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The Brian Lehrer Show

English, News magazine, 1 season, 1330 episodes, 5 days, 18 hours, 18 minutes
About
Newsmakers meet New Yorkers as host Brian Lehrer and his guests take on the issues dominating conversation in New York and around the world. This daily program from WNYC Studios cuts through the usual talk radio punditry and brings a smart, humane approach to the day's events and what matters most in local and national politics, our own communities and our lives. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin and many others. © WNYC Studios
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Summer Culture Preview: Classical & Opera

In this membership drive mini-series, we run through some of can't miss things to see and do this summer.  Today, Ed Yim, chief content officer and senior vice president at WQXR, shares some of highlights for classical music and opera fans.
5/20/20247 minutes, 20 seconds
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Reflecting on Jimmy Carter's Legacy

Jimmy Carter entered hospice care over a year ago, and just recently his grandson said he thinks the former president is "coming to the end." Julian Zelizer, professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University, CNN political analyst and contributor to NPR’s Here and Now, reflects on the 39th president's legacy in this presidential election year, plus shares more political analysis on the presidential election.
5/20/202411 minutes, 30 seconds
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10-Question Quiz: 'On the Media'

Each day during the spring membership drive, The Brian Lehrer Show is inviting listeners to try their hand at quiz questions, this time loosely based on the titles of radio shows that air on WNYC. Today's quiz questions are inspired by the title "On the Media." 
5/20/202411 minutes, 7 seconds
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Cultural Institutions Say They're Suffering Under City Budget Cuts

The city's cultural institutions rely on funding from the city budget, and they are dealing with budget cuts. Adrian Benepe, president of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Regina Bain, executive director of the Louis Armstrong House Museum, put the budget cuts in context, and talk about what they need from the city to operate compared to what they're getting - despite generating billions in economic activity
5/20/202415 minutes, 38 seconds
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Jen Psaki on Communicating

Jen Psaki, former White House press secretary, MSNBC host, and the author of Say More: Lessons from Work, the White House, and the World (Simon & Schuster, 2024), offers advice on effective communication in Washington, and beyond.
5/20/202417 minutes, 16 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Nikole Hannah-Jones; Ali Velshi; Medical Aid in Dying

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them:Nikole Hannah-Jones on Colorblindness (First) - A Family Heritage of Social Justice (28:00) - Advocates Push for Medical Aid in Dying Bill  (46:00) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
5/18/20241 hour, 26 minutes, 49 seconds
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Summer Culture Preview: Dance

In this membership drive mini-series, we run through some of can't miss things to see and do this summer. Today, Marina Harss, a dance writer in New York who contributes to The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, Dance Magazine, and other publications and is the author of The Boy from Kyiv—Alexei Ratmansky’s Life in Ballet (Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2023), shares some dance performances -- and open-air dance parties.
5/17/20247 minutes, 24 seconds
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Don't Wait for the Heroes

Eddie Glaude, Jr., Princeton professor and the author of We Are the Leaders We Have Been Looking For  (Harvard University Press, 2024), argues against waiting for "heroes" to do the work of seeking justice and safeguarding democracy.
5/17/202416 minutes, 51 seconds
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10-Question Quiz: 'Science Friday'

Each day during the spring membership drive, The Brian Lehrer Show is inviting listeners to try their hand at quiz questions, this time loosely based on the titles of radio shows that air on WNYC. Today's quiz questions are inspired by the title "Science Friday."
5/17/202410 minutes, 41 seconds
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The Lead-Painted Apartments in NYC

NYC passed a law in 2004 requiring landlords to remove lead paint hazards, but in the last 20 years some landlords have been cited over and over for violations without enforcement. Jaclyn Jeffrey-Wilensky, data reporter at WNYC and Gothamist, explains what loopholes have allowed the violations to continue and the new city laws going into effect this year to close them.
5/17/202415 minutes, 18 seconds
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A Family Heritage of Social Justice

Ali Velshi, MSNBC host and chief correspondent and the author of Small Acts of Courage: A Legacy of Endurance and the Fight for Democracy (Macmillan, 2024), shares the story of his grandfather's work with Gandhi and Mandela and how their influence continues in his generation.
5/17/202417 minutes, 54 seconds
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Summer Culture Preview: Outdoor Movies

Summer brings fun to the cultural calendar.  In this membership drive mini-series, we run through some of can't miss things to see and do this summer.  Today, Ryan Kailath, WNYC/Gothamist arts and culture reporter, shares some of opportunities to watch movies under the stars.
5/16/20246 minutes, 37 seconds
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A Way Through the Mental Health Struggles for Twentysomethings

Meg Jay, developmental clinical psychologist and the author of The Defining Decade and her latest, The Twentysomething Treatment: A Revolutionary Remedy for an Uncertain Age (Simon & Schuster, 2024), offers advice for navigating the extremes of trivializing and over-medicating the struggles of young adults today.
5/16/202415 minutes, 51 seconds
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10-Question Quiz: '1A'

Each day during the spring membership drive, The Brian Lehrer Show is inviting listeners to try their hand at quiz questions, this time loosely based on the titles of radio shows that air on WNYC. Today's quiz questions are about the First Amendment, inspired by the title "1A."
5/16/202412 minutes, 29 seconds
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Chancellor Banks Goes to Washington

David Banks, NYC Schools Chancellor, talks about his testimony before the House committee on antisemitism and how NYC public schools are responding to the heightened tensions over the Israel-Hamas war.
5/16/202418 minutes, 11 seconds
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Politics and Grievances

Frank Bruni, New York Times op-ed columnist and the author of The Age of Grievance (Avid Reader Press/Simon & Schuster, 2024), talks about the effect he sees of "grievances" big and small motivating so much of our politics -- on both the left and the right.
5/16/202416 minutes, 25 seconds
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Summer Culture Preview: Summerstage, Celebrate Brooklyn and More

Summer brings fun to the cultural calendar. In this membership drive mini-series, we run through some of can't miss things to see and do. Today, Ryan Kailath, WNYC/Gothamist arts and culture reporter, shares some of the big festivals in the parks.
5/15/20248 minutes, 20 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Win Rozario, Policing and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, inviting questions from reporters on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, summarizes this week's questions and topics, including the police killing of Win Rozario in Queens and more.
5/15/202415 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ten Question Quiz: 'New Yorker Radio Hour'

Each day during the spring membership drive, The Brian Lehrer Show is inviting listeners to try their hand at quiz questions, this time loosely based on the titles of radio shows that air on WNYC. Today's quiz questions—about New York people, places and things—are inspired by the title "New Yorker Radio Hour." 
5/15/202412 minutes, 50 seconds
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Nicholas Kristof's Optimism

Nicholas Kristof, opinion columnist for The New York Times and author of several books, including the new memoir Chasing Hope (Penguin Random House, 2024), reflects on his long career covering tough stories, including war, genocide and addiction, and explains how he remains optimistic despite it all.
5/15/202415 minutes, 16 seconds
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Trump's Former 'Fixer' Takes the Stand

Donald Trump's former "fixer" Michael Cohen, took the stand in the former president's hush money trial this week. Andrea Bernstein,  journalist reporting on Trump legal matters for NPR, host of many podcasts including "Will be Wild" and "Trump, Inc." and the author of American Oligarchs: The Kushners, The Trumps and the Marriage of Money and Power (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), offers analysis and reports on the latest.
5/15/202418 minutes, 58 seconds
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Are You Doing No-Mow May?

No-Mow May has become increasingly popular as a way to help pollinators during springtime. Allyson Chiu, reporter covering climate solutions for the Washington Post gives tips about the best practices—and listeners call in to report on the status of their lawns.
5/14/202413 minutes, 26 seconds
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Nikole Hannah-Jones on Colorblindness

Nikole Hannah-Jones, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for The New York Times Magazine and author of The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story (One World, 2021),  discusses the right-wing campaign to roll back civil rights gains under the guise of colorblindness.
5/14/202428 minutes, 37 seconds
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Recapping the NJ Democratic Senate Primary Debate

Michael Hill, host of WNYC's Morning Edition, and Mike Hayes, WNYC/Gothamist reporter covering New Jersey, offer analysis of the debate between Democratic candidates for Senate in New Jersey.
5/14/202421 minutes, 42 seconds
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Recapping the Latimer-Bowman Debate

Tara Rosenblum, anchor, host and reporter for News 12, and Chris McKenna, reporter at The Journal News and lohud.com, recap the debate between Westchester County Executive George Latimer and incumbent Congressman Jamaal Bowman, who are vying for the Democratic nomination in New York's 16th Congressional district.Watch the debate here. 
5/14/202445 minutes, 48 seconds
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Making More or Less Than Your Friends

Julia Carpenter, freelance writer and reporter, offers advice for listeners on either side of a financial divide in their friendships.
5/13/202414 minutes, 59 seconds
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Forgiveness After a Shooting

Mark Hertsgaard, journalist and co-founder and executive director of Covering Climate Now, and the author of Big Red’s Mercy: The Shooting of Deborah Cotton and A Story of Race in America (Pegasus, 2024), shares the story of Deborah “Big Red” Cotton, an African American racial justice activist, who forgave the young Black men who shot her when they fired into a second line parade in New Orleans, a shooting in which Hertsgaard himself was injured -- and what that shooting and her response to it taught him about race and violence in America.
5/13/202422 minutes, 25 seconds
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Advocates Push for Medical Aid in Dying Bill

Advocates have been pushing for nine years for the Medical Aid in Dying Act, but the New York State legislature has been hesitant to act. David Leven, executive director emeritus and senior consultant to End of Life Choices New York, and Corinne Carey, senior campaign director for NY/NJ for the group Compassion & Choices, discuss what the bill would involve and why they support it.
5/13/202439 minutes, 24 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: The Biden Admin on Whether Israel Has Violated Laws

Francesca Chambers, White House Correspondent for USA Today, talks about the news from Washington and beyond, including the Biden administration's policy toward sending weapons to Israel. 
5/13/202432 minutes, 40 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Egg Freezing, Luis Miranda, A.J. Jacobs, Originalist

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them:The Complicated Reality of Egg Freezing  (First) - Luis Miranda's 'Latino Spirit' (28:00) - A.J. Jacobs Lives Originalism  (58:00) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
5/11/20241 hour, 24 minutes, 38 seconds
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The Joy (And Surprises) of Motherhood

Ahead of Mother's Day, Liana Finck, illustrator and author of several books, most recently, How to Baby: A No-Advice-Given Guide to Motherhood, with Drawings (The Dial Press, 2024), discusses her non-parenting “parenting guide” and listeners call in to share what surprised them the most about motherhood. 
5/10/202415 minutes, 38 seconds
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The Cicadas Have Arrived

For the first time since 1803 two broods of cicadas in the Midwest and Southeast are emerging at the same time. Benji Jones, senior environmental reporter at Vox, explains what's going on with the billions of insects buzzing around and the effect they'll have on the ecosystem. 
5/10/202427 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Distortions of AMI

Samuel Stein and Oksana Mironova, housing policy analysts at the Community Service Society, talk about their report that highlights the problem of relying on "Area Median Income" in deciding what qualifies as "affordable housing."
5/10/202432 minutes, 15 seconds
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Friday Morning Politics: A Bipartisan Speaker Vote & the DOE Chancellor Testifies

Nicholas Wu, Politico congressional reporter, talks about the latest news coming out of Congress, including the bipartisan vote that kept Mike Johnson as speaker and NYC Schools Chancellor Banks' testimony to a House committee on antisemitism.
5/10/202433 minutes, 58 seconds
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Love After Retirement

A recent New York Times Magazine issue explores retirement, and how life after work brings an unexpected challenges to couples. Listeners call in to share how retirement has impacted the relationships in their lives.
5/9/202412 minutes, 50 seconds
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City Council Finds Plenty of Pay Disparities

A new report by the City Council found pay disparities between workers of color and women in the municipal work force. NYC Council Member Carmen De La Rosa (District 10, Washington Heights, Inwood and Marble Hill), breaks down the data, plus talks about other council news of the week.
5/9/202426 minutes, 49 seconds
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Biden's Shaky Legacy

President Biden is staking his legacy, and his reelection campaign, on massive amounts of domestic spending, spurred by the passage of four major laws. But a Politico analysis found billions of dollars Congress approved by passing these bills has not yet been spent. Jessie Blaeser, data reporter at Politico, and Ben Storrow, reporter at Politico's E&E News, explain the delays, and why they are a threat both to the president's legacy and his reelection.
5/9/202435 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ask Governor Murphy: May Recap

Nancy Solomon, WNYC reporter and editor, and host of the “Ask Governor Murphy” monthly call-in show recaps her conversation with New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy. Topics this month included a proposed corporate tax to fund NJ Transit, tax relief for seniors, an NJ Turnpike extension and more.
5/9/202433 minutes, 46 seconds
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A.J. Jacobs Lives Originalism

A. J. Jacobs, NPR contributor, essayist, host of the podcast "The Puzzler" and the author of The Year of Living Biblically, It's All Relative and his latest, The Year of Living Constitutionally: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Constitution's Original Meaning (Crown, 2024), offers his take on "originalism" by living like a "founding father"—tricorn hat and all. →EVENT: A. J. Jacobs talks to NYS Lieutenant Gov. Antonio Delgado at 92Y on Thursday, May 9 at 8pm.  Register here. 
5/8/202426 minutes, 8 seconds
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Who's the Teacher You Appreciate?

Listeners call in to shout out the teacher they most appreciate, whether it's the person who taught them how to read 40 years ago or the one currently coaching their child through long division.
5/8/202414 minutes, 2 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: State Sen. Myrie's Mayoral Exploration, Columbia's Graduation and More

Brooklyn State Senator Zellnor Myrie is making moves to run against Mayor Eric Adams in the Democratic primary next June. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, explains the latest and recaps Mayor Adams' weekly presser, including his remarks on Columbia University's graduation cancellation and more.
5/8/202426 minutes, 22 seconds
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Trump's 'Hush Money' Trial Continues

Andrea Bernstein, journalist reporting on Trump legal matters for NPR, host of many podcasts including "Will be Wild" and "Trump, Inc." and the author of American Oligarchs: The Kushners, The Trumps and the Marriage of Money and Power (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), reports on the latest news from Trump's so-called "hush money" trial, including testimonies from Hope Hicks and Stormy Daniels and a warning from the judge.
5/8/202443 minutes, 18 seconds
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Luis Miranda's 'Latino Spirit'

Luis A. Miranda, Jr., founder of the political consulting firm MirRam, founding president of the Hispanic Federation and the author of Relentless: My Story of the Latino Spirit that is Transforming America (Hachette Books, 2024), shares his story of his life and work in NYC politics (and as the father of Lin Manuel).
5/7/202430 minutes, 4 seconds
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Climate Change and Mosquitos in Southeast Queens

Roxanne Scott, independent journalist working on a series with the NY Amsterdam News about climate change in Southeast Queens, talks about how St. Albans in Southeast Queens, a majority-Black neighborhood where residents have long complained of neglected infrastructure and services, is dealing with a pest exacerbated by climate change: mosquitos.
5/7/202432 minutes, 51 seconds
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TikTok's Algorithm

TikTok once embraced the narrative of its algorithm as an all-powerful "secret sauce." Now, that narrative appears to be backfiring as Congress attempts to force a sale. John Herrman, tech columnist at New York Magazine, explains.→ The Secret Weakness of TikTok’s All-Powerful Algorithm | Intelligencer
5/7/202413 minutes, 38 seconds
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Organized Against Democracy

Anne Applebaum, staff writer at The Atlantic, historian and author of the forthcoming Autocracy, Inc: The Dictators Who Want to Run the World (Penguin, 2024) talks about her Atlantic cover story, “Democracy Is Losing the Propaganda War," about the rise of autocracy around the world.
5/7/202433 minutes, 25 seconds
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Is NYC's 'Retail Apocalypse' Turning Around?

Greg David, contributor covering fiscal and economic issues for THE CITY and director of the business and economics reporting program and Ravitch Fiscal Reporting Program at the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism, shares his analysis of where retail is and isn't booming, and what kinds of businesses are setting up shop here, plus comments on what the latest unemployment numbers say about the economy.
5/6/202425 minutes, 13 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Congress on Antisemitism; The Far Right and the House Speaker

Annie Karni, congressional correspondent at The New York Times, talks about the latest national political news of the week, including legislation that recently passed the House on antisemitism, Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's latest attempt to oust Speaker Mike Johnson and more.
5/6/202440 minutes, 38 seconds
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Have You Started Getting More Sleep Lately?

Survey data show that Americans are getting more sleep now than they did before the pandemic. Caitlin Gilbert, data reporter at The Washington Post, explains the trends, and how it differs between different groups of people.
5/6/202415 minutes, 57 seconds
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The Complicated Reality of Egg Freezing

Egg freezing as a method to extend fertility for women has become more accessible and popular in the past decade—though still costly. Anna North, senior correspondent for Vox, where she covers American family life, work and education, reports on whether the industry oversold women, as data now show having a baby through the process is no guarantee.→ The failed promise of egg freezing | Vox
5/6/202427 minutes, 19 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Latest in Transit; Are SATs a Good Thing?; Bird Migration

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Transit Latest: Congestion Pricing, Fare Evasion, the End of Free Bus Routes and More (First) | Are SATs a Good Thing? (Starts at 27:57) | Peak Spring Migration Season (Starts at 50:38) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
5/4/202459 minutes, 58 seconds
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Peak Spring Migration Season

It's peak spring migration season for birds. Jason Saul, assistant program director at WNYC and former managing producer for BirdNote, talks about where the birds are and what to look for (and listen to) if you're heading out on a birdwatching walk.
5/3/202410 minutes, 59 seconds
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What "The Competition" Says About Teenage Girlhood

Every year, 50 teenage girls representing each state in America descend on Alabama to compete for large scholarship checks in the Distinguished Young Women program. Shima Oliaee, host and creator of "The Competition," creator of Pink Card, co-creator of Dolly Parton's America and founder of Shirazad Productions, discusses her new podcast, "The Competition", which follows young women on their 2-week journey and offers a peek into what it's like to be a teenage girl in America today.
5/3/202428 minutes, 28 seconds
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City Council Reacts to the Mayor's Executive Budget

Mayor Adams released his executive budget this week that restored many of the cuts he'd previously proposed. Justin Brannan, New York City Councilmember (District 43-Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach) and chair of the Council Finance Committee, talks about areas where the council and the mayor still differ.
5/3/202424 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Federal Government Eases Up on Cannabis Restrictions

The Department of Justice plans to change the way the federal government classifies cannabis, which will loosen restrictions on weed. Natalie Fertig, federal cannabis policy reporter for Politico, reports on the change, including how it will affect people, businesses and research in states where cannabis is legal (and not).
5/3/202444 minutes, 34 seconds
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Moving Day: Tips and Stories

From the 18th century to the beginning of the 20th, May 1st was a day when scores of New Yorkers would change their residencies. As a nod to that old tradition, we open up the lines for listeners in the midst of moves and hear some tips and stories.
5/2/202413 minutes, 10 seconds
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Housing News Roundup

David Brand, housing reporter for WNYC/Gothamist, talks about some of the latest housing news, including the landlord facing possible "house" arrest (in one of his unrepaired buildings) and the Rent Guidelines Board preliminary vote on rent increases of 2 to 6.5 percent.
5/2/202443 minutes, 9 seconds
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What Next in Gaza?

Aaron David​​​​ Miller, senior fellow in the American Statecraft Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, former State Department advisor on the Middle East, and the author of several books, including The Much Too Promised Land: America’s Elusive Search for Arab-Israeli Peace (Bantam, 2008), talks about the current state of ceasefire negotiations between Israel and Hamas and the best pathways to peace in the region.  Plus, he reacts to President Biden's live remarks on the campus protests.
5/2/202432 minutes, 33 seconds
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Are SATs a Good Thing?

This year, many selective colleges are reversing Covid-era test-optional admissions policies, requiring applicants to submit ACT or SAT scores again. Emi Nietfeld, author of Acceptance: A Memoir (Penguin Press, 2022), discusses how taking the SAT changed her life and helped her, as a disadvantaged youth, to attend Harvard.
5/2/202421 minutes, 22 seconds
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Bruce Ratner on Early Cancer Screening

Bruce Ratner, real estate developer, philanthropist, founder of the Michael D. Ratner Center For Early Detection of Cancer (CEDC), and co-author of Early Detection: Catching Cancer When It’s Curable (OR Books, 2024), argues for earlier and more equitable cancer screening.
5/1/202434 minutes, 55 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: NYPD Arrests Campus Protesters at Columbia and CCNY

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event and on the news the morning after police dispersed on protests at Columbia and the City College of New York. 
5/1/202431 minutes, 24 seconds
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Wednesday Morning Politics With NJ Rep. Sherrill

U.S. Representative Mikie Sherrill (D, NJ-11) talks about her priorities related to reproductive rights and the National Defense Reauthorization Act, plus reacts to the news overnight of police arresting campus protesters.
5/1/202442 minutes, 40 seconds
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A Fraught College 'Decision Day'

Incoming college students traditionally need to make their decisions about what college they'll attend by May 1 -- and while issues with financial aid have caused some schools to delay the date, many are sticking with May 1. Listeners call in to talk about how they or their children made their decision this year, and whether the FAFSA debacle, or campus protests have affected their choice.
4/30/202410 minutes, 53 seconds
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Comparing Notes With the BBC

BBC presenter Nuala McGovern compares notes over how the UK is handling migrants, talks about her reporting here in New York and remembers her time as a Brian Lehrer Show producer.EVENT:Global Movements, Local Impacts: An Evening with WNYC + BBC NewshourWednesday, May 1, 2024, 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. ET, in person at the Greene Space (44 Charlton St in Manhattan).Tickets (pay what you wish starting at $5) and details here.
4/30/202433 minutes, 10 seconds
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Campus Protests at CUNY and Columbia

Activists at Columbia occupied a building overnight as administrators threatened to start suspending students. Joseph Howley, associate professor of classics at Columbia University, talks about how he and other faculty are supporting protesters at Columbia and Hadeeqa Arzoo, vice president of CCNY’s Students for Justice in Palestine chapter and organizer at the CUNY Gaza Solidarity Encampment, shares what activists at the City College of New York are demanding.
4/30/202450 minutes, 22 seconds
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Why Three New York Offshore Wind Projects Fell Apart

Marie French, reporter covering energy and the environment for POLITICO New York, discusses the collapse of three key wind farm projects in New York and their broader implications for the state's climate goals.
4/30/202412 minutes, 38 seconds
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The 'Inconceivable Truth' Hidden in New York City

Matt Katz, WNYC/Gothamist reporter covering public safety and host of the new podcast "Inconceivable Truth," went on a quest to learn the truth of his paternity after surprising DNA test results. Along the way, he uncovered a web of shady artificial insemination practices in 1970s New York City that produced countless children with unknown biological fathers. He shares his findings and listeners share similar stories. EVENT: Matt will speak at NYU on Tuesday, April 30 at 7pm. More details and info to RSVP is here. 
4/29/202419 minutes, 13 seconds
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Politics, and the Life of a Broadcast Trailblazer

Susan Page, USA Today Washington bureau chief and the author of several books, including The Rulebreaker: The Life and Times of Barbara Walters (Simon & Schuster, 2024), talks about her new biography of Barbara Walters, plus the latest national political news, including the White House Correspondents Dinner and Pres. Biden's agreement to a debate.
4/29/20241 hour, 2 minutes, 15 seconds
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Transit Latest: Congestion Pricing, Fare Evasion, the End of Free Bus Routes and More

Stephen Nessen, WNYC and Gothamist transportation reporter, brings updates on the latest transit news, including a launch date for congestion pricing, the end of free bus routes and more.
4/29/202427 minutes, 24 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Arab-Americans; Joseph Stiglitz; #PlasticsChallenge

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Your Arab-American Immigration Stories (First) | Reframing 'Free' Beyond Markets (Starts at 26:36) | A #PlasticsChallenge Wrap Up (Starts at 1:02:30) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
4/27/20241 hour, 27 minutes, 43 seconds
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A Harsh Critique of President Biden on Gaza

Nicholas Kristof, opinion columnist for The New York Times and author of several books, including the forthcoming memoir Chasing Hope (Penguin Random House, 2024), shares his critique of how he says President Biden has mishandled the United States' role in Israel's war in Gaza, what he sees as Biden's reasoning, the political implications and what the United States could do moving forward to end the war.
4/26/202424 minutes, 30 seconds
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A National Poetry Month Open-Mic

For National Poetry Month, we open up the phones for listeners to recite lines from their favorite poems.
4/26/202414 minutes, 59 seconds
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A #PlasticsChallenge Wrap Up

Listeners call in to share an honest assessment of the single-use plastics in their lives and Judith Enck, founder of Beyond Plastics, professor at Bennington College and former EPA Region 2 administrator, rides along to share tips and trick on how to reduce plastic use.
4/26/202426 minutes, 17 seconds
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Explaining the Demand to 'Divest'

Claire Thornton, USA Today breaking news reporter, talks about the calls by pro-Palestinian student protesters for their colleges and universities to divest from companies with ties to Israel.
4/26/202417 minutes, 42 seconds
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Your Arab-American Immigration Stories

In honor of National Arab American Heritage Month, Maya Berry, executive director of the Arab American Institute (AAI), a non-profit, nonpartisan, national civil rights advocacy organization, comes back on the show to tick through the long timeline of Arab-American immigration (and migration around the country), which shows the diversity of the community and where they landed throughout the country.
4/26/202426 minutes
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Special Coverage: Trump's Immunity Case Before the Supreme Court

On today's show:  Melissa Murray, NYU law professor, co-host of the "Strict Scrutiny" podcast and the co-author (with Andrew Weissmann) of The Trump Indictments: The Historic Charging Documents with Commentary (W. W. Norton & Company, 2024), previews the oral arguments the Supreme Court will hear on former President Trump's immunity case. Transcripts are posted to each segment as they become available.
4/25/202421 minutes, 22 seconds
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The Trump 'Hush Money' Trial, So Far

Erica Orden, Politico reporter, talks about the media diets of the jurors on the Trump "hush money" trial. Plus, she recaps the testimony of David Pecker, the former publisher for the National Enquirer, who talked about that publication's "catch and kill" strategy, which suppressed negative stories about people like Donald Trump. 
4/24/202430 minutes, 35 seconds
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News From Your Classroom

With teachers and students off of school this week, we open up the phones to hear stories from local classrooms that would otherwise be missed if not for the vacation.
4/24/202411 minutes, 34 seconds
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Reframing 'Free' Beyond Markets

Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel laureate in economics, university professor at Columbia University, chief economist at the Roosevelt Institute, and author of The Road to Freedom: Economics and the Good Society (W.W.Norton, 2024), argues the neoliberal idea of freedom has led to economic crises and social unrest and argues for a more humane, 21st-century reframing of the concept.
4/24/202434 minutes, 59 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Arrests on Campuses; Randy Mastro

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, including when the NYPD intervenes on campus protests and the pushback on his reported selection of attorney Randy Mastro to lead NYC's legal department.
4/24/202432 minutes
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An Organizer Reflects on Where Labor Stands Now

Jane McAlevey, labor organizer, columnist for The Nation and the author of several books, including (with Abby Lawlor) Rules to Win By: Power and Participation in Union Negotiations (Oxford University Press, 2023), reflects on her life's work in organizing and recent wins for labor, and what she sees as crucial for workers to do if they want to continue the positive streak for unions.
4/23/202431 minutes, 37 seconds
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What 1960s Campus Protesters Think of Today

Listeners who protested on their college campuses in the turbulent years around 1968 reflect on that time, and share their thoughts on today's young protesters on campuses here in NYC and around the country.
4/23/202412 minutes, 3 seconds
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Protests Swell on College Campuses

Kate Hidalgo Bellows, staff reporter covering campus health and safety at The Chronicle, reports on how administrations at colleges here in New York and across the country are struggling to respond to ongoing, and growing protests over the Israel-Hamas War.
4/23/202440 minutes, 45 seconds
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The NYS Budget and Climate

This Earth Week, Liz Moran, policy advocate for Earthjustice's Northeast office, talks about the ways the new New York State budget does, and does not, address climate change.
4/23/202424 minutes, 33 seconds
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On Being a Jew Today

As Passover begins, Noah Feldman, Harvard law professor, founding director of the Julis-Rabinowitz Program on Jewish and Israeli Law, and the author of To Be a Jew Today: A New Guide to God, Israel, and the Jewish People (Macmillan, 2024), talks about his new book, inspired by his conversations with his children and even more relevant since 10/7, that tries to define what all Jews have in common.
4/22/202438 minutes, 32 seconds
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New York's New Budget

WNYC / Gothamist Albany reporter Jon Campbell talks about what's in and what's out of the just-approved New York State budget, including housing incentives, zoning changes, limited tenant protections, mayoral control of the schools, and more.
4/22/202429 minutes, 14 seconds
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A #PlasticsChallenge for Albany (and Listeners!)

Judith Enck, founder of Beyond Plastics, professor at Bennington College and former EPA Region 2 administrator, talks about a new effort to keep New York State accountable to reduce single use plastics. Then, listeners call in to share an honest assessment of the single use plastics in their lives.
4/22/202437 minutes, 4 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Gov. Kathy Hochul; Measures on Tipping and Rat Control; George Takei

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. New York Governor Kathy Hochul breaks down the state budget and WNYC/Gothamist's Jon Campbell offers analysis (First) | Council member Shaun Abreu on proposed changes to tipping on delivery apps—and a plan to curb the city's rat population (Starts at 32:15) | George Takei discusses his debut picture book, an age-appropriate personal history a childhood in Japanese American incarceration camps during WWII (Starts at 1:14:35) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
4/20/20241 hour, 39 minutes, 25 seconds
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Strengthening Democracy Through Faith

Rev. Dr. Jacqueline Lewis, senior minister and public theologian at the Middle Collegiate Church, and author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness that Can Heal the World (Harmony, 2021),talks about what's at stake in the upcoming election, the work she and her community are doing to strengthen democracy and how rebuilding is going at Middle Church after a fire in 2020. Learn more about the Freedom Rising Conference, which aims to "ignite collective empowerment during this election season."    
4/19/202430 minutes, 57 seconds
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The Case for Getting Tech Out of the Classroom

Public school systems have poured large sums of money on tech hardware and software, but do more screens and apps actually help students learn? Jessica Grose, opinion writer at The New York Times, examines some of the downsides of tech's "incursion" into schools.
4/19/202425 minutes, 30 seconds
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A Cartoon Character's Big Move — Or Not?

The beloved children's show "Bluey" recently aired a special episode that threw some fans for a loop. Listeners call in to talk about the controversial episode, and whether they thought it missed the mark or held some important life lessons.
4/19/20249 minutes, 51 seconds
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Friday Morning Congressional Politics: FISA, Foreign Aid In Speaker Johnson's Rules Committee, And More

Burgess Everett, congressional bureau chief for POLITICO, brings the latest headlines from Congress, including the expected reauthorization of the FISA surveillance act, the foreign aid bills moving through Speaker Mike Johnson's Rules Committee, the Democrats' plan to hold the Senate in November, and more national politics.
4/19/202442 minutes, 55 seconds
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Dan Doctoroff's New York

Now facing a diagnosis of ALS, Dan Doctoroff, founder and chairman of the research foundation Target ALS, former president and CEO of Bloomberg LP and Sidewalk Labs, former New York City deputy mayor for economic development and rebuilding (2002-2007) and the subject of The Urbanist: Dan Doctoroff and the Rise of New York (Phaidon, 2024), talks about his impact on the city after 9/11 under Mayor Bloomberg and the new book that celebrates his achievements.
4/18/202425 minutes, 4 seconds
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CM Abreu on Tipping and Rat Control

Shaun Abreu, Council Member for District 7 (Manhattan Valley, Manhattanville, Morningside Heights, Hamilton Heights), and Ligia Guallpa, executive director of the Workers Justice Project, talk about proposed changes to how tipping on delivery apps works—and Council Member Abreu discusses his plan to control the rat population.
4/18/202442 minutes, 21 seconds
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Who Are You Tracking?

"Find My," Airtags and a multitude of other apps/devices allow us to check in on our friends and family's locations at any time. Listeners share who they're tracking, who's tracking them, and why. 
4/18/202412 minutes, 53 seconds
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Tri-Polar World

David Sanger, White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times, talks about what he calls the new 'Cold Wars'—emphasis on the 's'—as the U.S., China and Russia vie for dominance.
4/18/202429 minutes, 6 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: State Budget, Control Over NYC Schools and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event.
4/17/202418 minutes, 40 seconds
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Gov. Hochul's Take on the Budget Deal

Kathy Hochul, governor of New York (D), talks about this year's just-about-done budget deal, which includes her priorities like housing, cannabis and more. Then, Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC/Gothamist, reacts to the governor's take on her wins in this year's budget.
4/17/202431 minutes, 38 seconds
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Supreme Court: Considering Obstruction for Jan. 6 Rioters and a Decision on Transgender Health Care for Kids

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments concerning the law used to charge defendants for their actions on January 6th, and earlier in the week decided in favor of Idaho's ban on gender-affirming health care for transgender children. Kate Shaw, professor at the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School, co-host of the Supreme Court podcast Strict Scrutiny, a contributor with ABC News and a contributing opinion writer with The New York Times, offers analysis of both issues and previews what else the court is working on this spring.
4/17/202444 minutes
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The History of Arab-American Immigration

In honor of National Arab American Heritage Month, Maya Berry, executive director of the Arab American Institute (AAI), a non-profit, nonpartisan, national civil rights advocacy organization, ticks through the long timeline of Arab-American immigration (and migration around the country), which shows the diversity of the community and where they landed throughout the country.
4/17/202414 minutes, 58 seconds
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How Climate Change Drives Deer Populations

Toni Lyn Morelli, research ecologist at the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center and adjunct associate professor in the Department of Environmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, explains how milder winters in the Northeast are contributing to an explosion of deer populations, which can cause car accidents and increase Lyme disease.
4/16/202413 minutes, 32 seconds
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How the FAFSA Debacle is Affecting Students' College Plans

The Federal Education Department rolled out a new FAFSA form that was supposed to make things easier for students, but instead it has been plagued with problems. Erica Meltzer, national editor at Chalkbeat, talks about how the "bungled" rollout of the form has derailed some students' college plans.   
4/16/202440 minutes, 22 seconds
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Call Your Senator: Sen Gillibrand on Child Care for Police, Israel's Response to Iran and More

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) talks about her work in Washington, including what may happen next after Iran's strike on Israel, her bill for child care for police officers and more.
4/16/202431 minutes, 22 seconds
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George Takei on 'My Lost Freedom'

George Takei, actor, activist and writer, discusses his debut picture book, My Lost Freedom: A Japanese American World War II Story (Crown Books for Young Readers, 2024). My Lost Freedom: A Japanese American World War II Story (Crown Books for Young Readers, 2024) EVENT: George Takei and BD Wong will be in conversation at Symphony Space (2537 Broadway at 95th St. in Manhattan) TONIGHT (April 16, 2024) at 8 p.m. Details and ticketing information here.
4/16/202424 minutes, 25 seconds
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Assembly Member Zohran Mamdani on the State Budget

Zohran K. Mamdani, New York State assemblymember (D, D-36, Queens), comments on the sticking points preventing New York State from passing its annual budget as well as his initiative to expand the fare-free bus proposal in light of congestion pricing.
4/15/202418 minutes, 43 seconds
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Doris Kearns Goodwin's Personal Take on History

Doris Kearns Goodwin, presidential historian, author of many books, including Team of Rivals and her latest, An Unfinished Love Story: A Personal History of the 1960s (Simon & Schuster, 2024), writes about the life and times she shared with her late husband, Dick Goodwin, a speechwriter and advisor to JFK, RFK and LBJ.
4/15/202441 minutes, 41 seconds
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The Former President on Trial in Manhattan

Catherine Christian, former assistant district attorney in the Manhattan District Attorney's office, previews jury selection and the trial of former President Donald Trump in Manhattan.
4/15/202448 minutes, 9 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Listening on Israel & Gaza; MENA Added to Census; Gen Z Taking Up Trades

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. The Art of Listening on Israel and Gaza (First) | Changes to the Census Include People of Middle Eastern and North African Descent (Starts at 37:30) | Gen Z Taking Up Trades (Starts at 58:15) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
4/13/20241 hour, 22 minutes, 2 seconds
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Jobs, Inflation & Politics

John Cassidy, New Yorker staff writer and columnist on politics and economics, talks about the better-than-expected jobs report, the worse-than-expected inflation report and how both parties are responding to the perception and reality of the U.S. economy.
4/12/202440 minutes, 4 seconds
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Black Country Music: Tracing Its Past to Beyoncé

Beyonce’s latest album, “Act ll: Cowboy Carter,” hit No. 1 on the Billboard country albums chart this week, making her the first Black woman to ever top that chart. Alice Randall, novelist and songwriter, most recently author of My Black Country: A Journey Through Country Music's Black Past, Present, and Future (Atria/Black Privilege Publishing, 2024), discusses the legacy of Black country music and traces its roots to today's historic achievement.
4/12/202419 minutes, 28 seconds
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LGBTQ Catholics React to the Vatican's New Statement on Gender Theory

The Vatican released a new document that detailed what it called 'grave violations' of human dignity, including the struggles of migrants, poverty and war but also gender theory, sex change and surrogacy. Francis DeBernardo, executive director, New Ways Ministry, reacts on behalf of LGBTQ Catholics, and discusses his critique of the church's teachings on issues like this.
4/12/202423 minutes, 20 seconds
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Still No Budget in Albany

The New York State budget was due on April 1st and lawmakers have still not come to an agreement. Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, reports on what is reportedly in the budget, the remaining sticking points and whether late budgets are now the norm in Albany.
4/12/202426 minutes, 11 seconds
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Gen Z Taking Up Trades

Te-Ping Chen, Wall Street Journal work and work culture reporter, talks about her reporting on more young people are going off the college track in favor of the plumbing and electrical trades.
4/11/202424 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ask Governor Murphy: April Recap

Nancy Solomon, WNYC reporter and editor, and host of the “Ask Governor Murphy” monthly call-in show, recaps her conversation with New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, where they talked about the controversy over the so-called "county line" on ballots, school budget cuts for 140 districts and more.
4/11/202429 minutes, 18 seconds
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Do Teenagers Still Babysit?

Faith Hill, staff writer at The Atlantic, talks about the change in who's getting hired to baby-sit, no longer a mainstay of teenage girls.
4/11/202413 minutes, 35 seconds
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Thursday Morning Politics: Speaker Johnson's High-Wire Act

Luke Broadwater, congressional correspondent for The New York Times, talks about the latest congressional news, including the pressure on Speaker Johnson from the right over FISA, spending, foreign aid, and more.
4/11/202440 minutes, 44 seconds
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Smoking in Secret

Emily Gould, novelist and writer for New York Magazine, talks about the secret smoking habits of moms in New York City, plus, listeners expose their own smoking habits -- be it classic cigarettes, vaping, or even marijuana in the age of legalization -- why they hide it from their partners and children, and what lengths they go to to keep their smoking secret.
4/10/20249 minutes, 33 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Homelessness on the Subway, Mayoral Control of Schools and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, including how the NYPD should engage with the homeless on the subway, mayoral control of schools and much more.
4/10/202441 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Art of Listening on Israel and Gaza

Judith Sloan, actor, writer, educator, and radio producer, and Najla Said, actor, writer, and activist, talk about their project called "Imperfect Allies," where they will host live events with a performance, and dialogue among audience members with different perspectives on the violence in Israel and Gaza. →Information on upcoming events can be found here: https://earsay.org/
4/10/202436 minutes, 29 seconds
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What’s in Biden’s New Student Loan Forgiveness Plan?

The White House says that President Biden’s new student loan forgiveness plan could help 30 million borrowers. Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, national higher education reporter at the Washington Post, shares her reporting and unpacks the details.
4/10/202421 minutes, 55 seconds
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How Fracking Can Cause Earthquakes

Last Friday's earthquake in New Jersey was likely a natural phenomenon, but earthquakes can be caused by human interventions -- like fracking. For our climate story of the week, Umair Irfan, staff writer at Vox writing about climate change and energy policy, breaks down how fracking and other natural resource extractions have increased the likelihood of earthquakes in the United States.
4/9/202424 minutes, 19 seconds
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Tuesday Morning Politics: Abortion and the 2024 Election

Molly Ball, senior political correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, talks about the 2024 election and abortion in light of recent developments, including Donald Trump's announcement it should be up to the states and the court's decision to put abortion rights on the ballot in Florida.
4/9/202442 minutes, 44 seconds
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Reactions to the Total Solar Eclipse

Listeners talk about their experiences of the total solar eclipse.
4/9/202412 minutes, 3 seconds
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Covering Crime, Public Safety and the Cops

Harry Siegel, editor at The City, FAQ NYC podcast co-host, and Daily News columnist, responds to top police brass calling him names after he published critical columns, and talks about the substance of his critiques of the NYPD.
4/9/202430 minutes, 17 seconds
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Jobs, Trade & Politics

Megan Cassella, CNBC Washington correspondent, talks about Friday's jobs report, Treasury Sec. Yellen's trip to China, and other national political and economic news.
4/8/202433 minutes, 50 seconds
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Prepping for the Eclipse

Molly Webster, senior correspondent for Radiolab, previews the eclipse and offers a thought on why the moon deserves credit in this cosmic event.
4/8/202415 minutes, 16 seconds
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Changes to the Census Include People of Middle Eastern and North African Descent

Recently, the United States' census moved to recognize people of Middle Eastern and North African descent, creating a separate race and ethnicity option outside of 'White' and allowing for clearer representation. Karen Zraick, reporter for The New York Times, explains the changes to the census coming in six years, how people of MENA navigated government forms previously, and why these changes are coming now.
4/8/202420 minutes, 18 seconds
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NYPD's Chief of Patrol Talks Public Safety, Crime Stats and More

John Chell, chief of patrol at the NYPD, offers his take on current crime rates, subway safety and explains the department's recent social media strategy, which includes calling out journalists by name.
4/8/202438 minutes, 37 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Judith Butler; Driverless Cars; English Words on Loan

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Judith Butler on Gender (First) | Robotaxis on New York City Streets? (Starts at 34:45) | English 'Loan Words' in Your Language (Starts at 57:40) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
4/6/20241 hour, 3 minutes, 59 seconds
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Live Earthquake Coverage: MTA Chair Lieber, Calls from the Epicenter & More

Brian and WNYC host Sean Carlson provide live coverage of the earthquake, including a press conference with Mayor Adams and other officials, calls from listeners all over (including near the epicenter), seismologists Antonios Marcellos (from Hofstra University) and Benjamin Fernando (from Johns Hopkins), and officials including MTA chair Janno Lieber and NYC Commissioner of Emergency Management Zach Iscol. 
4/5/20241 hour, 53 minutes, 30 seconds
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Transportation Roundup: Post-Earthquake Infrastructure Update and NJ's Case Against Congestion Pricing

In a lawsuit, the state of New Jersey is arguing against congestion pricing, citing environmental concerns. Stephen Nessen, transportation reporter for the WNYC Newsroom, reports on how the state's lawyers presented their case in the courtroom this week, and how likely it seems to derail the toll program's June launch. Plus, a check-in on the state of infrastructure after the tristate area was hit by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake and updates from Governor Kathy Hochul.
4/5/202436 minutes, 14 seconds
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Updates on Local Earthquake

Alexander Gates, department chair and professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University and co-author of Encyclopedia of Earthquakes and Volcanoes New Edition (Facts-on-File Inc., third edition, 2006), discusses the preliminary information on New Jersey's 4.8 magnitude earthquake which occurred on Friday morning and was felt in the tristate area.
4/5/202429 minutes, 10 seconds
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An Earthquake and an Eclipse

Skies will dim on Monday as the moon passes between the sun and the Earth. Joshua Winter, physics instructor at BASIS Independent Brooklyn with 20 years experience teaching astronomy topics, offers a short preview of the total solar eclipse after a reaction to today's earthquake.
4/5/20246 minutes, 15 seconds
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Biden's Warning to Netanyahu Over Gaza

Yasmeen Abutaleb, Washington Post White House reporter and co-author of the book Nightmare Scenario: Inside the Trump Administration Response to the Pandemic that Changed History (Harper, 2021), offers analysis of the U.S. policy toward Israel and Gaza after President Biden apparently warned Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu the humanitarian situation in Gaza had to improve.
4/5/202438 minutes, 39 seconds
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Housing Roundup: State Budget, Property Taxes, 'Squatters'

David Brand, housing reporter for WNYC/Gothamist, talks about the deal taking shape on housing in the state budget; whether "squatters" are a real and growing issue and a state Court of Appeals decision that might upend NYC's property tax system.
4/4/202430 minutes, 19 seconds
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English 'Loan Words' in Your Language

Listeners who speak a second language call in to share which words in English are commonly used in that language, and what it might say about that culture.
4/4/20248 minutes, 30 seconds
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Judith Butler on Gender

Judith Butler, professor at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of several books, including Gender Trouble, and their latest, Who's Afraid of Gender? (Macmillan, 2024), talks about their pioneering academic work on the concept of gender and how fraught and misunderstood the topic has become.
4/4/202431 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Truth Social and Reddit IPOs

Felix Salmon, chief financial correspondent for Axios, host of the Slate Money Podcast and author of The Phoenix Economy: Work, Life, and Money in the New Not Normal (‎Harper Business, 2023), talks about both Reddit and Truth Social going public and what that means for their investors and users.
4/4/202438 minutes, 31 seconds
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A View from Israel

Allison Kaplan Sommer, a journalist for Haaretz and the host of the Haaretz podcast, talks about Israeli response to the deaths of the WCK aid workers, the state of U.S./Israel relations, and other developments in the Israel/Hamas war.
4/3/202441 minutes, 12 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: The Mayor Versus the Media, When NYPD Engage and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, including analysis of a contentious interview with the Mayor on The Breakfast Club, plus more.
4/3/202428 minutes, 29 seconds
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Faith & Politics & Ex-Evangelicals

Sarah McCammon, NPR national political correspondent, co-host of the NPR Politics podcast and the author of The Exvangelicals: Loving, Living, and Leaving the White Evangelical Church (Macmillan, 2024), shares her story of growing up within, and leaving, evangelical Christianity, and what her reporting shows of others like her and their impact on American politics and culture.
4/3/202424 minutes, 6 seconds
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What's In a Middle Name?

Michael Waters, writer and author of the forthcoming book The Other Olympians: Fascism, Queerness, and the Making of Modern Sports (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2024), explores the significance of middle names and what they say about our lives and our values.→ Middle Names Reveal More Than You Think
4/3/202415 minutes, 46 seconds
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Returning to Religion

With Ramadan in full swing, Passover around the corner, and Easter this past weekend, we're in a particularly holy time of year. In light of this, listeners who have reconnected with the religion they grew up with call in and share why they've returned and how they are practicing as adults.
4/2/202412 minutes, 20 seconds
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Guns Aren't Just a Big City Problem

For decades, gun violence has been often associated with urban areas, in politics and in the media. Chip Brownlee, a reporter at The Trace, a non-profit news site covering gun violence, breaks down new data that shows rural areas are more likely to experience gun violence, and the role policies have played in the increase.
4/2/202427 minutes, 27 seconds
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Lawmakers Push to Include the NY HEAT Act in the State Budget

New York State Senator Liz Krueger (D, WF - 28th, Manhattan's East Side), chair of the Finance Committee, talks about the NY HEAT act, a bill she sponsored that its supporters say would cut emissions across New York State by pushing people away from natural gas and toward more energy-efficient alternatives.
4/2/202428 minutes, 44 seconds
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Is Trump a Fascist?

As Donald Trump's rhetoric grows increasingly more inflammatory, debate surrounding whether or not to use the label 'fascist' heats up as well. Andrew Marantz, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation (Viking, 2019), discusses his latest piece, which explores whether or not Trump is a fascist, and what that label conceals or reveals about his campaign and his supporters.
4/2/202440 minutes, 57 seconds
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What Austin Can Teach NYC About Housing

Austin, Texas, is expected to add more apartment units than any other city in the country this year. Derek Thompson, staff writer at The Atlantic and the author of the Work in Progress newsletter, discuss what’s happening in Austin, and what blue cities like New York can learn from it.
4/1/202425 minutes, 57 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Campaign Donors

The Biden campaign is currently out-fundraising Trump, who needs money not only for the campaign but for his growing legal bills. Rebecca Davis O'Brien, reporter covering campaign finance and money in U.S. elections for The New York Times, explains why it matters, who is giving campaign cash and the difference between what large and small donors want when they give money.
4/1/202446 minutes, 29 seconds
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Robotaxis on New York City Streets?

Companies that want to test autonomous vehicles on New York City streets have received a major boost as Mayor Eric Adams announced a new permitting program. Sam Schwartz, former longtime "Gridlock Sam" columnist at the Daily News, former NYC Traffic Commissioner, president and CEO of Sam Schwartz Pedestrian Traffic Management and author of No One at the Wheel: Driverless Cars and the Road of the Future (Public Affairs, 2018), reacts to the news.
4/1/202422 minutes, 52 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Congestion Pricing Details; Child Actors; A 'Funner' Guide to English Usage

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Congestion Pricing Moves Ahead (First) | The Dark Side of Children's Television (Starts at 28:30) | A 'Funner' Guide to Language Usage (Starts at 52:50) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
3/30/20241 hour, 9 minutes, 32 seconds
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Kara Swisher's 'Tech Love Story'

Kara Swisher, tech journalist, host of the podcasts "On with Kara Swisher" and "Pivot" and the author of Burn Book: A Tech Love Story (Simon & Schuster, 2024), tells her story as it overlaps with that of the tech industry, and what's gone right and where it's gone wrong.
3/29/202438 minutes, 59 seconds
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Congestion Pricing Moves Ahead

Congestion pricing has cleared one of its biggest hurdles, and is now headed to the Federal Highway Administration where it is likely to be approved. Stephen Nessen, transportation reporter for the WNYC Newsroom, talks about which fares made the cut and what comes next.
3/29/202425 minutes, 26 seconds
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New York State's Late Budget

New York State legislators have left town for the holiday weekend without passing the budget before the April 1 deadline. Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, reports on what the sticking points are, and what is likely to make it into the more than $200 billion budget.
3/29/202444 minutes, 47 seconds
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How the City Hopes to Solve the Housing Crisis

Maria Torres-Springer, NYC deputy mayor for housing, economic development and workforce, talks about both the city's plans to combat the housing crisis, and what the city is hoping Albany will include in its budget that will spur more housing construction.
3/28/202433 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Dark Side of Children's Television

While Nickelodeon has been a staple in family television for decades, peaking in the late 90s and 2000s, the new documentary series "Quiet on Set: The Dark Side of Kids TV" recently exposed the abusive working conditions women and children experienced while working for the network. Kate Taylor, senior correspondent at Business Insider, discusses her reporting featured in the documentary.
3/28/202424 minutes, 17 seconds
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Congestion Pricing and You

On Wednesday, the MTA approved new tolls to drive into the busiest parts of Manhattan — including $15 for most passenger cars. Listeners call in to share how congestion pricing will impact them.
3/28/202413 minutes, 5 seconds
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Our Maritime and Bridge Infrastructure

Peter Ford, founder of SkyRock Advisors, a port and maritime infrastructure advisor, and a member of the Cornell Program in Infrastructure Policy advisory board, and Brian Buckman, professional engineer and founder and CEO of Buckman Engineering, discuss the local maritime and bridge infrastructure—how it's built and regulated—and the systems in place to prevent an accident like the collision in Baltimore from happening here.
3/28/202439 minutes, 3 seconds
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Josh Gosfield's 'The Atlas of Emotions'

Josh Gosfield, artist and illustrator, talks about his new zine, The Atlas of Emotions, which maps the inner world emotions.
3/27/202411 minutes, 37 seconds
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Wednesday Morning Politics: A New Poll; Support for Taxing the Rich

Laura Davison, politics editor at Bloomberg News, talks about a new Bloomberg News/Morning Consult poll that shows President Biden seemed to have gotten a bump in some swing states after the State of the Union, and that taxing the rich is a popular position among swing-state voters.
3/27/202439 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Supreme Court and Abortion Access

Lee Bollinger, First Amendment scholar, law professor and former president of Columbia University and the co-editor (with Geoffrey Stone) of Roe v. Dobbs: The Past, Present, and Future of a Constitutional Right to Abortion (Oxford University Press, 2024), and Mary Ziegler, UC Davis law professor and the author of Abortion and the Law in America: A Legal History, Roe v. Wade to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2020) and a contributor to Roe v. Dobbs: The Past, Present, and Future of a Constitutional Right to Abortion (Oxford University Press, 2024), talk about the new book and Tuesday's oral arguments at the Supreme Court to determine access of the abortion drug mifepristone.
3/27/202434 minutes, 7 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Two Deaths, Public Safety, and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, including the shooting death of an NYPD officer, a subway pushing fatality, the public safety infrastructure, a WNYC/Gothamist report on sexual abuse at Rikers Island, and more.
3/27/202424 minutes, 23 seconds
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Alleged Abuse at Rikers Comes to Light

WNYC/Gothamist reporters Samantha Max, who covers public safety, and Jessy Edwards, who covers incarceration and public safety, talk about their investigation into alleged sexual abuse on Rikers Island, which came to light after women filed hundreds of lawsuits due to the Adult Survivors Act.
3/26/202420 minutes, 17 seconds
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Early Voting in NY's Primary Underway

Early voting for New York's presidential primary is underway. Brigid Bergin, WNYC's senior political correspondent, shares information on who can vote, where it takes place, what's on the ballot and how people who want to register a protest vote against President Biden can do so since New York's ballots don't have the "uncommitted" option.
3/26/202412 minutes, 10 seconds
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A 'Funner' Guide to Language Usage

Anne Curzan, University of Michigan professor of English language and literature, linguistics, and education and the author of Says Who?: A Kinder, Funner Usage Guide for Everyone Who Cares About Words (Crown, 2024), offers her guide to English usage, where the 'rules' started and how to use them.  Her weekly chats about language on Michigan Public Radio are available as a podcast called “That’s What They Say.”
3/26/202418 minutes, 56 seconds
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Climate and the New York State Budget

The New York State budget deadline of April 1st is quickly approaching. Jo Anne Simon, New York State Assembly member (Assembly District 52), talks about several climate-related bills, including one related to fracking and one dubbed the "Stop Climate Polluters Handout Act," plus other legislative priorities.
3/26/202424 minutes, 37 seconds
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Is it Safe to Fly on a Boeing Plane?

The CEO of Boeing, Dave Calhoun, announced he will step down this year amid a management scandal. Lori Aratani, reporter covering transportation issues for The Washington Post, breaks down what's going on at the fraught airline company and just how safe it is to fly.
3/26/202433 minutes, 43 seconds
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What's Going on With Dating Apps?

A recent op-ed in The New York Times laments a decline in quality of dating apps. Listeners call in to share what their experience with online dating has been like recently and how they are coping with changes to the algorithms that fuel the apps.
3/25/20249 minutes, 52 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: US Ceasefire Resolution, Ukraine Aid, and more

Francesca Chambers, White House Correspondent for USA Today, talks about the news from Washington including the United State's shifting policy on a ceasefire for Israel and Palestine, updates about aid to Ukraine, and more.  
3/25/202436 minutes, 47 seconds
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'Standing Together' For Peace

Alon-Lee Green and Rula Daood, national co-directors of Standing Together, talk about their work leading a group that advocates for peace and justice for all Israelis and Palestinians, and how they are approaching their work amid the war.
3/25/202438 minutes, 29 seconds
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Trump’s Continuing Legal Troubles

Former president Donald Trump faces a hush money trial and a deadline to secure a half-billion-dollar bond in a separate civil business fraud case. Catherine Christian, former assistant district attorney in the Manhattan District Attorney's office and currently a lawyer in private practice at Liston Abramson LLP, offers analysis of Trump’s ongoing legal troubles.
3/25/202424 minutes, 29 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; Subway Safety; NYC's At-Risk Languages

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Defining 'Blackness' Through Literature (First) | Responding to Fear on the Subways (Starts at 30:40 ) | A Tour of New York City's Endangered Languages (Starts at 1:13:30) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
3/23/20241 hour, 28 minutes, 46 seconds
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Defining 'Blackness' Through Literature

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Alphonse Fletcher university professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, host of "Finding Your Roots" on PBS and the author of The Black Box: Writing the Race (Penguin Press, 2024), talks about his new book that examines the history of Black self-definition through literature.
3/22/202429 minutes, 55 seconds
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New Jersey's Affordable Housing Fix

Gov. Murphy signed legislation to improve the way New Jersey towns are held accountable for developing affordable housing. Mike Hayes, WNYC/Gothamist reporter covering equity and access to opportunity in New Jersey and the author of The Secret Files: Bill De Blasio, The NYPD, and the Broken Promises of Police Reform (Kingston Imperial, 2023), explains the new system and talks about the way Millburn, NJ, is failing to comply.
3/22/202424 minutes, 5 seconds
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The Story of Rosalind Franklin and Other Women Pioneers of Science

In honor of Women's History Month, Tanya Lee Stone, director of the Writing Program at Champlain College and author of several books about unsung heroes and missing histories for young readers, most recently, Remembering Rosalind Franklin: Rosalind Franklin and the Discovery of the Double Helix Structure of DNA (Christy Ottaviano Books, 2024) discusses her latest nonfiction picture book on a female pioneer in science and listeners call in to shout out the histories of other notable women in science.
3/22/202411 minutes, 48 seconds
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Birth Control Misinformation Flourishes on Social Media

Misinformation on social media—some of it seeded by groups that are anti-reproductive rights—is leading women away from using birth control. Lauren Weber, health and science accountability reporter at The Washington Post, explains how it is affecting women's choices and access to reproductive care.
3/22/202444 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Crisis Unfolding in Haiti

Garry Pierre-Pierre, founder and publisher of The Haitian Times, discusses the unfolding crisis in Haiti, where gangs have ousted the president and wreaked havoc on the population.
3/21/202443 minutes, 35 seconds
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Mehdi Hasan on Gaza, US Politics & More

Mehdi Hasan, editor-in-chief and CEO of Zeteo, columnist for The Guardian and former MSNBC host, talks about leaving MSNBC and starting his new network, plus the war in Gaza and long-term solutions and the U.S. presidential primary campaigns.
3/21/202422 minutes, 49 seconds
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Council Members on 'Community-Controlled' Affordable Housing

NYC Council Members Carmen De La Rosa (District 10, Washington Heights, Inwood, Marble Hill), chair of the council's labor committee, and Pierina Ana Sanchez (District 14, University Heights South-Morris Heights, Mount Hope, Fordham Heights, University Heights North-Fordham, Bedford Park, Kingsbridge Heights-Van Cortlandt Village, Kingsbridge-Marble Hill), chair of the council's housing committee, share details of their campaign for a capital investment that would direct more money toward permanently affordable housing.
3/21/202427 minutes, 6 seconds
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A Tour of New York City's Endangered Languages

Ross Perlin, co-director of the Endangered Language Alliance (ELA) and the author of Language City: The Fight to Preserve Endangered Mother Tongues in New York (Grove, 2024), talks about the many languages spoken in New York that are at risk of disappearing.EVENTS: Virtual eventThursday, Mar. 21, 6:00pmQueens Public LibraryA “Literary Thursdays” series eventVirtual Q&A and book talk Virtual eventThursday, Mar. 28, 12:00pmLive from New AmsterdamIn conversation with Russell Shorto In-person eventWednesday, Apr. 10, 6:30pmSouth Street Seaport Museum In-person eventThursday, Apr. 18, 7:00pmNYPL World Literature Festival
3/21/202415 minutes, 42 seconds
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How Anti-Semitism on the Right and Left Threatens the Golden Era of the Jewish Diaspora

Franklin Foer, staff writer at The Atlantic, discusses how rising anti-Semitism on both sides of the political spectrum threatens Jewish Americans safety and prosperity, and the consequences for our broader republic.  
3/20/202436 minutes, 4 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Subway Safety, Dissatisfaction and A New Lawsuit

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, including on subway safety, a sexual assault allegation against the mayor and more news.
3/20/202427 minutes, 29 seconds
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Caitlin Clark and This Moment in Women's Sports

With the NCAA basketball tournament, Lyndsey D'Arcangelo, sports writer and co-author of Hail Mary: The Rise and Fall of the National Women's Football League (Hachette, 2021), talks about the effect of Caitlin Clark on basketball and women's sports.
3/20/202411 minutes, 3 seconds
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Are Student Athletes Employees?

Two cases before The National Labor Relations Board —one from Dartmouth College and another from the University of Southern California — are questioning whether student athletes have the right to unionize. Billy Witz, reporter covering college sports for The New York Times, reports on the story and the larger implications any decision on either case could have for student athletes everywhere.  
3/20/202435 minutes, 18 seconds
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Chef Andrés in the Kitchen and in Conflict Zones

José Andrés, a Michelin-starred chef, Emmy-winning television host, founder of the non-profit organization World Central Kitchen and the author of Zaytinya: Delicious Mediterranean Dishes from Greece, Turkey, and Lebanon (Ecco, 2024), talks about his work on the ground in Ukraine and Gaza with World Central Kitchen and his new cookbook.
3/19/202429 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Feminist Reasoning Behind South Korea's Plummeting Birth Rate

This year, South Korea recorded a national birth rate of 0.62 babies per woman, breaking its own record for the country with the lowest birthrate in the world. Anna Louie Sussman, freelance journalist covering gender, economics, health, and reproduction, and Meera Choi, sociology Ph.D. candidate at Yale University researching heterosexual refusal in South Korea, explain the reason why Korean women are opting out of having children -- even if it results in the eventual extinction of Korean people on the planet.
3/19/202417 minutes, 37 seconds
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New York's (and America's) First Offshore Wind Farm

On Thursday, the South Fork Wind project was completed, comprised of 12 turbines about 30 miles off Montauk, that have the ability to power 70,000 homes. Marie French, who covers energy and the environment for POLITICO New York, talks about the impact of New York's first wind farm.
3/19/202419 minutes, 33 seconds
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Responding to Fear on the Subways

Harry Siegel, editor at The City, "FAQ NYC" podcast co-host, and Daily News columnist, and Dean Meminger, reporter and anchor for Spectrum News/NY1 covering criminal justice, talk about the city and state responses to crime and mental illness on the subways.
3/19/202443 minutes, 8 seconds
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Good Cause Eviction and New York's Housing Crisis

New York State Senator Julia Salazar (D, WF-18th district) discusses New York's housing crisis and a "good cause" eviction bill she's sponsored, plus other issues in play as part of the state budget.
3/18/202421 minutes, 49 seconds
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NYC's Pledge to Extend Life Expectancy

Ashwin Vasan, MD, PhD, commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, talks about the city's plan to increase life expectancy, which has taken a hit since COVID, including what conditions they are targeting in order to lengthen the life spans of New Yorkers.
3/18/202432 minutes, 35 seconds
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Women's Rights Around the World

Listeners call in to shout out stories of how women are fighting for their rights around the world.
3/18/202413 minutes, 44 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Schumer, Netanyahu and Biden

Claudia Grisales, NPR Congressional correspondent, talks about the latest national politics news, including the reverberations of Sen. Schumer's remarks about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
3/18/202441 minutes, 43 seconds
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Speaker Adams on the State of the City

New York City Council Speaker Adrienne Adams  (District 28, Queens neighborhoods of Jamaica, Rochdale Village, Richmond Hill, and South Ozone Park) talks about her recent State of the City address and the work of the council.
3/15/202423 minutes, 35 seconds
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1000 Wordles Later

Tracy Bennett, Wordle and puzzles editor at the New York Times, talks about the celebration around the 1,000th Wordle game and offers insights into how the NYT puzzles are created and played.
3/15/202413 minutes, 26 seconds
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How a Cease-Fire Could Work

Jon Alterman, senior vice president, Zbigniew Brzezinski chair in Global Security and Geostrategy and director of the Middle East Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), and Khaled Elgindy, senior fellow at the Middle East Institute and director of MEI’s Program on Palestine and Israeli-Palestinian Affairs, talk about the calls for cease-fire in Gaza, why it means different things to different groups, and how it could work.  
3/15/202446 minutes, 15 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Women Seeking Economic Equality; Systemic Racism Explained; 1000 Wordles Later

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Women Seeking Economic Equality (First) | Systemic Racism Explained (Starts at 23:57) | 1000 Wordles Later (Starts at 48:18) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.    
3/15/20241 hour, 2 minutes, 11 seconds
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Jay Caspian Kang on 'The Ideology of the Internet'

Jay Caspian Kang, staff writer for The New Yorker, documentary film director, and the author of The Loneliest Americans (Crown, 2021), shares his thoughts on what he calls the "ideology of the internet" and its tangible effects on culture, democracy, institutions and our day-to-day lives. → Arguing Ourselves to Death
3/15/202427 minutes, 2 seconds
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Jonathan Capehart on Biden's Campaign Strategy

Jonathan Capehart, associate editor at the Washington Post, host of the podcast "Capehart" and the Washington Post Live's "First Look," and host of The Saturday Show and The Sunday Show on MSNBC, talks about his interview with President Biden and other national political news.
3/14/202446 minutes, 20 seconds
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Ramadan Begins

Ammar Abdul Rahman, deputy imam at Masjid Al-Haram USA in the Bronx and outreach coordinator for the asylum seeker shelter program at the Interfaith Center of New York, talks about his observance of Ramadan, and his work helping Muslim asylum seekers get acclimated as they make their way to the city from West African countries.  
3/14/202428 minutes, 7 seconds
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Your Stories of Perfectionism

Building on examples from Atlantic columnist Arthur C. Brooks, listeners share where their perfectionism shows up, tricks for getting past it, and how it affects their lives.  
3/14/20249 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ask Governor Murphy: March Recap

Nancy Solomon, WNYC reporter and editor, and host of the “Ask Governor Murphy” monthly call-in show, recaps her conversation with New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy. Topics this month included NJ Transit, an assessment of the state's COVID response, and the Senate campaign that sees New Jersey First Lady Tammy Murphy vying for the Democratic nomination.
3/14/202424 minutes, 50 seconds
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Your 'Malicious Compliance' Stories

Inspired by the SubReddit r/MaliciousCompliance, listeners share stories in which they've conformed "to the letter, but not the spirit" of a rule or request in their lives.
3/13/202410 minutes, 40 seconds
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TikTok's Fate in Congress

The House is set to vote on banning TikTok this morning. Drew Harwell, Washington Post technology reporter, talks about the reasons for the bill and what happens if the bill to ban the popular social media app or force its parent company to sell it passes.
3/13/202427 minutes, 8 seconds
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Pres. Biden's Budget Proposal and Comparing Tax Policies

Michael Graetz, professor emeritus at Columbia Law School and Yale Law School, former special counsel and deputy assistant secretary for tax policy at the Department of the Treasury and the author of The Power to Destroy: How the Antitax Movement Hijacked America (Princeton University Press, 2024), offers analysis of Biden's budget proposals and tax policies and how they compare to GOP proposals.
3/13/202431 minutes, 9 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: From the National Guard to Pickpocket Crews

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, plus other city news from the week.
3/13/202440 minutes, 42 seconds
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Women Seeking Economic Equality

On Equal Pay Day, Josie Cox, business journalist and the author of Women Money Power: The Rise and Fall of Economic Equality (Harry N. Abram, 2024), shares the story of women who contributed to the fight for financial equality.
3/12/202423 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Millennial 'Micro-Generation'

Jeanna Smialek, reporter covering the Federal Reserve and the economy for The New York Times and the author of Limitless: The Federal Reserve Takes on a New Age of Crisis (Knopf, 2023), reports on a "massive microgeneration" of people born in 1990 and 1991, arguing they have been in a in lifelong competition for America’s economic resources.
3/12/202417 minutes, 11 seconds
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Comparing Biden and Trump on Climate Change

Scott Waldman, White House reporter focused on climate change at Politico's E&E News, compares President Biden's record on climate with former President Trump's, and shares what Trump says he will do, if he is elected, regarding energy and climate change.
3/12/202443 minutes, 30 seconds
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What's Next for the Museum of Chinese in America?

Michael Lee, incoming president of the Museum of Chinese in America, discusses the future of the museum, recently an unlikely site of protests over the city's borough-based jail program.
3/12/202425 minutes, 6 seconds
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Systemic Racism Explained

Tricia Rose, chancellor's professor of Africana Studies, director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown and author of Metaracism: How Systemic Racism Devastates Black Lives―and How We Break Free (Hachette, 2024), explains the interlocking and mutually reinforcing individual policies that disadvantage Black Americans and how to cut through.
3/11/202424 minutes, 17 seconds
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What Happened at the Oscars

Sam Sanders, co-host of SiriusXM’s news & culture podcast “Vibe Check," recaps the winners, losers, and culture-defining moments from the 2024 Oscar Awards ceremony.  
3/11/202416 minutes, 49 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Biden, Israel and Gaza

Susan Glasser, a staff writer at The New Yorker, where she writes a column on life in Biden's Washington and co-anchors a weekly roundtable discussion on "The Political Scene" podcast, and co-author with Peter Baker of The Divider: Trump in the White House, 2017-2021 (Doubleday, 2022), talks about the latest national political news as Pres. Biden moves from the State of the Union to his presidential campaign.
3/11/202427 minutes, 37 seconds
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The National Guard Comes to the Subways

First, Richard Davis, president of TWU Local 100, shares his thoughts on Governor Hochul's move to send members of the National Guard to patrol the subways and inspect bags, and what members of the Transport Workers Union are feeling about their safety underground.Then, Donna Lieberman, executive director for the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), shares criticism of Gov. Hochul's plan to send members of the National Guard and state police officers to patrol subway stations, as well as search bags, in an attempt to reassure riders of their safety.
3/11/202441 minutes, 15 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: How Memory Works; Assessing Israel-Gaza; Public Song Project

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. How Memory Works  (First) | Assessing Where Israel Went Wrong in Gaza (Starts at 18:45) | Introducing the 2024 Public Song Project (Starts at 54:15) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
3/9/20241 hour, 7 minutes, 2 seconds
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NYC Moves Toward Saying Goodbye to Mountains of Plastic Trash Bags

Earlier this month, all businesses in the city had to change how they put trash out to be collected - from plastic bags piled up on the street to inside containers with a tight lid. Jessica Tisch, commissioner of the New York City Department of Sanitation, reports on how the change is going, breaks news about residential trash containerization, and what might come next in the city's battle with its considerable rat population.
3/8/202424 minutes, 14 seconds
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Assessing Where Israel Went Wrong in Gaza

Israel has killed at least 30,000 Palestinians in the Gaza Strip since launching its retaliatory war after the devastating October 7th attack. Zach Beauchamp, senior correspondent at Vox, argues that the war in Gaza has become an "era-defining catastrophe" and explains where Israel went wrong in its approach to the war.
3/8/202436 minutes, 7 seconds
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NYC Public High School Admissions Offers

On Thursday, eighth-graders bound for New York City public high schools received their admission offers. Listeners call in to debrief.
3/8/202411 minutes, 35 seconds
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The State of the Union, According to President Biden

Tyler Pager, Washington Post White House reporter, offers analysis of President Biden's State of the Union address, amid high election year stakes.
3/8/202437 minutes, 45 seconds
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Finding Your Hobby: Mahjong

In this membership-drive mini-series, we get to know about hobbies and building skills and finding communities for fun. Today, David Bresnick, president of the U.S. Professional Mahjong League and founder of the mahjong event space Sparrow's Nest Studio in Manhattan, shares his passion for mahjong.
3/7/20245 minutes, 14 seconds
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What We Learned From California's Competitive Senate Primary

Christian Paz, senior politics reporter for Vox, offers analysis of California's Senate primary, where Rep. Adam Schiff and Republican (and former LA Dodgers star) Steve Garvey emerged as the top two candidates and will now face each other in the general election.
3/7/202417 minutes, 31 seconds
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Parents Brace for More Cuts to 3K and Pre-K

The Adams administration has made budget cuts that are affecting the number of available seats in 3K and pre-k. Jessica Gould, WNYC/Gothamist reporter, talks about where the cuts leave the program, which was the signature achievement of Mayor Adams's predecessor, and what it means for families with young children looking for a break on childcare costs.
3/7/202412 minutes, 50 seconds
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How Memory Works

Charan Ranganath, PhD, professor of psychology and neuroscience at UC Davis, where he leads their Dynamic Memory Lab, and the author of Why We Remember: Unlocking Memory’s Power to Hold on to What Matters (Doubleday, 2024), explains what we know about remembering and forgetting.
3/7/202417 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ten Question Quiz: NYC Mayors

Listeners try their hand at a ten-question quiz about New York City mayors from recent -- and more distant-- history.
3/7/20249 minutes, 42 seconds
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Finding Your Hobby: Woodworking

In this membership-drive mini-series, we get to know about hobbies and building skills and finding communities for fun. Today, Robyn Mierzwa, owner and founder of Makeville Studio in Gowanus, shares her passion for woodworking.
3/6/20248 minutes, 38 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Subway Crime, FBI Investigation and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, plus other city news from the week.
3/6/202415 minutes, 18 seconds
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Super Tuesday Takeaways

Errol Louis, political anchor of Spectrum NY1 News, host of Inside City Hall and The Big Deal with Errol Louis, New York Magazine columnist and host of the podcast "You Decide," shares his analysis of Super Tuesday results including breaking news that Nikki Haley has suspended her 2024 election campaign.
3/6/202417 minutes, 34 seconds
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Introducing the 2024 Public Song Project

All of It's Public Song Project, now back for a second year, invites musicians to incorporate works of art that have entered the public domain into new compositions. Simon Close, All of It producer, introduces the contest and shares a few tracks.→ The 2024 Public Song Project (All Of It with Alison Stewart and WNYC)
3/6/202413 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ten Question Quiz: This Year's Oscars

Listeners try their hand at a ten-question quiz about the movies and movie-makers nominated up for the Academy Awards at Sunday's Oscar ceremony.  
3/6/202410 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ten Question Quiz: Commuter Rails

Listeners try their hand at a ten-question quiz about the commuter rail systems in the tri-state area.
3/5/202411 minutes, 26 seconds
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Using Humor to Fight for Climate Mitigation

Shut the Fossils Up is a new media campaign that aims to shed light on one of the leaders within the oil and gas industry who is currently a part of writing New York's nation-leading climate law. Marc Weiss, co-Founder and steering committee member of NY Renews, a statewide multi-sector coalition of 370+ groups working to transition New York State to a fossil-free economy, and Rahwa Ghirmatzion, deputy director of People United for Sustainable Housing (PUSH Buffalo), a local membership-based community organization committed to social & climate justice, break down their campaign and how they're using humor to call out actions that could derail the climate law.
3/5/202414 minutes, 40 seconds
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Finding Your Hobby: Stamp Collecting

In this membership-drive mini-series, we get to know about hobbies and building skills and finding communities for fun. Today, Charles Epting, philatelist and vice president at Siegel Auction Galleries, shares his passion for collecting stamps as pieces of history.
3/5/20247 minutes, 23 seconds
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Navigating the CDC's Updated COVID Isolation Guidelines

Last week, the CDC shortened its isolation guidelines for those infected with COVID-19 from five days to 24 hours without a fever. Jessica Malaty Rivera, Science Communication Advisor at the de Beaumont Foundation explains the shift in policy, how COVID-19 compares to the flu and other common respiratory viruses, and how to stay safe when official guidelines miss the mark.
3/5/202414 minutes
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Explaining Trump's Major Indictments and More

Melissa Murray, NYU law professor, co-host of the "Strict Scrutiny" podcast,  and Andrew Weissmann, professor of practice at NYU School of Law who was the lead prosecutor in Robert Mueller’s Special Counsel's Office, authors of The Trump Indictments: The Historic Charging Documents with Commentary (W. W. Norton & Company, 2024), offer context on the major legal cases facing the former president and discuss the Supreme Court's ruling allowing Donald Trump to appear on the Colorado ballot.
3/5/202420 minutes, 52 seconds
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How Many Steps a Day Do You Really Need?

Amanda Mull, staff writer at The Atlantic, explains where the step count goal comes from and why, despite long-standing research calling into question the purported health benefits of getting 10,000 steps a day, we remain so committed to that particular number.
3/4/202416 minutes
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Meet the New Council Members: Yusef Salaam

New York City Councilmember Yusef Salaam (District 9, Morningside Heights, Manhattanville-West Harlem, Hamilton Heights-Sugar Hill, parts of Harlem and the Upper West Side-Manhattan Valley) talks about his district and his priorities as one of four new members of the City Council.
3/4/202414 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ten Question Quiz: Subway Stops

Listeners try their hand at a ten-question quiz about subway stops.
3/4/202411 minutes, 8 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Super Tuesday Preview

Asma Khalid, White House correspondent for NPR and co-host of The NPR Politics Podcast and contributor to ABC News, talks about the latest national political news, including previewing the 16 "Super Tuesday" primaries, Vice President Harris's calls for a cease fire, whether the "uncommitted" voters will become a bigger problem for President Biden, and more.
3/4/202418 minutes, 15 seconds
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Finding Your Hobby: Glass Arts

 In this membership-drive mini-series, we get to know about hobbies and building skills and finding communities for fun. Today, Richard Paz, teaching artist at GlassRoots in Newark, shares his passion for glass flameworking.
3/4/20247 minutes, 4 seconds
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Appliances That Lasted

Appliances are rarely built to last, but many from the past are still as good as new. Listeners call in to share which gadgets and technologies have survived years of use in their homes. Plus, Anna Kramer, technology and climate journalist, author of the newsletter, "Bite into this," talks about her in The Atlantic article titled "KitchenAid Did It Right 87 Years Ago."
3/1/202416 minutes, 26 seconds
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Finding Your Hobby: Ceramics

In this membership-drive mini-series, we get to know about hobbies and building skills and finding communities for fun. Today, Ellen Day, ceramicist and the founder and director of the BrickHouse Ceramic Art Center in Long Island City, shares her passion for pottery.
3/1/20247 minutes, 8 seconds
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Freakonomics on Feynman

Stephen Dubner talks about their series on Richard Feynman, known for his work in theoretical physics and for his boundless curiosity.
3/1/202420 minutes, 36 seconds
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Continued Challenges for African Asylum Seekers

After news broke this week of two separate overcrowded locations housing dozens of migrants from Africa, Amaha Kassa, founder and executive director of African Communities Together, talks about the challenges facing African asylum seekers in the city.  
3/1/202415 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ten Question Quiz: Women’s History

To mark the start of Women’s History Month, listeners try their hand at a women’s history quiz.
3/1/202411 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ten Question Quiz: Leap Year, Calendars and Time

On this leap day, listeners try their hand at quiz questions related to leap years, our modern day calendar, and time zones.
2/29/202413 minutes, 32 seconds
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Rev. Jesse Jackson's Historic Bid for the Presidency

For Black History Month, Clarence Lusane, professor and current director of the International Affairs program at Howard University, reflects on Jesse Jackson's two historic bids for the presidency.
2/29/202415 minutes, 39 seconds
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Finding Your Hobby: Birding

In this membership-drive mini-series, we get to know about hobbies and building skills and finding communities for fun. Today, Kate Hinds, long-time birding enthusiast and senior producer at All Of It, shares her passion for birding. Kate's list of organizations with information, and gatherings, for birders: NYC Audubon American Littoral Society – they work at Sandy Hook, Jamaica Bay, Barnegat Bay NYC Parks Department   Urban Park Rangers offers Feminist Bird Club (has chapters in NYC and Jersey City)  Brooklyn Bird Club Queens County Bird Club Jamaica Bay National Wildlife Refuge Shirley Chisholm State Park
2/29/20247 minutes, 7 seconds
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New Congressional Maps are Approved in Albany

Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, talks about what the latest Congressional maps, proposed by Democrats, will look like as the NYS legislature voted to approve the newly-drawn maps, wrapping up the redistricting process for now.
2/29/202411 minutes, 36 seconds
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Trump's Trials and the Campaign Trail

Andrea Bernstein, journalist reporting on Trump legal matters for NPR, host of many podcasts including "Will be Wild" and "Trump, Inc." and the author of American Oligarchs: The Kushners The Trumps and the Marriage of Money and Power (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), talks about the financial penalties and political benefits of former President Trump's legal trials, both past and upcoming, plus the news that the Supreme Court will take up Trump's claim of immunity.
2/29/202421 minutes, 4 seconds
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Call Your Senator: Sen. Gillibrand's Response to Albama's IVF Ruling and More

Kirsten Gillibrand, U.S. Senator (D NY), talks about her work in Washington, including her bill in response to Alabama's IVF ruling, which would guarantee access to IVF for all women, plus much more.
2/28/202415 minutes, 40 seconds
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Take Our Quiz: Black History Month  

As February winds down, listeners try their hand at quiz questions related to Black History Month.    
2/28/202411 minutes, 3 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Illegal Migrant Housing Bust and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event including the dispersement of an illegal migrant shelter housing over 70 new New Yorkers in the basement of a furniture store in Queens, potential shifting of sanctuary city policy, and Adams' defense of his program to dispense prepaid cards to migrands for food and baby supplies. 
2/28/202418 minutes, 34 seconds
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Finding Your Hobby: Knitting

In this membership-drive mini-series, we get to know about hobbies and building skills and finding communities for fun. Today, Nancy Ricci, knitter, crocheter, weaver, and pattern designer with Knitty City yarn store, shares her passion for knitting. Find Nancy Ricci on Instagram: @gettingpurlywithit
2/28/20247 minutes, 2 seconds
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Scams and How to Avoid Them

Michelle Singletary, personal finance columnist for The Washington Post, offers advice for avoiding scams and other personal finance guidance.→ Put your smugness away. You are not too clever to be conned.
2/28/202418 minutes, 7 seconds
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What Led to the Iraq War

Steve Coll, an editor at The Economist in London, dean emeritus of the Columbia Journalism School, former president of New America, and the author of Ghost Wars and his new book, The Achilles Trap: Saddam Hussein, the C.I.A. and the Origins of America’s Invasion of Iraq (Penguin, 2024), traces the relationship between Iraq's leader and the U.S. and how misunderstandings and miscommunications led to war over non-existent weapons of mass destruction, and the implications for today's Mideast policies.
2/27/202438 minutes, 29 seconds
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Greener Snowmaking Amid Climate Change

Tik Root, senior staff writer at Grist, a nonprofit media organization covering climate, justice and solutions, reports on how ski resorts, battling a lack of snow due to global warming, are making snow using greener technologies.
2/27/202416 minutes, 8 seconds
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Andy Kim Continues to Collect Victories Over Tammy Murphy in NJ's Senate Primary

The Senate primary race to replace Sen. Bob Menendez is on between Rep. Andy Kim and the governor's wife Tammy Murphy. Nancy Solomon, WNYC reporter and editor, host of the “Ask Governor Murphy” monthly call-in show and of the new podcast "Dead End: A New Jersey Political Murder Mystery," reports on what's happening in the campaign ahead of the June primary, and the string of surprising wins Kim has collected over Murphy in county Democratic committee elections.
2/27/202425 minutes, 16 seconds
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Tributes to Flaco

Flaco, the escaped Central Park Zoo eagle-owl who fascinated so many New Yorkers, died over the weekend. Listeners call in share their remembrances.
2/27/202410 minutes, 40 seconds
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New York's Redistricting Saga

On Monday, the Democratically-controlled legislature rejected the new districts proposed by the redistricting commission and offered their own new maps overnight. Susan Lerner, executive director of Common Cause New York, talks about the latest on New York's redistricting process and why they are calling for changes to the process before the next census.
2/27/202419 minutes, 8 seconds
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Anti-Trans Laws and the 2024 Election Year

As we close out the second month of the 2024 election year, numerous anti-trans laws have been enacted across the country. Alejandra Caraballo, Clinical Instructor at Harvard Law School's Cyberlaw Cliniclooks at the latest in anti-trans policies including an executive order in Nassau County that targets young trans women athletes as well as Oklahoma’s anti-trans laws that are under new scrutiny after a 16 year old nonbinary child died a day after an altercation in their school’s bathroom.
2/26/202430 minutes, 3 seconds
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How Has 'Hanging Out' Changed?

Four years ago this week, the first Covid case was diagnosed in New York and people began canceling plans. Listeners call in to share whether their patterns of in-person socializing have shifted, especially since the pandemic began.
2/26/202410 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Presidential Primaries Heat Up

Jonathan Martin, senior political columnist at Politico and the co-author of This Will Not Pass: Trump, Biden, and the Battle for America's Future (Simon & Schuster, 2022), breaks down the results of Saturday's Republican presidential primary in South Carolina, where Nikki Haley lost to Donald Trump, plus previews President Joe Biden's primary in Michigan, where opposition to his policies on Gaza face criticism.
2/26/202444 minutes, 11 seconds
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New York City Housing Roundup

David Brand, housing reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, breaks down the latest in New York City housing news, including why NYC Council is joining a lawsuit against Mayor Eric Adams over housing vouchers and his reporting on the lack of 2-bedroom apartments in neighborhoods with the most concentration of families.
2/26/202424 minutes, 52 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: AOC; NY's Legal Weed Rollout; Shirley Chisholm's Presidential Campaign

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. AOC on The Green New Deal's Anniversary (First) | New York's Unfulfilled Legal Cannabis Rollout (Starts at 28:30) | Shirley Chisholm's Historic Bid for the Presidency (Starts at 48:00) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
2/24/20241 hour, 34 minutes, 24 seconds
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Friday Morning Politics with Rep. Sherrill: Middle East and Russia

U.S. Representative Mikie Sherrill (D, NJ-11) talks about U.S. foreign policy, focusing particularly on the war in Gaza and growing tensions between the United States and Russia.  
2/23/202442 minutes, 6 seconds
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More Than Half of New Yorkers Live in Poverty

Robin Hood and Columbia University's Poverty Tracker Annual Report shows more than half of New York City—56%—lives in poverty or is low-income and likely faces challenges to make ends meet. Richard Buery, CEO of Robin Hood and former NYC deputy mayor for strategic policy initiatives, breaks down the reports finding, including how 1 in 4 children are impacted by poverty.
2/23/202426 minutes, 53 seconds
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Oscar Docs - To Kill a Tiger

This month we hear from the makers of the five films nominated for the Academy Award for best feature documentary. Today, writer and director Nisha Pahuja talks about her film "To Kill a Tiger" that tells the story of a family in rural India that decides to fight back in court after the daughter is sexually assaulted. "To Kill a Tiger" is screening at Manhattan's Quad Cinema on W. 13th St. Check out the interviews with all the nominees.  
2/23/202423 minutes, 18 seconds
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A Temperature Check for Teachers

On the final day of the Presidents' Week mid-winter recess, teachers call in to tell us how they’re doing this year.
2/23/202416 minutes, 17 seconds
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Exploring Shirley Chisholm's Historic Bid for the Presidency

For this Black History Month, Zinga Fraser, assistant professor of Africana Studies and Women's and Gender Studies and director of the Shirley Chisholm Project at Brooklyn College, joins us as we explore the life and legacy of Brooklyn's Shirley Chisholm (1924-2005), the first Black woman to be elected to Congress and the first woman and African American to campaign for a major party's nomination for president.
2/22/202416 minutes, 33 seconds
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Legal News Roundup: Trump's Woes and Alabama's IVF Ruling

Elie Mystal, justice correspondent for The Nation and the author of Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy’s Guide to the Constitution (The New Press, 2022), breaks down the latest on Trump's legal woes, Alabama's ruling on IVF and more.  
2/22/202444 minutes, 55 seconds
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Oscar Docs - 20 Days In Mariupol

This month we hear from the makers of the five films nominated for the Academy Award for best feature documentary. Today, director Mstyslav Chernov, Pulitzer Prize-winning video journalist at The Associated Press and president of the Ukrainian Association of Professional Photographers, talks about his feature documentary, 20 Days In Mariupol, and his experience with his fellow journalists trapped in Mariupol as the Russians invade. Check out the interviews with all the nominees.  
2/22/202419 minutes, 55 seconds
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Lawsuit Over ACS Practices

David Shalleck-Klein, founder and executive director of the Family Justice Law Center at the Urban Justice Center, discusses the class-action lawsuit charging the Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) uses coercion, traumatizing families, and is joined by Shalonda Curtis-Hackett, a plaintiff in the lawsuit.  
2/22/202428 minutes, 27 seconds
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What the Tweens Are Actually Buying

Casey Lewis, author of After School, a trendspotting newsletter about Gen Z and Gen Alpha, talks about her piece in The Cut titled "Tweencore: What the 13-and-under set is shopping for" as tweens who are off from school this week call in and share where they like to shop and hang out in person.
2/21/202412 minutes, 19 seconds
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Sen. Bradley's Life in Hoops, Politics and More

Bill Bradley, former professional basketball player for the Knicks and former U.S. senator from New Jersey, talks about his life, as depicted in a new film about his life airing now on Max called "Rolling Along: Bill Bradley."
2/21/202426 minutes, 4 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: Public Safety

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Katie Honan, senior reporter at The City and co-host of the podcast FAQ NYC, recaps what he talked about at this week's event—including a number of questions about public safety.
2/21/202432 minutes, 26 seconds
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The West's Muslim Liberals Respond to Gaza

Mustafa Akyol, senior fellow at the Cato Institute focusing on Islam and modernity, and the author the forthcoming book The Islamic Moses: How the Prophet Inspired Jews and Muslims to Flourish Together and Change the World (St. Martin's Essentials, 2024), argues that perceived indifference to Palestinian suffering in Gaza is alienating moderates across the Islamic world and has the potential to tarnish the appeal of liberal democratic values in the United States and the West.
2/21/202438 minutes, 14 seconds
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AOC on The Green New Deal's Anniversary

For our climate story of the week, U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY 14th District) talks about the fifth anniversary of The Green New Deal, its accomplishments so far, and the local and national priorities on climate change ahead of the election.  Plus, other national politics, including why, as a progressive, she's supporting President Biden's reelection.
2/20/202447 minutes, 48 seconds
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Oscar Docs: The Eternal Memory

This month we hear from the makers of the five films nominated for the Academy Award for best feature documentary. Today, director and producer Maite Alberdi talks about her film, "The Eternal Memory" that connects the individual crisis of an Alzheimer's diagnosis to the societal need to preserve its history through the story of a prominent Chilean couple. → Check out the interviews with all the nominees.  
2/20/202420 minutes, 31 seconds
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How to Learn From Regret

In a recent essay in Vox, Charley Locke writes that regret can “clarify a disconnect between who we are and who we want to be. And it can show us how to change.” She joins us to share a story about a couple reuniting 30 years after divorce and offer thoughts on how regret can inform our lives.→ What you can learn from regret
2/20/202417 minutes, 22 seconds
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Food Stamp Scammers Target New Yorkers

Over 61,000 New Yorkers have submitted a claim of EBT fraud since August of last year. Bahar Ostadan, WNYC and Gothamist reporter covering the NYPD and public safety, reports on how these thefts are happening and who is targeted. And Jessica González-Rojas, NY Assemblymember (AD-34, Corona, East Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, and Woodside) joins us for a few minutes to explain how lawmakers are dealing with the issue.
2/20/202423 minutes, 16 seconds
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New York's Unfulfilled Legal Cannabis Rollout

Jia Tolentino, staff writer at The New Yorker, author of Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion (Random House, 2019), discusses her reporting on the rollout of marijuana legalization in New York, specifically on those who are struggling to capitalize on a state program that promises dispensary licenses and on the seed money to those who have been adversely affected by the drug’s criminalization.
2/19/202429 minutes, 29 seconds
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Your Favorite Presidents

In a presidential election year featuring two presumptive nominees that provoke feelings of ambivalence and fear in segments of the electorate, listeners discuss their favorite presidents -- those that inspired them to vote, engendered feelings of hope for the future, or possessed other qualities they look for in a leader.
2/19/202415 minutes, 58 seconds
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The Case for a Cap on Wealth

Ingrid Robeyns, philosopher, economist and the author of Limitarianism: The Case Against Extreme Wealth (Astra House, 2024), expands on her idea of "limitarianism" and calls for a cap on extreme wealth.
2/19/202422 minutes, 52 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Rise of Global 'National Conservatism' and More

Idrees Kahloon, Washington bureau chief for The Economist, talks about his recent reporting on the rise of illiberal leaders, plus responses to the death of Alexei Navalny, the Munich Security Conference, Israel and Gaza and 
2/19/202441 minutes, 52 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: How 2020 Changed Us; The AIDS Epidemic & the Black Community; Deep Friendship

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. How 2020 Changed Us; (First) | The AIDS Epidemic and Black Communities  (Starts at 33:20) | In Praise of Deep Friendship  (Starts at 1:02:15) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
2/17/20241 hour, 22 minutes, 28 seconds
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Navalny, Putin, Russia and Ukraine

Russian opposition leader, anti-corruption activist and political prisoner Alexei Navalny has died. Masha Gessen, The New Yorker staff writer and the author of Surviving Autocracy (Riverhead Books, 2020), digests this news and offers analysis as Putin's war in Ukraine approaches its second anniversary.
2/17/202439 minutes, 33 seconds
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Modern (or Not) Lent Sacrifices

During Lent, Christians commonly choose a Lenten sacrifice, abstaining from pleasures such as chocolate, sugar, alcohol, or even social media. Listeners observing Lent call in and share what they are giving up.
2/16/20248 minutes, 13 seconds
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How 2020 Changed Us

Eric Klinenberg, professor in the social sciences and director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University and the author of 2020: One City, Seven People, and the Year Everything Changed (Knopf, 2024), tells the story of New York in 2020 through the lens of seven New Yorkers, and talks about the ongoing effect of that traumatic year. → Eric Klinenberg will talk about the book "2020: One City, Seven People, and the Year Everything Changed" with Columbia history professor Kim Phillips-Fein on Monday, March 4th at 6:30pm at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library on 5th Avenue at 40th Street.  
2/16/202432 minutes, 4 seconds
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Independent Review of the City Budget

Louisa Chafee, director of the New York City Independent Budget Office (IBO), a non-partisan source of information on the budget and economy, talks about their review of the Mayor's preliminary budget and economic forecast.
2/16/202429 minutes, 46 seconds
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The Ideological Differences Between Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X

While history looks back on both Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X as revolutionary figures in their own rights, their ideological roots led them to pursue different visions for Black American liberation. Peniel Joseph, professor of history and public affairs and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. (Basic Books, 2020), peels back behind the veneer of history, provides a deeper look at the ideologies they subscribed to throughout their lives, and reflects on how integrationism and Black nationalism have worked out in modern American society.
2/16/202415 minutes, 55 seconds
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Oscar Docs - Four Daughters

This month we hear from the makers of the 5 films nominated for the Academy Award for best feature documentary. Today, writer and director Kaouther Ben Hania talks about her film which explores the life of a Tunisian mother and her four daughters.     →Check out the interviews with all the nominees.
2/15/202422 minutes, 8 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, plus news that the mayor is suing social media companies over declining teenage mental health, and also being sued by the Legal Aid Society for not expanding housing voucher access to more low-income New Yorkers. 
2/15/202432 minutes, 13 seconds
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An Argument for Replacing Joe Biden as the Democratic Presidential Nominee

After last week's news of comments from Special Counsel Robert Hur's report on Biden's age and mental agility hit a nerve, Damon Linker, senior lecturer in political science at the University of Pennsylvania and writer of the Substack newsletter “Notes from the Middleground,” explains his argument expressed in a recently published piece for The Atlantic that "Democrats Should Pick a New Presidential Candidate Now." What would the process for choosing that new candidate could look like? And who might the Democrats be considering?
2/15/202439 minutes, 27 seconds
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Dems Claw Back Another House Seat as Suozzi Prevails on Long Island

Tom Suozzi won the special election in New York's 3rd congressional district, taking back his old seat and getting the Democrats one more vote in the House. Brigid Bergin, WNYC's senior political correspondent, and Randi Marshall, editorial board writer and columnist for Newsday, share their analysis of the result and what it might signal to other swing districts.
2/15/202439 minutes, 51 seconds
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Are We At A Jewish-American Inflection Point On Israel?

It's been 130 days since the Oct. 7 Hamas attack on Israeli civilians, which has reignited both violence in Gaza and discourse here in the United States about the relationship between state of Israel and the Palestinian territories. Marc Tracy, New York Times culture reporter, formerly a writer for Tablet, where he covered contemporary Jewish life, and editor of the essay collection, "Jewish Jocks: An Unorthodox Hall of Fame," discusses how recent events have impacted the way Jewish Americans think about their relationships to Israel, its government, its history, its people, and its treatment of its Palestinian neighbors.
2/14/202428 minutes, 18 seconds
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Using Love Languages in Your Relationships

While science doesn't back up the existence of the five love languages, listeners share how they use this particular theory of communication to create harmony within their relationships.
2/14/202412 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ask Governor Murphy: February Recap

Nancy Solomon, WNYC reporter and editor, and host of the “Ask Governor Murphy” monthly call-in show, recaps her conversation with New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, plus the state of the campaign to replace Senator Bob Menendez and how New Jersey is preparing to host the FIFA World Cup in 2026.
2/14/202428 minutes, 22 seconds
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In Praise of Deep Friendship

Rhaina Cohen, producer and editor of NPR's Embedded and the author of The Other Significant Others: Reimagining Life with Friendship at the Center (Macmillan, 2024), shares stories of people who have made life partners of friends, upending current expectations that spouses would be our closest relationships.
2/13/202420 minutes, 35 seconds
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News from Your Remote Classroom on an NYC Snow Day

For the first time since 2021, students in New York City are headed back to their virtual classrooms as opposed to their school buildings thanks to a projected Nor'easter heading towards the area. Listeners share how returning to remote learning on a snow day has played out in their households.
2/13/202416 minutes, 42 seconds
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Why Local Municipalities are Banning Green Energy

Elizabeth Weise, national correspondent for USA TODAY covering climate change and the energy transition, talks about her year-long investigation into why and how communities across the United States are banning wind and solar energy, despite clean energy goals and the consequences of a warming climate.
2/13/202426 minutes, 59 seconds
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City News With Comptroller Lander

New York City Comptroller Brad Lander talks about his office's forthcoming audit of NYC's housing stock, issues in the city's Intensive Mobile Treatment (IMT) program for people with serious mental health conditions, his take on the city's first remote school snow day and more city news.
2/13/202445 minutes, 1 second
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What Is Your Super Bowl?

Listeners call in to share stories of their personal and professional "Super Bowls" - the non-football event they are most excited about, and professionally, the highest achievement in their industry.
2/12/202412 minutes, 45 seconds
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The AIDS Epidemic and Black Communities

Kai Wright, host and managing editor of Notes From America with Kai Wright and Blindspot: The Plague in the Shadows, talks about how communities of color struggled with, and eventually reckoned with the HIV and AIDS crisis.
2/12/202428 minutes, 55 seconds
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Meet the New Council Members: Susan Zhuang

New York City Councilmember Susan Zhuang (District 43, Sunset Park, Dyker Heights, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, Gravesend, Borough Park, Mapleton-Midwood, Homecrest), talks about her district and her priorities as one of four new members of the City Council, including public safety and quality education -- and celebrating the new Year of the Dragon.
2/12/202426 minutes, 55 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Biden on Netanyahu; Trump on NATO

Susan Page, USA Today Washington bureau chief and the author of Madam Speaker: Nancy Pelosi and the Lessons of Power (Twelve, 2021) and the forthcoming The Rulebreaker: The Life and Times of Barbara Walters (Simon & Schuster, 2024), rounds up the latest news from the Biden White House, the campaign trail, and more national headlines.
2/12/202442 minutes, 35 seconds
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Down to the Wire in the NY-3 Special Election

Errol Louis, political anchor of Spectrum NY1 News, host of Inside City Hall, New York Magazine columnist and host of the podcast You Decide, and Rich Barrabi, co-anchor of "Mornings on News 12" and host of "Power and Politics" on News 12 Long Island, recap News 12 Long Island's debate between Democrat Tom Suozzi and Republican Mazi Pilip, who are in a tight race for a special election to replace George Santos in Congress in New York's 3rd Congressional district, and discuss the major issues at play.
2/9/202442 minutes, 50 seconds
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Stepping Up for the Migrants

This year's winners of the Lehrer Award for Community Well-Being focus their work on caring for the migrants arriving in NYC from the southern border. Nuala O'Doherty-Naranjo, attorney, community activist and the founder of the Jackson Heights Immigrant Center; Jesus Aguais, president of Aid for Life; and Power Malu, founder of Artists Athletes Activists, talk about their work connecting migrants with the services and the community they need.
2/9/202425 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Supreme Court Takes on Colorado's Trump Ballot Decision

Emily Bazelon, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, co-host of Slate's "Political Gabfest" podcast, Truman Capote fellow for creative writing and law at Yale Law School and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (Random House, 2019,) offers analysis of the oral arguments held at the Supreme Court over Colorado's decision to disqualify Trump from the primary ballot.
2/9/202426 minutes, 7 seconds
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Black Comedy From Dick Gregory to the Present

Mark Anthony Neal, Distinguished Professor of African and African American Studies and Chair of the Department of African and African American Studies at Duke University, offers an abridged history of Black comedy as a tool for activism from Dick Gregory to the present.
2/9/202415 minutes, 44 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: NY-3 Special Election; Kwame Alexander; Black Comedy

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Down to the Wire in the NY-3 Special Election (First) | Kwame Alexander on Sharing the Poems (Starts at 43:19) | Black Comedy From Dick Gregory to the Present (Starts at 1:08:59) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
2/9/20241 hour, 25 minutes, 3 seconds
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LIVE: Special Coverage of the Supreme Court

Today, we're taking NPR’s Special Coverage of the oral arguments before the Supreme Court in the case of Trump vs. Anderson.   Beginning at 9:30am, Brian is joined by Emily Bazelon, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, co-host of Slate's "Political Gabfest" podcast, Yale Law School fellow and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (Random House, 2019), to briefly preview the oral arguments the Supreme Court will be hearing over whether former President Trump is ineligible to hold office and appear on the primary ballot in Colorado.
2/8/202413 minutes, 56 seconds
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Deciding When to End Therapy

Over the past few years, the trend in society has been to encourage most people to enter therapy. Richard Alan Friedman, M.D., professor of clinical psychiatry and the director of the psychopharmacology clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College, explains why many of us may actually benefit from quitting therapy as listeners share how they knew it was time for them to end treatment.
2/7/202416 minutes, 2 seconds
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Sharing the Poems

Kwame Alexander, poet and Emmy-winning producer, author of Why Fathers Cry at Night and editor of This Is the Honey: An Anthology of Contemporary Black Poets (Little, Brown and Company, 2024), talks about the inspiration for, and from, the works collected in his new book.
2/7/202425 minutes, 36 seconds
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Mayor Adams Goes to Albany

After a stinging political defeat since the City Council overrode his vetoes on two bills, Mayor Adams is traveling to Albany to ask the state legislature to consider his priorities. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, shares insight and analysis of what's happening within the Adams administration.
2/7/202440 minutes, 1 second
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How American Politics Become Memes

Clare Malone, staff writer at The New Yorker, covering politics discusses how the internet, and meme culture, is continuing to having an influence on politics ahead of the 2024 election.→ The Meme-ification of American Politics
2/7/202426 minutes, 31 seconds
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Finding Community as a 'None'

A recent Pew Research poll found that 28% of the United States' population of "adults are religiously unaffiliated, describing themselves as atheists, agnostics or 'nothing in particular.”' Furthermore, "'nones' tend to vote less often, do less volunteer work in their communities, and follow public affairs at lower rates than religiously affiliated people do." Listeners who fall into the category of "nones" share how they find community without religion in their lives.
2/6/202413 minutes, 6 seconds
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Middle East Update

Missy Ryan, Washington Post reporter covering the Pentagon, military issues and national security, talks about the latest on the Israel/Gaza war and ceasefire negotiations, and the Biden response to the attack on U.S. troops in Jordan.
2/6/202427 minutes, 32 seconds
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NYC's Building Emissions Law Goes Into Effect

New York City’s landmark emissions reductions law took effect earlier this month. Rohit T. Aggarwala, chief climate officer and commissioner of NYC's Department of Environmental Protection, Simon Mugo, program manager of NYC Accelerator, and Andrew Chintz, financing specialist at NYC Accelerator, which provides free guidance to meet energy efficiency upgrades for buildings, talk about the implementation process so far, how owners can work to retrofit their buildings and what tools are available to them. → For more information about compliance, visit the NYC Accelerator website.
2/6/202426 minutes, 3 seconds
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Meet the Candidate: Tom Suozzi

Tom Suozzi, former congressman (D-NY3), talks about his campaign to reclaim his seat in Congress in the special election on February 13.
2/6/202443 minutes, 3 seconds
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Democrats Vote in South Carolina

Elena Schneider, national political reporter at Politico, shares insight and analysis of the results from the weekend's Democratic primary in South Carolina.
2/5/202425 minutes, 35 seconds
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Oscar Docs - Bobi Wine: The People’s President

This month we hear from the makers of the 5 films nominated for the Academy Award for best feature documentary. Today, Bobi Wine, Ugandan politician, singer and actor, and Moses Bwayo, director, talk about the film and Wine's challenge to Uganda's longtime president Gen. Yoweri Museveni.  
2/5/202423 minutes, 18 seconds
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Your Cross Generational Music Recs

There was some multigenerational synergy at the Grammy Awards on Sunday, as an 80-year-old Joni Mitchell performed with 40-something Brandi Carlile, and Tracy Chapman sang her hit song "Fast Car" with Luke Combs, the country artist who had a hit with his cover of it last year. Listeners call in to share their multigenerational music crossover tastes—what their 20- and 30-something kids have turned them on to, and what music "kids" in their 20s and 30s have gotten their parents into.
2/5/202412 minutes, 21 seconds
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Telling the Migrants' Stories

Jonathan Blitzer, New Yorker staff writer and the author of Everyone Who Is Gone Is Here: The United States, Central America, and the Making of a Crisis (Penguin Press, 2024), tells the larger story of the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border through the stories of individuals making the journey from Central America -- and talks about the politics of the current crisis, including the bipartisan compromise just negotiated.
2/5/202447 minutes, 23 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: 'Sustainable' Delivery; Dr. Blackstock on Race and Medicine; Why A Natural Gas Export Terminal Got Delayed

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. 'Sustainable' Delivery (First) | Dr. Uché Blackstock on Race and Medicine (Starts at 25:34) | Why An 'Enormous' Natural Gas Export Terminal Got Delayed (Starts at 53:36) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
2/2/20241 hour, 16 minutes, 15 seconds
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A Plan to 'Shed the Sheds'

Manhattan Borough President Mark Levine talks about his proposal to get down more quickly, and other news.
2/2/202421 minutes, 34 seconds
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How a Four-Day Workweek Works

As the City pilots a four-day workweek for certain onsite employees, Vanessa Fuhrmans, deputy bureau chief of Wall Street Journal careers and workplace team, reports on companies who have adopted that system and what makes it successful, and listeners share their experiences with the model.
2/2/202414 minutes, 54 seconds
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A 'Big Tech' Child Safety Hearing in Congress

A hearing this week on kids' online safety became contentious and, at times, emotional as senators from both parties grilled tech CEOs. Will Oremus, technology reporter at The Washington Post, offers a recap and analysis. 
2/2/202440 minutes, 36 seconds
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Making Journalism School More Affordable

The Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York got a big grant that will allow the school to work toward free tuition at a time when the profession is undergoing big changes. Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist and philanthropist, and Graciela Mochkofsky, dean at the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism, contributing writer for The New Yorker and the author of The Prophet of the Andes: An Unlikely Journey to the Promised Land (Knopf, 2022), talk about what this means for the school, individual students and the future of journalism.
2/2/202430 minutes, 33 seconds
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Health Code Violations in New York City School Cafeterias

Jaclyn Jeffrey-Wilensky, data reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, shares her reporting on the school cafeterias with the most health code violations in New York City, what kinds of transgressions have been documented, as well as kids true thoughts about what their served for lunch.  
2/1/202422 minutes, 30 seconds
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Getting Personal With Science

Nell Greenfieldboyce, NPR science correspondent and the author of Transient and Strange: Notes on the Science of Life (W. W. Norton & Company, 2024), talks about her new book that connects our lives to the science around us.
2/1/202433 minutes, 11 seconds
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Your Noisy City Advice

A recent Gothamist article one of the perennial problems of city life: too much noise. We ask listeners for their advice and hacks for coping with noisy neighbors, construction and traffic.→ Making life in NYC less noisy: How to quiet your home→ Noise could take years off your life. Here's How.
2/1/202414 minutes, 28 seconds
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Republicans Forge Ahead to Impeach Mayorkas

House Republicans have begun the process to impeach the Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas over border policy. Jacqueline Alemany, Congressional investigations reporter for The Washington Post, explains what Republicans are thinking, how they haven't actually presented any impeachable offenses and why Democrats say the GOP is abusing impeachment and using it as a political tool ahead of the 2024 election.
2/1/202438 minutes, 4 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: City Council Overrides Veto and More

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, including why City Council voted to override the Mayor's veto.
1/31/202446 minutes, 8 seconds
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Getting Unstuck When You're Feeling Stuck in Life

Winter blues and reflection during the early weeks of the new year can bring up a feeling of being absolutely stuck in life. Adam Alter, professor of marketing at NYU's Stern School of Business, affiliated professor of psychology at NYU, and author of Anatomy of a Breakthrough: How to Get Unstuck When It Matters Most (Simon & Schuster, 2023), explains why this feeling of being stuck may occur and how to get your life back on a fulfilling track.
1/31/202415 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Populists on the Left

Joshua Green, national correspondent for Bloomberg Businessweek and the author of The Rebels: Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the Struggle for a New American Politics (Penguin Press, 2024), talks about the rise of the progressive wing of the Democratic party and where it goes from here.
1/31/202422 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ominous Layoffs Hit the News Industry

As many organizations cut staff, Paul Farhi, former media reporter at The Washington Post, takes stock of the state of the news media and highlights solutions that Congress might consider soon.→ Is American Journalism Headed Toward an ‘Extinction-Level Event’?
1/31/202425 minutes, 13 seconds
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Why An 'Enormous' Natural Gas Export Terminal Got Delayed

Robinson Meyer, founding executive editor of Heatmap, a new climate-focused media company, breaks down the Biden administration's recent announcement to pause a decision on whether to approve what would be the largest natural gas export terminal in the United States.
1/30/202422 minutes, 13 seconds
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'Sustainable' Delivery

John Surico, a regular contributor to Bloomberg CityLab and adjunct professor at NYU's Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, talks about Mayor Adams's proposed Department of Sustainable Delivery, part of his State of the City address.
1/30/202425 minutes, 7 seconds
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Accidentally Permissive Parenting

Elizabeth Passarella, magazine writer and the author of the essay collections It Was an Ugly Couch Anyway and Good Apple (Thomas Nelson, 2023), discusses the phenomenon of excessively permissive parenting and its connection to gentle parenting, while listeners share how they're balancing discipline with the need to teach their children boundaries and how to work through their feelings.   
1/30/202415 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Role of the United States in the Middle East

Three U.S. service members were killed in Jordan this week, and now some Republicans are proposing that the United States should attack Iran. Fred Kaplan, Slate's War Stories columnist and the author of many books, including The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War (Simon & Schuster, 2020), explains why we even have troops in Jordan and other places in the Middle East at all, and how this is all related to the Israel-Hamas war.
1/30/202447 minutes, 18 seconds
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Can States Legislate Social Media Use for Teens?

In his State of the City address, Mayor Adams declared social media to be a public health hazard, at the same time that Florida is working on a ban for all teens under 16. Katherine Keyes, professor of epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, talks about what her research has shown on the good and bad effects of social media. Plus, Andrew Gounardes, New York State Senator (D, District 26 - Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, the Columbia Street Waterfront District, Dumbo, Dyker Heights, Fort Hamilton, Gowanus, Park Slope, Red Hook, South Slope, and Sunset Park), explains two new proposed state laws that aim to protect anyone under 18 online, including one which would prohibit social media companies from collecting and selling information and another which would curb features like curated algorithmic feeds.
1/29/202422 minutes, 22 seconds
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Dr. Uché Blackstock on Race and Medicine

Uché Blackstock, physician, founder and CEO of Advancing Health Equity, and the author of Legacy: A Black Physician Reckons with Racism in Medicine (Viking, 2024), shares the story of becoming, and practicing as, a Black female physician and how race and racism affect healthcare for patients.
1/29/202427 minutes, 57 seconds
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Mayor Adams on Policing, Housing and More

Eric Adams, New York City mayor, discusses his administration's work on housing, why they are calling social media a public health hazard and the disagreement with City Council over the "How Many Stops Act."
1/29/202425 minutes, 32 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: A South Carolina Primary Preview

With the next presidential primary taking place in South Carolina, Meg Kinnard, national politics reporter at The Associated Press, writer of their "Ground Game" newsletter and a South Carolina resident, shares her reporting and analysis on the politics of the Palmetto State—including the issues that voters there care most about, and how they feel about the fact that their former governor, Nikki Haley, is on the ballot.
1/29/202434 minutes, 36 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Chaos; Meat; Non-Monogamy

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Chaos theory and our political reality (First) | How meat exacerbates the climate crisis (Starts at 30:35) | The polycule: what is ethical non-monogamy? (Starts at 58:25) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
1/27/20241 hour, 13 minutes, 32 seconds
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Chaos Theory Explains It

Brian Klaas, social scientist, a contributing writer for The Atlantic, professor of global politics at University College London and the author of Fluke: Chance, Chaos, and Why Everything We Do Matters (Scribner, 2023), connects chaos theory to politics and all aspects of our lives.
1/26/202430 minutes, 5 seconds
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Financially Dependent Young Adults

Yesterday, Pew Research released a results of a study showing that only 45% of young adults ages 18 to 34 are completely financially independent from their parents. We hear from listeners -- both parents and young adults -- about giving and receiving financial aid within their families, what this aid is used for, how this dynamic affects their relationships, and their aspirations for financial independence in the future.
1/26/202414 minutes, 3 seconds
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Speaker Adams on NYPD Oversight and the State of the City

Adrienne Adams, New York City Council Speaker (District 28, Queens neighborhoods of Jamaica, Rochdale Village, Richmond Hill, and South Ozone Park), talks about the mayor's veto of the council bill to require NYPD documentation of stops and more.
1/26/202427 minutes, 46 seconds
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Honoring the Journalists

Jelani Cobb, dean of the Journalism School at Columbia University and a staff writer at The New Yorker, talks about the 2024 duPont-Columbia award winners, plus his latest political writing on why Republicans are still debating slavery and the Civil War.
1/26/202437 minutes, 24 seconds
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One Bedroom Families

Inspired by a recent piece in Curbed, listeners share why they choose to live in one bedroom apartments with their children.
1/25/202413 minutes, 54 seconds
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Recapping the 'State of the City'

Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, shares clips from and analysis of Mayor Adams's "State of the City" speech, where he called focused on housing, crime, the influx of migrants and more.
1/25/202443 minutes, 16 seconds
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Why Home and Auto Insurance Are Straining Budgets

The past decade of natural disasters has been the costliest ever, and home and auto insurance companies are taking note. Jean Eaglesham, reporter covering insurance for The Wall Street Journal, explains why prices for both insurance categories has shot up and how it's impacting homeowners and drivers.→ Buying Home and Auto Insurance Is Becoming Impossible
1/25/202425 minutes, 15 seconds
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The NY-3 Special Election as a Bellwether

Political observers have their eyes on the special election to replace George Santos in New York's 3rd Congressional district in case it serves as a bellwether for November's elections. Abby Livingston, Puck News reporter on political campaigns and Congress, talks about that and shares analysis of media buys and other spending by each candidate and their supporters.
1/25/202427 minutes, 39 seconds
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A Look Inside a Polycule

Anya Kamenetz, author of the parenting newsletter "The Golden Hour", The Stolen Year: How Covid Changed Children’s Lives, And Where We Go Now (Public Affairs, 2022), and advisor to the Aspen Institute and the Climate Mental Health Network, brings us into the story of a modern day polycule as documented in The Cut while listeners share how they're practicing polyamory in their homes in 2024.
1/24/202414 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Rent vs. Buy Question in 2024

Mortgage interest rates may be coming down some, but they are still higher than recent lows. Ronda Kaysen, real estate reporter for The New York Times, discusses the math homebuyers should take into consideration to make the best decision on buying vs. renting a home, plus the role logistics and emotion play in these decisions, and how the housing market might look in 2024
1/24/202424 minutes, 32 seconds
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New Hampshire Results and More

McKay Coppins, staff writer at The Atlantic and the author of Romney: A Reckoning (Simon & Schuster, 2023), talks about the results from Tuesday's presidential primary in New Hampshire and its implications for the race for the presidency.
1/24/202444 minutes, 11 seconds
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New York's Giant Medicaid Budget

New York State's Medicaid budget is one of the biggest in the country. Bill Hammond, senior fellow for health policy at the Empire Center, and Elisabeth Benjamin, vice president of Health Initiatives at the Community Service Society and co-founder of the Health Care for All New York Campaign, explain why Medicaid spending is over budget and what all that spending provides for New Yorkers.
1/24/202425 minutes, 56 seconds
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Tuesday Morning Politics With Rep. Mikie Sherrill

U.S. Representative (D, NJ-11) Mikie Sherrill talks about the latest issues at play in Congress, including aid for Israel and Ukraine, the southern border, the potential deal for an expanded child tax credit and more.  
1/23/202436 minutes, 3 seconds
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Meat's Role in the Climate Crisis

Kenny Torrella, staff writer for Vox’s Future Perfect section and author of Vox's "Meat/Less" newsletter, breaks down the role that meat plays in contributing to the climate crisis, from animals' greenhouse gas emissions to how trees are clear cut to make room for farms, and offers tips on how to incorporate more plant-based food into listeners' diets.
1/23/202427 minutes, 50 seconds
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Your Third Spaces

Per the nature of neoliberal capitalism, much of what was once deemed public space is now private, shrinking the possibilities of places to go without spending money and finding community. Listeners share their favorite third spaces, and discuss how these spaces have changed.
1/23/202414 minutes, 41 seconds
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Mayor Adams' Budget 'Whiplash'

Greg David, contributor covering fiscal and economic issues for THE CITY and director of the business and economics reporting program and Ravitch Fiscal Reporting Program at the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism, examines the cancelled spending cuts and the mayor's management of the budget. →"How Adams Played City Budget Numbers, Conjuring a Crisis" (The City, 1/17/24)
1/23/202431 minutes, 19 seconds
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Monday Morning Global Politics - Middle East Conflicts Converge into One

There are many conflicts happening in the Middle East right now besides the war between Israel and Hamas in Gaza. Robin Wright, contributing writer and columnist for The New Yorker and distinguished fellow at Woodrow Wilson Center and U.S. Institute of Peace, offers analysis of the hostilities, how the United States is involved and what else could go wrong.  
1/22/202445 minutes, 10 seconds
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Is Furniture Having A 'Fast Fashion' Moment?

Furnishings that used to last for a decade or more are now holding up for just a few years. Rachel Wolfe, reporter covering consumer trends in The Wall Street Journal’s life & work bureau, explains why the quality has gone down, even as prices continue to rise.  
1/22/202420 minutes, 32 seconds
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Who Should 'Control' the Schools?

With mayoral control of the schools being debated in Albany again, Clara Hemphill, founding editor of InsideSchools.org and the author of A Brighter Choice: Building a Just School in an Unequal City (Teachers College Press, 2023), talks about its history and the arguments for and against it.
1/22/202427 minutes, 12 seconds
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Your Dog Daughter

Some may scoff, but many pet owners feel their furry friends are more akin to human family. Katherine Wu, staff writer for The Atlantic, discusses the dynamics of the relationships between people and their pets. → Pets Really Can Be Like Human Family
1/22/202416 minutes, 47 seconds
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BL Weekend: Michele Norris; 'Doom Loop'?; Rats in Cars

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. What Americans Want to Say About Race and Identity (First) | Is NYC Avoiding the So-Called 'Urban Doom Loop'? (Starts at 39:10) | Why Your Car is a Rat Haven (Starts at 1:08:30) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
1/20/20241 hour, 22 minutes, 33 seconds
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Is NYC Avoiding the So-Called 'Urban Doom Loop'?

Back in 2022, Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, professor of real estate and finance at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business, argued New York City might be stuck in what he called an "urban doom loop." Now, he thinks the city may have avoided the the worst of it as tourism has rebounded and workers are returning to the office in decent numbers.  
1/19/202429 minutes, 20 seconds
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Staying Warm While Working Outside

Listeners who work outdoors call in to share tips on how to keep warm and Nathalia Varela, workplace justice supervising attorney at Make the Road New York, explains how employees can assert their rights for a safe work environment.
1/19/202415 minutes, 49 seconds
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Trump’s Second Defamation Trial

Writer E. Jean Carroll is taking former President Donald Trump back to court, this time focusing on what damages, if any, Trump must pay Carroll for defaming her. Andrea Bernstein, journalist reporting on Trump legal matters for NPR, host of "We Don't Talk About Leonard" podcast from ProPublica & On The Media (previous podcasts: Will be Wild and Trump, Inc) and the author of American Oligarchs: The Kushners, The Trumps and the Marriage of Money and Power (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), breaks down the first two days of the trial and what comes next.
1/19/202439 minutes, 25 seconds
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Library Funding Give and Take

New York City's libraries cut Sunday service after a first round of spending cuts, but Mayor Adams is holding off further cuts for now. Lauren Comito, executive director of Urban Librarians Unite and a manager of a branch library in New York City, talks about the budget back-and-forth and the services beyond books provided by the libraries.
1/19/202425 minutes, 16 seconds
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Introducing Blindspot Season 3: The Plague in the Shadows

Kai Wright, the host and managing editor of Notes From America with Kai Wright, and Lizzy Ratner, deputy editor at The Nation, discuss their third season of Blindspot, which focuses on the lesser-told stories of the early days of AIDS.  
1/18/202424 minutes, 18 seconds
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New Fare Evasion Gates and Other Transit News

Stephen Nessen, transportation reporter for the WNYC Newsroom, talks about the latest in the MTA's battle with fare evasion, plus other transit news.
1/18/202434 minutes, 24 seconds
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Why Your Car is a Rat Haven

Rats are resilient creatures, and sometimes their will to survive leads them into the machinery of your car. Jason Munshi-South, urban ecologist and professor of biology at Fordham University, explains.
1/18/202414 minutes, 30 seconds
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Call Your Senator: Sen. Gillibrand on Israel-Hamas War and More

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D NY), talks about her work in Washington, U.S. Middle East policy, funding negotiations, and more.
1/18/202436 minutes, 21 seconds
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A Rabbi Offers Spiritual Tools for Healing

Sharon Brous, founding and senior rabbi of IKAR, a Jewish community based in Los Angeles and the author of The Amen Effect: Ancient Wisdom to Mend Our Broken Hearts and World (Avery, 2024), draws on the Torah and her work leading a Jewish community to share insights into how to have a meaningful spiritual life, plus reflects on the grief caused by the October 7th Hamas attack, Israel's response and the suffering of Palestinians.  
1/17/202434 minutes, 59 seconds
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Puzzling It Out

A. J. Jacobs, host of the new daily iHeart podcast "The Puzzler with A.J. Jacobs," NPR contributor, contributing editor at Esquire, and the author of several books including The Puzzler: One Man's Quest to Solve the Most Baffling Puzzles Ever, from Crosswords to Jigsaws to the Meaning of Life (Crown, 2022), and Greg Pliska, chief puzzle officer for "The Puzzler" podcast, talk about why they think we are in a golden age of puzzles, and quiz listeners on New York-themed puzzle questions. →EVENT:  A.J. Jacobs with Greg Pliska hosts a live performance of The Puzzler on January 31st, 7:00-8:30pm, at the Midnight Theater, 75 Manhattan West Plaza. Guests include Ophira Eisenberg and Wyna Liu.
1/17/202412 minutes, 27 seconds
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Congress May Have a Deal on Expanding the Child Tax Credit

A bipartisan deal is in the works to expand the child tax credit in a way that would largely benefit low-income families. Dylan Matthews, senior correspondent and lead writer for Vox's "Future Perfect" section, talks about how it would work, how advocates say it would lift children out poverty, the corporate tax cuts that are part of the deal and whether it will pass the divided Congress.
1/17/202438 minutes, 26 seconds
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The NYC and NYS 2024 Budgets

Both Mayor Adams and Governor Hochul have unveiled their new budget proposals. WNYC and Gothamist reporters Elizabeth Kim and Jon Campbell talk about where the two leaders hope to direct spending, the gaps in the city's budget and how much the state will direct toward aiding migrants in the city.
1/17/202423 minutes, 43 seconds
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Tuesday Morning Politics: Iowa Results

Amber Phillips, Washington Post political reporter and author of The 5-Minute Fix newsletter, breaks down the results of the Iowa caucuses and what they signal about how GOP voters are feeling and the election year ahead.
1/16/202435 minutes, 36 seconds
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Is the FAFSA Simplified?

In 2020, Congress ordered a simplification of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which rolled out recently. Ron Lieber, the "Your Money" columnist for The New York Times, breaks down what happened when he filled out the FAFSA for his college-aged child and whether the process really is simplified.
1/16/202411 minutes, 59 seconds
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What Americans Want to Say About Race and Identity

Michele Norris, Washington Post columnist, host of the podcast "Your Mama's Kitchen," former cohost of NPR’s All Things Considered and the author of Our Hidden Conversations: What Americans Really Think about Race and Identity (Simon & Schuster, 2024), talks about her new book that builds on the over half a million submissions to the Race Card Project which invited people to submit six words that summed up their story about race.
1/16/202437 minutes, 53 seconds
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The State of Climate Crisis in NY and NJ

After New York Governor Kathy Hochul and New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy gave their State of the State addresses last week, Marie French, reporter who covers energy and the environment for POLITICO New York, and Ry Rivard, reporter who covers energy, the environment and transportation in New Jersey for Politico, break down how both governors plan to mitigate the impacts of the climate crisis in their states.
1/16/202423 minutes, 51 seconds
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Teaching Civil War History

After Nikki Haley's epic blundering on slavery's role in the Civil War, teachers call in on their day off and talk about how they teach children of all ages about the history of the Civil War.
1/15/202413 minutes, 57 seconds
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Dr. King's Legacy and How to Challenge Persistent Segregation

Richard Rothstein, distinguished fellow of the Economic Policy Institute and a senior fellow (emeritus) at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, and the author of many books including The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America (Liveright, 2017) and co-author of Just Action: How to Challenge Segregation Enacted Under the Color of Law (Liveright, 2023), and Leah Rothstein, community organizer and co-author of Just Action, talk about their books on segregation, and reflect on Dr. King's legacy.
1/15/202422 minutes, 21 seconds
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A COVID Resurgence

Wastewater surveillance data suggests a significant COVID surge in the United States. Daniel Griffin, MD, PhD, infectious disease physician with a PhD in molecular medicine, researcher at Columbia, Optum chief of the division of Infectious Disease, president of Parasites Without Borders and co-host of the podcast "This Week in Virology," explains the data and discusses the state of the so-called tripledemic.
1/15/202422 minutes, 47 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Iowa Caucuses Preview, NY Reparations Study Bill and More

Christina Greer, associate professor of political science at Fordham University, Moynihan Public Scholars fellow at City College, CUNY, host of the podcast FAQNYC, host of The Blackest Questions podcast on the Grio, previews the Iowa caucuses, plus discusses New York State's new task force to study reparations. 
1/15/202450 minutes, 9 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: Meeting African Migrants' Needs; CUNY Dean On Innovating Higher Ed; Medications For Alcohol Dependency

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Meeting the Needs of African Migrants in NYC (First) | Leading Growth and Change at CUNY (Starts at 26:45) | The Case for Treating Alcohol Use Disorder with Medication (Starts at 56:41) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
1/13/20241 hour, 22 minutes, 21 seconds
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Vision Zero Turns 10

New York City launched the Vision Zero street safety program ten years ago. Alec Hamilton, WNYC's senior producer for Morning Edition, talks about the progress it made and the many challenges that still remain as people continue to be killed or injured on the streets in high numbers, plus listeners weigh in with the intersections they think need safety upgrades.
1/12/202413 minutes, 36 seconds
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The Latest on the NY-3 Special Election

Rebecca Lewis, senior state politics reporter at City & State NY, and Nick Reisman, Politico New York reporter covering New York state government and politics and co-author of the New York Playbook, compare notes on how Tom Suozzi and Mazi Pilip are campaigning, and their policy differences, in the special election to replace George Santos in New York's third Congressional district.
1/12/202445 minutes, 15 seconds
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Israel's Defense Against South Africa's Accusation of Genocide

South Africa has brought a case to the International Court of Justice accusing Israel of committing a genocide against Palestinians living in the occupied territories. Julian Borger, world affairs editor at The Guardian, discusses the hearings at the ICJ and why Israel has decided to engage in the debate rather than ignore the accusations entirely.  
1/12/202431 minutes, 2 seconds
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Meet the New Council Members: Chris Banks

Chris Banks, New York City Council member (District 42, East New York, Starrett City, Brownsville, Canarsie, Remsen Village, and East Flatbush), talks about his district and his priorities as one of four new members of the City Council.
1/12/202418 minutes, 53 seconds
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Watching 'The Sopranos' as an Italian-American From New Jersey

The groundbreaking series 'The Sopranos' premiered 25 years ago. We ask Italian-American listeners from New Jersey to reflect on the show's portrayal of their community.
1/11/202410 minutes, 29 seconds
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The GOP Field the Week Before Iowa

It's the week before the Iowa caucuses and Donald Trump is still skipping debates. Aaron Blake, author, "The Campaign Moment" newsletter and senior political reporter for The Washington Post, recaps the latest debate between Nikki Haley and Ron DeSantis, Trump's town hall and more campaign news ahead of a big few weeks for the candidates.
1/11/202442 minutes, 2 seconds
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Meeting the Needs of African Migrants in NYC

Asylum seekers from African nations are flying to Central America and then traveling over land to the U.S. southern border as Europe cracks down on immigration. Amaha Kassa, founder and executive director of African Communities Together, discusses the special needs of African migrants and how his organization is responding to meet them.  
1/11/202426 minutes, 21 seconds
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Ask Governor Murphy: January Recap

Nancy Solomon, WNYC reporter and editor, and host of the “Ask Governor Murphy” monthly call-in show, recaps her conversation with New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, where they talked about his "state of the state" address from earlier this week, including plans to attract the generative A.I. industry, and more.
1/11/202430 minutes, 2 seconds
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Leading Growth and Change at CUNY

John Mogulescu, dean emeritus of the CUNY School of Professional Studies and author of The Dean of New Things: Bringing Change to CUNY and New York City (John Mogulescu, 2023), shares his story of innovation at CUNY and why other public universities should follow his lead.
1/10/202429 minutes, 52 seconds
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The NRA Goes to Trial in NY

A civil lawsuit in New York is underway which alleges misappropriation of funds on a grand scale by the National Rifle Association's leadership. Stephen Gutowski, founder of The Reload, an independent publication focused on firearms policy and politics, breaks down the details of the trial and its national implications.  
1/10/202424 minutes, 4 seconds
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Managing Our Streaming Services

Now that many of us are living without cable, we’ve grown reliant on the many streaming services available in the market. What once was Netflix and Hulu has now expanded to include more and more platforms — potentially resulting in a bill higher than the cost of cable if not managed properly. Listeners share how they keep track of their streaming services, which ones they’ve cut out, and which they can’t live without.
1/10/202412 minutes, 3 seconds
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Gov. Hochul's 2024 State of the State

Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, offer analysis of Governor Hochul's "state of the state" speech.
1/10/202444 minutes, 26 seconds
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Detoxing in the New Year

As many people seek to make lifestyle changes in the month of January, listeners call-in with unhealthy habits and toxic relationships they're seeking to let go of in the new year.
1/9/202416 minutes, 39 seconds
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Cyber Threats Facing the US

U.S. Army General Paul M. Nakasone, commander, U.S. Cyber Command and director, National Security Agency/chief, Central Security Service, talks about cyber threats from foreign adversaries facing the United States, how these threats play out in international conflicts, AI, election security and more.
1/9/202424 minutes, 56 seconds
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Taking Action for the Climate

In our climate story of the week, Dana Fisher, director of the Center for Environment, Community, and Equity and a professor in the School of International Service at American University and the author of the forthcoming Saving Ourselves: From Climate Shocks to Climate Action (Columbia University Press, 2024), talks about the role of climate activists in the 2024 presidential race and in combatting climate change in general.
1/9/202419 minutes, 47 seconds
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Reporters Ask the Mayor: 60 Day Limit for Migrant Families Is Up

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event, including how the new 60 day limit on migrant families in shelters is coming up today, as well as the city's budget and more.
1/9/202447 minutes, 36 seconds
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Your Film and TV Recs

Since awards season in Hollywood is now officially underway, listeners call in to recommend a film or television show from 2023 -- or a notable actor's performance.
1/8/202413 minutes, 57 seconds
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Monday Morning Politics: Congress Returns

Luke Broadwater, congressional correspondent for The New York Times, talks about the latest congressional news, including the status of negotiations over border security, upcoming funding deadlines, and more.
1/8/202443 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Case for Treating Alcohol Use Disorder with Medicine

Alcohol overuse causes 140,000 American deaths annually. Rachel DuRose, editorial production coordinator at Harvard Business Review and a former Vox Future Perfect fellow, breaks down treatment options and why they are rarely used to treat people who suffer from alcohol use disorder.
1/8/202425 minutes, 13 seconds
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MTA Chair Janno Lieber on the Subway Collision and Repair

John "Janno" Lieber, chair and CEO of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), talks about the work to recover from Thursday's collision and derailment and the disruption to some subway lines, plus other transit news.
1/8/202426 minutes, 58 seconds
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Brian Lehrer Weekend: National Debt; Elements & Climate Change; Dry January

Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Paul Krugman on the national debt (First) | Five essential elements and climate change (Starts at 27:10) | Listener calls on going without alcohol in January (Starts at 57:06) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.
1/6/20241 hour, 10 minutes, 50 seconds
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So Many Museums!

Jane August, content creator, talks about her Tik Tok series "Jane Visits Every Museum in New York City" and shares some of her favorites among the 106 she's seen already.
1/5/202413 minutes, 14 seconds
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Elections Around the World in 2024

Over 60 countries are set to vote in 2024. Ishaan Tharoor, foreign affairs columnist at The Washington Post, and the author of the Today's WorldView newsletter and column, ticks through the list and what to expect from a global policy perspective in countries including Britain, India, South Africa, Mexico and the United States.
1/5/202429 minutes, 36 seconds
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The State of Democracy, Three Years Since January 6

Saturday marks three years since Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in an attempt to prevent the peaceful transfer of power. Wendy Weiser, vice president for democracy at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, and Joseph Nunn, counsel in the Brennan Center’s Liberty and National Security Program, talk about the state of election denialism as the 2024 election nears, and explain how Donald Trump might use the Insurrection Act if he is reelected to tamp down protests or dissent against him.
1/5/202443 minutes, 34 seconds
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Gov. Hochul's 2024 Priorities

Grace Ashford, New York Times reporter covering New York State politics and government, talks about the proposals Governor Hochul is rolling out ahead of the State of the State address next week, including on housing, education, health care and more.
1/5/202422 minutes, 58 seconds
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National Debt's All Time High

The national debt has just surpassed $34 trillion for the first time. Paul Krugman, Nobel laureate in economics, New York Times columnist, distinguished professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center, and the author of (now in paperback) Arguing with Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), explains how that happened and where inflation may be headed in 2024.
1/4/202426 minutes, 22 seconds
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New York State Lawmakers Get to Work

New York State lawmakers are back in Albany for the new legislative session -- with palpable tension among Democrats.  Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, previews the priorities of Gov. Hochul and the legislature, including on housing, education, migrants and more, plus what bills got vetoed from the last session.
1/4/202439 minutes, 44 seconds
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What's in a Hyphenated Married Name?

Rachel Gutman-Wei, supervisory senior associate editor at The Atlantic asks, "Why does a silly little hyphen make so many people uncomfortable, or unsettled, or even—God forbid—uncomfortable-unsettled?" She joins us to explore what she sees as the American aversion to hyphenated married names.→ The Least Common, Least Loved Names in America
1/4/202415 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ask the Mayor of Paterson, NJ

Andre Sayegh, mayor of Paterson, New Jersey, talks about Paterson-related news including how the city's residents with Palestinian roots are feeling about the war in Gaza, plus the city's relaunch of a guaranteed income program, a plan for migrants and how the city is working to deal with the city's flooding issues.
1/4/202427 minutes, 34 seconds
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What Dry January Does For You

Last year, nearly 41% of adults surveyed in the U.S. reported they were very likely to attempt a sober January. Listeners who have participated in Dry January call in to share what they have gained from taking a month off from drinking and whether it made lasting changes for their relationship with alcohol.
1/3/202413 minutes, 55 seconds
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Europe's Plan to Regulate AI, and Other News

Cat Zakrzewski, Washington Post national technology policy reporter, talks about the European Union's AI Act, plus other news involving artificial intelligence.
1/3/202421 minutes, 14 seconds
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Recapping What Reporters Asked the Mayor

Mayor Adams holds one off-topic press conference per week, where reporters can ask him questions on any subject. Elizabeth Kim, Gothamist and WNYC reporter, recaps what he talked about at this week's event and previews Adams' year ahead.
1/3/202427 minutes, 19 seconds
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What A 'Softer' Israeli Approach To Gaza Might Look Like

Fred Kaplan, Slate's War Stories columnist and the author of many books, including The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War (Simon & Schuster, 2020), brings his analysis of the global ramifications of the Israel-Hamas war, and describes what it might look like if Israel continues to soften its approach, as Biden and others in the international community are urging.
1/3/202447 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Essential Elements and Climate Change

Stephen Porder, associate provost for sustainability and professor of ecology, evolution, and organismal biology at Brown University, co-founder of the radio show Possibly and the author of Elemental: How Five Elements Changed Earth’s Past and Will Shape Our Future (Princeton University Press, 2023), explains how five essential elements — hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus — have changed the climate and the earth, and how we might learn from them to prevent more destructive climate change in the