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The Current

English, Current Affairs, 1 season, 1231 episodes, 2 days, 8 hours, 19 minutes
About
CBC Radio's The Current is a meeting place of perspectives with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.
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Your car might be tracking your sexual activity: report

Your car is gathering an alarming amount of data about you, including your genetic information and sexual activity, according to a new report from privacy experts. What are carmakers doing with that data?
1/1/118 minutes, 1 second
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Devastating earthquake hits remote Moroccan villages

A powerful earthquake has killed more than 2,400 people in Morocco, with rescuers racing against time to reach survivors in remote villages. Matt Galloway talks to one woman who says “my teeth were shaking in my head” when the quake hit her home in Marrakesh.
1/1/120 minutes, 7 seconds
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Why Michael Crummey is interested in places on the edge

Michael Crummey’s new book The Adversary explores his familiar themes around life at the ocean's edge. Matt Galloway sat down with the author at the Woody Point Writers Festival in Newfoundland to discuss isolation, vulgarity and the responsibility that comes with telling the stories of home.
1/1/132 minutes, 48 seconds
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Uncovering the true meaning of strength

Alyssa Ages explores strongman and strongwoman culture in her new book, Secrets of Giants: A Journey to Uncover the True Meaning of Strength.
1/1/124 minutes, 19 seconds
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The summer camp for trans and queer kids

Jen Markowitz's new documentary Summer Qamp follows a group of trans and queer kids at a summer camp in Alberta that's just for them — a safer space where they can have fun and make friends. Markowitz and two campers discuss the importance of a place where you can be yourself, away from political debate about your own identity.
1/1/123 minutes, 46 seconds
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Dam breaches wash away entire Libyan neighbourhoods

Thousands of people are dead and missing in Libya after two dam breaches triggered floods that washed away entire neighbourhoods. Galloway hears how the impact of those floods are part of a decades-long neglect on the part of the country's leaders.
1/1/116 minutes, 2 seconds
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What Filipino nurses leave behind to work in Canada

Thousands of Filipino nurses come to Canada every year, easing this country’s nursing shortage while also earning money to send back home. But that recruitment pipeline robs the Philippines of qualified nurses and splits Filipino families apart. The CBC’s Stephanie Dubois travelled to the Philippines to explore the impact there.
1/1/117 minutes, 48 seconds
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How Colson Whitehead wrote Crook Manifesto

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Colson Whitehead tells Matt Galloway about his new novel, Crook Manifesto. It’s a story about crime and redemption in 1970s Harlem, packed with characters unable to stay out of trouble.
1/1/122 minutes, 59 seconds
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Putin and Kim Jong Un meet face-to-face

The Washington Post’s Michelle Lee breaks down a recent face-to-face meeting between Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong Un.
1/1/19 minutes, 8 seconds
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E. coli outbreak affecting 264 Calgary children

In Calgary, 264 children have confirmed cases of E. coli — potentially the worst outbreak of E. coli in Canada. The source is still not confirmed, but it may be connected to a commercial kitchen with numerous health infractions that was hired by Calgary daycares. Matt Galloway speaks with a mother of a four-year-old who was hospitalized.
1/1/118 minutes, 43 seconds
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Teaching kids the important lessons, Mr. Dressup style

A new documentary explores the life and career of Ernie Coombs, better known to generations of Canadians as Mr. Dressup. Matt Galloway talks to director Rob McCallum; and Judith Lawrence, the creator, voice and puppeteer behind the beloved Casey and Finnegan.
1/1/123 minutes
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We’re trying something new…

Starting on Fridays this September, you’ll notice something different about our podcast feed. We’re bringing you one drop you can’t miss. Our best stuff that day. Chosen by us for you. All in about 30 minutes.
1/1/11 minute, 56 seconds
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COVID-19’s still here. Now the challenge is talking about it

Health officials across the country are grappling with how to talk to the public about things like masks and COVID-19 booster vaccines, even as case numbers rise heading into the fall and winter. After three-and-a-half pandemic years, are people willing to listen?
1/1/119 minutes, 2 seconds
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Nfld. peninsula divided over plan for 164 wind turbines

A proposed wind-hydrogen megaproject has divided people on the Port au Port Peninsula in western Newfoundland. Matt Galloway went there to hear from those concerned about the impact of building 164 enormous turbines — and those who think their communities can’t survive without this kind of economic opportunity.
1/1/124 minutes, 28 seconds
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Why we need to take a sledgehammer to perfectionism

Steve Jobs and Serena Williams are titans in spite of their perfectionism, not because of it, says Thomas Curran. The author of The Perfection Trap says socially prescribed perfectionism is an epidemic, and our fantasies about it are hurting rather than helping us. “It’s like a bottomless pit, or chasing the horizon.” Instead, the self-described recovering perfectionist says it's time we all embrace being good enough.
1/1/123 minutes, 47 seconds
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How to eat like your ancestors

Dismayed by the state of today’s food systems, Montreal author Taras Grescoe travelled the world to dig into the agricultural practices of the past. He tells us what he found — and about his new book, The Lost Supper: Searching for the Future of Food in the Flavours of the Past.
1/1/123 minutes, 44 seconds
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Iran, one year after Mahsa Amini’s death

The death of Mahsa Amini in police custody sparked waves of protests in Iran. One year on, activist Masih Alinejad looks at the push for change and what, if anything, is different now.
1/1/112 minutes, 30 seconds
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Strike deadline looming for autoworkers

A strike deadline is looming for Canadian autoworkers, whose U.S. counterparts are already on the picket line. We look at what a strike would mean for a sector still recovering from the pandemic and facing upheaval in the transition to electric vehicles.
1/1/111 minutes, 39 seconds
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Housing, cost of living in focus as parliament returns

The Conservatives are surging in the polls and there's discontent in the Liberal ranks. Our national affairs panel breaks down what to expect as parliament returns for the fall session.
1/1/119 minutes, 25 seconds
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This Newfoundland landscape could hold clues to life on Mars

The Tablelands is a patch of barren landscape — largely devoid of life — in Newfoundland’s Gros Morne National Park. But scientists have discovered a type of bacteria there that could teach us about the possibility of life in another inhospitable environment: Mars.
1/1/110 minutes, 14 seconds
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Jagmeet Singh says sense of safety ‘shocked’ by accusation India played role in Canadian Sikh leader’s death

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has accused India’s government of involvement in the killing of Canadian Sikh community leader Hardeep Singh Nijjar, who was shot in B.C. in June. Matt Galloway talks to NDP leader Jagmeet Singh about the reaction in his community; and former CSIS director Richard Fadden about what happens next.
1/1/119 minutes, 28 seconds
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A humanitarian clown’s work in Ukraine

Guillaume Vermette has entertained traumatized children across the globe as Yahoo the humanitarian clown. But his recent trip to Ukraine was his first work in an active war zone.
1/1/123 minutes, 57 seconds
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Small Italian island struggles as 8,000 migrants arrive in one week

Thousands of migrants crossed the Mediterranean to reach the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa last week, doubling the island’s population. Megan Williams went there to find out how the locals — and the newcomers — are coping.
1/1/111 minutes, 8 seconds
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Finding healing on a surfboard, in wake of Hawaii wildfires

Surfboards are an important part of life in Hawaii — a way for people to connect to the waves and their culture. After many boards burned up in last month’s wildfires, surfboard shaper Jud Lau has been making and donating replacements to help survivors find healing.
1/1/123 minutes, 26 seconds
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What teen mental health support can learn from cancer care

Two new studies show a significant pandemic increase in ER visits and hospitalizations for teenagers due to self-harm or suicidal ideation. Experts say better mental health supports are needed — and a model for cancer care could be the path to providing them.
1/1/120 minutes, 22 seconds
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Protests and counter-protests around teaching LGBTQ rights in schools

Thousands across Canada rallied against how schools teach about sexuality and gender identity on Wednesday. They were met by thousands of counter-protesters, who said they were defending LGBTQ students and families, and the schools that support them. Matt Galloway speaks with people on both sides of the protest.
1/1/119 minutes, 50 seconds
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How not to be a ‘classhole’

Jonathan Menjivar’s podcast Classy brings tricky conversations about class out into the open. He talks to Matt Galloway about feeling uncomfortable in fancy restaurants, dealing with “classholes,” and the hidden barriers that can hold people back.
1/1/123 minutes, 41 seconds
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Reconnecting with lost loved ones — with the power of AI

Some grieving Canadians are using artificial intelligence to create digital versions of the dead, in the hopes of re-connecting with people they’ve loved and lost. What will technology like this mean for how we grieve?
1/1/124 minutes, 26 seconds
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Questions swirl after India accused of targeted killing

Many questions remain after the bombshell accusation that India had a role in the killing of a Canadian. Matt Galloway asks Minister Harjit Sajjan whether the evidence behind the allegation will be made public, and discusses the fallout for Indo-Canadian relations.
1/1/123 minutes, 40 seconds
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It’s time to talk about Khalistan

The Khalistan separatist movement is often the elephant in the room for Canadian Sikhs, says Satwinder Bains, an expert on the South Asian diaspora. "Maybe this is the point at which we say, 'The hell with it,' and have these conversations." The diplomatic crisis between Canada and India over the killing of a Khalistan advocate has put the push for a Sikh homeland back in the headlines. Bains thinks it’s time for the community to face the divisive issue, whether they support, oppose or are ambivalent towards Khalistan. Matt Galloway also speaks with Salimah Shivji, CBC's South Asia correspondent, to share the view from India — where some headlines are calling the Canadian prime minister a "guardian of gangsters."
1/1/119 minutes, 22 seconds
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Why rational people believe irrational things

Behavioural scientist Dan Ariely has spent years trying to understand why people believe in wild conspiracies. He shares his thoughts in his new book, Misbelief: What Makes Rational People Believe Irrational Things.
1/1/124 minutes, 9 seconds
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Rebuilding Enterprise, N.W.T., following the wildfires

Mike St. Amour, the mayor of Enterprise, N.W.T., on rebuilding the hamlet near Hay River following the destructive August wildfires.
1/1/17 minutes, 56 seconds
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Zelenskyy visits Canada as Ukraine war drags on

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy addressed the Canadian parliament last week. But after he spoke, House Speaker Anthony Rota introduced World War Two veteran Yaroslav Hunka — to a standing ovation. It has since emerged that Hunka fought in a Nazi unit. Matt Galloway speaks with John Paul Tasker, a senior reporter with CBC's parliamentary bureau, about how this happened, and gets an update on the war in Ukraine.
1/1/119 minutes, 23 seconds
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National affairs panel on Manitoba election

Manitoba’s provincial election is just over a week away. Our national affairs panel discusses healthcare, homelessness and the power of Indigenous voters in that province.
1/1/118 minutes, 44 seconds
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Could an extra year of residency steer doctors away from family medicine?

The shortest family medicine residency program in Canada is two years, but there’s now a plan to increase those to a minimum of three years. However, some practitioners are concerned the extra year will steer new doctors away from family medicine. Guest host Nora Young discusses the impact with Dr. Mike Green, head of family medicine at Queens University and the incoming president of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, and Dr. Sarah Lespérance, a family doctor and the president of Society of Rural Physicians of Canada.
1/1/117 minutes, 58 seconds
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Storm Fiona’s lingering impact in Newfoundland

It’s been a year since post-tropical storm Fiona ripped entire homes into the sea in Channel-Port aux Basques, N.L. Earlier this summer, Matt Galloway travelled there to meet residents still picking up the pieces and grappling with whether they can ever feel safe again, living so close to the ocean.
1/1/121 minutes, 46 seconds
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At What Cost? A Public Forum on the Housing Crisis and Your Community

Weston used to be an affordable neighbourhood in Toronto, but soaring housing costs are putting home ownership out of reach and pushing more and more people into poverty. It’s a dynamic that’s playing out across the country. At a public forum in Weston, Matt Galloway talks to locals about the impact on their community, and the solutions that could be applied all across Canada.
1/1/11 hour, 14 minutes, 38 seconds
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The Current Introduces: Someone Knows Something | Season 8

Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In the highly-anticipated 8th season of Someone Knows Something, award-winning investigator David Ridgen delves into a cold case that has haunted Whitehorse for more than 15 years. Angel Carlick was a vibrant youth worker, nicknamed ‘Happy-Go-Lucky’ by her loved ones. She had plans after graduation to become legal guardian of her brother and work to support struggling youth at her local resource centre. But just days before she was set to graduate in 2007, at age 18, Angel disappeared. Months later, her remains were found in a remote area in the Canadian north. As David works alongside Angel's family, friends, and community, he uncovers details surrounding her death and strives to bring her justice, while honouring the legacy of her late mother, Wendy. More episodes are available at: https://link.chtbl.com/QwOW-UNC
1/1/148 minutes, 1 second
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How to plant to prevent future forests from burning

Canada has lost more trees to wildfires this year than in any other year on record. It’s led some tree planters to question if their methods of the past have contributed to the fires of today. Guest host Nora Young speaks with two tree planters, and John Innes, the forest renewal B.C. chair in forest management.
1/1/123 minutes, 14 seconds
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Exodus from Nagorno-Karabakh

The government of Azerbaijan has attacked Nagorno-Karabakh, a self-declared Armenian state that has existed within Azerbaijan’s border for decades. At least 65,000 ethnic Armenians have now fled their homes to escape the conflict, sparking a humanitarian crisis.
1/1/119 minutes, 11 seconds
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Could lawsuit lead to breakup of Amazon?

Amazon is being sued by 17 U.S. states and the Federal Trade Commission for allegedly monopolizing online sales, keeping prices artificially high and squeezing out competitors. What might the case mean for consumers and big tech monopolies?
1/1/17 minutes, 41 seconds
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They were adopted as orphans. It was a lie

Almost 3,000 South Korean children were adopted by Canadian families after the Korean War, with paperwork stating they were orphans. But many are learning their parents are still alive and searching for them. Priscilla Ki Sun Hwang brings us her documentary, The Orphan Papers.
1/1/119 minutes, 45 seconds
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Why Elon Musk isn’t a ‘chill, normal dude’

Walter Isaacson’s new biography of Elon Musk paints a picture of a risk-taker who is changing our world, but can be critically short on empathy. Isaacson tells Matt Galloway what he learned about the mercurial billionaire — and why Musk might be a hero, but not one you should emulate. 
1/1/124 minutes, 12 seconds
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What’s in the way for Indigenous doctors?

“Can an Indigenous girl from a small town become a doctor one day?” Kallie Ritchie is among a new generation of medical students hoping to change the face of healthcare. She chose a school that dropped the MCAT, one of a few Canadian universities changing how they assess and admit Indigenous applicants. But that hasn’t come without pushback. Indigenous physicians Dr. Brent Young and Dr. Alika Lafontaine weigh in on the shift and what needs to be done to diversify the next generation of doctors.Plus, we take you to a peaceful patch of prairie where a Blackfoot nation is reclaiming native grasslands.
1/1/130 minutes, 42 seconds
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Listeners share stories from the housing crisis

Last week’s special programming on soaring housing costs touched a nerve with listeners. We call up some of the Canadians who wrote to us with something to say.
1/1/113 minutes, 36 seconds
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Sam Bankman-Fried goes on trial

Sam Bankman-Fried goes on trial Tuesday, accused of fraud and scamming people out of billions of dollars with his cryptocurrency exchange FTX. We talk to technology reporter David Yaffe-Bellany, who’s waiting in line outside the courthouse.
1/1/19 minutes, 15 seconds
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Chris Snow, and the fight to make ALS a treatable disease

Calgary Flames assistant general manager Chris Snow died last week, after a four-year battle with the degenerative illness ALS. Snow spent his final years fighting to raise awareness about ALS, which he described as “not an incurable disease,” but an underfunded one.
1/1/119 minutes, 33 seconds
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This teacher spends $1,500 of her own money on classroom supplies

Grade 3 teacher Alexandra Sorin spends a lot of her own money buying basics like tissues for her classroom each year. She tells us why she’s resorted to Amazon wishlists to help cover those costs; and education expert Annie Kidder explains why we need to join the dots on what underfunded schools mean for Canada’s future.
1/1/114 minutes, 25 seconds
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Wab Kinew says his win shows Manitobans want unity

Fresh from his election win in Manitoba, NDP Leader Wab Kinew talks to Matt Galloway about becoming the first First Nations provincial leader in Canada; and delivering on campaign promises around health care, affordability and searching a landfill for two missing women.
1/1/120 minutes, 53 seconds
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Destroyed tree at Hadrian’s Wall is a sign of the ‘war on nature’: poet

A beloved tree near Hadrian’s Wall in northern England was cut down in the dead of night last week. Poet Robert Macfarlane says its destruction was a “gut punch,” and one that says a lot about our broken relationship with nature.
1/1/110 minutes, 29 seconds
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Canada’s defence budget facing cuts of $1 billion

The Liberal federal government is looking to cut almost $1 billion from Canada’s defence budget over the next three years. Matt Galloway asks Defence Minister Bill Blair what kind of impact that will have, and what message it sends to both new recruits and the wider world.
1/1/120 minutes, 3 seconds
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Costco is selling gold bars. Really

Costco Canada is selling 24-carat gold bars for $2,679.99 each — and they’re flying off the shelves. But is it a good investment?
1/1/115 minutes, 38 seconds
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Antimatter falls, just like matter. Why is that important?

A team of researchers have proven that antimatter responds to gravity the same way as matter. Senior scientist Makoto Fujiwara tells us more.
1/1/18 minutes, 53 seconds
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Why former NHL brawler Chris Nilan is offering his brain for study

Former NHL enforcer Chris “Knuckles” Nilan was a brawler on the ice long before links were drawn between hits to the head and traumatic brain injuries. Now Nilan is letting researchers study his brain to help protect the next generation of players.
1/1/124 minutes, 36 seconds
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Steep rise in adults taking ADHD drugs

New data suggests a dramatic increase in adults taking ADHD medication. While many Canadians say these drugs have improved their daily lives, some physicians are concerned about overdiagnosis and health risks, if people are taking drugs they don’t need.
1/1/119 minutes, 53 seconds
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Using AI to decode the language of whales

Ottawa scientist Shane Gero is using artificial intelligence to decode the patterns of clicks and pauses that sperm whales use to communicate. He tells us why decoding the languages of animals could lead to better protections for the natural world.
1/1/124 minutes, 25 seconds
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Catholic leaders debate women priests, LGBT inclusion

Catholic leaders have gathered in Rome to debate issues around women’s ordination and greater inclusion for LGBT believers. But while women and lay people have been given a vote for the first time, conservative cardinals have warned of a “hostile takeover.” We talk to people working for change in the church, even if that change still feels very far off.
1/1/124 minutes, 14 seconds
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Kevin McCarthy ousted as U.S. House speaker

Kevin McCarthy has become the first U.S. House speaker in history to be ousted. Congressional reporter Max Cohen talks us through what this means for U.S. politics, amid looming threats of a government shutdown.
1/1/19 minutes, 13 seconds
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Canada’s place on world stage in ‘very sad state’

Canada’s status on the world stage is in a “very sad state” after years of diplomatic neglect under prime ministers Harper and Trudeau, says Guy Saint-Jacques, former ambassador to China. Amid a diplomatic row with India, Matt Galloway discusses Canada’s place in the world with Saint-Jacques and fellow former diplomats David McKinnon and Senator Peter Boehm.
1/1/120 minutes, 8 seconds
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Want to be an influencer? There’s a degree for that

A university in Ireland will soon offer a degree in how to be an influencer. We hear what the course involves — and whether graduates can expect to make big money online.
1/1/116 minutes, 4 seconds
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Why Chris Hadfield’s life is ‘bizarre’ enough to fuel fiction

Before he was an astronaut, a young Chris Hadfield was a Cold War test pilot intercepting Soviet bombers. If that sounds like the beginning of a novel, you’re not far off. In conversation with Matt Galloway, the astronaut-turned-bestselling-author talks about his latest book The Defector — and how he builds a story from his real life. Plus, what he thinks about billionaires in space (see Elon Musk), and a friendly game of Name that Space Film.
1/1/123 minutes, 47 seconds
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War returns between Israel and Hamas 'very suddenly, but very totally'

Days after Hamas launched an unprecedented attack on Israel, Israel has promised a “complete siege” of Hamas-controlled Gaza. Matt Galloway talks to Noga Tarnopolsky, an independent journalist in Jerusalem; and global affairs experts Janice Stein and Bruce Hoffman about what’s happening on the ground and why de-escalation won’t come any time soon.
1/1/120 minutes, 5 seconds
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Bedbugs infest Paris

Bedbugs are running rampant in the city of Paris, with the creepy crawlers spotted on trains and in schools and hospitals. How big of a problem are they in Canada, and how can you guard against them?
1/1/18 minutes, 34 seconds
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Could AI put authors out of business?

Hundreds of writers have learned that their books have been used to train artificial intelligence to spit out imitations. Bestselling authors Sean Michaels and Linwood Barclay discuss what AI might mean for human creativity and artist compensation.
1/1/124 minutes, 12 seconds
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Is it time to adopt a 32-hour work week?

The push for a four-day workweek has been gaining momentum in recent years, primarily in office settings where salaried work is more common. But striking autoworkers in the U.S. are demanding 40 hours pay for a 32-hour week — could that model be adopted more widely?
1/1/118 minutes, 20 seconds
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Perfection? This author says good enough is actually great

Many people strive for perfection, but Thomas Curran argues that we need to rethink our definition of success and achievement. In a conversation from September, he makes the case that perfectionism is overrated.
1/1/124 minutes, 22 seconds
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Families fearful amid Israel-Hamas war

It has been four days since Hamas militants stormed into Israel, prompting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to announce his country was at war. Matt Galloway talks to a man whose family members in Israel are missing; and a man in Gaza City, sheltering from air strikes with his own extended family.
1/1/119 minutes, 47 seconds
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Marathon runners are smashing records. How fast could they get?

Marathon runners are breaking records around the world, defying expectations and challenging assumptions about speed and endurance. What’s helping these athletes dash to glory, and just how fast could humans get?
1/1/122 minutes, 10 seconds
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Now not the time to question ‘blunder’ that missed Hamas attack: incoming ambassador to Canada

Israel’s ambassador-designate to Canada Iddo Moed says now is not the time to ask why the country’s intelligence services did not see Hamas’s surprise attack coming, but that “blunder” will be “addressed very thoroughly” in due course. Matt Galloway asks Iddo about growing public anger in Israel, and whether his government’s retaliation will subject civilians in Gaza to collective punishment as the conflict drags on.
1/1/120 minutes, 15 seconds
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Tackling denialism around unmarked graves at residential schools

The work of reckoning with residential schools is being hampered by limited access to records, a lack of support for families and outright denialism, says Kimberley Murray, the independent special interlocutor for unmarked graves at the institutions. She tells Matt Galloway about the obstacles she’s encountered helping families track down missing children, and what she needs from all levels of government.
1/1/121 minutes, 6 seconds
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Where can we find hope? 'Nowhere,' says Gaza resident

The UN agency on the ground in Gaza is warning of a “humanitarian catastrophe” if safe corridors aren’t opened, amid Israeli airstrikes and a blockade of fuel, water and electricity. Matt Galloway talks to Isam Hammad, an engineer and regional manager of a medical equipment company, who’s sheltering with his family in Gaza City.
1/1/119 minutes, 32 seconds
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Éric Ripert puts ketchup on fish?

It’s a bit of a joke, but there are circumstances in which the renowned French chef would allow ketchup on fish. Éric Ripert joins Matt Galloway to share the stories behind his new cookbook Seafood Simple, which guides you from the fish counter to the frying pan — including his humble origin story. (When Ripert was starting out, becoming a chef was for “anti-social” kids with bad grades.) Plus, he gives us a chef’s reality check on the hit TV show The Bear. (Accurate? “Not.”)
1/1/126 minutes, 34 seconds
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How post-war Canada shaped hockey legend Ken Dryden

Ken Dryden is best known for his hockey career, but his new memoir The Class tells the story of living in post-war Canada — through the lens of his high school graduating class.
1/1/123 minutes, 19 seconds
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Evacuating Canadians out of Gaza and Israel

Canada’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Mélanie Joly says the evacuation of Canadians out of Israel will begin in a few days. But for Canadians trapped inside Gaza, there may be no way out. What’s being done to evacuate Canadians stuck in the conflict?
1/1/124 minutes, 14 seconds
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B.C. cracks down on short-term rentals

B.C. is tightening rules on short-term rentals like Airbnb, in a bid to make more places available for long-term housing. Will the threat of hefty fines make it easier to find somewhere to live?
1/1/110 minutes, 31 seconds
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Anglophone students still welcome in Quebec: minister

The Quebec government plans to almost double tuition fees for university students who come from outside the province — a move that Liberal Party of Quebec member Antoine Dionne Charest says is based on “political rhetoric” and could dissuade students from coming. But Quebec's Minister of Higher Education Pascale Déry says anglophone students are still welcome and her province’s universities are still competitive even with higher fees.
1/1/120 minutes, 12 seconds
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New Democrats meet in person for first time in five years

This weekend, New Democrats gathered in person for the first time in five years to hash out their policy agenda. Althia Raj, a national columnist at the Toronto Star, was there — she tells Galloway what she heard.
1/1/18 minutes, 29 seconds
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Jane Goodall never loses hope because without it 'we're doomed'

Iconic primatologist and conservationist, Jane Goodall, was in Toronto for a talk at Meridian Hall on Oct. 12. Matt Galloway visited her at her hotel that morning to learn about her groundbreaking work and insights into the urgent issues of conservation and climate change.
1/1/124 minutes, 8 seconds
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Margaret Evans in the Middle East

The CBC's Margaret Evans joins us from Jerusalem to discuss the latest in Israel’s war with Hamas, efforts to get humanitarian aid to civilians in Gaza, and what to expect when U.S. President Joe Biden visits the region.
1/1/114 minutes, 42 seconds
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Rachel Maddow on the history of fascism in the U.S.

In her new book Prequel: An American Fight Against Fascism, Rachel Maddow looks at attempts to bring Nazi-inspired fascism to the U.S. in the 1930s. She tells Matt Galloway about listening to the echoes of history and what happens when stories from the past get buried.
1/1/123 minutes, 55 seconds
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Surgeon in Gaza says it’s ‘impossible’ to evacuate patients

Ten days into the Hamas-Israel war, more than 2,750 people have been killed in Gaza, and at least 1,300 people in Israel. With a ground invasion looming, Israel is demanding all 1.1 million Palestinians in north Gaza leave. Matt Galloway speaks with a British-Palestinian surgeon who travelled to Gaza; an Israeli in Toronto who travelled to Israel to be with his injured brother; and Hussein Ibish, a senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington, D.C.
1/1/120 minutes, 6 seconds
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Thinking about quality of sleep, not just quantity

There is a growing body of research to show that REM sleep — short for Rapid Eye Movement — is critical to our daytime functioning. But are Canadians getting enough of it?
1/1/115 minutes, 5 seconds
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Biden arrives in Middle East amid escalating crisis

U.S. President Joe Biden arrived in Israel amid a rapidly escalating crisis, and just hours after hundreds were killed in a blast at a hospital in Gaza. Matt Galloway talks to Bushra Khalidi, the policy lead for Oxfam in the West Bank, who is in Ramallah; Noga Tarnopolsky, an independent journalist based in Jerusalem; and United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk.
1/1/119 minutes, 55 seconds
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‘Queen of Canada’ cult threatens executions in Sask. village

Far-right QAnon conspiracy theorist Romana Didulo and her followers have set up camp in the small village of Richmound, Sask. They’re threatening to publicly execute elected officials and community members who want them to leave. The CBC’s Sam Samson went there to meet residents worried about the woman who calls herself “The Queen of Canada.”
1/1/119 minutes, 43 seconds
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A clue in the fight against long COVID

University of Pennsylvania researchers say serotonin levels in long COVID patients may offer a vital clue to understanding the debilitating condition — and perhaps start the process of developing an effective treatment.
1/1/111 minutes, 11 seconds
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50 years of the ‘backpacker’s bible’

Lonely Planet guidebooks have been the so-called “backpacker's bible” for 50 years, ever since Tony Wheeler and his wife Maureen self-published a guide based on their own adventure driving across Europe and Asia. Tony tells Matt Galloway about the joys of travelling off the beaten path, and how the name for the iconic books actually comes from a misheard lyric.
1/1/124 minutes, 26 seconds
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Waubgeshig Rice on telling truth through fiction

Waubgeshig Rice’s new novel Moon of the Turning Leaves is a sequel to his 2018 bestseller, about an Anishinaabe community reconnecting with the land and traditional knowledge after the collapse of wider society He tells Galloway about telling truth in fiction, and why it shouldn’t take a cataclysm to liberate Indigenous people from oppression.
1/1/124 minutes, 18 seconds
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Israeli and Palestinian child psychologists tackling trauma of war

Two child psychologists — one Israeli, one a Palestinian-Israeli citizen — are working together to help children affected by war, and train the next generation of Palestinian, Arab-Israeli and Jewish-Israeli mental health professionals. Dr. Esti Galili-Weisstub and Dr. Shafiq Masalha tell Matt Galloway about their efforts to build trust between their communities.
1/1/118 minutes, 13 seconds
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Confusion over when aid will reach Gaza

CBC foreign correspondent Chris Brown joins us from Jerusalem with the latest from the Israel-Hamas conflict, including the question of when humanitarian aid will be allowed into Gaza.
1/1/16 minutes, 11 seconds
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Building homes out of plastic bottles

The Canadian company JD Composites is building homes out of recycled plastic bottles — and tests show they’re sturdy enough to withstand hurricane-force winds. We hear how that model might help places where the changing climate is making weather more extreme.
1/1/19 minutes, 53 seconds
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BONUS | Remembering Esther the Wonder Pig

Esther the Wonder Pig was adopted as a piglet by Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter in 2012, on the understanding that she wouldn’t get much bigger. But then she did — roughly 650 pounds bigger — and changed the couple’s lives forever. We listen back to when Anna Maria Tremonti met Esther and her dads in 2016, and remember a pig who won hearts around the world.
1/1/122 minutes, 22 seconds
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Olive oil's in danger!

Black market dealings. Large scale heists. These things are already happening for an everyday kitchen staple. Matt Galloway speaks to an olive oil producer and a researcher about the rising cost and increasing scarcity of olives in times of climate change. And asks if we’re all going to have to change the way we cook.
1/1/120 minutes
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One father’s story of losing his teen daughter to toxic drugs

Kamilah Sword was just 14 when she died after a drug overdose last year. Her dad Greg Sword tells us about the obstacles he faced getting Kamilah the help she needed, and why he doesn’t want her death to be in vain. Matt Galloway also asks B.C.’s Minister for Mental Health and Addictions Jennifer Whiteside how her government is addressing the “terrifying” fact that unregulated drugs are now the leading cause of death for youth in her province.
1/1/130 minutes, 53 seconds
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Michael Audain on how art changed his life

Vancouver businessman Michael Audain is one of Canada’s most prominent art collectors, often offering pieces from his private collection for public show and donating millions to galleries. He tells us about exploring his collection of paintings — and the stories behind them — in his new book, Pictures on the Wall: Building a Canadian Art Collection.
1/1/125 minutes, 57 seconds
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Why some people love pickleball (and some hate it)

Pickleball has exploded in popularity in recent years, but the sport has also courted controversy over noise pollution and taking over space in public parks. Matt Galloway picked up a paddle to find out why some people love pickleball and some hate it.
1/1/112 minutes, 30 seconds
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'Lemon law' proposed to protect consumers

Quebec is moving to protect consumers from planned obsolescence, by banning products intentionally built not to last, and reinforcing the right to repair (instead of replace). George Iny, executive director of the Automobile Protection Association Executive Director, tells us more about the proposed “lemon law.”
1/1/18 minutes, 40 seconds
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How Ozempic could change our relationship with food

The diabetes drug Ozempic has become extraordinarily popular as an off-label weight loss tool. But could medications like this be changing our relationship with food? We talk to long-time food writer Laura Reiley.
1/1/114 minutes, 1 second
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Searching for the missing children of ISIS fighters

Many young children of ISIS fighters disappeared after the militant group was defeated — and some have family around the world desperate to find them. Investigative reporter Poonam Taneja tells us about her new CBC/BBC podcast, Bloodlines, which tries to find one of those children, and discover what happened to hundreds more.
1/1/111 minutes, 10 seconds
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Finding optimism in the fight against climate change

Optimism can feel in short supply in the face of climate change and worsening fires, floods and extreme weather across Canada. Matt Galloway talks about where to find that hope — and how to turn it into action — with authors Rebecca Solnit, John Vaillant and Chris Turner in a panel discussion recorded at the Vancouver Writers Festival.
1/1/137 minutes, 9 seconds
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What we learned from Israeli hostages released by Hamas

The CBC’s Margaret Evans brings us the latest from the Israel-Hamas war, including what Israeli hostages released Monday have revealed about their time in captivity. And the World Food Programme’s Abeer Etefa says the aid trickling into Gaza is just “a drop in the ocean” of what’s needed in the face of a deepening humanitarian crisis.
1/1/119 minutes, 42 seconds
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How war in the Middle East is creating tensions in Canadian politics

Our national affairs panel discusses how the Israel-Hamas conflict is playing out in Canadian party politics; and looks at ongoing tensions with India. Matt Galloway puts the questions to the CBC’s Rosemary Barton, the Globe and Mail’s Shannon Proudfoot and the National Post’s Catherine Lévesque.
1/1/120 minutes, 17 seconds
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Retailers ‘under siege’ from big increase in theft

Retailers say they're seeing a significant increase in theft, including organized gangs, violent encounters and “shelf sweeps,” where an entire display of products is quickly stolen. We hear what businesses are doing to deter theft — from AI tools to controversial measures like receipt checks — and what it all means for consumers.
1/1/124 minutes, 26 seconds
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Housing crisis leaves women stuck in abusive homes

It’s hard enough for women to leave a violent partner, but the housing crisis and a stretched shelter system are making it even harder for them to find a safe place to live. Advocates are calling for more comprehensive housing support, and warning that women will be killed if they’re left with nowhere to turn.
1/1/124 minutes, 35 seconds
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Convenient or annoying? The great self-checkout debate

Love them or hate them, self-checkouts have been popping up everywhere in recent years — but now Walmart has completely removed the kiosks from some stores. We hear why some stores are retreating from do-it-yourself payment, while others see a future free of cashiers.
1/1/119 minutes, 57 seconds
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Who is the real Buffy Sainte-Marie?

Buffy Sainte-Marie’s claims to Indigenous ancestry are being contradicted by members of her own family and an extensive investigation from The Fifth Estate. The iconic singer-songwriter has rejected the allegations, which she called “deeply hurtful.” Matt Galloway speaks to investigative reporter Geoff Leo, and Indigenous scholar Kim TallBear, who says if the accusations are true, “Buffy Sainte-Marie has appropriated or stolen the stories of some of the most vulnerable in our society.”
1/1/120 minutes, 39 seconds
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Why Tiff Macklem won’t rule out more rate hikes

Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem says he knows Canadians feel financially squeezed by aggressive interest rate hikes, but insists doing nothing to curb inflation would have been worse. He tells Matt Galloway why he’s confident those measures are working, even if he’s not ruling out raising interest rates again in future.
1/1/119 minutes, 7 seconds
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Taliban restrictions cuts women off from earthquake aid

A series of earthquakes have killed thousands of people in Afghanistan, and left thousands more in need of humanitarian aid. But relief workers say the Taliban’s restrictions on women are leaving some cut off from the help they need.
1/1/16 minutes, 51 seconds
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As pandemic loans come due, many restaurants say they can’t pay

Repayment deadlines are looming for restaurants that took out government-backed CEBA loans to survive the pandemic — but many say they’re just not in a position to pay. We hear from industry insiders about what might happen if restaurants don’t get a break, and ask Minister for Small Business Rechie Valdez whether her government is heeding those concerns.
1/1/122 minutes, 43 seconds
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A break in the federal carbon tax — for some

The federal Liberal government will exempt home heating oil from the carbon tax for three years, as well as doubling the rural supplement in the rebate program and offering new incentives to help rural Canadians switch to electric heat pumps. While some have welcomed the move as a way to help homeowners make that transition, others say it undercuts the government’s own climate strategy at a time when decisive action is needed.
1/1/120 minutes, 29 seconds
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Tensions within Israel

Many Israelis have lost faith in Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for not preventing the Oct. 7 Hamas attack, says Yossi Alpher, but he adds that the population is broadly united in backing the military campaign in Gaza. Matt Galloway gets the view from inside Israel with Alpher, a former senior official with Israel's intelligence agency Mossad; and Ronen Bergman, a New York Times writer based in Tel Aviv.
1/1/119 minutes, 39 seconds
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Remember when the internet was fun?

New Yorker writer Kyle Chayka misses the days when the internet was fun. He tells us why and how he thinks the world wide web lost its spontaneity, and whether it's possible to get it back.
1/1/115 minutes, 8 seconds
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Why schools are more likely to call moms when a kid gets sick

As flu season kicks in, many parents will get that dreaded call asking them to pick up a sick child from school. But new research suggests something many might long have suspected: schools often default to calling the mother, even when both parents expressed a desire to share the responsibility equally.
1/1/18 minutes, 41 seconds
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How three strangers are helping refugees start new lives in Canada

What do a former refugee from Afghanistan, an advocate in Canada and a retired academic in Australia have in common? In Alisa Siegel’s documentary Say Yes, they share a determination to help refugees start new lives in Canada. We hear how these three strangers found an unexpected connection, and pooled their money and skills to change lives forever.
1/1/124 minutes, 18 seconds
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Why austerity is trending on TikTok

Amid the cost-of-living crisis, some social media creators are using their platforms to teach financial literacy and thrifty culture to a generation struggling to make ends meet.
1/1/124 minutes, 15 seconds
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Music can soothe physical pain, research shows

New Canadian research suggests that your favourite music could be as effective as ibuprofen for relieving pain. Darius Valevicius, lead author of the study, tells us more.
1/1/110 minutes, 59 seconds
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The Current Introduces: Bloodlines

From BBC Sounds and CBC Podcasts. Syria. 2018. ISIS is on the brink of defeat. A toddler disappears in the chaos. In London, his grandad needs answers. Poonam Taneja investigates. More episodes are available at: https://link.chtbl.com/SHTtxkgL
1/1/130 minutes, 42 seconds
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Malcolm Gladwell on what’s missing from the gun violence debate

Malcolm Gladwell's podcast Revisionist History recently had a special series dedicated to gun violence in the U.S. He talks to Matt Galloway about what’s missing from the conversation around gun culture, and what he learned when he shot an assault rifle for the first time.
1/1/122 minutes, 9 seconds
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Fight looming over Alberta’s threat to leave pension fund

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland says Alberta’s proposal to withdraw from the Canada Pension Plan would be a historic, costly and irreversible mistake. Freeland will meet with provincial and territorial finance ministers later this week; CBC senior reporter John Paul Tasker tells us what’s at stake.
1/1/110 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ambulance wait times at crisis levels

Wait times for ambulances are at crisis levels in some parts of Canada, with reports that a 99-year-old Ontario woman waited more than four hours with a cracked vertebrae last month. What’s causing these delays, and what are the solutions?
1/1/120 minutes
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How Israel-Hamas conflict is playing out in wider region

Matt Galloway discusses the Israel-Hamas conflict and its deadly impact on civilians inside Gaza with Rami Khouri, a distinguished fellow at the American University of Beirut; and Omar Rahman, a fellow at the Middle East Council on Global Affairs.
1/1/124 minutes, 13 seconds
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What’s at stake with Canada’s new immigration plan?

A poll this week suggests a sharp drop in Canadian public support for immigration, even as the federal government moves to align immigration policy with the country’s needs in housing, infrastructure and health care. Matt Galloway asks three experts what those changes should look like and what's at stake for Canada’s future.
1/1/120 minutes, 6 seconds
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What Ed Broadbent thinks of today’s politics

Former federal NDP leader Ed Broadbent has been part of some of the biggest moments in Canadian political history, from opposing the War Measures Act to helping shape the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. He reflects on that legacy in his new book, Seeking Social Democracy: Seven Decades in the Fight for Equality.
1/1/124 minutes, 41 seconds
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Why airlines have to stop treating wheelchairs like luggage

Landing at an airport without your mobility device is like having both your legs broken on arrival. That’s how Canada’s Chief Accessibility Officer Stephanie Cadieux felt after an airline left her wheelchair behind on a recent flight. She tells guest host Duncan McCue that “people with disabilities are paying customers … not problems.” Plus, hear from a Tofino teen making history as the first Canadian surfer to qualify for the Olympics
1/1/120 minutes, 5 seconds
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Hands of a Midwife: How Inuit women brought birth home

For decades, Inuit women in northern Quebec had to travel south to give birth, far from family and support. That started to change in 1986 when the North’s first midwifery clinic opened in Puvirnituq. Duncan McCue takes us into that maternity centre with his documentary, Hands of a Midwife, which first aired in September.
1/1/126 minutes, 3 seconds
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How to decide if a heat pump is the right choice for you

Not many Canadians have a heat pump installed at home, but experts say making the switch could both save you money and reduce emissions. Guest host Duncan McCue digs into how the devices work, what they cost, and what government incentives are available for making the switch.
1/1/118 minutes, 34 seconds
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Skilled migrants tied up in red tape

Migrants with foreign training often face complex barriers to getting a professional license here in Canada, but new legislation in B.C. aims to streamline that process. Two engineers tell us what it’s like trying to resume your career after migrating to Canada; and what the change might mean for the lawyers, teachers and social workers stuck in limbo.
1/1/119 minutes, 2 seconds
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Families terrified for Canadians still stuck in Gaza

The first Canadians were able to leave Gaza on Tuesday, but many more are still awaiting evacuation assistance from Global Affairs Canada. Matt Galloway speaks with a man who made it across the border and an Ontario woman whose elderly father is still in northern Gaza, as Israel’s airstrikes continue.
1/1/120 minutes, 2 seconds
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Antisemitism in Canada amid Israel-Hamas war

As Israel’s military offensive in Gaza drags into another week, many Jewish Canadians say they feel afraid — at the synagogue, at school and on the street. Matt Galloway talks to Rabbi Louis Sachs, human rights consultant Karen Mock, and writer and filmmaker David Bezmozgis about the anxiety of the moment, unsettling echoes of the past and divisions within the community itself.
1/1/124 minutes, 8 seconds
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Nathan Thrall on what can and can't be said in the heat of war

Jewish-American author Nathan Thrall hoped his new book, A Day in the Life of Abed Salama, would give the world an insight into the daily lives of Palestinians and Israelis — and perhaps start conversations about ending the cycle of violence. But when the Israel-Hamas war broke out just days after its publication, his book tour events were cancelled or postponed. Thrall talks to Matt Galloway about what can and can't be said in the heat of war, and the complicated road to peace.
1/1/124 minutes, 21 seconds
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N.B. premier considering not collecting carbon tax

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs says he is seeking legal advice about whether his province can stop collecting the carbon tax, arguing that it’s making the affordability crisis worse for Canadians. But former federal environment minister Catherine McKenna says the tax is a necessary tool in the climate change fight, and the focus should be on companies charging high prices.
1/1/119 minutes, 48 seconds
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Trump leads Biden in polls ahead of 2024

One year out from the U.S. presidential election, Donald Trump is ahead of Joe Biden in polls in several key states — and in and out of court defending himself against a series of criminal indictments. The New York Times’ Ruth Igielnik unpacks the political mood south of the border.
1/1/19 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Current Introduces: Crime Story

Fraud. Abduction. Murder. Every week, Crime Story host and investigative journalist Kathleen Goldhar goes deep into a tale of true crime with the storyteller who knows it best. From the reporter who exposed Bill Cosby, to the writer who solved one of Australia’s most chilling cold cases — Crime Story guests include: Gilbert King (Bone Valley), Eric Benson (Project Unabomb),Carole Fisher (The Girlfriends), and many more. More episodes are available at: https://link.chtbl.com/JFjZjkd4
1/1/150 minutes, 13 seconds
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Making video games more accessible for disabled players

Millions of people play video games — and many of those gamers have a disability. Now, a new type of controller is the latest step in increasing accessibility for disabled players.
1/1/126 minutes, 8 seconds
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What sandwiches can teach us about history

Fancy a peanut butter and chili sandwich? Cream cheese and cornflakes on bread? Barry Enderwick makes these unusual sandwiches based on recipes from throughout history, posting the delicious (and not-so-delicious) results to his thousands of social media followers. He says these recipes tell us a lot about the times and people who cooked them up.
1/1/117 minutes, 42 seconds
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Is this the end of panda diplomacy?

Pandas have been important tools in normalizing relations between China and the West. But now, the cuddly bears are leaving North American zoos and heading home. Is this the end of panda diplomacy; and could it be a good thing for the actual bears?
1/1/111 minutes, 21 seconds
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Canadians skip the dentist over rising costs

Dental fees are rising to record levels in some provinces, and new data suggests one in four Canadians is avoiding the dentist chair as a result. Matt Galloway asks why the cost of care is increasing, and hears about a no-frills clinic trying to make it more affordable.
1/1/119 minutes, 48 seconds
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Israel is risking hostages’ lives over ‘petty politics’: family member

Four of Aharon Brodutch’s family members are being held hostage by Hamas, and the Toronto resident says not enough is being done to free them. He tells Galloway that Israel’s government is risking his family’s lives for the sake of “petty politics.”
1/1/117 minutes, 46 seconds
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Tiny beetles enlisted to save iconic N.S. hemlock trees

An invasive species of insect is threatening Nova Scotia’s hemlock trees, prompting scientists to ship in tiny black beetles to gobble them up. Jeff Fidgen, a biologist with the Canadian Forest Service, tells us how it works — and whether anything could go wrong.
1/1/110 minutes, 6 seconds
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Why we need to rethink how we remember war

R.H. Thomson is grappling with war and remembrance — and why the way we think about both needs to change. In his book, By the Ghost Light, the Canadian actor asks who is telling our stories of combat — and explores how rhetoric from the First World War is still being used in Ukraine and the Middle East today.
1/1/121 minutes, 38 seconds
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Why Michael Crummey is interested in places on the edge

Michael Crummey’s book The Adversary explores his familiar themes around life at the ocean's edge. In an interview first broadcast in September, Matt Galloway sat down with the author at the Woody Point Writers Festival in Newfoundland to discuss isolation, vulgarity and the responsibility that comes with telling the stories of home.
1/1/123 minutes, 33 seconds
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The future of hearing technology

Hearing aids are expensive and make everything sound louder, not just the things you want to hear. But technology is changing, and some researchers are turning to artificial intelligence for a solution. Galloway speaks with Ian Bruce, a professor in the McMaster School of Biomedical Engineering; and Richard Plummer, executive director of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association.
1/1/123 minutes, 12 seconds
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Growing number of Canadians getting MAID

A growing number of Canadians are choosing medically-assisted death. Last year, more than 13,000 Canadians used the program — a 31 per cent increase over the year prior. Matt Galloway discusses why more Canadians are choosing medically-assisted death, with Dr. Michel Bureau, the head of Quebec's commission on end-of-life care; and Dr. James Downar, a physician who heads the University of Ottawa’s palliative care division, and the co-author of a recent study for the Canadian Medical Association Journal that looked at who gets MAID and why.
1/1/119 minutes, 44 seconds
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Tackling the rise of ransomware attacks

Public libraries, hospitals and even the state of Maine have fallen victim to ransomware attacks recently, freezing operations and compromising the personal data of millions. Guest host Nora Young asks cybersecurity expert Ali Dehghantanha what can be done to block these breaches.
1/1/112 minutes, 14 seconds
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Misery in Gaza getting worse every day, says surgeon

Israel’s military incursion is pushing Gaza’s health-care system to the brink, with doctors reporting having to make life-or-death decisions amid dwindling fuel and medical supplies. With no ceasefire in sight, a surgeon in Gaza says he feels like the world has turned its back.
1/1/119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Pakistan begins mass deportation of Afghan asylum seekers

When the Taliban retook control of Afghanistan, nearly two million Afghans fled to neighbouring Pakistan. But now, Pakistan’s government wants those asylum seekers out — and many of them are terrified of what they’ll face if they go back to Afghanistan.
1/1/121 minutes, 25 seconds
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Houses being ‘split apart’ by volcano tremors in Iceland

Iceland is bracing for what could be a significant volcanic eruption, after thousands of recent tremors cracked roads, opened sinkholes and damaged buildings. Photographer Jeroen Van Nieuwenhove speaks to us from Grindavik, a town sitting on a 15-kilometre stretch of magma.
1/1/17 minutes, 54 seconds
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Peace activists remember Vivian Silver

Winnipeg-born peace activist Vivian Silver was initially believed to have been taken hostage by Hamas, but her family has now confirmed she was killed in the Oct. 7 attack. Matt Galloway talks to Palestinian and Israeli peace activists who knew her, and who say they’ll keep fighting for the path to peace paved by Silver.
1/1/119 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ottawa should ‘stay in their own lane’: Danielle Smith

Alberta Premier Danielle Smith says national unity means all levels of government working together — but it doesn’t mean provinces letting Ottawa do whatever it wants. She talks to Matt Galloway about pushing back on the carbon tax, pulling Alberta out of the Canada Pension Plan, and why she’s hitting the stage with Tucker Carlson. 
1/1/119 minutes, 8 seconds
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U.S. and China agree crackdown on flow of fentanyl

China and the U.S. have agreed on a deal to crack down on the manufacture and export of fentanyl from China, in the hopes of curbing overdose deaths in North America. Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, explains what it might mean for the toxic drug crisis and U.S.-China relations. 
1/1/18 minutes, 55 seconds
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HRW’s Tirana Hassan on seeking justice in war

Tirana Hassan is watching the conflict in the Middle East closely. The new executive director of Human Rights Watch says even wars have laws — and part of her job is to pursue justice for those caught in the crossfire.
1/1/124 minutes, 12 seconds
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Growing babies in an artificial womb

Scientists are working on devices that would allow a baby to develop entirely outside a human body. In her new book, Eve: The Disobedient Future of Birth, researcher Claire Horn explores the ethics around artificial wombs — and the politics imposed on women’s bodies.
1/1/124 minutes, 2 seconds
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Criminal cases thrown out over Ontario court delays

Criminal cases in Ontario must be tried within 18 months, but staffing shortages and other problems are leading to cases being thrown out when that time is up. Galloway talks to legal experts about what happens when serious cases like sexual assault allegations get thrown out, and protecting public faith in the legal system.
1/1/121 minutes, 1 second
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Is listening to audiobooks cheating?

Audiobooks are growing in popularity, but some people question whether listening to a book is the same as reading it. We put that question to psychology professor Dan Willingham, author of The Reading Mind.
1/1/114 minutes, 34 seconds
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A father’s quest to get his kids out of Gaza

Mohammed Fayad has been trying to get his 14 year old daughter and 12 year old son out of Gaza for years. But as war breaks out, his efforts turn to desperation. CBC’s Jodie Martinson documents their journey — the extreme anxiety and fear as communication breaks down, and the joy and relief when they are reunited in British Columbia.
1/1/118 minutes, 40 seconds
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Canada's plastic ban faces obstacle from courts

A judge said that the federal government’s decision to list plastic items as toxic was "unconstitutional,” dealing a major blow to Ottawa’s efforts to ban single-use plastic. We hear about the fight to keep plastic out of our environment — and how activists in Kenya may offer a path forward.
1/1/124 minutes, 19 seconds
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Tech sector tensions as Sam Altman ousted

Sam Altman has been fired as CEO of OpenAI — the makers of Chat-GPT — and promptly hired at Microsoft. Tech writer Will Knight discusses what the ouster tells us about the rapid development of artificial intelligence, and industry tensions around safety.
1/1/19 minutes, 46 seconds
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The Current Introduces: Gay Girl Gone

Of all the young revolutionaries in Syria during the Arab Spring, Amina is different. An out lesbian in a country where homosexuality is illegal, she bravely documents her life on the blog Gay Girl in Damascus. Her candid posts attract readers from around the world, and soon she has a wide, ardent following. But then a post appears saying Amina has been abducted. Her fans mobilize, desperate to track down and save their fearless heroine. What they find shocks them. Journalist Samira Mohyeddin investigates what actually happened to the infamous Gay Girl in Damascus in this 6-part series. The result is a twisted yarn that spans the globe and challenges our thinking on love, politics and identity in cyberspace. More episodes are available at: https://link.chtbl.com/In8lyVBh
1/1/136 minutes, 9 seconds
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Canadian ‘ecstatic’ as U.K. approves gene therapy for sickle cell disease

Beverly Ndukwu lives with sickle cell disease, a genetic mutation that causes pain she describes as a constant stabbing knife. She tells Matt Galloway what it’s like managing that pain, and why she’s “ecstatic” that the U.K. has now approved the world's first gene therapy treatment for the disease, using the gene-editing tool CRISPR.
1/1/119 minutes, 26 seconds
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New podcast tells the real story of a gay blogger in Syria

Amid the Arab Spring a decade ago, Amina Arraf was an openly gay blogger sharing news about life in Syria — a place where homosexuality is illegal. But when she disappeared, questions arose about whether Arraf was really who she said she was. Samira Mohyeddin explores that story in the new CBC podcast, Gay Girl Gone.
1/1/116 minutes, 41 seconds
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Why more Canadians are deciding not to have children

A growing number of Canadians are delaying parenthood or choosing not to have children at a time when Canada's fertility rate is at an all-time low. The Current’s producer Kate Cornick looked into these decisions and the long-term implications.
1/1/118 minutes, 39 seconds
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Could AI revolutionize the weather forecast?

Artificial intelligence is producing increasingly accurate weather forecasts, but climatologist Russ Schumacher says there’s an element of chaos that the machines can’t account for. He explains why it’s not time to take humans out of the equation just yet.
1/1/19 minutes, 58 seconds
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Israel, Hamas agree to temporary ceasefire

Israel and Hamas have agreed to a temporary ceasefire in Gaza for at least four days, to let in aid and release at least 50 hostages captured by militants in exchange for at least 150 Palestinians jailed in Israel. Matt Galloway hears about what this means for those living there, how Qatar played a role in the ceasefire, and what happens next.
1/1/124 minutes, 21 seconds
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Argentina’s new president promises drastic change

Argentina has elected a former sex coach and self described anarcho-capitalist as it’s next president. Javier Milei has promised to slash spending, privatize state companies and close the national bank. What does this mean for South America’s second-largest economy?
1/1/18 minutes, 14 seconds
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What to look for in the fall economic statement

The federal government presents its fall economic statement Tuesday, amid a cost-of-living crisis and pressure for Ottawa to cut back on its own spending. Matt Galloway asks what can be done to make a real difference for ordinary Canadians, and how Prime Minister Justin Trudeau can convince voters the economy is in good hands.
1/1/120 minutes, 10 seconds
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Chrystia Freeland defends government’s fall economic statement

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland says the fall economic statement shows her government is prepared to combat the rising cost of living for Canadians. But critics suggest the Liberal government still isn’t doing enough.
1/1/120 minutes, 3 seconds
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Loneliness as bad for you as smoking, says WHO

The World Health Organization has declared loneliness a global health threat — as bad for your health as smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. We discuss how to tackle the problem and the stigma that stops people from talking about it.
1/1/120 minutes, 46 seconds
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Crisis in Sudan, as the world looks away

Refugees fleeing Sudan’s civil war have reported a surge in ethnically driven killings of civilians and a deepening humanitarian crisis — but aid workers say the world isn't paying attention.
1/1/113 minutes, 51 seconds
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Ontario Universities call for more funding, end of a tuition freeze

Ontario universities are calling for a tuition increase and more funding, after a new provincial government-commissioned report says the post-secondary sector is in financial trouble. Matt Galloway asks Deborah MacLatchy, president and vice-chancellor of Wilfred Laurier University in Waterloo, Ont., whether increasing tuition for students is the right move; and discusses the value of higher learning with Paul Tough, an author and broadcaster who has written extensively about education.
1/1/120 minutes
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Former RCMP intelligence official found guilty of violating secrets act

Cameron Ortis, a former RCMP intelligence official, has been found guilty of breaching secrets laws for leaking sensitive police information. Ortis says he will appeal the decision. Stephanie Carvin, an associate professor at Carleton University in Ottawa and a former national security analyst, explains the verdict.
1/1/16 minutes, 51 seconds
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Why singer Marichka Marczyk joined the war effort to support Ukraine

For nearly a decade, Ukrainian-Canadian singer Marcihka Marczyk has been supporting her home country by using her voice. But recently, Marczyk stepped up her support and joined the fight as a combat medic. She tells Galloway what she saw during a tour in Ukraine.
1/1/126 minutes, 37 seconds
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IV vitamin therapy a ‘case of marketing, not science,’ says UBC nursing prof

Clinics offering IV vitamin drips are popping up in cities across Canada, and more celebrities and online influencers are promoting the treatments. But Bernie Garrett, a professor of nursing at the University of British Columbia, says they’re nothing more than a “health scam.” Is there any evidence supporting IV drips?
1/1/117 minutes, 24 seconds
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Can 'public adjusters' really take on big insurance?

A little-known field is growing in Canada, as public adjusters step in to represent homeowners in the wake of disaster. "It's like having a lawyer in a lawsuit," says Brandon Sobel, an insurer-turned-adjuster who sees a “massive power imbalance” between laypeople and the professionals who handle their claims – one he compares to a beer league team going up against the NHL. “We become their voice.” He joins Matt Galloway to share some of what he’s learned from big fights and fine print.
1/1/120 minutes, 8 seconds
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Could rent banks soften the impact of rising rent?

The impact of rising rent is being felt across the country — and with more people on the edge of affording rent, some municipalities are looking at rent banks as a possible solution. Matt Galloway discusses this with Gladys Wong, executive director of Neighbourhood Information Post; and a panel of Melissa Giles, managing director of the BC Rent Bank, and Tobin Leblanc Haley, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of New Brunswick.
1/1/119 minutes, 55 seconds
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Why a moving iceberg has scientists’ attention

A giant iceberg three times the size of Manhattan has broken from the Antarctic ice shelf. Its movement — and environmental impact — is being closely monitored by scientists around the world, including David Holland, a professor of math and environmental science at New York University.
1/1/16 minutes, 11 seconds
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These young Canadians are pushing the boundaries of science

Matt Galloway meets grade 12 student Anush Mutyala and grade 11 student Vinny Gu, two young scientists who are inventing the future for the benefit of others.
1/1/126 minutes, 51 seconds
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Inquest looks into the death of Soleiman Faqiri

In 2016, Soleiman Faqiri was being held at the Central East Correctional Centre in Lindsay, Ont., awaiting trial. But 11 days after he went into custody, Faqiri, who lived with schizophrenia, died in a violent confrontation with guards. An inquest into Soleiman Faqiri's death is underway. CBC’s Shanifa Nasser walks us through the details.
1/1/118 minutes, 6 seconds
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Brodutch family reunited after weeks held hostage by Hamas

Hagar Brodutch and her three children have been released by Hamas, seven weeks after they were taken hostage in the Oct. 7 attack. Hagar’s brother-in-law Aharon Brodutch tells Matt Galloway about the family’s long-awaited reunion; and the CBC’s Margaret Evans discusses the ceasefire deal that has allowed much-needed aid into Gaza.
1/1/119 minutes, 49 seconds
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Tackling the housing crisis with prefabricated modular homes

Could modular homes be a key part of solving Canada’s housing crisis? Some experts say this type of structure, built quickly in a warehouse like Lego, could be what's needed to get more Canadians into homes of their own.
1/1/124 minutes, 30 seconds
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Rise of Islamophobia worse now than after 9/11, says sociology professor

An increase in anti-Palestinian and anti-Muslim hate crimes has taken place in Canada since Israel declared war on Hamas in early October. Matt Galloway discusses living in the shadow of Islamophobia and anti-Palestinian racism with Jasmin Zine, a professor of Sociology and Religion and Culture at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ont.; and Dalia El Farra, a Palestinian-Canadian who works in human rights and equity, diversity and inclusion at the post-secondary level.
1/1/122 minutes, 33 seconds
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Path to limit climate change ‘narrowing by day’: Fatih Birol

Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, discusses the role of the energy sector in addressing climate change, what we'd have to change in our lives to meet climate targets — and whether those targets are still realistic.
1/1/124 minutes, 4 seconds
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Why Martin Baron thinks journalists should keep their opinions to themselves

Veteran editor and journalist Martin Baron led the Washington Post through seismic shifts in the world of journalism, as well as the newspaper’s sale to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Baron tells Matt Galloway about being yelled at by former U.S. president Donald Trump, and why he believes objectivity is still a vital part of journalism.
1/1/124 minutes, 23 seconds
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Alberta to fund nurse practitioner clinics, but critics urge more action on family doctor shortage

Alberta will soon fund nurse practitioners to open their own clinics, in the hopes of providing primary care to the estimated 800,000 Albertans without a family doctor. But some medical associations say the move leaves physicians overlooked and disrespected, and the province needs to do more to fix the root causes of the shortage.
1/1/119 minutes, 51 seconds
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Lost Salieri ballet found after 200 years

Researcher Ellen Stokes was sifting through library archives when she happened upon the pieces of a long-lost work by Antonio Salieri, Mozart's arch rival. She tells us about the discovery, and what it was like to see it performed for the first time in 200 years.
1/1/16 minutes, 33 seconds
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How to talk to your kids about online sexual extortion

A 12-year-old boy in B.C. took his own life after becoming a victim of online sexual extortion. In a world where kids are increasingly online, we discuss how parents can start conversations about digital safety.
1/1/118 minutes, 39 seconds
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Green ambition or just greenwashing? COP28 kicks off in Dubai

The United Nations COP28 climate talks have begun in the United Arab Emirates, amid criticism that the summit’s leader is also head of the country's largest oil and gas company. The CBC’s Susan Ormiston joins us from Dubai to discuss the country’s enormous new solar farm, accusations of greenwashing and whether the meeting will meet this climate moment.
1/1/114 minutes, 10 seconds
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Like ‘day and night’: India’s reaction to assassination plot allegations in Canada and U.S.

U.S. prosecutors allege that an Indian government employee ordered the killing of a Sikh separatist leader on U.S. soil — just two months after Ottawa accused India of playing a role in the killing of a Sikh leader in B.C. Matt Galloway talks to former CSIS director Richard Fadden about the allegations, and why India’s reaction to each country's accusations has been very different.
1/1/118 minutes, 48 seconds
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Nanalan finds new fans on TikTok

The classic Canadian kids TV show Nanalan is entertaining millions in memes on social media, almost 20 years after it went off air. Jamie Shannon, the show’s co-creator and voice of Mona, tells us why a trip to Nana’s house might be just what the world needs right now.
1/1/110 minutes, 22 seconds
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Why focusing on talent can obscure potential

We often think that people who achieve great success must have been born with raw, natural talent. But in his new book Hidden Potential: The Science of Achieving Greater Things, psychologist Adam Grant says that idea misses the potential lurking in all of us.
1/1/124 minutes, 34 seconds
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Fifth Estate investigates actor Nathan Chasing Horse

Multiple women in Canada say they were sexually assaulted by the Dances with Wolves actor Nathan Chasing Horse, and that accusations against him were overlooked for years. The actor has been charged with sexual assault in Nevada, where Las Vegas police also allege he’s the leader of a cult called The Circle. In a new CBC Fifth Estate investigation, Surviving the Circle, Mark Kelley explores the allegations, which the actor denies.
1/1/119 minutes, 21 seconds
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Saving the wriggle fence, and other endangered Nfld. crafts

Traditional crafts like weaving, instrument- and broom-making are disappearing in Newfoundland, but the award-winning Crafts at Risk project is helping experts pass their skills on to the next generation. Matt Galloway talks to some of the people bringing those traditions back from the brink of extinction, and learns how to make something called a wriggle fence.
1/1/122 minutes, 25 seconds
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Surging violence in the West Bank

With the world’s eyes on Gaza, a Palestinian farmer in the West Bank says his community is facing a surge in Israeli settler violence, which has prompted fears of escalating conflict in the wider region.
1/1/125 minutes, 15 seconds
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Why you don’t need to panic about ‘white lung syndrome’

Many Canadians are dealing with colds and flu right now, and some with RSV and COVID-19 infections. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Isaac Bogoch discusses what to expect this winter virus season — and why there’s no need to panic about an uptick in what's being called “white lung syndrome” among children.
1/1/19 minutes, 52 seconds
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Venezuela votes to set up new state in neighbouring Guyana

Venezuelans have voted overwhelmingly in favour of setting up a new state in an oil-rich territory called Essequibo. The snag? Essequibo makes up roughly two-thirds of neighbouring country Guyana, with a population of more than 200,000. Washington Post reporter Ana Vanessa Herrero discusses what happens next with the disputed region.
1/1/18 minutes, 47 seconds
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Can sustainable fuel cut the climate cost of flying?

Flight emissions are a major contributor to climate change, but Canadian businessman John Risley says it's not realistic to think people will just stop air travel. He tells Matt Galloway about his company’s work on curbing those emissions with sustainable aviation fuel, made from waste fats and plant sugars. The Aviation Environment Federation's Cait Hewitt says that sustainable fuel solutions are decades away, and baby steps won’t cut it.
1/1/119 minutes, 50 seconds
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‘Tis the season for holiday advertising

The holiday advertising season has begun, and companies are using humour, nostalgia or just a good old-fashioned tear-jerker to sell their wares. Under The Influence host Terry O'Reilly highlights the best Christmas ads and what companies are really trying to pitch you on.
1/1/120 minutes, 35 seconds
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Why turning empty offices into housing could make our cities more vibrant

Calgary is leading the way in converting empty office towers into housing, with more than a dozen projects underway in the city. Experts say only a fraction of buildings are suitable, but the ones that are convertible could help ease the housing crisis and bring vibrant new life to our downtown cores.
1/1/120 minutes, 9 seconds
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Turning deep space data into music

Researchers and musicians have collaborated to translate scientific data from deep space into music. NASA scientist Kimberly Arcand and Montreal composer Sophie Kastner explain how they turned starscapes into symphonies.
1/1/113 minutes, 9 seconds
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‘Loophole’ letting teens buy nicotine pouches

Nicotine pouches were approved for sale in Canada as a product to help smokers quit — but health experts warn they are being marketed to teens through a loophole.
1/1/111 minutes, 30 seconds
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Why the push for paid sick days stalled

Canada is one of the few countries without nationally mandated paid sick days, leaving many workers feeling forced to work when they’re unwell. Matt Galloway talks to a physician, an economist and a business advocate about the arguments for and against paid sick days — and hears why a pandemic-era push for them stalled.
1/1/124 minutes, 29 seconds
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Could U.S. deadlock change course of war in Ukraine?

U.S. politicians are deadlocked over renewing military funding to Ukraine, with Republicans demanding a tightening of the U.S.-Mexico border in exchange for new overseas funding. Matt Galloway hears what that funding means to Ukraine’s defence against Russia, and whether a shortfall could change the course of the war.
1/1/119 minutes, 56 seconds
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How Cabbage Patch Kids became a ‘riot-worthy’ toy

Cabbage Patch Kids were the must-have toy for many kids in the 1980s, with parents brawling in stores when there weren’t enough dolls to go around. Dan Goodman, executive producer of new documentary Billion Dollar Babies, says the frenzy around the toys reached “next-level insanity,” in a shopping craze that changed consumer culture.
1/1/122 minutes, 42 seconds
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To plug a methane leak, you have to find it first

The federal government plans to lower methane emissions in the oil and gas sector by 75 per cent — but scientists aren't even sure where all this potent greenhouse gas is coming from. We hear how satellite tracking is helping pinpoint methane leaks, from the oil patch to the garbage dump.
1/1/123 minutes, 23 seconds
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Desperation growing in Gaza

Desperation is growing in Gaza, where Israel’s military offensive is pushing further south, hostages remain in Hamas detention, and hundreds of Palestinians have been killed since the temporary ceasefire ended last week. Matt Galloway talks to Isam Hammad, who is trying to get his family out via Gaza’s southern border; Médecins Sans Frontières International President Dr. Christos Christou, who has just returned from the region; and Israel's ambassador to Canada Iddo Moed.
1/1/119 minutes, 11 seconds
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How ‘micro-acts of joy’ can nudge you toward happiness

It can be hard to find happiness in the world these days, but the Big Joy Project asks people to engage in little acts of joy every single day. Project leader Emiliana Simon-Thomas explains the science behind giving people a daily nudge to making their own happiness — from doing something kind for someone else, to taking in the beauty of the natural world.
1/1/117 minutes, 21 seconds
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Reader's Digest Canada shuts down

After more than 70 years, the Canadian version of Reader's Digest will shut down in March. The magazine’s former editor-in-chief Mark Pupo looks back at the legacy of a groundbreaking magazine that had an impact well beyond the doctor’s waiting room.
1/1/18 minutes, 7 seconds
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Many kids hate math. It doesn’t have to be that way

Math scores for Canadian students continue to slide, but some say the fault lies not with the students but in how the subject is taught. Matt Galloway asks a panel of experts how we can help kids rediscover the wonder and creativity in mathematics.
1/1/123 minutes, 9 seconds
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Almost half a million workers on strike in Quebec

Close to half a million public sector workers are striking in Quebec, including nurses, social service workers and educators. Matt Galloway calls up a teacher on the picket line to hear why she’s out on strike, and asks a union leader how the public will be impacted by what’s one of the largest strikes in Canadian history.
1/1/119 minutes, 36 seconds
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What would you give for your dog to live longer?

A U.S. biotech company has unveiled an anti-aging drug that could increase a dog’s lifespan by a full year. The drug isn’t on the market yet, but it’s sparked some debate about what’s in the best interests of the animal — and what people would give for a little extra time with the animals they love.
1/1/117 minutes, 36 seconds
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AI trained to tell fine wine from plonk

Researchers say that artificial intelligence can now tell the difference between an expensive bottle of wine and a bottle of plonk made in someone's garage. Neuroscientist Alex Pouget explains how computer code can measure mouthfeel and more, and what AI can tell us about why certain wines shine.
1/1/114 minutes, 43 seconds
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Why Alexis Hillyard sees her disability as a superpower

On her YouTube show Stump Kitchen, Alexis Hillyard shows that life with one hand is no hindrance to cooking great food. Now she’s received a Governor General's Meritorious Service award for her work championing representation for people with limb difference and disabilities in the culinary world.
1/1/111 minutes, 53 seconds
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Rick Mercer on the fun of being Canadian

Rick Mercer spent 15 years criss-crossing the country for The Mercer Report, talking to Canadians in every walk of life — and performing some death-defying stunts. At a live event in Toronto’s Glenn Gould Studio, Mercer tells Matt Galloway what he learned about being Canadian, and why he wouldn’t recommend getting Tasered.
1/1/119 minutes, 16 seconds
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How Reader’s Digest changed this Canadian’s life

After hearing that Reader’s Digest is pulling out of Canada, listener Elisabeth Baugh wrote to The Current to share how the magazine changed her life. Baugh was born with a facial difference. She tells us how a magazine article led her to the help she needed, and inspired her to start a charity to help others.
1/1/17 minutes, 31 seconds
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Why a trip to the mall is different these days

We discuss the changing nature of shopping malls — including why some malls are dying, and how those that are thriving are being transformed into a new kind of mall community.
1/1/120 minutes, 52 seconds
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Activists clash with oil industry at COP28

Climate activists have voiced concerns about the growing influence of oil and gas industry lobbyists at COP 28. As the climate conference wraps up in Dubai, we hear what progress has been made, and where the sticking points have been.
1/1/116 minutes, 43 seconds
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The best recipes and cookbooks of 2023

In turbulent times many people turn to comfort food, seeking solace in the kitchen. We ask chefs and food critics about their favourite recipes and cookbooks in 2023 — including “Marry Me Chicken,” a dish so good it’s said to elicit proposals of marriage.
1/1/122 minutes, 32 seconds
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Why dentists have questions about Canada’s new dental plan

The federal government’s new dental-care plan is expected to help millions of uninsured Canadians, but some dentists say they need more details before they enroll to provide care. Matt Galloway talks to two dentists about how the plan will work, questions around staffing shortages, and concerns that some employers may cancel their private insurance plans.
1/1/120 minutes, 7 seconds
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The fight over a sunken treasure worth $27 billion

Colombia’s government wants to salvage the San José, a Spanish galleon that sank off the country’s coast in 1708. The ship was carrying gold and jewels that could be worth billions today — but there’s quite a fight about who gets that sunken treasure, and some archaeologists say the ship should stay where it sank.
1/1/122 minutes, 46 seconds
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Shut down websites selling poison, urges brother of man who died by suicide

Ontario man Kenneth Law is facing 14 counts of second-degree murder, for allegedly selling sodium nitrite on websites offering items that can be used for self harm. Matt Galloway talks to Gerald Cohn, whose brother Benjamin Cohn died by suicide in February after allegedly placing an order online from Law. Cohn says he wants these websites shut down.
1/1/119 minutes, 37 seconds
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A hand-drawn map with no people, but 1,642 free-roaming animals

New Zealander Anton Thomas hand-drew a massive map free of humans and political borders, but packed with 1,642 animals roaming the earth’s lands and seas. He talks us through this Wild World, which took three years to complete.
1/1/111 minutes, 43 seconds
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Soleiman Faqiri’s death in custody ruled a homicide

A coroner’s inquest has deemed that Soleiman Faqiri’s 2016 death in an Ontario jail was a homicide. His brother Yusuf Faqiri tells Matt Galloway what this verdict means to his family, and why he wants better support for Canadians living with mental illness.
1/1/113 minutes, 25 seconds
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Adrienne Clarkson on her incredible career, and the future of public broadcasting

Adrienne Clarkson says her career in broadcasting opened up the world to her, and made her realize she could do the same for other people. The journalist, author and former governor general of Canada was recently inducted into the CBC News Hall of Fame. She joins Matt Galloway to look back at a groundbreaking career, and peer into the uncertain future of public broadcasting.
1/1/123 minutes, 8 seconds
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The 'internet's chess teacher' on making the game cool

Levy Rozman says anyone can learn to play and love chess, as long as they’re willing to embrace a little failure on the way. The former competitive player and now YouTube star tells us about reaching new players online — and why chess has nothing to do with intelligence.
1/1/123 minutes, 8 seconds
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What 2024 might hold for Canadian politics

With the House of Commons set to rise, our national affairs panel discusses why MPs are divided on calls for a ceasefire in the Middle East, how party leaders are polling with the public, and what lies ahead in 2024. Matt Galloway talks to host of CBC Radio’s The House Catherine Cullen, National Post parliamentary reporter Ryan Tumilty and Globe and Mail feature writer Shannon Proudfoot.
1/1/119 minutes, 15 seconds
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Researchers pinpoint cause of severe morning sickness

Researchers say they have isolated the cause of the most acute form of morning sickness, which can lead to weight loss, malnutrition and even threaten the lives of the mother and fetus. We hear why this might be a breakthrough for health in pregnancy, and why the debilitating condition isn’t always taken seriously by doctors.
1/1/122 minutes, 15 seconds
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What if the universe is a hologram?

Could what we see as the world actually be a projection from a wrapper that goes around everything in existence? Canadian scientist Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski explains the theory that the universe is a hologram, and why it matters.
1/1/19 minutes, 45 seconds
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Former NHL player Sheldon Kennedy on tackling abuse in sport

Former NHL hockey player Sheldon Kennedy has dedicated his life to tackling abuse in sports. He joins Matt Galloway to discuss the federal government’s new commission to investigate systemic abuse — and what more needs to be done to make sport safe for all.
1/1/118 minutes, 52 seconds
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N.W.T. Premier R.J. Simpson on what the North needs

R.J. Simpson was among hundreds forced to flee wildfires in the Northwest Territories last summer. Now he’s the territory’s new premier, promising communities they’ll be better prepared for the next big fire or flood. He talks to Galloway about settling outstanding land claims, pushing back on the carbon tax, and what some people don't understand about Canada's North.
1/1/119 minutes, 42 seconds
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Why self-driving cars don’t mean you can zone out

Tesla is recalling more than two million cars over safety concerns with its autopilot system. We dig into the misconception that drivers can zone out while those kinds of systems are engaged — and why that’s a problem for the entire concept of automated driving
1/1/117 minutes, 14 seconds
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BONUS | Rick Mercer wouldn’t recommend getting Tasered

Rick Mercer risked his own safety (and sometimes Jann Arden’s) as he trekked around Canada, from getting Tasered to wearing a beard made of bees to climbing aboard “the train of death.” At a live event in Toronto last week, Mercer told Matt Galloway why he always leaned into the wild things people get up to in small towns — and how he never quite figured out what it means to be Canadian, but he wouldn’t want to be anything else.
1/1/132 minutes, 22 seconds
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An exhibit of (entirely fake) J.E.H. MacDonald sketches

The Vancouver Art Gallery acquired 10 works by Group of Seven painter J.E.H. MacDonald in 2015 — and now knows they were fakes all along. Curator Richard Hill tells us about turning these pieces into a new exhibition, and the road to discovering they were forgeries.
1/1/111 minutes
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Tackling Canada’s food waste problem

Canada has a massive food waste problem, even as many people struggle with rising grocery costs and food insecurity. We hear what can be done to tackle the problem: from thinking differently about best before labels, to apps saving perfectly edible produce from the dumpster.
1/1/119 minutes, 28 seconds
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Investigating allegations of Hamas sexual violence

Nadav Davidovitch has been helping Israel's Physicians for Human Rights investigate allegations of sexual violence perpetrated against Israeli women and girls during the Hamas attack on Oct. 7. Davidovich, the dean of the School of Public Health at Ben-Gurion University, discusses the complexities of the investigation, and accusations that international bodies have responded with indifference.
1/1/113 minutes, 28 seconds
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Anderson Cooper on confronting grief to find the joy in life

Journalist Anderson Cooper lost his father when he was 10, and his brother when he was 21 — but it wasn’t until the death of his mother in 2019 that he confronted any of that grief. He talks to Matt Galloway about how squaring up to death helped him feel greater joy in being alive, and why people can feel so alone in something that so many of us go through.
1/1/123 minutes, 29 seconds
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The best things that happened to you in 2023

What was the best thing that happened to you in 2023? Listeners share the highlights from what hasn’t always been an easy year — from learning a new skill late in life to a life-saving gift from a loved one.
1/1/127 minutes, 9 seconds
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A jolt for Canada's electric car market

Ottawa’s new electric vehicle regulations are expected to include mandated sales targets — a measure aimed at making sure there are enough EVs available for any Canadian who wants to buy one. But questions remain about affordability and infrastructure, and whether Canada can reach its target of ensuring all passenger car sales are zero-emission vehicles by 2035.
1/1/120 minutes, 5 seconds
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Home for Christmas: How a P.E.I. mom tracked down her mentally ill son in Toronto

When Marlene Bryenton's adult son suffered a mental health crisis last year, he left P.E.I. and ended up living on the streets in Toronto. She tracked him down with the help of strangers on Facebook, but struggled to secure treatment because her son suffers from anosognosia — a condition where people do not understand that they’re sick. Bryenton tells Matt Galloway why she thinks the system needs to force help on those who don't know they need it; and what it’ll be like to have him home for Christmas this year.
1/1/124 minutes, 24 seconds
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How Israelis and Palestinians view the ongoing conflict

The Israeli government continues its military campaign against Hamas, despite mounting international pressure over civilian casualties in Gaza. What are Israelis and Palestinians thinking as the conflict drags on and the death toll mounts? Matt Galloway talks to Dahlia Scheindlin, a political analyst and polling expert in Jerusalem; and Khalil Shikaki, director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research in the West Bank.
1/1/119 minutes, 29 seconds
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Unravelling the mysteries of a baby woolly mammoth

A perfectly preserved baby woolly mammoth was discovered in Yukon’s permafrost last year — and quickly became important to the Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin First Nation, who named her Nun cho ga and declared her an ancestor. Now, the First Nation has decided to bring the mammoth to Ottawa for further study, blending science and tradition to unravel her mysteries.
1/1/116 minutes, 7 seconds
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Aren't volcanoes fascinating?

A spectacular eruption in Iceland has captured the world’s attention, after rumbling for weeks and forcing the evacuation of an entire town. Volcanologist Clive Oppenheimer discusses the science, lore and lure of the country’s so-called lava fountains.
1/1/18 minutes, 9 seconds
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McGill bursary to offset tuition fee hikes

McGill University has announced a bursary to offset the Quebec government’s tuition fee hikes for out-of-province students — but most of those students will have to commit to learning French. Mark Kelley talks to McGill's Deputy Provost Fabrice Labeau about the impact on enrollment; and asks Tthe Logic’s Martin Patriquin what’s behind the changes.
1/1/119 minutes, 31 seconds
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How Quebec’s tourtière became a New York hit

Tourtière is a Christmas Eve staple in Quebec, and now New Yorkers are catching on to this quintessentially Quebecois cuisine. Mark Kelley talks to Hugue Dufour and Sarah Obraitis, who have built a loyal following for the pie south of the border.
1/1/110 minutes, 59 seconds
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The patriarchy of pockets

There’s a lot of history tucked into the pockets ofin our clothing, including a long-standing frustration that women’s clothes tend not to have them. Hannah Carlson digs into the patriarchy folded into fabric in her new book Pockets: An Intimate History of How We Keep Things Close.
1/1/122 minutes, 38 seconds
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Why isn’t hockey more popular in the U.S.?

Author and comedian Dave Hill wanted to understand why hockey is so popular in Canada and other parts of the world, but never took off in the U.S. He set off on a global odyssey to find out why in his new book, The Awesome Game.
1/1/123 minutes, 15 seconds
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Canadian youth take climate change fight to court

The Federal Court of Appeal has given a group of young Canadian activists the green light to sue the federal government over alleged inaction on climate change. Mark Kelley talks to one of the plaintiffs, Lauren Wright, and co-counsel Chris Tollefson.
1/1/119 minutes, 29 seconds
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What happens to the holiday gifts you return?

The holiday season is a time to give gifts — and also return them. But what happens to those returned purchases? Mark Kelley takes a look at “reverse logistics,” the booming industry aimed at reselling those products and keeping them out of a landfill.
1/1/122 minutes, 56 seconds
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Astra Taylor on tackling the age of insecurity

In this year's CBC Radio Massey Lectures, Astra Taylor argues that insecurity is at the core of many of the crises we face today. In a conversation from last month, the filmmaker and activist tells Matt Galloway how collective action could tackle that insecurity, and help to build a whole new world.
1/1/123 minutes, 36 seconds
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How 3 strangers are helping refugees start new lives in Canada

What do a former refugee from Afghanistan, an advocate in Canada and a retired academic in Australia have in common? These three strangers found an unexpected connection and pooled their money and skills to change the lives of refugees forever.
1/1/124 minutes, 42 seconds
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Director Robert McCallum on his Mr. Dressup movie

Ernie Coombs' Mr. Dressup was a beloved mainstay at CBC for 29 seasons. London, Ont., filmmaker Rob McCallum is the director of Mr. Dressup: The Magic of Make-Believe, which debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival earlier this year. It follows Coombs' early years in Pittsburgh working with Fred Rogers, and his enduring legacy in Canada.
1/1/122 minutes, 51 seconds
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Sea otters return to Haida Gwaii and 50 years since the US Endangered Species Act

Sea otters have returned to the Haida Nation after years without the animals living alongside the people. Marine planning manager at the Council of the Haida Nation, Niisii Guujaaw, tells The Current's guest host Nahlah Ayed that the return of sea otters to the region marks an exciting shift for conservation in the area. Plus, the vice president of science, knowledge and innovation at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Canada James Snider explains why 50 years after the implementation of the US Endangered Species Act, scientists are calling for more immediate action on saving animal populations.
1/1/119 minutes, 22 seconds
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Hallucinations and omelettes in a 60-hour marathon

Jasmin Paris tells us about becoming the first woman to complete the Barkley Marathons in Tennessee, one of the most gruelling ultramarathons in the world.
1/1/114 minutes, 30 seconds
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Lawsuit targets pharma giants over opioid crisis

A Quebec class action lawsuit is looking to hold 16 pharmaceutical companies responsible for their alleged role in the opioid epidemic. Matt Galloway talks to the lawyer leading the case and asks a pain doctor about how opioids are prescribed now.
1/1/121 minutes, 54 seconds
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Inside a boxer's brain

Professional boxer Claire Hafner gets tested every year for signs of head trauma, by researchers studying hits to the head and long-term degenerative brain conditions. But there’s a personal factor for Hafner: she says if there’s evidence of decline, she’ll retire. The CBC’s Katie Nicholson went with Hafner for this year’s testing — and the results. 
1/1/119 minutes, 33 seconds
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Helping Jewish and Palestinian diaspora communities understand each other

Raja Khouri and Jeffrey Wilkinson reflect on the trauma and pain of the last few months. They have a shared project to help Jewish and Palestinian diaspora communities understand each other better.
1/1/119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Acclaimed French chef Eric Ripert on cooking seafood with love

We revisit our conversation with acclaimed French chef Eric Ripert. His latest book, Seafood Simple, aims to make cooking fish and octopus less intimidating, because cooking is an essential part of what it means to be human.
1/1/125 minutes, 38 seconds
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Why dozens of Canadian adoptees from South Korea are questioning their origins

Dozens of Canadian adoptees from South Korea are questioning their origins after growing concerns that their birth records may have been falsified amid a child export frenzy in the decades following the Korean War.
1/1/123 minutes, 51 seconds
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For this 95-year-old musician with dementia, playing the piano keeps her feeling like herself

For many dementia patients, music remains even when other aspects of memory have slipped away. Mother and daughter Marjorie and Beverly Taft are experiencing first-hand what dementia specialists and caregivers have known for years — music can serve as a lifeline.
1/1/123 minutes, 52 seconds
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Canadian politics in 2023 and what’s in store for 2024

From affordability and housing, to foreign interference at home and wars abroad, it's been a big year in Canadian politics. To look at the year that was and what's to come in the year ahead, we've convened our national affairs panel.
1/1/118 minutes, 25 seconds
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Chefs and food writers share the recipes and cookbooks that brought them comfort this year

We revisit Matt Galloway’s conversation with deputy food editor for the New York Times Genevieve Ko about the best recipes of the year, and culinary experts Jonathan Cheung and Lucy Waverman recommend cookbooks from 2023.
1/1/122 minutes, 36 seconds
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Extraordinary people named to Order of Canada

Then, some of the country's best and brightest have been named to the Order of Canada. Matt Galloway talks to physician and paralympian Dr. Francine Lemire; Inuk writer and opera singer Deantha Edmunds; and businesswoman Carol Lee, a leader in revitalizing Vancouver's Chinatown.
1/1/122 minutes, 23 seconds
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Why Jane Goodall won’t give up on hope

And Jane Goodall’s research into chimpanzees changed our understanding of the natural world. In a conversation from October, she tells Matt Galloway how her youthful curiosity sparked a ground-breaking career — and why her hope for curbing climate change lies with young people.
1/1/123 minutes, 48 seconds
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Was 2023 the best year ever?

The news in 2023 was dominated by cruelty, conflict and climate disasters, but Angus Hervey says it was also the “best year ever” for global health, conservation and clean energy. Hervey is the editor of Future Crunch, a newsletter highlighting positive news. He says the good news can often outweigh the bad in our world — and explains why you don’t always hear about it.
1/1/120 minutes, 38 seconds
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What would a Biden-Trump rematch look like?

This year’s U.S. presidential election could be a rematch of Democratic incumbent Joe Biden and his Republican rival Donald Trump. But with Biden struggling with consistently low approval ratings and Trump facing a litany of criminal charges, our panel of political journalists says it could be an election unlike anything we’ve seen before.
1/1/119 minutes, 58 seconds
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Strongwoman Alyssa Ages on the true meaning of strength

Alyssa Ages likes lifting very heavy things. The journalist got interested in strongwoman athletics almost a decade ago, and says lifting giant stones often isn’t about superhuman strength, “but just about being more human.” In a conversation from September, she talks to Matt Galloway about her book Secrets of Giants, and what it really means to be strong.
1/1/123 minutes, 31 seconds
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Honouring new Order of Canada appointees

We continue our celebration of the extraordinary people appointed to the Order of Canada. Matt Galloway speaks with editorial cartoonist Michael de Adder; pioneering AIDS activist Richard Burzynski; and refugee education advocate Wenona Giles.
1/1/124 minutes, 32 seconds
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One father’s anxious fight to get his kids out of Gaza

Mohammed Fayad was living in B.C. when Israel’s military incursion began in Gaza, leaving him terrified for his two children still living there. We listen back to the documentary, first broadcast in November, about Fayad's fight to bring his children to safety in Canada — and find out how the family has fared since being reunited.
1/1/123 minutes, 37 seconds
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Childcare spots getting harder to find, research shows

New research shows that childcare in Canada is on average becoming more affordable, but it’s becoming harder to find a spot. Matt Galloway talks to parents struggling to find care, and checks in on the federal government’s pledge to provide $10-a-day childcare by 2026.
1/1/120 minutes, 20 seconds
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Michael Audain on how art changed his life

Businessman Michael Audain is one of Canada’s most prominent art collectors, often offering his pieces for public exhibition and donating millions to galleries. In a conversation from October, he tells us about his new book, Pictures on the Wall: Building a Canadian Art Collection, and shares the lessons of a life surrounded by art.
1/1/125 minutes, 58 seconds
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George Stroumboulopoulos wants to show you some really great music

George Stroumboulopoulos’ vibrant broadcast career has been recognized with the Order of Canada. He talks to Matt Galloway about the power of music, the art of listening and what he learned when he was dumped as host of Hockey Night in Canada.
1/1/120 minutes, 34 seconds
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Tensions mounting in the Middle East

The killing of a top Hamas commander in Beirut is fuelling fears that Israel’s military assault in Gaza will flare up into a wider regional conflict. We discuss those mounting tensions, and what it might take to de-escalate.
1/1/120 minutes, 1 second
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André Picard on his hopes for Canadian health care

Journalist and new Order of Canada inductee André Picard discusses his career covering health care, the life-or-death problem of online misinformation, and why he still has hope for Canada’s struggling health-care system.
1/1/110 minutes, 55 seconds
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Meet Martinus Evans, the 300-pound marathon runner

Martinus Evans has run several marathons — at his own gloriously slow pace — and started the Slow AF Run Club to inspire other plus-sized people to lace up their running shoes. In a conversation from June, he tells us about challenging society’s idea of an athlete, and why it’s not about being the fastest.
1/1/116 minutes, 3 seconds
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Bird flu kills polar bear

A strain of bird flu that started out in poultry killed a polar bear in Alaska last month. Conservation biologist Diana Bell talks us through the risks of the H5N1 strain, which has been wreaking havoc on wildlife for more than two years now.
1/1/19 minutes
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Are saunas really good for your health?

Saunas appear to be having a moment on social media — but what do we know for sure about the benefits, both physical and social? Matt Galloway talks to filmmaker Anna Hints, whose film about sauna culture is up for an Oscar; and asks Dr. Peter Attia what sweating it out does for our health and longevity.
1/1/123 minutes, 47 seconds
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Clearing homeless encampments violates Charter rights: advocate

Advocates are suing the city of Edmonton over its policy of tearing down homeless encampments, arguing that it violates the Charter rights of the people who live there. While the city cites fears around fires and organized crime, advocates say clearing tents doesn’t address the underlying causes, or the reality that they’re appearing all over Canada.
1/1/120 minutes, 1 second
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RSV vaccine approved for use during pregnancy

Newborn babies and infants are particularly vulnerable to the respiratory virus RSV, but Health Canada has approved a vaccine that can be given during pregnancy. Pediatrician Dr. Jesse Papenburg explains how it might keep kids out of hospital in the earliest days of their lives.
1/1/110 minutes, 24 seconds
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How dreams vary in different cultures

New research looks at the cultural differences in how we dream, comparing the dreams of Western societies to foraging hunter-gatherer communities. What do those differences tell us about human evolution? And what other mysteries might our dreams unlock?
1/1/118 minutes, 25 seconds
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More men report sexual misconduct in Canada’s military

When Larry Beattie reported being sexually assaulted by a superior officer in Canada’s armed forces, he was told to “suck it up, buttercup.” Decades later, the number of men reporting sexual misconduct in the military is increasing, but survivors often don’t feel safe or supported in doing so. Matt Galloway talks to Beattie about his experience and discusses what needs to change with Rick Goodwin, who specializes in treating male survivors of trauma at the psychotherapy firm Men & Healing.
1/1/118 minutes, 16 seconds
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Loose bolts led to jetliner blowout at 16,000 feet

Investigators say loose bolts led to the door of a Boeing jetliner blowing out at 16,000 feet last week. We ask aviation expert John Gradek what happened — and whether you should be worried about boarding your next flight.
1/1/18 minutes, 48 seconds
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Drone swarms, AI attacks and the changing face of war

Drones are now a huge part of how we fight, from battles in Ukraine to rebels attacking ships in the Red Sea. We hear how cheaper devices and the rise of artificial intelligence are changing the face of warfare — and why armed drone swarms are as ominous as they sound.
1/1/120 minutes, 42 seconds
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Worried you’re always glued to your phone? Listen to this

Kashmir Hill spends too much time on her phone — sound familiar? The technology reporter tells Matt Galloway what happened when she switched from the latest iPhone to an old-school flip phone, and researcher Jay Olson shares some tips about how to put your device down — and whether thinking of it as an addiction is even the right approach.
1/1/120 minutes, 9 seconds
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N.S. has a plan to support paramedics. Will it endanger patients?

Nova Scotia is offering 12 weeks of training to become an emergency medical responder, a new role working alongside paramedics. The province’s Health Minister Michelle Thompson says it’ll help get paramedics back out in the field and reduce ambulance wait times, but ER physician Dr. Margaret Fraser worries the training isn’t sufficient — and could put patients in dangerous situations.
1/1/120 minutes, 20 seconds
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Whitehorse school eases ban on nuts

A school in Whitehorse is allowing peanuts back in the lunchroom, moving away from a blanket ban toward a focus on educating kids about allergies. The school’s principal says bans create a false sense of safety, but one parent of children with multiple allergies says the idea is insulting.
1/1/120 minutes, 17 seconds
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South Africa accuses Israel of genocide in court

South Africa is accusing Israel of genocide in Gaza at the International Court of Justice. We discuss the apartheid legacy that led South Africa to bring this case forward, how Israel is likely to defend itself, and whether the court could order an immediate suspension of the violence.
1/1/123 minutes, 48 seconds
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How saving street dogs in Thailand helped this man save himself

Niall Harbison had a successful career as an entrepreneur and a private chef to billionaires. But when addiction brought him to his lowest, he found his calling in saving neglected and abused street dogs in Thailand. Harbison tells the stories of the dogs he’s saved — and how dogs saved him — in his book Hope: How Street Dogs Taught Me the Meaning of Life.
1/1/124 minutes, 20 seconds
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The race back to the moon

Several missions to the moon faltered this week, with a private-led expedition experiencing technical difficulties after takeoff and NASA delaying two upcoming missions over safety concerns. We look at our enduring fascination with the moon, and why some experts are worried about balancing public and private interests in our race to get back there.
1/1/123 minutes, 21 seconds
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Why old-school explorers were ‘utterly mad’

Before GPS and air travel, explorers did some “utterly mad” things in pursuit of adventure, says Peter Rowe, a filmmaker and explorer himself. Rowe looks at how these voyagers were the rock stars of their day in his new book Out There: The Batshit Antics of the World's Great Explorers.
1/1/112 minutes, 38 seconds
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Chaos in Ecuador as gunmen storm live TV

Gunmen armed with explosives stormed a live TV broadcast in Ecuador this week, amid escalating gang violence, prison riots and the abduction of several police officers. President Daniel Noboa says the country is now in an "internal armed conflict" — what’s driving the chaos?
1/1/113 minutes, 17 seconds
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Remembering Ed Broadbent, a ‘giant of Canadian politics’

Ed Broadbent, former NDP leader, has died at 87. He was part of some of the biggest moments in Canadian political history, and a lifelong champion of social democracy and making life better for ordinary Canadians. In a conversation in November, he spoke with Matt Galloway about his legacy, and what he thinks of Ottawa today.
1/1/120 minutes, 5 seconds
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The incredible power of the humble hug

What is it about a hug that can feel so special? Why can some human touch, even from a stranger, make such a difference to your day? Michael Banissy tries to answer those questions in his latest book Touch Matters: Handshakes, Hugs, and the New Science on How Touch Can Enhance Your Well-Being.
1/1/124 minutes, 27 seconds
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Airstrikes on Yemen, explained

The U.S. and U.K. have launched airstrikes on Yemen, in response to Houthi rebels raiding commercial ships in the Red Sea, over Israel's war in Gaza. Journalist Iona Craig explains what the rebels want, and why they’re not afraid of an escalating conflict.
1/1/111 minutes, 33 seconds
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The life of a modern-day lighthouse keeper

British Columbia is looking for lighthouse keepers — the perfect job if you like rugged coastlines, working with your hands and lots of time by yourself. Matt Galloway talks to former lighthouse keepers Caroline Woodward and Barry Porter about a life that’s all about isolation, wild weather and saving lives.
1/1/124 minutes, 27 seconds
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This Florida school has a strict cellphone ban. It’s working

Quebec has implemented a ban on smartphones in classrooms, something which has already largely failed in Ontario. In Orlando, Fla., Timber Creek High School has a strict rule banning phones at any time during the day — and Principal Marc Wasko says it’s working.
1/1/112 minutes, 12 seconds
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What a Canadian doctor saw in Gaza

When Dr. Yasser Khan heard the sound of an explosion in Gaza, he knew he had about ten minutes before casualties started pouring into the hospital where he was volunteering. The Canadian eye surgeon went there earlier this month to help civilians caught up in Israel’s military offensive. He tells us about the “unprecedented” suffering he saw, a health-care system in a state of collapse, and why he’d go back in a heartbeat.
1/1/119 minutes, 25 seconds
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People finding creative solutions to the homelessness crisis

Advocates say there’s no single, perfect solution to the homelessness crisis across Canada, so sometimes a little creativity is required. We hear how tiny homes, electrified encampments and supportive modular housing are chipping away at the problem, and supporting people in crisis when more permanent solutions are lacking.
1/1/119 minutes, 58 seconds
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Russian antiwar activist (finally) becomes Canadian

Maria Kartasheva had already moved to Canada when she was convicted in her native Russia for blog posts criticizing the war in Ukraine. That conviction blocked her from becoming a Canadian citizen last spring, but she was finally allowed to take the oath last week. She talks to Matt Galloway about the perils of speaking out against Putin, and her hopes for a new life here.
1/1/111 minutes, 5 seconds
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Trump supporter on why criminal charges haven’t swayed his vote

Donald Trump dominated the Iowa caucuses Monday night, cementing his Republican nominee front-runner status — despite ongoing court cases and the prospect of prison time. One voter in Iowa says those charges are “trumped up” and won’t sway his support.
1/1/123 minutes, 29 seconds
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Deep freeze heats up political debate in Alberta

Icy cold temperatures pushed Alberta's energy grid to its limit over the weekend. But when an emergency alert went out asking Albertans to conserve energy, it also stirred up political debate about the federal government's plans to decarbonize the grid.
1/1/19 minutes, 44 seconds
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Daycares say $10-a-day childcare isn’t adding up

Some child-care operators say the federal government’s pledge to provide $10-a-day daycare isn’t adding up for them financially — and they might face closure without more support. Matt Galloway talks to workers and owners about where provincial and federal governments are going wrong.
1/1/124 minutes, 20 seconds
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How reframing chronic back pain could bring relief

Many Canadians suffer from debilitating chronic back pain, affecting their work, relationships and even mental health. We hear from researchers about a treatment called pain reprocessing therapy, which could offer some sweet relief by reframing that pain in our minds.
1/1/124 minutes, 22 seconds
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Making immigration work for Canada

The federal government is facing criticism that it has hiked immigration targets in recent years, without ensuring there’s enough housing and other essential services to support a bigger population. Matt Galloway talks to economists who say immigration is an important part of Canada’s future prosperity, but the policies around it need more nuanced thinking.
1/1/119 minutes, 38 seconds
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Rumblings of war between North and South Korea

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has scrapped the idea of reconciliation with South Korea, instead declaring that nation his "principal enemy." Journalist Jean Lee says the shift is a strong indication that the Hermit Kingdom might be preparing for war.
1/1/110 minutes, 28 seconds
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Huge ancient city discovered in Amazon

Researchers have found the ruins of a huge ancient city in the depths of the Amazon, using airborne laser sensors to see what’s hidden in the dense vegetation. Stéphen Rostain, who led the investigation, says this complex society thrived for 1,000 years; and archaeologist Jay Silverstein tells us what this discovery reveals about humankind's potential — and fragility.
1/1/116 minutes, 31 seconds
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Liberals polling poorly as Conservatives woo young voters

Our national affairs panel discusses the prime minister’s controversial vacation, the Liberals’ struggling poll numbers, the Conservatives’ pitch to young voters and Rachel Notley’s legacy as Alberta NDP leader. Matt Galloway talks to Globe and Mail reporter Carrie Tait; the Toronto Star’s deputy Ottawa bureau chief Stephanie Levitz; and Shachi Kurl, president of the Angus Reid Institute.
1/1/119 minutes, 59 seconds
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How to feng shui your fridge

Jiaying Zhao wants to feng shui your fridge — both to reduce your personal food waste and help curb emissions worldwide. She tells Galloway how happiness can be a great motivator in the fight against climate change and can turn individual action into systemic change.
1/1/119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Working 9-5 and then some — just to stay afloat

Rafid Khan works 9 to 5 at his full-time job, attends class from 5 to 6, and then heads to his second job from 6 p.m. to midnight. Khan says he feels like a machine sometimes — but it’s the only way he can make ends meet in the cost-of-living crisis. Matt Galloway talks to Khan and CBC reporter Malone Mullin, whose series The Grind explores the stories of Canadians working round the clock just to stay afloat.
1/1/119 minutes, 40 seconds
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Greenland’s losing 30 million tonnes of ice every hour

Greenland is losing 30 million tonnes of ice every hour, a new study suggests. Canadian researcher William Colgan regularly visits the country’s ice sheet. He tells us about the changes he’s seen and what that surge of freshwater might mean for the world’s oceans.
1/1/114 minutes, 24 seconds
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Bankruptcy rates climbing in Canada

Bankruptcy rates are climbing, and they could get worse as businesses stare down deadlines to repay pandemic assistance loans. What’s driving these numbers, and what’s needed to help people navigate this painful process?
1/1/124 minutes, 12 seconds
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The hype around the Stanley cup (not that one)

If you hear “Stanley cup” and immediately think “hockey trophy,” you’ve probably missed the latest craze in reusable water bottles. The insulated travel mug holds 1.2 litres of water, comes in a variety of colours — and has become so popular that stores are limiting how many people can buy. Journalist Meg Duff helps us understand the hype.
1/1/19 minutes, 3 seconds
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Premier P.J. Akeeagok on Nunavut’s future

Nunavut has taken over land and resource responsibility from the federal government in the largest land transfer in Canadian history. Premier P.J. Akeeagok talks to Matt Galloway about the opportunities — and challenges — that lie ahead.
1/1/114 minutes, 4 seconds
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Risk of famine grows in Gaza

Isam Hamad says it feels like “the dark ages” at Gaza’s southern border, where he and his family are stuck with extremely limited food and water. Matt Galloway talks to Hamad about what he’s doing to try to survive; and discusses getting humanitarian aid where it’s needed with Arif Husain, chief economist for the World Food Programme.
1/1/119 minutes, 31 seconds
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Well Founded: Do office wellness programs actually work?

Companies spend big money to help their employees feel good at work, from lunchtime yoga to mindfulness seminars. But a new study suggests these workplace wellness programs aren’t actually doing much to help. We dive into office wellness in the first instalment of Well Founded, our new series about making sense of all the pitches on how to be a better you.
1/1/124 minutes, 51 seconds
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Inquest into mass stabbings at James Smith Cree Nation

The CBC’s Sam Samson shares the latest from the coroner's inquest into the mass stabbings at James Smith Cree Nation, where Myles Sanderson killed 11 people in Sept. 2022.
1/1/110 minutes, 1 second
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Alberta is not the ‘caricature’ that Canada thinks it is: Rachel Notley

Rachel Notley is stepping down as leader of the Alberta NDP, after leading the party to victory in 2015 — and suffering defeat in two subsequent elections. She talks to Matt Galloway about pipelines, polarization and why the best night out in Canada is a night out in Alberta.
1/1/123 minutes, 24 seconds
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Anesthesiologist shortage puts surgeries in jeopardy

Provinces are warning of a shortage of anesthesiologists, fuelled by a mix of burnout and retirements. We talk to anesthesiologists Dr. Kevin Gregg and Dr. Lucie Filteau about the very real impacts for patients in the operating room, and how to solve the shortage.
1/1/117 minutes, 1 second
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Does Apple’s Vision Pro live up to the hype?

Apple is pitching its new Vision Pro — a virtual reality headset — as the future of personal computing. But are people ready to wear what looks like a large pair of ski goggles, at a price tag of roughly $4,700? We ask Julian Chokkattu, the reviews editor at Wired.
1/1/17 minutes, 14 seconds
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Canada needs more foster parents. What does the role involve?

Many foster parents in Canada are getting too old to take on new kids — but not enough people are stepping up to replace them. Matt Galloway talks to advocates and foster parents about the urgent need for new foster homes, and why the cost-of-living crisis is a big part of the problem.
1/1/119 minutes, 46 seconds
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The social expectations that stifle young Black boys

Growing up as a young Black man, Matthew R. Morris felt hemmed in by expectations around race, masculinity and how people thought he should fit into Canadian society. In his new memoir Black Boys Like Me, he explores his journey from a difficult student with something to prove, to an educator and role model for Black youth.
1/1/123 minutes, 1 second
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Invoking Emergencies Act was unreasonable, judge rules

A federal judge has ruled that the Liberal government infringed on Charter rights by invoking the Emergencies Act to clear protesters in Ottawa and elsewhere in early 2022. We look at the ruling, why a public inquiry came to a different conclusion — and what the political fallout might be.
1/1/119 minutes, 27 seconds
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Far-right plot to mass deport migrants in Germany

It has emerged that members of Germany’s far-right political party Alternative for Germany (AfD) met with neo-Nazis to discuss plans to mass deport migrants, including German citizens of foreign origin. We discuss the reaction in Germany, where the AfD is still polling high — and why anti-immigrant rhetoric is gaining ground across Europe.
1/1/117 minutes, 30 seconds
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Are full-body MRIs worth the money?

Celebrity endorsements are driving up demand for full-body MRIs, which scan for anything lurking in your body that might not show up in more routine check-ups. But some experts say these expensive scans might not actually help you — rather, they could hurt Canada’s already struggling health-care system. As part of our new series Well Founded, we talk to a doctor who tried it out for himself.
1/1/124 minutes, 46 seconds
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B.C. chief coroner angry at province’s ‘lackadaisical’ response to toxic drugs crisis

B.C.’s chief coroner Lisa Lapointe says she’s angry with the provincial government’s “lackadaisical” response to the toxic drugs crisis, which has killed almost 14,000 people in B.C. since 2016. As she prepares to retire, Lapointe talks to Matt Galloway about what’s needed to save lives, and the intense pain she sees in parents who have lost children to toxic drugs.
1/1/123 minutes, 49 seconds
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What we know about former world junior hockey players told to surrender to police

Five former world junior hockey players have been told to surrender themselves to police to face sexual assault charges, according to the Globe and Mail. The charges are believed to be connected to the alleged sexual assault of a woman in a London, Ont., hotel room in 2018 — a case that has mired Hockey Canada in controversy. Matt Galloway discusses the latest developments with Globe and Mail investigative reporter Robyn Doolittle; and The Athletic’s senior investigative writer Katie Strang.
1/1/119 minutes, 23 seconds
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At 99, swimmer Betty Brussel just smashed 3 world records

Swimmer Betty Brussel just broke three world records. She’s training hard for her next competition — while preparing for her 100th birthday this summer. As part of our series Well Founded, we talk to researchers and older Canadians about the importance of staying active in your golden years.
1/1/127 minutes, 20 seconds
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Top UN court orders Israel to prevent genocide in Gaza

The International Court of Justice has ordered Israel to contain death and damage in Gaza, but has stopped short of ordering a ceasefire. The court is also allowing the case involving South Africa’s accusation of genocide to proceed. We'll unpack the ruling and explain what might happen next.
1/1/118 minutes, 44 seconds
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Alleged human smuggler living freely outside Toronto

An investigation from The Fifth Estate has found that a man accused of smuggling a migrant family — who froze to death while walking from Canada into the U.S. — is living freely outside Toronto. Steven D'Souza brings us his ongoing investigation into the search for those accused of human smuggling.
1/1/120 minutes, 16 seconds
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What it's like working with the world's 'forgotten' refugees

War Child Canada founder Samantha Nutt recently travelled to South Sudan, where she met refugees who feel forgotten by the wider world. She talks to Matt Galloway about what she saw in the unfolding humanitarian crisis and where she finds the will to keep working in the face of great suffering.
1/1/121 minutes, 33 seconds
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Retraining the brain to silence tinnitus

Tinnitus can sound like a ringing in your ears or a whooshing in your head — and can be constant and disruptive for the people who live with it. We hear how scientists are trying to treat the problem, including a way to retrain the brain to silence the ringing.
1/1/124 minutes, 6 seconds
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What to expect from the foreign interference inquiry

The highly anticipated public inquiry into foreign electoral interference begins Monday. It will start by deciding what it can — and can’t — talk about publicly. We discuss what to watch for as the inquiry unfolds and what it might mean for Canada’s relations with China, Russia and India.
1/1/119 minutes, 40 seconds
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Eliminating cervical cancer ‘well within our sights’

Scotland began vaccinating teenage girls against HPV in 2008. Now, a new study shows no one in that cohort has developed cervical cancer in the years since. Matt Galloway talks to the study’s author Dr. Tim Palmer about whether it’s possible to make cervical cancer an exceedingly rare disease; and asks Dr. Gina Ogilvie about at-home screening and vaccination efforts here in Canada.
1/1/124 minutes, 2 seconds
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Can IVF save the northern white rhino?

There are just two northern white rhinos left on the planet, and both are older females. But researcher Thomas Hildebrandt is confident that there’ll be a bunch of baby rhinos running around in just a few years. He says his group BioRescue has made a breakthrough: an IVF pregnancy that could help to save the critically endangered species.
1/1/110 minutes, 43 seconds
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Tackling deepfake nudes in schools and online

Explicit AI-generated images of Taylor Swift flooded social media last weekend, just weeks after deepfake nudes of Canadian teens were found circulating in a Winnipeg school. Experts say more needs to be done to address this abusive use of technology, from the playground to the boardroom.
1/1/118 minutes, 31 seconds
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How animals see colour in the world around them

What does a dog see when it looks at a peacock feather? Or a bee, when it looks at a flower? Scientists have developed a camera system to show how various species perceive colour as they navigate their habitats — biologist Daniel Hanley tells us how it works.
1/1/112 minutes, 44 seconds
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How B.C. gangs move drugs all over the world

Veteran crime reporter Kim Bolan has just returned from a worldwide trip to investigate Canada’s place in the global drug trade — and found that the gangs in charge see Vancouver's port as a safe haven to operate from. She tells Matt Galloway what she’s uncovered in her latest investigative series Lethal Exports, published in the Vancouver Sun.
1/1/123 minutes, 29 seconds
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Canadian ‘aghast’ at delay to MAID for mental illness

John Scully says he feels betrayed by the government’s decision to delay expanding medical assistance in dying to the mentally ill. The 82-year-old says he’s tried everything to treat his complex mental illness and without MAID, he’s left with “the horror of suicide.” Matt Galloway talks to Dr. Sonu Gaind, who testified in parliament about the need for a delay; and Dr. Jean Marmoreo, a MAID provider who says the delay is intolerable and cowardly.
1/1/119 minutes, 36 seconds
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Why ‘risky play’ is important for kids

The Canadian Pediatric Society says "risky play" is good for kids’ mental, physical and social health — even if it might result in injury. We hear what’s behind this new advice, why ”incredibly boring playgrounds” are part of the problem, and why parents might need to just take a deep breath.
1/1/121 minutes, 58 seconds
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Environmentalists make the case for nuclear power

Ontario intends to refurbish the Pickering nuclear plant as part of wider plans to expand the province’s nuclear sector. We talk to environmentalists who say that despite the cost and concerns around toxic waste, nuclear power is a crucial part of the push to reach net zero.
1/1/119 minutes, 40 seconds
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Facing up to fatphobia

Kate Manne had never gone swimming until recently because she didn’t want to be seen in a bathing suit. Her new book, Unshrinking: How to Face Fatphobia, explores how her body has been received, from the workplace to the doctor's office — and why she thinks fatphobia is one of the last acceptable forms of discrimination.
1/1/124 minutes, 4 seconds
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Men fleeing Ukraine to avoid conscription

Thousands of men have fled Ukraine to avoid being drafted into the war with Russia, with many crossing into neighbouring Moldova and claiming asylum. CBC correspondent Briar Stewart takes us to the Ukraine-Moldova border to meet some of the men refusing to fight.
1/1/120 minutes, 6 seconds
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Mass stabbing inquiry delivers recommendations

The inquest into the stabbing massacre at James Smith Cree Nation has shared recommendations to help prevent similar tragedies in the future. The CBC’s Sam Samson explains what the inquest found and how families have reacted.
1/1/16 minutes, 38 seconds
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Explorers say they’ve found Amelia Earhart's plane

Explorers think they might have finally found the wreckage of Amelia Earhart's plane. Is this the end of an 87-year mystery?
1/1/111 minutes, 36 seconds
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Alberta’s new policies will put trans kids at risk, says teenager

A transgender teen in Alberta says Premier Danielle Smith’s new policies amount to forcing teenagers out of the closet via government regulation. The premier’s sweeping changes, unveiled this week, will affect how transgender teens are treated in schools and their access to what experts say is life-saving health care.
1/1/118 minutes, 54 seconds
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Ten years after the Rana Plaza collapse, what’s changed?

The 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory killed 1,134 people and sparked a global outcry around the high human cost of making cheap clothes. The Fifth Estate's Mark Kelley returned to Bangladesh, where he found that promises to improve wages and safety have backslid, including by some Canadian companies.
1/1/124 minutes
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What the Manulife-Loblaw deal means for your health care

Insurance company Manulife says its coverage of certain drugs will only apply at Loblaws-owned pharmacies. We unpack what the change means for you and your access to health care.
1/1/114 minutes, 46 seconds
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How to tell which wellness trends are just wrong

As part of our series Well Founded, Jonathan Jarry explains how to spot some of the pseudoscience you see online, and separate wellness myths from what can actually help you. Jarry is a science communicator at McGill University's Office for Science and Society, and co-hosts the podcast The Body of Evidence.
1/1/120 minutes, 6 seconds
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10,000 patients in this city are losing their doctor

A health centre in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., is dropping 10,000 patients due to a doctor shortage. Matt Galloway talks to some of the people left scrambling to find primary care, and asks what’s driving the shortage of family doctors across the entire country.
1/1/120 minutes, 22 seconds
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Cash-strapped Canadians turn to loans charging 47% interest

And many Canadians turn to alternative lenders when money gets tight, but those lenders can charge up to 47 per cent interest. The federal government is taking steps to cap that interest rate at 35 per cent — but critics say the move won’t address why people turn to alternative lenders in the first place.
1/1/122 minutes, 53 seconds
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Conflict in Gaza enters fifth month

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken is back in the Middle East, pushing Washington’s call for “a sustained pause in hostilities” as the Israel-Hamas war enters its fifth month. The CBC's Chris Brown brings us the latest from Jerusalem.
1/1/18 minutes, 55 seconds
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Saving people from homelessness — for just $11,000

A Montreal program offers struggling Canadians a cash boost to help them avoid falling into homelessness — at an average cost of $11,000. Welcome Hall Mission CEO Samuel Watts tells Matt Galloway why that’s money well spent to get people back on their feet, and discusses how it could be scaled up to tackle the homelessness crisis in other parts of the country.
1/1/119 minutes, 27 seconds
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To Kill a Tiger gets Oscar nod

After a teenage girl was raped in India, her family went on a quest for justice. Their story is the subject of To Kill a Tiger, a film by Canadian director Nisha Pahuja that has now been nominated in the Best Documentary Feature category at the Oscars. We revisit her conversation with Galloway from Sept. 2022.
1/1/123 minutes, 44 seconds
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How a Canadian 'orphan' found her long-lost family in Korea

Kimberly Taylor grew up believing she was an orphan, until a CBC investigation last year revealed that thousands of children adopted from South Korea had been lied to. Taylor set out to reunite with a family she never knew she had, who had been searching for her for decades.
1/1/111 minutes, 7 seconds
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Lingering cough? Here’s what you need to know

Are you dealing with a nagging cough that just won’t go away? Respirologist Dr. Nicholas Vozoris says if you’ve been sick recently, it could just be a post-infectious cough. He explains what you can do to ease the annoyance — and when to check if it’s something more serious.
1/1/18 minutes, 55 seconds
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The Dubai princesses who risked it all to run away

Sheikha Latifa was born into incredible privilege as the daughter of the leader of Dubai, but she and her sister risked everything to escape years of alleged abuse at the hands of their father. Heidi Blake explores the story in her new podcast The Runaway Princesses.
1/1/123 minutes, 3 seconds
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Nevada GOP voters pick ‘none of these candidates’

Donald Trump wasn’t on the ballot in Nevada’s Republican primary on Tuesday, but his main rival Nikki Haley lost to an option that let voters pick “none of these candidates.” The Globe and Mail’s Nathan Vanderklippe brings us the latest on the presidential race and Trump’s ongoing legal troubles.
1/1/110 minutes, 30 seconds
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What Canada needs to do to fight car thefts

A Toronto man was able to track his stolen truck to a rail yard, but neither police nor the rail company were able to help retrieve it. He tells Matt Galloway how he tracked his vehicle as it was moved around the world, and why he’s still determined to get it back — and experts weigh up what can be done to stop the spate of car thefts across Canada.
1/1/119 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ron MacLean on the state of hockey culture

Five former Canadian world junior hockey players were charged with sexual assault this week, including four current NHL players. Matt Galloway discusses the state of hockey culture and what needs to change with Ron MacLean, host of Hockey Night in Canada.
1/1/119 minutes, 18 seconds
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Cape Breton rallies to help snowed-in seniors

Some Cape Bretoners are still trying to dig themselves out after almost 5 feet of snow fell this week, with reports that older people in particular are missing medical appointments and running low on food. We talk to people on the Nova Scotian island about the scramble to get supplies to the vulnerable — by snowshoe, if necessary.
1/1/115 minutes, 48 seconds
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Support for Ukraine fading in Canada, poll suggests

Our national affairs panel discusses a new poll that suggests Canadians' support for Ukraine has begun to fade; and an NDP ultimatum to the Liberals on pharmacare. Matt Galloway talks to President of the Angus Reid Institute Shachi Kurl, the Toronto Star's Stephanie Levitz, and the National Post’s Ryan Tumilty.
1/1/122 minutes, 46 seconds
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Turkey, one year after the earthquake

It's been a year since an earthquake killed nearly 60,000 people in Turkey and Syria, but hundreds of thousands of survivors are still sleeping in tents, shipping containers or on the street. Victoria Craig, a reporter based in Turkey, brings us the view from a still-devastated country.
1/1/18 minutes, 11 seconds
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Online cults goading teens into self harm

When a B.C. teen tried to kill herself, her dad found messages on her phone from an online cult called 764, goading her into self-harm. The Fifth Estate’s Ioanna Roumeliotis talks to Matt Galloway about 764 and other groups that target vulnerable minors online and pressure them into recording or livestreaming self-harm.
1/1/119 minutes, 37 seconds
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What’s a ballbecue?

It’s a barbecue shaped like a giant football. And this Super Bowl weekend, its Quebec inventor Stéphan Genest will use the “ballbecue” to cook for more than 1,000 people in Las Vegas — realizing a dream 15 years in the making.
1/1/18 minutes, 45 seconds
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Measles outbreaks prompt calls for vaccine catch-up

Europe has seen a sharp increase in measles, with researchers saying it's only a matter of time before more cases show up here in Canada. Dr. Natasha Crowcroft tells us about the race to catch up on routine vaccinations after a pandemic lull.
1/1/111 minutes, 6 seconds
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How B.C. could fix unsafe rooming houses

Vancouver's SROs, or single-room-occupancy hotels, house thousands of vulnerable people — and are notoriously unsafe spaces. Two recent court rulings are putting pressure on the B.C. government to make this housing option safer, perhaps by buying it.
1/1/120 minutes, 22 seconds
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Why burnt-out nurses are turning to private agencies

A growing number of nurses are leaving an overburdened health-care system to work for private agencies — an exodus that is fuelling staffing shortages and driving up costs in the public system. What’s needed to recruit and retain staff, and make nursing sustainable for those already on the brink of burnout?
1/1/119 minutes, 54 seconds
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Manitoba NDP moving 'as fast as we can' on landfill search: minister

Manitoba’s new NDP government has promised to search a Winnipeg landfill believed to hold the remains of two murdered Indigenous women, after more than a year of debate and delay. Matt Galloway asks Minister Nahanni Fontaine when the search will happen and what that commitment means to her personally, as a longtime advocate for Indigenous women.
1/1/119 minutes, 6 seconds
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Artist Jordan Stranger on sharing his Indigenous culture

Jordan Stranger’s murals can be seen all over Winnipeg. The Cree artist and graphic designer from Peguis First Nation tells us what it’s like to share his art and culture, and why he hopes commemorating the past can lead to a brighter future.
1/1/17 minutes, 25 seconds
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‘Winterpeg’ struggling with warmer weather

Winnipeg’s known for frigid winters, but the city has felt warmer temperatures this year. We meet some of the people who embrace all that ‘Winterpeg’ has to offer, and find out how businesses that rely on the cold have been forced to pivot.
1/1/16 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ukrainians in Winnipeg hold out hope for home

Manitoba has welcomed 20,000 Ukrainians since Russia invaded their homeland two years ago. We meet three women who left their lives and families behind to start a new life in Winnipeg, in the hopes of helping the war effort at home.
1/1/114 minutes, 13 seconds
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Calls for mental health care to be covered in Canada

Research suggests five million Canadians have a mental health disorder — but only about half of them receive any professional help. Guest host Rebecca Zandbergen takes a look at the push for universal mental health care and what it’ll take to help struggling Canadians.
1/1/119 minutes, 52 seconds
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Palestinian in Rafah says last semblance of safety is gone

Aid worker Yousef Hammash and his family fled south to Rafah as Israel’s military offensive unfolded in Gaza. But after Israel bombed Rafah Sunday night and warned that an incursion is imminent, Hammash says there’s nowhere safe in what he called a “land of rubble.”
1/1/19 minutes, 16 seconds
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Scathing report on ArriveCan app

Auditor General Karen Hogan has delivered a scathing report about the federal government’s ArriveCan app. She says the cost of the pandemic-era travel app ballooned to an estimated $59.5 million, but poor record-keeping means the true figure is “impossible to determine.”
1/1/19 minutes
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Are saunas really good for your health?

A sauna feels nice on a cold winter’s day — but what do we know for sure about the physical and social benefits? In a conversation from last month, Matt Galloway talks to filmmaker Anna Hints, whose film about sauna culture is up for an Oscar; and asks Dr. Peter Attia what sweating it out does for our health and longevity.
1/1/124 minutes, 5 seconds
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What standing in joy means to William Prince

Singer-songwriter William Prince has had a blockbuster year, from Juno nominations to performing at Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry. But what’s more important to him is that his son can look back one day and say, “My dad was happy.” The award-winning artist talks about making an intentional choice to stand in joy, and why it’s still an honour to come home to perform in Winnipeg, even as he sells out shows across Canada and beyond.
1/1/125 minutes, 2 seconds
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Why Wab Kinew thinks it’s Manitoba’s turn now

Wab Kinew says he never set out to be the first First Nations premier in Canada, but he does intend to be the best premier Manitoba has ever had. He talks to Matt Galloway about the weight of expectations, the tough decisions ahead and why he thinks Manitoba is ready to take a leading role in Canada’s future. Plus we talk to Indigenous leaders and innovators about a transformation happening in Winnipeg.
1/1/124 minutes, 32 seconds
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Meet the deli worker helping Ukrainian newcomers find their feet

Daria Zozulia made Winnipeg her home after leaving Russia-occupied Crimea in 2014, and now helps Ukrainians who are escaping Russia’s full-scale invasion. She’s hiring some of those newcomers at the Sausage Makers Delicatessen Meat Market, a Winnipeg deli that has become something of a community hub.
1/1/14 minutes, 2 seconds
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Embracing winter — and eating well — in Manitoba

Matt Galloway talks to Winnipeggers about embracing winter in all its glory, whether that’s wandering snowy trails or a game of crokicurl, the Manitoba game that’s sweeping North America. Plus, we take a bite of Manitoba's unique food culture, from nips to Fat Boys to honey dill sauce.
1/1/114 minutes, 9 seconds
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A trailblazer for women’s hockey

Dagmar Boettcher was one of the first girls to play organized hockey against boys 60 years ago — and this week she’ll be among thousands of fans cheering on players in Canada’s new Professional Women’s Hockey League. She reflects on how hockey shaped her life and what has changed over the past six decades.
1/1/110 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Current Introduces: Hollywood Exiles

From the BBC World Service and CBC Podcasts comes Hollywood Exiles. Host Oona Chaplin tells the story of the decades-long campaign to root out communism in Hollywood. It’s a campaign that eventually drove her grandfather, Charlie Chaplin, and many others out of tinseltown. Hollywood Exiles is a tale of glamour, duplicity and political intrigue that reverberates to this day. It’s the story of how Tinseltown became an ideological battleground. The toll of the fight was enormous – reputations, careers and families were torn apart by the campaign to drive communists from the movie business. More episodes are available at: https://link.chtbl.com/B7rMdDYT
1/1/136 minutes, 4 seconds
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Growing up in a decades-long psychological experiment

Susannah Breslin was enrolled in a psychological experiment from almost the moment she was born. It studied personality traits in children to see whether you could predict the type of adults they’d become. The journalist and author talks about her new book Data Baby, the cost of being a human lab rat — and what she wants us to think about in a time where it feels like we’re all being watched by our own devices.
1/1/124 minutes, 14 seconds
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Lululemon accused of greenwashing

Vancouver non-profit Stand.earth is accusing Lululemon of greenwashing, saying the clothing retailer’s environmental claims and marketing don’t line up with its own sustainability reports. We look at Stand.earth’s call for the Competition Bureau to investigate, and ask how consumers can spot greenwashing if they want to make environmentally friendly choices.
1/1/119 minutes, 38 seconds
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‘Major’ finding in food allergy research

Scientists at McMaster University say they’ve discovered a cell that remembers allergic reactions and triggers an immune response. Some experts say the finding could be the key to future treatments for people living with food allergies. 
1/1/114 minutes, 9 seconds
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Will lab-grown meat ever reach our plates?

Lab-grown meat was pitched as the future of protein, with billions invested in the promise of meat without killing. But lab-grown steak and chicken still haven't made it to the dinner table — will they ever?
1/1/127 minutes, 10 seconds
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First Nation gets its own emergency alert system

James Smith Cree Nation has released its own emergency alert system, something that Chief Robert Head says could have saved lives during the mass stabbing attack in September 2022. Matt Galloway discusses First Nations safety and security with Robert Head, chief of Peter Chapman, one of the bands that make up James Smith Cree Nation; and Edward Lennard Busch, executive director of the First Nations Chief of Police Association.
1/1/120 minutes, 9 seconds
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Putin saw Navalny as a ‘mortal threat’: Bill Browder

Jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny died Friday, according to Russian prison services. Political activist Bill Browder says Russian President Vladimir Putin saw Navalny as a “mortal threat,” and his death sends a message ahead of elections in the country next month.Plus, we revisit Matt Galloway’s conversation with filmmaker Daniel Roher, who won an Oscar for his documentary Navalny.
1/1/127 minutes, 10 seconds
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Winnipeg is having a moment

There’s a lot to talk about in Manitoba’s biggest city, including a new wave of leadership and Indigenous-led transformations within the city’s core. Matt Galloway hosts a live show at Winnipeg’s West End Cultural Centre, with music from singer-songwriter William Prince, and a discussion of the province’s future with Premier Wab Kinew. Plus, we explore the joy of embracing winter and eating well — anyone for a Fat Boy burger?
1/1/11 hour, 12 minutes, 8 seconds
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George Stroumboulopoulos’ on his extraordinary career in music media

In a conversation from January, George Stroumboulopoulos discusses the power of music, the art of listening and the elements that have shaped his lengthy career in the broadcast industry.
1/1/120 minutes, 52 seconds
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Loss of habitat is biggest threat to migratory species, says UN report

A new report by a United Nations conservation group highlights the challenges migratory species are facing. It says nearly half of the world's migratory species are in decline — and loss of habitat is the biggest threat. But conservationists in Canada say there are ways to work across borders to address this, as working together to conserve those species is crucial.
1/1/119 minutes, 6 seconds
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Bringing maternity care to Inuit women in Quebec’s north

We revisit Duncan McCue's Hands of a Midwife documentary, which highlights the decades long struggle for Inuit women to find proper midwife care in northern Quebec. That started to change in 1986 when the north’s first midwifery clinic opened in Puvirnituq, allowing women to stay close to their community, family and support.
1/1/125 minutes, 59 seconds
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Where the idea of free time came from

It took an international agreement in 1919 for a five-day workweek and eight-hour workdays to become a reality — and as Gary Cross, author of Free Time, points out, that is when our idea of free time came to be. He tells Matt Galloway about his book and how fast consumerism is distorting our free time.
1/1/123 minutes, 28 seconds
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‘Humanity itself [has] failed us,’ says aid worker in Rafah

Israel has stepped up military action in Rafah, a city on the border of Egypt where more than a million people in Gaza have taken refuge. It’s still threatening to invade the city, despite those stuck there not having anywhere else to flee. Matt Galloway speaks with aid worker Yousef Hammash, who fled with his family to Rafah, about the situation in the southern Gaza Strip city; and asks Israel’s Ambassador to Canada Ido Moed what evidence exists to support Israel’s accusations against UNRWA workers.
1/1/119 minutes, 31 seconds
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Retire at 65? Some seniors can’t — out of necessity

The cost of just about everything is going up in Canada, and a growing number of seniors are living with the reality that they can’t afford to retire. We hear from two Canadians who planned to retire at 65 but are still working at 67 — out of necessity.
1/1/122 minutes, 27 seconds
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Addressing the opioid crisis in Belleville, Ont.

In the span of just 48 hours, there were 23 drug overdoses in Belleville, Ont. — enough to prompt Mayor Neil Ellis to declare a state of emergency. In the days that followed, our producer Amanda Grant went to Belleville to meet some of the people facing the crisis head on and learn what support they need from all levels of government.
1/1/119 minutes
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Why a Canadian military veteran set up a humanitarian organization in Ukraine

When Russia’s invasion of Ukraine started two years ago, Paul Hughes, a Canadian farmer and military veteran, went to Ukraine and launched a humanitarian organization there. CBC Radio’s Danny Kerslake caught up with Hughes for his documentary, Mission 300.
1/1/119 minutes, 2 seconds
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‘Strong desire’ from international community for ceasefire in Gaza: Canada’s UN ambassador

The calls for a ceasefire are growing louder after more than 29,000 Palestinians were killed in Gaza, according to Palestinian officials. But Israel is still threatening to invade Rafah, where more than a million Palestinians have fled for refuge. Matt Galloway asks Bob Rae, Canada's ambassador to the United Nations, if the international community should be taking a firmer line to dissuade Israel from invading Rafah.
1/1/115 minutes, 33 seconds
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Toronto rec hockey player Ike Werner on getting cut by a skate blade

Rec hockey player Ike Werner was sliced in the neck by a fellow player’s skate. He tells Matt Galloway about the experience.
1/1/110 minutes, 56 seconds
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The appeal of — and alarm created by — biometrics use at airports

Emirates Airlines in Dubai is installing a biometric system that lets passengers through airport security just by showing their face. It’s an idea gaining traction around the world, from Germany to China. We hear about the appeal of — and alarm created by — this technology.
1/1/119 minutes, 13 seconds
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Zelenskyy’s peculiar transformation, from television star to wartime leader

Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s career change — from wise-cracking television star to wartime leader — was an unlikely one, to put it mildly. But Time Magazine’s Simon Shuster watched the transformation up close. He tells us more about it in his new book, The Showman.
1/1/124 minutes, 22 seconds
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The Current Introduces: The Secret Life of Canada | Season 6

The Secret Life of Canada is a podcast about the country you know and the stories you don't. Join hosts Leah-Simone Bowen and Falen Johnson as they reveal the beautiful, terrible and weird histories of this land. In this clip from the brand new episode “Sorry not Sorry” Leah and Falen try to find out whether or not Canadians actually apologize any more than anyone else. The full episode and many more are available at: https://link.chtbl.com/pZDNzU2h
1/1/16 minutes, 3 seconds
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Controversies cloud the start of MLS’s 2024 season

As the 2024 Major League Soccer season kicks off, several controversies — from a referee strike to outraged fans in East Asia — have cast a bit of a cloud over the opening matches. Soccer writer John Molinaro walks us through the issues.
1/1/17 minutes, 53 seconds
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The precarious state of Putin’s opposition after Navalny’s death

Before his death, Alexei Navalny was the most visible symbol of the opposition to Vladimir Putin in Russia. Now, the opposition is in a precarious state. Matt Galloway speaks with Navalny’s friend and Putin critic Boris Akunin, a celebrated Russian author; and political scientist Jan Matti Dollbaum, co-author of Navalny.
1/1/119 minutes, 11 seconds
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NASA’s looking for volunteers to help simulate life on Mars

NASA is looking for volunteers to live in a habitat meant to simulate life on the red planet. Suzanne Bell, NASA’s lead for its Behavioral Health and Performance Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center, tells Galloway what researchers are hoping to learn from this experiment.
1/1/119 minutes, 44 seconds
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Why more construction workers are talking about mental health

At least one third of construction workers struggle with their mental health, according to Statistics Canada. We hear a worker’s story about what he went through privately, what’s preventing workers from talking about how they’re doing — and how that’s slowly changing.
1/1/120 minutes, 58 seconds
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Killer of London, Ont., Muslim family committed terrorism, says judge

The actions of Nathaniel Veltman, who was convicted of murder and attempted murder after deliberately driving his truck into five members of the Afzaal family in London, Ont., on June 6, 2021, amounted to terrorism under Canadian law, a judge ruled Thursday. Matt Galloway speaks with child and adolescent psychiatrist Dr. Javeed Sukhera, who knew the Afzaal family; and Jessica Davis, president of Insight Threat Intelligence and a former CSIS Analyst.
1/1/119 minutes, 45 seconds
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Addressing intimate partner violence after Sault Ste. Marie deaths

Last October, five people across two homes in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., were found dead, including Angie Sweeney and her ex — the man who pulled the trigger. Sweeney’s friends and family believe her death could have been prevented if recommendations from an inquest into a similar killing had been implemented. In her documentary Angie’s Angels, CBC’s Katie Nicholson visits Sault Ste. Marie to hear calls for changes to how cases of intimate partner violence are treated. 
1/1/120 minutes, 1 second
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What’s behind Canada’s teacher shortage

School boards across the country are struggling to find — and keep — teachers. Educators are calling it a “crisis,” and they say efforts to get teachers into schools faster may have a negative impact on learning. We hear from teachers and advocates about what’s behind the shortage, and what solutions are needed to help students thrive.
1/1/124 minutes, 27 seconds
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Why author Randy Boyagoda wants people to disagree better

In the wake of protests over Hamas' Oct. 7 attack on Israel and Israel's ensuing bombardment of Gaza, author and professor Randy Boyagoda has been appointed a special adviser on civil discourse at the University of Toronto. He speaks with The Current’s Matt Galloway about what civility means in the era of social media, and whether we actually want to hear each other anymore.
1/1/119 minutes, 37 seconds
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Legal concerns for would-be parents amid Alabama embryo ruling

Patients in Alabama are reeling after the state’s Supreme Court declared that frozen embryos produced for in-vitro fertilization are people with legal rights. Lawyer AshLeigh Meyer Dunham says the decision could have significant legal implications for people seeking fertility treatments.
1/1/112 minutes, 57 seconds
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Praise and concern for proposed online safety bill

The federal government is focusing its sights on big tech with the online harms bill, tabled on Monday. The bill aims to combat hatred and incitements to violence, protect young people online and create a new commission on digital safety. Justice Minister Arif Virani says the proposed legislation is a needed safeguard, amid increasing radicalization and online hate.
1/1/124 minutes
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Kara Swisher says it’s time to regulate big tech

Kara Swisher has been writing about our life online since the beginning of her career. In her new memoir Burn Book, the opinionated tech journalist holds little back about the people who control the technology we use. Swisher speaks with The Current’s Matt Galloway about what it will take to hold tech titans to account for what their products do.
1/1/123 minutes, 16 seconds
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Study finds Amazon rainforest still at risk of tipping point

A year after his election, Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s government has cracked down on illegal logging in the Amazon rainforest, and made it harder for farmers to raise animals in protected lands. But a new study says the Amazon is still on course to reach a critical tipping point of degraded earth and plantlife.
1/1/112 minutes, 47 seconds
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Three big city mayors on facing the housing crisis

Cities need more housing, but federal Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre says municipalities are standing in the way of it being built and is promising to tie funding to homes created. Three Canadian mayors — Halifax’s Mike Savage; Brampton, Ont.’s Patrick Brown; and Surrey, B.C.’s Brenda Locke — discuss the challenges their cities are facing when it comes to building more homes.
1/1/122 minutes, 33 seconds
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The case for a ‘leap minute’

The Earth is constantly slowing down, in part due to climate change. That’s why a couple times per year, scientists add a “leap second” to the clock to keep everything in sync. Now, some researchers are advocating to extend that second to a minute.
1/1/110 minutes, 32 seconds
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How Canada’s health-care system can better support older patients

Health journalist Liz Payne's father was 90, healthy and drove himself around town, until one day when he fell and broke his arm. Soon after he was admitted to hospital, then transferred to rehab and eventually, taken to long-term care where he died the year after his fall. The Current’s Matt Galloway speaks with Payne about why she believes her father’s experience is emblematic of the way Canada’s health-care system fails seniors.
1/1/132 minutes, 41 seconds
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What traversing the Trans Canada Trail taught this filmmaker

Dianne Whelan was at a turning point in her life. So she decided she would travel across Canada — by bike, canoe, snow shoe and foot — along the Trans Canada Trail. Whelan shares what she learned about herself and how her faith in the goodness of strangers was restored in a new documentary film, 500 Days in the Wild.
1/1/121 minutes, 17 seconds
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The Next War: Sexual violence in Ukraine

Two years into Russia's war with Ukraine, the fighting continues — and so does the healing in villages reclaimed by Ukrainian forces. Allegations of sexual violence, perpetrated against soldiers and civilians, have emerged from the war. Freelance reporter Sarah Lawrynuik visited one of those towns to understand how survivors are now fighting a new battle for accountability.
1/1/124 minutes, 41 seconds
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New rules for renewable energy projects in Alberta

After a nearly seven-month pause, renewable energy projects are back on the table in Alberta. But those projects come with strict rules — including a buffer zone around wind turbine projects and a ban on renewable energy products on prime agricultural land. We hear about the impact those new rules could have on investment in Alberta.
1/1/119 minutes, 28 seconds
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Airdropping food and supplies into Gaza

Aid agencies are warning of famine in Gaza as Israel continues its siege on the region. As it becomes increasingly difficult to get aid into the Gaza Strip, some countries, including Canada, are now considering dropping food and supplies — from the sky.
1/1/117 minutes, 26 seconds
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Remembering former prime minister Brian Mulroney

Former prime minister Brian Mulroney — known for brokering a free-trade deal with the United States, introducing the GST and his vocal opposition to apartheid in South Africa — has died. He was 84. Two former colleagues, David Crombie and Perrin Beatty, and former CBC chief correspondent Peter Mansbridge reflect on the politician’s legacy with The Current’s Matt Galloway.
1/1/119 minutes, 47 seconds
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Novelist Tommy Orange on Indigenous triumph

Native American novelist Tommy Orange, an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma, became a sensation with his debut novel, There There. His new book, Wandering Stars, is the story of trauma, triumph and the impact of residential schools in the United States. Why the author says he needs to write about Indigenous communities thriving, not just surviving.
1/1/124 minutes, 25 seconds
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Warnings over measles as some officials fear spread in Canada

Measles is on the rise abroad and cases are popping up in Canada. Dr. Isaac Bogoch explains why many health experts are concerned as Canadians get set to travel for March Break.
1/1/18 minutes, 38 seconds
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Afghan migrants in Pakistan fear crackdown by authorities

Afghan migrants who fled to Pakistan when the Taliban returned to power are fearing for their lives after a deadline to leave the country passed. While many are in hiding, some caught in the sweep say they’re not Afghan at all. CBC 's South Asia correspondent Salimah Shivji speaks with The Current’s Matt Galloway about families living in fear in Pakistan and those still waiting to come to Canada.
1/1/117 minutes, 58 seconds
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Regulating overcrowded rooming houses in Brampton, Ont.

In response to an estimated 30,000 illegal rental units — some housing 10 to 15 residents in unsafe conditions — Brampton, Ont., started a pilot program to require landlords to be licensed. It was put on pause after backlash — but officials are planning to start it up again.