened that year.Guest: David K. Shipler, author of “Arab and Jew: Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land.”Background reading: Recent violence in an Israeli town carries bitter echoes of the past for Palestinians.From the archive: Israel declares independence on May 14, 1948.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com
03/11/202343 minutes 7 seconds
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The Many Missed Warnings Before Maine’s Mass Shooting

The mass shooting in Maine last week, which killed 18 people, was the country’s deadliest of the year. It may have also been one of the most avoidable.More than five months earlier, the Army Reserve and a Maine sheriff’s department had been made aware of a reservist’s deteriorating mental health. Just six weeks before the killings, he had punched a friend and said he was going to carry out a shooting spree.Nicholas Bogel-Boroughs, a national reporter for The Times, explains why so many warnings failed to stop the shooting.Guest: Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, a national correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The Army Reserve and a Maine sheriff’s department knew of a reservist’s deteriorating mental health five months before America’s deadliest mass shooting this ye
02/11/202324 minutes 49 seconds
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Lessons From an Unending Conflict

In late September, one of the world’s most intractable conflicts ended suddenly and brutally when Azerbaijan seized the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh and tens of thousands of ethnic Armenians fled their homes.Andrew Higgins, the New York Times bureau chief for East and Central Europe, explains how the conflict started, why it lasted for more than 30 years, and what its end can tell us about the nature of seemingly unsolvable disputes.Guest: Andrew Higgins, the East and Central Europe bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: After decades of wars and tense stalemates, almost no one saw it coming: Azerbaijan seized Nagorno-Karabakh from Armenian control seemingly overnight.The military offensive prompted<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/09/24/world/europ
01/11/202334 minutes 19 seconds
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A Historic Strike (And Win) For Auto Workers

A wave of strikes that has paralyzed the auto industry came to an end on Monday, when the last of the three big car manufacturers, General Motors, reached a deal with the United Automobile Workers union.Neal E. Boudette, who covers the auto industry for The Times, discusses the historic deal and why it was such a big win for workers.Guest: Neal E. Boudette, an auto industry correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Autoworkers scored big wins in new contracts with carmakers, the most generous in decades.The U.A.W. said it aims to organize nonunion plants.For more information on today’s episode, visit
31/10/202322 minutes
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Israel's Invasion Begins

Over the weekend, the Israeli military appears to have begun an invasion of the Gaza Strip, with tanks rolling into the enclave and Israeli soldiers fighting Hamas inside. But the operation remains shrouded in secrecy, and Israel is revealing little about its actions.Raja Abdulrahim, a Middle East correspondent for The Times, and Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief, discuss the latest escalation in the war.Guests: Raja Abdulrahim, a Middle East correspondent for The New York Times, based in Jerusalem, and Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the Israel-Hamas war had entered its “second stage.”As Israeli troops bega
30/10/202323 minutes 22 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Who Hired the Hitmen to Silence Zitácuaro?’

On Oct. 19, 2021, Armando Linares López was writing up notes from an interview when his cellphone buzzed with an unknown number. Linares, 49 and stocky with black hair that was just starting to show gray streaks, ran an online news site in a small Mexican city called Zitácuaro. He knew his beat so intimately that calls from unfamiliar phone numbers were rare.But the man on the other end spoke in a way that was instantly familiar. Linares had come to know that pitched, menacing tone from years of run-ins with every kind of Mexican gangster.“This is Commander Eagle,” the voice said. “I’m from the Jalisco New Generation Cartel.”Zitácuaro, in the hills of the state of Michoacán, had for years mostly been known for its fertile avocado orchards and the pine-oak forest where tourists came to see the annual arrival of the monarch butterflies. But its central location had made it increasingly attractive to the drug trade. Farmers grew marijuana and opium poppy, the sourc
29/10/202354 minutes 59 seconds
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A New Threat: Surprise Hurricanes

Hurricane Otis, which killed more than two dozen people in southern Mexico this week, exemplified a phenomenon that meteorologists fear will become more and more common: a severe hurricane that arrives with little warning or time to prepare.Judson Jones, who covers natural disasters for The Times, explains why Hurricane Otis packed such an unexpected punch.Guest: Judson Jones, who covers natural disasters and Earth’s changing climate for The New York Times.Background reading: On Tuesday morning, few meteorologists were talking about Otis. By Wednesday morning, the “catastrophic storm” had left a trail of destruction in Mexico and drawn attention from around the globe. What happened?The hurricane, one of the more powerful Category 5 storms to batter the region, cre
27/10/202323 minutes 30 seconds
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Introducing ‘The War Briefing’

As the Israel-Hamas war intensifies, fears are growing that the conflict could spread beyond Gaza. And with an expected Israeli ground invasion, the coming days are likely to have enormous consequences. To meet this moment, The Times has started a daily afternoon report, hosted by Lulu Garcia-Navarro. “The War Briefing” is available in the New York Times Audio app, which is available to Times subscribers. If you’re not a subscriber, become one: nytimes.com/audioapp.
26/10/202317 minutes 37 seconds
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The House Finally Has a Speaker

Warning: this episode contains strong language.After 21 days without a leader, and after cycling through four nominees, House Republicans have finally elected a speaker. They chose Representative Mike Johnson of Louisiana, a hard-right conservative best known for leading congressional efforts to overturn the 2020 election.Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The Times, was at the capitol when it happened.Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The House elected Mike Johnson as speaker, embracing a hard-right conservative.Speaker Johnson previously played a l
26/10/202328 minutes 2 seconds
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Why Israel Is Delaying the Ground Invasion

Almost immediately after Israel was attacked on Oct. 7, it began preparing for a ground invasion of Gaza, drafting hundreds of thousands of its citizens and amassing forces along its southern border.But more than two weeks later, that invasion has yet to happen. Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The Times, explains why.Guest: Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: U.S. advised Israel to delay a Gaza invasion, officials said.Here’s the latest on the fighting. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of eac
25/10/202327 minutes 48 seconds
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The Lawyers Now Turning on Trump

Over the past few days, two of the lawyers who tried to help former President Donald J. Trump stay in power after losing the 2020 election pleaded guilty in a Georgia racketeering case and have agreed to cooperate with prosecutors against him.Richard Faussett, who writes about politics in the American South for The Times, explains why two of Mr. Trump’s former allies have now turned against him.Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent for The New York Times covering the American South.Background reading: Sidney Powell, a member of the Trump legal team in 2020, pleaded guilty and will cooperate with prosecutors seeking to convict the former president in an election interference case in Georgia.Kenneth Chesebro, a Trump-aligned lawyer, also<a href="https://www
24/10/202325 minutes 15 seconds
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The Problem With a $2 Trillion Deficit

Over a year, the federal deficit — the gap between what the U.S. government spends and what it earns — has doubled, to nearly $2 trillion.That figure seems to validate the worries of congressional Republicans about government spending, which have been at the center of the messy fight over who should be House speaker.Jim Tankersley, who covers economic policy at the White House for The Times, explains the Republicans’ concerns — and why their plans would not come close to solving the problem.Guest: Jim Tankersley, an economic policy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The U.S. deficit effectively doubled in 2023.This
23/10/202325 minutes 14 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Genius Behind Hollywood’s Most Indelible Sets’

Kihekah Avenue cuts through the town of Pawhuska, Okla., roughly north to south, forming the only corridor you might call a “business district” in the town of 2,900. Standing in the middle is a small TV-and-appliance store called Hometown, which occupies a two-story brick building and hasn’t changed much in decades. Boards cover its second-story windows, and part of the sign above its awning is broken, leaving half the lettering intact, spelling “Home.”One winter day in February 2021, Jack Fisk stood before Hometown with Martin Scorsese, explaining how beautiful it could be. For much of the last week, he and Scorsese had been walking around Pawhuska, scouting set locations for the director’s 28th feature film, “Killers of the Flower Moon.” The film, which is based on David Grann’s best-selling book, chronicles the so-called 1920s Reign of Terror, when the Osage Nation’s discovery of oil made them some of the richest people in the world but also the target of a conspiracy amon
22/10/202352 minutes 27 seconds
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Hamas Took Her Son

Warning: This episode contains strong language and descriptions of violence.When Hamas attacked Israel, they took two hundred hostages back with them into the Gaza Strip, including grandparents and children as young as nine months old. It was one of the largest mass abductions in recent history.Now, the fate of those hostages is at the center of a deepening crisis in the Middle East, and a looming ground invasion of Gaza. Today, we hear from the mother of one of these hostages.Guest: Rachel Goldberg, the mother of Hersh Goldberg-Polin, who is currently being held hostage by Hamas.Background reading: Hamas is believed to hold at least 199 people in Gaza, a dense territory descending into a chaotic crisis, where many officials believe a military rescue would be dangerous for soldiers and hostages alike.Relatives
20/10/202335 minutes 28 seconds
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A Texas Town Wanted Tougher Border Security. Now It’s Having Regrets.

When the governor of Texas announced an extraordinary plan to use local law enforcement to try to deter migrants from crossing from the border with Mexico, few communities were more receptive than the city of Eagle Pass, where residents had become fed up with the federal government’s approach.Now, two years later, people who once welcomed the plan are turning against it. Edgar Sandoval, who writes about South Texas for The New York Times, and Nina Feldman, a producer on “The Daily,” traveled to Eagle Pass to find out why.Guest: Edgar Sandoval, a reporter covering South Texas for The New York Times.Background reading: A campaign by Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas to turn back migrants was initially welcomed on the border. But in Eagle Pass, some of that support appears to be waning.<a href="
19/10/202328 minutes 33 seconds
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The Diplomatic Scramble to Contain the Israel-Hamas War

A devastating blast at a hospital in Gaza on Tuesday killed hundreds and ignited protests across the broader Middle East, deepening the crisis in the region.As President Biden visits Israel looking to ease tensions and avoid a broader conflict, Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The Times, discusses the narrow path the American leader must navigate.Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Palestinians and Israelis blamed each other for the explosion at the hospital, where people had sought shelter from Israeli bombing.The U.S. response to the Israel-Hamas war has drawn fury in the Middle East.For more informat
18/10/202330 minutes 29 seconds
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The Arm-Twisting, Back-Stabbing Battle for House Speaker

The House of Representatives still has no speaker, crippling a vital branch of the government. And the Republican who seems to be in the strongest position to take the role, Jim Jordan of Ohio, was once called a “legislative terrorist” by a former speaker of his own party.Catie Edmondson, who covers Congress for The Times, talks through the latest turns in the saga of the leaderless House.Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Allies of Jim Jordan are threatening right-wing retribution to any Republican lawmakers who oppose him.Analysis: With the world in crisis, House Republicans bicker among themselves, Carl Hulse write
17/10/202326 minutes 18 seconds
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Voices from Gaza

Warning: This episode contains descriptions of death.As the conflict continues, Israel has blocked food, water and electricity from entering Gaza and has bombarded the area with airstrikes that have killed more than 2,600 Palestinians.Late last week, Israel ordered people in the north of Gaza, nearly half the enclave’s population, to evacuate to the south ahead of an expected Israeli ground invasion. Many in Gaza now fear that this mass expulsion will become permanent.Last week we told the story of a father of four whose kibbutz was attacked by Hamas. Today, we hear from the Gaza residents Abdallah Hasaneen and Wafa Elsaka about what they’ve experienced so far and what they expect will come next.Guest: Abdallah Hasaneen, from the town Rafah in southern Gaza. Wafa Elsaka, a Palestinian-American and one of those who have fled from the north of Gaza over the past few days.Background reading: “Civilians of Gaza City, evacuate south f
16/10/202334 minutes 53 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Is Måneskin the Last Rock Band?’

The triumphant return to Rome of Måneskin — arguably the only rock stars of their generation, and almost certainly the biggest Italian rock band of all time — coincided with a heat wave across Southern Europe. On a Thursday morning in July, the band’s vast management team was officially concerned that the night’s sold-out performance at the Stadio Olimpico would be delayed. When Måneskin finally took the stage around 9:30 p.m., it was still well into the 90s — which was too bad, because there would be pyro.The need to feel the rock may explain the documented problem of fans’ taste becoming frozen in whatever era was happening when they were between the ages of 15 and 25. Anyone who adolesced after Spotify, however, did not grow up with rock as an organically developing form and is likely to have experienced the whole catalog simultaneously, listening to Led Zeppelin at the same time they listened to Pixies and Franz Ferdinand — i.e. as a genre rather than as particular artist
15/10/202328 minutes 51 seconds
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Golan’s Story

Warning: this episode contains descriptions of death.In the week since Israel suffered the deadliest day in its modern history, fresh accounts have emerged in village after village of just how extreme and widespread the violence was.Today we hear the story of one man at the epicenter of that violence: Golan Abitbul, a resident of Kibbutz Be’eri, where more than 100 civilians were killed.Guest: Golan Abitbul, a resident of Kibbutz Be’eri, in southern Israel.Background reading: Video: a son’s conversation with his mother as gunmen attacked her kibbutz.The long wait for help as massacres unfolded in Israel.Follow<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/live/2023
13/10/202332 minutes 17 seconds
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The Spoiler Threat of R.F.K. Jr.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. was once dismissed as a fringe figure in the 2024 presidential race. But this week, as he announces an independent run for the White House, he’s striking fear within both the Democratic and Republican parties.Rebecca Davis O’Brien, who covers campaign finance for The Times, explains why.Guest: Rebecca Davis O’Brien, a reporter covering campaign finance and money in U.S. elections for The New York Times.Background reading: Robert F. Kennedy Jr. told supporters he would end his campaign as a Democratic candidate and run as an independent, potentially upsetting the dynamics of the 2024 election.From July, five noteworthy
12/10/202329 minutes 36 seconds
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Israel’s Plan to Destroy Hamas

For years, Israel’s leaders believed that they could coexist with Hamas. After this weekend’s massacre, that belief is over.Steven Erlanger, a former Jerusalem bureau chief at The New York Times, explains what Israel’s plan to destroy Hamas will mean for Palestinians and Israelis.Guest: Steven Erlanger, the chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe for The New York Times.Background reading: The attack ended Israel’s hope that Hamas might come to embrace stability. Now senior Israeli officials say that Hamas must be crushed.Follow The Times’s latest updates on the Israel-Gaza war.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/the
11/10/202326 minutes 48 seconds
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The New Supreme Court Cases to Watch

Last week, the Supreme Court began its new term, picking up where it left off on the most contentious issues of the day, with cases connected to government power, gun rights and abortion.Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, explains why, while previous terms produced major victories for the conservative legal movement, this term may be different.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court and writes Sidebar, a column on legal developments, for The New York Times.Background reading: In cases this term, the justices will explore the scope of the Second Amendment, the fate of the administrative state and limits on free speech on the internet.From Adam Liptak’s Sidebar colu
10/10/202325 minutes 9 seconds
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War in Israel

Warning: This episode contains descriptions of violence.Over the weekend, Palestinian militants with Hamas, the Islamic group that controls the Gaza Strip, mounted a stunning and highly coordinated invasion of Israel, rampaging through Israeli towns, killing people in their homes and on the streets, and taking hostages.Isabel Kershner, who covers Israeli and Palestinian politics and society for The Times, talks about the attack and the all-out war that it has now prompted.Guest: Isabel Kershner, a correspondent in Jerusalem for The New York Times.Background reading: Israel and Hamas battled around Gaza on Sunday as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned of a “long and difficult war.”Here
09/10/202328 minutes 20 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Dungeons & Dragons Players of Death Row’

The first time Tony Ford played Dungeons & Dragons, he was a wiry Black kid who had never seen the inside of a prison. His mother, a police officer in Detroit, had quit the force and moved the family to West Texas. To Ford, it seemed like a different world. Strangers talked funny, and El Paso was half desert. But he could skateboard in all that open space, and he eventually befriended a nerdy white kid with a passion for Dungeons & Dragons. Ford fell in love with the role-playing game right away; it was complex and cerebral, a saga you could lose yourself in. And in the 1980s, everyone seemed to be playing it.The game has since become one of the most popular in the world, celebrated in nostalgic television shows and dramatized in movies. It is played in homes, at large conventions and even in prisons.When Ford, who is now on death row, first overheard the other men playing D.&D., they were engaged in a fast, high-octane version. The gamers were members of the Mexican M
08/10/202334 minutes 29 seconds
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Chaos or Conscience? A Republican Explains His Vote to Oust McCarthy.

The ouster of House Speaker Kevin McCarthy a few days ago demonstrated how powerful a small group of hard-right House Republicans have become and how deep their grievances run.We speak to one of the eight republicans who brought down Mr. McCarthy: Representative Tim Burchett of Tennessee.Guest: Representative Tim Burchett of Tennessee’s 2nd Congressional District.Background reading: How have the Republicans who ousted Mr. McCarthy antagonized him before?Although some names have started to be bandied about, there is no clear replacement candidate for the speaker’s position.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Tr
06/10/202332 minutes 14 seconds
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The Mosquitoes Are Winning

For decades, the world seemed to be winning the war against mosquitoes and tamping down the deadly diseases they carried. But in the past few years, progress has not only stalled, it has reversed.Stephanie Nolen, who covers global health for The Times, explains how the mosquito has once again gained the upper hand in the fight.Guest: Stephanie Nolen, a global health correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Climate change has brought disease-spreading mosquitoes to places they have never been found before, compounding the problem.One invasive malaria-carrying species thrives in urban areas and resists all insecticides, threatening catastrophe in Africa.For more
05/10/202330 minutes 12 seconds
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The Ouster of House Speaker Kevin McCarthy

The vote on Tuesday to remove Representative Kevin McCarthy as speaker of the House of Representative has left the chamber mired in chaos.Luke Broadwater, a congressional correspondent for The Times, describes what happened on an unprecedented day in American politics.Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The vote to ouster the House speaker exposed once again the deep polarization in Congress.Mr. McCarthy’s demise also reflected the challenge of wielding a Republican majority in the House that refuses to be governed.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
04/10/202328 minutes 24 seconds
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Sam Bankman-Fried Goes on Trial

Sam Bankman-Fried, the fallen golden boy of crypto, is going on trial for what prosecutors are calling the largest financial fraud in recent history.David Yaffe-Bellany, a technology reporter for The Times, explains the case of the man who was supposed to save the cryptocurrency industry and what its outcome could tell us about why he did not.Guest: David Yaffe-Bellany, a technology reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: A year ago, Sam Bankman-Fried was a fixture on magazine covers and in the halls of Congress. Now he’s fighting federal charges of fraud and money laundering.Crypto insiders are trying to distance themselves from Mr. Ban
03/10/202329 minutes 55 seconds
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Amazon’s Most Beloved Features May Turn Out to Be Illegal

The U.S. government has filed a landmark antitrust lawsuit against Amazon, pointing to a set of familiar features that have made, the internet retail giant so beloved by consumers.Karen Weise, a technology correspondent for The Times, explains why those features may actually be illegal.Guest: Karen Weise, a technology correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The Federal Trade Commission and 17 states have sued Amazon, saying its conduct in its online store and services to merchants illegally stifled competition.The F.T.C. says there are two main tactics that Amazon used to undermine co
02/10/202322 minutes 33 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Art of Telling Forbidden Stories in China’

As China strove for a larger role on the international stage at the turn of the century, the arrival of the internet and a relatively relaxed political environment spurred a boom in self-expression. Many writers tested the boundaries of Chinese literary culture, experimenting with subjects that were quotidian but taboo on the page: corruption, sexual desire and evolving gender roles.In today’s China, though, the pursuit of free expression requires writers to operate under the ever-watchful eye of a complex state surveillance system. This can resemble a high-stakes game of Whac-a-Mole in which writers, editors and online publishers try to outmaneuver the Chinese Communist Party’s apparatus, using any opportunity and resource at their disposal to chronicle life as they see it.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, <a href="https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_c
01/10/202338 minutes 7 seconds
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Why the Government is About to Shut Down

A showdown between House Republicans and their leader, Speaker Kevin McCarthy, is heading toward a government shutdown.Carl Hulse, chief Washington correspondent for The Times, explains the causes and consequences of the looming crisis.Guest: Carl Hulse, is chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: How a small minority of right-wing Republicans succeeded in sowing mass dysfunction, spoiling for a shutdown, an impeachment and a House coup.As a government shutdown looms, Speaker McCarthy is toiling to turn the fight over federal spending into a battle over border security.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/09/28/us/politics
29/09/202325 minutes 3 seconds
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The Presidential Politics of the Autoworkers’ Strike

Although one major strike, against Hollywood studios, was finally resolved this past week, another, against U.S. vehicle makers, is expanding. The plight of the autoworkers has now become a major point of contention in the presidential race.Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The Times, explains why the strike could be an essential test along the road to the White House.Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A day after President Biden appeared on a picket line with United Automobile Workers, former President Donald J. Trump spoke at an auto parts factory.The U.A.W. strike could either accelerate a wave of worker actions or stifle labor’s
28/09/202325 minutes 16 seconds
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Did Hollywood Writers Get Their Happy Ending?

After 148 days on strike, writers of movies and television are returning to work on Wednesday with an agreement in hand that amounts to a major win for organized labor in Hollywood.John Koblin, a media reporter for The Times, explains why the studios acquiesced to writers’ demands and what the deal means for the future of American entertainment.Guest: John Koblin, a media reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: After Hollywood’s bitter monthslong labor dispute, the Writers Guild of America got most of what it wanted.Now the focus turns to actors: Th
27/09/202325 minutes 50 seconds
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Gold Bars, Wads of Cash and a Senator’s Indictment

In one of the most serious political corruption cases in recent history, federal prosecutors have accused a senior U.S. senator of trading the power of his position for cash, gifts and gold.Tracey Tully, who covers New Jersey for The Times, tells the story behind the charges against the senator, Robert Menendez, and his wife, Nadine, and describes the role played by Wael Hana, an Egyptian American businessman at the center of the allegations.Guest: Tracey Tully covers New Jersey for The New York Times.Background reading: Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey, charged with taking bribes in exchange for exerting political influence, predicted that he would be exonerated.Inside the Menendez investigati
26/09/202323 minutes 33 seconds
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An Unexpected Battle Over Banning Caste Discrimination

California is poised to become the first state to outlaw discrimination based on a person’s caste. The system of social stratification, which dates back thousands of years, has been outlawed in India and Nepal for decades.Amy Qin, a correspondent who covers Asian American communities for The Times, explains why so many believe a prejudice that originated on the other side of the globe now requires legal protection in the U.S.  — and why so many are equally convinced that it would be a bad idea.Guest: Amy Qin, a national correspondent covering Asian American communities for The New York Times.Background reading: The bill, recently passed by the California State Legislature, has led to intense debate among South Asian immigrants.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/03/06/world/asia/india-caste-discriminatio
25/09/202324 minutes 45 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Kidnapped Child Who Became a Poet’

“The weird thing about growing up kidnapped,” Shane McCrae, the 47-year-old American poet, told me in his melodious, reedy voice one rainy afternoon in May, “is if it happens early enough, there’s a way in which you kind of don’t know.”There was no reason for McCrae to have known. What unfolded in McCrae’s childhood — between a day in June 1979 when his white grandmother took him from his Black father and disappeared, and another day, 13 years later, when McCrae opened a phone book in Salem, Ore., found a name he hoped was his father’s and placed a call — is both an unambiguous story of abduction and a convoluted story of complicity. It loops through the American landscape, from Oregon to Texas to California to Oregon again, and, even now, wends through the vaster emotional country of a child and his parents. And because so much of what happened to McCrae happened in homes where he was beaten and lied to and threatened, where he was made to understand that Bl
24/09/202337 minutes 49 seconds
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He Tried to Save a Friend. They Charged Him With Murder.

Warning: This episode contains descriptions of rape, sexual abuse and death.As an epidemic of fentanyl use continues in America, causing tens of thousands of deaths each year, lawmakers and law enforcement agencies are holding one group increasingly responsible: drug users themselves.Eli Saslow, a writer for The Times, tells the story of a man whose friendship ended in tragedy and a set of laws that say he is the one to blame.Guest: Eli Saslow, a writer at large for The New York Times.Background reading: Two friends bought $30 worth of fentanyl before making it into rehab. One overdosed. The other was charged in his death.Harsh fentanyl laws ignite a fierce debate. Critics say, th
22/09/202338 minutes 53 seconds
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Canada Confronts India Over Alleged Assassination

Warning: This episode contains descriptions of violence.The relationship between two democratic allies fell to its lowest point in history this week, after Canada accused India of assassinating a Sikh community leader in British Columbia in June.Mujib Mashal, The Times’s South Asia bureau chief, explains this stunning accusation — and what India’s reaction to it tells us about the era of its leader, Narendra Modi.Guest: Mujib Mashal, The New York Times’s bureau chief for South Asia.Background reading: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada said agents of India had assassinated a Sikh community leader, Hardeep Singh Nijjar, who was fatally shot in British Columbia in June.Mr. Nijar was <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/09/19/world/canada/who-is-hardeep-singh-nijj
21/09/202327 minutes 2 seconds
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Is College Worth It?

New research and polling show that more and more Americans now doubt a previously unquestioned fact of U.S. life — that going to college is worth it.Paul Tough, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, explains why so many high-school students and their parents are souring on higher education and what it will mean for the country’s future.Guest: Paul Tough, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine who has written several books on inequality in education.Background reading: Americans are losing faith in the value of college. Whose fault is that?In December, Colby-Sawyer in New Hampshire reduced its tuition to $17,500 a year, from about $46,000. The cut was a recognition that few pay the list price.
20/09/202328 minutes 52 seconds
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Inside Ukraine’s Drone Attacks on Russia

As Ukraine’s counteroffensive grinds on, it’s increasingly turning to a secret drone program that is hitting targets deep inside Russian territory. At least three different Ukrainian-made drones have been used in attacks inside Russia, including on Moscow, according to an analysis by The New York Times.Christiaan Triebert, a journalist on The Times’s Visual Investigations team, explains the origins of that program. We also speak to Serhiy Prytula, a former Ukrainian television host who is now a key force behind it.Guest: Christiaan Triebert, a journalist on The New York Times’s Visual Investigations team.Background reading: Officials in Ukraine rarely discuss attacks on targets inside Russia, including Moscow. But video evidence <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/31/world/europe/ukraine-dro
19/09/202337 minutes
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The Ozempic Era of Weight Loss

Drugs like Ozempic are revolutionizing the treatment of obesity. The medications, originally used to treat diabetes, keep gaining attention as celebrities and other influencers describe taking them to lose weight quickly.Dani Blum, a reporter for The Times, tells the story behind the drugs and describes some of the ramifications of using them.Guest: Dani Blum, a reporter for Well at The New York Times.Background reading: Ozempic can cause major weight loss. What happens if you stop taking it?Some people taking the drugs can experience such intense lack of appetite that they become malnourished.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thed
18/09/202337 minutes 52 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Inheritance Case That Could Unravel an Art Dynasty’

Twenty years ago, a glamorous platinum-blond widow arrived at the Paris law office of Claude Dumont Beghi in tears. Someone was trying to take her horses — her “babies” — away, and she needed a lawyer to stop them.She explained that her late husband had been a breeder of champion thoroughbreds. The couple was a familiar sight at the racetracks in Chantilly and Paris: Daniel Wildenstein, gray-suited with a cane in the stands, and Sylvia Roth Wildenstein, a former model with a cigarette dangling from her lips. They first met in 1964, while she was walking couture shows in Paris and he was languishing in a marriage of convenience to a woman from another wealthy Jewish family of art collectors. Daniel, 16 years Sylvia’s senior, already had two grown sons when they met, and he didn’t want more children. So over the next 40 years they spent together, Sylvia cared for the horses as if they were the children she never had. When Daniel died of cancer in 2001, he left her a small stabl
17/09/202356 minutes 57 seconds
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The Republican Attempt to Impeach President Biden

Speaker Kevin McCarthy has ordered an impeachment inquiry into President Biden, putting into motion the third formal attempt by Congress to remove a president in the past four years.Luke Broadwater,  a congressional reporter for The Times, explains the unique realities behind this one.Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. McCarthy, who formerly argued that the House must vote before opening an impeachment inquiry, changed his tune this week.What we know about the impeachment case against Mr. Biden.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Tra
15/09/202328 minutes 33 seconds
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An Armored Train and a Dangerous New Alliance

In a rare move, the leader of North Korea, Kim Jong-un, traveled outside his country this week to meet with the Russian president, Vladimir V. Putin. Julian Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times, explains what Russia wants from North Korea and how far Mr. Putin might go to get it.Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Kim Jong-un has ammunition stocks that Russia covets as it continues its war in Ukraine, and North Korea may get advanced technology and badly needed food aid in return.Heading to Russia to meet with President Vladimir V. Putin, the North Korean leader chose to travel by rail,<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/09/11/world/asia/kim-jong-un-armored-train-north-korea.html?search
14/09/202327 minutes 3 seconds
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A New Covid Shot for a New Covid Era

On Tuesday afternoon, the U.S. government recommended that almost every American begin taking a new annual vaccine for Covid, a milestone in the nation’s three-year battle against the virus.Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times, explains why the era of booster shots is now over and how to navigate this latest uptick in infections.Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The C.D.C. recommended all Americans aged 6 months and older should get at least one dose of new Covid vaccines.Covid continues to rise, but experts remain optimistic.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href
13/09/202326 minutes 25 seconds
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A Breaking Point for the U.S. Auto Industry

Later this week, as many as 150,000 U.S. autoworkers may walk out in a historic strike against the three Detroit automakers, General Motors, Ford and Stellantis. The United Auto Workers union and the Big Three are still far apart in talks, and have only two days left to negotiate a new labor contract before the deadline.Neal Boudette, who covers the auto industry for The New York Times, walks us through a tangled, decades-long dynamic and explains why a walkout looks increasingly likely.Guest: Neal E. Boudette, an auto industry correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: An auto strike is looming that threatens to shut down Detroit’s Big Three.The United Auto Workers has said it is prepared to strike at General Motors, Ford and Stellantis<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/09/08
12/09/202330 minutes 28 seconds
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U.S. v Google

For years, the government has been trying to rein in Big Tech, pursuing some of the largest and most powerful companies on the internet. This week, the government takes on Google in the first monopoly trial of the modern internet era.David McCabe, who covers technology policy for The Times, discusses the case against the internet giant and what it might mean for the future if the it loses.Guest: David McCabe, a technology policy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The 10-week trial amps up efforts to rein in Big Tech by targeting the core search business that turned Google into a $1.7 trillion behemoth.A federal judge said that the Justice Department could not
11/09/202324 minutes 18 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Wikipedia’s Moment of Truth’

In early 2021, a Wikipedia editor peered into the future and saw what looked like a funnel cloud on the horizon: the rise of GPT-3, a precursor to the new chatbots from OpenAI. When this editor — a prolific Wikipedian who goes by the handle Barkeep49 on the site — gave the new technology a try, he could see that it was untrustworthy. The bot would readily mix fictional elements (a false name, a false academic citation) into otherwise factual and coherent answers. But he had no doubts about its potential. “I think A.I.’s day of writing a high-quality encyclopedia is coming sooner rather than later,” he wrote in “Death of Wikipedia,” an essay that he posted under his handle on Wikipedia itself. He speculated that a computerized model could, in time, displace his beloved website and its human editors, just as Wikipedia had supplanted the Encyclopaedia Britannica, which in 2012 announced it was discontinuing its print publication.Recently, when I asked this editor if he still wor
10/09/202351 minutes 59 seconds
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A Tragic Fire and Broken Promises in South Africa

This episode contains descriptions of severe injuries. Last week, a devastating fire swept through a derelict building in Johannesburg that housed desperate families who had no place else to go. The authorities had been repeatedly warned that it was a potential firetrap. Nothing was done, and at least 76 people died.Lynsey Chutel, who covers southern Africa for The Times, explains how Johannesburg, once a symbol of the hope of post-apartheid South Africa, became an emblem of just how bad the country’s breakdown has become.Guest: Lynsey Chutel, a southern Africa correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: An extensive paper trail revealed that the authorities in Johannesburg were warned repeatedly about the dangers in the building that burned down.Johannesburg, with a seve
08/09/202331 minutes 43 seconds
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Why One Drug Company Held Back a Better Drug

For decades, drugmakers have argued that patents are critical to bringing new drugs to the market. But in 2004, when a promising H.I.V. treatment emerged, Gilead Sciences decided to slow-walk its release to maximize profit on the company’s existing patents.Rebecca Robbins, who covers the pharmaceutical industry for The Times, discusses one man’s case and how patents can create perverse incentives to delay new and better drugs.Guest: Rebecca Robbins, a business reporter covering the pharmaceutical industry for The New York Times.Background reading: Gilead delayed a new version of a drug, allowing it to extend the patent life of a blockbuster line of medications, internal documents showed.In August, an expert panel<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/22/health/hiv-prep-truvada-descovy.html?search
07/09/202335 minutes 38 seconds
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How 100,000 Migrants Became a Political Crisis in New York

In New York, the arrival of more than 100,000 migrants seeking asylum over the past year has become a crisis for the city’s shelter system, schools and budget.As another critical election season begins to take shape, Nicholas Fandos, who covers New York State politics for The Times, explains why the situation has also become a political crisis for the state’s Democratic leaders.Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a reporter covering New York State politics for The New York Times Metro desk.Background reading: New York’s migrant crisis is growing. So are Democrats’ anxieties.A scathing letter revealed tension among New York Democrats over the city’s migrant crisis.For more information on today’s episode, vi
06/09/202328 minutes 19 seconds
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Passenger Planes Nearly Collide Far More Than You Know

A Times investigation found that U.S. passenger planes come dangerously close to crashing into each other far more frequently than the public knows.Sydney Ember, an economics reporter for The Times, explains why an aviation system known for its safety is producing such a steady stream of close calls.Guest: Sydney Ember, an economics correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Airline close calls happen far more often than previously known.What you need to know about turbulence.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by t
05/09/202328 minutes 21 seconds
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Arizona’s Pipe Dream

A Times investigation revealed that in much of the United States, communities and farms are pumping out groundwater at alarming rates. Aquifers are shrinking nationwide, threatening supplies of drinking water and the country’s status as a food superpower.Christopher Flavelle, who covers climate adaptation for The Times, went to Arizona, the state at the forefront of the crisis, and looked at one especially controversial idea to address it: desalination.Guest: Christopher Flavelle covers climate adaptation for The New York Times.Background reading: America is using up its groundwater like there’s no tomorrow.Five takeaways from the investigation into the groundwat
01/09/202339 minutes 3 seconds
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A Major Overhaul of Prescription Drug Prices

A year ago, Congress overhauled the way drugs for older Americans get paid for, by giving Medicare the power to bargain with drug makers over prices in the biggest change to health care for more than a decade. This week, the Biden administration began its implementation.Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers health policy for The Times, discusses the decades long battle for bargaining power and Rebecca Robbins, who covers the pharmaceutical industry for The Times, explains its potential to reshape the business of drugs in America.Guest: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, a Washington correspondent covering health policy for The New York Times.Rebecca Robbins, a business reporter for The New York Times covering the pharmaceutical industry.Background reading: The Biden administration announced <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/29/us/politics/m
31/08/202332 minutes 45 seconds
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A Breakout Moment for Vivek Ramaswamy

In the Republican presidential race, the battle for second place has been jolted by the sudden rise of a political newcomer whose popularity has already eclipsed that of far more seasoned candidates — Vivek Ramaswamy.Jonathan Weisman, who is a political correspondent for The Times, explains the rising candidate’s back story, message and strategy.Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Surging poll numbers underscore that Vivek Ramaswamy is having a well-timed political moment.Mr. Ramaswamy, a millennial, has a lot to say about his generation.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes
30/08/202328 minutes 13 seconds
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A Marriage, a Secret and a Crackdown in China

Over the past decade, China has placed more and more restrictions on the lives of its citizens — tightening its hold over what people can do, read and say.When Bei Zhenying’s husband was arrested and sentenced to seven years in prison for “smearing” the country’s political system, she was left to pick up the pieces of his life. She now believes that her husband was the writer behind one of the most mysterious blogs on the Chinese internet, which for 12 years had ridiculed the ruling Communist Party from within the country.Vivian Wang, a China correspondent for The Times, tells the story of the couple.Guest: Vivian Wang, a China correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: China took Bei Zhenying’s husband. She was left to uncover his secret cause.China’s search engines hav
29/08/202340 minutes 59 seconds
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A New Race to the Moon

Last week, India landed its spacecraft Chandrayaan-3 on the moon, becoming the first country to land such a craft near the south pole, where scientists believe vital reserves of water could be found frozen. The landing also revealed just how much the international space race has changed.Kenneth Chang, a science reporter for The Times, explains why a new set of players are dominating the space race and what is motivating their groundbreaking missions to the moon.Guest: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: India became the first country to get a craft to the lunar south polar region in one piece, adding to the achievements of its homegrown space program.At the moon’s south pole,<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/23/science/on-the-moons-south-pole-a-qu
28/08/202323 minutes 37 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Fight for the Right to Trespass’

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
27/08/202343 minutes 41 seconds
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A Plane Crash, 10 Dead People and a Question: Was This Putin’s Revenge?

The mysterious crash of a private jet outside Moscow is believed to have killed Yevgeny Prigozhin, the boss of the Wagner militia who led an armed rebellion against Moscow in June. Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The Times, explains what we’ve learned about the crash, and what a potential political assassination says about President Vladimir Putin’s Russia.Guest: Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: All 10 people on a jet linked to Yevgeny V. Prigozhin, the founder of the mercenary group Wagner, were killed, Russian officials said.A blast is likely to have downed the jet and killed Mr. Prigozhin, U.S. officials say.</u
25/08/202325 minutes 54 seconds
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A Fiery First Republican Debate — Without Trump

Last night, Republicans held their first debate of the 2024 presidential cycle without the party’s dominant candidate onstage: Donald J. Trump.Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The Times, walks us through the debate and discusses how it might influence the rest of the race.Guest: Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Seven takeaways from the first Republican debate.Trump skipped the event in favor of a gentle online interview with Tucker Carlson.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of e
24/08/202326 minutes 53 seconds
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Ready or Not, Driverless Cars Are Here

After a closely watched vote, driverless cars, once a Silicon Valley fantasy, have become a 24-hour-a-day reality in San Francisco. Are autonomous vehicles an interesting and safe transportation alternative? Or are they a nuisance and a traffic-blocking disaster waiting to happen?Cade Metz, who covers technology for The Times, describes the unique challenges of coexisting with cars that drive themselves.Guest: Cade Metz, a technology correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: On Monday, Waymo began letting the public pay for rides in its driverless cars in San Francisco. The New York Times dispatched three reporters around the city
23/08/202333 minutes 37 seconds
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Why the Coral Reef Crisis in Florida Is a Problem for All of Us

A marine heat wave is warming the waters off the coast of Florida, pushing temperature readings as high as 101 Fahrenheit and endangering a critical part of sea life: the coral reef.Catrin Einhorn, who covers biodiversity, climate and the environment for The Times, discusses the urgent quest to save coral and what it might mean for the world if it disappears.Guest: Catrin Einhorn, a biodiversity, climate and environment correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A desperate push to save Florida’s coral reef, by getting it out of the sea.Measuring and comparing sea surface temperatures is complex, but scientists agree on one thing: 101 Fahrenheit in the ocean off Florida is bad news for w
22/08/202328 minutes 12 seconds
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Inside the Sputtering Campaign of Ron DeSantis

Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida began the race for the Republican nomination with high expectations and a clear argument: that he was a political fighter with a solid record of conservative achievements in his state. Now, he appears to be in a downward spiral.Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The Times, explains why the DeSantis campaign is stumbling so badly.Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Governor DeSantis, who has been losing ground in polls and dealing with staffing, spending and messaging issues, tweaks his messaging and tactics.Here are <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/10/u
21/08/202329 minutes 17 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Ongoing Mystery of Covid’s Origin’

Where did it come from? More than three years into the pandemic with untold millions of people dead, that question about the origin of Covid-19 remains widely disputed and fraught, with facts sparkling amid a tangle of analyses and hypotheticals like Christmas lights strung on a dark, thorny tree. One school of thought holds that the virus, known to science as SARS-CoV-2, spread to humans from a nonhuman animal, probably in the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, an emporium brimming with fish, meats and wildlife on sale as food in Wuhan, China.Another school argues that the virus was laboratory-engineered as a bioweapon to infect humans and cause them harm, and was possibly devised in a “shadow project” sponsored by the People’s Liberation Army of China. A third school, more moderate than the second but also implicating laboratory work, suggests that the virus got into its first human victim by accident at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, a research complex on the eastern side
20/08/20231 hour 2 minutes 17 seconds
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How a Paradise Became a Death Trap

Warning: This episode contains descriptions of death.When fires swept West Maui, Hawaii, many residents fled for their lives — but soon discovered they had nowhere to go. Thousands of structures, mostly homes, have been reduced to rubble. Husks of incinerated cars line the historic Front Street in Lahaina, while search crews nearby make their way painstakingly from house to house, looking for human remains.Ydriss Nouara, a resident of Lahaina, recounts his experience fleeing the inferno and Mike Baker, the Seattle bureau chief for The Times, explains how an extraordinary set of circumstances turned the city into a death trap.Guest: Mike Baker, the Seattle bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Nearly a week after the fires started, relatives are receiving little information as search and<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/14/us/hawaii-missing-answers.html?searchRe
18/08/202342 minutes 18 seconds
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Hunter Biden’s Legal Problems Keep Getting Worse

A plea deal struck between the Department of Justice and Hunter Biden was supposed to bring his years of legal troubles to an end. Instead, that deal has unraveled and a special counsel has been named to take over the case.Michael Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The Times, explains why that turn of events is increasingly pitting the interests of Hunter Biden against those of President Biden.Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The lawyer who represented Hunter Biden in plea negotiations stepped down, saying that he intends to testify as a witness on behalf of the president’s son.Here’s a timeline of Hunter Bi
17/08/202326 minutes 53 seconds
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Why a Coup in Niger Has the World’s Attention

In a region of Africa where authoritarianism has been rising, Niger seemed to be on a different path of democracy and partnership with the United States.Declan Walsh, chief Africa correspondent for The Times, explains how a military coup has now put all of that in jeopardy and why Niger’s allies still think it’s possible to reverse that coup.Guest: Declan Walsh, the chief Africa correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The military junta that seized power in Niger said it would prosecute the president on treason charges, while also telling an intermediary that it was open to talks with neighboring countries.“Not another coup as usual”: Here’s what to know about Niger’s crisis.<
16/08/202326 minutes 3 seconds
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A Law Used Against the Mafia — and Now Trump

On Monday, former President Donald J. Trump and 18 others were indicted by an Atlanta grand jury, with Mr. Trump and some of his former top aides accused of orchestrating a “criminal enterprise” to reverse the results of the 2020 election in Georgia.Richard Fausset, who covers politics and culture in the American South for The Times, explains why, of all the charges piling up against Trump, this one may be the hardest to escape.Guest: Richard Fausset, a New York Times correspondent based in Atlanta.Background reading:A grand jury in Georgia indicted the former president and 18 allies on multiple charges related to a conspiracy to subvert the will of voters.Here are <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/live/2023/08/14/us/trump-indictment-georgia-election#here-are-the-latest-developments-in-the-investi
15/08/202322 minutes 27 seconds
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What Lahaina Lost in Hawaii’s Wildfires

Last week, wildfires broke out on the Hawaiian island of Maui that became the deadliest in the United States in over a century. The town of Lahaina, once the royal capital of the kingdom of Hawaii, was one of the places hit hardest — its historic center was decimated, including Waiola Church, the oldest on the island and a cherished meeting place.Today, the minister of Waiola Church, Anela Rosa, explains what it means to lose Lahaina and what it will take to rebuild it.Guest: Anela Rosa, minister of Waiola Church in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii.Background reading: Lahaina was once Hawaii’s royal capital, and there were fears that some of its oldest buildings had been destroyed by the wildfires.A journey through Lahaina’s endless streets of suffering.</l
14/08/202328 minutes 1 second
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Silicon Blockade’

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
13/08/202334 minutes 8 seconds
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The End of An Era for U.S. Women’s Soccer

A few days ago, when the U.S. team was eliminated from the FIFA Women’s World Cup, it marked the end of a history-making run.Rory Smith, chief soccer correspondent for The Times, argues that it also marked the end of something even bigger: an entire era that redefined women’s sports.Guest: Rory Smith, the chief soccer correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: After 48 games in the Women’s World Cup, half the teams had been sent home. And yet the field of potential winners feels bigger than it did at the start.Expanding the tournament was a good idea. Just not for the reasons FI
11/08/202332 minutes 58 seconds
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Lives, Livelihoods, and the High Cost of Heat

This summer, unrelenting heat waves have taken a devastating toll in many parts of the world, putting this year on track to be the hottest ever recorded.Coral Davenport, who covers energy and environmental policy for The Times, and Dana Smith, a reporter for the Well section, discuss what it means to live in this new normal, an era in which extreme heat threatens our way of life.Guest: Coral Davenport, an energy and environmental policy correspondent for The New York Times.Dana G. Smith, a reporter for the Well section of The New York Times.Background reading: Heat is costing the U.S. economy billions in lost productivity.Here’s what extreme heat<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/08/10/well/live/heat-body-dehydration-hea
10/08/202335 minutes 24 seconds
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Elon Musk’s Quest to Own the Stars

Satellites owned by Elon Musk’s Starlink orbit the earth and beam an internet connection to almost anywhere. In 2019, the company sent its first 60 or so satellites into orbit — today, it has some 4,500 circling the planet, with around 1.5 million customers across about 50 countries and territories.Adam Satariano, a technology correspondent for The Times, details the company’s rise and power, and discusses the implications of one man’s controlling it all.Guest: Adam Satariano, a technology correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Elon Musk has become the dominant power in satellite internet technology. The ways he is wielding that influence are raising global alarms.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com
09/08/202326 minutes 58 seconds
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The Legal Strategy Behind the Latest Trump Indictment

To win a conviction against former President Donald J. Trump for trying to subvert the results of the 2020 election, Jack Smith, the special counsel, is applying laws in ways that have never been used before.Charlie Savage, a Washington correspondent for The Times, explains Mr. Smith’s approach and previews Mr. Trump’s likely response.Guest: Charlie Savage, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: By layering varied charges atop the same facts, while sidestepping a free-speech question, the special counsel has structured the election indictment to reduce risk.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be mad
08/08/202327 minutes 44 seconds
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The Economy is on an Upswing. Should Biden Get Credit for It?

The latest economic figures are some of the best of President Biden’s tenure so far. It appears increasingly likely that the United States has managed to tame high inflation without causing a recession.Jim Tankersley, who covers economic policy for The Times, discusses the encouraging outlook and speculates about why the positive data hasn’t translated into a bump in President Biden’s popularity.Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: For President Biden, many of the numbers that define an administration — on the economy, crime, immigration — are finally heading in the right direction. Except one: his approval rating.With the strong numbers, there are tentative signs that<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/01/us/politics/biden
07/08/202326 minutes 12 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Vanishing Family: Life in the Shadow of a Cruel Genetic Mutation’

When Barb’s father all but left, her mother turned inward, sitting quietly in front of the television, always smoking, often with a cocktail. Something had overtaken her, though it wasn’t clear what.Six years later, Barb was 20 and in college when someone else in the family needed help. Her sister Christy was the second-born, 24 years older than Barb and the star of the family in many ways. But where once Christy was capable and professionally ambitious and socially conscious, now, at 44, she was alone, her clothes unkempt and ripped, her hair unwashed, her marriage over.Depression was the first suspected diagnosis, then schizophrenia, though neither seemed quite right. Christy wasn’t sad or delusional; she wasn’t even upset. It was more as if she were reverting to a childlike state, losing her knack for self-regulation. Her personality was diluting — on its way out, with seemingly nothing to replace it.What was left of Christy was chaotic and unpredictable. She
06/08/202346 minutes 35 seconds
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Fighting Canada’s Unending Fires

The wildfires sweeping Canada have become the largest in its modern history. Across the country, 30 million acres of forest have burned — three times as much land as in the worst American fire in the past 50 years.The scale has forced an international response and a re-evaluation of how the world handles wildfires.Firefighters on the front lines discuss the challenges they face, and David Wallace-Wells, a climate columnist for The Times, explores how climate change has shifted thinking about wildfires.Guest: David Wallace-Wells, a climate columnist for The New York Times. Background reading: With most of Canada’s fire season still ahead, the country is on track to produce more carbon emissions
04/08/202327 minutes 11 seconds
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43% vs. 43%: Why Trump and Biden Are Tied in Our New Poll

With Donald Trump facing charges in three different criminal cases, the biggest questions in American politics are whether that creates an opening for his Republican rivals in the presidential race — and whether it disqualifies him in the eyes of general election voters.A new set of Times polls has answers to those questions. It shows the president and the former president still tied among registered voters, each at 43 percent.Nate Cohn, The New York Times’s chief political analyst, talks us through the first Times/Siena polling of the 2024 election cycle.Guest: Nate Cohn, chief political analyst for The New York Times.Background reading: Can the race really be that close?The first Times/Siena poll of the Republican primary shows<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/31/upshot/poll-tr
03/08/202330 minutes 59 seconds
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The Charges Against Trump for Conspiring to Overturn the Election

On Tuesday afternoon, the special counsel Jack Smith filed criminal charges against former President Donald Trump over his wide-ranging attempt to overthrow the 2020 election.Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The Times, talks us through the indictment and the evidence it lays out that Trump participated in an illegal conspiracy to remain in power.Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The New York Times’s live coverage of the indictment.Four takeaways from the indictment.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transc
02/08/202326 minutes 25 seconds
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The Secret History of Gun Rights

How did the National Rifle Association, America’s most influential gun-rights group, amass its power?A New York Times investigation has revealed the secret history of how a fusty club of sportsmen became a lobbying juggernaut that would compel elected officials’ allegiance, derail legislation behind the scenes, and redefine the legal landscape.Mike McIntire, an investigative reporter for The Times, sets out the story of the N.R.A.’s transformation — and the unseen role that members of Congress played in designing the group’s strategies. Guest: Mike McIntire, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Over decades, a small group of legislators led by a prominent Democrat pushed the gun lobby to help transform the law, the courts and views on the Second Amendment.The pot
01/08/202326 minutes 57 seconds
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Italy’s Giorgia Meloni Charts a Path for the Far Right

Last year, Giorgia Meloni, an Italian far-right politician, became prime minister on an agenda that many feared would mark a radical turn for the country. Now, her visit to the White House last week has bolstered her credentials on the international stage.Jason Horowitz, the Rome bureau chief for The New York Times, explains how she got here and the path she has carved out for Europe’s far-right parties.Guest: Jason Horowitz, the Rome bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: At the White House, President Biden embraced Ms. Meloni as a friend and cast aside initial doubts that her far-right party might prove to be troublesome for Washington.Ms. Meloni has surprised many by showing a pragmatic s
31/07/202331 minutes 31 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The America That Americans Forget’

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
30/07/20231 hour 43 minutes 56 seconds
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Menopause Is Having a Moment

Some of the worst symptoms of menopause — including hot flashes, sleeplessness and pain during sex — have an established treatment. Why aren’t more women offered it?Susan Dominus, a writer for The New York Times Magazine, explains how menopause has been misunderstood both by doctors and society for years, and tells us what happened when her article about it went viral.Guest: Susan Dominus is a writer for The New York Times Magazine.Background reading: From The New York Times Magazine: Women have been misled about menopause.A selection of seven books to guide you through menopause.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode w
28/07/202332 minutes 8 seconds
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Affirmative Action for the 1 Percent

A major new study has revealed just how much elite colleges admissions in the U.S. systematically favor the rich and the superrich.David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The Times and The Morning, walks through the data and explains why the study is fueling calls to abandon longstanding practices like legacy admissions.Guest: David Leonhardt, a senior writer for The New York Times and The Morning.Background reading: From the Upshot: A study of elite college admissions data suggests being very rich is its own qualification.Here’s David Leonhardt’s article for The Morning discussing the results of the study.
27/07/202338 minutes 24 seconds
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Hunter Biden’s Day in Court

On Wednesday morning, Hunter Biden was scheduled to a guilty plea in a Delaware courtroom, marking the end of a yearslong federal investigation that many Republicans believed would put the president’s son in prison, and put an end to the Biden presidency.Michael Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times, explains why none of that has happened.Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times who covers national security and federal investigations.Background reading: Under an agreement with the Justice Department, Hunter Biden accepted probation for filing his taxes late.Republicans in Congress sought to block the plea deal, arguing that it had been<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/25/us/politics/republican
26/07/202334 minutes 4 seconds
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Russia’s Newest Target: The Global Food Supply

When Russia invaded Ukraine, it put the global food supply at risk — until the two countries struck an unusual deal to keep shipments flowing. Last week, that deal fell apart.Marc Santora, who has been reporting from Ukraine since the beginning of the conflict, explains what the collapse of the agreement means for the war and why its impact will be felt by tens of millions of people across the world.Guest: Marc Santora, a Ukraine correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: After Russia pulled out of the agreement allowing ships to carry grain past its Black Sea blockade, Ukraine accused Moscow of aiming strikes at food export infrastructure.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/live/2023/07/19/world/russia-ukraine-news#russian-overnight-attacks-concentrate-on-infrastructure-in-odesa
25/07/202321 minutes 51 seconds
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A One-Man Blockade Against the U.S. Military

For the past few months, a single senator — Tommy Tuberville — has blocked hundreds of promotions in the U.S. military.Karoun Demirjian, a congressional correspondent for The Times, explains what’s behind the senator’s blockade, and why military leaders say it’s becoming a threat to national security.Guest: Karoun Demirjian, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Tuberville’s bid to reverse a Pentagon policy ensuring abortion access for service members has delayed the smooth transfer of power at the highest echelons of the armed forces.Here’s David Firestone of Times Opinion on Tuberville’s blockade.For more information on today’s epi
24/07/202324 minutes 56 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Trillion- Gallon Question’

On the morning of Feb. 7, 2017, two electricians were working on a warning siren near the spillway of Oroville Dam, 60 miles north of Sacramento, when they heard an explosion. As they watched, a giant plume of water rose over their heads, and chunks of concrete began flying down the hillside toward the Feather River. The dam’s spillway, a concrete channel capable of moving millions of gallons of water out of the reservoir in seconds, was disintegrating in front of them. If it had to be taken out of service, a serious rainstorm, like the one that had been falling on Northern California for days, could cause the dam — the tallest in the United States — to fail.Kory Honea, the sheriff of Butte County, which includes the dam and the town it is named for, first heard that something was wrong from Dino Corbin, a local radio personality, who called him at his office: “Are you aware there’s a hole in the spillway?” Around the same time, one of the sheriff’s dispatchers received a con
23/07/202354 minutes 18 seconds
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Can Barbie Be Rebranded as a Feminist Icon?

“Barbie” is premiering this weekend and is trying to pull off a seemingly impossible task: taking a doll best known for reinforcing conventional stereotypes of women and rebranding it as a symbol of feminism, all without coming off as a shameless ad for the doll’s maker, Mattel. Willa Paskin, a journalist and host of Slate’s Decoder Ring podcast, recounts her conversation with the film’s director, Greta Gerwig, about how she approached the challenge.Guest: Willa Paskin, Slate’s television critic and the host of Slate’s Decoder Ring podcast.Background reading: Mattel wanted a summer blockbuster to kick off its new wave of brand-extension movies. Greta Gerwig wanted the film to be a work of art.The reviews are in: Some critics viewed “Barbie” as satirically capitalistic,<a href="https://www.nyti
21/07/202331 minutes 20 seconds
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The Man Trying to Save Phoenix From Historic Heat

As a historic heat wave grips much of the world and the United States, no city has become more emblematic of the crisis than Phoenix, where temperatures have exceeded 110 degrees for the past three weeks.Today, the city’s chief heat officer, David Hondula, discusses how the city is adjusting to the new reality of chronic extreme heat — and whether we are adapting to it fast enough.Guest: David Hondula, the director of heat response and mitigation for the city of Phoenix.Background reading: Arizona is used to scorching summers, but a long stretch of days with 110-degree temperatures is straining patience and resources.Week
20/07/202323 minutes 52 seconds
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How the Birth Control Pill Got Over the Counter

Last week, for the first time in U.S. history, federal regulators approved the sale of a birth control pill without a prescription.Pam Belluck, a health and science correspondent for The Times, explains why, after decades of brutal battles over contraception, this decision played out so differently.Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The F.D.A. approved a birth control pill to be sold without a prescription for the first time in the United States, a milestone that could significantly expand access to contraception.Here’s how women reacted to the news.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href=
19/07/202329 minutes 28 seconds
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The Writers’ Revolt Against A.I. Companies

To refine their popular technology, new artificial intelligence platforms like Chat-GPT are gobbling up the work of authors, poets, comedians and actors — without their consent.Sheera Frenkel, a technology correspondent for The Times, explains why a rebellion is brewing.Guest: Sheera Frenkel, a technology correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Fed up with A.I. companies consuming online content without consent, fan fiction writers, actors, social media companies and news organizations are among those rebelling.The comedian and actress Sarah Silverman has joined two lawsuits accusing the companies of training A.I. models using he
18/07/202328 minutes 47 seconds
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China’s Economic Rebound Hits a Wall

When China suddenly dismantled its lockdowns and other Covid precautions last December, officials in Beijing and many investors expected the economy to spring back to life. It hasn’t worked out that way.Daisuke Wakabayashi, an Asia business correspondent for The Times, explains why China’s economic rebound hit a wall, and what it says about the country’s next chapter.Guest: Daisuke Wakabayashi, an Asia business correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Policymakers and investors expected China’s economy to rev up again after Beijing abruptly dropped Covid precautions, but recent data shows alarming signs of a slowdown.Nanchang’s skyscrapers represented urban transformation, but the
17/07/202322 minutes 59 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Moral Crisis of America’s Doctors’

Some years ago, a psychiatrist named Wendy Dean read an article about a physician who died by suicide. Such deaths were distressingly common, she discovered. The suicide rate among doctors appeared to be even higher than the rate among active military members, a notion that startled Dean, who was then working as an administrator at a U.S. Army medical research center in Maryland. Dean started asking the physicians she knew how they felt about their jobs, and many of them confided that they were struggling. Some complained that they didn’t have enough time to talk to their patients because they were too busy filling out electronic medical records. Others bemoaned having to fight with insurers about whether a person with a serious illness would be preapproved for medication.The doctors Dean surveyed were deeply committed to the medical profession. But many of them were frustrated and unhappy, she sensed, not because they were burned out from working too hard but because the hea
16/07/202331 minutes 12 seconds
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How Clarence Thomas Came to Reject Affirmative Action

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, the second Black justice to sit on the court after Thurgood Marshall, has spent years opposing affirmative action. When the high court struck down the policy last month, Justice Thomas was one of the most influential figures behind the ruling.Abbie VanSickle, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, explains the impact affirmative action has had on Justice Thomas’s life and how he helped to bring about its demise.Guest: Abbie VanSickle, a Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A look at Justice Thomas’s path to the Supreme Court.Here’s what the justices have sai
14/07/202333 minutes 38 seconds
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How Affirmative Action Changed Their Lives

Two weeks ago, the United States Supreme Court struck down affirmative action, declaring that the race-conscious admissions programs at Harvard and the University of North Carolina were unlawful.Today, three people whose lives were changed by affirmative action discuss the complicated feelings they have about the policy.Guest: Sabrina Tavernise, a co-host of The Daily.Background reading: For many of the Black, Hispanic and Native Americans whose lives were shaped by affirmative action, the moment has prompted a personal reckoning with its legacy.In earlier decisions, the court had endorsed taking account of race as one factor among many to promote educational diversity.
13/07/202335 minutes 56 seconds
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The Great Resignation is Over

 Tens of millions of Americans changed jobs over the past two years, a rare moment of worker power as employees demanded higher pay, and as employers, short on staff, often gave it to them.The tidal wave of quitting became known as the “great resignation.” Now, as the phenomenon seems to have fizzled out, the Times economic writer Ben Casselman discusses whether there have been any lasting benefits for American workers.Guest: Ben Casselman, an economy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The furious pace of job-switching in recent years has led to big gains for low-wage workers. But the pendulum could be swinging back toward employers.Last year, the Times opinion writer Paul Krugman<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/05/opinion/great-resignation-employment.html?searchRes
12/07/202324 minutes 16 seconds
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Many Countries Banned Cluster Munitions. The U.S. Is Sending Them to Ukraine Anyway.

For months, President Biden has been wrestling with one of the most vexing questions in the war in Ukraine: whether to risk letting Ukrainian forces run out of the artillery rounds they desperately need to fight Russia, or agree to ship them cluster munitions — widely banned weapons known to cause grievous injury to civilians, especially children. On Friday, the Biden administration announced that it would send the weapons, which have been outlawed by many of Washington's closest allies.David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times, tells the story behind the president’s contentious decision.Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: With Ukraine burning through stockpiles of conventional artillery,<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/07/us/politics/ukraine-cluster-munitions-
11/07/202323 minutes 16 seconds
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Will Threads Kill Twitter?

 Last week, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, released Threads, a social media platform to compete with Twitter. In just 16 hours, Threads was downloaded more than 30 million times.Mike Isaac, who covers tech companies and Silicon Valley for The Times, explains how Twitter became so vulnerable and discusses the challenges Meta faces to create a less toxic alternative.Guest: Mike Isaac, a technology correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Threads is on pace to exceed 100 million users within two months, a feat achieved only by ChatGPT.Here’s what to know about Threads and how it diff
10/07/202333 minutes 14 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Spy Who Called Me’

The wave of scandals that would engulf Spain began with a police raid on a wooded property outside Madrid. It was Nov. 3, 2017, and the target was José Manuel Villarejo Pérez, a former government spy. Villarejo’s name had been circulating in the Spanish press for years. He was rumored to have had powerful friends and to have kept dirt on them all. The impressive variety of allegations against him — forgery, bribery, extortion, influence peddling — had earned him the nickname “king of the sewers.”For many decades, Villarejo’s face had been known to almost no one. He was, after all, a spy — and not just any spy, but one who had started his career in the secret police of the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. In those years, he would dress in overalls from Telefónica, the national telephone company, as he conducted surveillance operations in the mountains, and on several occasions he even wore a priest’s collar in order to infiltrate the Basque separatist group ETA. More recentl
09/07/202335 minutes 17 seconds
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The Complicated Future of Student Loans

Last week, the Supreme Court struck down President Biden’s sweeping plan to cancel billions of dollars in student loan debt.Stacy Cowley, a finance reporter for The New York Times, explains what the decision means for borrowers now facing their first payments since a coronavirus pandemic-related pause and how an alternative plan could still ease their burden.Guest: Stacy Cowley, a finance correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The proposed debt cancellation of more than $400 billion would have been one of the most expensive executive actions in U.S. history.Millions will now have to repay debts that the Biden administration had promised to eliminate.For more in
07/07/202324 minutes 9 seconds
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Russia After the Rebellion

Last month, a rebellion inside Russia left lingering questions about what really happened and about what the ramifications would be for President Vladimir V. Putin.Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The Times, discusses what Mr. Putin has done since the mutiny and looks at how those actions might reveal how vulnerable the president is.Guest: Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Putin is rewarding loyalty among the ruling elite and showering his most important constituency — the men with guns — with cash.The mutiny gave a glimpse of a post-Putin Russia. Is the window still open?For more information on today’s episode, visit
06/07/202330 minutes 24 seconds
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How MrBeast Became the Willy Wonka of YouTube

Jimmy Donaldson, better known as MrBeast, has become a sensation on YouTube for ostentatious and sometimes absurd acts of altruism.Today, Max Read, a journalist and contributor to The Times, discusses what the rise of one of YouTube’s most popular star tells us about the platform and its users.Max Read is a contributor to The New York Times Magazine and writes about technology and internet culture in his newsletter “Read Max.”Background reading: Why do so many people think Mr. Donaldson is evil?MrBeast is out to become the Elon Musk of online creators.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available
05/07/202329 minutes 37 seconds
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From Serial: ‘The Retrievals’

The patients in this story came to the Yale Fertility Center to pursue pregnancy. They began their I.V.F. cycles full of expectation and hope. Then a surgical procedure called egg retrieval caused them excruciating pain.Some of the patients screamed out in the procedure room. Others called the clinic from home to report pain in the hours that followed. But most of the staff members who fielded the patients’ reports did not know the real reason for the pain — a nurse at the clinic was stealing fentanyl and replacing it with saline.Today, we’re sharing the first episode of “The Retrievals,” a five-part narrative series from Serial Productions and The New York Times, reported by Susan Burton, a veteran staff member at “This American Life” and author of the memoir “Empty.”
04/07/202358 minutes 4 seconds
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A Clash Between Religious Faith and Gay Rights

The Supreme Court delivered another major decision this past week, ruling in favor of a web designer who said she had a First Amendment right to refuse to create wedding websites for same-sex couples.Adam Liptak, a Times correspondent who covers the court, explains what the ruling might mean for all kinds of different groups of Americans.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: The justices settled a question left open in 2018: whether businesses open to the public and engaged in expression may refuse to serve customers based on religious convictions.Here’s what to know about the free speech decision</
03/07/202328 minutes 51 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘A Week With the Wild Children of the A.I. Boom’

HF0, or Hacker Fellowship Zero, is a start-up accelerator that provides 12-week residencies for batches of fellows from 10 different start-ups. Their experience, which culminates in a demonstration day, is supposed to be the most productive three months of the fellows’ lives. Dave Fontenot, one of HF0’s founders, was inspired by the two years he spent living in monasteries in his 20s: While monastery life was materially ascetic, he found that it was luxurious in the freedom it gave residents to focus on the things that really mattered. And this year at the Archbishop’s Mansion in San Francisco, the home of the fellows, almost everyone has been monastically focused on what has become the city’s newest religion: artificial intelligence.The A.I. gospel had not yet spread in 2021, when Fontenot and his two co-founders, Emily Liu and Evan Stites-Clayton, started the accelerator. Even a year ago, when HF0 hosted a batch of fellows at a hotel in Miami, six out of the eight companies
02/07/202332 minutes 51 seconds
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The Supreme Court Ends Affirmative Action

On Thursday, the Supreme Court overturned decades of precedent by striking down affirmative action and declaring that the race-conscious admissions programs at Harvard and the University of North Carolina were unlawful.Adam Liptak, who covers the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times, explains the ruling, and what it means for American society.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the court for The New York Times.Background reading: The Supreme Court’s vote to reject affirmative action programs was 6 to 3, with the liberal justices in dissent.In 2016, in its last major case on affirmative action in higher education, the Supreme Court upheld an aspect of an idiosyn
30/06/202327 minutes 32 seconds
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Is Washington Finally Ready to Take On Big Tech?

In a San Francisco courtroom, federal regulators are fighting to block one of the biggest deals in the history of Silicon Valley. David McCabe, who covers technology policy for The New York Times, talks about Lina Khan, the F.T.C. chair who is the architect of the lawsuit, and the growing campaign to finally rein in big tech.Guest: David McCabe, a New York Times correspondent covering technology policy.Background reading: The Federal Trade Commission sued Microsoft to stop the company from closing its purchase of the video game powerhouse Activision Blizzard, escalating government efforts to stymie the largest consumer technology deal in decades.Satya Nadella, the chief executive of Microsoft, appeare
29/06/202327 minutes 53 seconds
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Suspicion, Cheating and Bans: A.I. Hits America’s Schools

Since its introduction less than a year ago, ChatGPT, the artificial intelligence platform that can write essays, solve math problems and write computer code, has sparked an anguished debate in the world of education. Is it a useful research tool or an irresistible license to cheat?Stella Tan, a producer on The Daily, speaks to teachers and students as they finish their first semester with ChatGPT about how it is changing the classroom.Guest: Stella Tan, an audio producer for The New York Times.Background reading: ChatGPT’s potential as an educational tool outweighs its risks, a Times technology columnist argues.While schools debate what to teach students about powerful new A.I. tools, tech giants, universities
28/06/202329 minutes 16 seconds
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Speaker McCarthy Has Lost Control of His House

Earlier this month, a group of hard-right Republicans hijacked the floor of the House of Representatives in protest against Speaker Kevin McCarthy. The mutiny, staged by nearly a dozen members of the ultraconservative House Freedom Caucus, raised questions about whether the speaker could continue to govern his slim and fractious majority.Annie Karni, a congressional correspondent for The Times, explains how and why this small group of members made the chamber ungovernable.Guest: Annie Karni, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: In early June, members of the ultraconservative House Freedom Caucus refused to surrender control of the floor, forcing Republican leaders to scrap votes for the week and leaving speaker Kevin McCarthy facing what he conceded was “chaos.”</l
27/06/202326 minutes 35 seconds
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A 36-Hour Rebellion in Russia

An armed rebellion in Russia over the weekend stunned the world and amounted to the single biggest challenge to President Vladimir V. Putin’s rule since he came to power 23 years ago.Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times, talks about the man who led the revolt, Yevgeny V. Prigozhin, and about what might happen next.Guest: Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: How the rebellion in Russia unfolded.The mutiny raised a searing question: Could Mr. Putin lose power?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts
26/06/202328 minutes
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Understanding Ukraine’s Counteroffensive

For months, much of the world has been watching and waiting as Ukraine prepares for a major counteroffensive in its war with Russia. That battle is now underway, and it’s not what was expected.Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The New York Times, reports from the front line.Guest: Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Military analysts said it would take weeks or months to gauge the success of the attacks Ukraine mounted last week across a broad stretch of the front line.As Ukraine pushes to recapture territory, Russia has moved ahead with elections in occupied areas.
23/06/202322 minutes 7 seconds
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Lost 2 Miles Below the Ocean

A few days ago, when passengers set off on a deep sea expedition in the Atlantic Ocean, they were aboard a vessel that many experts had already concluded was dangerously designed.William Broad, a science correspondent for The Times, explains why he was worried from the start.Guest: William J. Broad, a science correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: What to know about the Titan, the vessel that went missing on Sunday on its way to the Titanic shipwreck site with five people aboard.Three decades ago, a dive in the three-person submersible Alvin revealed not only an alien world but why people engage in such risky pursuits.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://ny
22/06/202327 minutes 17 seconds
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The Re-Militarization of Germany

In the decades after World War II and the atrocities of the Holocaust, Germany deliberately underinvested in its military. But that’s about to change.Katrin Bennhold, a correspondent in Europe and former Berlin bureau chief, explains why Germany is re-entering an era of militarization, and what that will mean for its national identity.Guest: Katrin Bennhold, a Germany and Europe correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Germany adopted a more muscular security plan in an attempt to set priorities, especially since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, but politics may have weakened it.German leaders are vowing to transform the country into a military power capable of taking responsibility for Europe’s security.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/24/ma
21/06/202327 minutes 42 seconds
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Inflation Is Way Down. Is It by Design or Just Luck?

Rapid inflation has been a problem in the United States for more than two years, but the tide appears to be turning. Annual inflation is now less than half of what it was last summer.Jeanna Smialek, who covers the Federal Reserve and the U.S. economy for The Times, discusses whether the decline is a result of careful policymaking, or more of a lucky accident.Guest: Jeanna Smialek, a Federal Reserve correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Inflation is coming down. Is the Fed winning its fight?How to read the Fed’s projections like a pro.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://ny
20/06/202323 minutes 54 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The High-Risk Feat of Bringing ‘American Born Chinese’ to TV’

For more information on today’s episode visit nytimes.com/thedaily.For more information on today’s episode visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
18/06/202324 minutes
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The Kids Take the Climate Change Fight to Court

This week, a historic case has landed in a Montana courtroom. A group of young environmentalists is suing the state, arguing that its embrace of fossil fuels is destroying pristine environments, upending cultural traditions and robbing young residents of a healthy future.David Gelles, a climate correspondent for The Times, explains why the case could be a turning point, and what a win in Montana would mean for the future of the climate fight.Guest: David Gelles, a climate correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The landmark youth climate trial, which has been more than a decade in the making, began on Monday in Montana.Sixteen young Montanans have sued their state, arguing th
16/06/202328 minutes 26 seconds
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How Saudi Arabia Took on Pro Golf — and Won

Last week, golf’s premier circuit, the PGA Tour, announced it was partnering with its rival circuit LIV Golf, an upstart league backed by Saudi Arabia, giving the country a powerful new seat at the table of international sports.Alan Blinder, who covers golf for The New York Times, explains what was behind the deal and what it means for the business of sports.Guest: Alan Blinder, a reporter who covers golf and health for The New York Times.Background reading: The deal to merge LIV Golf with the PGA Tour is a big win for oil-rich Saudi Arabia, headlining a banner week that also includes a visit from the American secretary of state.The U.S. Senate opened an inquiry into the PGA Tour’s deal with LIV Golf.<
15/06/202329 minutes 5 seconds
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Arraigned, Again: Trump’s Federal Court Hearing in Miami

Donald Trump was arraigned in Miami yesterday on 37 criminal counts covering seven different violations of federal law, including the handling of classified documents.Three New York Times journalists covered the proceedings: Glenn Thrush was inside the courtroom, Luke Broadwater reported from outside the courthouse, and Maggie Haberman was at Mr. Trump’s home in Bedminster, N.J.Guests: Luke Broadwater, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Glenn Thrush, who covers the Department of Justice for The New York Times.Maggie Haberman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Trump, now twice indicted since leaving the White House, surre
14/06/202331 minutes 37 seconds
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A Forced Reckoning in the Restaurant Industry

When the #MeToo movement gained momentum in exposing abuses at the highest levels of power, the restaurant industry was exposed as a chief offender. In 2020, the James Beard Awards, the food world’s main kingmaker, announced that there would be no winners in either 2020 or 2021 after allegations against several top chefs.Brett Anderson, a contributing writer on The Times’s Food desk and a former member of the awards committee, discusses the attempts to hold the industry to account.Guest: Brett Anderson, a food correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading:Early indications suggest that the new vetting process for the James Beard Awards is vulnerable to failure in several ways.Behind the cancellation of the 2020 and 2021 James Beard Awards were<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020
13/06/202325 minutes 44 seconds
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Nuclear Secrets and Taped Conversations: A Look at the Evidence Against Trump.

Last week, Donald Trump was charged with federal violations relating to his handling of classified material after leaving office.Ben Protess, who covers the government and law enforcement for The Times, discusses the indictment and walks us through the evidence.Guest: Ben Protess, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The Trump indictment shows critical evidence came from one of his own lawyers.The information about the yearlong inquiry contains a host of embarrassing and potentially devastating new revelations. Here’s what we learned.For more information on today’s episode, visit nyti
12/06/202325 minutes 46 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Most Dangerous Person in the World Is Randi Weingarten’

For more information on today’s episode visit nytimes.com/thedaily.For more information on today’s episode visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
11/06/202351 minutes 18 seconds
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Special Episode: A Second Trump Indictment

The seven new criminal charges against Donald Trump relate to his handling of classified material upon leaving office and then obstructing the government’s efforts to reclaim them. Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The Times, talks about what this will mean for Trump, and for President Biden, whose administration will now be prosecuting his biggest potential rival for the White House.Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Trump is the first former president in U.S. history to face federal charges.The former president assailed Hillary Clinton for her handling of sensitive information. Now, the same issue
09/06/202317 minutes 42 seconds
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There’s No Escaping Wildfire Smoke

Smoke from wildfires in Canada has created a crisis in the American Northeast and beyond, with air pollution in New York reaching its worst level in modern history.David Wallace-Wells, a climate columnist for The Times, explains why this happened, and why there is so little we can do to keep it from happening again.Guest: David Wallace-Wells, a climate columnist correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: New York City experienced its worst air quality on record. Here’s how to stay safe as the smoke spreads.David Wallace-Well’s column on the smoke that shrouded New York City.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/
09/06/202328 minutes 34 seconds
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A Guide to the Suddenly Crowded Republican Primary

Candidates for the Republican presidential nomination keep entering the field, despite the fact that Donald Trump polls consistently as the front-runner and Ron DeSantis has emerged as the clear No. 2. Why do so many lesser-tier Republicans think they have a real shot?Shane Goldmacher, a national political correspondent for The Times, offers a guide to the new crop of candidates and discusses their rationale for running.Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Mike Pence, former vice president — and now rival — to Mr. Trump gave his most aggressive criticism of his former boss, portraying him as unfit to be president.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/06/06/us/politics/chris-christie-donald-trump-2024.ht
08/06/202336 minutes 10 seconds
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Turned Away and Left at Sea

A few weeks ago, footage showing asylum seekers, including young children, being rounded up, taken to sea and abandoned on a raft by the Greek Coast Guard was sent to The New York Times.Matina Stevis-Gridneff, The Times’s bureau chief in Brussels, discusses how she proved the truth of the tip that a major European government was carrying out an illegal scheme risking the lives of civilians.Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Greece has said that it doesn’t ditch migrants at sea. But it was caught in the act.The Times’s investigation into the video points to a slew of Greek, European Union and international law violations
07/06/202330 minutes 54 seconds
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The Fight Over Phonics

About 50 years ago, the educator Lucy Calkins pioneered a technique called balanced literacy, which de-emphasized the use of phonics to teach reading. It was widely adopted in the United States, including in New York, the country’s largest public school system.But doubts about the approach persisted, and now it seems that using balanced literacy has given a generation of American students the wrong tools.Dana Goldstein, who covers family policy and demographics for The Times, discusses the story of balanced literacy and how Professor Calkins is trying to fix the problems that the technique created.Guest: Dana Goldstein, a national correspondent for The New York Times who writes about family policy and demographics.Background reading: Lucy Calkins has rewritten her curriculum to include a fuller embrace of phonics.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/22/us/reading-teaching-curriculum-p
06/06/202339 minutes 21 seconds
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The New Afghanistan, Through the Eyes of Three Women

This episode contains descriptions of violence.In the two years since the United States pulled out of Afghanistan, the Taliban has shut women and girls out of public life.Christina Goldbaum, a correspondent in the Kabul bureau for The New York Times, traveled across Afghanistan to talk to women about how they’re managing the changes. What she found was not what she had expected.Guest: Christina Goldbaum, a correspondent in the Times bureau in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan.Background reading: The Taliban’s takeover ended decades of war. But their restrictions, and the economic fallout, have thrown many women into a new era of diminished hopes.In an uncommon display of consensus, the U.N. Security Council has<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/04/27/world/asia/un-
05/06/202340 minutes 19 seconds
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Special Episode: A Crash Course in Dembow, a Misunderstood Pantry Staple and Simple Tips to Keep Calm and Carry On

This weekend, we’re bringing dispatches from Times critics and writers on great music, TV, movies, recipes and more. They’re all part of a new series called “NYT Shorts,” available only on NYT Audio, our new iOS audio app. It’s home to podcasts, narrated articles from our newsroom and other publishers, and exclusive new shows. Find out more at nytimes.com/audioapp. On today’s episode: An ode to the Dominican musical genre dembow.  The many uses of Worcestershire sauce, an often misunderstood pantry staple. A Times health editor on how she holds it all together. 
03/06/202317 minutes 57 seconds
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America’s Big City Brain Drain

In recent years, well-paid and college-educated Americans have shed major cities like New York, San Francisco and Washington for places like Philadelphia or Birmingham, Ala.Emily Badger, who writes about cities and urban policy for The Upshot at The New York Times, explains what is driving the change, and what it means for the future of the American city.Guest: Emily Badger, a cities and urban policy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Coastal cities have long been too expensive for low-wage workers. Now college graduates are leaving, too.More renters are moving out of big cities. But where are they going?For more information on today’s episode,
02/06/202329 minutes 50 seconds
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How the G.O.P. Picked Trans Kids as a Rallying Cry

With stunning speed, the status of trans youth has become the rallying cry of the Republican Party, from state legislatures to presidential campaigns.Adam Nagourney, who covers West Coast cultural affairs for The New York Times, explains how that came to be, and why it’s proving such a potent issue.Guest: Adam Nagourney, a West Coast cultural affairs correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Defeated on same-sex marriage, the religious right went searching for an issue that would re-energize supporters and donors.Since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, anti-gay rhetoric and calls to roll bac
01/06/202327 minutes 44 seconds
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Republicans Impeach One of Their Own

Since 2016, the cardinal rule of Republican politics has been to defend Donald J. Trump and his allies at all costs, no matter the allegation. That appeared to change last week, when Texas lawmakers issued 20 articles of impeachment against their state’s attorney general, Ken Paxton, a powerful Trump supporter.J. David Goodman, the Houston bureau chief for The New York Times, explains what the escalating conflict in Texas indicates about tensions within the party.Guest: J. David Goodman, the Houston bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: The extraordinary vote on impeachment exposed rifts among Texas Republicans and set the stage for a showdown in the State Senate.The escalating conflict between moderates and hard-liners in one of the Republican Party’s most important states
31/05/202327 minutes 8 seconds
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The Godfather of A.I. Has Some Regrets

As the world begins to experiment with the power of artificial intelligence, a debate has begun about how to contain its risks. One of the sharpest and most urgent warnings has come from a man who helped invent the technology.Cade Metz, a technology correspondent for The New York Times, speaks to Geoffrey Hinton, who many consider to be the godfather of A.I.Guest: Cade Metz, a technology correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: For half a century, Geoffrey Hinton nurtured the technology at the heart of chatbots like ChatGPT. Now he worries it will cause serious harm.Here’s how A.I. could be weaponized to spread disinformation.<
30/05/202339 minutes 46 seconds
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Special Episode: An Interplanetary Jazz Legend, a Cosmic Vegetable and a Psychic Prodigy

This weekend, we’re bringing dispatches from Times critics and writers on great music, TV, movies, recipes and more. They’re all part of a new series called “NYT Shorts,” available only on NYT Audio, our new iOS audio app. It’s home to podcasts, narrated articles from our newsroom and other publishers, and exclusive new shows. Find out more at nytimes.com/audioapp. On today’s episode: Five minutes to fall in love with jazz legend Sun Ra. A food critic’s love letter to the eggplant.  Recommendations from a Times editor on what to listen to, watch and who to follow this weekend. 
27/05/202321 minutes 40 seconds
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The Ticking Clock of a U.S. Debt Default

Top White House officials and Republican lawmakers are racing to reach an agreement as the date when the United States is projected to default on its debt approaches.Jim Tankersley, who covers the White House for The New York Times, looks at the state of the negotiations and explains what it will take to win over enough votes in Congress to avoid an economic disaster.Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The details have not been finalized, but the deal taking shape would allow Republicans to point to spending reductions and Democrats to say they had prevented large cuts.The longer it takes to reach an agreement, the more turmoil there could be for the United States and the global economy.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive
26/05/202332 minutes 58 seconds
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The Headlines: May 26

Our new show brings you the biggest stories in about 10 minutes. It's the complement to The Daily you’ve been waiting for. This episode includes: Oath Keepers Leader Is Sentenced to 18 Years in Jan. 6 Sedition Case, with our courts and criminal justice reporter Alan FeuerLeaders Let Problems Mount at Brutal SEAL Course, Navy Finds, with our military correspondent Dave PhilippsAirlines and F.A.A. Try to Head Off Summer Travel Meltdowns, with our business reporter Niraj ChokshiWe'll be sharing The Headlines every day this week, right here in your Daily feed. To get the full experience, download New York Times Audio, a new app that's home to all
26/05/20239 minutes 33 seconds
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Millions of Dollars, Thousands of Robocalls and 1 Legal Loophole

A New York Times investigation has found that a group of Republican operatives used robocalls to raise $89 million on behalf of veterans, police officers and firefighters.David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The Times, explains how they actually spent the money and the legal loophole that allowed them to do that.Guest: David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: A group of conservative operatives using sophisticated robocalls raised millions of dollars from donors. Instead of using the money to promote issues and candidates, nearly all of it went to pay the firms making the calls and the operatives themselves.How “scam PAC” fund-raisers<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/explain/20
25/05/202325 minutes 35 seconds
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The Headlines: May 25

Our new show brings you the biggest stories in about 10 minutes. It's the complement to The Daily you’ve been waiting for. This episode includes: DeSantis’s Entry into the 2024 Race Goes Awry With a Twitter Meltdown, with our national political correspondent Shane GoldmacherAnti-Kremlin Fighters Take War to Russian Territory for a Second Day, with our Russia and Ukraine War reporter Valerie HopkinsRemembering Tina Turner, with our critic Wesley MorrisWe'll be sharing The Headlines every day this week, right here in your Daily feed. To get the full experie
25/05/202312 minutes 38 seconds
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Ukraine Lost in Bakhmut. But It Has Much Bigger Plans.

After almost a year of deadly battle, Russia has claimed victory in the eastern Ukrainian city of Bakhmut. But what happens now is uncertain.Eric Schmitt, who covers national security for The New York Times, explains what this moment in the war means, and why the next few months could be critical for Ukraine.Guest: Eric Schmitt, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A top Ukrainian official essentially acknowledged that Bakhmut had been lost. Thousands of Ukrainian and Russian soldiers died there, but the cost for Moscow was especially steep, experts say.The battle for Bakhmut, in photos.For more information
24/05/202323 minutes 5 seconds
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The Headlines: May 24

Our new show brings you the biggest stories in about 10 minutes. It's the complement to The Daily you’ve been waiting for. This episode includes: A Year After a School Shooting, Divisions Run Through Uvalde, with our National reporter Edgar SandovalUnder the Radar, Right-Wing Push to Tighten Voting Laws Persists, with our national politics correspondent Nick CorasanitiSurgeon General Warns That Social Media May Harm Children and Adolescents, with our Well reporter Catherine PearsWe'll be sharing The Headlines every day this week, right here in your Daily feed. To get the full experience, download New York Times Audio, a new app that'
24/05/20239 minutes 38 seconds
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The Supreme Court vs. Andy Warhol

A few days ago, the Supreme Court tried to answer a question that has long bedeviled the world of art: When is borrowing from an earlier artist an act of inspiration, and when is it theft? Adam Liptak, who covers the court for The Times, explains a case that could change how art is made.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: The Supreme Court justices considered whether the artist Andy Warhol was free to use elements of a rock photographer’s portrait of the musician Prince.The case could change the future of Western art — and, in a sense, its history, too.For more inform
23/05/202330 minutes 34 seconds
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The Headlines: May 23

Our new show brings you the biggest stories in about 10 minutes. It's the complement to The Daily you’ve been waiting for. This episode includes: Prosecutors Sought Records on Trump’s Foreign Business Deals Since 2017, with our courts and criminal justice reporter Alan FeuerA Breakthrough Deal to Keep the Colorado River From Going Dry, for Now, with our climate reporter Chris FlavelleWhy Bakhmut? It’s a Question as Old as War, with our Ukraine correspondent Thomas Gibbons-Neff We'll be sharing The Headlines every day this week, right here in your Daily feed. To get the full experience, download New York Times Audio, a new app that's home to all our audio journalism, including
23/05/202312 minutes 23 seconds
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Is Trump's Nomination Now Inevitable?

Voters in the 2022 midterms seemed to send a clear message — a rejection of Trumpism and extremism. And yet it appears increasingly likely that he will win the Republican nomination for the 2024 presidential election. Astead W. Herndon, a national political correspondent for The Times and the host of the politics podcast The Run-Up, explains what has shifted in Republican politics so that Mr. Trump’s nomination could start to seem almost inevitable.Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: To some Republicans and Democrats, the charges brought against Mr. Trump in New York appeared flimsy and less consequential than many had hoped. To others, the case had the potential to reverberate politically.In a
22/05/202342 minutes 20 seconds
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Introducing The Headlines: May 22

Our new show brings you the biggest stories in about 10 minutes. It's the complement to The Daily you’ve been waiting for. This episode includes: A Group of 7 Summit Wrap-Up, with our chief White House correspondent, Peter BakerEven Flirting With U.S. Default Takes Economic Toll, with our economics reporter Ben CasselmanGreece Says It Doesn’t Ditch Migrants at Sea. It Was Caught in the Act, with our Brussels bureau chief, Matina Stevis-Gridneff We'll be sharing The Headlines every day this week, right here in your Daily feed. To get the full experience, download New York Times Audio, a new app that's home to all our audio journalism, including exclusive new shows. Free for Times news su
22/05/202311 minutes 23 seconds
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Special Episode: Classic TV, New Music and a Side of Pasta

This weekend, we’re bringing you something a little different: dispatches from Times critics and writers on great music, TV, movies, recipes and more. They’re all part of a new series called “NYT Shorts,” and they’re available only on NYT Audio, our new iOS audio app. It’s home to podcasts, narrated articles from our newsroom and other publishers, and exclusive new shows. Find out more at nytimes.com/audioapp.On today’s episode: The enduring comfort of the detective show “Columbo.”A recipe from Sam Sifton of NYT Cooking that tastes like “childhood and happiness.”Recommendations from our chief pop music critic on new music this week.
20/05/202320 minutes 12 seconds
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When the Culture Wars Came for NASA

The James Webb Space Telescope, the most powerful ever made, has revolutionized the way we see the universe. The name was chosen for James E. Webb, a NASA administrator during the 1960s. But when doubts about his background emerged, the telescope’s name turned into a fight over homophobia.Michael Powell, a national reporter for The Times, tells the story of Dr. Hakeem Oluseyi, an astrophysicist whose quest to end the controversy with indisputable facts only made it worse.Guest: Michael Powell, a national reporter covering free speech and intellectual debate for The New York Times.Background reading: Dr. Oluseyi tried to refute the accusations against Mr. Webb, only to find himself the target of attacks.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/th
19/05/202339 minutes 35 seconds
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An Anonymous #MeToo Source Goes Public

This episode contains descriptions of alleged sexual assault. It’s been more than five years since the #MeToo movement, driven by reporting at publications like The New York Times, toppled powerful and abusive men. Behind that essential journalism were sources, many anonymous, who took enormous risks to expose harassment and sexual violence.Today, Rachel Abrams, a producer and reporter at The Times, speaks to Ali Diercks, a lawyer who provided crucial information for a major #MeToo story. Ms. Diercks has waived her anonymity to discuss the costs of her coming forward and what she thinks about her decision years later.Guest: Rachel Abrams, a senior producer and reporter for “The New York Times Presents” documentary series. Background reading: Ms. Diercks provided anonymous information to The Times about the misconduct of Mr. Moonves, former chairman and chief executive of CBS.<a href
18/05/202345 minutes 32 seconds
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Turkey’s President Fights for Political Survival

For two decades, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has loomed large over Turkish politics. But skyrocketing inflation and a devastating earthquake have eroded his power and, in a presidential election over the weekend, he was forced into a runoff.Ben Hubbard, The Times’s Istanbul bureau chief, discusses how Turkey’s troubles have made Mr. Erdogan politically vulnerable.Guest: Ben Hubbard, the Istanbul bureau chief for The New York Times. Background reading: Despite the headwinds, Mr. Erdogan appears to be in a strong position to emerge with another five-year term. Here’s what to know.The election suggested that even if Mr. Erdogan’s grip on power has been loosened, it has not yet broken.For
17/05/202324 minutes 50 seconds
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The Day Title 42 Ended

For weeks, officials have feared that the end of Title 42 would create a crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border that would strain and possibly cripple America’s immigration system.Natalie Kitroeff, the New York Times bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, reports from the border about what actually happened when the pandemic-era policy expired.Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, the New York Times bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.Background reading: Economic hardship, climate change, political instability and gang violence will continue to spur emigration from many corners of the world.Why are so many migrants trying to cross the border?</
16/05/202326 minutes 40 seconds
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The U.S. Banned Spyware — and Then Kept Trying to Use It

A little over a decade ago, a small Israeli company created what would become the world’s most powerful and notorious hacking tool.Mark Mazzetti, who is a Washington investigative correspondent for The Times, explains the surprising story of the NSO Group and why, despite banning its technology, the United States kept trying to use it.Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The Biden administration has been trying to choke off use of hacking tools made by the Israeli firm NSO. It turns out that not every part of the government has gotten the message.The president signed an executive order seeking to limit deployment of a tool that has been abus
15/05/202322 minutes 13 seconds
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The Lifesaving Power of … Paperwork?

In the final days of Marleny Mesa’s pregnancy, she could not shake the feeling that something was wrong. She could barely breathe, for one thing. For another, her anxiety and physical discomfort were approaching what felt like an unbearable peak. A week or so later, she delivered a tiny, squirming boy with jet black hair and soft, curious eyes. She and her husband, Andrés Noscue, named him Eliad. Marleny thought he was perfect, but her mother, a retired midwife, insisted that the placenta contained a hint of trouble. It was far too big, she said, and Eliad was too small, probably because he did not have enough room in her womb to grow. His grandmother thought he might need an incubator. Marleny thought he was fine, but when the baby was a few days old, she and Andrés traveled from the Jerusalén-San Luis Alto Picudito Indigenous reservation in Putumayo, Colombia, to take him to Villagarzón for a checkup, just to be safe.This proved harder than they expected. The baby could not
14/05/202352 minutes 54 seconds
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Biden’s Radical Option to End the Debt Fight

In a high-stakes showdown this week, President Biden and the leaders of congress met face to face in an effort to avoid the United States defaulting on its debt for the first time in history.Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains how close the country is to financial calamity, and the radical step Biden might take to avoid it.Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The president has not wavered in his calls for Republicans to raise the nation’s borrowing limit without conditions. Privately, his aides have discussed other paths.What could a possible bipartisan deal to rais
12/05/202325 minutes 7 seconds
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Even More Trouble for George Santos

Last year, Times reporting revealed the many lies that the freshman Republican congressman George Santos had told about his life and career. Now he is facing legal consequences.Michael Gold, who covers politics in New York for The Times, explains the charges against Mr. Santos and what they mean for his role in Congress.Guest: Michael Gold, a New York politics correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: George Santos pleaded not guilty to charges that included accusations of fraudulently receiving unemployment benefits.The George Santos indictment, annotated.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.co
11/05/202323 minutes 24 seconds
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Trump Liable for Sexual Abuse

This episode contains detailed descriptions of sexual assault.A jury in Manhattan has found former President Donald J. Trump legally liable for sexually abusing and defaming the writer E. Jean Carroll.Ben Weiser, who covers the Manhattan federal courts for The Times, tells the story of how a nearly 30-year-old case reached this moment.Guest: Benjamin Weiser, a correspondent for The New York Times covering the Manhattan federal courts.Background reading: More than a dozen women have accused Mr. Trump of sexual misconduct, but this civil case is the only one to have been tested before a jury.The former president’s new campaign is<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/20
10/05/202329 minutes 17 seconds
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A Big Policy Change at the Border

For the past three years, the United States has relied on Title 42, a pandemic restriction that has allowed the swift expulsion of many migrants at the southern border. But by the end of the week, that rule will expire.Miriam Jordan, who covers immigration for The Times, explains what that will mean on both sides of the border.Guest: Miriam Jordan, a national correspondent covering immigration for The New York Times.Background reading: An end to pandemic restrictions could bring thousands to the border.President Biden has used his executive authority to significantly expand the number of legal immigrants entering the U.S.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedai
09/05/202324 minutes 37 seconds
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A Crisis of Ethics at the Supreme Court

Debate about ethical standards for Supreme Court justices has intensified after a series of revelations about undisclosed gifts, luxury travel and property deals. Adam Liptak, who covers the court for The Times, reviews the allegations of misconduct and the growing calls to do something about it.Guest: Adam Liptak, a correspondent covering the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: Revelations about Justice Clarence Thomas’s failure to disclose largess from a Republican donor have highlighted a dilemma.In written testimony sent to the Senate Judiciary Committee, the retired conservative judge J. Michael Luttig called for new ethics rules for Suprem
08/05/202333 minutes 52 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The School Where the Pandemic Never Ended’

Lakishia Fell-Davis is aware that at this point, in 2023, most people are treating the coronavirus pandemic as a thing of the past. For her, though, Covid still poses a real threat: Fell-Davis has Type I diabetes, putting her at higher risk of hospitalization and long-term complications from illness. As such, her experience during the pandemic has shaped how she thinks about her daily life, especially at Ninety-Fifth Street Elementary School, where she has worked on and off for more than a decade as a substitute teacher and teaching assistant.She felt much more comfortable when schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District were online during the first year and a half of the pandemic and her kids, Makayla and Kevin, were attending virtually. Sure, they missed their friends, but they were shy and soft-spoken children who had never really strayed far from home. They didn’t seem to mind the arrangement. And back then, Fell-Davis’s mother, who was paralyzed on her left side a
07/05/202337 minutes 25 seconds
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How Streaming Hurt Hollywood Writers

This week, thousands of writers went on strike against Hollywood studios over what they say is an existential threat to their livelihoods.John Koblin, a media reporter for The New York Times, explains how streaming turned the most prolific era in American entertainment into an industry-changing labor dispute.Guest: John Koblin, a media reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The dispute, which pits 11,500 television and screenwriters against the major studios, has shattered 15 years of labor peace in the entertainment business.In the years since the entertainment industry’s last strike, sweeping technological change has upended the television and movie business.For more informatio
05/05/202327 minutes 51 seconds
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What if You Could Save Someone From an Overdose?

In the face of an escalating opioid epidemic, the F.D.A. recently approved over-the-counter sales for Narcan — a lifesaving nasal spray that can reverse an opioid overdose. Jan Hoffman, who covers health law for The Times, explains why the new availability of Narcan could change the trajectory of the epidemic.Guest: Jan Hoffman, a health law correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Narcan can reverse opioid overdoses and public health officials hope that making the nasal spray more widely available could save lives and reduce America’s high rate of drug fatalities.Here are answers to 10 questions about Narcan.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/t
04/05/202326 minutes 39 seconds
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The Democrats’ Dianne Feinstein Problem

For the past few months, a single lawmaker has prevented Democrats from carrying out their agenda in Congress. For now, there is no simple solution in sight. Annie Karni, a congressional correspondent for The Times, explains the issue surrounding Senator Dianne Feinstein.Guest: Annie Karni, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Ms. Feinstein, who has been absent from the Senate for more than a month after being diagnosed with shingles, sought a temporary replacement on the powerful Judiciary Committee.High-profile absences have created complications for Democrats in Congress and prompted new questions about the future of the Repub
03/05/202329 minutes 47 seconds
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A Third Bank Implodes. Now What?

On Monday morning, the federal government took over a third failing bank — this time, First Republic.Jeanna Smialek, an economy correspondent for The Times, discusses whether we are at the end of the banking crisis, or the start of a new phase of financial pain.Guest: Jeanna Smialek, an economy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: First Republic bank was seized by regulators and sold to JPMorgan Chase.Key takeaways from regulatory review of bank failures.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
02/05/202323 minutes 32 seconds
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Kevin McCarthy’s Debt Ceiling Dilemma

Last week, Speaker Kevin McCarthy persuaded Republicans to narrowly pass a bill to raise the U.S. debt ceiling, setting up high-stakes negotiations with the Biden administration.Catie Edmondson, who covers Congress for The New York Times, explains the risks this might pose to his job and the country’s economy.Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: House Republicans have narrowly passed a bill to raise the debt ceiling while cutting spending by nearly 14 percent over a decade.Here’s a look at what is in the bill.For more information on today’s episode, visit ny
01/05/202321 minutes 59 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Agony of Putting Your Life on Hold to Care for Your Parents’

In January 2022, Randi Schofield was a 34-year-old single mother who, not long before, left her full-time job of eight years as a personal bailiff to a local judge. She pulled $30,000 from her retirement savings and was planning to give herself all of 2022 to expand the small catering business she had always dreamed about. This would be the year she bet on herself. Then, that month, she received the news that medics were pulling her father out of his car.The collision splintered the bone in his left thigh down to his knee; three days later, a metal rod held the broken pieces together. Until his leg recovered from the surgery, he would not be able to walk without assistance. In hindsight, there were warning signs that her father’s health could upend Schofield’s life. But he was also youthful and spirited, and it was easy to believe that everything was fine, that he was fine and that if she were to take care of him some day, it would be occasional and in a distant future. She d
30/04/202331 minutes 38 seconds
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The Ballad of ‘Deepfake Drake’

This month, an anonymous producer jolted the music industry by using artificial intelligence to impersonate the singers Drake and the Weeknd, creating a fake track, “Heart on My Sleeve,” that quickly went viral.Joe Coscarelli, a culture reporter for The Times, talks about how the song’s rise and fall could presage widespread changes in the way music is made.Guest: Joe Coscarelli, a culture correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A track like “Heart on My Sleeve” may be a novelty for now. But the legal and creative questions it raises are here to stay.Who owns a song created by A.I.?For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?
28/04/202324 minutes 48 seconds
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Can India Become the Next Global Superpower?

This month, India reached a notable milestone. The country’s population surpassed that of China, which had held the No. 1 position for at least three centuries.Alex Travelli, who covers South Asia and business for The Times, examines whether India can use its immense size to become an economic superpower.Guest: Alex Travelli, a South Asia business correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Turning India’s vast young work force into an engine for economic advancement will pose enormous challenges.Will this be the “Indian century”? Here are four key questions.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedail
27/04/202330 minutes 25 seconds
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Voters Are Wary of Biden. Here’s Why He Might Win Anyway

President Biden has announced that he will seek another term in the Oval Office, despite the fact that he will be 81 on Election Day 2024.Not everyone is overjoyed about that prospect — more than half of Democrats don’t want him to run again. Nonetheless, the party’s leaders are increasingly confident about his chances. Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The Times, explains why.Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Biden has acknowledged that he has not accomplished all he wished to. But that, he maintains, is an argument for his re-election.Although his poll numbers remain low, structural advantages have Democrats insisting that Mr. Biden<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/04/25/us/politics/biden-re-election.ht
26/04/202326 minutes 14 seconds
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Fox News Fires Its Biggest Star

Less than a week after Fox News agreed to pay $787.5 million to settle the Dominion lawsuit, the network has abruptly fired Tucker Carlson — an anchor at the center of the case.Jeremy W. Peters, who covers media and politics for The Times, explains why the network decided to cut ties with one of its biggest stars.Guest: Jeremy W. Peters, a media and politics correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Tucker Carlson was one of the network’s top-rated hosts for many years.Here is the latest on Mr. Carlson’s departure.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedai
25/04/202329 minutes 7 seconds
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How Two Generals Led Sudan to the Brink of Civil War

Sudan was supposed to be moving away from military rule and toward democracy. But over the past week, the country has been thrown into violent chaos as two factions battle for control.Declan Walsh, chief Africa correspondent for The Times, explains how an explosive rivalry between two generals turned into a catastrophic conflict.Guest: Declan Walsh, the chief Africa correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: In the days before fighting erupted, American and British mediators held out hope that crunch talks could defuse the tensions and even steer Sudan to democracy.Here are the latest developments in the conflict.For more information on today’s episode,
24/04/202322 minutes 34 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Why Are These Italians Massacring Each Other With Oranges?’

One Sunday in February, in a northern Italian town called Ivrea, the facades of historic buildings were covered with plastic sheeting and nets. And in several different piazzas, hundreds of wooden crates had appeared. Inside them were oranges. Oranges, the fruit.Over the next three days, 8,000 people in Ivrea would throw 900 tons of oranges at one another, one orange at a time, while tens of thousands of other people watched. They would throw the oranges very hard, very viciously, often while screaming profanities at their targets or yowling like Braveheart. But they would also keep smiling as they threw the oranges, embracing and joking and cheering one another on, exhibiting with their total beings a deranged-seeming but euphoric sense of abandon and belonging — a freedom that was easy to envy but difficult to understand.The Battle of the Oranges is an annual tradition in Ivrea and part of a larger celebration described by its organizers as “the most ancient historic
23/04/202327 minutes 17 seconds
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Why Low-Ranking Soldiers Have Access to Top Secret Documents

Last week, a 21-year old airman from Massachusetts, Jack Teixeira, was arrested under the Espionage Act and charged with violating federal laws by sharing top secret military documents with an online gaming group.Dave Philipps, a military correspondent for The Times, explains why so many low-level government workers have access to so much classified material.Guest: Dave Philipps, a military correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The arrest of Mr. Teixeira lays bare the sheer volume of people who have clearance to view a swath of national security documents that the government categorizes as top secret.Mr. Teixeira grew up in a family with strong military ties, was quiet and somewhat awkwa
21/04/202325 minutes 23 seconds
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The Blockbuster Fox Defamation Trial That Wasn’t

At the very last minute, both Dominion Voting Systems and Fox News decided to settle their closely watched defamation lawsuit, rather than make their cases at trial.Jeremy W. Peters, who covers media and politics for The Times, was inside the courtroom as it happened.Guest: Jeremy W. Peters, a media and politics correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The settlement with Dominion Voting Systems was another extraordinary twist in a case that exposed the inner workings of the most powerful voice in conservative news.The settlement averts what would have been a landmark trial.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href=
20/04/202324 minutes 46 seconds
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Abortion Goes to the Supreme Court (Again)

In overturning Roe v. Wade last year, the Supreme Court’s message was that it was done with the issue of abortion. Now, dueling rulings on abortion pills will send the issue back to the highest court in the country.Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, explains the case that is forcing the court to weigh in on abortion all over again.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: The justices are poised to consider whether an abortion pill can be sharply curtailed in states where abortion remains legal.Here’s what to watch for next in the case.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=
19/04/202325 minutes 6 seconds
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How the I.R.S. Became a Political Boogeyman

Earlier this month, the Internal Revenue Service unveiled an $80 billion plan to transform itself into a “digital first” tax collector focused on customer service and cracking down on wealthy tax evaders.Today, on the day that taxes are due in the United States, Alan Rappeport, who covers economic policy for The Times, explains how the plan could result in the agency repeating a set of old mistakes.Guest: Alan Rappeport, an economic policy correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: I.R.S. unveiled their $80 billion plan to overhaul tax collection this month.Here’s how tax season felt inside the I.R.S. last year, after decades of neglect.For more information on today’s episode, visit
18/04/202328 minutes 27 seconds
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China and Taiwan: A Torrid Backstory

The posturing between the United States and China has been intensifying in recent weeks — China responded with condemnations and military drills after Taiwan’s president, Tsai Ing-wen, met the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Kevin McCarthy.Today, Edward Wong, who covers foreign policy at The Times, explains why China is so fixated on Taiwan, and how the U.S. got in the middle of it.Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The Chinese military’s ships, planes and troops held three days of drills in a spectacle designed to warn Taiwan against challenging Beijing.U.S. tensions with China were on display as Speaker McCarth
17/04/202325 minutes 4 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Daring Ruse That Exposed China’s Campaign to Steal American Secrets’

In March 2017, an engineer at G.E. Aviation in Cincinnati received a request on LinkedIn. The engineer, Hua, is in his 40s, tall and athletic, with a boyish face that makes him look a decade younger. He moved to the United States from China in 2003 for graduate studies in structural engineering.The LinkedIn request came from Chen Feng, a school official at the Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, in eastern China. Days later, Chen sent him an email inviting him to the university to give a research presentation. Hua arranged to arrive in May, so he could attend a nephew’s wedding and his college reunion at Harbin Institute of Technology. There was one problem, though: Hua knew that G.E. would deny permission to give the talk if he asked, which he was supposed to do. He went to Nanjing, and flew back to the United States after the presentation. He thought that would be the end of the matter.Many scientists and engineers of Chinese origin in the United Stat
16/04/202354 minutes 37 seconds
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Broadway’s Longest-Running Musical Turns Out the Lights

“The Phantom of the Opera,” the longest running show in the history of Broadway, will close its doors on Sunday after more than three decades.We went backstage during one of the final performances before the show’s famous chandelier crashes down one last time.Guest: Michael Paulson, a theater correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The show was originally set to close in February, but the announcement set off a surge in ticket sales. “Phans,” as they call themselves, rushed to see it one last time.In an interview, Cameron Mackintosh said weakening box office and rising production costs led to the dec
14/04/202334 minutes 19 seconds
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What We’re Learning From the Leaked Military Documents

A week ago, the world discovered that dozens of classified documents from the American government had been leaked online, including highly sensitive information about Russia’s war in Ukraine and damaging revelations on American spying abroad.David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The Times, explains the contents of the leak and what it might mean for the war.Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: How the latest leaked documents are different from past breaches.A quick guide to what the leaked U.S. intelligence documents say.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/
13/04/202327 minutes 4 seconds
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How Strong (or Not) Is New York’s Case Against Trump?

In the week since Donald Trump was arraigned on 34 felony charges, debate about the strength of the case against him has only intensified.Charlie Savage, a Washington correspondent at The Times, has closely studied the case and explains which side he stands on.Guest: Charlie Savage, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Trump could turn to a familiar legal strategy: attack and delay.Analysis: A surprise accusation bolsters a risky case against Trump.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episo
12/04/202329 minutes 8 seconds
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Inside Russia’s Crackdown on Dissent

Days after Russia invaded Ukraine, the Kremlin made it a crime to oppose the war in public. Since then, it has waged a relentless campaign of repression, putting Russian citizens in jail for offenses as small as holding a poster or sharing a news article on social media.Valerie Hopkins, an international correspondent for The Times, tells the story of Olesya Krivtsova, a 19-year-old student who faces up to 10 years in prison after posting on social media, and explains why the Russian government is so determined to silence those like her.Guest: Valerie Hopkins, an international correspondent for The New York Times, covering Russia and the war in Ukraine.Background reading: Oleysa’s story has underlined the perils of using social media to criticize the war in Ukraine.</li
11/04/202335 minutes 18 seconds
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An Extraordinary Act of Political Retribution in Tennessee

Last week, Tennessee’s Republican-controlled House expelled two of its members — both young Black Democrats. Emily Cochrane, a national correspondent for The New York Times, explains the story behind the extraordinary ousting and what it tells us about this moment in American politics.Guest: Emily Cochrane, a national correspondent for The New York Times covering the American South.Background reading: The Tennessee House voted to expel two Democrats after they interrupted a debate by leading protesters in a call for stricter gun laws.Here is what you need to know about the ousting.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-
10/04/202329 minutes 9 seconds
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‘The Run-Up’: The Republican Party Sorts Through Its Mess

The Times reporter Astead W. Herndon and the team are back for a new season of “The Run-Up” and they’re looking ahead to the 2024 presidential election, which in many ways has already begun. In this first episode, Astead heads to California for the Republican National Committee’s winter meeting to explore the tangled lines and scrambled allegiances that animated the effort to unseat Ronna McDaniel, the chair of the R.N.C.
09/04/202353 minutes 56 seconds
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The Outsourcing of America’s Border Problem

This episode contains descriptions of severe injuries.Tough new border policies introduced by the Biden administration have sharply reduced the number of migrants crossing into the United States. But the measures have also created a combustible bottleneck along the southern border. That situation exploded last week when a deadly fire broke out at a detention center in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico.Simon Romero, a national correspondent for The Times, explains how the United States has leaned more heavily on Mexico to help handle its immigration dilemma, bringing cities like Juárez to a breaking point.Guest: Simon Romero, a national correspondent for The New York Times covering the Southwest.Background reading: Mexican officials have announced that they are investigating the fire as a homicide case.
07/04/202324 minutes 4 seconds
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America Has a Problem in Africa: China

Vice President Kamala Harris’s visit to Africa last week was designed to send a simple message to its governments and people — China is not your friend. The United States is.Abdi Latif Dahir, The New York Times’s East Africa correspondent, explains what the United States has to lose if countries in Africa choose China.Guest: Abdi Latif Dahir, the East Africa correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The vice president faced a balancing act as she tried to foster relationships.The U.S. tried to counter China’s moves in Africa during a summit last year.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Trans
06/04/202328 minutes 54 seconds
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What It Was Like at Donald Trump’s Arraignment

The line for reporters seeking to be in the courtroom for Donald J. Trump’s arraignment in Manhattan started forming at 2 p.m. on Monday, more than a day before the former president was scheduled to face a judge in a case centered on hush-money payments.One of those who got in was Jonah Bromwich, a criminal justice correspondent for The Times.He tells us what it was like inside the courthouse as Mr. Trump was charged with 34 felony counts.Guest: Jonah E. Bromwich, a criminal justice correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Trump pleaded not guilty, then sat quietly as lawyers sparred.The former president is accused of orc
05/04/202326 minutes 26 seconds
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The Election That Could Reshape Wisconsin, and the Country

Wisconsin will hold an election for a seat on its Supreme Court today, and it is no exaggeration to say that the result could end up reshaping U.S. politics for years to come.The Times political correspondent Reid J. Epstein explains why the race to replace a single judge has become the most important American election of 2023.Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Cash is pouring in to the Wisconsin race, and some of the candidates have shed any pretense of judicial neutrality.Here’s what you need to know about the battle for the seat.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smi
04/04/202329 minutes 5 seconds
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Fear and Bravado: Inside Trump’s Reaction to the Indictment

After Donald J. Trump was indicted over his role in paying hush money to a porn star during the 2016 presidential campaign, he called the move an act of political persecution.But his impending arrest could actually make Mr. Trump a stronger candidate for 2024, the Times correspondent Maggie Haberman explains.Guest: Maggie Haberman, a political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Many of Mr. Trump’s potential opponents snapped into line behind him, showing just how hard it may be to persuade Republican voters to choose an alternative.Mr. Trump reacted to his indictment by returning to his time-tested legal strategy: attack and delay.For more information on toda
03/04/202327 minutes 45 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘A Sandwich Shop, a Tent City and an American Crisis'

For more information on today’s episode visit nytimes.com/thedaily.For more information on today’s episode visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
02/04/202329 minutes 23 seconds
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The Indictment of Donald Trump

A Manhattan grand jury has indicted Donald J. Trump for his role in paying hush money to a porn star, according to people with knowledge of the matter. The precise charges are not yet known, but the case against him has kicked off a historic moment in American politics.The investigative reporter Ben Protess discusses the development — which will shake up the 2024 presidential race and forever mark Mr. Trump as the nation’s first former president to face criminal charges — and what happens next.Guest: Ben Protess, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Trump becomes the first former president to face criminal charges.Why was he indicted? These are the key events that led to
31/03/202323 minutes 29 seconds
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The Plan to Save Baseball From Boredom

Major League Baseball is putting in effect some of the biggest changes in the sport’s history in an effort to speed up the game and inject more activity.As the 2023 season opens, Michael Schmidt, a Times reporter, explains the extraordinary plan to save baseball from the tyranny of the home run.Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: With three major rule changes this season, Major League Baseball will try to reinvent itself while looking to the game’s past for inspiration.Here’s a look at the new rules.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedai
30/03/202330 minutes 22 seconds
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Israel’s Far Right Government Backs Down

For months in Israel, the far-right government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been pushing a highly contentious plan to fundamentally change the country’s Supreme Court, setting off some of the largest demonstrations in Israel’s history.On Monday, Mr. Netanyahu announced that he would delay his government’s campaign. Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times, explains the prime minister’s surprising concession.Guest: Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Netanyahu delayed his bid to overhaul Israel’s judiciary in the face of furious protests.Israel’s prime minister is caught between his far-
29/03/202323 minutes 4 seconds
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The Fight Over ‘Cop City’

This episode contains descriptions of violenceIn a patch of woods southwest of Atlanta, protesters have been clashing with the police over a huge police training facility that the city wants to build there. This month, that fight came to a head when hundreds of activists breached the site, burning police and construction vehicles.Sean Keenan, an Atlanta-based reporter, explains how what opponents call “Cop City,” and the woods surrounding it, have become an unlikely battleground in the nation’s debate over policing.Guest: Sean Keenan, a freelance reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: This month, protesters damaged property at the site of a planned police center in Atlanta in a disturbance that grew out of a demonstration among activists in a forest being developed into a training center.How a forest near Atlanta became<a href="https
28/03/202326 minutes 41 seconds
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A Sweeping Plan to Protect Kids From Social Media

A few days ago, Utah became the first state to pass a law prohibiting social media services from allowing users under 18 to have accounts without the explicit consent of a parent or guardian. The move, by Republican officials, is intended to address what they describe as a mental health crisis among American teenagers as well as to protect younger users from bullying and child sexual exploitation.The technology reporter Natasha Singer explains the measure, and why it could be a sign of where the country is headed.Guest: Natasha Singer, who writes about technology, business and society for The New York Times.Background reading: The Utah law prohibits social networks from allowing minors to have accounts without parental consent.The creator of Fortnite was fou
27/03/202327 minutes 30 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘How Danhausen Became Professional Wrestling’s Strangest Star’

Like a lot of people who get into professional wrestling, Donovan Danhausen had a vision of a different version of himself. Ten years ago, at age 21, he was living in Detroit, working as a nursing assistant at a hospital, watching a lot of “Adult Swim” and accumulating a collection of horror- and comedy-themed tattoos.At the suggestion of a friend, he took a 12-week training course at the House of Truth wrestling school in Center Line, Mich., and then entered the indie circuit as a hand: an unknown, unpaid wrestler who shows up at events and does what’s asked of him, typically setting up the ring or pretending to be a lawyer or another type of extra. When he ran out of momentum five years later, he developed the character of Danhausen. Originally supposed to be an evil demon, Danhausen found that the more elements of humor he incorporated into his performance, the more audiences responded.“I was just a bearded guy with the tattoos, trying to be a tough guy, and I’m not
26/03/202332 minutes 50 seconds
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Should The Government Pay for Your Bad Climate Decisions?

A few days ago, the Biden administration released a report warning that a warming planet posed severe economic challenges for the United States, which would require the federal government to reassess its spending priorities and how it influenced behavior.White House reporter Jim Tankersley explains why getting the government to encourage the right decisions will be so difficult.Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A chapter in the new Economic Report of the President focuses on the growing risks to people and businesses from rising temperatures.In theory, funding the government takes place in two major stages. But it’s a fraught and complicated process. Here’s a<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/03
24/03/202327 minutes 7 seconds
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Our Film Critic on Why He’s Done With the Movies

A.O. Scott started as a film critic at The New York Times in January of 2000. Next month he will move to the Book Review as a critic at large.After 23 years as a film critic, Mr. Scott discusses why he is done with the movies, and what his decision reveals about the new realities of American cinema.Guest: A.O. Scott, a longtime film critic for The New York Times.Background reading: A.O. Scott conducts his own exit interview as he moves to a new post after more than two decades of reviewing films.A.O. Scott’s review of “65.”For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workd
23/03/202341 minutes 13 seconds
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Barney Frank on His Role in the Banking Crisis

Barney Frank was one of the people most responsible for overhauling financial regulation after the 2008 economic crisis. After retiring from Congress, he supported a change to his own law that would benefit midsize banks, and joined the board of such a bank. Last week, that bank failed. David Enrich called Mr. Frank and asked him to explain.Guest: David Enrich, the business investigations editor at The New York Times.Background reading: Officials with Signature and Silicon Valley banks, which regulators seized in recent days, had called for looser financial requirements for midsize banks.Here’s why people are worried abou
22/03/202336 minutes 6 seconds
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China, Russia and the Risk of a New Cold War

As Xi Jinping, China’s leader, meets with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia in Moscow this week, Chinese officials have been presenting his trip as a mission of peace. But American and European officials are watching for something else altogether — whether Mr. Xi will add fuel to the full-scale war that Mr. Putin began more than a year ago.Edward Wong explains what Mr. Xi is really up to, and why it’s making people wonder whether a new Cold War is underway.Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Chinese officials say Xi Jinping’s trip to Moscow is a peace mission. But U.S. and European officials say he aims to bolster Vladimir Putin.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/live/2023/03/21/world/russia-ukraine-news#heres-what
21/03/202323 minutes 18 seconds
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How TikTok Became a Matter of National Security

TikTok, the app known for short videos of lip syncing, dancing and bread baking, is one of the most popular platforms in the country, used by one out of every three Americans.In recent weeks, the Biden administration has threatened to ban it over concerns that it poses a threat to national security.Guest: Sapna Maheshwari, a business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: TikTok’s owner, ByteDance, is being investigated over possible spying on journalists.Why countries are trying to ban TikTok.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be m
20/03/202328 minutes 50 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Spirited Away to Miyazaki Land’

As an American, Sam Anderson knows what it feels like to arrive at a theme park. “The totalizing consumerist embrace,” he writes. “The blunt-force, world-warping, escapist delight.” He has known theme parks with entrances like “international borders” and ticket prices like “mortgage payments.” Mr. Anderson has been to Disney World, which he describes as “an alternate reality that basically occupies its own tax zone.”In November, when Ghibli Park finally opened, Mr. Anderson made sure to get himself there. The park is a tribute to the legendary Studio Ghibli, first started by the animator Hayao Miyazaki in 1985, out of desperation, when he and his co-founders, Isao Takahata and Toshio Suzuki, couldn’t find a studio willing to put out their work.Miyazaki is detail-obsessed. He agonizes over his children’s cartoons as if he were Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel, insisting that, although few viewers will be conscious of all this work, every viewer will feel it. And
19/03/202354 minutes 46 seconds
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Why the Banking Crisis Isn’t Over Yet

In the past week, as spooked customers frantically withdrew $42 billion from Silicon Valley Bank, the U.S. government stepped in to craft a rescue operation for the failed lender.But efforts to contain the crisis have met resistance, and the fallout of the collapse has already spread to other regional banks, whose stocks have plummeted.Guest: Emily Flitter, a finance correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The stunning demise of Silicon Valley Bank has spurred soul-searching about how large and regional banks are overseen.Here’s what to know about the bank’s collapse.For more information on today’s episode,
17/03/202329 minutes 4 seconds
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France’s Battle Over Retirement

This episode contains strong languageMillions of people have taken to the streets in France to protest a government effort to raise the retirement age to 64, from 62, bringing the country more in line with its European neighbors.Today, as Parliament holds a key vote on the proposal, we look into why the issue has hit such a nerve in French society.Guest: Roger Cohen, the Paris bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: After large protests, all eyes were on the French Parliament on Thursday as it prepared to vote on the measure to increase the retirement age by two years.Here are some of the reasons so many people in France are
16/03/202321 minutes 20 seconds
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What to Know About the Covid Lab Leak Theory

Three years after the start of Covid, the central mystery of the pandemic — how exactly it began — remains unsolved. But recently, the debate about the source of the coronavirus has re-emerged, this time in Congress.The Energy Department has concluded, with “low confidence,” that an accidental laboratory leak in China was most likely the origin, but politics are making it harder to find definitive answers.Guest: Benjamin Mueller, a health and science correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Republicans have pushed the lab leak theory, but they lack a “smoking gun.”What we know and don’t know about the origins of Covid.For more information on today’s epis
15/03/202322 minutes 56 seconds
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The Implosion of Silicon Valley Bank

With federal regulators planning to take over the collapsed Silicon Valley Bank, a 40-year-old institution based in California, nearly $175 billion in customer deposits will be placed under the authorities’ control.The lender’s demise is the second-largest bank failure in U.S. history and the largest since the financial crisis in 2008. The debacle raised concerns that other banks could face problems, too.Guest: Emily Flitter, a finance correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A run on deposits brought Silicon Valley Bank’s failure.Here’s what to know about the fallout from the lender’s collapse.For more in
14/03/202334 minutes 9 seconds
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What Is E.S.G., and Why Are Republicans So Mad About It?

The principle behind E.S.G. is that investors should look beyond just whether a company can make a profit and take into account other factors, such as its environmental impact and action on social issues.But critics of that investment strategy, mostly Republicans, say that Wall Street has taken a sharp left turn, attacking what they term “woke capitalism.”Guest: David Gelles, a climate correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: How did environmentally conscious investing became a target of conservatives?Republicans are likely to keep making E.S.G. a political punching bag.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-
13/03/202327 minutes 5 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Can Germany Be a Great Military Power Again?’

After Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February last year, Chancellor Olaf Scholz of Germany told Parliament that the attack was a Zeitenwende — a historic “turning point” for Europe and Germany. The risk of a large land war in Europe had previously been considered far-fetched, but recent years of Russian aggression have inspired fear in Germany and a 100-billion-euro fund to bolster its military.In Germany, skepticism of the merits of military strength has enabled a long post-Cold War process of disarmament. As a result, it is a historic anomaly in the heart of Europe — an economic leviathan but a military minnow. Now German leaders are vowing to transform the country into a military power capable of taking responsibility for Europe’s security.In Nienburg, a medieval town in Lower Saxony, civilians come to train for “homeland protection” units in the country’s reserves. The question is whether a hesitant German society can follow through on this paradigm shi
12/03/202353 minutes 3 seconds
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Protests and the Future of Democracy in Israel

Almost immediately after taking power in December, Benjamin Netanyahu’s far-right coalition in Isreal proposed a highly contentious overhaul of the Supreme Court.The court has long been seen as a crucial check and lone backstop on the government, and the plan has divided Israeli society, kindling fears of political violence and even civil war.Guest: Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Protesters restricted road access to Israel’s main airport hours before Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu flew to Italy.Here’s what to know about the government’s proposals.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.
10/03/202329 minutes 3 seconds
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A New Child Labor Crisis in America

Slaughterhouses, construction sites, factories. A Times investigation has found that migrant children have been thrust into jobs in some of the most demanding workplaces in the United States.How did this crisis in child labor develop? And now that it has been exposed, what is being done to tackle the problem?Guest: Hannah Dreier, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The shadow work force of migrant children extends across industries in every state, flouting labor laws that have been in place for nearly a century.As lawmakers clamor for action, federal and state enforcement agencies have begun a crackdown on companies that employ children.</l
09/03/202332 minutes 50 seconds
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Who Blew Up the Nord Stream Pipelines?

The sabotage in September of the Nord Stream pipelines carrying Russian gas to Europe has become one of the central mysteries of the war in Ukraine, prompting months of finger-pointing and guesswork.Now, new intelligence reporting has provided the first significant known lead about who was responsible.Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Officials say there are still enormous gaps in what American spy agencies and their European partners know about the detonations.The Baltic seabed provided a nearly ideal crime scene.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=
08/03/202322 minutes 3 seconds
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Ron DeSantis’s Rise From Unknown to Heir Apparent

As the race to be the Republican Party’s presidential candidate gets underway, one figure has emerged as a particularly powerful rival to Donald J. Trump.That person, Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida, has broken away from the pack by turning his state into a laboratory for a post-Trump version of conservatism.Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading:Mr. DeSantis will soon get a chance to check off his wish list of proposals for Florida, including expanding gun rights.In his new book, “The Courage to Be Free,” Mr. DeSantis offers a template for governing.For more information on today’s episode, visit nyti
07/03/202328 minutes 7 seconds
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How a Derailed Train Galvanized an Ohio Town, and Congress

On Feb. 3, a nearly two-mile long freight train carrying hazardous materials derailed near East Palestine, Ohio, a town of about 4,700 people.The railroad company and local officials decided to do a chemical burn to neutralize the cargo, but as a giant plume of black smoke settled over the town, residents’ anger about the handling of the accident has intensified.Guest: Emily Cochrane, a national correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A bipartisan group of lawmakers has proposed that the Transportation Department impose stricter rules for freight rail.The derailment of a second train in Ohio — despite assurances that no hazardous materials had leaked — sharpened the questions abou
06/03/202327 minutes 11 seconds
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Sunday Special: An Episode of ‘The Coldest Case in Laramie’

Today, we’re taking some time out of our regularly scheduled programming to share the first episode of “The Coldest Case in Laramie.” In the new series from The Times and Serial, Kim Barker, a Times investigative reporter, digs into the 1985 murder of Shelli Wiley, a young woman who was a few years older than Kim when they both lived in Laramie, Wyoming. The long-unsolved case took a turn in 2016 when the police arrested someone for Shelli’s murder: a former officer named Fred Lamb. The evidence against him seemed solid, but prosecutors, confusingly, dropped the case. They’ve never refiled. How did a case that seemed this open-and-shut fall apart with such a whimper? To find answers, Kim heads back to Laramie and grapples with conflicting memories and dueling narratives.In episode one, Kim starts to call up Shelli’s family members to try to piece together what happened. To listen to all eight parts, visit nytimes.com/laramie.
05/03/202324 minutes 44 seconds
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Why Russia Is Taking Thousands of Ukrainian Children

As Russian troops pushed into Ukraine, children who were fleeing newly occupied territories were swept up. Many became part of a Russian effort to portray itself as a charitable savior. The children were placed in Russian families and paraded on television. The Times interviewed one child who was taken from Ukraine, a girl named Anya, who said she ached to return.Guest: Emma Bubola, a reporter for The New York Times based in London.Background reading: Using adoptions, Russia has turned Ukrainian children into spoils of war.The mayor of a Ukrainian city disappeared, but<a href="
03/03/202330 minutes 19 seconds
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Will the Supreme Court Let Biden Cancel Student Debt?

In August, President Biden announced a loan cancellation plan that would erase an astonishing $400 billion in student debt — one of the most ambitious and expensive executive actions ever.Now, in a far-reaching case, the Supreme Court will decide whether the president is authorized to take such a big step.Guest: Adam Liptak, a Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The student loan case could redefine the limits of presidential power.Here’s how the arguments at the Supreme Court played out and what to expect in the coming
02/03/202324 minutes 49 seconds
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A Threat to Abortion Pills. Plus, the U.S. Shares Secrets

In 2000, the F.D.A. approved the medication abortion drug mifepristone. Now a federal judge in Texas is set to rule on a case filed by anti-abortion groups urging the agency to revoke its approval of mifepristone and the other main drug used for medication abortion in the United States. Abortion via medication has become increasingly common and now accounts for more than half of the nation’s abortions.Plus, the Biden administration has started talking publicly about its intelligence when it comes to China, breaking with a long tradition of keeping U.S. secrets close to the chest. The secretary of state, the director of the C.I.A. and even the president himself have made statements on TV expressing concern over China’s plans to help Russia in the war in Ukraine.Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science correspondent for The New York Times.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/by/julian-e-barnes?smid=
01/03/202331 minutes 3 seconds
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Why So Many Buildings Collapsed in Turkey

The 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Turkey and Syria on Feb. 6 left more than 50,000 people dead. The sight of rescuers combing the rubble has prompted questions about why so many buildings seemed so inadequate to resist the shaking earth.In Turkey, the government has turned the focus onto builders and property developers, accusing them of chasing profit over safety. But the reality is far more complicated.Guest: Ben Hubbard, the Istanbul bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Some in Turkey wonder whether the number of fatalities caused by the quake could have been cut significantly with better building standards.As the death toll rose, the Turkish government<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/02/11/world/midd
28/02/202320 minutes 31 seconds
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Why Election Denialism Might Cost Fox News $1.6 Billion

After the 2020 election, wild theories ran rampant on the right of an election stolen from Donald Trump through a coordinated conspiracy. The news channel Fox News became one of the loudest voices amplifying these false claims into millions of U.S. households.Now, a defamation lawsuit by Dominion, a voting machine maker that was cast as a villain in these conspiracy theories, seeks to hold the media company responsible for the false claims made by its hosts and guests, presenting evidence that Fox knew what it was doing was wrong.Guest: Jeremy W. Peters, a correspondent for The New York Times who covers the media and its intersection with politics, culture and law.Background reading: Here’s what Fox News hosts said privately and publicly about voter
27/02/202322 minutes 56 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Elon Musk’s Appetite for Destruction’

In February, the first lawsuit against Tesla for a crash involving its driver-assistance system, Autopilot, will go to trial. The slew of trials set to follow will be a costly fight that the company’s chief executive, Elon Musk, has vowed to take on in court. When Tesla released its Autopilot feature in October 2015, Musk touted the feature as “probably better” than a human driver. The reality, however, has proved different: On average, there is at least one Autopilot-related crash in the United States every day.While several of these accidents will feature in the upcoming trials, another camp of Tesla users who have fallen victim to Autopilot crashes are unwilling to take a negative stance because of their love for the brand. Or because they believe that accidents are a necessary evil in the process of perfecting the Autopilot software.Dave Key, whose 2015 Tesla Model S drifted out of its lane and slammed into the back of a parked police S.U.V., is of the latter camp.
26/02/202348 minutes 5 seconds
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A Year of War in Ukraine

The war has already done untold damage. By some estimates, tens of thousands have died, and the country has sustained tens of billions of dollars’ worth of damage that has left cities flattened. But Ukraine has also largely stopped the offensives of its much larger and better-armed neighbor and has regained some captured land.On the first anniversary of Russia’s invasion, these Ukrainians reflect on how the past year of conflict has changed their lives.Background reading: Here’s a guide to how the war came about, and what’s at stake for Russia and the world.People in Ukraine have become adept at telling which threats are probably not deadly, leaving room for a little enjoyment, and even hope.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thed
24/02/202334 minutes 23 seconds
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A Ruling That Could End the Internet as We Know It

Since 1996, the modern internet has been defined by a sweeping law that prevents tech companies such as Facebook and Google from being held responsible for the content posted on their sites.This week, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that could take that legal immunity away.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: The decision on website immunity has the potential to alter the very structure of the internet.Lawmakers are targeting big tech “amplification.” What does that mean?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily</
23/02/202328 minutes 4 seconds
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The Veterans Fighting to Legalize Psychedelics

In a major shift that would modify laws set half a decade ago, states and cities around the United States are moving to legalize psychedelics for use as a medical treatment.The sudden change of heart has a lot to do with who is asking for the substances.Guest: Andrew Jacobs, a health and science reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Lawmakers find it hard to “just say no” to combat veterans seeking support for drug decriminalization efforts.In January, Oregon became the first state to allow adult use of psilocybin “magic” mushrooms.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily<
22/02/202328 minutes 25 seconds
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Why ‘Made in China’ Is Becoming ‘Made in Mexico’

The great supply chain disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic scrambled the shipping system across the Pacific.Although mostly over, the turmoil has led to alterations in the way the global economy functions. One such change can be seen in Mexico, where companies from China are increasingly setting up shop.Guest: Peter S. Goodman, a global economics correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Alarmed by shipping chaos and geopolitical fractures, exporters from China are setting up factories in Mexico to preserve their sales to the United States.Laredo, a Texas border city, is primed to become one of the world’s most important land ports as American companies reduce their reliance on factories in Asia.
21/02/202328 minutes 39 seconds
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Sunday Special: An Episode of ‘Hard Fork’

Times tech columnist Kevin Roose stopped by The Daily twice this week to chronicle the debut of Bing’s new chatbot — and the creepy things that transpired. Today, we’re bringing you the latest episode of Kevin’s podcast, Hard Fork. Kevin, along with his co-host Casey Newton, expand the discussion about why Microsoft’s A.I. search tool appears more powerful — and more unsettling — than they initially believed. Plus: a conversation about Elon Musk’s quest to be the most popular user on Twitter, and why online ads have gotten so much worse (like, much worse).Hard Fork is a podcast about the future of technology that’s already here. You can search for Hard Fork wherever you get your podcasts. Visit nytimes.com/hardfork for more.
19/02/20231 hour 1 minute 23 seconds
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The Online Search Wars Got Scary. Fast.

Microsoft recently released a new version of its search engine Bing that is powered by artificial intelligence software from OpenAI, the maker of the popular chatbot ChatGPT.On Valentine’s Day, after a meal with his wife, Kevin Roose, a New York Times technology columnist, had a two-hour conversation with the chatbot.The chatbot, which revealed that it identified as Sydney, told Kevin that it wanted to be human, that it loved him and that he should leave his wife.“There is something going on here that I don’t think Microsoft intended to build into a search engine,” Kevin said on today’s episode. “Something is not right.”Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times and host of the Times podcast “Hard Fork.”Background reading: A conversation with Bing’s chatbot left<a href="http
17/02/202329 minutes 5 seconds
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A Crisis Within a Crisis in Syria

When a 7.8-magnitude earthquake hit Syria and Turkey last week, it killed thousands and created a crisis within a crisis.International aid began pouring into Turkey, but northwestern Syria, which was also hard-hit, received only a trickle. It was a bitter blow for Syrians, whose lives had already been uprooted by years of civil war, mass displacement and death.Today, we hear from some Syrians and look at why it is so difficult for the world to help them.Guest: Raja Abdulrahim, a correspondent in Jerusalem for The New York Times who traveled to northwestern Syria after the earthquake.Background reading: Little international aid has come to hard-hit northwestern Syria. Residents there said they felt abandoned by the world, and rescue workers said they felt “helpless.”Syrians have expe
16/02/202326 minutes 28 seconds
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The Online Search Wars

Microsoft recently released a new version of Bing, its search engine that has long been kind of a punchline in the tech world.The company billed this Bing — which is powered by artificial intelligence software from OpenAI, the maker of the popular chatbot ChatGPT — as a reinvention of how billions of people search the internet.How does that claim hold up?Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times and host of the Times podcast “Hard Fork.”Background reading: When Microsoft released the new Bing, it was billed as a landmark event and the company’s “iPhone moment.”On t
15/02/202331 minutes 19 seconds
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Why the U.S. Keeps Shooting Objects Out of the Sky

Last week, after the Air Force shot down a Chinese surveillance balloon, examination of its wreckage revealed that it could not only take images, but also scoop up radio and cellphone communications. The balloon, the U.S. military said, was part of a bigger global program by China to collect information about military operations.Since then the U.S. has shot down three other objects from the skies over North America — apparently without knowing much about them.Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The U.S. and Canada are investigating three unidentified flying objects shot down over North America in recent days. Militaries have adjusted radars to try to spot more incursions.<a href="https://ww
14/02/202322 minutes 37 seconds
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The Navy’s Very Expensive Mistake

Amid growing threats from rivals like China, the United States military is determined to invest in new forms of defense and abandon those that no longer meet its needs.On that list: a combat ship rife with flaws. But getting rid of the ship has proved unexpectedly difficult.Guest: Eric Lipton, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: After years of crippling problems and a changing mission, the Navy pushed to retire nine of its newest ships. Then the lobbying started.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
13/02/202323 minutes 17 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Women Have Been Misled About Menopause’

Menopausal hormone therapy was once the most commonly prescribed treatment in the United States. In the late 1990s, some 15 million women a year were receiving a prescription for it. But in 2002, a single study, its design imperfect, found links between hormone therapy and elevated health risks for women of all ages. Panic set in; in one year, the number of prescriptions plummeted.Hormone therapy carries risks, to be sure, as do many medications that people take to relieve serious discomfort, but dozens of studies since 2002 have provided reassurance that for healthy women under 60 whose hot flashes are troubling them, the benefits of taking hormones outweigh the risks. The treatment’s reputation, however, has never fully recovered, and the consequences have been wide-reaching.About 85 percent of women experience menopausal symptoms. Rebecca Thurston, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh who studies menopause, believes that, in general, menopausal
12/02/202352 minutes 38 seconds
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How Sports Betting Hit the Mainstream in America

This weekend, one of the most watched sporting events of the year, the Super Bowl, will draw an estimated $16 billion in bets from Americans, more than double last year’s total.The booming trade is a sign of how gambling has gone from illegal to legal very quickly in many states — and hints at the enormous risks posed by the change.Guest: Kenneth P. Vogel, an investigative correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Cigars, booze, money: A lobbying blitz helped to make sports betting ubiquitous.Government oversight of gambling in the United States offers scant consumer protections and looks to the industry to police itself, The Times found.For more information on
10/02/202334 minutes 25 seconds
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The Most Empty Downtown in America

For the past decade, San Francisco has worked hard to turn its downtown into a vibrant hub, providing a model that other cities in the United States looked to emulate.In the wake of the pandemic, however, many buildings and offices in the center of the city have remained empty.What went wrong?Guest: Conor Dougherty, an economics reporter at The New York Times and author of “Golden Gates: The Housing Crisis and a Reckoning for the American Dream.”; and Emma Goldberg, a reporter covering the future of work for The Times. Background reading: What lessons does San Francisco have for the future of downtowns in America?For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="htt
09/02/202328 minutes 17 seconds
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The Police Unit That Was Supposed to Keep Memphis Safe

This episode contains descriptions of violence. The death of Tyre Nichols, a 29-year-old Black man, at the hands of officers in Memphis last month has intensified calls for fundamental reform in policing. Those calls were echoed yesterday by President Biden, who hosted Mr. Nichols’s parents at the State of the Union address.Today, we hear about a Times investigation into the special team of officers, known as the Scorpion unit, that is accused of killing Mr. Nichols.Guest: Mike Baker, the Seattle bureau chief and a national correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: For 14 months, officers from the high-profile Scorpion unit patrolled Memphis with an air of menace.City leaders had praised the Scorpion unit as a key strategy for fighting crime. Now they are trying to
08/02/202332 minutes 2 seconds
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The Deadly Earthquake in Turkey and Syria

On Monday, a giant 7.8-magnitude earthquake and an aftershock almost as big shook the earth in southern Turkey. The quakes sent ripples through neighboring countries, but the area along the Syrian-Turkish border was hit particularly hard.Thousands of people have been killed, and dozens of cities have been gutted.We hear from witnesses on the ground about what happened when the devastating tremors hit.Guest: Ben Hubbard, the Istanbul bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: The initial earthquake struck before dawn, shattering lives in a region already rocked by war, a refugee crisis and economic distress.In northwestern Syria, nearly three million people
07/02/202324 minutes 6 seconds
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A Chinese Balloon and a Diplomatic Showdown

On Wednesday, residents in Montana saw a mysterious object — a balloon — hovering and bobbing around in the skies. The enigma brought Americans out to squint at the heavens, caused a diplomatic visit to be canceled and opened a political debate.How did a balloon end up kindling such tension between Washington and Beijing?Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The Chinese balloon drifted for seven days across the United States. Here’s a timeline of events.The balloon was brought down by an air-to-air missile fired at it off the coast of South Carolina.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid
06/02/202325 minutes 51 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Man Who Made Spain the Magic Capital of the World’

Going out to dinner with Juan Tamariz in Madrid is a little like accompanying a cartoon character on a journey to the real world. As Shuja Haider, the author of today’s Sunday Read, walked with him on side streets off the city center’s main drag, the Calle Gran Vía, heads turned left and right.Mr. Tamariz, 80, has been a professional magician for 52 years, and in that time, he has managed the singular feat of becoming both a household name in his home country and a living legend in magic everywhere. David Blaine has called him “the greatest and most influential card magician alive.” But in Spain, Mr. Tamariz is an icon, less like Mr. Blaine or David Copperfield and more like Kermit the Frog.In the United States, the most visible performers of magic in the late 20th century were stage illusionists who worked with big boxes and flashing lights. But Mr. Tamariz appears on stage and screen armed with little more than his two hands. He introduced Spanish viewers to the styl
05/02/202336 minutes 41 seconds
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The End of the Pandemic Emergency in the U.S.

The Biden administration said this week that it would end the public health emergency for Covid, a sign that federal officials believe that the pandemic has moved into a new, less dire phase.The move carries both symbolic weight and real-world consequences for millions of Americans.Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The end of the public health emergency, planned for May, will bring about a complex set of policy changes and signals a new stage in the government’s pandemic response.Among the effects of the change, access to tests and treatment will be more complicated.For more information on today’s episode,
03/02/202320 minutes 15 seconds
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A Revolution in How Democrats Pick a President

For the past 50 years, the race to become the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee has been shaped by the where the contest begins: Iowa.But that process could soon be overhauled. In a coming meeting of the Democratic National Committee, South Carolina — a state that is more representative of the party and, possibly, of the country — could take over the key role of going first.Guest: Adam Nagourney, a West Coast cultural affairs correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: President Biden’s push to abandon Iowa for younger, racially diverse states is likely to reward candidates who connect with the party’s most loyal voters.Reshuffling the early-state order could run into<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/05/us/politics/democrats-primary-calenda
02/02/202326 minutes 20 seconds
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The State of the U.S. Economy in 4 Numbers

The typical sales price of an existing family home in the United States in December: 372,700. The number of layoffs in the tech sector since the beginning of the year: 76,000. The number by which consumer spending fell in December: 0.2 percent. The increase in the cost of the same kind of carton of eggs bought by an editor on “The Daily” a year apart: 251 percent.What do these numbers tell us about the state of the country’s economy?Guest: Ben Casselman, an economics and business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The U.S. economy showed momentum at the end of 2022, defying recession fears and displaying the resilience of consumers and businesses in the face of inflation and rising interest rates.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes
01/02/202323 minutes 7 seconds
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7 States, 1 River and an Agonizing Choice

In the United States, 40 million people in seven states depend on water provided by the Colorado River.After 20 years of drought, the situation is dire and the river is at risk of becoming a “deadpool,” a condition in which there is not enough water to pass through the dams.The states were supposed to come up with a deal to cut their usage by Tuesday. Now, the federal government may have to step in and make a difficult decision.Guest: Christopher Flavelle, a climate reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The seven states that rely on the river for water are not expected to reach a deal on reductions. The federal government could impose cuts for the first time in the water supply for millions of Americans.For more information on today’s episode, visit </p
31/01/202323 minutes 45 seconds
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The Death of Tyre Nichols

This episode contains descriptions of violence and strong language.Tyre Nichols was a 29-year-old Black man who lived in Memphis. His mother described him as living a simple and pleasant life. He worked for FedEx, loved to skateboard, was an amateur photographer and had a 4-year-old son.On the evening of Jan. 7, after a traffic stop, Mr. Nichols was violently beaten by the police, sustaining severe injuries. He died on Jan. 10.For weeks, what exactly had happened was unclear. This weekend, videos of the encounter were released.Guest: Rick Rojas, the Southern bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: The five officers charged with the murder of Tyre Nichols are also Black, complicating the anguish and efforts to change the police.<a hr
30/01/202330 minutes 58 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Has the Amazon Reached Its “Tipping Point”?’

In the past half-century, 17 percent of the Amazon — an area larger than Texas — has been converted to croplands or cattle pasture. Less forest means less recycled rain, less vapor to cool the air, less of a canopy to shield against sunlight. Under drier, hotter conditions, even the lushest of Amazonian trees will shed leaves to save water, inhibiting photosynthesis — a feedback loop that is only exacerbated by global warming.According to the Brazilian Earth system scientist Carlos Nobre, if deforestation reaches 20 to 25 percent of the original area, “flying rivers” — rain clouds that recycle the forest’s own moisture five or six times — will weaken enough that a rainforest simply will not be able to survive in most of the Amazon Basin. Instead it will collapse into scrubby savanna, possibly in a matter of decades.Losing the Amazon, one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth, would be catastrophic for the tens of thousands of species that make their home there. Wh
29/01/202358 minutes 17 seconds
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Arrests, Executions and the Iranian Protesters Who Refuse to Give Up

This episode contains descriptions of violence and injury. In September, protests began in Iran over the death of a young woman, Mahsa Amini, at the hands of the government. The demonstrations have since intensified, as has the government’s response, with thousands arrested and a terrifying campaign of public executions underway.Today, Iranians who have taken part in the demonstrations tell us — in their own words — why they are willing to brave such severe punishments to help bring about change.Guest: Cora Engelbrecht, an international reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The protests in Iran have escalated amid anger over religious rules and a rock-bottom economy.A look at the Iranians<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/article/iran-protests-death-sentences
27/01/202334 minutes 35 seconds
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An Aggressive New Approach to Childhood Obesity

Recent advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended a bold approach to treating the millions of children in the United States who are affected by obesity. Counseling, drug treatment and even surgery should be considered, the group says.The guidelines are a response to a deeper understanding of what obesity is — and what to do about it.Guest: Gina Kolata, a medical reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The new guidelines have underscored how complicated childhood obesity is for patients and health providers.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
26/01/202322 minutes 36 seconds
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How Nonprofit Hospitals Put Profits Over Patients

Nonprofit hospitals — which make up around half of hospitals in the United States — were founded to help the poor.But a Times investigation has revealed that many have deviated from those charitable roots, behaving like for-profit companies, sometimes to the detriment of the health of patients.Guest: Jessica Silver-Greenberg, an investigative business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: With the help of a consulting firm, the Providence hospital system trained staff members to wring money out of patients, even those eligible for free care.Dozens of doctors have said that this New York nonprofit hospital pressured them to give preferential treatment to donors, tru
25/01/202331 minutes 49 seconds
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What Biden Miscalculated About His Classified Documents

Over the weekend, F.B.I. agents found classified documents at President Biden’s residence in Wilmington, Del., after conducting a 13-hour search.The search — at the invitation of Mr. Biden’s lawyers — resulted in the latest in a series of discoveries that has already led to a special counsel investigation.What miscalculations have Mr. Biden and his team make throughout this ordeal?Guest: Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Inside the decision by Mr. Biden and his top advisers to keep the discovery of classified documents secret from the public and even most of the White House staff for 68 days.Investigators for the Justice Department recently
24/01/202324 minutes 49 seconds
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The Debt Ceiling Showdown, Explained

In the past decade or more, votes over increasing the U.S. debt ceiling have increasingly been used as a political tool. That has led to intense showdowns in 2011, 2013 and, now, 2023. This year, both sides of the argument are dug in and Republicans appear more willing to go over the cliff than in the past. What does this year’s showdown look like and how, exactly, did the United States’ debt balloon to $31 trillion?Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Two decades of tax cuts, recession responses and bipartisan spending fueled more borrowing has set the stage for another federal showdown over the debt limit.Last week, America hit its debt limit. <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/article/debt-ceiling-us-economy.html?sm
23/01/202328 minutes 5 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Could I Survive the “Quietest Place on Earth”?’

In a room in a modest concrete building in a leafy Minneapolis neighborhood is silence exceeding the bounds of human perception. Technically an “anechoic chamber,” the room is the quietest place on the planet — according to some.What happens to people inside the windowless steel room is the subject of wild and terrible speculation. Public fascination with it exploded 10 years ago, with an article on The Daily Mail’s website. The article left readers to extrapolate their own conclusions about the room from the short, haunting observations of its proprietor, Steven J. Orfield, of Orfield Laboratories.“You’ll hear your heart beating,” Orfield was quoted as saying. And, “In the anechoic chamber, you become the sound.”Much of the lore about the chamber’s propensity for mind-annihilation centers on the concept of blood sounds. Hearing the movement of blood through the body is supposedly something like an absolute taboo, akin to witnessing the fabrication of Chicken Mc
22/01/202327 minutes 34 seconds
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A Mother, a Daughter, a Deadly Journey

With mountains, intense mud, fast-running rivers and thick rainforest, the Darién Gap, a strip of terrain connecting South and Central America, is one of the most dangerous places on the planet.Over the past few years, there has been an enormous increase in the number of migrants passing through the perilous zone in the hopes of getting to the United States.Today, we hear the story of one family that’s risking everything to make it across.Guest: Julie Turkewitz, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: The pandemic, climate change and growing conflict are forcing a seismic shift in global migration.Two crises are converging at the Darién Gap: an economi
20/01/202338 minutes 29 seconds
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Why the U.S. Is Sending More Powerful Weapons to Ukraine

Since the beginning of the war in Ukraine, the United States and allies have held back from sending Kyiv their most potent arms.Over the past few weeks, that has started to change.Guest: Eric Schmitt, a national security correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Ukraine has a narrow window of time to retake more territory ahead of an expected Russian spring offensive.The Biden administration is considering the argument that Kyiv needs the power to strike Crimea, the Ukrainian peninsula annexed by Russia in 2014.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts
19/01/202331 minutes 18 seconds
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The ‘Enemies List’ at Madison Square Garden

With little warning or regulation, companies are increasingly using facial recognition technology on their customers — as a security measure, they say.But what happens when the systems are actually being used to punish the companies’ enemies?Guest: Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter for The New York Times. Background reading: Madison Square Garden Entertainment, the owner of the arena, has put lawyers who represent people suing it on an “exclusion list” to keep them out of concerts and sporting events.Some have undermined the company’s ban by using a law passed in 1941 to protect theater critics.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://n
18/01/202323 minutes 35 seconds
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China’s Abrupt Reversal of ‘Zero Covid’

For nearly three years, China had one of the lowest coronavirus death rates in the world, thanks to its strict yet effective “zero Covid” approach.But last month, the government suddenly abandoned the policy. Since then, there have been millions of coronavirus cases across the country.Guest: Alexandra Stevenson, the Shanghai bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: After micromanaging the coronavirus strategy for nearly three years, China’s leader, Xi Jinping, has suddenly left people to improvise.China said that it recorded nearly 60,000 fatalities linked to the coronavirus in the month since the country lifted the “zero Covid” policy.For more information o
17/01/202323 minutes 42 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Risking Everything to Offer Abortion Access Across State Lines’

In states where abortion is severely limited or illegal, clinicians face imminent prosecution if they continue to provide abortions. What is much less clear is what happens if providers in blue states offer telemedicine abortions to women in states where that’s against the law. These clinicians, too, could be arrested or sued or lose their medical licenses. To protect themselves, they may have to give up traveling to certain parts of the country — and it’s still no guarantee.In the face of so much uncertainty and an invigorated anti-abortion movement, large organizations and most clinicians are loath to gamble.But some providers think that the end of Roe v. Wade calls for doctors to take bold action.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm
15/01/202355 minutes 39 seconds
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The Presidents and the Classified Documents

The Justice Department is scrutinizing how both former President Donald J. Trump and President Biden came to have classified records after they left office.Attorney General Merrick B. Garland appointed a special counsel after the discovery of two batches of classified documents from Mr. Biden’s time as vice president.How are the two cases similar, how are they different and what might that mean for both?Guest: Glenn Thrush, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Special counsels are looking into both Mr. Biden and Mr. Trump. Here’s how the situations differ.Robert K. Hur has been appointed to oversee the investigation into Mr. Biden’s handling of classified documents.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/12/us/politics/robert-hur-special
13/01/202320 minutes 52 seconds
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The California Floods

For weeks, a string of major storms have hit California, causing extreme flooding. While it might seem as if rain should have a silver lining for a state stuck in a historic drought, the reality is far more complicated.Today, how California’s water management in the past has made today’s flooding worse and why it represents a missed opportunity for the future of the state’s water crisis.Guest: Christopher Flavelle, a climate reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: In the wake of recent storms, California is facing questions about whether its approach to handling crippling storms is suited to 21st-century climate threats.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each
12/01/202326 minutes 49 seconds
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A Jan. 6 Moment for Brazil

After Jair Bolsonaro lost October’s Brazilian presidential election to Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, many believed that the threat of violence from the defeated leader’s supporters would recede. They were wrong. Mr. Bolsonaro had spent years sewing doubt and undermining Brazil’s election system, and last week, thousands of rioters stormed Brazil’s Congress, Supreme Court and presidential offices. What happened — and how did Brazil get here?Guest: Jack Nicas, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: What drove a mass attack on Brazil’s capital? Mass delusion.The riots in Brazil had echoes of Jan. 6 in the United States. The comparison is inevitable and useful but <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/10/briefing/bra
11/01/202331 minutes 8 seconds
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The Southwest Airlines Meltdown

Air travel was a mess over the holidays — in the last 10 days of December, 30,000 flights were canceled. While every airline was affected, one stood out: Southwest, which over the past few decades has transformed how Americans fly, melted down. In the last 10 days of the year, it canceled as many flights as it had done in the previous 10 months. So what went wrong?Guest: Niraj Chokshi, a business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Southwest’s crisis shows what can go wrong when a company relied on by millions of people moves too slowly to invest in unglamorous parts of its operation.The airline’s customers incurre
10/01/202328 minutes 22 seconds
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Speaker McCarthy. But at What Cost?

Representative Kevin McCarthy’s bid to become speaker of the House turned into a rolling disaster last week, played out over five long days and 15 rounds of voting. Today, the inside story of how it went so wrong — and what he was forced to give up in order to finally win.Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. McCarthy’s slog to the speakership ended with a remarkably public show of intraparty strife during a history-making overnight session.The speaker’s concessions have given the rebels on the right flank of his party more tools to sow disarray.For more informat
09/01/202334 minutes 30 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘She Fell Nearly 2 Miles, and Walked Away’

On Christmas Eve in 1971, Juliane Diller, then 17, and her mother boarded a flight in Lima, Peru. She was headed for Panguana, a biological research station in the belly of the Amazon, where for three years she had lived, on and off, with her mother, Maria, and her father, Hans-Wilhelm Koepcke, both zoologists.About 25 minutes after takeoff, the plane flew into a thunderstorm, was struck by lightning and broke apart. Strapped to her seat, Juliane fell some 10,000 feet, nearly two miles. Her row of seats is thought to have landed in dense foliage, cushioning the impact. Juliane was the sole survivor of the crash.LANSA Flight 508 was the deadliest lightning-strike disaster in aviation history.In the 50 years since the crash, Juliane moved to Germany, earned a Ph.D. in biology, became an eminent zoologist, got married — and, after her father’s death, took over as director of Panguana and the primary organizer of expeditions to the refuge.To hear more audi
08/01/202324 minutes 4 seconds
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Consider the Burying Beetle. (Or Else.)

The current level of biodiversity loss is extraordinary in human history: The global rate of species extinction is at least tens to hundreds of times higher than the average over the past 10 million years. At the end of 2022, countries around the world came together in Montreal for an agreement akin to the Paris climate accord to tackle the biodiversity crisis. Here’s more on the effort and how it seeks to confront the problem.Guest: Catrin Einhorn, who reports on biodiversity and climate for The New York Times.Background reading: Last year, roughly 190 nations, aiming to halt a dangerous decline in biodiversity, agreed to preserve 30 percent of the planet’s land and seas. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/the
06/01/202325 minutes 43 seconds
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The Life and Lies of George Santos

George Santos, the Republican representative-elect from New York, ran for office and won his seat in part on an inspiring personal story.But when Times reporters started looking into his background, they made some astonishing revelations: Almost all of Mr. Santos’s story was fake.Guests: Michael Gold, a reporter covering New York for The New York Times. Grace Ashford, a reporter covering New York politics for The Times.Background reading: Mr. Santos said that he was the “embodiment of the American dream.” But his résumé was largely fiction.On the first day of the 118th Congress, the Santos saga
05/01/202328 minutes 39 seconds
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Inside Russia’s Military Catastrophe

This episode contains strong language and descriptions of violence.When Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine began, many believed the country’s army would quickly crush the Ukrainian forces. Instead, Russian military failures have defined the war.Today, we hear from Russian soldiers, and explore why a military superpower keeps making the same mistakes and why, despite it all, its soldiers keep going back to fight.Guest: Michael Schwirtz, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Secret battle plans, intercepted communications and interviews with Russian soldiers explain how a “walk in the park” became a catastrophe for Russia.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thed
04/01/202325 minutes 30 seconds
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A Crisis of Kevin McCarthy’s Own Making

This episode contains strong language. Republicans are set to take control of the House of Representatives for the first time in four years. The transition is shaping up to be chaotic. Today, the 118th Congress will gather for the first time in the Capitol, yet there is still a question mark over who is going to be the Republican speaker of the House. Why is there still a fight over leadership?Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Representative Kevin McCarthy is struggling to break through a wall of entrenched opposition to his speakership from hard-right lawmakers even after agreeing to weaken his leadership power.Mr. McCarthy has so far faced no viable challenger. But if he is unable to secure the votes, an
03/01/202333 minutes 19 seconds
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One Man Flees Putin’s Draft: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.Kirill, 24, worked at a nonprofit for homeless people in the Moscow region. He does not support the policies of President Vladimir V. Putin and is vehemently against the invasion of Ukraine.After suffering setbacks in the war, Mr. Putin announced a military draft in September. Kirill was among those called up. In September, Sabrina Tavernise spoke to Kirill who was hiding to avoid being served his papers. Since then, Kirill decided to flee Russia to avoid the draft. Today, Sabrina Tavernise checks in with Kirill about what’s happened since he left his country.Background readingRussia’s defense minister, Sergei K. Shoigu, said in October that the target of drafting 300,000 reservists was finished
30/12/202234 minutes 58 seconds
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A Post-Roe America: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since.In May, the United States was stunned by the leak of a Supreme Court draft opinion that previewed the end of Roe v. Wade. After, we spoke to people on both sides of the abortion issue. Today, we revisit conversations with two women, an anti-abortion activist and an abortion provider, and discuss how their lives have changed since the end of the constitutional right to abortion.Guests: Anja Baker, an anti-abortion activist in Mississippi who works for Her PLAN, a project of the Susan B. Anthony List Education Fund.Dr. Jessica Rubino, a f
29/12/202237 minutes 6 seconds
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A View of the Beginning of Time: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.In July, NASA released new images captured from a point in space one million miles from Earth. Ancient galaxies carpeting the sky like jewels on black velvet. Fledgling stars shining out from deep within cumulus clouds of interstellar dust.Today, we return to our episode about the moment when the James Webb Space Telescope, the largest space observatory ever built, sent its first images back to Earth — and explore what the telescope has discovered since then in its long journey across the universe. Guest: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter for The New York Times.Background readingHere are mo
28/12/202227 minutes 8 seconds
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How Two Friends Beat Amazon and Built a Union: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.This year, we explored the story of Christian Smalls and Derrick Palmer, two Amazon workers at a warehouse in New York City, who had embarked on an improbable attempt to create the company’s first union and succeeded.Today, we return to their story and learn about the current state of their organizing effort.Guest: Jodi Kantor, an investigative reporter for The New York Times; and Christian Smalls and Derrick Palmer, warehouse workers who led the first successful unionization attempt at Amazon.Background readingChristian Smalls and Derrick Palmer won the first successful unionization effort at any Amazon warehouse in the United States, one of the <a href="https://www.nytimes
27/12/202243 minutes 28 seconds
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On the Road With Ukraine’s Refugees: An Update

This week, The Daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened in the time since they first ran.This episode contains strong language.This year, in response to Russia’s increasingly brutal campaign against Ukrainian towns and cities, millions of people — most of them women and children — fled Ukraine. It was the fastest displacement of people in Europe since World War II.Today, we return to the beginning of the invasion and reporting from our host Sabrina Tavernise, who traveled alongside some of those fleeing the conflict.Background readingWith most men legally prohibited from leaving Ukraine, the international border gates serve as a painful filter, splitting families as women and children move on.Spared direct attacks so far, Lviv, a c
26/12/202238 minutes 17 seconds
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A Restaurant Critic (Ours) On the Year That Changed Him Forever

During his time as a restaurant critic for The Times, Pete Wells has become both feared and revered in the world of dining — crowning those at the top and dethroning those whose time has passed.But when the pandemic arrived, handing out stars to fancy restaurants made no sense anymore. A fundamental change was needed.Guest: Pete Wells, a restaurant critic for The New York Times. Background reading: For the return of The Times’s star ratings this year, Pete Wells visited La Piraña Lechonera, a weekend party in a Bronx trailer where one man serves up the rich flavors of Puerto Rico.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made avai
23/12/202242 minutes 42 seconds
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A Crisis in Peru Signals Trouble for South America

A few weeks ago, when President Pedro Castillo of Peru attempted an illegal power grab and ended up in jail, the response was unexpected: Thousands of protesters took to the streets to support him, and some died.Why does such a divisive leader have such fierce backing? And what does the upheaval in Peru tell us about the way the political winds are blowing in South America?Guest: Julie Turkewitz, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: What is going on in Peru and why are people protesting? Here’s what to know.Days after Mr. Castillo’s removal from office and arrest, thousands of his supporters have joined protests demanding his reinstatement. To them,<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/15/world/americas/peru-protests-pedro-castillo.html?searchResultPositi
22/12/202231 minutes 8 seconds
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The Lives They Lived

This episode contains descriptions of violence. At the end of every year, The New York Times Magazine devotes an issue to remembering those who have died in the past year.This year’s focus is gun violence, which is now the leading cause of death for American children, and the short lives that ended far too soon because of it.Today, we remember three of them: Lavonte’e Williams, Elijah Gomez and Shiway Barry.On today’s episode: The voices of Cheese, Shiway Barry's best friend; Crystal Cathcart, Elijah Gomez’s aunt, and his mother, Jennifer Cathcart; and Lavonte’e Williams’s mother, Miracle Jones, and Michael Jones and Tanika Jones, his grandparents.Background reading: A boy just baptized. A girl who just had her Sweet 16. These are the stories of 12 children killed by guns this year.For more information on toda
21/12/202228 minutes 40 seconds
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A Congressional Call to Prosecute Trump

Every step of the way, the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol has been groundbreaking.As it wraps up its work, the panel referred former President Donald J. Trump to the Justice Department and accused him of four crimes, including inciting insurrection. The referrals do not carry legal weight or compel any action by the Justice Department, but they were a major escalation.Here’s what happened during the committee’s final public meeting.Guest: Luke Broadwater, a Congressional reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Here are six takeaways from the final Jan. 6 hearing, and key findings from the panel’s report, annotated.Mr. Tr
20/12/202224 minutes 57 seconds
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How This World Cup Changed Soccer

For weeks, much of the globe has been riveted by the highs and lows of the World Cup in Qatar. On Sunday, the soccer tournament culminated in a win for Argentina and its star, Lionel Messi, against France.Here’s how the thrill of the game eclipsed the tournament’s tainted beginnings, and what that might reveal about the future.Guest: Rory Smith, the chief soccer correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: After a tournament shadowed by controversy, Qatar had the turn in the global spotlight it sought.This World Cup has blurred the line between the artificial and the authentic, but the people, as usual, defined the tournament.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http:
19/12/202229 minutes 25 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘He Had a Dark Secret. It Changed His Best Friend’s Life.’

“On his first night at the Brooklyn homeless shelter, Tin Chin met his best friend.”So begins an unforgettable story of deceit and friendship, and the loneliness of starting life anew in a foreign country.The journalist Sam Dolnick traces how two men came to find themselves in the homeless shelter, and how their shared backgrounds meant they became fast friends. But the story, as all good stories often do, quickly takes an unexpected turn.This story was written and narrated by Sam Dolnick. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
18/12/202225 minutes 53 seconds
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Did Artificial Intelligence Just Get Too Smart?

This episode contains strong language.In the past few weeks, a major breakthrough in the world of artificial intelligence — ChatGPT — has put extraordinary powers in the hands of anyone with access to the internet.Released by OpenAI, a San Francisco-based company, ChatGPT can write essays, come up with scripts for TV shows, answer math questions and even write code.Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times and host of the Times podcast “Hard Fork.”Background reading: ChatGPT has inspired awe, fear, stunts and attempts to circumvent its guardrails.The chatbot is suddenly everywhere. Who should decide how it’s built? What could go wrong? And what could go right?<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/09/podcasts/can-c
16/12/202233 minutes 8 seconds
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Scenes from a Russian Draft Office

This fall, as Russia’s losses mounted in Ukraine, President Vladimir Putin announced a draft. Almost immediately, hundreds of thousands of men fled the country, though many more stayed.Valerie Hopkins, an international correspondent for The Times, spoke to Russians at a draft office in Moscow to gauge how they felt about going to war and who they blame for the fighting.Guest: Valerie Hopkins, an international correspondent covering the war in Ukraine for The New York Times.Background reading: Across Moscow, there are noticeably fewer men at restaurants, stores and social gatherings. Many have been called up to fight in Ukraine. Others have fled to avoid being drafted.For more information on today’s episode, visit 
15/12/202235 minutes 8 seconds
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The Unexpected Ways the Left is Winning in the Abortion Fight

When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade this year, it appeared to be an unvarnished victory for the anti-abortion movement.But as the year draws to a close, the realities of a post-Roe America are turning out differently than anyone predicted.Guest: Kate Zernike, a national correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: After the midterms, abortion rights advocates hope to harness public support for the long term, while anti-abortion campaigners look to advance new laws.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
14/12/202222 minutes 46 seconds
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The Far-Right Plot to Overthrow Germany’s Government

Three thousand security officers fanned out across Germany this past week, raiding 150 homes, arresting 25 people and putting more than 50 others under investigation for plotting to overthrow the national government in Berlin.The target of the counterterrorism operation, one of the biggest that postwar Germany has seen, was a movement known as the Reichsbürger, or citizens of the Reich.What does the Reichsbürger plot reveal about the depth of right-wing extremism in the country?Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Among those arrested was a German aristocrat called Prince Heinrich XIII of Reuss. Nostalgic for an imperial past, the prince embraced far-right conspiracy theories.The Reichsbürger movement picked up mom
13/12/202223 minutes 3 seconds
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How Layoff News Is Hiding a Hot Job Market

 Companies like Meta and Twitter have said that they will be cutting jobs. Google and Amazon have announced that they are putting a freeze on any new hiring.Are tech layoffs a sign of things to come across other sectors? Is this the opening bell for the bad news on the economy that many have been bracing for?Guest: Jeanna Smialek, a correspondent covering the Federal Reserve and economy for The New York Times.Background reading: President Biden is celebrating a jobs engine that is running hot; Federal Reserve officials want to see more signs of slowing growth amid their campaign to tame inflation.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode
12/12/202221 minutes 36 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Ukraine’s 15,000-Mile Lifeline’

Shortly after the war in Ukraine began, terrified civilians from across the country made their way to their cities’ main train stations.The stations became scenes of great panic, with people jostling to be admitted onto the crowded trains. Compartments were filled 10 times their intended capacity, and people were packed shoulder to shoulder, unable to sit down. Images from these moments captured the beginning of the largest refugee crisis in Europe since World War II.In this extensively reported article, Sarah A. Topol explores the history and cultural significance of Ukraine’s railways, and their crucial importance within the war effort.This story was written by Sarah A. Topol and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.<
11/12/20221 hour 2 minutes 21 seconds
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A Court Case That Could Transform Elections

On one level, the case brought before the Supreme Court is about gerrymandering. But on a broader level, it’s about a theory that would completely reorient the relationship between the federal and state governments and upset the ordinary checks and balances.Guest: Adam Liptak, a correspondent covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: The Supreme Court justices are considering whether to adopt the “independent state legislature” theory, which could give state lawmakers nearly unchecked power over federal elections.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
09/12/202230 minutes 48 seconds
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Why Haiti Asked for an Intervention

This episode contains descriptions of distressing scenes. Haiti is unraveling. Gangs control much of the capital, thousands have been displaced and hundreds more are dead.In recent weeks, the government has taken the extraordinary step of asking for an armed intervention from abroad.What is it like on the ground, and what does the request mean for Haitians?Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, the bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Background reading: With unchecked gang violence rocking its capital and a cholera outbreak spreading, Haiti’s government has called for an international armed intervention to stabilize the country.Fearing a mass exodus, some Biden administration officials have<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/
08/12/202231 minutes 40 seconds
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When Book Bans Came to Small Town New Jersey

This episode contains strong language. In the contentious debate over who controls what happens in America’s schools, a new battleground has emerged: library books.This is the story of what happened when parents in one town in New Jersey tried to remove a handful of books that they said were explicit and sexually inappropriate — and the battle that ensued.Guest: Alexandra Alter, a reporter covering publishing and the literary world for The New York Times. Background reading: As highly visible and politicized book bans have exploded across the United States, librarians — accustomed to being seen as dedicated public servants in their communities — have found themselves on the front lines of an acrimonious culture war, with their careers and their personal reputations at risk.
07/12/202244 minutes 18 seconds
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The Last Senate Seat

Georgia voters are heading to the polls for the final battle of the 2022 midterms — the runoff election between Senator Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, and his Republican opponent, Herschel Walker.Both parties have their own challenges: Republicans have a candidate quality issue in Mr. Walker, and Democrats are concerned about the turnout of their voter coalition. One side, though, already seems resigned to losing.Guest: Maya King, a politics reporter covering the South for The New York Times.Background reading: On the eve of Georgia’s Senate runoff, Mr. Warnock warned his supporters about being overconfident, and Mr. Walker urged Republicans to flood the polls.The runoff will answer<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/05/us/politics/georgia-senate-race-democrats-rep
06/12/202228 minutes 45 seconds
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Life in Ukraine as Russia Weaponizes Winter

For months, the war in Ukraine was about territory as both sides fought to control areas in the country’s south and east.In recent weeks, the war has taken a new turn.Mounting attacks on civilian infrastructure have left people across Ukraine without power, heat and sometimes water as the snow begins to fall.Guest: Marc Santora, the International News Editor for The New York Times.Background reading: Even as Ukrainian workers race to restore basic services like electricity, heat and water, new Russian airstrikes send them back to the starting line.Survival kits in elevators, alternative menus in cafes, flashlights and generators everywhere: This is life under Russian bombardment.</
05/12/202221 minutes 48 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘How Noah Baumbach Made “White Noise” a Disaster Movie for Our Moment’

Jon Mooallem met with the director Noah Baumbach to discuss his latest film, an adaptation of Don DeLillo’s 1985 novel “White Noise.”The pair explore the recent chain of personal and public events in Baumbach’s life, including the toll of the coronavirus pandemic and the death of his father, and how this “routine trauma” has affected his work, and why it prompted him to create a discombobulated, “elevated reality” for his film in the vein of David Lynch, the Coen brothers and Spike Lee.This story was written and narrated by Jon Mooallem. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
04/12/202244 minutes 33 seconds
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Who Pays the Bill for Climate Change?

Last month at COP27, the U.N. climate change conference, a yearslong campaign ended in an agreement. The rich nations of the world — the ones primarily responsible for the emissions that have caused climate change — agreed to pay into a fund to help poorer nations that bear the brunt of its effects. In the background, however, an even more meaningful plan was taking shape, led by the tiny island nation of Barbados. Guest: David Gelles, a climate correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: As global warming delivers cascading weather disasters, leaders at U.N. climate talks said it’s time to radically overhaul the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.co
02/12/202245 minutes 40 seconds
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A Landmark Jan. 6 Verdict

In a landmark verdict, a jury convicted Stewart Rhodes, leader of the Oath Keepers, a right-wing militia, of sedition for his role in the Jan. 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol.The charge he faced, seditious conspiracy, is one that can be traced to the American Civil War. How did federal prosecutors make their case, and what does the verdict tell us about just how organized the attack really was?Guest: Alan Feuer, a reporter covering courts and criminal justice for The New York Times.Background reading: A jury in federal court in Washington convicted Mr. Rhodes and one of his subordinates for a plot to keep Donald Trump in power.The outcome of the trial was<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/11/30/us/politics/oath-keepers-stewart-rhodes.html?smid=pc-theda
01/12/202234 minutes 41 seconds
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What It’s Like Inside One of China’s Protests

Over the weekend, protests against China’s strict coronavirus restrictions ricocheted across the country in a rare case of nationwide civil unrest. It was the most extensive series of protests since the pro-democracy movement in Tiananmen Square in 1989.This is what these demonstrations look and feel like, and what they mean for President Xi Jinping and his quest for “zero Covid.”Guest: Vivian Wang, a China correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Demonstrations against coronavirus restrictions in China have evolved into broader demands. What are protesters calling for?In a country where protests are swiftly quashed, many who gathered to voice their discontent — under the watchful eye of the police — were<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/11/28/world/asia/
30/11/202230 minutes 50 seconds
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A Secret Campaign to Influence the Supreme Court

For the past few months, Jodi Kantor and Jo Becker, investigative reporters for The New York Times, have looked into a secretive, yearslong effort by an anti-abortion activist to influence the justices of the Supreme Court.This is the story of the Rev. Rob Schenck, the man who led that effort.Guest: Jodi Kantor, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. Background reading: Years before the leaked draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, a landmark contraception ruling was disclosed, according to Mr. Schenck.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
29/11/202240 minutes 36 seconds
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Qatar’s Big Bet on the World Cup

The World Cup, the biggest single sporting event on the planet, began earlier this month. By the time the tournament finishes, half the global population is expected to have watched. The 2022 World Cup has also been the focus of over a decade of controversy because of its unlikely host: the tiny, energy-rich country of Qatar. How did such a small nation come to host the tournament, and at what cost?Guest: Tariq Panja, a sports business reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The decision to take the World Cup to Qatar has upturned a small nation, battered the reputation of global soccer’s governing body and altered the fabric of the sport.Many in Qatar say the barrage of criticism about its human rights record and the exploitation of migrant workers
28/11/202234 minutes 14 seconds
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Talking Turkey: A Holiday Special Edition

Being tasked with the turkey on Thanksgiving can be a high-pressure, high-stakes job. Two Times writers share what they’ve learned.Kim Severson takes listeners on a journey through some of the turkey-cooking gimmicks that have been recommended to Americans over the decades, and J. Kenji López-Alt talks about his foolproof method for roasting a bird.Guest: Kim Severson, a food correspondent for The New York Times; and J. Kenji López-Alt, a food columnist for The Times. Background reading: From brining to bagging to clothing the bird in cotton, every year brings a fresh cooking trick that promises perfection. Here are the oddest and most memorable.The secret to great Thanksgiving turkey<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/11/0
23/11/202227 minutes 27 seconds
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The ‘Tripledemic’ Explained

This winter, three major respiratory viruses — respiratory syncytial virus or R.S.V., the flu and the coronavirus — are poised to collide in the United States in what some health officials are calling a “tripledemic.”What does this collision have to do with our response to the coronavirus pandemic, and why are children so far the worst affected?Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Most cases of Covid, flu and R.S.V. are likely to be mild, but together they may sicken millions of Americans and swamp hospitals, public health experts warned.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by th
22/11/202225 minutes 36 seconds
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Trump Faces a New Special Counsel

Donald J. Trump is running for president again. Donald J. Trump is back on Twitter again. And now a special prosecutor has been appointed to investigate Donald J. Trump again.In the saga of the Trump investigations, there seem to be recurring rhythms and patterns. Here’s what to know about the latest developments.Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The two major criminal investigations involving Mr. Trump examine his role in the lead up to Jan. 6 and his decision to retain sensitive government documents at his home in Florida.What is it that makes a special counsel “special”?For more information on today’s
21/11/202225 minutes 11 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘What Does Sustainable Living Look Like? Maybe Like Uruguay’

Across the world, developed nations have locked themselves into unsustainable, energy-intensive lifestyles. As environmental collapse threatens, the journalist Noah Gallagher Shannon explores the lessons in sustainability that can be learned from looking “at smaller, perhaps even less prosperous nations” such as Uruguay.“The task of shrinking our societal footprint is the most urgent problem of our era — and perhaps the most intractable,” writes Shannon, who explains that the problem of reducing our footprints further “isn’t that we don’t have models of sustainable living; it’s that few exist without poverty.”Tracing Uruguay’s sustainability, Shannon shows how a relatively small population size and concentration (about half of the country’s 3.5 million people live in Montevideo, the capital) had long provided the country with a collective sense of purpose. He also shows how in such a tight-knit country, the inequalities reach a rapid boil, quoting a slogan of a Marxist
20/11/202257 minutes 47 seconds
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'The Run-Up': The Post-Mortem

The midterm elections have left both parties in a moment of reflection. For Republicans, it’s time to make a choice about Trumpism, but one that may no longer be theirs to make. For Democrats, it’s about how much of their future is inherently tied to the G.O.P. 
19/11/202240 minutes 41 seconds
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The Man Who Was Supposed to Save Crypto

Earlier this year, much of the crypto industry imploded, taking with it billions of dollars. From that crash, one company and its charismatic founder emerged as the industry’s savior.Last week, that company collapsed.Who is Sam Bankman-Fried, how did he become the face of crypto, and why did so many believe in him?Guest: David Yaffe-Bellany, a reporter covering cryptocurrencies and fintech for The New York Times.Background reading: Here’s what to know about the collapse of FTX.In an interview with The Times, Mr. Bankman-Fried said he had expanded too fast and failed to see warning signs. But he shared few details about his handli
18/11/202233 minutes 35 seconds
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The Far Right Rises in Israel

This week, Israel swore in a new Parliament, paving the way back to power for former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, even as he is on trial for corruption. Now, the country is on the cusp of its most right-wing government in history.Who and what forces are behind these events in Israeli politics?Guest: Patrick Kingsley, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: To win election, Mr. Netanyahu and his far-right allies harnessed perceived threats to Israel’s Jewish identity after ethnic unrest and the subsequent inclusion of Arab lawmakers in the government.The rise of the Israeli far right has stoked fear among some Palestinians of a surge of vio
17/11/202229 minutes 16 seconds
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A Republican House

Divided government appears poised to return to Washington. In the midterm elections, the Republicans seem likely to manage to eke out a majority in the House, but they will have a historically small margin of control.The Republican majority will be very conservative, made up of longtime members — some of whom have drifted more to the right — and a small but influential group of hard-right Republicans who are quite allied with former President Donald J. Trump and helped lead the effort to try to overturn the 2020 election.What can we expect from this new Republican-controlled House?Guest: Julie Davis, congressional editor for The New York Times.Background reading: After the midterm elections, the Republican ranks in the House have grown more extreme and slightly more diverse.<l
16/11/202228 minutes 11 seconds
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Another Trump Campaign

Days after voters rejected his vision for the country in the midterms, former President Donald J. Trump is expected to announce a third run for president.Despite the poor results for candidates he backed, why are Republican leaders powerless to stop him?Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Republicans may still win the House. But an underwhelming showing has the party wrestling with what went wrong: Was it bad candidates, a bad message or Mr. Trump?Mr. Trump has faced unusual public attacks from across the Republican Party.Republicans pushing to move past the former president face one big obstacle:<a href="https://www
15/11/202224 minutes 58 seconds
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The Nation’s ‘Report Card’ on Remote Learning

On the first nationwide test of American students since the pandemic, scores plummeted to levels not seen in 20 years. The results show how challenging it was to keep students on track during the pandemic.What do the scores tell us about remote learning, who lost the most ground academically, and what can schools do to help students recover?Guest: Sarah Mervosh, a national reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: In the U.S., students in most states and across almost all demographic groups have experienced troubling setbacks in both math and reading, according to an authoritative national exam released last month.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of e
14/11/202222 minutes 53 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Young and Homeless in Rural America’

Sandra Plantz, an administrator at Gallia County Local Schools for more than 20 years, oversees areas as diverse as Title I reading remediation and federal grants for all seven of the district’s schools. In recent years, though, she has leaned in hard on a role that is overlooked in many districts: homeless liaison.Ms. Plantz’s district, in rural Ohio, serves an area that doesn’t offer much in the way of a safety net beyond the local churches. The county has no family homeless shelters, and those with no place to go sometimes end up sleeping in the parking lot of the Walmart or at the hospital emergency room.Homeless students have the worst educational outcomes of any group, the lowest attendance, the lowest scores on standardized tests, the lowest graduation rates. They all face the same cruel paradox: Students who do not have a stable place to live are unable to attend school regularly, and failing to graduate from high school is the single greatest risk factor for f
13/11/202243 minutes 9 seconds
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How Democrats Defied the Odds

This week’s elections have been startlingly close. Control of both chambers of Congress remain up in the air.Historically, the president’s party is blown away in midterms. And the Democrats were further hampered this time round by President Biden’s unpopularity.Considering the headwinds, how did they do so well?Guest: Nate Cohn, chief political analyst for The New York Times.Background reading: President Biden appears to have had the best midterms of any president in 20 years.Election denial didn’t play as well as Republicans hoped. And former President Donald Trump has<a href="https://ww
10/11/202225 minutes 21 seconds
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The Republican Wave That Wasn’t

In the early hours of Wednesday, control of both the House and Senate remained uncertain.Going into the midterms, some analysts expected a repudiation of the Democrats and a surge of Republican victories. But this “red wave” did not materialize. Today, we try to make sense of the surprising results. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: As the results continue to come in, follow the latest updates here. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
09/11/202225 minutes 46 seconds
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How Democracy Itself Ended Up on the Ballot in Wisconsin

Over the last decade, Wisconsin has become an extreme experiment in single-party rule. Republican officials have redrawn the state’s election districts and rewritten laws to ensure their domination of the state’s legislature.In Tuesday’s elections, those officials are asking voters for the final lever of power: control over the entire system of voting. Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a reporter covering elections and campaigns for The New York Times.Background reading: In Wisconsin, a 50-50 battleground state, Republicans are close to capturing supermajorities in the State Legislature that would render the Democratic governor irrelevant even if he wins re-election.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.com/thedaily?s
08/11/202249 minutes 30 seconds
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John Fetterman and the Fight for White Working-Class Voters

For the Democrats to hold on to power in Washington, they have to do what President Biden did in Pennsylvania two years ago: Break the Republican Party’s grip on the white working-class vote, once the core of the Democratic base. In tomorrow’s midterm election, no race better encapsulates that challenge than the Pennsylvania Senate candidacy of John Fetterman.Is the plan working or is this crucial group of voters now a lost cause for the Democrats?Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Among white working-class voters in places like northeast Pennsylvania, the Democratic Party has both the furthest to fall and the most to gain.In the final days of the Pennsylvania Senate race, Mr. Fetterman
07/11/202241 minutes 5 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Taken Under Fascism, Spain’s “Stolen Babies” Are Learning the Truth’

The phenomenon of babies stolen from hospitals in Spain, once shrouded in secrecy, is now being spoken about.The thefts happened during the end of the regime of Francisco Franco, the right-wing dictator who ruled the country until 1975, and even today the disappearances remain a subject of mystery and debate among scholars.According to the birth mothers, nuns who worked in maternity wards took the infants shortly after they were delivered and told the women, who were often unwed or poor, that their children were stillborn. But the babies were not dead: They had been sold, discreetly, to well-off Catholic parents, many of whom could not have families of their own. Under piles of forged papers, the adoptive families buried the secret of the crime they committed. The children who were taken were known in Spain simply as the “stolen babies.” No one knows exactly how many were kidnapped, but estimates suggest tens of thousands.Nicholas Casey relates Ana Belén Pintado
06/11/20221 hour 26 seconds
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‘The Run-Up': The Grass Roots, Part 2

This moment in politics will be defined by shifts at the grass-roots level. It wasn’t long ago that Democrats used to brag about the coalition they had built — full of young people, minority voters and college-educated women. Today, we talk to members of the Democratic base, many of whom no longer see a clear path forward for the party.“The Run-Up” is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we’ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. You can search for “The Run-Up” wherever you get your podcasts. Visit nytimes.com/therunup for more.
05/11/202257 minutes 28 seconds
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Can Abortion Still Save the Democrats?

With an unpopular president and soaring inflation, Democrats knew they had an uphill battle in the midterms.But the fall of Roe v. Wade seemed to offer the party a way of energizing voters and holding ground. And one place where that hope could live or die is Michigan.Guest: Lisa Lerer, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Some top Democrats say that their party has focused too much attention on abortion rights and not enough on worries about crime or the cost of living.The outcome of the midterms will affect abortion access for millions of Americans. Activists on both sides are focused on races up and down the ballot.For more infor
04/11/202238 minutes 29 seconds
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Why the Supreme Court Might End Affirmative Action

For decades, many universities have used race as a factor when deciding which students to admit. In the past, the Supreme Court has backed that practice, called affirmative action, in the interest of creating a diverse student body.This week, however, the majority-conservative court is considering a case that may change affirmative action forever.Guest: Adam Liptak, a correspondent covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: The Supreme Court appears ready to rule that race-conscious admissions programs at Harvard and the University of North Carolina were unlawful.In the clash over affirmative action, both sides invoke Brown v. Board of Educ
03/11/202225 minutes 46 seconds
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The Man Who Tried to Kidnap Nancy Pelosi

Early on Friday, an intruder broke into the San Francisco home of Nancy Pelosi and bludgeoned Ms. Pelosi’s husband, Paul, with a hammer.The shocking attack underlined fears about the growing number of threats against members of Congress and the woeful lack of security around those lawmakers.Guest: Catie Edmondson, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: A trail of strained relationships. An itinerant life that included a stint living in a storage unit. A personality that was “consumed by darkness.” Who is the man accused of attacking Mr. Pelosi?The assault at the Pelosi home comes as threats against members of Congress have increased in recent years.
02/11/202228 minutes 32 seconds
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Twitter in the Time of Elon Musk

It was long awaited, and some doubted that it would ever come to pass, but last week, the tech billionaire Elon Musk officially took over Twitter.The platform was once the place of underdogs, a public square that allowed users to challenge the moneyed and powerful. Is that about to change?Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times, and co-host of the Times podcast “Hard Fork.”Background reading: A decade ago, Twitter was a tool for rebels and those challenging authority. But over time, the powerful learned how to use it for their own goals.Mr. Musk and a group of his advisers have been meeting with company exec
01/11/202225 minutes 8 seconds
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Xi Jinping Opens a New Chapter for China

Four years ago, Xi Jinping set himself up to become China’s leader indefinitely.At last week’s Communist Party congress in Beijing, he stepped into that role, making a notable sweep of the country’s other top leaders and placing even greater focus on national security.Guest: Chris Buckley, chief China correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: At the congress, Mr. Xi didn’t mention two long-repeated maxims. To many, it’s a warning of the turbulent times to come.Mr. Xi has created a new ruling elite packed with loyalist officials primed to elevate his agenda of bolstering national security and turning China into a technological great power.For more informat
31/10/202225 minutes 20 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Why We Take Animal Voyages’

For Sam Anderson, a staff writer, traveling with animals can lead to enlightening experience. In this essay for The New York Times Magazine, Mr. Anderson explores what he has learned from a lifetime of voyaging with animals, and what it means to connect with another creature: bridging spiritual, physical and even temporal distances, and reaching into “something like evolutionary time.”“An animal voyage,” Mr. Anderson writes, “is special because it requires us to make many journeys all at once.”This story was written and narrated by Sam Anderson. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
30/10/202226 minutes 38 seconds
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'The Run-Up': The Grass Roots, Part 1

This moment in politics will be defined by shifts at the grass-roots level. Today, we talk to conservative voters about the forces animating the midterm elections for them — and what Washington can learn from the people. What do you think of “The Run-Up” so far? Please take our listener survey at nytimes.com/therunupsurvey. “The Run-Up” is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we’ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow “The Run-Up” wherever you get your podcasts, including Apple, Spotify, <a href="https://podcasts.
29/10/202252 minutes 2 seconds
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Two Futures Face Off in Brazil

Voters in Brazil on Sunday will choose between two larger-than-life, populist candidates in a presidential race that is widely seen as the nation’s — and Latin America’s — most important election in decades.Who are the candidates, and why is the future of Brazilian democracy also on the ballot?Guest: Jack Nicas, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: The contest — a matchup between Brazil’s two biggest political heavyweights — could swing either way and promises to prolong what has already been a bruising battle that has polarized the nation and tested the strength of its democracy.For the past decade, Brazil has lurched from one crisis to the next. Brazilians will<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/30/world/americas/brazil-election-bolsonaro-lu
28/10/202228 minutes 31 seconds
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Is New York (of All Places) About to Go Red?

As Democratic Party leaders assessed their vulnerabilities in this year’s midterm elections, the one state they did not worry about was New York. That — it turns out — was a mistake.Despite being a blue state through and through, and a place President Donald J. Trump lost by 23 points two years ago, the red tide of this moment is lapping at New York’s shores.Why is New York up for grabs?Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a Metro reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Ahead of the midterms, New York has emerged from a haywire redistricting cycle as perhaps the most consequential congressional battleground in the country.Republicans are pressing their advantage deep into Democratic ter
27/10/202223 minutes 46 seconds
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The Trump Subpoena

A few days ago, when the House committee investigating Jan. 6 issued a subpoena to former President Donald J. Trump, it raised a legal question: Can Congress compel a former president to testify?The committee’s move, while dramatic, is not without precedent.What do presidential subpoenas of the past teach us about the moment we’re in, and about what the former president might do next?Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The Jan. 6 committee issued a subpoena to Mr. Trump, paving the way for a potentially historic court fight over whether Congress can compel testimony from a former president.If the former president fights the subpoena, his lawyers are likely to <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/22/us
26/10/202227 minutes 55 seconds
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How Europe’s Energy Crisis Exposed Old Fault Lines and New Anxieties

In the early days of its war on Ukraine, Russia cut off gas supplied to most of Europe, plunging the continent into the most severe energy crisis in decades.Soaring prices have put some European leaders on the defensive over their support of Ukraine in the war as they navigate economic crises and bubbling unrest at home.Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: European countries are facing dwindling supplies of Russian natural gas. The scarcity has distorted the market, driving gas prices to historic highs and pulling up the price of electricity.The downfall of Britain’s prime minister sent perhaps
25/10/202222 minutes 3 seconds
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Running an Election in the Heart of Election Denialism

This episode contains strong language. Hundreds of candidates on the ballot in November still deny that President Biden won in 2020 — a level of denialism that is fueling harassment and threats toward election workers. Few have experienced those attacks as viscerally as election workers in Arizona. Today, we speak with the top election official in the state’s largest county. Guest: Stephen Richer, the recorder of Maricopa County in Arizona. Background reading: Election officials are on alert as voting begins for midterm elections, the biggest test of the American election system since former President Donald J. Trump’s lies about the 2020 results launched an assault on the democratic process.<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2022/10/13/us/politics/republican-candidates-2020-election-misinformation.html?smid
24/10/202249 minutes 14 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘How Yiyun Li Became a Beacon for Readers in Mourning’

Yiyun Li has garnered legions of fans with her unsparing prose, writing extensively about her own struggles with depression and suicidality.Her latest novel, “The Book of Goose,” is no different, sharing the same quality that has made Ms. Li something of a beacon to those suffering beneath unbearable emotional weight.Alexandra Kleeman, also a novelist, meets Ms. Li to discover the secrets of her charm, her experience of growing up in China and her writing process.This story was written by Alexandra Kleeman and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
23/10/202232 minutes 57 seconds
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'The Run-Up': What 12 Years of Gerrymandering Has Done to Wisconsin

How a 12-year project to lock in political power in Wisconsin could culminate in this year’s midterms – and provide a glimpse into where the rest of the country is headed. “The Run-Up” is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we’ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow “The Run-Up” wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitche
22/10/202234 minutes 2 seconds
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The Rapid Downfall of Liz Truss

Prime Minister Liz Truss of Britain has resigned after only 44 days in office. Hers is the shortest premiership in the country’s history.What led to her downfall, and why has Britain entered a period of such profound political dysfunction?Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Prime Minister Liz Truss’s resignation, yet another episode of political instability, only added to Britons’ concerns and frustrations over galloping inflation and a looming economic crisis.Her fate was sealed three weeks ago when currency and bond traders reacted to her new fiscal program by torpedoing the pound and other British financial assets.<a href="https:
21/10/202230 minutes 23 seconds
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Why Republicans Are Winning Swing Voters

After a summer of news that favored Democrats and with just two weeks until the midterms, a major new poll from The Times has found that swing voters are suddenly turning to the Republicans.The Times’s Nate Cohn explains what is behind the trend and what it could mean for Election Day.Guest: Nate Cohn, the chief political analyst for The New York Times.Background reading: According to the Times/Siena College poll, American voters see democracy in peril, but saving it isn’t a priority.Despite Democrats’ focus on abortion rights, disapproval of President Biden seems to be hurting his party.For more information on today’s episode, visit <a href="http://nytimes.co
20/10/202224 minutes 44 seconds
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Race, Power and the Leaked Recording in Los Angeles

This episode contains strong language.A leaked audio recording of Latino lawmakers in Los Angeles making racist comments has created a political firestorm and brought demands for resignations.But not only has the uproar forced the authorities to reckon with what officials say behind closed doors, it has also raised a sharp issue: Why is a city with so many Latino constituents represented by so few of them?Guest: Shawn Hubler, a California correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The recording of the private conversation between three council members and a labor leader has already led to two resignations. Here’s what to know about the controversy.The disparaging remarks highlighted<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/14/us/latino-racism-oaxacan.ht
19/10/202228 minutes 12 seconds
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Did Hurricane Ian Bust Florida’s Housing Boom?

Since Hurricane Ian devastated southwestern Florida last month, residents have filed a record number of insurance claims for the damage caused by the storm.Today, Chris Flavelle, a climate reporter for The Times, discusses whether the insurance companies can survive. And if they can’t, what will the effect be on Florida’s housing market, the cornerstone of its economy?Guest: Christopher Flavelle, a climate reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The hurricane’s record-breaking cost will make it even harder for many to get insurance, experts say — threatening home sales, mortgages and construction.Aerial videos and photos show the destruction caused by Hurricane Ian on F
18/10/202231 minutes 25 seconds
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The Personal and Political Saga of Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker, the former football star who is running for the Senate, is, according to the Times political reporter Maya King, a “demigod in Georgia sports and in Georgia culture.”The midterm election in that state is crucial — it could determine whether Democrats keep control of the Senate. Mr. Walker’s candidacy, however, has been tainted by a slew of stories about his character, including claims that he paid for an abortion for a former girlfriend despite publicly opposing the procedure.Guest: Maya King, a politics reporter covering the South for The New York Times.Background reading: How Republicans cast aside concerns and learned to love Mr. Walker.Will any of the allegations against Mr. Walker<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/07/upshot/herschel-walker-midterm
17/10/202229 minutes 30 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘Daring to Speak Up About Race in a Divided School District’

In July 2020, Stephanie Long, the school superintendent in Leland, Mich., wrote a heartfelt letter to her students and their families after George Floyd’s murder by Minneapolis police officers. Haunted by the images she’d seen in the media, she wrote: “Why be in a position of leadership,” she asked herself, “and not lead?”“All people of color,” Ms. Long typed, “need us to stand with them to clearly state that we condemn acts of systematic and systemic racism and intolerance.” She envisioned profound pedagogical changes in her school; she imagined creating illuminating discussions within classrooms and searching, transformative conversations in the community beyond. She hit send. A degree of support came in reply. A letter of praise signed by 200 Leland alumni was published in a peninsula newspaper.But angry emails, phone calls and letters poured in from within the district and, because Long’s message made the local news and spread over the internet, from across the cou
16/10/202251 minutes 51 seconds
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'The Run-Up': The Stacey Abrams Playbook

When Georgia flipped blue in the 2020 election, it gave Democrats new hope for the future. Credit for that success goes to Stacey Abrams and the playbook she developed for the state. It cemented her role as a national celebrity, in politics and pop culture. But, unsurprisingly, that celebrity has also made her a target of Republicans, who say she’s a losing candidate. On today’s episode: the Stacey Abrams playbook, and why the Georgia governor’s race means more to Democrats than a single elected office.“The Run-Up” is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we’ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow “The Run-Up” wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, <a href="https://open.spotify.c
15/10/202237 minutes 31 seconds
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The Fear Facer: An Update

In 2019, Julia Longoria, then a Daily producer, traveled to Nashville to speak with Ella Maners and her mother, Katie Maners.Ella, 8 going on 9, was terrified of tornadoes and getting sick. So she did something that was even scarier than her fears: confront them at Fear Facers camp.We revisit her story and catch up with Ella, now 12 and in the fifth grade, who has since returned to the camp.Background reading: Three years ago, Ella spent a week at Fear Facers Summer Camp, a day camp in Florida that helps children learn to deal with obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
14/10/202233 minutes 18 seconds
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'The Decision of My Life': Part 3

This episode contains mention of suicide.A year ago, Lynsea Garrison, a senior producer on The Daily, started telling the story of N, a teenager in Afghanistan.N’s family tried to force her to marry a member of the Taliban, but she resisted. When she tried to escape to the U.S., however, her case was rejected, so she had to remain in Kabul, fearful and in hiding.Here’s what happened next.If you are having thoughts of suicide, and you live in the United States, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK). You can find a list of additional resources at SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources. Additional resources in other countries can be found here.Background reading: Listen to<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2
13/10/202238 minutes
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A Bridge, a Bomb and Putin’s Revenge

Just before the sun came up on Saturday on the Kerch Strait Bridge, a strategically and symbolically important link between Russia and the Crimean Peninsula, a bomb detonated, creating a giant fireball.But Ukrainian elation about the explosion quickly turned into concern about how Russia would respond. And in the days since, Moscow’s retaliation has been to pound Ukrainian cities with missiles in the most sweeping rocket assault since the start of the war.Guest: Michael Schwirtz, an investigative reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: President Vladimir V. Putin vowed that more strikes would follow if Russian targets were hit again.The hail of missiles also seemed i
12/10/202220 minutes 49 seconds
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The Rise of the Single-Family Home

To tackle its critical shortage of affordable housing, California has taken aim at a central tenet of the American dream: the single-family home.Telling the story of one such property, in San Diego, can teach us about the larger housing crisis and how we might solve it.Guest: Conor Dougherty, an economics reporter at The New York Times and author of “Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America.”Background reading: The transformation of 5120 Baxter Street in San Diego is a projection of California’s tighter, taller future.NIMBYs, referring to residents who fight nearby development — especially anything involving apartments — are often blamed for worsening the housing crisis.For more informat
11/10/202234 minutes 29 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Search for Intelligent Life Is About to Get a Lot More Interesting’

The search for intelligence beyond Earth has long entranced humans. According to Jon Gertner, a regular contributor to The New York Times Magazine, this search has been defined “by an assumption that extraterrestrials would have developed radio technologies akin to what humans have created.”However, Mr. Gertner writes, “rather than looking for direct calls to Earth, telescopes now sweep the sky, searching billions of frequencies simultaneously, for electronic signals whose origins can’t be explained by celestial phenomena.”What scientists are most excited about is the prospect of other planets’ civilizations being able to create the same “telltale chemical and electromagnetic signs,” or, as they are now called, “technosignatures.”This story was written by Jon Gertner and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times,<a href="https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=age_
09/10/202242 minutes 6 seconds
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'The Run-Up': The Blueprint

How the Republican grass roots got years ahead of a changing country, and whether the Democrats can catch up.“The Run-Up” is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we’ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow “The Run-Up” wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher and <a href="https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/d00566e5-d
08/10/202243 minutes 37 seconds
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What Are Tactical Nuclear Weapons, and What if Russia Uses Them?

If President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia follows through on his threats to use a nuclear weapon in Ukraine, he is likely to turn to a specific type.Tactical nuclear weapons have a fraction of the strength of the Hiroshima bomb and of the super bombs and city busters that people worried about during the Cold War.What exactly are these weapons, how did they develop and what would it mean if Mr. Putin resorted to them in the war in Ukraine?Guest: William J. Broad, a science reporter and senior writer for The New York Times. Background reading: American officials suspect that Mr. Putin is discovering that small nuclear weapons are hard to use, harder to control and a far better weapon of terror and intimidation than a weapon of war.Amid recent nuclear threats from Russi
07/10/202228 minutes 50 seconds
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Why Is It So Hard to Hit the Brakes on Inflation?

In the struggle to control inflation, the Federal Reserve has raised interest rates five times already this year.But those efforts can be blunted if companies keep raising prices regardless. And one industry has illustrated that difficulty particularly starkly: the car market.Guest: Jeanna Smialek, a federal reserve and economy reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Many companies have been able to raise prices beyond their own increasing costs over the past two years, swelling their profitability but also exacerbating inflation. That is especially true in the car market.Inflation stayed far above the Federal Reserve’s goal in August, as prices climbed more quickly than economists ex
06/10/202226 minutes 49 seconds
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Pakistan, Under Water

A few weeks into this year’s monsoon season in Pakistan, it became clear that the rains were unlike anything the country had experienced in a long time.The resulting once-in-a-generation flood has marooned entire villages and killed 1,500 people, leaving a trail of destruction, starvation and disease.Guest: Christina Goldbaum, an Afghanistan and Pakistan correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: The flooding has crippled Pakistan’s agricultural sector, threatening a food crisis and dealing another critical blow to a country already in the economic doldrums.Farm laborers are scrambling to salvage whatever they can from the battered remains of their cotton and rice harvests. It i
05/10/202235 minutes 39 seconds
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Another Momentous Term for the Supreme Court

The last Supreme Court term was a blockbuster. The justices made a number of landmark rulings, including in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which ended 50 years of the constitutional right to abortion in the United States.The new term could be just as testing, with a series of deeply divisive cases on the docket.Guest: Adam Liptak, a correspondent covering the United States Supreme Court for The New York Times.Background reading: The six-justice conservative supermajority seems poised to dominate the Supreme Court’s new term as it did the earlier one.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 
04/10/202229 minutes 36 seconds
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The Latino Voters Who Could Decide the Midterms

Latino voters have never seemed more electorally important than in the coming midterm elections: the first real referendum on the Biden era of government.Latinos make up 20 percent of registered voters in two crucial Senate races — Arizona and Nevada — and as much or more in over a dozen competitive House races.In the past 10 years, the conventional wisdom about Latino voters has been uprooted. We explore a poll, conducted by The Times, to better understand how they view the parties vying for their vote.Guest: Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Two years after former President Donald Trump made surprising gains with Hispanic voters, Republican dreams of a major realignment have failed to materialize, according to a New Y
03/10/202235 minutes 16 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Safe Space That Became a Viral Nightmare’

In September 2021, a group of female minority students at Arizona State University confronted two white male students who were studying in the library’s multicultural center.The women were upset with what they saw as blatant antagonism: One of the men sported a “Didn’t Vote for Biden” shirt, the other had a “Police Lives Matter” laptop sticker. The women felt they had chosen the multicultural center in order to rile them. A heated row between both parties erupted, a video of which quickly went viral, threatening to upend the lives of all involved.For The New York Times, Sarah Viren, a journalist and essayist, explored the incident in the context of “the widening gyre of the culture wars.” The row at Arizona State was, she explained, “a symbolic fight,” one that raised questions of “wokeism” and “free speech,” the perils of viral videos, and the purpose of “safe spaces.”“It was a brief drama that was also a metaphor,” Ms. Viren wrote. “But watching and rewatching
02/10/20221 hour 7 minutes 22 seconds
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'The Run-Up': The Guardrails

Why we can’t understand this moment in politics without first understanding the transformation of American evangelicalism.“The Run-Up” is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we’ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow “The Run-Up” wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher and <a href="https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/d00566e5-d738-4166-9794-9102adb15da8/the-run-up?ref=dm_sh_fwY
01/10/202246 minutes 57 seconds
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Florida After Hurricane Ian

As the sun came up over Florida yesterday, a fuller picture began to emerge of the destruction that Hurricane Ian had inflicted on the state and its residents.The Category 4 storm washed away roads, bridges, cars, boats and homes. The damage is so extensive that, according to the state’s governor, Ron DeSantis, it may take years to rebuild.Guests: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times; Richard Fausset, a Times correspondent based in Atlanta; Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, a national news reporter for The Times; and Hilary Swift, a photojournalist.Background reading: Data from NASA reveals how warm ocean
30/09/202231 minutes 38 seconds
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One Man Flees Putin’s Draft

Kirill, 24, works at a nonprofit for homeless people in the Moscow region. He does not support the policies of President Vladimir V. Putin and is vehemently against the invasion of Ukraine.After suffering setbacks in the war, Mr. Putin announced a military draft a week ago. Kirill was among those called up. As he hides out to avoid being served his papers, Kirill spoke to Sabrina Tavernise about how his life has changed.Guest: Kirill, a 24-year-old from Moscow who is attempting to avoid the draft and who asked that only his first name be used to avoid reprisals.Background reading: In a rare admission of official mistakes, the Kremlin has acknowledged that the military draft has been rife with problems.Resistance to the draft has grown as villagers, activ
29/09/202238 minutes 13 seconds
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An Iranian Uprising Led By Women

Mahsa Amini, 22, traveled from her hometown in the province of Kurdistan to the Iranian capital, Tehran, this month. Emerging from the subway, she was arrested for failing to cover her hair modestly enough. Three days later, she was dead.The anger over Ms. Amini’s death has prompted days of rage, exhilaration and street battles across Iran, with women stripping off their head scarves — and even burning them — in the most significant outpouring of dissent against the ruling system in more than a decade.Guest: Farnaz Fassihi, a reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: The protests have been striking for the way they have cut across ethnic and social class divides, but there is one group that has risen up with particular fury.Beyond the anger over Ms. Amini’s death lies<a href="https://www
28/09/202229 minutes 24 seconds
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The Great Pandemic Theft

During the pandemic, an enormous amount of money — about $5 trillion in total — was spent to help support the newly unemployed and to prop up the U.S. economy while it was forced into suspension.But the funds came with few strings and minimal oversight. The result: one of the largest frauds in American history, with billions of dollars stolen by thousands of people.Guest: David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, focused on nonprofits.Background reading: Investigators say there was so much fraud in federal Covid-relief programs that — even after two years of work and hundreds of prosecutions — they’re still just getting started.A federal watchdog almost tripled its estimate of the amount of unemployment benefits paid out t
27/09/202231 minutes 38 seconds
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Why Fewer American Children Are Living in Poverty

The high poverty rate among children was long seen as an enduring fact of American life. But a recent analysis has shown that the number of young people growing up poor has fallen dramatically in the past few decades.The reasons for the improvement are complicated, but they have their roots in a network of programs and support shaped by years of political conflict and compromise.Guest: Jason DeParle, a senior writer at The New York Times and a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine. Background reading: Child poverty in the United States has fallen 59 percent since 1993, a new analysis showed.Few states have experienced larger declines in child poverty than West Virginia. One fami
26/09/202227 minutes 15 seconds
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The Sunday Read: ‘The Quest by Circadian Medicine to Make the Most of Our Body Clocks’

The concept of having a “body clock” is a familiar one, but less widespread is the awareness that our body contains several biological clocks. Understanding their whims and functions may help us optimize our lives and lead to better overall health, according to scientists.Every physiological system is represented by a clock, from the liver to the lungs, and each one is synced “to the central clock in the brain like an orchestra section following its conductor,” writes Kim Tingley, a New York Times journalist who explored the effect this knowledge has on how conditions are treated, and spoke to scientists about how misalignment or deregulation of these clocks can have a profound effect on our health.Exploring the components that dictate our lives, and how they work together like the “gears in a mechanical watch,” Ms. Tingley builds a case for the importance of paying attention to all our circadian rhythms — and not just when it comes to monitoring our sleep.<s
25/09/202254 minutes 26 seconds
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'The Run-Up': The Republic

In kicking off the midterms, Joe Biden talked about American democracy as a shared value, enshrined in the country’s founding — a value that both Democrats and Republicans should join together in defending. But there is another possible view of this moment. One that is shared by two very different groups: the voters who propelled Biden to the presidency … and the conservative activists who are rejecting democracy altogether.“The Run-Up” is a new politics podcast from The New York Times. Leading up to the 2022 midterms, we’ll be sharing the latest episode here every Saturday. If you want to hear episodes when they first drop on Thursdays, follow “The Run-Up” wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, Spotify
24/09/202246 minutes 42 seconds
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The Pastors Being Driven Out by Trumpism

Evangelicals make up about a quarter of the population in the United States and are part of the nation’s largest religious group. But lately the movement is in crisis.The biggest issue is church attendance. Many churches closed at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic and struggled to reopen while congregations thinned.But a smaller audience isn’t the only problem: Pastors are quitting, or at least considering doing so. Guest: Ruth Graham is a national correspondent covering religion, faith and values for The New York Times.Background reading: Across the country, theologically conservative white evangelical churches that were once comfortably united are at odds over many of the same issues dividing the Republican Party and other institutions.For more information on today’s ep
23/09/202241 minutes 38 seconds
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Putin’s Escalation of the War in Ukraine

In a speech on Wednesday, President Vladimir V. Putin said that he would require hundreds of thousands more Russians to fight in Ukraine — and alarmed the West by once again raising the specter of nuclear force.The mobilization signals that Mr. Putin is turning the war from one of aggression to one of defense, offering clues about what the next phase of the fighting will involve.Guest: Anton Troianovski, the Moscow bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Accelerating his war effort, Mr. Putin accused the West of trying to “weaken, divide and ultimately destroy” Russia.American and other officials vowed to continue sending military, economic and humanitarian aid to Ukraine.
22/09/202221 minutes 15 seconds
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How Border Politics Landed in Martha’s Vineyard

Last week, nearly 50 Venezuelan migrants showed up, without warning, on the wealthy island of Martha’s Vineyard.Their arrival was the culmination of a monthslong strategy by two of the United States’ most conservative governors to lay the issue of undocumented immigration at Democrats’ doorstep.How has this strategy played out and what has it meant for the migrants caught in the middle?Guest: Miriam Jordan, a national correspondent covering immigration for The New York Times.Background reading: Scores of migrants have been shipped north by southern Republican governors. Here’s what you need to know.Martha’s Vineyard, the moneyed summer resort, <a href=