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The Changelog: Software Development, Open Source Cover
The Changelog: Software Development, Open Source Profile

The Changelog: Software Development, Open Source

English, Computing/Technology, 1 season, 730 episodes, 3 days, 11 hours, 31 minutes
About
Conversations with the hackers, leaders, and innovators of software development. Hosts Adam Stacoviak and Jerod Santo face their imposter syndrome so you don’t have to. Expect in-depth interviews with the best and brightest in software engineering, open source, and leadership. This is a polyglot podcast. All programming languages, platforms, and communities are welcome. Open source moves fast. Keep up.
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The threat to open source comes from within (News)

Forrest Brazeal is concerned about the open source threat from within, Vicki Boykis explains why Redis is forked, John O’Nolan and the Ghost team plan to federate over ActivityPub, Llama 3 is now available for “businesses of all sizes” & nolen writes up questions to ask when you don’t want to work.
4/22/20249 minutes, 59 seconds
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Rug pull, not cool! (Friends)

If Changelog News had an extended edition, this might be it! Jerod & Adam discuss Hashicorp’s Cease and Desist letter, Redis getting forked, Boston Dymanics’ scary cool new robot, Justin Searls’ extensive use of the Apple Vision Pro, Thorston Ball moving from Vim to Zed, Firefox becoming hard to use, Beeper joining Automattic & more.
4/19/20241 hour, 19 minutes, 8 seconds
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Leading and building Raycast (Interview)

This week Adam is joined by Thomas Paul Mann, Co-founder and CEO of Raycast, to discuss being productive on a Mac, going beyond their free tier, the extensions built by the community, the Raycast Store, how they’re executing on Raycast AI chat which aims to be a single interface to many LLMs. Raycast has gone beyond being an extendable launcher – they’ve gone full-on productivity mode with access to AI paving the way of their future.
4/17/20242 hours, 8 minutes, 32 seconds
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Devin's Upwork "side hustle" exposed (News)

YouTuber “Internet of Bugs” breaks down why AI “software engineer” Devin is no Upwork hero, Redka is Anton Zhiyanov’s attempt to reimplement Redis with SQLite, OpenTofu issues its response to Hashicorp’s Cease and Desist letter, Brian LeRoux introduces Enhance WASM & PumpkinOS is not your average PalmOS emulator.
4/15/20247 minutes, 10 seconds
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More BMC goodness (Friends)

Our beat freak in residence returns, this time to discuss the shiny new Dance Party album! We deconstruct its nostalgic mix, break down some of our favorite tracks & even learn that BMC is writing a mysterious book…
4/13/20241 hour, 16 minutes, 45 seconds
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Replacing Git with Git (Interview)

This week we’re talking to Scott Chacon, one of the co-founders of GitHub, to discuss the history and future of Git and Scott’s new project Git Butler, a branch manager tool that’s aiming to improve the developer experience of Git using Git. We also touch on the contentious topic of open source licensing and the challenges of defining “Open Source”, FSL vs GPL, and more.
4/12/20241 hour, 44 minutes, 13 seconds
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HashiCorp strikes back (News)

HashiCorp sends OpenTufu a nasty-gram in the wake of Matt Asay’s infringement claims, Polar is like Patreon but for software creators, a Common Corpus of LLM data is released on HuggingFace & Loki is an open source tool for fact verification.
4/8/20249 minutes, 8 seconds
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Kaizen! There goes my PgHero (Friends)

Thisis our 14th Kaizen episode! Gerhard put some CDNs to the test, we’ve taken our next step with Postgres on Neon & Jerod pushed 55 commits (but 0 PRs)!
4/5/20241 hour, 22 minutes, 51 seconds
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Getting to Resend (Interview)

This week Adam is joined by Zeno Rocha — the creator of the beloved Dracula theme and Co-founder and CEO of Resend. They discuss his personal journey and the challenges of balancing work and family life, how becoming a parent has given him new perspectives and influenced his decision to start his own company, the role of citizenship and immigration in his journey, how he prepared for the Y Combinator interview, meeting Paul Graham, the challenges of sending email, and the future of Resend and the possibility of a Series A round.
4/4/20241 hour, 35 minutes, 9 seconds
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Who in the world is Jia Tan? (News)

The big story right now is the recently uncovered backdoor in liblzma (aka XZ) – a relatively obscure compression library that happens to be a dependency of OpenSSH. This incident is noteworthy for so many reasons: the exploit itself, how it was deployed, how it was found, what it says about our industry & how the community reacted. Let’s dig in!
4/1/20249 minutes, 53 seconds
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The undercover generalist

Which is smarter: specializing in a particular tech or becoming more of a generalist? It depends! Which is why Jerod invited “undercover generalist” Adolfo Ochagavía on our “It Depends” series to weigh the pros & cons of each path.
3/29/20241 hour, 15 minutes, 13 seconds
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We're flipping the script

Script flipped! Today we’re sharing two interviews of us on Other People’s Podcasts (OPP): Kathrine Druckman from the Open at Intel podcast invited us on the show at KubeCon NA in November and Den Delimarsky hosted Jerod on The Work Item podcast in February.
3/27/20241 hour, 16 minutes, 40 seconds
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Another one bites the dust

Redis’ re-licensing prompts forks like Drew DeVault’s Redict, Matthew Miller thinks we need more community built software, Paul Gross makes the case that DuckDB is the new jq, Anton Zhiyanov shares how he makes a living as a developer despite being “pretty dumb” & Baldur Bjarnason chimes in on the state of the web developer job market.
3/25/20249 minutes, 7 seconds
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Retirement is for suckers

THE Cameron Seay joins us once again! This time we learn more about his life/history, hear all about the boot camps he runs, discuss recent advancements in AI / quantum computing and how they might affect the tech labor market & more!
3/23/20241 hour, 24 minutes, 38 seconds
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It's a TrueNAS world

This week Adam talks with Kris Moore, Senior Vice President of Engineering at iXsystems, about all things TrueNAS. They discuss the history of TrueNAS starting from its origins as a FreeBSD project, TrueNAS Core being in maintenance mode, the momentum and innovation happening in TrueNAS Scale, the evolution of the TrueNAS user interface, managing ZFS compatibility in TrueNAS, the business model of iXsystems and their commitment to the open-source community, and of course what’s to come in the upcoming Dragonfish release of TrueNAS Scale.
3/22/20241 hour, 37 minutes, 59 seconds
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No Maintenance Intended

A new badge for open source projects that won’t be getting any maintenance, everything Chip Huyen learned from looking at 900 open source AI tools, CNBC writes up tech’s renewed layoff trend, Teable is a Postgres-Airtable fusion & Target announces an open source fund.
3/18/20248 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Oban Pros

Today you get Sorentwo for the price of one! We are joined by Shannon & Parker Selbert, both halves of the mom-and-pop software shop behind Oban, the robust job processing library that’s been delivering our emails & processing our audio for years.
3/15/20241 hour, 36 minutes, 8 seconds
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We have a right to repair!

This week Adam went solo — talking to Kyle Wiens, Founder and CEO at iFixit, about all things Right to Repair. They discussed the latest win here in the US with Oregon passing an electronics Right to Repair law to allow owners the right to get their stuff fixed anywhere as well as limit the anti-repair practices of parts pairing. They also discussed the history of the DMCA, the challenges posed by Section 1201, the challenges of recycling products with glued-in batteries, the need for producer responsibility, the future of repairability, repair scoring systems to inform consumers, and so much more. Did you know that iFixit funds its advocacy work through the sale of its tools and parts? So cool.
3/15/20241 hour, 23 minutes, 40 seconds
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Puter is the internet OS

Puter puts an entire operating system in your web browser, the kapa.ai team write down how to structure your docs for LLMs, Daytona is an open source Codespaces alternative, Gleam v1.0 has been released & Rolldown is a JavaScript bundler written in Rust.
3/11/20249 minutes, 33 seconds
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Bourbon and better software

Adam is joined by Robert Ross, Founder and CEO of FireHydrant — they discuss Bourbon, sniffing arms, better software, leading a successful startup, scaling teams, building vs acquiring, and Adam even gets Robert to commit to watching Silicon Valley!!
3/8/20241 hour, 21 minutes, 59 seconds
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It's not always DNS

This week we’re talking about DNS with Paul Vixie — Paul is well known for his contributions to DNS and agrees with Adam on having a “love/hate relationship with DNS.” We discuss the limitations of current DNS technologies and the need for revisions to support future internet scale, the challenges in doing that. Paul shares insights on the future of the internet and how he’d reinvent DNS if given the opportunity. We even discuss the cultural idiom “It’s always DNS,” and the shift to using DNS resolvers like OpenDNS, Google’s 8.8.8.8 and Cloudflare’s 1.1.1.1. Buckle up, this is a good one.
3/8/20241 hour, 33 minutes, 26 seconds
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Apple backs off killing EU web apps

Apple backs off killing web apps (but the fight continues), Luka Kladaric writes about how to ship quality software in hostile environments, Deno’s new package registry is an npm superset, Martin Fowler on the value of periodic face-to-face & Eugene Ghanizadeh wants us to get more decentralized than the Fediverse. Leave us nice words!
3/4/20248 minutes, 27 seconds
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Zed's secret sauce

The Zed text editor has come a long way since Nathan Sobo came on the show last year to tell us about this follow-up to Atom. Zed is open source now, has the underpinnings of collaboration built in, is beginning its journey toward full extensibility, is coming to Linux soon & shows serious promise if Nathan’s team can mix their secret sauce just right.
3/1/20241 hour, 31 minutes, 56 seconds
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Leading in the era of AI code intelligence

This week Adam is joined by Quinn Slack, CEO of Sourcegraph for a “2 years later” catch up from his last appearance on Founders Talk. This conversation is a real glimpse into what it takes to be CEO of Sourcegraph in an era when code intelligence is shifting more and more into the AI realm, how they’ve been driving towards this for years, the subtle human leveling up we’re all experiencing, the direction of Sourcegraph as a result — and Quinn also shares his order of operations when it comes to understanding the daily state of their growth.
2/28/20241 hour, 18 minutes, 33 seconds
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Dance Party

Listen to our newest album called Dance Party as a podcast! This is an EPIC bundle of BMC bangers. We double dog dare you to listen and try NOT to dance 🕺
2/28/202439 minutes, 20 seconds
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Natural Language Programming

GPTScript is a new scripting language to automate your interactions with LLMs, Adam Wiggins conducts a retrospective on Muse, Nikita Prokopov surveyed a bunch of popular websites to see how much JS they loaded on their pages, Pages CMS is a no-hassle CMS for GitHub pages & Jim Nielsen writes about the subversive hyperlink.
2/26/20246 minutes, 41 seconds
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Brewing up something for work

Mike McQuaid, maintainer of Homebrew, and now CTO at Workbrew joins us to discuss open tabs, social media spam and distractions, TikTok’s addictive nature, Apple Vision Pro and its potential future, the maintenance of software, the swing back to old school web development, the value of telemetry in open source projects, Mike’s ongoing involvement in Homebrew and what they’re working on at Workbrew, Homebrew’s relationship with Apple, the importance of developer experience, and sooo much more.
2/23/20241 hour, 55 minutes, 18 seconds
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Making shell history magical with Atuin

Today we speak with Ellie Huxtable, the creator of a magical open source tool for syncing, searching & backing up your shell history. Along the way we learn all about the sync service, why she likes Rust, the branding / marketing of the project, how she quit her job to work on it full time, the business model & so much more.
2/21/20241 hour, 12 minutes, 23 seconds
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Quantum computing gets a reality check

Ship It is back! IEEE Spectrum writes about quantum computing’s reality check, Maxim Dounin announces freenginx, Nadia Asparouhova goes deep on AI & the “effective accelerationism” movement, Angie Byron helps first time open source contributors avoid common pitfalls & Miroslav Nikolov writes up his advice for high-risk refactoring.
2/19/20247 minutes, 31 seconds
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Yeeting stuff into public

Jamie Tanna (who has a website) joins us to discuss the indie web, living with ADHD, sharing his salary history with the world & building DMD – a dynamite open source tool to help you better understand the use of dependencies across your org.
2/17/20241 hour, 29 minutes, 55 seconds
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What exactly is Open Source AI?

This week we’re joined by Stefano Maffulli, the Executive Director of the Open Source Initiative (OSI). They are responsible for representing the idea and the definition of open source globally. Stefano shares the challenges they face as a US-based non-profit with a global impact. We discuss the work Stefano and the OSI are doing to define Open Source AI, and why we need an accepted and shared definition. Of course we also talk about the potential impact if a poorly defined Open Source AI emerges from all their efforts. Note: Stefano was under the weather for this conversation, but powered through because of how important this topic is.
2/16/20241 hour, 17 minutes, 20 seconds
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We can dance if we want to...

Changelog Beats drops a new Dance Party album, Will McGugan’s new Toolong (tl) terminal app, Mitchell Baker is out as Mozilla CEO, Microsoft’s Jordi Adoumie announces sudo for Windows, Tatu Ylonen tells the tale of how they got SSH to be port 22 & Jack Lindamood gives an “Endorse” or “Regret” rating for ~50 different services, tools & processes he used over the 4 years he led infrastructure at a startup.
2/12/20248 minutes, 31 seconds
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Future of [energy, content, food]

We’re taking you back to the hallway track at THAT Conference where we have 3 MORE fun conversations: one with Samuel Goff about the future of energy, one with YouTuber Jess Chan about the future of content creation & one with Vanessa Villa / Noah Jenkins about ag tech & the future of food.
2/9/20242 hours, 28 minutes, 43 seconds
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Taking on Goliath

This week on The Changelog we’re talking with Nadia Odunayo, founder of StoryGraph. Nadia started out as a one woman dev and product team — she’s had to adjust and maneuver along way to becoming the Amazon-free alternative to Goodreads. We talk about the importance of customer research, the iterative nature of customer research and what it takes to synthesize and analyze the findings to guide product development, the technical challenges and learnings she faced while building StoryGraph, for example at several points they’ve faced challenges in handling an influx of users and had to re-architect the system. We also talk about the business model of StoryGraph and how they generate revenue through Plus subscriptions, and partnerships with publishers for book giveaways.
2/8/20241 hour, 53 minutes, 10 seconds
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The promise of hackable software

Geoffrey Litt thinks browser extensions are underrated, Adolfo Ochagavía on being a generalist in a specialist’s world, Jack Garbus praises the Arch Wiki, Terence Eden tries to rebuild FourSquare for ActivityPub using OpenStreetMap & Sebastien Dubois teaches us how to connect ideas together.
2/5/20248 minutes, 48 seconds
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You have how many open tabs?!

We’re taking you to the hallway track at THAT Conference in Austin TX, where we have 3 fun conversations: one with our old friend Nick Nisi from JS Party, one with our new(ish) friend Amy Dutton from CompressedFM (who has been a guest on JS Party of late) & one with our brand new friend / long-time listener Andres Pineda from the Dominican Republic.
2/4/20241 hour, 33 minutes, 18 seconds
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In the beginning (of generative AI)

This week on The Changelog we’re talking with Joe Reis about data engineering and the beginning of generative AI. We discuss, phone hacking via frequency, the role of a data engineer, this AI hype cycle we’re in, build vs buy, the disconnect between data analysts and the business, ethical considerations around AI-generated content, and more. We also discuss the tension between AI and traditional engineering, as well as the inevitability of AI integration into pretty much everything.
2/2/20241 hour, 24 minutes, 58 seconds
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$100k for indie game devs

The Rune team announces $100k in open source grants for indie game devs, the Zed code editor is now open source, the Ollama team releases Python & JavaScript libraries, Max Bernstein tells the story of Scrapscript & Pooya Parsa writes up some notes from a tired maintainer.
1/29/20248 minutes, 51 seconds
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Gradually gradually typing Elixir

Our old friend José Valim & his team have been hard at work adding gradual typing to Elixir. They’re only 1-3% of the way there, but a lot of progress has been made. So, we invited him back on the show for a deep-dive on why, how & when Elixir will be gradually typed.
1/27/20241 hour, 41 minutes, 40 seconds
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Shift left, seriously.

This week we’re going deep on security and what it takes to shift left, seriously. Adam is joined by Justin Garrison (co-host of Ship It), plus two members of the BoxyHQ team — Deepak Prabhakara, Co-founder & CEO and Schalk Neethling, Community Manager and DevRel as well as fellow Changelog Slack member. We discuss how to shift left, the role of the developer and the burden of security, the importance of tooling, the difference between authentication and authorization, and a mindset change for when security takes place — it’s a matter of “when” not “who.”
1/26/20241 hour, 28 minutes, 17 seconds
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GitHub Actions as a time-sharing supercomputer

Alex Ellis’ new actions-batch project uses GitHub Actions as a time-sharing supercomputer, DevDocs.io combines multiple API documentations in a fast, organized, and searchable interface, Jarred Sumner announces Bun’s very own JavaScript shell, Shoelace is a forward-thinking library of web components & Martin Heinz writes an awesome guide to building an indoor air quality monitoring system with Prometheus, Grafana & a CO2 sensor.
1/22/20247 minutes, 23 seconds
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The state of homelab tech (2024)

Techno Tim is back with Adam to discuss the state of homelab in 2024 and the trends happening within homelab tech. They discuss homelab environments providing a safe place for experimentation and learning, network improvement as a gateway to homelab, trends in network connection speeds, to Unifi or not, storage trends, ZFS configurations, TrueNAS, cameras, home automation, connectivity, routers, pfSense, and more. Umm, should we make these conversations between Adam and Tim more frequent?
1/19/20241 hour, 45 minutes, 18 seconds
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Let's talk FreeBSD (finally)

This week we’re joined by FreeBSD & OpenZFS developer, Allan Jude, to learn all about FreeBSD. Allan gives us a brief history of BSD, tells us why it’s his operating system of choice, compares it to Linux, explains the various BSDs out there & answers every curious question we have about this powerful (yet underrepresented) Unix-based operating system.
1/17/20241 hour, 23 minutes, 40 seconds
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A plea for lean software

Niklaus Wirth makes his plea for lean software, PocketBase puts your entire backend in 1 file, Vanna is a Python RAG framework for accurate text-to-SQL generation, Henrik Karlsson wants you to think more about what to focus on & Calvin Wankhede shares how he built a fully offline smart home (and you should too).
1/15/20247 minutes, 41 seconds
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Kaizen! Should we build a CDN?

It’s our 13th Kaizen episode! We’re back from KubeCon, we’re making goals for the year, we’re migrating to Neon & we’re weighing the pros/cons of building our own custom CDN.
1/12/20241 hour, 31 minutes, 56 seconds
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Amazon's silent sacking

Justin Garrison joins us to talk about Amazon’s silent sacking, from his perspective. He should know. He works there. Well, as of yesterday he quit. We discuss how the cloud and Kubernetes have transformed the way software is developed and deployed, the impact silent layoffs have on employees and their careers, speaking out about workplace issues (the right way), how changes in organizational structure can lead to gaps in expertise and responsibility which can lead to potential outages and slower response times. By the way, we officially let the cat off out of the bag in this episode. Justin has joined the ranks here at Changelog and is taking over as the host of Ship It! Expect new episodes soon.
1/11/20241 hour, 20 minutes, 57 seconds
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The I in LLM stands for intelligence

Daniel Stenberg is frustrated with the state of AI tooling for finding security bugs, Brian Birtles is surprised by weird things engineers believe about web dev, Feross Aboukhadijeh details the fallout from a nasty npm prank, Rob Pike shares what he thinks they got right and wrong with Go & Gavin Howard writes up why he believes “all code is tech debt” is all wrong.
1/8/20248 minutes, 19 seconds
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Dear new developer

Hello 2024! We’re kicking off the year with Dan Moore, author of ‘Letters to a New Developer’ — a blog series of letters of what Dan wished he had known when starting his developer career. We discuss the value of online communities for new developers, the importance of communication skills, and the need to stay relevant in a rapidly changing industry. Dan shares his best advice for new developers, including the importance of saying no, leaving code better than you found it, and the value of skill stacking. So much wisdom and advice in this episode!
1/4/20241 hour, 3 minutes, 52 seconds
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State of the "log" 2023

Our 6th annual year-end wrap-up episode! This time we’re featuring 12 (yes, 12!) listener voice mails, our favorite episodes of the year & some insanely cool Breakmaster Cyilnder beats made just for this occasion. Thanks for listening! 💚
12/20/20231 hour, 46 minutes, 12 seconds
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The code, prose & conversations that shaped 2023

This episodes diverges from our traditional fare. I’ve reviewed the 50 previous editions and picked (IMHO) the coolest code, best prose & my favorite podcast episode from each month!
12/18/202314 minutes, 38 seconds
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#define: game theory, dude

What happens when you take four grizzled #define veterans and throw an Emma Bostian into the mix? Find out on this episode because our award-worthy game of fake definitions is back and this time it’s even better!
12/17/20231 hour, 22 minutes, 19 seconds
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ANTHOLOGY — The technical bits

This week we’re taking you to the hallway track of All Things Open 2023 in Raleigh, NC. Today’s episode features: Heikki Linnakangas (Co-founder of Neon and Postgre hacker), Robert Aboukhalil (Bioinformatics software engineer) working on bringing desktop apps to the web with WASM, and Scott Ford who loves taking a codebase from brown to green at Corgibytes.
12/15/20231 hour, 27 minutes, 16 seconds
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Open source LLMs are catching up

A group of researchers set out to test claims that its open source rivals had achieved parity (or even better) with ChatGPT on certain tasks, Richard Hipp and his team have rewritten SQLite’s text-based JSON functions, Ratatui is a Rust crate for cooking up TUIs, Morris Brodersen built a complex app in vanilla JS as a case study & Headscale is Kristoffer Dalby’s open source, self-hosted implementation of the Tailscale control server.
12/11/20237 minutes, 26 seconds
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HATEOAS corpus

Jerod is back with another “It Depends” episode! This time he’s joined by Kris Brandow from Go Time and they’re talking all things API design. What makes a good API? Is GraphQL a solid choice? Why do we do REST wrong? And WTF does HATEOAS mean, anyway?
12/8/20231 hour, 44 minutes, 29 seconds
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Hare aims to be a 100 year language

This week on The Changelog we’re joined by Drew DeVault, talking about the Hare programming language. From the website, Hare is a systems programming language designed to be simple, stable, and robust. When we asked Drew why he credted it, he said “[because] I wanted it to exist, and it did not exist.” Wise words. Hare aims to be a 100 year language (which we get into on the show), why he’s so possionate about all things open source, the state of the language, fostering a culture that values stability, and oddly enough — what it takes to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwhich.
12/6/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 24 seconds
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Leaked GPT prompts & Firefox on the brink

ChatGPT’s new GPTs feature leak their prompts, Firefox’s share of the browser market will soon drop below 2%, Robin Berjon tries to formalize a name for those who can’t be named, Amy Lai tells the tale of the weirdest bug she’s ever seen & Facundo Olano trumps the “code is read more than written” cliche with his own: “code is run more than read.”
12/4/20237 minutes, 57 seconds
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The state of the 2023 tech market

Gergely Orosz is back for our annual year-end update on the tech market, writ large. How is hiring? Has AI really changed the game? What about that OpenAI fiasco? We also talk in-depth about Gergely’s self-published book, The Software Engineer’s Guidebook, which has been four years in the making.
12/1/20231 hour, 14 minutes, 46 seconds
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Gleaming the KubeCon

This week we’re gleaming the KubeCon. Ok, some people say CubeCon, while others say KubeCon…we talk with Solomon Hykes about all things Dagger, Tammer Saleh and James McShane about going beyond cloud native with SuperOrbital, and Steve Francis and Spencer Smith about the state of Talos Linux and what they’re working on at Sidero Labs.
11/30/20232 hours, 4 minutes, 55 seconds
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Was Jamstack a zero interest rate phenomenon?

Zach Leatherman on the tension and future of the Jamstack community, Chenxin Li helps you avoid 13 bad practices in data visualization, Laravel Pulse is coming real soon, Max Chernyak develops a new way to accomplish long term refactors & Spencer Baugh makes the case for more libraries and less services in our software stacks.
11/27/20238 minutes, 26 seconds
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Bringing Dev Mode to Figma

This week on we’re joined by Emil Sjölander from Figma — talking about bringing Dev Mode to Figma. Dev Mode is their new workspace in Figma that’s designed to bring developers and design to the same tool. The question they’re trying to answer is “How do you create a home for developers in a design tool?” We go way back to Emil’s startup that was acquired by Figma called Visly, how we iterated to here from 20 years ago (think PSD > HTML days), what they did to build Dev Mode, what they’re doing around codegen, the popularity of design systems, and what it takes to go from zero to Dev Mode.
11/22/20231 hour, 17 minutes, 11 seconds
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Watching OpenAI unravel in real-time

The internet watches OpenAI unravel in real-time, tldraw has a new experiment going with GPT-4 Vision that turns mockups into code, Tony Ennis makes the case for HTML First, James Somers writes a “eulogy” to coding for The New Yorker & Laurence Tratt describes and details four kinds of optimisation.
11/20/20238 minutes, 49 seconds
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It dependencies

Jerod goes one-on-one with our old friend Justin Searls! We talk build vs buy decisions, dependency selection & how Justin has implemented POSSE (Post On Site Syndicate Elsewhere) in response to the stratification of social networks.
11/17/20231 hour, 9 minutes, 41 seconds
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All the places Swift will go

This week we’re talking about Swift with Ben Cohen, the Swift Team Manager at Apple. We caught up with Ben while at KubeCon last week. Ben takes us into the world of Swift, from Apple Native apps on iOS and macOS, to the Swift Server Workgroup for developing and deploying server side applications, to the Swift extension for VS Code, Swift as a safe C/C++ successor language, Swift on Linux and Windows, and of course what The Browser Company’s Arc browser is doing to bring Arc to Windows.
11/16/202353 minutes, 43 seconds
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Share your terminal with anyone on the web

sshx lets you share your terminal with anyone on a multiplayer infinite canvas, Herbert Lui writes three things about your competitors, Anton Medvedev’s fx is a terminal JSON viewer & processor, Danny Castonguay shares advice on attending large conferences & Jeremy Pinto’s experimental RAGTheDocs project is working toward an exciting reality.
11/13/20236 minutes, 49 seconds
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Backslashes are trash

Mat Ryer returns with his guitar, an unpopular opinion & his favorite internet virus.
11/11/20231 hour, 30 minutes, 2 seconds
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Pushing back on unconstrained capitalism

This week we’re talking with Cory Doctorow (this episode contains explicit language) about how we can get back to that “new good internet.” Cory’s new book The Internet Con offers a lens to this conversation about disenshittifying the internet through anti-trust laws, limits on corporate tweaking, regulating unconstrained capitalism, and all the ways enshittification is enabled. Cory also shares his experience recording his own audio book under the direction of Gabrielle de Cuir at Skyboat Media, and what’s to come from his next Science Fiction book The Lost Cause.
11/10/20231 hour, 35 minutes, 2 seconds
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How to write a good comment

David Hugh-Jones has a lot to say about what makes a good comment, Hugging Face released a distilled variant of Whisper for speech recognition, The New Stack reports on C++ creator Bjarne Stroustrup’s plan for bringing safety to the language, Jeff Sandberg declares that CSS is fun again & Jose M. Gilgado praises the beauty of finished software.
11/6/20237 minutes, 40 seconds
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Beat freak in residence

We’re joined this week by the beat freak in residence himself, the mysterious Breakmaster Cylinder. Listen along as we talk about how we make our beats, what inspires us for our music, and some behind the scenes on our latest albums.
11/3/20231 hour, 20 minutes, 58 seconds
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Observing the power of APIs

Jean Yang’s research on programming languages at Carnegie Mellon led her to realize that APIs are the layer that makes or breaks quality software systems. Unfortunately, developers are underserved by tools for dealing with, securing & understanding APIs. That realization led her to found Akita Software, which led her to join Postman by way of acquisition. That move, at least in part, also led her to join us on this very podcast. We think you’re going to enjoy this interview, we sure did.
11/2/20231 hour, 26 minutes, 55 seconds
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What will React come up with Next?

The hubbub of the web dev world right now is Next.js’ integration of React Server Components, Kent C. Dodds writes up why he doesn’t use Next, Lee Robinson responds with why he does, the NixOS team hits a milestone in their reproducible builds effort & OpenSign is an open source alternative to DocuSign.
10/30/20237 minutes, 14 seconds
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Protecting screen time

Jared Henderson joins us to discuss the state of the art in software parental controls and how we protect our children and lock down our home networks from the constant onslaught of malicious and unwanted content.
10/27/20231 hour, 35 minutes, 44 seconds
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ANTHOLOGY — The way of open source

This week we’re taking you to the hallway track of All Things Open 2023 in Raleigh, NC. Today’s episode features: Matthew Sanabria (former Engineer at HashiCorp working on Terraform Enterprise), Nithya Ruff (Chief Open Source Officer and Head of the Open Source Program Office at Amazon) & Jordan Harband (Open Source Maintainer-at-large with dependencies in most JavaScript apps out there. There has been many changes this year in open source, and each of these perspectives lends insight into challenging and changing waters happening right now in open source.
10/27/20231 hour, 38 minutes, 39 seconds
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Next Level

Listen to our Next Level album as a podcast! We grew up in the days of the Nintendo Entertainment System and the Sega Genesis. It’s no surprise that so many of our tracks are inspired by the 8-bit and 16-bit music of our youth. From Castlevania to Contra, Sonic the Hedgehog, and many more — we were inspired by all the nostalgic soundtracks from the games that got us here, to give our pods one-of-a-kind vibes. If you’ve been head nodding to our beats during our shows and you’ve been wishing for a way to listen outside of our pods, then this release will be an absolute delight. It’s dangerous to go alone! Take this on your next coding adventure or deep work session…
10/23/202342 minutes, 2 seconds
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Introducing Changelog Beats

Changelog drops full-length musical albums in collaboration with Breakmaster Cylinder, Justin Searls on why the right tools fail for the wrong reasons, The Unix Sheikh says we have too many level of abstractions, Adam at PiCockpit compares the newly-announced Raspberry Pi 5 to the competition & Jorge Medina assures us that we’re not lacking creativity, we’re just overwhelmed by content.
10/23/202310 minutes, 1 second
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Human skills to pay the bills

Long time friend KBall makes his “first” appearance on The Changelog by way of Changelog & Friends. You likely know Kevin from his panelist position on JS Party. Today he’s sharing his passion for coaching and developing human skills.
10/20/20231 hour, 24 minutes, 39 seconds
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Pushing ntfy to the next level

This week Jerod goes solo with Philipp Heckel, creator of ntfy, to discuss this simple HTTP-based service that lets you send notifications to your phone or desktop via scripts from any computer. They discuss why he built it, how he built it, and what his plans are for the future of this beloved side hustle.
10/20/202358 minutes, 21 seconds
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LMMS are the new LLMs

Chip Huyen documents the shifting sand of large data models, Herman Õunapuu reviews the Zimaboard, Bryan Braun shares 4 of his most recent VSCode configuration discoveries & Swizec Teller wrote a great summary of the inaugural AI Engineer Summit.
10/16/20236 minutes, 28 seconds
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Kaizen! Slightly more instant

Gerhard joins us for the 12th Kaizen and this time talk about what we DIDN’T do. We were holding S3 wrong, we put some cash back in our pockets, we enabled HTTP/3, Brotli compression, and Fastly websockets, we improved our SLOs, we improved Changelog Nightly, and we’re going to KubeCon 2023 in Chicago.
10/13/20231 hour, 22 minutes, 39 seconds
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Coming to asciinema near you

This week we’re joined by Marcin Kulik to talk about his project asciinema. You’ve likely seen this out there in the wild — asciinema lets you record and share your terminal sessions in full fidelity. Forget screen recording apps that offer blurry video. asciinema provides a lightweight, text-based approach to terminal recording with lots of possibilities. Marcin shares the backstory on this project, where he’d like to take it, who’s supporting him along the way, and we even included 11 minutes of bonus content for Changelog ++ subscribers.
10/11/20231 hour, 23 minutes, 3 seconds
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RTO vs WFH & the case for strong static typing

Jacob Kaplan-Moss’ recommendations for remote vs colocated teams, Duarte Carmo created a neural search engine from Changelog transcripts, Tom Hacohen says strong static typing is a hill he’s willing to die on, Orhun Parmaksız created a CLI that makes your keyboard sound like a typewriter & Luke Plant spits hard truths about simplicity.
10/9/20238 minutes, 38 seconds
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The beginning of the end of physical media

On September 29th, Netflix shipped its final DVDs, marking the end of an era in physical media. So, we invited our friend Christina Warren (aka film_girl) from GitHub to pour out a drink with us and lament the end of this golden age of access to the films we all love.
10/6/20231 hour, 12 minutes, 38 seconds
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Tauri’s next big move

This week we’re joined by Daniel Thompson, Co-founder and Core Member of Tauri. It’s been a year since we last had Daniel on the show. He catches us up on all things Tauri, their continued efforts towards Tauri 1.5 (which just released), the launch of CrabNebula and how they’re the people pushing the Tauri ecosystem forward and building on top of it, the state of Electron vs Tauri, and UI with Tauri. He even surprises us with his idea of creating a web browser.
10/5/20231 hour, 11 minutes, 34 seconds
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InfluxDB drops Go for Rust but gokrazy is really cool

InfluxDB finishes a multi-year rewrite in Rust, the Raspberry Pi 5 will be on sale by the end of the month, the Bruno team builds an open source API explorer that’s local-first and will never have a cloud, Xe Iaso thinks gokrazy is really cool & Matt Rickard shares lessons from years of debugging.
10/2/20238 minutes, 9 seconds
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#define: a game of fake definitions

Jerod gathers a group of friends for our first game show experiment here on Changelog & Friends! This is a game of obscure jargon, fake definitions & expert tomfoolery. Our contestants checked their imposter syndrome at the door, because they either know what these words mean or they fake it ’til they make their peers think they do.
9/29/20231 hour, 44 minutes, 3 seconds
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Vibes from Strange Loop

This week on The Changelog we’re taking you to the hallway track of the final Strange Loop conference. First up is AnnMarie Thomas — an engineering, business, and education professor. AnnMarie gave one of the opening keynotes titled “Playing with Engineering.” We also caught up with many first-time and multi-time attendees who shared their favorite moments from Strange Loop over the years. You’ll hear from Richard Feldman, Colin Dean, and Taylor Troesch. Last up we talk with Pokey Rule. He gave a talk about his project called Cursorless which is a spoken language for structural code editing. Changelog++ subscribers get a super extended version of this episode which includes everything we recorded at Strange Loop. Become a Changelog++ subscriber
9/28/20231 hour, 15 minutes, 28 seconds
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The missing sync layer for modern apps

ElectricSQL is a project that offers a local-first sync layer for web and mobile apps, Ned Batchelder writes about the myth of the myth of “learning styles”, Carl Johnson thinks XML is better than YAML, Berkan Sasmaz defines and describes “idempotency” & HyperDX is an open source alternative Datadog or New Relic.
9/25/20238 minutes, 10 seconds
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Open source is at a crossroads

This week we’re joined by Steve O’Grady, Principal Analyst & Co-founder at RedMonk. The topic today is the definition of open source, the constant pressure on the true definition of the term, and the seemingly small but vocal minority that aim to protect that definition. In Steve’s post Why Open Source Matters, he says “open source is at a crossroads” and there are some seeking to break the definition of open source to one that is more permissive to their desires, and they are closer than ever to achieving that goal. Today’s conversation goes deep on this subject.
9/20/20231 hour, 26 minutes, 15 seconds
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Death by a thousand microservices

Andrei Taranchenko says the software industry is learning once again that complexity kills, Casey Muratori outlines a long list of Unity alternatives, Filip Szkandera builds a functioning (macro) processor for RISC-V & Matt Basta tells the tale of the time he built a web-based Excel clone inside Uber only to have it discarded a week later.
9/18/20238 minutes, 37 seconds
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What do we want from a web browser?

A hoy hoy! Our old friend Nick Nisi does his best to bring up TypeScript, Vim & Tmux as many times as possible while we discuss a new batch of web browsers, justify why we like the ones we do & try to figure out what it’d take to disrupt the status quo of Big Browser.
9/15/20231 hour, 44 minutes, 35 seconds
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Attack of the Canaries!

This week we’re joined by Haroon Meer from Thinkst — the makers of Canary and Canary Tokens. Haroon walks us through a network getting compromised, what it takes to deploy a Canary on your network, how they maintain low false-positive numbers, their thoughts and principles on building their business (major wisdom shared!), and how a Canary helps surface network attacks in real time.
9/13/20231 hour, 43 minutes, 36 seconds
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Bun 1.0 is here & Mojo is ready for download

Bun 1.0 is out of the oven, Mojo is now available for local download, Vince Lwt asked 60+ LLMs a set of 20 questions & published the answers, Textual Web turns TUIs in to web applications & James Haydon dives deep to discover the bug that the UK air traffic control meltdown.
9/11/20238 minutes, 32 seconds
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Doomed to discuss AI

Author, journalist, travel writer & software engineer Jon Evans joins us to weigh in on the cultural history (and present-day sentiment) of AI doom. Along the way, we talk plausible Sci-Fi, ultrasound drug delivery, the maybe-evolving laws of physics & even weirder stuff.
9/8/20231 hour, 23 minutes, 15 seconds
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OpenTF for an open Terraform

This week we’re talking about the launch of OpenTF and what it’s going to take to successfully fork HashiCorp’s Terraform. We’re joined by Josh Padnick to discuss what exactly happened, how HashiCorp’s license change changes things, who has been impacted by this change, and ultimately what they are doing about it.
9/6/20231 hour, 22 minutes, 10 seconds
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A portrait of the best worst programmer

Dan North tells the tale of Tim, the worst programmer he’s worked with (who also is a heck of a programmer), Kevin Lin declares that OpenTelemetry delivers on its promise for open observability, Justin Garrison details Terraform vs GitOps vs System Initiative, Inc. writes how Apple beats burnout & Aline Lerner’s advice on how (not) to sabotage your salary negotiations before you even start.
9/5/20238 minutes, 27 seconds
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You call it tech debt I call it malpractice

Go Time panelist (and semi-professional unpopular opinion maker) Kris Brandow joins us to discuss his deep-dive on the waterfall paper, his dislike of the “tech debt” analogy, why documentation matters so much & how everything is a distributed system.
9/1/20231 hour, 39 minutes, 15 seconds
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Back to the terminal of the future

This week on The Changelog Adam is joined by Zach Lloyd, Founder & CEO of Warp. We talked with Zach last year about what it takes to build the terminal of the future, and today Adam catches up with Zach to see where they are at on that mission. They talk about the business model of Warp, how they measure success, reaching product/market fit, building features developers love, integrating AI, and the pros and cons of going open source (again).
8/30/20231 hour, 49 minutes, 58 seconds
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OpenTF sticks a fork in Terraform

OpenTF announces they’re forking Terraform and joining the Linux Foundation, Meta gets in the LLM-for-codegen game with Code Llama, Matt Mullenweg announces WordPress.com’s new 100-year plan, Paul Gichuki from Thinkst learns that default behaviors stick (and so do examples) & Marco Otte-Witte makes his case for Rust on the web.
8/28/20237 minutes, 56 seconds
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The serenity of building your own OS

This week we’re talking to Andreas Kling about SerenityOS and Ladybird. Andreas started SerenityOS as a means of therapy. It’s self-described as a love letter to “‘90s user interfaces with a custom Unix-like core.” Andreas previously worked at Nokia and later at Apple on the WebKit team, so he had an itch to do something along the lines of a browser, and that’s where Ladybird came from. We get into the details of compilers, OSs, browsers, web specifications, and the love of making software.
8/24/20231 hour, 22 minutes, 47 seconds
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All your CAPTCHAs are belong to bots

New research shows that CAPTCHAs are now utterly useless, hundreds of concerned technologists signed the OpenTF Manifesto to keep Terraform open source forever, Josh Collinsworth writes down all the things you forgot (or never knew) because of React, Mike Seidle shared some quick-but-powerful advice on building new software features & Erlend Sogge Heggen urges new open source projects to join the Fediverse (by way of Mastodon).
8/21/20238 minutes, 25 seconds
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An aberrant generation of programmers

Our friend Justin Searls recently published a widely-read essay on enthusiast programmers, inter-generational conflict & what we do with this information. That seemed like a good conversation starter, so we grabbed Justin and Landon Gray to discuss. Let’s talk!
8/18/20231 hour, 22 minutes, 1 second
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30 years of Debian

This week we’re talking with Jonathan Carter who’s on his fourth term as Debian Project Lead (DPL) and we’re talking about 30 years of Debian!
8/17/20231 hour, 31 minutes, 15 seconds
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HashiCorp means business (source), why Tailwind won, WarpStream, managing difficult devs & an update on Go 2

HashiCorp adopts a Business Source license, Matt Rickard hypothesizes why Tailwind CSS won, WarpStream sets out to make a Kafka-compatible offering directly on S3, Vadim Kravcenko publishes an excellent guide for managing difficult software engineers & Russ Cox gives an update on Go 2.
8/14/20238 minutes, 4 seconds
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Kaizen! S3 R2 B2 D2

Gerhard joins us for the 11th Kaizen and this one might contain the most improvements ever. We’re on Fly Apps V2, we’ve moved from S3 to R2 & we have a status page now, just to name a few.
8/11/20231 hour, 19 minutes, 15 seconds
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Thinking outside the box of code

Leslie Lamport is a computer scientist & mathematician who won ACM’s Turing Award in 2013 for his fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of distributed and concurrent systems. He also created LaTeX and TLA+, a high-level language for “writing down the ideas that go into the program before you do any coding.”
8/9/20231 hour, 8 minutes, 8 seconds
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The open source licensing war is over, Tailwind components for your AI app, Mac mini modded to use PoE, Apple joins OpenUSD alliance & picking the worst tool for the job

Matt Asay thinks the open source licensing war is over, LangUI is an open source Tailwind component library for your AI chat app, Ivan Kuleshov modded a Mac mini to run via PoE, Apple joins Pixar and others in the Alliance for OpenUSD & John D. Cook says sometimes you shouldn’t pick the best tool for the job.
8/7/20237 minutes, 41 seconds
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DX on DX

This week Adam is joined by Abi Noda, founder and CEO of DX to talk about DX AKA DevEx (or the long-form Developer Experience). Since the dawn of software development there has been this push to understand what makes software teams efficient, but more importantly what does it take to understand developer productivity? That’s what Abi has been focused on for the better part of the last 8 years of his career. He started a company called Pull Panda that was acquired by GitHub, spent a few years there on this problem before going out on his own to start DX which helps startups to the fortune 500 companies gather real insights that leads to real improvement.
8/3/20231 hour, 37 minutes, 34 seconds
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Stack Underflow, LLM Attacks, web DRM by Google, unlocking Python & no one wants to talk to your chatbot

Something interesting is going on at Stack Overflow, researches dig up some new (and potentially unavoidable) LLM attacks, Google proposes a new API that Ron Amadeo calls a DRM gatekeeper for the web, the Python Steering Council affirms PEP 703 & Lucas McGregor writes why no one wants to talk to your chatbot.
7/31/20239 minutes, 12 seconds
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Homelab nerds, unite!

Ok Homelabbers, it’s time to unite! Join Adam and his new friend Techno Tim for 1.5 hours of homelab goodness. From networking and WiFi, virtualizing Ubuntu running Docker containers, to Home Assistant and automation, building a Kubernetes cluster, to gutting a perfectly good machine just to build exactly what you need to run the ultimate Plex server — that’s what homelab is about. Let’s do this.
7/28/20231 hour, 34 minutes, 18 seconds
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From Docker to Dagger

This week we’re joined by Solomon Hykes, the creator of Docker. Now he’s back with his next big thing called Dagger — CI/CD as code that runs anywhere. We’re users of Dagger so check out our codebase if you want to see how it works. On today’s show Solomon takes us back to the days of Docker, what it was like on that 10 year journey, his transition from Docker to Dagger, Dagger’s community-led growth model, their focus on open source and community, how it works, and even a cameo from Kelsey Hightower to explain how Dagger works.
7/28/20231 hour, 33 minutes, 35 seconds
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Supabase quietly went public, Twitter is now X, GitHub's Copilot Chat now in public preview & Oxide has homelab plans (in 2050)

Our friends at Supabase quietly went public today, Redpoint’s InfraRed 100 report is out, Twitter is now X, GitHub’s Copilot Chat now in public preview (for businesses) & Oxide has homelab plans (in 2050).
7/24/20239 minutes, 33 seconds
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Bringing the cloud on prem

Adam was out when Bryan made his podcast debut here on The Changelog, so we had to get him back on the show along with his co-founder and CEO Steve Tuck to discuss Silicon Valley (the TV show), all things Oxide, homelab possibilities, bringing the power of the cloud on prem, and more.
7/21/20231 hour, 37 minutes, 24 seconds
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Storytime with Steve Yegge

This week it’s storytime with Steve Yegge! Steve came out of retirement to join Sourcegraph as Head of Engineering. Their next frontier is Cody, their AI coding assistant that answers code questions and writes code for you by reading your entire codebase and the code graph. But, we really spent a lot of time talking with Steve about his time at Amazon, Google, and Grab. Ok, it’s storytime!
7/20/20231 hour, 43 minutes, 7 seconds
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Magical shell history, engineers should focus on writing, LazyVim, CSS in 2023 & bad issue tracker behaviors

Ellie Huxtable’s Atuin makes your shell history magical, Dmitry Kudryavtsev writes why he thinks engineers should focus on writing, LazyVim promises to transform your Neovim setup into a full-fleged IDE, Geoff Graham shares with Smashing Magazine how he writes CSS in 2023 & Brad Fitzpatrick collects a public list of bad issue track behaviors.
7/17/20237 minutes
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Dear Red Hat...

Red Hat’s decision to lock down RHEL sources behind a subscription paywall was met with much ire and opened opportunity for Oracle to get a smack in and SUSE to announce a fork with $10 million behind it. Few RHEL community members have been as publicly irate as Jeff Geerling, so we invited him on the show to discuss.
7/14/20231 hour, 15 minutes
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Types will win in the end

This week we’re talking about type checking with Jake Zimmerman. Jake is one of the leads at Stripe working on Sorbet — an open source project that does Type checking in Ruby and runs over Stripe’s entire Ruby codebase. As of May of 2022 Stripe’s codebase was over 15 million lines of code spread across 150,000 files. If you think you have a bigger Ruby codebase, Jake is down to go byte-for-byte to see who wins. Jake shares tons of wisdom and more importantly he shares why he thinks types will win in the end.
7/13/20231 hour, 5 minutes
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Oracle smacks IBM over RHEL, a Slack clone in 5 lines of Bash, 13 ways to think about joins, llama.cpp learns web chat & Meta will pay to remove Python's GIL

Oracle smacks IBM for their handling of RHEL, the folks at The Dam share a Slack clone in 5 lines of Bash, Justin Jaffray writes up 13 ways to think about joins, llama.cpp learns web chat thanks to a contribution by Tobi Lütke & Meta is willing to pay 3 engineers to remove Python’s GIL.
7/10/20238 minutes
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Efficient Linux at the CLI

This week we’re talking to Daniel J. Barrett, author of Efficient Linux at the Command Line as well as many other books. Daniel has a PhD and has been teaching and writing about Linux for more than 30 years (almost 40!). So we invited Dan to join us on the show to talk about efficient ways to use Linux. He teaches us about combining commands, re-running commands, $CDPATH hacks, and more.
7/6/20231 hour, 22 minutes, 56 seconds
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Streak redemption, vectors are the new JSON, CommonJS is hurting JavaScript & the rise of the AI Engineer

Lukas Mathis writes about streak redemption, Jonathan Katz thinks vectors are the new JSON, Andy Jiang says CommonJS is hurting JavaScript & Swyx on the rise of the AI Engineer.
7/3/20236 minutes, 20 seconds
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Even the best rides come to an end

On Monday, Kelsey Hightower announced his retirement from Google. On Tuesday, he sat down with us to discuss why, how & what’s next. Along the way, Kelsey teaches us how not to suck at work, analyzes his magical demos, fights off the haters (again) & opines on System Initiative, Dagger & 37Signals moving off the cloud.
6/30/20231 hour, 28 minutes, 53 seconds
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Don't make things worse!

Taylor Troesh joins Jerod to discuss a bevy of software development topics: yak shaves, dependency selection, -10x engineers, IKEA-oriented development, his new content-addressable programming language & much more along the way.
6/28/20231 hour, 7 minutes, 8 seconds
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AI poisoned its own well, libraries to UnsuckJS, we need more Richard Stallman & ChatGPT package hallucination

Tracy Durnell thinks AI has already poisoned its own well, Adam Hill’s microsite catalogs everything you need to UnsuckJS, Lionel Dricot thinks we need more Richard Stallman, not less & the Vulcan team proves you can’t trust ChatGPT’s package recommendations.
6/26/20238 minutes, 3 seconds
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There's a whole PEP about that

Brett Cannon (our unofficial ambassador to the Python community) is here to help alleviate our pip install anxiety. Along the way, we ask him about Python 4, removing the GIL, what he thinks about Chris Lattner’s Mojo project, Rust in the Python world & way more (of course).
6/23/20231 hour, 31 minutes, 7 seconds
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Rebuilding DevOps from the ground up

This week we’re joined by Adam Jacob and we’re talking about his mission at System Initiative to rebuild DevOps. They are out of stealth mode and ready to show off their transformative new power tool that reimagines what’s possible from DevOps. It’s an intelligent automation platform that allows DevOps teams to build detailed interactive simulations of their infrastructure and use them to rapidly update their production environments.
6/22/20231 hour, 27 minutes, 48 seconds
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An open platform for LLMs, speed matters, imaginary problems, Val Town & how to finish your projects

An open platform for operating LLMs in production, working quickly is more important than it seems, imaginary problems are the root of bad software, Val Town is a social website to write and run code & Aaron Francis’ guide to finishing your projects.
6/19/20237 minutes, 27 seconds
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"Mat Depends"

Mat Ryer is back and he’s brought with him 10 tips to be a 10x developer (like he is). After that, we try a new segment we’re calling “Tool Time” (and try out a few jingles for it along the way). Finally, it’s time to review our previous unpopular opinions and put some new ones into the world for your (dis)agreeing pleasure. Join us for an automagical time!
6/16/20231 hour, 40 minutes, 25 seconds
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Passkeys for a passwordless future

This week we’re talking about Passkeys with Anna Pobletts, Head of Passwordless, at 1Password. Will Passkeys enable a passwordless future? Time will tell. Anna shares the what, the why, how, and the when on Passkeys.
6/15/20231 hour, 10 minutes, 38 seconds
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Reddit goes dark, Lemmy lights up, OpenObserve, some blogging myths & Jefro on Automotive Linux

Reddit goes dark as subreddits protest, Lemmy lights up as disillusioned redditors turn to the fediverse, OpenObserve is a cloud native observability platform, Julia Evans dispels some myths about blogging & Red Hat’s Jeffrey “Jefro” Osier-Mixon tells Adam and Jerod all about Automotive Linux at Open Source Summit NA.
6/12/202328 minutes, 57 seconds
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Reactions to Apple’s new vision

Homebrew project leader Mike McQuaid joins us to weigh in on Apple’s big Vision Pro announcement. We also hit on our favorite (and least favorite) non-AR things from the WWDC 2023 keynote.
6/9/20231 hour, 23 minutes, 7 seconds
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ANTHOLOGY — It's a Cloud Native world

This is our last week of hallway track coverage at The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit North America 2023 in Vancouver, Canada. Today’s anthology episode features: Jeffrey Sica (Developer Experience & Programs @ CNCF), Eddie Zeneski (Kubernetes SIG CLI), Yaron Schneider (Co-creator of Dapr and Founder and CTO at Diagrid). Special thanks to our friends at GitHub for sponsoring us to attend this conference as part of Maintainer Month.
6/8/20231 hour, 21 minutes, 34 seconds
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Starlight, Knuth asks ChatGPT, Stack Overflow mods strike, Reddit API pricing revolt & open source AI has a new champ

The Astro team releases a new documentation builder, legendary computer scientist Donald Knuth plays with ChatGPT, over 500 volunteer mods have signed an open letter to Stack Overflow Inc, Reddit faces a revolt due to their new API pricing & the Technology Innovation Institute release Falcon, a new open source LLM that’s topping Hugging Face’s leaderboard.
6/5/20239 minutes, 48 seconds
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Kaizen! The best pipeline ever™

Gerhard is back! Today we continue our Kaizen tradition by getting together (for the 10th time) with one of our oldest friends to talk all about the continuous improvements we’re making to Changelog’s platform and podcasts.
6/2/20231 hour, 20 minutes, 16 seconds
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ANTHOLOGY — Maintaining maintainers

This week on The Changelog we’re continuing our Maintainer Month series by taking to you back to the hallway track of The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit North America 2023 in Vancouver, Canada. Today’s anthology episode features: Stormy Peters (VP of Communities at GitHub), Dr. Dawn Foster (Director of Open Source Community Strategy at VMware), and Angie Byron (Drupal Core Product Manager and Community Director at Aiven). Special thanks to our friends at GitHub for sponsoring us to attend this conference as part of Maintainer Month.
5/31/20231 hour, 30 minutes, 1 second
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An API store for LLMs, DeviceScript, Nyxt: the hacker's browser, expectations debt & there's still no silver bullet

The Gorilla team is building an API store for LLMs, DeviceScript is Microsoft’s new TypeScript programming environment for microcontrollers, Nyxt is a hackable browser written in Lisp, Morgan Housel writes about expectations debt & I issue a gentle reminder to my fellow software engineers: there’s still no silver bullet.
5/30/20237 minutes, 51 seconds
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Introducing Changelog & Friends

What if your favorite conference’s hallway track continued year round? That’s the vibe we’re trying to capture with Changelog & Friends, a new Friday talk show from your friends at Changelog. In this intro episode, Adam & Jerod talk all about our new MWF plan for The Changelog , discuss what this Friends flavor is all about, and have a lot of fun along the way.
5/26/202343 minutes, 26 seconds
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ANTHOLOGY — Open source AI

This week on The Changelog we’re taking you to the hallway track of The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit North America 2023 in Vancouver, Canada. Today’s anthology episode features: Beyang Liu (Co-founder and CTO at Sourcegraph), Denny Lee (Developer Advocate at Databricks), and Stella Biderman (Executive Director and Head of Research at EleutherAI). Special thanks to our friends at GitHub for sponsoring us to attend this conference as part of Maintainer Month.
5/24/20231 hour, 38 minutes, 6 seconds
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Trogon, StableStudio, life after Apple, Google's problematic new TLDs & how to discuss programming languages

Will McGugan’s Trogon auto-generates friendly TUIs for your CLI apps, Stability AI’s official open source variant of DreamStudio, John Calhoun writes about life after 26 years programming at Apple, Google’s news TLDs could be a boon to scammers & Pablo Meier documents a way to discuss programming languages.
5/22/20238 minutes, 27 seconds
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Engineering management (for the rest of us)

This week Sarah Drasner joins us to talk about her book Engineering Management for the Rest of Us and her experience leading engineering at Zillow, Microsoft, Netlify, and now Google.
5/17/20231 hour, 21 minutes, 28 seconds
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Syncthing, Thunderbird, Baseline & vector databases

Thunderbird is thriving on small donations, Syncthing is a super-cool continuous file sync program, LLMs are so hot right now and they’re making vectors hot by proxy & MDN defines a Baseline for stable web features.
5/15/20235 minutes, 39 seconds
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How companies are sponsoring OSS

This week we’re celebrating Maintainer Month along with our friends at GitHub. Open source runs the world, but who runs open source? Maintainers. Open source maintainers are behind the software we use everyday, but they don’t always have the community or support they need. That’s why we’re celebrating open source maintainers during the month of May. Today’s conversation features Alyssa Wright (Bloomberg), Chad Whitacre (Sentry), and Duane O’Brien (Creator of the FOSS Contributor Fund and framework). We get into all the details, the why, the hows, and the struggles involved for companies to support open source.
5/10/20231 hour, 10 minutes, 19 seconds
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Mojo might be huge, chatbots aren't it, big tech lacks an AI moat & monoliths are not dinosaurs

Jeremy Howard thinks Mojo might be the biggest programming language advance in decades, Amelia Wattenberger is not impressed by AI chatbots, a leaked Google memo admits big tech has no AI moats & Werner Vogels reminds us that monoliths are not dinosaurs.
5/8/20239 minutes, 5 seconds
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Livebook's big launch week

José Valim joins Jerod to talk all about what’s new in Livebook – the Elixir-based interactive code notebook he’s been working on the last few years. José made a big bet when he decided to bring machine learning to Elixir. That bet is now paying off with amazing new capabilities such as building and deploying a Whisper-based chat app to Hugging Face in just 15 minutes. José demoed that and much more during Livebook’s first-ever launch week. Let’s get into it.
5/3/20231 hour, 22 minutes, 44 seconds
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Hyperswitch, the future of programming, Thoughtworks' latest tech radar & your docs aren't "simple"

Hyperswitch is like the adapter pattern for payments, Austin Henley writes about the future of programming by summarizing recent research papers, Thoughtworks published their 28th volume of their Tech Radar, the team at General Products reminds devs to scan our technical writing for words such as “easy”, “painless”, “straightforward”, “trivial”, “simple” and “just” & we finish with a lightning round of cool tools.
5/1/20237 minutes, 6 seconds
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Hard drive reliability at scale

This week Adam talks with Andy Klein from Backblaze about hard drive reliability at scale.
4/26/20231 hour, 40 minutes, 59 seconds
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Dataset wars, Bark, Kent Beck needs to recalibrate, StableLM & blind prompting is not prompt engineering

The dataset wars are heating up, Bark is a transformer-based text-to-audio model that can generate highly realistic, multilingual speech as well as other audio, Kent Beck needs to recalibrate after using ChatGPT, the team behind Stable Diffusion release a new open source language model & Mitchel Hashimoto weighs in on prompt engineering.
4/24/20238 minutes, 9 seconds
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How do you do, fellow Hack Clubbers?

This week we’re joined by Zach Latta, the Founder of Hack Club. At 16, Zach tested out of high school and moved to SF to join Yo as their first engineer. After playing a key role at Yo, he founded Hack Club to help teen hackers start coding clubs around the world. Today, teen hackers can meet IRL, online, at a hackathon, or leverage Hack Club Bank a fiscal sponsor to create their own organization. Hack Club is the program Zach wished he had in high school.
4/19/20231 hour, 33 minutes, 9 seconds
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Free Dolly, GitHub Accelerator's cohort, improving Tailscale via Apple’s open source & what the heck are passkeys?!

Kara Deloss announces GitHub Accelerator’s 2023 cohort, Databricks releases the first open source, instruction-following LLM, fine-tuned on a human-generated instruction dataset licensed for research and commercial use, Mihai Parparita writes how he improved Tailscale thanks to Apple’s open source & Neal Fennimore asks and answers the question: Passkeys: what the heck and why?!
4/17/20238 minutes, 31 seconds
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Examining capitalism's chokepoints

This week we’re talking with Cory Doctorow (this episode contains explicit language) about his newest book Chokepoint Capitalism, which he co-autored with Rebecca Giblin. Chokepoint Capitalism is about how big tech and big content have captured creative labor markets and the ways we can win them back. We talk about chokepoints creating chickenized reverse-centaurs, paying for your robot boss (think Uber, Doordash, Amazon Drivers), the chickenization that’s climbing the priviledge gradient from the most blue collar workers to the middle-class. There are chokepoints in open source, AI generative art, interoperability, music, film, and media. To quote Cory, “We’re all fighting the same fight.”
4/14/20231 hour, 27 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ken Thompson's keynote, Tabby, The LLama Effect, Codeberg & facing the inevitable

Ken Thompson’s 75-year-project is a jukebox for the ages, Tabby is a self-hosted AI coding assistant, Codeberg is a collaboration platform and Git hosting for open source software, content and projects, TheSequence explains The LLama Effect & Paul Orlando writes about Ghosts, Guilds and Generative AI.
4/10/20238 minutes, 7 seconds
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LLMs break the internet

This week we’re talking about LLMs with Simon Willison. We can not avoid this topic. Last time it was Stable Diffusion breaking the internet. This time it’s LLMs breaking the internet. Large Language Models, ChatGPT, Bard, Claude, Bing, GitHub Copilot X, Cody…we cover it all.
4/7/20231 hour, 42 minutes, 43 seconds
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Twitter's open algorithm, Auto-GPT, LLMs as "calculators for words", SudoLang & stochastic parrots

Twitter publishes (some of) its recommendation algorithm, Toran Bruce Richards puts GPT-4 on autopilot, Simon Willison shares a good way for us to think about LLMs, Eric Elliot creates a powerful pseudocode programming language for LLMs & I define and demystify the term “stochastic parrot”.
4/3/20237 minutes, 36 seconds
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A new path to full-time open source

After years of working for Google on the Go Team, Filippo Valsorda quit last year to experiment with more sustainable paths for open source maintainers. Good news, it worked! Filippo is now a full-time open source maintainer and he joins Jerod on this episode to tell everyone exactly how he’s making the equivalent to his total compensation package at Google in open source.
3/29/20231 hour, 4 minutes, 22 seconds
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GitHub Copilot X, Chatbot UI, ChatGPT plugins, defining juice for software dev, Logto, Basaran & llama-cli

GitHub announces Copilot X, Mckay Wrigley created an open source ChatGPT UI buit with Next.js, TypeScripe & Tailwind CSS, OpenAI is also launching a ChatGPT plugin initiative, Brad Woods writes about juice in software development, Logto is an open source alternative to Auth0, Basaran is an open source alternative to the OpenAI text completion API & llama-cli is a straightforward Go CLI interface for llama.cpp.
3/27/20237 minutes, 4 seconds
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Bringing Whisper and LLaMA to the masses

This week we’re talking with Georgi Gerganov about his work on Whisper.cpp and llama.cpp. Georgi first crossed our radar with whisper.cpp, his port of OpenAI’s Whisper model in C and C++. Whisper is a speech recognition model enabling audio transcription and translation. Something we’re paying close attention to here at Changelog, for obvious reasons. Between the invite and the show’s recording, he had a new hit project on his hands: llama.cpp. This is a port of Facebook’s LLaMA model in C and C++. Whisper.cpp made a splash, but llama.cpp is growing in GitHub stars faster than Stable Diffusion did, which was a rocket ship itself.
3/22/20231 hour, 11 minutes, 56 seconds
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Self-hosting in 2023, no more Alpine Linux, type constraints in 65 lines of SQL, Initial V, Minimal Gallery, the legacy of Visual Basic, tracking fake GitHub stars & Mastodon's 10M

Michal Warda on self-hosting in 2023, Martin Heinz will never use Alpine Linux again, Oliver Rice at Supabase creates type constraints in Postgres with just 65 lines of SQL, Aaron Patterson converted a BMW shifter into a Bluetooth keyboard that can control Vim, Piet Terheyden has been curating beautiful & functional websites daily since 2013, Ryan Lucas put together a history of Visual Basic, turns out it’s easy for an open source project to buy fake GitHub stars & Mastodon hit 10 million accounts.
3/20/20234 minutes, 34 seconds
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Goodbye Atom. Hello Zed.

This week we’re talking with Nathan Sobo about his next big thing. Nathan is known for his work on the Atom editor while at GitHub. But his work wasn’t finished when he left, so…he started Zed, a high-performance multiplayer editor that’s engineered for performance. And today, Nathan talks us through all the details.
3/15/20231 hour, 27 minutes, 37 seconds
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Dalai, InputOutput.dev, Wik, Rspack, Doodle, Marqo & iLLA

Dalai is the simplest way to run LLaMA on your local machine, simple web tools that just work without annoying you, Wik is a tool to view wikipedia pages from your terminal, Rspack is a fast, Rust-based web bundler, Doodle is a pure Kotlin UI framework, Marqo is tensor search for humans & iLLA is an open source alternative to Retool.
3/13/20237 minutes, 10 seconds
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Chasing the 9s

This week Adam talks with Marcin Kurc about chasing the 9s. Marcin is the Co-founder and CEO of Nobl9 where they build tools for managing service level objectives, aka SLOs. We also talk about service level agreements (SLAs), service level indicators (SLIs), error budgets, and monitoring, and how it all comes together to help teams align on goals, improve customer satisfaction, manage risks, increase transparency, and of course, a favorite around here…continuous improvement. Kaizen! This is an awesome deep dive into the world of chasing those 9s, and how teams are levering SLOs to earn the trust of their customers as well showcase transparency.
3/9/202354 minutes, 41 seconds
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New OpenAI APIs, self-hosting all the things, the Dart Frog project, curl's NuGet story & Hacker Stations

Reorx lists awesome apps & tools using the new ChatGPT API, Ernie Smith ranks self-hosted app alternatives, Very Good Ventures brings Dart to the server, Daniel Stenberg tells curl’s NuGet story & Hacker Stations showcases tech workspace setups from all over the world.
3/6/20237 minutes, 6 seconds
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You’re just a devcontainer.json away

This week we’re joined by Brigit Murtaugh, Product Manager on the Visual Studio Code team at Microsoft, and we’re talking about Development Containers and the Dev Container spec. Ever since we talked with Cory Wilkerson about Coding in the cloud with Codespaces we’ve wanted to get the Changelog.com codebase setup with a dev environment in the cloud to more easily support contributions. After getting a drive-by contribution from Chris Eggert to add a Dev Container spec to our codebase, we got curious and reached out to Brigit and asked her to come on the show to give us all the details.
3/1/20231 hour, 10 minutes, 23 seconds
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Stack Overflow's architecture, Lobsters' killer libraries, Linux is ready for modern Macs, what to expect from your framework & GoatCounter web analytics

Sahn Lam details Stack Overflow’s monolith/on-prem architecture, Hillel Wayne asks the Lobsters community for killer libraries, Linux 6.2 is ready to run on M1 Macs thanks to Asahi Linux, Johan Halse writes up what to expect from your web framework & Eli Bendersky on using GoatCounter for blog analytics.
2/27/20237 minutes, 21 seconds
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Into the Fediverse

This week Evan Prodromou is back to take us deeper into the Fediverse. As many of us reconsider our relationship with Twitter, Mastodon has been by-and-large the target of migration. They helped to popularize the idea of a federated universe of community-owned, decentralized, social networks. And, at the heart of it all is ActivityPub. ActivityPub is a decentralized social networking protocol published by the W3C. It is co-authored by Evan as well as; Christine Lemmer-Webber, Jessica Tallon, Erin Shepherd, and Amy Guy. Today, Evan shares the details behind this protocol and where the Fediverse might be heading.
2/24/20231 hour, 18 minutes, 5 seconds
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Sidney Bing, Elk for Mastodon, writing an engineering strategy, what's next for core-js & cool tool lightning round

Simon Willison rounds up the goings on around Microsoft’s new GPT-powered Bing search, The Vue/Vite team build a nimble web client for Mastodon, Will Larson writes about writing an engineering strategy, Denis Pushkarev seeks support to maintain core-js & I share a lightning round of cool tools I’ve found and used recently. ⚡️
2/20/20238 minutes, 45 seconds
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What it takes to scale engineering

This week we’re talking to Rachel Potvin, former VP of Engineering at GitHub about what it takes to scale engineering. Rachel says it’s a game-changer when engineering scales beyond 100 people. So we asked to her to share everything she has learned in her career of leading and scaling engineering.
2/17/20231 hour, 27 minutes, 3 seconds
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Load testing a $4 VPS, TOML for .env files, counting unique visitors sans cookies, the Arc browser & a love letter to Deno

Alice Girard Guittard finds out how much she could you really get out of a $4 VPS, Brett Cannon wonders if using TOML for .env files is a good idea, Nic Mulvaney details how they count unique visitors to a website without using cookies, UIDS, or fingerprinting, after a few months, Chris Coyier is still using the Arc browser & Alex Kladov pens a love letter to Deno.
2/13/20239 minutes, 27 seconds
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Git with your friends

This week we invited our friend Mat Ryer to join us for some good conversation about some Git tooling that’s been on our radar. You may know Mat from Go Time and also Grafana’s Big Tent, which we help to produce. We speculate, we discuss, we laugh, and Mat even breaks into song a few times. It’s good fun.
2/10/20231 hour, 40 minutes, 48 seconds
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OpenAI's new text classifier, teach yourself CS, programming philosophies are about state, you might not need Lodash & overrated scalability

OpenAI’s working on an AI classifier trained to distinguish between AI-written and human-written text, Oz Nova and Myles Byrne created a guide to teach yourself computer science, Charles Genschwap recently realized that all the various programming philosophies can be boiled down into a simple statement about how to work with state, you probably don’t need Lodash or Underscore anymore & Waseem Daher thinks scalability is overrated.
2/6/20237 minutes, 56 seconds
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Data tool belts, Build Your Own Redis, the giscus comments system, prompt engineering shouldn't exist & ALPACA

Jeremia Kimelman takes stock of his “data tool belt”, Build Your Own Redis with C/C++ is ready to read, giscus is a comments system powered by GitHub Discussions, Matt Rickard says prompt engineering shouldn’t be a thing and won’t be a thing in the future & Kolja Lubitz’s ALPACA is engine for building adventure games and interactive comics.
1/30/20237 minutes, 2 seconds
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Mainframes are still a big thing

This week we’re talking about mainframes with Cameron Seay, Adjunct Professor at East Carolina University and a member of the Governing Board of the Open Mainframe Project. If you’ve been curious about mainframes, this show will be a great guide. Cameron explains exactly what a mainframe is and how it’s different from the cloud. We talk COBOL and the state of education and opportunities around that language. We cover the state-of-the-art in mainframe land, System Z, Linux on mainframes, and more.
1/27/20231 hour, 4 minutes, 50 seconds
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Prioritizing tech debt, UI components to copy/paste, learnings from 20 years in software, git-sim & jqjq

Max Countryman wrote up a framework for prioritizing tech debt, shadcn builds a copy/paste-able UI component library in public, Justin Etheredge shares 20 things he’s learned in his 20 years as a software engineer, Jacob Stopak’s git-sim lets you easily visualize git operations without affecting your repo & Mattias Wadman implemented jq in jq.
1/23/20239 minutes, 8 seconds
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Just Postgres

This week we’re talking about by Postgres with Craig Kerstiens, Chief Product Officer at Crunchy Data, and a well known ambassador for Postgres. Just Postgres. That’s what this week’s show is about.
1/20/20231 hour, 11 minutes, 53 seconds
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Premium PCB cheat sheets, a disappearing AWS dev, HyperSwitch, Servo is back at it & Cloudflare Wildebeest

WestArtFactory’s premium PCB cheat sheets, Maxime Topolov tells of a disappearing AWS dev, Juspay Technologies releases HyperSwitch for payment processing, Servo gets new funding for 2023 & Cloudflare’s open source Wildebeest.
1/16/20236 minutes, 43 seconds
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The principles of data-oriented programming

Jerod is joined by Yehonathan Sharvit, author of Data-Oriented Programming, to discuss the virtues of treating data as a first-class citizen in our applications and the four principles that make it possible.
1/14/202356 minutes, 41 seconds
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A simpler alternative to deleted_at, rules of thumb for better software, faking it until you automate it, the only civilized way to read online & AI and the big five

Brandur Leach’s easy, alternative soft deletion strategy, Lane Wagner’s zen of proverbs, Nicolas Carlo says fake it until you can automate it, Felix A. Crux thinks feeds are the only civilized way to read online & Ben Thompson analyzes AI and the big five tech companies.
1/9/20238 minutes, 22 seconds
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Don't sleep on Ruby & Rails

Welcome to 2023 — we’re kicking off the year talking to Justin Searls about the state of web development and why he just might write a “You Might Not Need React” post. He’s been so productive using Turbo and Stimulus (and tailwind) in Rails 7 that we had to talk about the state of Rails development today and a bunch of other fun topics around building for the web in 2023.
1/6/20231 hour, 21 minutes, 36 seconds
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Clipboard, unbundling tools for thought, microfeed, prepare to be productive & a look inside Matrix

Jackson Huff’s clipboard powertool for the command line, Fernando Borretti thinks tools for thought should be unbundled, Listen Notes helps you run a microfeed on Cloudflare, Martin Rue says to be productive, be prepared & Paul Sawers takes TechCrunch readers inside Matrix and features its recent adoption wins.
1/2/20236 minutes, 15 seconds
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State of the "log" 2022

Our 5th annual year-end wrap-up episode! Sit back, relax, pour a glass of your favorite beverage and join us for listener voice mails, our favorite episodes, some must-listens, and of course the top 5 most listened to episodes of the year. Thanks for listening! 💚
12/23/20221 hour, 28 minutes, 38 seconds
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GPT has entered the chat

To wrap up the year we’re talking about what’s breaking the internet, again. Yes, we’re talking about ChatGPT and we’re joined by our good friend Shawn “swyx” Wang. Between his writings on L-Space Diaries and his AI notes repo on GitHub, we had a lot to cover around the world of AI and what might be coming in 2023. Also, we have one more show coming out before the end of the year — our 5th annual “State of the log” episode where Adam and Jerod look back at the year and talk through their favorite episodes of the year and feature voices from the community. So, stay tuned for that next week.
12/16/20221 hour, 14 minutes, 43 seconds
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tRPC, a bug tracker embedded in git, awesome ChatGPT prompts, half-baked cloud dev envs & Whisper.cpp

tRPC helps you move fast and break nothing, Michael Muré embeds a bug tracker in git, Fatih Kadir Akın curates some awesome ChatGPT prompts, Mike Nikles thinks dev environments in the cloud are a half-baked solution & Georgi Gerganov ports OpenAI’s Whisper model to a lightweight, portable C/C++ program.
12/12/20227 minutes, 17 seconds
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Coming home to GitHub

This week we’re joined by Christina Warren, Senior Developer Advocate at GitHub, and a true tech and pop culture connoisseur. From her days at Mashable covering the intersections of entertainment and technology, to Gizmodo, to Microsoft, and now her current role at GitHub we talk with Christina about her journey from journalist to developer, and the latest happenings coming out of GitHub Universe. BTW, we’re planning to get Christina on Backstage in the new year to talk about Plex, MakeMKV, and all things that go into hosting your own media server. Drop a commment on this episode with a +1 if you want to see that happen.
12/9/20221 hour, 17 minutes, 47 seconds
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Building a VM inside ChatGPT, Advent of Code 2022, webdev Liam Neeson, Fedifinder & BDougie

Jonas Degrave builds a virtual machine inside ChatGPT, Advent of Code 2022 is in full swing, Mat Ryer impersonates Liam Neeson as web developer, Luca Hammer’s Fedifinder project helps you join the Fediverse & we chat with Brian (BDougie) Douglas about Open Sauced at All Things Open 2022.
12/5/202228 minutes, 44 seconds
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ANTHOLOGY - Wasm, efficient code review & the industrial metaverse

This week we’re back at All Things Open 2022 covering the hallway track. Up first is Shivay Lamba and he’s schooling us on all things server-side WASM. It’s the new hotness. After that, we talk with Yishai Beeri, CTO of LinearB about the world of code review, PR queues, AI developers, and making human developers more efficient, and happier. And last, we talk with Guy Martin from NVIDIA about what’s going on in the Industrial Metaverse. He shares details about an open source project developed by Pixar called Universal Scene Description (USD) and what they’re doing with NVIDIA Omniverse.
12/2/202256 minutes, 45 seconds
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Free Heroku EOL, Stable Diffusion 2.0, Twitter SRE explains why it stays up, Git Notes & Joel Lord

Heroku’s free plans officially reach EOL, Swyx explains the mixed reaction to Stable Diffusion 2.0, a real Twitter SRE explains how it continues to stay up even with ~80% gone, Tyler Cipriani tells us about one of Git’s coolest, most unloved features & we chat with Joel Lord about brewing beer with IoT & JavaSCript at All Things Open 2022. Oh, and help make this year’s state of the “log” episode awesome by lending your voice!
11/28/202225 minutes, 10 seconds
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This !insane tech hiring market

This week we’re back talking to Gergely Orosz — this time not quite about the insane tech hiring market, but more so the flip side, the 180, the not so good tech hiring market, the layoff market and what you can expect. There’s a lot of FUD out there, so hopefully this show gives you a lens into what’s really going on, and what to really expect. Maybe more so, how to keep your job or find a new job. We come to this topic with great compassion and great understanding, so please…there is a community here for you. There’s a lot of people in our Slack. Call it your home, it’s free to join and everyone is welcome.
11/25/20221 hour, 22 minutes, 28 seconds
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Kindle as a smart device, Changelog on Mastodon, GPT-3 up in your CLI, no arch better than bad arch & Mish Manners

Matt Healy says your next smart device is a $30 Kindle, Changelog sets up an instance as Mastodon takes off, Anurag Bhagsain puts OpenAI’s GPT-3 in your CLI, Kirill Rogovoy argues that no architecture is better than bad architecture & we talk to Mish Manners at All Things Open 2022.
11/21/202220 minutes, 58 seconds
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ANTHOLOGY — Advocating for and supporting open source

This week we’re taking you to the hallway track of All Things Open 2022 in Raleigh, NC. Let’s set the stage, here’s what we like do when we go to conferences — we setup our podcast studio at our booth where all the other vendors are and we talk to everyone we can. We give out t-shirts, stickers, pins, high fives…and it’s a blast. Today’s anthology episode from ATO features: Arun Gupta (VP and GM of Open Ecosystem Initiatives at Intel), long-time friend Chad Whitacre (Head of Open Source at Sentry), and Ricardo Sueiras (Principal Advocate in Open Source at AWS). The common denominator for each of these conversations is advocating for and supporting open source. Special thanks to Todd Lewis and team for inviting us to come back to ATO. We enjoyed meeting long time fans and new ones too.
11/18/20221 hour, 16 minutes, 23 seconds
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Tracking layoffs, tech worker demand still high, ntfy, devenv, Markdoc & Mike Bifulco

Roger Lee has been tracking all tech layoffs since COVID-19, Amanda Hoover says tech worker demand is still high, ntfy helps you send push notifications for free, devenv lets you share development environments without containers, Markdoc scales from personal blogs to massive documentation sites & we talk with Mike Bifulco at All Things Open 2022.
11/14/202217 minutes, 19 seconds
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Beyond Heroku to Muse

This week we’re back for part 2 with Adam Wiggins — going beyond Heroku and the story of Muse (listen to part 1). After a six-year adrenaline high on Heroku, Adam needed time to recover and refill the creative well. So, he moved to Berlin, did some gig work with companies…dabbled in investing and advising. But he wasn’t satisfied. Adam likes to build things. Ultimately, he was just waiting for the right time to reconnect with James Lindenbaum and Orion Henry — the same fellas he created Heroku with. Eventually they founded Ink & Switch, an independent research lab which led to innovations that made Muse possible. Muse is a tool for deep work and thinking on iPad and Mac. Today’s show is all about that journey and the details in-between.
11/11/20221 hour, 50 minutes, 40 seconds
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Useful Vim commands, bad first ideas, PETS config manager, Kaizen shirts for sale & infinite canvas tools

Colin Bartlett’s 50 useful Vim commands, Jeremey Utley on why your first ideas aren’t always the best, Emanuele Rocca’s pets configuration management project, our Kaizen shirts are now on sale & Arun Venkatesen makes a microsite for infinite canvas tools.
11/7/20226 minutes, 51 seconds
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The story of Heroku

This week on The Changelog we’re joined by Adam Wiggins, co-founder and former CTO of Heroku, for an exclusive trip down Heroku memory lane. Adam and Jerod are both tremendous fans of Heroku and believe (to this day) they represent the apex in developer experience for delivering code to production. We talk through the beginnings of Heroku, the v1 most people have forgotten about, the era of web hosting back in 2008-2010, the serendipity of Silicon Vally in those days, pitching to Y Combinator, the makings of git push heroku, the Heroku style and name, the sale of Heroku to Salesforce, potential regrets — and we tee up part 2 coming next week with Adam going beyond Heroku and the story of Muse.
11/4/20221 hour, 41 minutes, 27 seconds
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Linux mythbusting & retro gaming

This week we’re doing some Linux mythbusting and talking retro gaming with Jay LaCroix from Learn Linux TV. This is a preview of what’s to come from our trip to All Things Open next week. By the way, make sure you come and check us out at booth 60. We’ll be recording podcasts, shaking hands, giving out t-shirts and stickers…and speaking of gaming, you can go head-to-head with us on Mario Kart or Rocket League on the Nintendo Switch. We’re giving that Switch away to a lucky winner at the conference, but you have to play to win. If you’re there, make sure you come see us because we want to see you.
10/28/20221 hour, 39 minutes, 18 seconds
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Sonic search, building software like an SRE, leaving the cloud, an HTTP crash course & breaking up with CSS-in-JS

Valerian Saliou’s Sonic search backend, Brandon Willett on how to build software like an SRE, DHH on why they’re leaving the cloud, Amos’ HTTP crash course nobody asked for & Sam Magura tells why he and the Spot team are breaking up with CSS-in-JS.
10/24/20228 minutes, 9 seconds
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The terminal as a platform

This week we’re talking with Will McGugan about using the terminal to not just build software, but also to deliver software. Will is a few months into his journey of building Textualize, a company he started around his open source projects Textual and Rich. When combined Textual and Rich give you a Python framework to build beautiful full-featured TUIs for the Terminal. We talk with Will about his big idea of the terminal as a platform, how he got here from first principles, what it takes to build Textual apps and whether or not they can replace not so good web admins, building, launching, and distributing Textual apps, why Python was his choiice of language, the big picture and business model behind Textualize, and why he’s building this as open source and in public.
10/21/20221 hour, 13 minutes, 6 seconds
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Harmonai revisited, lessons learned from public salary, Open Core Ventures, Stripe is Paypal in 2010 & Helix

We revisit our Harmonai story from last week, Jamie Tanna reviews posting his salary history publicly, Sid Sijbrandij’s new (open core) venture fund, Zed Shaw thinks Stripe is like Paypal in 2010 & Helix is a new Rust-based terminal.
10/17/20226 minutes, 38 seconds
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Taking Postgres serverless

This week we’re talking about serverless Postgres! We’re joined by Nikita Shamgunov, co-founder and CEO of Neon. With Neon, truly serverless PostgreSQL is finally here. Neon isn’t Postgres compatible…it actually is Postgres! Neon is also open source under the Apache License 2.0. We talk about what a cloud native serverless Postgres looks like, why developers want Postgres and why of the top 5 databases only Postgres is growing (according to DB-Engines Ranking), we talk about how they separated storage and compute to offer autoscaling, branching, and bottomless storage, we also talk about their focus on DX — where they’re getting it right and where they need to improve. Neon is invite only as of the recording and release of this episode, but near the end of the show Nikita shares a few ways to get an invite and early access.
10/14/20221 hour, 24 minutes, 14 seconds
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Forking SQLite, generative AI for music, saying no to sprints, awesome diagramming tools & state machine facts

The libSQL community is forking SQLite, StabilityAI announces Haromai and Dance Diffusion, Robin Rendle doesn’t believe in sprints, Shubham Garg curates some awesome diagramming tools & Chris Pressey writes up some must-read facts about state machines.
10/10/20227 minutes, 14 seconds
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A new batch of web frameworks emerge!

This week we’re talking fresh, faster, and new web frameworks by way of JS Party. Yes, today’s show is a web framework sampler because a new batch of web frameworks have emerged. There’s always something new happening in the front-end world and JS Party does an amazing job of keeping us up to date. So…what’s fresh, faster, and new? The first segment of the show focuses on Deno’s Fresh new web framework. Luca Casonato joins Jerod & Feross to talk about Fresh – a next generation web framework, built for speed, reliability, and simplicity. In segment two, AngularJS creator Miško Hevery joins Jerod and KBall to talk about Qwik. He says Qwik is a fundamental rethinking of how a web application should work. And he’s attempting to convince Jerod & KBall that the implications of that are BIG. In the last segment, Amal talks with Fred Schott about Astro 1.0. They go deep on how Astro is built to pull content from anywhere and serve it fast with their next-gen island architecture. Plus there’s an 8 minute bonus for our ++ subscribers (changelog.com/++). Fred Schott explains Astro Islands and how Astro extracts your UI into smaller, isolated components on the page, and the unused JavaScript gets replaced with lightweight HTML — leading to faster loads and time-to-interactive.
10/7/20221 hour, 34 minutes, 58 seconds
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Hacktoberfest is ON, DiffusionBee is 1.0, Dracula UI is out, GitX is undead, Prerender is off AWS & we'll be at ATO!

Digital Ocean kicks off Hacktoberfest 2022, Divam Gupta releases DiffusionBee 1.0 with “Image To Image” support, Zeno Rocha open sources Dracula UI for React, GitX gets brought back from the brink & Prerender.io engineers save a bundle by moving off AWS. Oh, and join us at All Things Open in early November!
10/3/202212 minutes, 12 seconds
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A guided tour through ID3 esoterica

This week we turn the mics on ourselves, kind of. Lars Wikman joins the show to give us a guided tour through ID3 esoterica and the shiny new open source Elixir library he developed for us. We talk about what ID3 is, its many versions, what it aims to be and what it could have been, how our library project got started, all the unique features and failed dreams of the ID3v2 spec, how ID3v2 and Podcasting 2.0 are solving the problem differently, and how all of this maps back to us giving you (our listeners) a better experience while listening to our shows.
9/30/20221 hour, 22 minutes, 44 seconds
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Firefox supports blockers, NATS is great, Uber's MFA fatigue, OAuth2 drawn in cute shapes & an aging programmer

Mozilla says Firefox will continue to support current content blockers, Nabeel Sulieman thinks NATS is great and recommends you check it out, InfoQ breaks down Uber’s recent security breach, Klemen Sever explained OAuth2 by drawing cute shapes & Jorge Manrubia reflects back as an aging programmer.
9/26/20225 minutes, 25 seconds
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Product development structures as systems

This week we’re talking about product development structures as systems with Lucas da Costa. The last time we had Lucas on the show he was living the text-mode only life, and now we’re more than 3 years later, Lucas has doubled down on all things text mode. Today’s conversation with Lucas maps several ideas he’s shared recently on his blog. We talk about deadlines being pointless, trajectory vs roadmap and the downfall of long-term planning, the practices of daily stand-ups and what to do instead, measuring queues not cycle time, and probably the most controversial of them all — actually talking to your customers. Have you heard? It’s this newly disruptive Agile framework that seems to be working well.
9/23/20221 hour, 27 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ladybird, how QR codes work, GitUI, software vs systems & Stable Diffusion ported to Tensorflow

Andreas Kling’s new cross-platform browser project, Dan Hollick’s nerdy deep-dive on QR code tech, Stephan Dilly’s Rust-based terminal UI for Git, Miłosz Piechocki’s opinion on junior vs senior engineers & Divam Gupta’s Tensorflow port of Stable Diffusion.
9/19/20227 minutes, 58 seconds
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Stable Diffusion breaks the internet

This week on The Changelog we’re talking about Stable Diffusion, DALL-E, and the impact of AI generated art. We invited our good friend Simon Willison on the show today because he wrote a very thorough blog post titled, “Stable Diffusion is a really big deal.” You may know Simon from his extensive contributions to open source software. Simon is a co-creator of the Django Web framework (which we don’t talk about at all on this show), he’s the creator of Datasette, a multi-tool for exploring and publishing data (which we do talk about on this show)…most of all Simon is a very insightful thinker, which he puts on display here on this episode. We talk from all the angles of this topic, the technical, the innovation, the future and possibilities, the ethical and the moral – we get into it all. The question is, will this era be known as the initial push back to the machine?
9/16/20221 hour, 17 minutes, 6 seconds
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Quality is systemic, React is a self-fulfilling prophecy, Difftastic, Devbox & the shortest URLs on the web

Jacob Kaplan-Moss writes up a hot take on software quality, Wilfred Hughes creates the diff tool he’s always wanted, Josh Collinsworth thinks React is only great at being popular, Jetpack’s Devbox project looks pretty cool & James Williams sets out to find the shortest URLs on the internet. Oh, and chapters are here!
9/12/20229 minutes, 55 seconds
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Typesense is truly open source search

This week we’re joined by Jason Bosco, co-founder and CEO of Typesense — the open source Algolia alternative and the easier to use ElasticSearch alternative. For years we’ve used Algolia as our search engine, so we come to this conversation with skin in the game and the scars to prove it. Jason shared how he and his co-founder got started on Typesense, why and how they are “all in” on open source, the options and the paths developers can take to add search to their project, how Typesense compares to ElasticSearch and Algolia, he walks us through getting started, the story of Typesense Cloud, and why they have resisted Venture Capital.
9/9/20221 hour, 20 minutes, 11 seconds
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Python's :=, email falsehoods, no more self-hosting & Leon

Martin Heinz thinks you should be using Python’s walrus operator, you probably believe some falsehoods about email, Carlos Fenollosa threw in the towel after self-hosting his email for 23 years & Leon is an open source personal assistant that can live on your server.
9/6/20225 minutes, 21 seconds
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Building actually maintainable software ♻️

This week we’re sharing the most popular episode of Go Time from last year — Go Time #196. We believe this episode was the most popular because it’s all about building actually maintainable software and what goes into that. Kris Brandow is joined by Johnny Boursiquot, Ian Lopshire, and Sam Boyer. There’s lots of hot takes, disagreements, and unpopular opinions. This is part two of a three part mini-series led by Kris on maintenance. Make sure you check out Go Time #195 and Go Time #202 to continue the series.
9/2/20221 hour, 14 minutes, 35 seconds
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Qalculate is awesome, Restic adds compression, CS teachers coping with Copilot & Heroku's next non-free chapter

Qalculate has a command-line interface, Michael Eischer adds compression to Restic, Emery Berger warns his fellow CS professors about Copilot, and Heroku GM Bob Wise details Heroku’s next chapter (which excludes free accounts).
8/29/20228 minutes, 53 seconds
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Building Reflect at sea

This week we’re talking with Alex MacCaw — he’s well known for his work as founder and CEO of Clearbit. In May of 2021, Alex shared a personal update with the world on his blog. After much reflection, he decided to step down as CEO of Clearbit to go back to his roots. In his words, “I love the early stages of company building. Hacking together code, setting up the Stripe account, getting the first customer. That’s my jam.” We talk with Alex about this portion of his journey at Clearbit, the Catamaran he bought in South Africa and then sailed across the Atlantic Ocean, and the new thing he’s building called Reflect that let’s you keep track of your notes, books, and meetings.
8/27/20221 hour, 24 minutes, 39 seconds
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SSH tips and tricks, retro Apple UIs, iOS Privacy and TikTok, Marta & Tauri vs Electron

Carlos Alexandro Becker shared some SSH tips, Sakun Acharige (a Comp Sci student + visual design enthusiast) created System.css, Felix Krause built a browser app that shows the JavaScript commands being executed by iOS app in-app browers, Yan Zhulanow decided to create Marta, and Lőrik Levente did a comparrison between Tauri & Electron using a real world application he’s building called Authme.
8/22/20226 minutes, 11 seconds
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Fireside chat with Jack Dorsey ♻️

This week we’re re-broadcasting a very special episode of Founders Talk. Adam was invited by our friends at Square to host a fireside chat with Jack Dorsey as the featured finale of their annual developer conference called Square Unboxed. Jack is one of the most prolific CEOs out there. He’s a hacker turned CEO, often working at the very edge of what’s to come. He’s focused on what the future has to offer and an innovator at scale. He’s also a Bitcoin maximalist and has positioned himself and Block long on Bitcoin.
8/19/202246 minutes
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Stand-up advice, Redis explained, big changes for Deno, DevDash & Minimum Viable Python

Lucas F. Costa on why your daily stand-ups don’t work and host to fix them, Mahdi Yusuf deeply explains Redis, the Deno team announces some big changes coming, DevDash is a highly configurable terminal dashboard for developers and creators & Brett Cannon determines what is a Minimum Viable Python (MVPy).
8/15/20225 minutes, 57 seconds
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The power of eBPF

eBPF is a revolutionary kernel technology that has lit the cloud native world on fire. If you’re going to have one person explain the excitement, that person would be Liz Rice. Liz is the COSO at Isovalent, creators of the open source Cilium project and pioneers of eBPF tech. On this episode Liz tells Jerod all about the power of eBPF, where it came from, what kind of new applications its enabling, and who is building the next generation of networking, security, and observability tools with it.
8/14/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 53 seconds
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Chapters, PiBox, using one big server, oncall compensation, being swamped is normal, Tabler & Gum

We add episode chapters to the website, KubeSail sells a PiBox, Nima Badizadegan wants you to use one big server, Gergeloy Orosz details oncall compensation across the software industry, Greg Kogan isn’t impressed with how swamped you are at work, a dashboard template built on Bootstrap & Charm releases a CLI tool for shell scripts.
8/8/20228 minutes, 2 seconds
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The legacy of CSS-Tricks

Episode 500!!! And it has been a journey! Nearly 13 years ago we started this podcast and as of today (this episode) we’ve officially shipped our 500th episode. As a companion to this episode, Jerod and Adam shipped a special Backstage episode where they reflect on 500 episodes. And…not only has it been a journey for us, but it’s also been a journey for our good friend Chris Coyier and CSS-Tricks — which he grew from his personal blog to a massively popular contributor driven model, complete with an editor-in-chief, a wide array of influential contributors, and advertisers to help fund the way. The news, of course, is that CSS-Tricks was recently acquired by DigitalOcean in March of 2022. We get into all the details of this deal, his journey, and the legacy of CSS-Tricks.
8/5/20221 hour, 35 minutes, 8 seconds
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OkSo, Markdown generator speeds, Egr Mgr framework, Crockford says retire JS & messy code not required

Oleksii Trekhleb has a new drawing app, Zach Leatherman did some markdown generator speed tests, Jorge Fioranelli built a framework for Engineering Managers, Crockford got interviewed on Evrone & Daniel Sieger wrote up his clean coding advice.
8/1/20226 minutes, 51 seconds
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Long live RSS!

This week we’re joined again by Ben Ubois and we’re talking about RSS. Yes, RSS…the tech that never seems to die and yet so many of us rely on it daily. Ben is the creator of Feedbin, which is self-described as “a nice place to read on the web.” Ben is also the maker of a new app on iOS for people who like podcasts. It’s called Airshow and you can download it at airshow.fm. Ben catches us up on the state of Feedbin, we discuss the nine lives of RSS and its foundational utility for the indie web, the possibilities and short-comings of RSS, we get deep in the weeds on the Podcast 2.0 spec and the work being done on , and Ben also shares the details on his new app called Airshow.
7/29/20221 hour, 42 minutes, 5 seconds
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Soft deletion, obscure data structures, driving away your best engineers, a blog platform for hackers & moar RSS

Brandur thinks soft deletion probably isn’t worth it, the orange website delivers a high quality discussion on data structures, Podge O’Brien drops satirical management advice, team pico delivers prose.sh, Mat Ryer shares his thoughts on estimations & Matt Rickard’s thoughts on RSS have us thinking about it as well.
7/25/20226 minutes, 30 seconds
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From WeWork to upskilling at Wilco

This week we’re joined by On Freund, former VP of Engineering at WeWork and now co-founder & CEO of Wilco. WeWork you may have heard of, but Wilco maybe not (yet). We get into the details behind the tech and scaling of WeWork, comparisons of the fictional series on Apple TV+ called WeCrashed and how much of that is true. Then we move on to Wilco which is what has On’s full attention right now. Wilco has the potential to be the next big thing for developers to acquire new skills. Wilco aims to be the ultimate simulator to gain new skills on a real-life tech stack. If you want to skip ahead, you can request access at trywilco.com/changelog — they are moving our listeners to the top of the waiting list.
7/24/20221 hour, 28 minutes, 20 seconds
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Spicy designs, more open source opinions, privacy-focused services, the real cost of context switching & jqq

Anthony Hobday has 37 ways to spice up your designs, James Bennett has opinions on open source and PyPi security, Alicia Sykes compiled some awesome security/privacy options, ContextKeeper layouts out the real price of context switching, and Nick Nisi tells us all about jqq. Bam! Bam! Bam!
7/18/20227 minutes, 7 seconds
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Build tiny multi-platform apps with Tauri and web tech

This week we’re talking with Daniel Thompson about Tauri and their journey to their recent 1.0 release. Tauri is often compared to Electron - it’s a toolkit that lets you build software for all major desktop operating systems using web technologies. It was built for the security-focused, privacy-respecting, and environmentally-conscious software engineering community. The core libraries are written in Rust and the UI layer can be written using virtually any frontend framework. We get into all the details, why Rust, how the project was formed, their resistance (thus far) to venture capital, their full commitment to the freedom virtues of open source, and all the technical bits you need to know to consider it for your next multi-platform project.
7/15/20221 hour, 37 minutes, 17 seconds
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Bun, K8s is a red flag, "critical" open source packages, Rustlings & FP jargon in simple terms

Jarred Sumner’s Bun comes out of the oven, Jeremy Brown doesn’t want you prematurely optimizing, Armin Ronacher’s not excited about his “critical” Python package, Daniel Thompson from Tauri thinks you should check out Rustlings, and we draw a straight line between Functional Programming jargon and boujee Gen Z slang.
7/11/20226 minutes, 27 seconds
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Oxide builds servers (as they should be)

Today we have a special treat: Bryan Cantrill, co-founder and CTO of Oxide Computer! You may know Bryan from his work on DTrace. He worked at Sun for many years, then Oracle, and finally Joyent before starting Oxide. We dig deep into their company’s mission/principles/values, hear how it it all started with a VC’s blank check that turned out to be anything but, and learn how Oxide’s integrated approach to hardware & software sets them up to compete with the established players by building servers as they should be.
7/8/20221 hour, 32 minutes, 54 seconds
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DevTool platform types, things to know about databases, starting with commas, Lobsters turns 10 & Upptime

We’re listening! This week’s experimental, super-brief Monday edition of “The Changelog” has the following new features: It’s longer, there’s no background music during the stories, and it includes stories previously not featured in the newsletter. If you like this better than the last one, would listen to it, and want us to keep it going… let us know in the comments or by tweeting @changelog!
7/5/20228 minutes, 3 seconds
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Actual(ly) opening up

Adam and Jerod are joined once again by James Long. He was on the podcast five years ago discussing the surprise success of Prettier, an opinionated code formatter that’s still in use to this day. This time around we’re going deep on Actual, his personal finance system James built as a business for over 4 years before recently opening it up and making it 100% free. Has James given up on the business? Or will this move Actual(ly) breathe new life into a piece of software that’s used and beloved by many? Tune in to find out.
7/1/20221 hour, 35 minutes, 26 seconds
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Markwhen, Tauri 1.0, SLCs & imposters

We’re experimenting with something new: a super-brief Monday edition of “The Changelog” to help start your week off right and keep you up with the fast-moving software world. If you like this, would listen to it, and want us to keep it going… let us know in the comments or by tweeting @changelog. If you’d rather we didn’t… also let us know!
6/27/20224 minutes, 19 seconds
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Lessons from 5 years of startup code audits

Adam and Jerod are joined by Ken Kantzer, co-founder of PKC Security. Ken and his team performed upwards of 20 code audits on well-funded startups. Now that it’s 7 or 8 years later, he wrote up 16 surprising observations and things he learned looking back at the experience. We gotta discuss ’em all!
6/24/20221 hour, 39 minutes, 32 seconds
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What even is a DevRel?

This week Lee Robinson joins us to talk about his journey as a DevRel. We talk about what it means to be a DevRel, what orgs they fall under, how he runs his team at Vercel, Lee’s three pillars of DevRel: education, community, and product, we compare the old days of DevRel vs now, and of course what makes a DevRel a good DevRel.
6/20/20221 hour, 15 minutes, 29 seconds
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Two decades as a solo indie Mac dev

This week Jesse Grosjean joins us to talk about his career as a solo indie Mac dev. Since 2004 Jesse has been building Mac apps under the company name Hog Bay Software producing hits such as WriteRoom, Taskpaper, and now Bike. We talk through the evolution of his apps, how he considers new features and improvements, why he chose and continues to choose the Mac platform, his business model and pricing for his apps, and what it takes to build his business around macOS and the driving force of the App Store.
6/10/20221 hour, 33 minutes, 12 seconds
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Stacked diffs for fast-moving code review

This week we’re peeking into the future again — this time we’re looking at the future of modern code review and workflows around pull requests. Jerod and Adam were joined by two of the co-founders of Graphite — Tomas Reimers and Greg Foster. Graphite is an open-source CLI and code review dashboard built for engineers who want to write and review smaller pull requests, stay unblocked, and ship faster. We cover all the details – how they got started, how this product emerged from another idea they were working on, the state of adoption, why stacking changes is the way of the future, how it’s just Git under the hood, and what they’re doing with the $20M in funding they just got from a16z.
5/27/20221 hour, 19 minutes, 36 seconds
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Schneier on security for tomorrow’s software

This week we’re talking with Bruce Schneier — cryptographer, computer security professional, privacy specialist, and writer (of many books). He calls himself a “public-interest technologist”, a term he coined himself, and works at the intersection of security, technology, and people. Bruce has been writing about security issues on his blog since 2004, his monthly newsletter has been going since 1998, he’s a fellow and lecturer at Harvard’s Kennedy School, a board member of the EFF, and the Chief of Security Architecture at Inrupt. Long story short, Bruce has credentials to back up his opinions and on today’s show we dig into the state of cyber-security, security and privacy best practices, his thoughts on Bitcoin (and other crypto-currencies), Tim Berners-Lee’s Solid project, and of course we asked Bruce to share his advice for today’s developers building the software systems of tomorrow.
5/20/20221 hour, 15 minutes, 12 seconds
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Run your home on a Raspberry Pi

This week we’re joined by Mike Riley and we’re talking about his book Portable Python Projects (Running your home on a Raspberry Pi). We breakdown the details of the latest Raspberry Pi hardware, various automation ideas from the book, why Mike prefers Python for scripting on a Raspberry Pi, and of course why the Raspberry Pi makes sense for home labs concerned about data security. Use the code PYPROJECTS to get a 35% discount on the book. That code is valid for approximately 60 days after the episode’s publish date.
5/13/20221 hour, 20 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mob programming deep dive

We’re talking with Woody Zuill today about all things Mob Programming. Woody leads Mob Programming workshops, he’s a speaker on agile related topics, and coaches and guides orgs interested in creating an environment where people can do their best work. We talk through it all and we even get some amazing advice from Woody’s dad. We define what Mob Programming is and why it’s so effective. Is it a rigid process or can teams flex to make it work for them? How to introduce mob programming to a team. What kind of groundwork is necessary? And of course, are mob programming’s virtues diminished by remote teams in virtual-only settings?
5/6/20221 hour, 27 minutes, 15 seconds
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Warp wants to be the terminal of the future

Today we’re talking with Zach Lloyd, founder of Warp — the terminal being re-imagined for the 21st century and beyond. Warp is a blazingly fast, rust-based terminal that’s being designed from the ground up to work like a modern app. We get into all the details — why now is the right time to re-invent the terminal, where they got started, the business they aim to build around Warp, what it’s going to take to gain adoption and grow, but more importantly — what’s Warp like today to get developers excited and give it a try.
4/26/20221 hour, 14 minutes, 36 seconds
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Practical ways to solve hard problems

Frank Krueger joined us to talk about solving hard problems. Earlier this year he wrote a blog post titled “Practical Guide to Solving Hard Problems,” and a lot of what he had to say really resonated with us. The premise is simple — if you have to write some code that you’re just not sure how to write…what do you do? What are the practical steps that you can take when you’re feeling stumped? Today’s show goes deep on that subject…practical ways to solve hard problems and ship your best work. Frank has his own podcast called Merge Conflict — check it out at mergeconflict.fm.
4/22/20221 hour, 15 minutes, 36 seconds
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The story of Vitess

This week we’re joined by Deepthi Sigireddi, Vitess Maintainer and engineer at PlanetScale — of course we’re talking about all things Vitess. We talk about its origin inside YouTube, how Vitess handles sharding, Deepthi’s journey to Vitess maintainer, when you should begin using it, and how it fits into cloud native infra.
4/12/20221 hour, 31 minutes, 7 seconds
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Wisdom from 50+ years in software

Today we have a special treat. A conversation with Brian Kernighan! Brian’s been in the software game since the beginning of Unix. Yes, he was there at Bell Labs when it all began. And he is still at it today, writing books and teaching the next generation at Princeton. This is an epic and wide ranging conversation. You’ll hear about the birth of Unix, Ken Thompson’s unique skillset, why Brian thinks C has stood the test of time, his thoughts on modern languages like Go and Rust, what’s changed in 50 years of software, what makes platforms like Unix and the web so powerful, his take as a professor on the trend of programmers skipping the university track, and so much more. Seriously, this is a must-listen.
3/30/20221 hour, 36 minutes, 30 seconds
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ONE MORE thing every dev should know

The incomparable Jessica Kerr is back with another grab-bag of amazing topics. We talk about her journey to Honeycomb, devs getting satisfaction from the code they write, why step one for her is “get that new project into production” and step two is observe it, her angst for the context switching around pull requests, some awesome book recommendations, how game theory and design can translate to how we skill up and level up our teams, and so much more.
3/11/20221 hour, 14 minutes, 13 seconds
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Securing the open source supply chain

This week we’re joined by the “mad scientist” himself, Feross Aboukhadijeh…and we’re talking about the launch of Socket — the next big thing in the fight to secure and protect the open source supply chain. While working on the frontlines of open source, Feross and team have witnessed firsthand how supply chain attacks have swept across the software community and have damaged the trust in open source. Socket turns the problem of securing open source software on its head, and asks…“What if we assume all open source may be malicious?” So, they built a system that proactively detects indicators of compromised open source packages and brings awareness to teams in real-time. We cover the whys, the hows, and what’s next for this ambitious and very much needed project.
3/1/20221 hour, 28 minutes, 21 seconds
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Making the command line glamorous

This week we’re talking to Toby Padilla, Co-Founder at Charm — where they build tools to make the command line glamorous. We talk about the state of the art, the next big thing happening on the command line and in ssh-land. They have an array of open source tooling to build great apps for the terminal and Charm Cloud to power a new generation of CLI apps. We talk through all their tooling, where things are headed for CLI apps, the focus and attention of their team, and what’s to come in bringing glamor to the command line.
2/26/20221 hour, 33 minutes, 3 seconds
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Git your reset on

This week we’re joined by Annie Sexton, UX Engineer at Render, to talk about her blog post titled Git Organized: A Better Git Flow that made the internet explode when she suggested using reset instead of rebase for a better git flow. On this show we talk about the git flow she suggests and why, how this flow works for her when she’s hacking on the Render codebase (and when she uses it), the good and the bad of Git, and we also talked about the cognitive load of Git commits as you work.
2/15/20221 hour, 10 minutes, 33 seconds
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Principles for hiring engineers

This week we’re joined by Jacob Kaplan-Moss and we’re talking about his extensive writing on work sample tests. These tests are an exercise, a simulation, or a small slice of real day-to-day work that candidates will perform as part of their job. Over the years, as an engineering leader, Jacob has become a practicing expert in effectively hiring engineers — today he shares a wealth of knowledge on the subject.
2/8/20221 hour, 17 minutes, 59 seconds
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Learning from incidents

This week we’re joined by Nora Jones, founder and CEO at Jeli where they help teams gain insight and learnings from incidents. Back in December Nora shared here thoughts in a Changelog post titled “Incident” shouldn’t be a four-letter word - which got a lot of attention from our readers. Today we’re talking with Nora about all things incidents — the learning and growth they represent for teams, why teams should focus on learning from incidents in the first place, their Howie guide to post‑incident investigations, why the next emerging role is an Incident Analyst, and she also shares a few book recommendations which we’ve linked up in the show notes.
2/4/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 23 seconds
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Song Encoder: Forrest Brazeal

Welcome to Song Encoder, a special series of The Changelog podcast featuring people who create at the intersection of software and music. This episode features Pwnie Award-winning songwriter Forrest Brazeal.
1/31/202224 minutes, 40 seconds
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Supabase is all in on Postgres

This week Paul Copplestone, CEO of Supabase joined us to catch us up on the next big thing happening in the world of Postgres. Supabase might be best known as “the open source Firebase alternative,” a tagline they might be reluctant to maintain. But from Adam’s perspective, he’s never been more excited about what they’re bringing to market for Postgres fans. In the last year, Supabase has gone from 0 to more than 80,000 databases on their platform — and they’re still in beta…and it’s open source. Hopefully today’s show sheds some light on why everyone is talking about Supabase.
1/25/20221 hour, 15 minutes, 46 seconds
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Making the ZFS file system

This week Matt Ahrens joins Adam to talk about ZFS. Matt co-founded the ZFS project at Sun Microsystems in 2001. And 20 years later Adam picked up ZFS for use in his home lab and loved it. So, he reached out to Matt and invited him on the show. They cover the origins of the file system, its journey from proprietary to open source, architecture choices like copy-on-write, the ins and outs of creating and managing ZFS, RAID-Z and RAID-Z expansion, and Matt even shares plans for ZFS in the cloud with ZFS object store.
1/18/20221 hour, 30 minutes, 32 seconds
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Complex systems & second-order effects

Paul Orlando joins Jerod to talk through some unintended consequences that occur when systems operate at scale. We discuss Goodhart’s Law, The Cobra Effect, how to design incentive systems, dependency management decisions, the risks of autonomous vehicles, and much more along the way.
1/10/20221 hour, 10 minutes, 7 seconds
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State of the "log" 2021

Our 4th annual year-end wrap-up episode! We don’t naval gaze often, but when we do… we make sure you get your money’s worth. Reflections, most popular episodes, our favs, and new this year: listener voice mails. Thanks for listening! 💚
12/20/20211 hour, 51 minutes, 38 seconds
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AI-assisted development is here to stay

We’re joined by Eran Yahav — talking about AI assistants for developers. Eran has been working on this problem for more than a decade. We talk about his path to now and how the idea for Tabnine came to life, this AI revolution taking place and the role it will play in developer productivity, and we talk about the elephant in the room - how Tabnine compares to GitHub Copilot, and what they’re doing to make Tabnine the AI assistant for every developer regardless of the IDE or editor you choose.
12/17/20211 hour, 16 minutes, 40 seconds
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Deeply human stories

Today we’re bringing our appearance on DevDiscuss right here to The Changelog. Jerod and I guested their launch episode for Season 7 to talk about deeply human stories we’ve covered over the years on this podcast. For long-time listners this will be a trip down memory lane and for recent subscibers this will be a guided tour on some of our most impactful episodes. Special thanks to Ben Halpern and Christina Gorton for hosting us. Check out their show at dev.to/devdiscuss
12/8/202155 minutes, 18 seconds
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Help make state of the "log" 2021 extra special!

We’re prepping for our 4th annual state of the “log” episode where we look back at the year, discuss some of our favorite episodes as well as the most popular ones, and talk a bit about what we have in the works for 2022 and beyond. We thought it’d be awesome to include some listener voices on the show! So, please share your favorite Changelog guests, topics, or a-ha moments you’ve had over the last year. If you get your message included in the episode, we’ll send you a free t-shirt. It doesn’t have to be super produced. Just pop open your Voice Memos app on your phone or use QuickTime or Audacity on your laptop. Tell us what’s on your mind. Then upload your audio to ~> changelog.fm/sotl We’re recording the episode next week, so don’t sleep on the opportunity. We’d love to hear from you!
12/3/20211 minute, 15 seconds
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Returning to GitHub to lead Sponsors

Today we’re joined by Jessica Lord, talking about the origins of Electron and her boomerang back to GitHub to lead GitHub Sponsors. We cover the early days of Electron before Electron was Electron, how she advocated to turn it into a product and make it a framework, how it’s used today, why she boomeranged back to GitHub to lead Sponsors, what’s next in funding open source creators, and we attempt to answer the question “what happens to open source once it’s funded?”
12/2/20211 hour, 38 minutes, 57 seconds
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Shopify's vision for the future of commerce

Today we’re joined by Ilya Grigorik to talk about Shopify’s developer preview release of Hydrogen and the preview release of Oxygen which is in early access preview with select merchants on Shopify. Hydrogen is their React framework for dynamic, contextual, and personalized e-commerce. And Oxygen is Shopify’s hosted V8 JavaScript worker runtime that leverages all of their platform with the hope of scaling millions of storefronts. We cover what developers can expect from the Hydrogen framework, Shopify’s big bet on React Server Components, the future of Shopify at scale with Hydrogen powered by Oxygen, and a world where merchants never have to think about the complexities of scaling infrastructure.
11/19/20211 hour, 12 minutes, 25 seconds
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1Password is all in on its web stack

This week we’re bringing JS Party to The Changelog — Mitch and Andrew from the 1Password team talk with Amal and Nick about the company’s transition to Electron and web technologies, and how the company utilized its existing web stack to shape the future of its desktop experience.
11/12/20211 hour, 13 minutes, 55 seconds
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Connecting the dots in public

Today we’re joined by Shawn “swyx” Wang, also known as just “swyx” — and we’re talking about his interesting path to becoming a software developer, what it means to “learn in public” and how he’s been able to leverage that process to not only level up his skills and knowlege, but to also rapidly advance his career. We cover Swyx’s recent writing on the light and dark side of the API economy — something he calls “living above or below the API,” his thoughts on Cloudflare eating the cloud by playing Go instead of Chess, and we also talk about the work he’s doing at Temporal and how’s taking his frontend skills to the backend.
11/5/20211 hour, 9 minutes, 7 seconds
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Song Encoder: $STDOUT

Welcome to Song Encoder, a special series of The Changelog podcast featuring people who create at the intersection of software and music. This episode features $STDOUT and contains explicit language.
10/29/202137 minutes, 12 seconds
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Oh my! Zsh.

Robby Russell is back on The Changelog after more than 10 years to catch us up on all things Oh My Zsh — a delightful, open source, community-driven framework for managing your Zshell configuration. It comes bundled with plugins, themes, and can be easily customized and contributed to, because hey, that’s how open source works. In this episode Robby gives us a glimpse into the passion and the struggle of being an open source software maintainer.
10/25/20211 hour, 11 minutes, 40 seconds
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This insane tech hiring market

This week we’re joined by Gergely Orosz and we’re talking about the insane tech hiring market we’re in right now. Gergely was on the show a year ago talking about growing as a software engineer and his book The Tech Resume Inside Out. Now he’s laser focused on Substack with actionable advice for engineering managers and engineers, with a focus on big tech and high-growth startups. On today’s show we dig into his recent coverage of “the perfect storm” that’s causing this insane tech hiring market.
10/19/20211 hour, 13 minutes, 15 seconds
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Lessons from 10k hours of programming

Today we’re talking to Matt Rickard about his blog post, Reflections on 10,000 Hours of Programming. Matt was clear to mention that these reflections are purely about coding, not career advice or other soft skills. These reflections are just about deliberately writing code for 10,000 hours, which also correlates with the number of hours needed to master a skill. If you count the reflections we cover on the show and be the first to comment on this episode, we’ll get in touch and send you a coupon code to use for a 100% free t-shirt in the merch store. Good luck…
10/8/20211 hour, 13 minutes, 24 seconds
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Learning-focused engineering

This week we’re joined by Brittany Dionigi, Director of Platform Engineering at Articulate, and we’re talking about how organizations can take a more intentional approach to supporting the growth of their engineers through learning-focused engineering. Brittany has been a software engineer for more than 10 years, and learned formal educational and classroom-based learning strategies as a Technical Lead & Senior Instructor at Turing School of Software & Design. We talk through a ton of great topics; getting mentorship right, common coaching opportunities, classroom-based learning strategies like backwards planning, and ways to identify and maximize the learning opportunities for teams and org.
10/1/20211 hour, 12 minutes, 43 seconds
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Fauna is rethinking the database

This week we’re talking with Evan Weaver about Fauna — the database for a new generation of applications. Fauna is a transactional database delivered as a secure and scalable cloud API with native GraphQL. It’s the first implementation of its kind based on the Calvin paper as opposed to Spanner. We cover Evan’s history leading up to Fauna, deep details on the Calvin algorithm, the CAP theorem for databases, what it means for Fauna to be temporal native, applications well suited for Fauna, and what’s to come in the near future.
9/24/20211 hour, 5 minutes, 33 seconds
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The business model of open source

This week we’re joined by Adam Jacob, CEO of System Initiative and Co-Founder of Chef, about open source business models and the model he thinks is the right one to choose, his graceful exit from Chef and some of the details behind Chef’s acquisition in 2020 for $220 million…in cash, and how his perspective on open source has or has not changed as a result. Adam also shared as much stealth mode details as he could about System Initiative.
9/17/20211 hour, 20 minutes, 43 seconds
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Coding in the cloud with Codespaces

On this special edition of The Changelog, we’re talking with Cory Wilkerson, Senior Director of Engineering at GitHub, about GitHub Codespaces. For years now, the possibility of coding in the cloud seemed so close, yet so far away for a number of reasons. According to Cory, the raw ingredients to make coding in the cloud a reality have been there for years. The challenge has really been how the industry thinks, and we are now at a place where the skepticism in cloud based workflows is “non-existent.” After 15 months in preview, GitHub not only announced the availability of Codespaces for Teams and Enterprise — they also showcased their internal adoption, with 600 of their 1,000 engineers using it daily to develop GitHub.com. On this episode, Cory shares the full backstory of that journey and a peek into the future where we’re all coding in the cloud.
9/11/20211 hour, 7 minutes, 50 seconds
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We ask a lawyer about GitHub Copilot

This week we’re bringing JS Party to The Changelog — Nick Nisi and Christopher Hiller had an awesome conversation with Luis Villa, co-founder and General Counsel at Tidelift. They discuss GitHub Copilot and the implications of an AI pair programmer and fair use from a legal perspective.
9/8/202159 minutes, 29 seconds
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Why Neovim?

This week Neovim core maintainer TJ DeVries joins Jerod and guest co-host Nick Nisi (from JS Party) to follow-up on our Vim episode with a conversation dedicated to Neovim. TJ tells us why Neovim was created in the first place, how it differs from Vim, why Lua is awesome for configuration and plugins, what LSPs are all about, the cool tech inside tree-sitter, and how he’s writing his own fuzzy file finder for Neovim called Telescope.
8/31/20211 hour, 14 minutes
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OAuth, "It's complicated."

Today we’re joined by Aaron Parecki, co-founder of IndieWebCamp and maintainer of OAuth.net, for a deep dive on the state of OAuth 2.0 and what’s next in OAuth 2.1. We cover the complications of OAuth, RFCs like Proof Key for Code Exchange, also known as PKCE, OAuth for browser-based apps, and next generation specs like the Grant Negotiation and Authorization Protocol, also known as GNAP. The conversation begins with how Aaron experiements with the IndieWeb as a showcase of what’s possible.
8/23/20211 hour, 10 minutes, 24 seconds
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Building software for yourself

Today we’re talking to Linus Lee about the practice of building software for yourself. Linus has several side projects we could talk about, but today’s show is focused on Linus’ dynamically typed functional programming language called Ink that he used to write his full text personal search engine called Monocle. Linus is focused on writing software that solves his own needs, all of which is open source, to help him learn more deeply and organize the knowledge of his life.
8/23/20211 hour, 11 minutes, 51 seconds
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Richard Hipp returns

This week, Richard Hipp returns to catch us up on all things SQLite, his single file webserver written in C called Althttpd, and Fossil – the source code manager he wrote and uses to manage SQLite development instead of Git.
8/19/20211 hour, 26 minutes, 8 seconds
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Leading leaders who lead engineers

This week we’re joined by Lara Hogan – author of Resilient Management and management coach & trainer for the tech industry. Lara led engineering teams at Kickstarter and Etsy before she, and Deepa Subramaniam stepped away from their deep roots in the tech industry to start Wherewithall – a consultancy that helps level up managers and emerging leaders. The majority of our conversation focuses on the four primary hats leaders and managers end up wearing; mentoring, coaching, sponsoring, and delivering feedback. We also talk about knowing when you’re ready to lead, empathy and compassion, and learning to lead.
8/11/20211 hour, 9 minutes, 1 second
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Kaizen! The day half the internet went down

This week we’re sharing a special episode of our new podcast called Ship It. This episode is our Kaizen-style episode where we point our lens inward to Changelog.com to see what we should improve next. The plan is do this episode style every 10 episodes. Gerhard, Adam, and Jerod talk about the things that we want to improve in our setup over the next few months. We talk about how the June Fastly outage affected changelog.com, how we responded that day, and what we could do better. We discuss multi-cloud, multi-CDN, and the next sensible and obvious improvements for our app.
8/5/20211 hour, 7 minutes, 35 seconds
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Modern Unix tools

This week we’re talking with Nick Janetakis about modern unix tools, and the various commands, tooling, and ways we use the commmand line. Do you Bash or Zsh? Do you use cat or bat? What about man vs tldr? Today’s show is a deep dive into unix tools you know and love, or should know and maybe love.
7/31/20211 hour, 15 minutes, 6 seconds
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Why we 💚 Vim

On this special edition of The Changelog, we tell Vim’s story from the mouths of its users. Julia Evans, Drew Neil, Suz Hinton, and Gary Bernhardt join Jerod Santo for a deep and wide-ranging discussion about “the best text editor that anyone ever wrote.”
7/21/202144 minutes, 56 seconds
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The story behind Inter

This week we’re talking to Rasmus Andersson about his journey as a software creator. We talk about the work he’s doing right now on Playbit, a computing environment which encourages playful learning, building, and sharing of software. We also talk about his work on the Inter typeface, as well as the reasons why this font family needed to be free and open source.
7/19/20211 hour, 25 minutes, 29 seconds
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Massive scale and ultra-resilience

This week we’re sharing a recent episode from Founders Talk that we continuously hear about from listeners. Listen and subscribe to Founders Talk at founderstalk.fm and anywhere you listen to podcasts. On Founders Talk #75 — Adam talks with Spencer Kimball, CEO and Co-founder of Cockroach Labs — makers of CockroachDB an open source cloud-native distributed SQL database. Cockroach Labs recently raised $160 million dollars on a $2 billion dollar valuation. In this episode, Spencer shares his journey in open source, startups and entrepreneurship, and what they’re doing to build CockroachCloud to meet the needs of applications that require massive scale and ultra-resilience.
7/9/20211 hour, 12 minutes, 51 seconds
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The foundations of Continuous Delivery

This week we’re sharing one of the most popular episodes from our new podcast Ship It. Ship It launched in May and now has 8 episodes in the feed to enjoy…it’s hosted by Gerhard Lazu, our SRE here at Changelog. In this episode, Gerhard talks with Dave Farley, co-author of Continuous Delivery and the inventor of the Deployment Pipeline. Today, most of us ship code the way we do because 25 years ago, Dave cared enough to drive the change that we now call CI/CD. He is one of the great software engineers: opinionated, perseverant & focused since the heydays of the internet. Dave continues inspiring and teaching us all via his newly launched YouTube channel, courses, and recent books. The apprentice finally meets the master 🙇‍♂️🙇‍♀️
7/2/20211 hour, 13 minutes, 37 seconds
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xbar puts anything in your macOS menu bar

On this episode we’re talking with our good friend Mat Ryer whom you may know from the Go Time podcast. Mat created an awesome open source tool for putting just about anything in your Mac’s toolbar. It was originally written in Objective-C, but it just got a big rewrite in Go and abig rename from BitBar to xbar. If you don’t use a Mac don’t hit skip on this episode quite yet! There are lessons to be learned for anyone interested in hacking on tools to make your life better. Plus, with this rewrite Mat has positioned xbar to go cross-platform, which we talk about as well.
6/21/20211 hour, 5 minutes, 10 seconds
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Funds for open source

This week we’re talking with Pia Mancini about the latest updates to the mission of Open Collective. Earlier this year Open Collective announced “Funds for Open Source.” The idea is simple, make it easy for companies to invest in open source, and they will. Also, since recording this episode, Pia and the team at Open Collective along with Gitcoin announced fundoss.org as part of Maintainer Week announcements. And right now, they have a matching fund of $75,000 dollars funding open source that you can support.
6/18/20211 hour, 1 minute, 56 seconds
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Every commit is a gift

Maintainer Week is finally here and we’re excited to make this an annual thing! If Maintainer Week is new to you, check out episode #442 with Josh Simmons and Kara Sowles. Today we’re talking Brett Cannon. Brett is Dev Manager of the Python Extension for VS Code, Python Steering Council Member, and core team member for Python. He recently shared a blog post The social contract of open source, so we invited Brett to join us for Maintainer Week to discuss this topic in detail. Thank a maintainer on us! We’re printing a limited run t-shirt that’s free for maintainers, and all you gotta do is thank them, today!
6/10/20211 hour, 7 minutes, 40 seconds
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Exploring Deno Land 🦕

This week we’re joined by Ryan Dahl, Node.js creator, and now the creator of Deno - a simple, modern and secure runtime for JavaScript and TypeScript that uses V8 and is built in Rust. We talk with Ryan about the massive success of Node and how it impacted his life, and how he eventually created Deno and what he’s doing differently this time around. We also talk about The Deno Company and what’s in store for Deno Deploy.
6/8/20211 hour, 17 minutes, 23 seconds
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Maintainer week!

This week is all about Maintainer Week — it’s a week long event starting June 7th for open source maintainers to gather, share, and be celebrated. We’re joined by Josh Simmons (Ecosystem Strategy Lead at Tidelift & President of Open Source Initiative) and Kara Sowles (Senior Open Source Program Manager at GitHub). Of course we love open source maintainers, that’s why we’re so excited about Maintainer Week and making it an annual thing. Today we talk through all the details of this event, what we can expect for this year and the years to come.
5/28/20211 hour, 6 minutes, 21 seconds
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Inside 2021's infrastructure for Changelog.com

This week we’re talking about the latest infrastructure updates we’ve made for 2021. We’re joined by Gerhard Lazu, our resident SRE here at Changelog, talking about the improvements we’ve made to 10x our speed and be 100% available. We also mention the new podcast we’ve launched, hosted by Gerhard. Stick around the last half of the show for more details.
5/21/202158 minutes, 54 seconds
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Open source goes to Mars 🚀

This week we’re talking about open source on Mars. Martin Woodward (Senior Director of Developer Relations at GitHub) joins us to talk about the new Mars badge GitHub introduced. This collaboration between GitHub and NASA confirmed nearly 12,000 people contributed code, documentation, graphic design, and more to the open source software that made Ingenuity’s launch possible. Today’s show is a celebration of this human achievement and the impact of open source on space exploration as we know it.
5/14/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 43 seconds
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Elixir meets machine learning

This week Elixir creator José Valim joins Jerod and Practical AI’s Daniel Whitenack to discuss Numerical Elixir, his new project that’s bringing Elixir into the world of machine learning. We discuss why José chose this as his next direction, the team’s layered approach, influences and collaborators on this effort, and their awesome collaborative notebook project that’s built on Phoenix LiveView.
5/7/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 8 seconds
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Let's mint some NFTs

This week we’re talking about NFTs — that’s right, non-fungible tokens and we’re joined by Mikeal Rogers, who’s leading all things InterPlanetary Linked Data at Protocol Labs. We go down the NFT rabbit hole on a very technical level and we come out the other side with clarity and a compelling use of NFTs.
4/27/20211 hour, 20 minutes, 41 seconds
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Into the Nix ecosystem

This week we’re talking about Nix with Domen Kožar. The Nix ecosystem is a DevOps toolkit that takes a unique approach to package management and system configuration. Nix helps you make reproducible, declarative, and reliable systems. Domen is writing the Nix ecosystem guide at nix.dev and today he takes us on a deep dive on all things Nix.
4/20/202155 minutes, 33 seconds
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Curl is a full-time job (and turns 23)

This week we’re talking with Daniel Stenberg about 23 years of curl. Daniel shares how curl came to be, what drives and motivates him, maintaining a good cadence of an open source product, what to expect from http3, how many billions of users curl has, and Daniel also shares some funny stories like the “Spotify and Instagram hacking ring.”
4/12/20211 hour, 17 minutes, 36 seconds
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The future of the web is HTML over the wire

This week we’re joined by long-time web developer Matt Patterson. Earlier this year Matt wrote an evocative article for A List Apart called The Future of Web Software Is HTML-over-WebSockets. In this episode Matt sits down with Jerod to discuss, in-detail, why he believes the future of the web is server-rendered (again) and how Ruby on Rails is well positioned to bring that future to us today.
4/5/202158 minutes, 40 seconds
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Restic has your backup

This week Alexander Neumann takes Jerod on a tour of Restic, the world-class backup solution that’s fast, secure, and cross-platform. We discuss why he created Restic in the first place, how (and why you should) you use it, some of its more interesting technical bits, lessons learned over the years building and maintaining a community, and more of course.
4/2/20211 hour, 6 minutes, 45 seconds
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Open source, not open contribution

This week we’re talking with Ben Johnson. Ben is known for his work on BoltDB, his work in open source, and as a freelance Go developer. Late January when Ben open sourced his newest project Litestream in the readme he shared how the project was open source, but not open for contribution. His reason was to protect his mental health and the long term viability of the project. On this episode we talk with Ben about what that means, his thoughts on mental health and burnout in open source, choosing a license, and the details behind Litestream - a standalone streaming replication tool for SQLite.
3/26/20211 hour, 22 minutes, 43 seconds
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Big breaches (and how to avoid them)

This week we’re talking about big security breaches with Neil Daswani, renowned security expert, best-selling author, and Co-Director of Stanford University’s Advanced CyberSecurity Program. His book, Big Breaches: Cybersecurity Lessons for Everyone helped to guide this conversation. We cover the six common key causes (aka vectors) that lead to breaches, which of these causes are exploited most often, recent breaches such as the Equifax breach (2017), the Capital One breach (2019), and the more recent Solarwinds breach (2020).
3/24/20211 hour, 21 minutes, 16 seconds
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Leading a non-profit unicorn

This week we’re talking about the future of freeCodeCamp with Quincy Larson and what it’s taken to build it into the non-profit unicorn that it is. They’re expanding their Python section into a full-blown data science curriculum and they’ve launched a $150,000 fundraiser to make it happen with 100% dollar-for-dollar matching up to the first $150,000 thanks to Darrell Silver. As you may know, we’re big fans of Quincy and the work being done at freeCodeCamp, so if you want to back their efforts as well, learn more and donate.
3/16/20211 hour, 17 minutes, 14 seconds
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Darklang Diaries

This week Jerod is joined by Paul Biggar the creator of Dark, a new way to build serverless backends. Paul shares all the details about this all-in-one language, editor, and infrastructure, why he decided to make Dark in the first place, his view on programming language design, the advantages Dark has as an integrated solution, and also why it’s source available, but NOT open source.
2/26/202157 minutes, 2 seconds
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Community perspectives on Elastic vs AWS

This week we’re talking about the recent falling out between Elastic and AWS around the relicensing of Elasticsearch and Kibana. Like many in the community, we have been watching this very closely. Here’s the tldr for context. On January 21st, Elastic posted a blog post sharing their concerns with Amazon/AWS misleading and confusing the community, saying “They have been doing things that we think are just NOT OK since 2015 and it has only gotten worse.” This lead them to relicense Elasticsearch and Kibana with a dual license, a proprietary license and the Sever Side Public License (SSPL). AWS responded two days later stating that they are “stepping up for a truly open source Elasticsearch,” and shared their plans to create and maintain forks of Elasticsearch and Kibana based on the latest ALv2-licensed codebases. There’s a ton of detail and nuance beneath the surface, so we invited a handful of folks on the show to share their perspective. On today’s show you’ll hear from: Adam Jacob (co-founder and board member of Chef), Heather Meeker (open-source lawyer and the author of the SSPL license), Manish Jain (founder and CTO at Dgraph Labs), Paul Dix (co-founder and CTO at InfluxDB), VM (Vicky) Brasseur (open source & free software business strategist), and Markus Stenqvist (everyday web dev from Sweden).
2/17/20211 hour, 46 minutes, 40 seconds
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Open source civilization

This week we’re talking about open source industrial machines. We’re joined by Marcin Jakubowski from Open Source Ecology where they’re developing open source industrial machines that can be made for a fraction of commercial costs, and they’re sharing their designs online for free. The goal is to create an efficient open source economy that increases innovation through open collaboration. We talk about what it takes to build a civilization from scratch, the Open Building Institute and their Eco-Building Toolkit, the right to repair movement, DIY maker culture, and how Marcin plans to build 10,000 micro factories worldwide where anyone can come and make.
1/29/20211 hour, 18 minutes, 21 seconds
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The rise of Rocky Linux

This week we’re talking with Gregory Kurtzer about Rocky Linux. Greg is the founder of the CentOS project, which recently shifted its strategy and has the Linux community scrambling. Rocky Linux aims to continue where the CentOS project left off — to provide a free and open source community-driven enterprise grade Linux operating system. We discuss the history of the CentOS project, how it fell under Red Hat’s control, the recent shift in Red Hat’s strategy with CentOS, and how Rocky Linux is designed to be 100% bug-for-bug compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
1/22/20211 hour, 26 minutes, 54 seconds
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What the web could be (in 2021 and beyond)

Vercel CEO Guillermo Rauch and JS Party panelist Amal Hussein join Jerod to discuss the state of the web platform! We opine on why it’s so important and unique, where it stands today, what modern web development looks like, and where the whole thing is headed in 2021 and beyond.
1/12/20211 hour, 6 minutes, 25 seconds
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State of the “log” 2020

It’s the end of 2020 and on this year’s “State of the log” episode Adam and Jerod carry on the tradition of looking back at our favorite moments of the year – we talk through our most popular episodes, our personal favorites and must listen episodes, top posts from Changelog Posts, and what we have in the works for 2021 and beyond.
12/21/20201 hour, 22 minutes, 15 seconds
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You can FINALLY use JSHint for evil

Today we welcome Mike Pennisi into our Maintainer Spotlight. This is a special flavor of The Changelog where we go deep into a maintainer’s story. Mike is the maintainer of JSHint which, since its creation in 2011, was encumbered by a license that made it very hard for legally-conscious teams to use the project. The license was the widely-used MIT Expat license, but it included one additional clause: “The Software shall be used for Good, not Evil.” Because of this clause, many teams could not use JSHint. Today’s episode with Mike covers the full gamut of JSHint’s journey and how non-free licensing can poison the well of free software.
12/20/20201 hour, 19 minutes, 30 seconds
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Coding without your hands

What do you do when you make a living typing on a keyboard, but you can no longer do that for more than a few minutes at a time? Switch careers?! Not Josh Comeau. He decided to learn from others who have come before him and develop his own solution for coding without his hands. Spoiler Alert: he uses weird noises and some fancy eye tracking tech. On this episode Josh tells us all about the fascinating system he developed, how it changed his perspective on work & life, and where he’s going from here. Plus we mix in some CSS & JS chat along the way.
12/13/20201 hour, 18 minutes, 18 seconds
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Growing as a software engineer

Gergely Orosz joined Adam for a conversation about his journey as a software engineer. Gergely recently stepped down from his role as Engineering Manager at Uber to pursue his next big thing. But, that next big thing isn’t quite clear to him yet. So, in the meantime, he has been using this break to write a few books and blog more so he can share what he’s learned along the way. He’s also validating some startup ideas he has on platform engineering. His first book is available to read now — it’s called The Tech Resume Inside Out and offers a practical guide to writing a tech resume written by the people who do the resume screening. Both topics gave us quite a bit to talk about.
12/2/20201 hour, 20 minutes, 32 seconds
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The future of Mac

We have a BIG show for you today. We’re talking about the future of the Mac. Coming off of Apple’s “One more thing.” event to launch the Apple M1 chip and M1 powered Macs, we have a two part show giving you the perspective of Apple as well as a Mac app developer on the future of the Mac. Part 1 features Tim Triemstra from Apple. Tim is the Product Marketing Manager for Developer Technologies. He’s been at Apple for 15 years and the team he manages is responsible for developer tools and technologies including Xcode, Swift Playgrounds, the Swift language, and UNIX tools. Part 2 features Ken Case from The Omni Group. Ken is the Founder and CEO of The Omni Group and they’re well known for their Omni Productivity Suite including OmniFocus, OmniPlan, OmniGraffle, and OmniOutliner – all of which are developed for iOS & Mac.
11/20/20201 hour, 17 minutes, 58 seconds
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The Kollected Kode Vicious

We’re joined by George Neville-Neil, aka Kode Vicious. Writing as Kode Vicious for ACMs Queue magazine, George Neville-Neil has spent the last 15+ years sharing incisive advice and fierce insights for everyone who codes, works with code, or works with coders. These columns have been among the most popular items published in ACMs Queue magazine and it was only a matter of time for a book to emerge from his work. His book, The Kollected Kode Vicious, is a compilation of the most popular items he’s published over the years, plus a few extras you can only find in the book. We cover all the details in this episode.
11/13/20201 hour, 29 minutes, 14 seconds
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Inside 2020's infrastructure for Changelog.com

We’re talking with Gerhard Lazu, our resident SRE, ops, and infrastructure expert about the evolution of Changelog’s infrastructure, what’s new in 2020, and what we’re planning for in 2021. The most notable change? We’re now running on Linode Kubernetes Engine (LKE)! We even test the resilience of this new infrastructure by purposefully taking the site down. That’s near the end, so don’t miss it!
11/6/20201 hour, 21 minutes, 9 seconds
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Maintaining the massive success of Envoy

Today we welcome Matt Klein into our Maintainer Spotlight. Matt is the creator of Envoy, born inside of Lyft. It’s an edge and service proxy designed for cloud-native applications. Envoy was unexpectedly popular, and completely changed the way Lyft considers what and how to open source. While Matt has had several opportunities to turn Envoy into a commercial open source company, he didn’t. In today’s conversation with Matt we learn why he choose a completely different path for the project.
10/30/202059 minutes, 31 seconds
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What's so exciting about Postgres?

PostgreSQL aficionado Craig Kerstiens joins Jerod to talk about his (and our) favorite relational database. Craig details why Postgres is unique in the world of open source databases, which features are most exciting, the many things you can make Postgres do, and what the future might hold. Oh, and some awesome psql tips & tricks!
10/23/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 20 seconds
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Shopify’s massive storefront rewrite

Maxime Vaillancourt joined us to talk about Shopify’s massive storefront rewrite from a Ruby on Rails monolith to a completely new implementation written in Ruby. It’s a fairly well known opinion that rewrites are “the single worst strategic mistake that any software company can make” and generally something “you should never do.” But Maxime and the team at Shopify have proved successful in their efforts in this massive storefront rewrite and today’s conversation covers all the details.
10/16/20201 hour, 9 minutes, 3 seconds
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Spotify's open platform for shipping at scale

We’re joined by Jim Haughwout (Head of Infrastructure and Operations) and Stefan Ålund (Principal Product Manager) from Spotify to talk about how they manage hundreds of teams producing code and shipping at scale. Thanks to their recently open sourced open platform for building developer portals called Backstage, Spotify is able to keep engineering squads connected and shipping high-quality code quickly — without compromising autonomy.
10/9/20201 hour, 13 minutes, 14 seconds
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The team that fashioned Apollo 11

We’re helping Atlassian to promote Season 2 of Teamistry. If this is the first time you’re hearing about this podcast, Teamistry is an original podcast from Atlassian that tells the stories of teams who work together in new and unexpected ways, to achieve remarkable things. Today, we’re sharing a full-length episode from Season 1 which tells the story of the team that fashioned the Apollo 11 spacesuits. When Neil Armstrong stepped on the moon for the first time, we don’t actually see his face. We see his moonsuit. That moonsuit — in effect — is Neil Armstrong; an inseparable part of this historic moment. While the spacesuit kept him alive to tell that story in his own words, what went unnoticed is the extraordinary team that stitched it together.
10/8/202031 minutes, 40 seconds
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Gitter’s big adventure

Gitter is exiting GitLab and entering the Matrix…ok, we couldn’t help ourselves with that one. Today we’re joined by Sid Sibrandij (CEO of GitLab) and Matthew Hodgson (technical co-founder of Matrix) to discuss the acquisition of Gitter. A little backstory to tee things up…back in 2017 GitLab announced the acquisition of Gitter to help push their idea of chatops within GitLab. As it turns out, the GitLab team saw a different path for Gitter as a core part of Matrix rather than a non-core project at GitLab. We talk through all the details in this episode with Matthew and Sid.
9/30/20201 hour, 12 minutes, 39 seconds
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How open source saved htop

Today we welcome Hisham Muhammad into our Maintainer Spotlight. Hisham is the creator of htop - a well known cross-platform interactive process viewer. This conversation with Hisham covers the gamut of being an open source software maintainer. To set the stage, a new version of htop was announced, but not by Hisham – it was a kind takeover of the project and needless to say Hisham was surprised, but ultimately relieved. Why? Well, that’s what this episode it all about…
9/24/20201 hour, 8 minutes, 2 seconds
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Estimating systems with napkin math

We’re joined by Simon Eskildsen, Principal Engineer at Shopify, talking about how he uses a concept called napkin math where you use first-principle thinking to estimate systems without writing any code. By the end of the show we were estimating pretty much everything using napkin math.
9/11/20201 hour, 4 minutes, 31 seconds
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Inside GitHub's Arctic Code Vault

Earlier this year on February 2nd, 2020 Jon Evans and his team of archivists took a snapshot of all active public repositories on GitHub and sent it to a decommissioned coal mine in the Svalbard archipelago where it will be stored for the next 1,000 years. On this episode, Jon chats with Jerod all about the GitHub Archive Program and how they’re preserving open source software for future generations.
9/4/202051 minutes, 35 seconds
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Bringing beauty to the world of code sharing

Carbon is an open source web app that helps you create and share beautiful images of your source code. Whether you’ve used Carbon personally or not, odds are you’ve seen its dent on the universe of social code sharing. Mike Fix has been maintaining Carbon for a few years and he’s embraced the project as an opportunity to experiment and practice working in public. On this Maintainer Spotlight episode, we chat with Mike about building Carbon, growing its community, sustainability models, and why he loves the world of open source.
8/26/20201 hour, 2 minutes, 55 seconds
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Celebrating Practical AI turning 100!! 🎉

We’re so excited to see Chris and Daniel take this show to 100 episodes, and that’s exactly why we’re rebroadcasting Practical AI #100 here on The Changelog. They’ve had so many great guests and discussions about everything from AGI to GPUs to AI for good. In this episode, we circle back to the beginning when Jerod and I joined the first episode to help kick off the podcast. We discuss how our perspectives have changed over time, what it has been like to host an AI podcast, and what the future of AI might look like. (GIVEAWAY!)
8/21/20201 hour, 11 minutes, 56 seconds
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Working in Public

Nadia Eghbal is back and this time she’s talking with us about her new book Working in Public. If you’re an old school listener you might remember the podcast we produced with Nadia and Mikeal Rogers called Request for Commits. If you weren’t listening then, or can’t remember…don’t worry…the back catalog of Request for Commits is still online and subscribe-able via all the podcast ways. That podcast is still getting listens to this very day! Obviously we go way back with Nadia…and having a chance to now talk with her through all the details of her new book Working in Public, this was a milestone for this show and Jerod and I. We talked through the reasons she wrote the book in the first place, Nadia’s thoughts on the future of the internet and the connection of creators to the platforms they build their followings on, and we also talk about the health of projects and communities and the challenges we face internet-at-large as well as right here in our backyard in the open source community.
8/12/20201 hour, 15 minutes, 14 seconds
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Designing and building HEY

We’re talking about designing and building HEY with Jonas Downey, the lead designer behind HEY. In their words, “Email sucked for years, but not anymore.” We were super interested in how they went about solving the problems with email, so we invited Jonas on to share all the details and a behind-the-scenes look at the making of HEY.
8/7/20201 hour, 25 minutes, 58 seconds
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Making Windows Terminal awesome

Kayla Cinnamon, Program Manager at Microsoft for Windows Terminal, Console, Command Line, and Cascadia Code joined us to talk about the release of Windows Terminal 1.0 and the new Windows command-line experience. We talk about everything that went into rethinking the command line experience on Windows, the UX and UI design behind it all, the learnings of working in open source, and what’s to come for the Windows command line experience.
7/31/20201 hour, 2 minutes, 56 seconds
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It’s OK to make money from your open source

Adam loves a good dark theme and supporting a fellow creator, and Hedy Li finished the episode we did with Nikita Prokopov covering FiraCode and reached out saying Zeno Rocha’s work on Dracula deserved the same credit. We agreed. So we linked up with Zeno about his passion for open source, how he’s changed his mind on making money with open source, his big release of Dracula Pro and the future of Dracula, and of course his new book – 14 Habits of Highly Productive Developers. Check for a link in the show notes for details on how to get your hands on Zeno’s book for free through our giveaway.
7/22/20201 hour, 5 minutes, 16 seconds
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Laws for hackers to live by

Dave Kerr joins Jerod to discuss the various laws, theories, principles, and patterns that we developers find useful in our work and life. We unpack Hanlon’s Razor, Gall’s Law, Murphy’s Law, Kernighan’s Law, and too many others to list here.
7/16/20201 hour, 2 minutes, 29 seconds
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What's next for José Valim and Elixir?

We’re joined again by José Valim talking about the recent acquihire of Plataformatec and what that means for the Elixir language, as well as José. We also talk about Dashbit a new 3 person company he helped form from work done while at Plataformatec to help startups and enterprises adopt and run Elixir in production. Lastly we talk about a new idea José has called Bytepack that aims to help developers package and deliver software products to developers and enterprises.
7/10/20201 hour, 6 minutes, 32 seconds
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The intersection of coding and fonts

A listener request led us to Nikita Prokopov and FiraCode, and we’re sure glad they did. When we think of open source software, fonts aren’t usually high on the list of things that need maintaining. That’s not true when your font also supports hundreds of programming ligatures like FiraCode does. Nikita has his hands full!
7/3/202058 minutes
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Big updates in Safari 14

We’re joined by Ronak Shah and Beth Dakin from the Safari team at Apple about their announcements at WWDC20 and the release of Safari 14. We talk about Safari WebExtensions, Face ID and Touch ID coming to the web, Safari’s plans to advance the web platform, and it all comes down to their focus on privacy, power, and performance.
6/29/202051 minutes, 15 seconds
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Shipping work that matters

We’re revisiting Shape Up and product development thoughts with Ryan Singer, Head of Product Strategy at Basecamp. Last August we talked with Ryan when he first launched his book Shape Up and now we’re back to see how Shape Up is shaping up — “How are teams using the wisdom in this book to actually ship work that matters? How does Shape Up work in new versus existing products?” We also talk about the concept of longitudinal thinking and the way it’s impacting Ryan’s designs, plus a grab bag of topics in the last segment.
6/25/20201 hour, 32 minutes, 45 seconds
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The ONE thing every dev should know

The incomparable Jessica Kerr drops by with a grab-bag of amazing topics. Understanding software systems, transferring knowledge between devs, building relationships, using VS Code & Docker to code together, observability as a logical extension of TDD, and a whole lot more.
6/16/202053 minutes, 1 second
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Creating GitLab’s remote playbook

We’re talking about all things all-remote with Darren Murph, Head of Remote at GitLab. Darren is tasked with putting intentional thought and action into place to lead the largest all-remote company in the world. Yes, GitLab is 100% all-remote, as in, no offices…and they employee more than 1,200 people across 67 countries. They’ve been iterating and documenting how to work remotely for years. We cover Darren’s personal story on remote work while he served as managing editor at Engadget, his thoughts on how “work” is evolving and ways to reframe and rethink about when you work, this idea of work life harmony, and the backstory and details of the playbook GitLab released free of charge to the world.
6/9/20201 hour, 19 minutes, 9 seconds
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De-Google-ing your website analytics

Plausible creators Uku Täht and Marko Saric join the show to talk about their open source, privacy-friendly alternative to Google Analytics. We talk through the backstory of the project, why it’s open source, the details behind a few viral blog posts Marko shared to bring in a ton of new interest to the project, why privacy matters in web analytics, how they prioritize building new features, the technical details behind their no cookie light-weight JavaScript approach, and their thoughts on a server-side option.
5/27/20201 hour, 29 minutes, 43 seconds
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Leading GitHub to a $7.5 billion acquisition

Jason Warner (CTO at GitHub) joined the show to talk with us about the backstory of how he helped to lead GitHub to a $7.5 billion acquisition by Microsoft. Specifically how they trusted their gut not just the data, and how they understood the value they were bringing to market. We also talk about Jason’s focus on “horizon 3” for GitHub, and his thoughts on remote work and how they’re leading GitHub engineering today.
5/18/20201 hour, 32 minutes, 48 seconds
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VisiData is like duct tape for your data

Saul Pwanson is the creator and maintainer of VisiData, a terminal interface for exploring and arranging tabular data. On this Maintainer Spotlight episode, Saul joins Jerod for a wide-ranging discussion on crossword puzzles, biographs, and Saul’s open source gift to the world. Thanks to AJ for the suggestion!
5/12/202057 minutes, 5 seconds
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Gatsby's long road to incremental builds

Gatsby creator Kyle Mathews joins Jerod fresh off the launch of incremental builds to tell the story of this feature that’s 3 years in the making. We talk about Kyle’s vision for Gatsby, why incremental builds took so long, why it’s not part of the open source tool, how he makes decisions between Cloud and open source features, and more.
5/6/20201 hour, 3 minutes, 17 seconds
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Indeed's FOSS Contributor Fund

Duane O’Brien (head of open source at Indeed) joined the show to talk about their FOSS Contributor Fund and FOSS Responders. He’s super passionate about open source, and through his role at Indeed Duane was able to implement this fund and open source it as a framework for other companies to use. We talk through all the details of the program, its impact and influence, as well as ways companies can use the framework in their organization. We also talk about FOSS Responders an initiative to support open source that has been negatively impacted by COVID-19.
4/30/20201 hour, 16 minutes, 39 seconds
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Work from home SUPERCUT

Today we’re featuring conversations from different perspectives on working from home from our JS Party, Go Time, and Brain Science podcasts here on Changelog.com. Because, hey…if you didn’t know we have 6 active podcasts in our portfolio of shows. Head to changelog.com/podcasts to collect them all!
4/22/20201 hour, 12 minutes, 26 seconds
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Visualizing the spread of Coronavirus

Harry Stevens is a Graphics Reporter at The Washington Post and the author of “Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to ‘flatten the curve’” — the most popular post in The Washington Post’s online history. We cover the necessary details of this global pandemic, the journalist, coding, and design skills required to be a graphics reporter, the backstory on visualizing this outbreak, why Harry chooses R over Python, advice for aspiring graphics reporters, and how all of this came together at the perfect time in history to give Harry a chance to catch lightning in a bottle.
4/13/20201 hour, 6 minutes, 44 seconds
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Securing the web with Let's Encrypt

We’re talking with Josh Aas, the Executive Director of the Internet Security Research Group, which is the legal entity behind the Let’s Encrypt certificate authority. In June of 2017, Let’s Encrypt celebrated 100 Million certificates issued. Now, just about 2.5 years later, that number has grown to 1 Billion and 200 Million websites served. We talk with Josh about his journey and what it’s taken to build and grow Let’s Encrypt to enable a secure by default internet for everyone.
4/7/20201 hour, 20 minutes, 16 seconds
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The 10x developer myth

In late 2019, Bill Nichols, a senior member of the technical staff at Carnegie Mellon University with the Software Engineering Institute published his study on “the 10x developer myth.” On this show we talk with Bill about all the details of his research. Is the 10x developer a myth? Let’s find out.
3/31/20201 hour, 17 minutes, 6 seconds
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Welcome to The Changelog

The Changelog is deep discussions in & around the world of software… and it’s been going for over a decade. We talk to hackers, like Chris Anderson from 3D Robotics… leaders, like Devon Zuegel from GitHub… and innovators, like Amal Hussein… Welcome to The Changelog! Please listen to an episode from our catalog that interests you and subscribe today. We’d love to have you with us.
3/30/20201 minute, 45 seconds
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Prepare yourself for Quantum Computing

Johan Vos joined us to talk about his new book ‘Quantum Computing for Developers’ which is available to read right now as part of the Manning Early Access Program (MEAP). Listen near the end of the show to learn how you can get a free copy or check the show notes for details. We talked with Johan about the core principles of Quantum Computing, the hardware and software involved, the differences between quantum computing and classical computing, a little bit of physics, and what can we developers do today to prepare for the perhaps-not-so-distant future of Quantum Computing.
3/24/20201 hour, 9 minutes, 30 seconds
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Engineer to manager and back again

Lauren Tan joined us to talk about her blog post titled “Does it spark joy?” In this post Lauren shared the news of her resignation as an engineering manager at Netflix to return to being a software engineer. We examine the career trajectory of a software engineer and the seemingly inevitable draw to management for continued career growth. The idea of understanding “What are you optimizing for?” and whether or not what you’re doing truly brings you joy.
3/18/20201 hour, 22 minutes
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Pushing webpack forward

We sit down with Tobias Koppers of webpack fame to talk about his life as a full-time maintainer of one of the most highly used (4 million+ dependent repos!) and influential tools in all of the web. Things we ask Tobias include: how he got here, how he pays himself, has he ever gotten a raise, what his typical day is like, how he decides what to work on, if he pays attention to the competition, and if he’s ever suffered from burnout.
3/13/202048 minutes, 36 seconds
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Altair 8800 and the dawn of a revolution

We partnered with Red Hat to promote Season 4 of Command Line Heroes — a podcast about the people who transform technology from the command line up. Season 4 is all about hardware that changed the game. We’re featuring episode 3 from season 4 — called “Personal Computers: The Altair 8800 and the Dawn of a Revolution.” This is the story of personal computers and the revolution that took place in the PC era. Learn more and subscribe at redhat.com/commandlineheroes.
3/11/202033 minutes, 6 seconds
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Enter the Matrix

Matthew Hodgson (technical co-founder) joined us to talk about Matrix - an open source project and open standard for secure, decentralized, real-time communication. It’s open source, it’s decentralized, it’s end-to-end-encrypted, and it’s also self-sovereign. Matrix also provides a bridge feature to bridge existing platforms and communication silos into a global open matrix of communication. A recent big win for Matrix was Mozilla’s announcement of switching off its IRC network that it had been using for 22 years and now uses Matrix instead.
3/9/20201 hour, 33 minutes, 8 seconds
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From open core to open source

Frank Karlitschek joined us to talk about Nextcloud - a self-hosted free & open source community-driven productivity platform that’s safe home for all your data. We talk about how Nextcloud was forked from ownCloud, successful ways to run community-driven open source projects, open core vs open source, aligned incentives, and the challenges Nextcloud is facing to increase adoption and grow.
3/2/20201 hour, 10 minutes, 9 seconds
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The developer's guide to content creation

Stephanie Morillo (content strategist and previously editor-in-chief of DigitalOcean and GitHub’s company blogs) wrote a book titled The Developer’s Guide to Content Creation — it’s a book for developers who want to consistently and confidently generate new ideas and publish high-quality technical content. We talked with Stephanie about why developers should be writing and sharing their ideas, crafting a mission statement for your blog and thoughts on personal brand, her 4 step recipe for generating content ideas, as well as promotional and syndication strategies to consider for your developer blog.
2/21/20201 hour, 25 minutes, 10 seconds
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The dawn of sponsorware

Caleb Porzio is the creator & maintainer of Livewire, AlpineJS, and more. His latest open source endeavor was announced as “sponsorware”, which means it lived in a private repo (only available to Caleb’s GitHub Sponsors) until he hit a set sponsorship threshold, at which point it was open sourced. On this episode, we talk through this sponsorware experiment in-depth. We learn how he dreamt it up, how it went (spoiler: very well), and how he had to change his mindset on 2 things in order to make sustainability possible.
2/17/20201 hour, 3 minutes, 27 seconds
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Productionising real-world ML data pipelines

Yetunde Dada from QuantumBlack joins Jerod for a deep dive on Kedro, a workflow tool that helps structure reproducible, scaleable, deployable, robust, and versioned data pipelines. They discuss what Kedro’s all about and how it’s “changing the landscape of data pipelines in Python”, the ins/outs of open sourcing Kedro, and how they found early success by sweating the details. Finally, Jerod asks Yetunde about her passion project: a virtual reality film which debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January.
2/14/202049 minutes, 8 seconds
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Good tech debt

Jon Thornton (Engineering Manager at Squarespace) joined the show to talk about tech debt by way of his post to the Squarespace engineering blog titled “3 Kinds of Good Tech Debt”. We talked through the concept of “good tech debt,” how to leverage it, how to manage it, who’s in charge of it, how it’s similar to ways we leverage financial debt, and how Squarespace uses tech debt to drive product development.
2/6/202059 minutes, 59 seconds
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The soul of an old machine

We partnered with Red Hat to promote Season 4 of Command Line Heroes — a podcast about the people who transform technology from the command line up. Season 4 is all about hardware that changed the game. We’re featuring episode 1 from season 4 — called “Minicomputers: The soul of an old machine.” This is the story of Minicomputers and how they paved the way for the personal computers that could fit in a bag and, eventually, the phones in our pockets. Learn more and subscribe at redhat.com/commandlineheroes.
2/4/202030 minutes, 12 seconds
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Open source meets climate science

Anders Damsgaard is a climate science researcher working on cryosphere processes at the Department of Geophysics at Stanford University. He joined the show to talk with us about the intersection of open source and climate science. Specifically, we discuss a set of shell tools he created called The Scholarref Tools which allow you to perform most of the tasks required to gather the references needed during the writing phase of an academic paper. We also discuss climate science, physics, self hosting Git, and why Anders isn’t present on any “social” networks.
1/31/20201 hour, 6 minutes, 49 seconds
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Intro to Rust programming

We teamed up with some friends of ours at Heroku to promote the Code-ish podcast so we’re sharing a full-length episode right here in The Changelog’s feed. This episode features Chris Castle with special guests Carol Nichols and Jake Goulding talking about the strengths of the Rust programming language. Learn more and subscribe at heroku.com/podcasts/codeish.
1/24/202044 minutes, 40 seconds
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Meet Algo, your personal VPN in the cloud

The commercial VPN industry is a minefield to navigate and many open source solutions are a pain to use or ill-suited for the task. Algo VPN, on the other hand, is a self-hosted personal VPN designed for ease of deployment and security. It uses the securest industry standards, builds on rock-solid solutions like WireGuard and Ansible, and runs on an ever-growing list of cloud hosting providers. On this episode Dan Guido –CEO of security firm Trail of Bits and Algo’s creator– joins Jerod to discuss the project in depth.
1/20/202054 minutes, 55 seconds
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State of the “log” 2019

Welcome to 2020 — on this year’s “State of the ‘log’” episode Jerod and I look back at our favorite moments from 2019 and forward to 2020 and beyond. We talk through our most popular episodes, our personal favorites, our 10-year anniversary, the excitement we have for Brain Science our newest podcast, it’s for the curious! And we also look forward to plans we have for 2020 and the decade to come…
1/14/20201 hour, 29 seconds
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Gerhard goes to KubeCon (part 2)

Gerhard is back for part two of our interviews at KubeCon 2019. Join him as he goes deep on Prometheus with Björn Rabenstein, Ben Kochie, and Frederic Branczyk… Grafana with Tom Wilkie and Ed Welch… and Crossplane with Jared Watts, Marques Johansson, and Dan Mangum. Don’t miss part one with Bryan Liles, Priyanka Sharma, Natasha Woods, & Alexis Richardson.
12/27/20192 hours, 19 minutes, 50 seconds
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Gerhard goes to KubeCon (part 1)

Changelog’s resident infrastructure expert Gerhard Lazu is on location at KubeCon 2019. This is part one of a two-part series from the world’s largest open source conference. In this episode you’ll hear from event co-chair Bryan Liles, Priyanka Sharma and Natasha Woods from GitLab, and Alexis Richardson from Weaveworks. Stay tuned for part two’s deep dives in to Prometheus, Grafana, and Crossplane.
12/18/20191 hour, 24 minutes, 54 seconds
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Trending up GitHub's developer charts

In this episode we’re shining our maintainer spotlight on Ovilia. Hailing from Shanghai, China, Ovilia is an up-and-coming developer who contributes to Apache ECharts, maintains Polyvia, which does very cool low-poly image and video processing, and has a sweet personal website, too. This episode with Ovilia continues our maintainer spotlight series where we dig deep into the life of an open source software maintainer. We’re producing this series in partnership with Tidelift. Huge thanks to Tidelift for making this series possible.
12/14/201945 minutes, 26 seconds
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Building an open source excavation robot for NASA

Ronald Marrero is a software developer working on NASA’s Artemis program, which aims at landing the first woman and next man on the Moon by 2024. How Ron got here is a fascinating story, starting at UCF and winding its way through the Florida Space Institute, working with NASA’s Swamp Works team, and building an open source excavation robot. On this episode Ron tells us how it all went down and shares what he learned along the way.
12/11/20191 hour, 6 minutes, 50 seconds
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Re-licensing Sentry

David Cramer joined the show to talk about the recent license change of Sentry to the Business Source License from a BSD 3-clause license. We talk about the details that triggered this change, the specifics of the BSL license and its required parameters, the threat to commercial open source products like Sentry, his concerns for the “open core” model, and what the future of open source might look like in light of protections-oriented source-available licenses like the BSL becoming more common.
12/8/20191 hour, 18 minutes, 43 seconds
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The making of GitHub Sponsors

Devon Zuegel is an Open Source Product Manager at GitHub. She’s also one of the key people responsible for making GitHub Sponsors a thing. We talk with Devon about how she came to GitHub to develop GitHub Sponsors, the months of research she did to learn how to best solve the sustainability problem of open source, why GitHub is now addressing this issue, the various ways and models of addressing maintainers’ financial needs, and Devon also shared what’s in store for the future of GitHub Sponsors.
12/1/20191 hour, 26 minutes, 12 seconds
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Five years of freeCodeCamp

Today we have a very special show for you – we’re talking with Quincy Larson the founder of freeCodeCamp as part of a two-part companion podcast series where we each celebrate our 5 and 10 year anniversaries. This year marks 5 years for freeCodeCamp and 10 years for us here at Changelog. So make sure you check out the freeCodeCamp podcast next week when Quincy ships our episode to their feed. But, on today’s episode we catch up with Quincy on all things freeCodeCamp.
11/15/20191 hour, 31 minutes, 38 seconds
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Finding collaborators for open source

Jeff Meyerson, host of Software Engineering Daily, and the founder of FindCollabs (a place to find collaborators for open source software) joined the show to talk about living in San Francisco, his thoughts on podcasting and where the medium is heading, getting through large scale market changes. We talk at length about his new project FindCollabs, the difficulty of reliably finding people to collaborate with, the importance of reputation and ratings systems, and his invite to this audience to check out what he’s doing and get involved.
11/10/20191 hour, 9 minutes, 5 seconds
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Back to Agile's basics

Robert C. Martin, aka Uncle Bob, joined the show to talk about the practices of Agile. Bob has written a series of books in order to pass down the wisdom he’s gained over his 50 year software career — books like Clean Architecture, Clean Code, The Clean Coder, The Software Craftsman, and finally Clean Agile — which is the focus of today’s discussion. We cover the origins of his “Uncle Bob” nickname, the Agile Manifesto, why Agile is best suited for developing software, how it applies today, communication patterns for teams, co-location vs distributed, and more importantly Bob shares his “why” for writing this book.
10/31/20191 hour, 20 minutes, 16 seconds
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Pioneering open source drones and robocars

Chris Anderson, former Editor-in-Chief of WIRED and a true pioneer in the world of drones, joined the show to talk about his hobby gone wrong, how he started 3D Robotics, DIY Drones, and Dronecode. We also talked about his newest passion, DIY Robocars.
10/18/201952 minutes, 25 seconds
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Let's talk Elixir!

Jerod is joined by Chris and Desmond (co-hosts of the ElixirTalk podcast) to catch up on what’s moving and shaking in the Elixir and Phoenix communities. We discuss what’s attractive about Elixir, what it means to have the language finalized, why folks are so excited by Phoenix LiveView, the ambitious new Lumen project that’s bringing Elixir to WebAssembly, and more.
10/9/201940 minutes, 23 seconds
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Maintainer spotlight! Valeri Karpov

In this episode we’re shining our maintainer spotlight on Valeri Karpov. Val has been the solo maintainer of Mongoose since 2014. This episode with Val continues our maintainer spotlight series where we dig deep into the life of an open source software maintainer. We’re producing this series in partnership with Tidelift. Huge thanks to Tidelift for making this series possible.
10/2/201943 minutes, 15 seconds
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Nushell for the GitHub era

Jonathan Turner, Andrés Robalino, and Yehuda Katz joined the show to talk about Nushell, or just Nu for short. It’s a modern shell for the GitHub era. It’s written in Rust, and it has the backing of some of the greatest minds in open source. We talk through what it is, how it works and cool things you can do with it, why Rust, ideas for the future, and ways for the community to get involved and contribute.
9/27/20191 hour, 32 minutes, 51 seconds
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Machine powered refactoring with AST's

Amal Hussein (Engineering Manager at npm) joined the show to talk about AST’s — aka, abstract syntax trees. Amal is giving a talk at All Things Open on the subject so we asked her to give us an early preview. She’s on a mission to democratize the knowledge and usage of AST’s to push legacy code and the web forward.
9/19/20191 hour, 4 minutes, 15 seconds
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Generative engineering cultures

Dave Kaplan (Head of Software Engineering at Policygenius) joined the show to talk about Generative Engineering Cultures and how they have become the goal of industry-aware tech teams. We talk through the topology of organizational cultures ranging from pathological, to bureaucratic, to generative, the importance of management buy-in (from the top down) on leading a generative culture, the ability to contribute original value which is deeply rooted in the concept of aligned autonomy. We also covered the 6 core skills required for us to be empowered in our teams.
9/17/20191 hour, 17 minutes, 11 seconds
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Modern software is built on APIs

Abhinav Asthana (founder of Postman) joined the show to talk about Postman, an ADE — API Development Environment — that began as open source and is now a full-fledged company that just announced a $50 million dollar Series B. We talk about why Postman has grown so successfully, APIs and their impact to core business factors, what it means to be an API Development Environment (ADE), and how they created one of the most popular API platforms and community.
9/6/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 18 seconds
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Maintainer spotlight! Feross Aboukhadijeh

In this episode we’re shining our maintainer spotlight on Feross Aboukhadijeh. Feross is the creator and maintainer of 100’s of open source projects which have been downloaded 100’s of million of times each month — projects like StandardJS, BitMidi, and WebTorrent to name a few. This episode with Feross continues our maintainer spotlight series where we dig deep into the life of an open source software maintainer. We’re producing this series in partnership with Tidelift. Huge thanks to Tidelift for making this series possible.
8/29/20191 hour, 4 minutes, 13 seconds
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OSCON 2019 anthology

We’re on the expo hall floor of OSCON 2019 talking with Eric Holscher, Ali Spittel, and Hong Phuc Dang. First up, we talk to Eric about his work at Write the Docs, ethical advertising, and the Pac-Man rule at conferences. Second, we talk with Ali about her passion for teaching developers, her passion for writing, and her new found love for podcasting. Last, we talk with Hong about her work at FOSSASIA, the disconnect between America and Asia in open source, and several of the cool open source projects they have on GitHub.
8/23/20191 hour, 19 minutes, 46 seconds
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Shaping, betting, and building

Ryan Singer, head of Product Strategy at Basecamp, joined the show to talk about their newest book — Shape Up: Stop running in circles and ship work that matters. It’s written by Ryan himself and you can read it right now for free online at Basecamp.com/shapeup. We talked about the back story of the book, how the methodology for Shape Up developed from within at Basecamp, the principles and methodologies of Shape Up, how teams of varying sizes can implement Shape Up. Ryan even shared a special invitation to our listeners near the end of the show to his live and in-person Shape Up workshop on August 28th in Detroit, Michigan.
8/16/20191 hour, 28 minutes, 33 seconds
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Observability is for your unknown unknowns

Christine Yen (co-founder and CEO of Honeycomb) joined the show to talk about her upcoming talk at Strange Loop titled “Observability: Superpowers for Developers.” We talk practically about observability and how it delivers on these superpowers. We also cover the biggest hurdles to observability, the cultural shifts needed in teams to implement observability, and even the gains the entire organization can enjoy when you deliver high-quality code and you’re able to respond to system failure with resilience.
8/7/20191 hour, 5 minutes, 47 seconds
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Federating JavaScript's language commons with Entropic

We’re joined by C J Silverio, aka ceejbot on Twitter, aka 2nd hire and former CTO at npm Inc. We talk with Ceej about her recent JS Conf EU talk titled “The Economies of Open Source” where she laid our her concerns with the JavaScript language commons being owned by venture capitalists. Currently the JavaScript language commons is controlled by the npm registery, and as you may know, npm is a VC backed for profit start up. Of course we also talk with Ceej about the bomb she dropped, Entropic, at the end of that talk — a federated package registry for JavaScript C J hopes will unseat npm and free the JavaScript language commons.
8/2/20191 hour, 5 minutes, 15 seconds
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Go is eating the world of software

We’re joined by Ron Evans at OSCON on the expo hall floor talking about Go and how it’s eating the world of software. Specifically we’re talking about TinyGo and what they’re doing to bring the Go programming language to micro-controllers and modern web browsers. According to Ron Evans, “embedded systems and Go are the most exciting things happening right now.”
7/25/201954 minutes, 40 seconds
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The war for the soul of open source

Adam Jacob (co-founder and board member of Chef) joins the show to talk about the keynote he’s giving at OSCON this week. The keynote is titled “The war for the soul of open source.” We talked about what made open source great in the first place, what went wrong, the pitfalls of open core models, licensing, and more. By the way, we’re at OSCON this week so if you make your way to the expo hall, make sure you come by our booth and say hi.
7/16/20191 hour, 30 minutes, 59 seconds
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Learning the BASICs

We partnered with Red Hat to promote Season 3 of Command Line Heroes — an original podcast from Red Hat, hosted by Saron Yitbarek, about the people who transform technology from the command line up. It’s an awesome show and we’re huge fans of Saron and the team behind the podcast, so we wanted to share it with you. Learn more and subscribe at redhat.com/commandlineheroes.
7/16/201926 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Pragmatic Programmers

Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt, best known as the authors of The Pragmatic Programmer and founders of The Pragmatic Bookshelf, joined the show today to talk about the 20th anniversary edition of The Pragmatic Programmer. This is a beloved book to software developers all over the world, so we wanted to catch up with Andy and Dave to talk about how this book came to be, some of the wisdom shared in its contents, as well as the impact it’s had on the world of software. Also, the beta book is now “fully content complete” and is going to production. If you decide to pick up the ebook, you’ll get a coupon for 50% off the hardcover when it comes out this fall.
7/11/20191 hour, 18 minutes, 40 seconds
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Python's Tale

We partnered with Red Hat to promote Season 3 of Command Line Heroes — an original podcast from Red Hat, hosted by Saron Yitbarek, about the people who transform technology from the command line up. It’s an awesome show and we’re huge fans of Saron and the team behind the podcast, so we wanted to share it with you. Learn more and subscribe at redhat.com/commandlineheroes.
7/2/201928 minutes, 49 seconds
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Maintainer spotlight! Ned Batchelder

In this episode we’re shinning our maintainer spotlight on Ned Batchelder. Ned is one of the lucky ones out there that gets to double-dip — his day job is working on open source at edX, working on the Open edX community team. Ned is also a “single maintainer” of coverage.py - a tool for measuring code coverage of Python programs. This episode with Ned kicks off the first of many in our maintainer spotlight series where we dig deep into the life of an open source software maintainer. We’re producing this series in partnership with Tidelift. Huge thanks to Tidelift for making this series possible.
6/28/201950 minutes, 54 seconds
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Boldly going where no data tools have gone before

Computer Scientist Yaw Anokwa joins the show to tell us how Open Data Kit is enabling data collection efforts around the world. From monitoring rainforests to observing elections to tracking outbreaks, ODK has done it all. We hear its origin story, ruminate on why it’s been so successful, learn how the software works, and even answer the question, “are people really using it in space?!” All that and more…
6/19/20191 hour, 14 minutes, 25 seconds
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The state of CSS in 2019

We’re talking with Sacha Greif to discuss the State of CSS survey and results. CSS is evolving faster than ever. And, coming off the heels of their annual State of JavaScript survey, they’ve decided to take on the world of styles and selectors to help identify the latests patterns and trends in CSS. We talk through the history and motivations of this survey, the methodology of their data collection, the tooling involved to build and run the survey, and of course we dig deep into the survey results and talk through the insights we found most interesting.
6/14/20191 hour, 16 minutes, 52 seconds
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Python's new governance and core team

We’re talking with Brett Cannon for a behind the scenes look at Guido stepping down as Python’s BDFL (Benevolent dictator for life) and the process they had to go through to establish a new governance model, the various proposed PEPs to establish this new direction, the winning PEP, and what the future holds for Python.
6/6/20191 hour, 11 minutes, 17 seconds
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Creating and selling multiplayer online games

We’re talking with Victor Zhou about the explosion of the .io game genre. We talked through all the details around building and running one of these games, the details behind Victor’s super popular game called Generals — which he eventually sold, and we also covered the economics behind creating and selling one of these games.
5/24/20191 hour, 18 minutes, 58 seconds
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Off the grid social networking with Manyverse

We’re talking with Andre Staltz, creator of Manyverse — a social network off the grid. It’s open source and free in every sense of the word. We talked through the backstory, how a user’s network gets formed, how data is stored and shared, why off-grid is so important to Andre, and what type of user uses an “off-the-grid” social network.
5/18/20191 hour, 19 minutes, 22 seconds
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Quirk and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

We’re talking with Evan Conrad — for most of Evan’s life he has suffered from severe panic attacks, often twice per week. Eventually he stumbled upon a therapy method called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, or CBT for short, and saw positive results. This led him to create Quirk, an open source iOS app which allows its users to practice one of the most common formats of CBT. On the show we mentioned a new podcast we’re launching called Brain Science — it’s hosted by Adam Stacoviak and Mireille Reece, a Doctor of Clinical Psychology. Brain Science is a podcast for the curious that explores the inner-workings of the human brain to understand behavior change, habit formation, mental health, and the human condition. It’s Brain Science applied — not just how does the brain work, but how do we apply what we know about the brain to better our lives. Stay tuned after the show for a special preview of Brain Science. If you haven’t yet, right now would be a great time to subscribe to Master at changelog.com/master. It’s one feed to rule them all, plus some extras that only hit the master feed.
5/10/20191 hour, 11 minutes, 29 seconds
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Inside 2019's infrastructure for Changelog.com

We’re talking with Gerhard Lazu, our resident ops and infrastructure expert, about the setup we’ve rolled out for 2019. Late 2016 we relaunched Changelog.com as a new Phoenix/Elixir application and that included a brand new infrastructure and deployment process. 2019’s infrastructure update includes Linode, CoreOS, Docker, CircleCI, Rollbar, Fastly, Netdata, and more — and we talk through all the details on this show. This show is also an open invite to you and the rest of the community to join us in Slack and learn and contribute to Changelog.com. Head to changelog.com/community to get started.
5/5/20191 hour, 38 minutes, 55 seconds
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Running functions anywhere with OpenFaaS

We’re talking with Alex Ellis, the founder of OpenFaaS — serverless functions made simple for Docker and Kubernetes. We talked about the backstory and details of OpenFaaS, “the curious case of serverless on Kubernetes,” the landscape of open source serverless platforms, how Alex is leading and building this community, getting involved, and maintainership vs leadership.
4/25/20191 hour, 27 minutes, 23 seconds
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From zero to thought leader in 6 months

We’re talking with Emma Bostian about going from zero to thought leader in 6 months. We talk about the nuances of UX including the differences between an UX Designer and a UX Engineer, we touch on “the great divide”, and we talk about Coding Coach — the open source project and community that Emma and others are building to connect software developers and mentors all over the world.
4/18/20191 hour, 12 minutes, 25 seconds
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Wasmer is taking WebAssembly beyond the browser

We’re talking with Syrus Akbary about WebAssembly and Wasmer — a standalone just in time WebAssembly runtime aiming to be fully compatible with Emscripten, Rust, and Go. We talked about taking WebAssembly beyond the browser, universal binaries, what’s an ABI?, running WebAssembly from any language, and what a world might look like with platform independent universal binaries powered by WebAssembly.
4/12/201954 minutes, 45 seconds
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All things text mode

We’re talking all things text mode with Lucas da Costa — we logged his post “How I’m still not using GUIs in 2019” a guide focused on making the terminal your IDE. We talked through his Terminal starter pack which includes: neovim, tmux, iterm2, and zsh by way of oh-my-zsh, his rules for learning vim, the awesomeness of CLI’s, and the pros and cons of graphical and plain text editors.
4/4/20191 hour, 17 minutes, 14 seconds
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Why smart engineers write bad code

We’re talking with Adam Barr, a 23 year Microsoft veteran, about his book “The problem with software,” sub-titled “Why smart engineers write bad code.” We examine that very idea, the gap between industry and academia, and more importantly what we can do to get a better feedback loop going between them.
3/29/20191 hour, 6 minutes, 6 seconds
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Funding OSS with Mozilla Open Source Support awards

We’re talking with Mehan Jayasuriya program officer at Mozilla about MOSS — the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) program which recognizes, celebrates, and supports open source projects. Earlier this year we caught the “MOSS 2018 Year in Review” blog post — this post highlighted many of their efforts in 2018 so we reached out to talk through the history, goals, and impact of this very generous project.
3/13/20191 hour, 16 minutes, 46 seconds
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Homebrew! Part Deux

We’re talking with Mike McQuaid about Homebew 2.0.0, supporting Linux and Windows 10, the backstory and details surrounding the security issue they had in 2018, their new governance model, Mike’s new role, the core team meeting in-person at FOSDEM this year, and what’s coming next for Homebrew.
3/6/20191 hour, 20 minutes, 44 seconds
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Containerizing compute driven workloads with Singularity

We’re talking with Greg Kurtzer, the founder of CentOS, Warewulf, and most recently Singularity — an open source container platform designed to be simple, fast, and secure. Singularity is optimized for enterprise and high-performance computing workloads. What’s interesting is how Singularity allows untrusted users to run untrusted containers in a trusted way. We cover the backstory, Singularity Pro and how they’re not holding the open source community version hostage, as well as how Singularity is being used to containerize and support workflows in artificial intelligence, machine learning, deep learning, and more.
2/28/20191 hour, 23 minutes, 20 seconds
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Enabling open code for science at NumFOCUS

We’re talking with Gina Helfrich the Communications Director for NumFOCUS about their story and history, the impact of open code on science, the difference between sponsored and affiliated projects, corporate backing, the back story of their education and events program PyData, and the struggles of storytelling and fundraising.
2/22/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 17 seconds
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With great power comes great responsibility

Adam and Jerod are joined by JS Party panelist Nick Nisi and #causeascene advocate Kim Crayton for a deep discussion on ethics in the technology industry at-large and our roles as software developers. If you’ve never heard Kim describe what life is like online for underrepresented and marginalized folks, you have to listen to this show!
2/15/20191 hour, 27 minutes, 38 seconds
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Tactical design advice for developers

Adam talks with Erik Kennedy about tactical design advice for developers. Erik is a self-taught UI designer and brings a wealth of practical advice for those seeking to advance their design skills and learn more about user interface design. We cover his seven rules for creating gorgeous UI, the fundamentals of user interface design — color, typography, layout, and process. We also talk about his course Learn UI Design and how it’s the ultimate on-ramp for upcoming UI designers.
2/6/20191 hour, 13 minutes, 26 seconds
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A UI framework without the framework

Jerod and Adam talked with Rich Harris –a JavaScript Journalist on The New York Times Investigations team– about his magical disappearing UI framework called Svelte. We compare and contrast Svelte to React, how the framework is embedded in a component, build time vs. run time, scoping CSS to components, and CSS in JavaScript. Rich also shares where Svelte v3 is heading and the details on Sapper, a framework for building extremely high-performance progressive web apps, powered by Svelte.
1/30/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 42 seconds
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GitHub Actions is the next big thing

Adam and Jerod talk to Kyle Daigle, the Director of Ecosystem Engineering at GitHub. They talk about GitHub Actions, the new automation platform announced at GitHub Universe this past October 2018. GitHub Actions is the next big thing coming out of GitHub with the promise of powerful workflows to supercharge your repos and GitHub experience. Build your container apps, publish packages to registries, or automate welcoming new users to your open source projects — with access to interact with the full GitHub API and any other public APIs, Actions seem to have limitless possibilities.
1/23/20191 hour, 17 minutes, 21 seconds
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source{d} turns code into actionable insights

Adam caught up with Francesc Campoy at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018 in Seattle, WA to talk about the work he’s doing at source{d} to apply Machine Learning to source code, and turn that codebase into actionable insights. It’s a movement they’re driving called Machine Learning on Code. They talked through their open source products, how they work, what types of insights can be gained, and they also talked through the code analysis Francesc did on the Kubernetes code base. This is as close as you get to the bleeding edge and we’re very interested to see where this goes.
1/16/201947 minutes, 19 seconds
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Perspectives on Kubernetes and successful cloud platforms

Adam caught up with Brendan Burns (co-creator of Kubernetes and Partner Architect at Microsoft Azure) at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018 in Seattle, WA to talk about the state of Kubernetes, the importance of community, building healthy cloud platforms, and the future of cloud infrastructure.
1/9/201942 minutes, 36 seconds
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State of the "log" 2018

On this year’s “State of the ‘log’” episode we’re going behind the scenes to look back at 2018 as we prepare for 2019 and onward. We talk through our most popular episodes, most controversial episodes, and even some of our personal favorites. We also catch you up on some company level updates here at Changelog Media. We hired Tim Smith earlier this year as our Senior Producer, we retired Request for Commits, started some new shows…