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Talking with Painters

English, Arts, 1 season, 159 episodes, 4 days, 13 hours, 51 minutes
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Want to hear from the painter behind the painting? Maria Stoljar talks enthusiastically with Australian painters about how they became an artist, their influences, painting techniques, current work and lots more!
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Laura Jones wins the 2024 Archibald Prize

Watch the video version of my interview with Laura Jones here on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel Congratulations to previous podcast guest Laura Jones on winning the Archibald Prize - Australia’s most famous portrait prize  - with a sensitive and meaningful portrait of writer and environmentalist Tim Winton. On Friday I interviewed Laura shortly after the announcement and I’m bringing you that 5 minute conversation in this episode but I’ve also gone through the archives to my podcast conversation with Laura in 2018 to bring you something extra.  When I interviewed Laura a few years ago it was after she had finished a residency on the Great Barrier Reef where she was studying the terrible bleaching events which occurred there (and continue to occur) and her concern surrounding those events is not unconnected with her winning portrait in this year's Archibald Prize. Because it was after seeing Tim Winton’s documentary on the ABC, Ningaloo Nyinggulu, about the fight to save the Ningaloo reef that Laura requested an Archibald portrait sitting. They have in common a sense of urgency that we must act now on climate change and are doing everything they can to bring attention to the devastating and inevitable consequences of inaction. One of the most interesting parts of my conversation with Laura was when she explained how coral bleaching occurs. It’s complex and scientific but she explained it in a way that anyone could understand so I thought I would bring you that part of the interview today .   2018 podcast interview with Laura Jones (ep 53) Laura Jones' Archibald Prize acceptance speech (Instagram) YouTube version of my Archibald interview with Laura Incognito Art Show Studio A Tim WintonOil on linen, 198 x 152.5cmImage: Art Gallery of NSW, Jenni Carter Winner 2024 Archibald Prize              
6/9/20240
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The Loading Dock Interviews (also on YouTube)

See the video version of this episode on the TWP YouTube channel here.  This is my 5th collection of Loading Dock Interviews of entrants to the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes. Six brave painters fronted my camera and microphone as they delivered their work to the packing room at the Art Gallery of NSW via the loading dock. Thankyou to these artists (tap on their name for their Instagram page): Andrew Bischoff Mila Kalik Joshua Van Gestel Simon Weir Linda Lockyer Mary Shackman Tickets for the 'Artists in Conversation' talk with me and Marikit Santiago at the Art Gallery of NSW Sign up for the Talking with Painters Newsletter here.  https://youtu.be/T-26mfmJMqw?si=L_YMco2XH8Hwwsup  
5/19/20240
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Ep 157: Caroline Zilinsky

Podcast listeners click here to view the works Caroline Zilinsky's paintings freeze pivotal moments in our culture's history, encouraging us to reflect upon our times, whether it's the absurdity, the horror or the humour. At the risk of being labelled a conspiracy theorist, she's attracted to the dilemmas brought on by the internet era and shines a light on the things that trouble most of us: our loss of privacy, shortened attention, a heightened focus on appearance,  a growing indifference to human suffering and the increasing power assumed by tech giants. Her paintings often depict a political or social narrative and although she accepts some are too confronting to hang above the sofa, there's something about the levity in her use of line, colour and form which invites us to venture into the darker corners of our culture, causing us to linger and question. Caroline is also well known for her portraiture and landscape painting. She won the Portia Geach Memorial Award portraiture prize in 2020 (the same year she won the Evelyn Chapman award) and has been a finalist in many others including the Archibald and Darling portrait prizes. This interview took place at the mid-career survey show of Caroline's work 'Exquisite Cadaver' at the University of Newcastle Gallery. Curated by Gillean Shaw, it was a collection of 40 stunning works spanning over 2 decades. The interview was also filmed and I'll be posting a video, including footage from the exhibition and Caroline's studio, on the TWP YouTube channel in the coming weeks. Feature photo:  Phillip Antonio Lemos Caroline Zilinsky on Instagram Caroline Zilinsky at Nanda\Hobbs Sign up to the TWP newsletter TWP YouTube channel Loading Dock interview My AGNSW Artists in Conversation interview with Caroline Ceal Floyer 'Kubla Khan'2022oil on linen107 x 106.7 cm 'Exquisite Corpse'2024Oil on linen 'For Whom the Bell Tolls' 2023oil on linen138 x 138cm 'Faceless The Congressional Hearing of Mark Zuckerberg' 2020oil on linen122 x 122cm 'Man of Few Words'2020Ink on AGNSW archive manila folder30 x 21cm (paper size), 60 x 47cm (framed size) 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow' 2023Oil on linen112 x 122cm 'Plastic Fantastic', 2023oil on linen56 x 62cm 'Refract Back', 2023Oil on linen112 x122 cm 'Too Long; Didn't Read (Universal Declaration of Human Rights)'2023Oil, Oil Stick and Digital Configuration on Canvas97 x 87cm 'Me and Ellie', 2004-2005oil on linen 71 x 454.5cm'My Brother Adrian' oil on linen72.5 x 54cm      
4/21/20240
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The Story Behind the Painting (Part 2)

Podcast listeners click here to see images of the works Over the years, podcast guests have shared some fascinating back stories to paintings they have made, stories which you could never have guessed just on viewing the work. Sometimes that back story has made me look at the work in a totally different way and I’m bringing you another eight artists' works in addition to those in ep 155. Click on the artist's name below for the full podcast episode (and any YouTube videos) and see images of the works we talk about below. Davida Allen Jacqui Stockdale Sam Leach Sam Leach YouTube video Robin Eley Peter O'Doherty Kathrin Longhurst Tom Carment Nicholas Harding Links mentioned in this episode TWP YouTube channel Sign up for the TWP Newsletter TWP Loading Dock video  NGV Triennial highlights - Instagram reel Memorial service for Jan Senbergs I dream of Sam Neill when I go to bed, 1986Davida AllenNational Gallery of Victoria © Davida AllenCollection: National Gallery of Victoria, MelbournePurchased 1986 (P22-1986) Drawings of George StirlingJacqui Stockdale George Stirling from the Heads of the Family seriesJacqui Stockdale Sam LeachMachine-assisted memory of Harewood Farm, Meadowsoil on linen51 x 51 cm Robin Eley‘Self Portrait’, 2010, oil on Belgian linen, 39″ x 25″Runner Up, Doug Moran portrait Prize, 2010 Peter O'DohertyEdgecliff high rise, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 198x167cm Kathrin LonghurstPoster Girl, 2011, oil on canvasFinalist Portia Geach Memorial Award, 2011 Tom CarmentWhere I scattered my father's ashes, Oratunga, SAwatercolour on paper45.3 x 52 cm Nicholas HardingRobert Drewe (In the swell)2006oil on canvas (frame: 140.4 cm x 125.0 cm, support: 138.0 cm x 123.0 cm)Collection: National Portrait Gallery
4/4/20240
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Ep 155: The story behind the painting: Fantauzzo, Flint, Quilty and Dobell

Podcast listeners click here to see images of the works Over the years, podcast guests have shared some fascinating back stories to paintings they have made, stories which you could never have guessed on merely viewing the work. Sometimes that back story has made me look at the work in a totally different way and I’m bringing you a few of those to you in this episode. See images of the works we talk about below. Links Tickets for talk with Caroline Zilinsky at the Art Gallery of NSW (Artists in Conversation) YouTube video - Anthony White Vincent Fantauzzo podcast episode Prudence Flint podcast episode Ben Quilty podcast episode Scott Bevan podcast episode on William Dobell 2:40    ‘Heath’, 2008, oil on canvas, 106 x 140cm (Collection of the Art Gallery of NSW, highly commended and winner of the Archibald Prize People’s Choice award 2008. Portrait of Heath Ledger) 10:40    ‘Baby’, 2015, oil on linen, 105 x 90.5cm (Finalist in Archibald Portrait Prize 2015) 15:45.  ‘Kandahar’ 2011, oil on linen, 140 x 190cmPhoto: Australian War Memorial 18:00   ‘Captain S. after Afghanistan’ 2012, oil on linen, 210 x 230cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2012Photo: AGNSW/ Mim Stirling 20:30    ‘Margaret Olley’, 1948, oil on hardboard, 114.3 x 85.7 cm boardCollection: Art Gallery of NSWWinner Archibald Prize 1948 23:45.    ‘Storm Approaching, Wangi’, 1948, oil on cardboard on composition board, 32.9 x 56cmWinner Wynne Prize 1948
2/19/202425 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ep 154: Inspiration from the archives: The Flow State

Podcast guests talk with me about the flow state! 3:39 Julie Nicholson and Fiona Verity - Podcast | Instagram video 6:40 Ann Thomson - Podcast | YouTube 7:54 Joshua Yeldham - Podcast | YouTube 10:15 Antonia Perricone Mrljak - Podcast | YouTube 11:25 Wendy Sharpe - Podcast | YouTube 12:51 Lewis Miller - Podcast | YouTube 13:50 Aida Tomescu - Podcast | YouTube 16:30 David Griggs - Podcast | YouTube 17:27 Idris Murphy - Podcast | YouTube 18:40 Kathrin Longhurst - Podcast | YouTube 20:50 Anthony White - Podcast | YouTube (coming soon) 22:07 Bernard Ollis - Podcast | YouTube 23:59 Kim Leutwyler - Podcast | YouTube 25:20 Tim Maguire - Podcast | YouTube 26:40 Belinda Street - Podcast | YouTube 27:58 Yvette Coppersmith - Podcast | YouTube (coming soon) 29:30 Tim Storrier - Podcast | YouTube 31:15 Jacqui Stockdale - Podcast | YouTube 32:02 Sandi Hester - YouTube Links  Sandi Hester interview on the YouTube channel Sandi Hester’s YouTube channel ‘Bits of an Artist’s life’ Paul Newton YouTube video TWP Instagram reels - ‘Summer reels from the archives’ Ep  ‘Inspiration from the archives: Colour (1)’ Ep  ‘Inspiration from the archives: Colour (2)’ Ep  ‘Inspiration from the archives: Risk’ Subscribe to the Talking with Painters monthly newsletter
1/23/202434 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 153: Jan Senbergs

Above photo of Jan Senbergs by Riste Andrievski Links Click 'play' above for my introduction to this interview (which is by way of transcript) and some background information about Jan Senbergs' life and work YouTube video of Jan Senbergs' studio (3 mins) Transcript of interview for mobile phone and podcasts listeners (scroll past these links) Transcript of interview for tablet/desktop (PDF) Jan Senbergs' website Jan Senbergs on Instagram Jan Senbergs at Niagara Galleries Talking with Painters YouTube channel Talking with Painters on Instagram Talking with Painters on Facebook Subscribe to the TWP newsletter Over six decades of work as a painter, printmaker and draughtsman, leading artist Jan Senbergs has exhibited in over 50 solo shows and has been the subject of three survey shows including a major retrospective curated by the National Gallery of Victoria in 2016. A rare accomplishment for any painter, however famous. His art evolved from early masterly screenprints to large scale paintings and with subject matter as varied as urban and natural landscapes, industrial themes, surreal structures and forms and aerial map-like works. This episode has been a long time coming. Covid threw out our plans for an early 2020 meeting but two years later we met in Jan's inspirational studio in Melbourne. His voice has been affected by some health issues and so this episode is coming to you by way of transcript and an intro on the podcast. Click on the link above for the transcript best for desktop and tablet and scroll down this page for the mobile phone version. Podcast listeners click here. As I was setting up my audio equipment on the day of the interview, Jan and I chatted about the time he had spent in London in his 20s. We talked about other Australian artists who were there at that time. That’s where the recording of the interview began. Jan Senbergs I was the younger artist who came into that area and I didn't know anybody. I didn't want to bother the local Antipodeans (laughs) so I usually went out by myself. I headed for the National Gallery on one occasion and ran into Arthur Boyd heading there too. We travelled together on the bus from Pimlico to Trafalgar Square. It was very nice because we walked through the Gallery making comments. It's lovely to do that with another painter. We walked past one room and Arthur stopped and said, 'There's a good painting in this room.’ It was a big dog watching over a dying nymph, by Piero di Cosimo. He was such an interesting painter. Afterwards, Arthur suggested we go and have a drink, so we went across the road and had a couple of beers and then he said 'You'll have to excuse me, but I've got to go back home. I've got a few duties there.' We shook hands and I never saw him again.  Maria Stoljar You never saw him again? JS No, but what was nice about it was the generosity of the older person to somebody younger who had just arrived.  MS How lovely. But you knew a lot of famous Australian artists like Fred Williams, for example. He was a friend of yours, wasn't he? JS Yeah, I knew Fred. When I first started showing around, I mixed with some of the older artists. At that time there were hardly any younger artists around. And because I hadn't gone to an art school, I was very isolated. It's quite different for artists today. Now there are thousands of young people trying very hard to make good art after their schooling. It's a different atmosphere. Schools pump out all these people with hopes and ambitions. That’s the reason it's good to know some of the older painters. MS Yes. Like John Brack? JS Yes, John Brack was one … Len Crawford, Fred, Roger Kemp – these were heavy-duty Melbourne blokes. MS It's amazing that you, in your early 20s, were hanging out with those people. JS Yeah, it was actually. Because I couldn't get into art school so I’d started working in a silkscreen printing ...
12/2/20236 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 152: ‘Kandinsky’ with co-curator Jackie Dunn and artist Desmond Lazaro

See a video version of the interview with curator Jackie Dunn here See a video version of the interview with artist Desmond Lazaro here The largest exhibition of Kandinsky's work ever to be seen in Australia has just opened at the Art Gallery of NSW! The exhibition, titled simply 'Kandinsky', brings together over 50 works of one of the 20th century's most innovative and ground breaking painters - Vasily Kandinsky - with 47 paintings from the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum in New York. Curated by the Guggenheim's curator of modern art and provenance Megan Fontanella together with the AGNSW's senior curator Jackie Dunn, these works touch on the most important periods of Kandinsky's artistic career, from the early 'Blue Rider' period, to his time in Germany when teaching at the Bauhaus school right through to his final years in Paris. In this podcast episode (which you can also see on YouTube) I talk with Jackie Dunn about this extraordinary exhibition. She tells me about Kandinsky's life and work, including what the catalysts were for him to become a painter, his use of colour, line and form and his interests in spirituality and music. I also talk with Desmond Lazaro who was commissioned to design a family-friendly space where visitors are invited to follow the path of a colourful labyrinth and create drawings using the shapes that inspired Kandinsky. Lazaro is a British-Indian-Australian artist whose primary ingredient is colour. His practice explores map-making, planetary systems and the concept of the journey. Also, alongside the Kandinsky show is an exhibition of 'spirit drawings' created by British medium Georgiana Houghton in the 1860s and 70s. The exhibition, 'Invisible Friends', brings together a collection of rarely seen swirling, evocative watercolours.  They highlight how significant spiritualism was in early modernism. 'Kandinsky' is a must-see exhibition.  It runs from November 4th to March 10th, 2024.  More details here. To hear the podcast episode press 'play' beneath the above photo. To watch the video versions of the interviews click on the links at the top of this page or see below. Links 'Kandinsky' at the Art Gallery of NSW Desmond Lazaro Tickets for my conversation with Julia Gutman on 15 November 2023 in the Artists in Conversation series Talking with Painters on Instagram Talking with Painters on Facebook Connect with me on LinkedIn https://youtu.be/Pgm4112joG8 https://youtu.be/D3b3WLlsakc 'Composition 8' July 1923, oil on canvas, 140.3 x 200.7 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, by gift, photo courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 'Blue mountain' 1908-09, oil on canvas, 107.3 x 97.6 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, by gift, photo courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Vasily Kandinsky 'In the black square' June 1923, oil on canvas, 97.5 x 93.3 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, by gift, photo courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 'Landscape with rain' January 1913, oil on canvas, 70.5 x 78.4 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, photo courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 'Yellow painting' July 1938, oil and enamel on canvas, 116.4 x 88.9 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, photo courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 'Around the circle' May–August 1940, oil and enamel on canvas, 97.2 x 146.4 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, photo courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation    
11/5/20230
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Ep 151: James Powditch live at the AGNSW

This episode is a conversation between James Powditch and Maria Stoljar in front of an audience at the Art Gallery of NSW, recorded by the Art Gallery Society James Powditch has always loved the movies. As a child in the 70s and 80s he would watch whatever he could get away with - from Taxi Driver to Deliverance. But in recent years, after being shortlisted in the Archibald prize with paintings of Labor leader (now PM) Anthony Albanese and journalists Kerry O'Brien and Laura Tingle he noticed other themes emerge; media and politics. In his most recent solo show at Nanda Hobbs Gallery he found a way to merge those interests. In Medium Cool: Journalism in Film, works took on titles of films in which journalism and politics were central themes. Beautifully composed assemblages incorporating found objects explored the ideas behind movies such as All the President's men and Network. James has exhibited in over 10 solo shows and has won the Mosman and Blake art prizes. He has been a finalist in the Archibald Wynne and Sulman prizes for a combined total of about 25 times. In this episode Maria has a vibrant (and often humorous) conversation with James in front of an audience at the Art Gallery of NSW as part of the Artists in Conversation series. You can see images of the works they talk about below. Members of the Art Gallery Society can also see a video of this conversation for a limited period on the Art Gallery website. To hear the podcast conversation press 'play' beneath the above photo. Links James Powditch on Instagram James Powditch at Nanda\Hobbs Gallery Video of this interview on the AGNSW website (for members) Art Gallery Society membership page Get tickets for the Steve Lopes talk at the AGNSW  Samantha Dennison interview on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel 'Once upon a time in Marrickville – Anthony Albanese', acrylic on paper and board 190 x 190 cm Finalist Archibald Prize 2020  Lloyd Cole and the Commotions album cover  New Order - Power, Corruption and Lies album cover   'Citizen Kave' mixed media  200 x 300 cm, Finalist Archibald Prize 2014 ‘Citizen Kane’ 2022 Mixed media, framed 80 x 120cm  'All the President’s men II' 2023 mixed media, 40 x 60cm 'All the President's men' 2023, mixed media 130 x 282cm 'Laura Tingle - the fourth estate' Acrylic and paper on board 204 x 170.1cm Finalist Archibald Prize 2022 Movie poster ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ Digital work, James Powditch Peter Powditch Photograph by Robert Walker (c1970)  ‘Peter Powditch is a dead man smoking’ 2009, Mixed media 193 x 263cm, Finalist Archibald Prize  Family photo, James Powditch ‘Crowdy Head (after Peter Powditch)’, acrylic on paper and cardboard  122 x 366 Finalist Wynne Prize 2022 ‘Crowdy Head IV’, Oil on masonite, 50 x 48cm, Peter Powditch The Wynne Club Championship 2023, oil, acrylic and pen on board, found objects , 180 x 316.1 cm , Wynne Prize finalist Sam I Am, acrylic on paper and board  200 x 240 cm, Finalist Archibald Prize 2023 Digital work, James Powditch    
10/21/202351 minutes, 43 seconds
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Inspiration from the Archives | Risk

Risk. Some painters want it in their toolbox while others are terrified by it. But nearly every painter will tell you that you need it in order to move forward in your practice.  It might be using a new material, drastically altering the composition of a nearly completed painting or creating a completely different body of work to what had previously been commercially successful and critically acclaimed. Any way you look at it, you're leaving yourself open to the possibility of failure, disappointment and probably the most painful of all - ridicule.  So whether we call it risk, chance, letting go of control or just leaving yourself open to mistakes, it all amounts to a greater openness to creativity. Taking the leap and seeing what happens. In this episode I bring together clips from eight previous guests about what risk means to them - and how they use it. See below for a list of the artists together with links to the full podcast conversation and YouTube video Press 'play' beneath the above image to listen Vanessa Stockard  Podcast | YouTube Paul Ryan  Podcast | YouTube Guy Warren   Podcast | YouTube Julian Meagher  Podcast | YouTube Ken Done  Podcast | YouTube Juliet Holmes a Court  Podcast | YouTube Tim Maguire  Podcast | YouTube Joe Furlonger  Podcast | YouTube   Watch the Idris Murphy YouTube Video Listen to the full Idris Murphy podcast interview Sign up to the TWP newsletter Book tickets for my conversation with Steve Lopes at the Art Gallery of NSW    
10/7/202324 minutes, 24 seconds
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Inspiration from the Archives | Colour (Part 2)

More inspiration from the archives! Here are another 12 past podcast guests talking with me about colour. Links to full podcast conversations and YouTube videos on each of the artists in this episode: 2:13  David Griggs - Podcast | YouTube 5:00  Laura Jones - Podcast | YouTube 9:08  Lewis Miller - Podcast | YouTube 11:10  Lucy Culliton - Podcast | YouTube 13:13  Robin Eley - Podcast | YouTube 18: 25  Melinda Harper - Podcast | YouTube 20:35  Tim Storrier - Podcast | YouTube 22:35. Wendy Sharpe - Podcast | YouTube 25:28  Idris Murphy - Podcast | YouTube video online soon! 28:22  Aida Tomescu - Podcast | YouTube 29:31  Bernard Ollis - Podcast | YouTube 31:19  Emily Imeson - Podcast | YouTube Sign up to the TWP monthly newsletter here Follow the show on Instagram Follow the show on Facebook Connect with me on LinkedIn      
9/10/202335 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ep 148: Inspiration from the archives: COLOUR

This episode I'm bringing you some gems from the archives. Leading artists talk with me about colour! Episodes of featured artists: Jo Bertini Paul Newton Philip Wolfhagen Nicholas Harding John Wolseley Peter O'Doherty Links YouTube channel Talking with Painters website Sign up to the TWP newsletter Nicholas Harding talks with me about his Wynne prize painting John Wolseley talks with me about his watercolour techniques Short Instagram video of Paul Newton talking about flesh tones (longer YouTube video coming soon)  
8/22/202320 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ep 147: Ann Thomson in her 90th year

Watch an edited version of this conversation (4 mins) on the YouTube channel here Ann Thomson, one of Australia's most important artists, might be in her 90th year but she shows no signs of putting down the brush. A powerful collection of works is currently hanging in a solo show at Sydney's Defiance Gallery and Ann is looking forward to a busy 2024.  A major survey show to be curated by Terence Maloon will open at the S.H.Ervin Gallery in Sydney and travel to Orange Regional Art gallery in country NSW and solo shows at Messums in London and with Stephane Jacob in Paris are also in the calendar. Although Ann resists the label 'abstract artist', it’s her masterful use of colour and her superb mark making that will most likely catch your attention - those luscious brushstrokes and drips. But subjects often emerge; a landscape, tribal elements, creatures of the ocean. You’ll also see collaged passages. Ann is well known for using a textured ‘tarred paper’ which was used by builders. Although it’s in scarce supply (she believes she has bought up all remaining rolls in existence!) she doesn’t treat the material as a precious commodity. If you look closely at ‘Calypso’ for example, you’ll see the section of collaged paper is splattered with drips of paint. That’s because it had previously been lying on the floor of Ann’s studio like a drop sheet. She later pasted the paper onto the canvas where it exists surrounded by bright colours, its own history intact. It was wonderful to catch up with Ann to hear her thoughts on creativity and studio life. She has been a guest on the podcast twice previously – in 2018 talking about her life and art and in 2020 talking about her memories of meeting Ian Fairweather (links below). Ann is represented by Defiance Gallery in Sydney, Mitchell Fine Art in Brisbane, Charles Nodrum Gallery in Melbourne, Messums in London and Stephane Jacob in Paris. To hear our conversation press 'play' beneath the above photo and scroll down for images of selected works included in the show. Latest Talking with Painters YouTube videos Matthew Clarke Daniel Boyd Ruth Levine and Robyn Kinsela Ann Thomson Other links 2018 Podcast conversation with Ann Thomson 2018 YouTube video in Ann Thomson's studio Podcast conversation with Ann Thomson on Ian Fairweather Podcast conversation with Claire Roberts on Ian Fairweather Ann Thomson's website Article on Artsy Website: 9 Overlooked Women Artists in Their Nineties   https://youtu.be/qLf00VQ3U6E Transcending 2018 Acrylic on linen 153 x 122.5 cm Shield, 2023 acrylic on tarred paper on canvas 120.5 x 81 cm This is one of the two works referred to at about 4mins in the episode. Calypso, 2013 oil on linen 122 x 122cm  
8/9/202325 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 146: Francis Giacco at his Australian Galleries exhibition

Click here for the edited video version of this podcast episode on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel The exhibition of Francis Giacco's paintings now showing at Australian Galleries in Sydney has been a long time coming. Covid pushed back the scheduling but it was worth the wait! I met Francis at the gallery and we walked through the exhibition talking about several key works which cross portraiture, still life and landscape. Apart from the Archibald, Francis has won the Percival Portrait Painting prize (and other awards) and has been a People's Choice winner in the S.H.Ervin's Salon des Refuses.  Titled 'Recent works: Pictures at an Exhibition (apologies to Mussorgsky)', the show is a combination of recent work and major paintings from the 80s and 90s. It includes Francis' enigmatic multi-figured portrait which won the Archibald prize in 1994. Several other works hanging in this first room were shortlisted in the Archibald and Doug Moran National Portrait Prize.  Influenced by Vermeer and the early Renaissance masters, his work exudes beauty and vitality. He's a keen observer of the effects of light, whether it's streaming from behind a still life or fracturing through a bamboo curtain and the way he depicts detail in the illuminated subject often pushes the real into the abstract. Francis (also known as Frank to those who know him) was my first podcast guest and in the past also taught at Julian Ashton Art School where I first met him. Many of his students have gone on to make paintings which have hung in the Archibald prize themselves and I can think of at least three who are finalists in this year’s exhibition.  The exhibition continues at Australian Galleries until 2 July 2023. To hear the episode click on 'play' above. Click here to watch the shorter 8 minute video version of this episode. Links YouTube video of this episode My first podcast interview with Francis in 2016 Francis Giacco at Australian Galleries Francis Giacco on Instagram Francis Giacco on Facebook Johannes Vermeer Subscribe to the TWP newsletter https://youtu.be/csBvbFfcwUc Homage to John Reichard (1994) egg emulsion on marine plywood, 202cm x 188cm Archibald Prize Winner, 1994 Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries Lee Lin Chin (1993) egg emulsion on marine plywood, 163cm x 127cm, Archibald Prize Finalist, 1993; Doug Moran Finalist, 1995. Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries White widow 1999-2000 egg emulsion on marine plywood, 132cm x 119cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries The piano 1984 oil on canvas, 96cm x 89cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries Jenny’s garden #25 – the altar 2020-23 oil on marine plywood, 122cm x 128.5cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries Jenny’s garden #20 – commotion 2020-23 oil on marine plywood, 43cm x 88cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries Balthus’ cats 2020-23 oil on marine plywood, 122cm x 126cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries The audition 1990 egg emulsion and oil on marine plywood, 60cm x 60cmImage courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries Bondi Pavilion 1988 oil on canvas, 76cm x 61cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries Self portrait #3 – after Rembrandt c. 1980 oil on canvas, 31cm x 27cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries Rushcutters Park – bushfire smoke c. 1990 oil on canvas on board, 39cm x 35cm Image courtesy of the artist and Australian Galleries
6/19/202339 minutes, 36 seconds
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When I won that art prize (part 4) – Georgia Spain

In the final episode of the series ‘When I won that art prize’ we go back to 2021 when a 27 year old Georgia Spain won the Sir John Sulman Prize at the Art Gallery of NSW, the first time she had entered the prize. In the same week she was announced the winner of the Women’s Art Prize Tasmania. These announcements were made less than 12 months after she was one of 5 artists to receive the Brett Whiteley Travelling Art scholarship. Georgia's recent work is currently hanging in the exhibition ‘Once more with feeling’ showing at Ngununggula, in the southern highlands of NSW. See below for links to Instagram videos about that exhibition. To hear this episode click on 'play' beneath the above photo. Links Full Georgia Spain interview  Georgia Spain's acceptance speech for the Sulman Prize at the AGNSW Episode 115 - 'The Archibald Winners' Sam Leach YouTube video (Part 1) Sam Leach YouTube video (Part 2) Tickets for Del Kathryn Barton live interview at the AGNSW 'Artists in Conversation' Subscribe to the TWP newsletter 'Once More with Feeling' at Ngununggula, Southern Highlands, 3 June - 13 August Instagram video - Megan Monte talks about 'Once more with feeling' Instagram video -  Maria Stoljar at Ngununggula Karen Black Ben Quilty  Solo exhibition by Francis Giacco at Australian Galleries, 15 June to 2 July 2023 ‘Getting down or falling up’, acrylic on canvas, 180.6 x 187.5 cm Winner: Sir John Sulman Prize, 2021 https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cs73wXShsoy/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link&igshid=MzRlODBiNWFlZA== https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cs94XEbhR5e/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link&igshid=MzRlODBiNWFlZA==  
6/11/202314 minutes, 37 seconds
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When I won that art prize (part 3) – Megan Seres

In this episode I’m taking you back to my interview with Megan Seres who won the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize in 2016.  Megan received the $150,000 in prize money for her stunning painting, ‘Scarlett as Colonial girl’, which depicted her daughter in 19th century dress against a golden landscape. Megan hadn't planned on entering the competition, but was persuaded by a friend. When she heard her name announced as the winner, she was completely shocked. To hear the episode press play beneath the above photo. Central photo of Megan Seres supplied by the artist  Links Megan Seres full Talking with Painters interview (ep 41) 'The Archibald Winners' (ep 115) Talking with Painters YouTube channel My YouTube video of Megan in her studio (2018) My 15 second video of the painting hanging in the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize exhibition in 2016 Megan Seres' website ‘Scarlett as colonial girl’, 2016, winner of the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2016
5/17/202316 minutes, 25 seconds
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Archibald winner Julia Gutman

Australia's most famous art prize was awarded yesterday at the Art Gallery of NSW together with the Wynne and Sulman prizes. The $100,000 prize went to a shocked but happy 29 year old Julia Gutman for her fabulous portrait of singer/songwriter Montaigne. It’s titled ‘Head in the sky feet on the ground’, a beautiful mixed media work consisting of oils, found textiles and embroidery. I had a chance to talk with her shortly after the announcement and I’m bringing you today that conversation together with her acceptance speech. The Wynne prize for landscape painting or figure sculpture went to Zaachariaha Fielding for his painting 'Inma’. Zaachariaha is primarily a singer, the lead vocalist of the band Electric Fields, and he sings in Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara and English. Together with producer Michael Ross he has received 22 awards over the past 6 years for his music. In his winning work he’s aiming to visually depict sound, specifically the sounds of Mimili, a small community in the eastern part of the APY lands in South Australia. He thrilled everyone  at the announcement by singing with a few friends saying 'this is what the canvas sounds like' (see below for a link to a short video).  The Sulman Prize for genre painting which was judged by the artist Nell and went to Doris Bush Nangarrayi for her work 'Mamunya ngalyananyi (Monster coming)' which depicts several Mamus the ominous and malevolent spirits that terrify Anangu. These figures are typically seen to have large haunting eyes with straight hair standing upright and can shapeshift into many different forms, including the human figure. Doris lives in Papunya in the Northern Territory and paints vivid memories stories and dreams from her life. See below for images of all winning works. Links Julia Gutman Video of Zaachariaha Fielding https://youtu.be/GIF0LOntO2o   Winner Archibald Prize 2023, Julia Gutman 'Head in the sky, feet on the ground', oil, found textiles and embroidery on canvas, 198 x 213.6 cm © the artist, image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter Winner Wynne Prize 2023, Zaachariaha Fielding 'Inma', acrylic on linen, 306.2 x 198.5 cm © the artist, image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter Winner Sulman Prize 2023, Doris Bush Nungarrayi 'Mamunya ngalyananyi (Monster coming)', acrylic on linen, 198 x 273.5 cm © the artist, image © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Jenni Carter
5/6/202314 minutes, 54 seconds
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‘When I won that art prize’ (Part 2)- James Drinkwater

In part 2 of the series 'When I won that art prize' we go back to episode 29 when James Drinkwater recalled winning the Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship in 2014.   The award included a three month residency in Paris at the Cité Internationale des arts, a dream come true for any young painter. However, when he and his young family set off for France, not everything went according to plan. Upcoming show Solo show at Edwina Corlette, 'You could just make a painting and write it all in there - new paintings from the slip room', 3 - 23 May, 2023 Links Episode 29, James Drinkwater on Talking with Painters Episode 115, The Archibald Winners YouTube video of interview with Packing Room prize winner Andrea Huelin James Drinkwater on Instagram James Drinkwater at Nanda\Hobbs James Drinkwater at Edwina Collette James Drinkwater at Nicholas Thompson Gallery Lottie Consalvo  Photo of James Drinkwater by Maria Stoljar (2017) ‘Encrusting the marvellous heart’, diptych, 2015, oil and collage on hardboard, 180 x 244cm Finalist Wynne Prize 2015    
4/28/202311 minutes, 58 seconds
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‘When I won that art prize’ (part 1) – Prudence Flint

Golden moments from the archives! While I'm busy updating my YouTube channel and taking a break from new interviews, I'm thrilled to bring you a new series featuring clips from past podcast guests. In my first series 'When I won that art prize' I look back at conversations I've had with painters about their experiences with winning awards. Although there are plenty of upsides (the prize money being one of the main ones) it's not always a positive experience! In 2017 (ep 35), I chatted with the fabulous Prudence Flint. No stranger to art prizes, she has won the Portia Geach Memorial Award, the Len Fox Painting Award and has been shortlisted in the Archibald seven times. But when I asked her what it was like winning the Doug Moran National Portrait prize in 2004, with prize money of $100,000, her response was not what you might expect. Links Full TWP Prudence Flint interview - episode 35 Prudence Flint website Prudence Flint on Instagram Prudence Flint's studio on TWP YouTube channel Talking with Painters YouTube channel The Good Oil Podcast with Graeme Douglas Subscribe to the Talking with Painters newsletter ‘A Fine Romance #9’, 2004, oil on linen, 117 x 82cm Winner of Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2004 ‘Baby’, 2015,  oil on linen, 105 x 90.5cm Finalist in Archibald Portrait Prize 2015
4/22/202313 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ep 140: Idris Murphy: Backblocks (live at the S.H.Ervin Gallery)

Last Thursday I was thrilled to speak with Idris Murphy, leading contemporary artist and a previous podcast guest, in front of a live audience at the S.H.Ervin Gallery in Sydney. It's where the survey exhibition of his work, 'Idris Murphy: Backblocks' is now showing and continues until 26 March 2023. Curated by Terence Maloon, it features breathtaking work predominantly from the last two decades. Paintings which shimmer, glow, and transport the viewer.  Idris talked with me about his career including the stories behind several works, the influence indigenous culture has had on his approach and how he works in the studio. Although this exhibition is impressive in its quality and depth, this isn't the first survey show of Idris’s work. The exhibition ‘I and Thou’ in 2009/2010 had highlighted the preceding 30 years of work. He has exhibited in over 40 solo shows over the years with work in major public collections including  the National Gallery of Australia and Art Gallery of NSW. Thanks to everyone who came along!  I also filmed our conversation and will be uploading an edited version of this chat to the TWP YouTube channel in the coming months. Idris is represented by King Street Gallery in Sydney. Photo of Idris Murphy in his studio (2022) by me Current exhibition 'Idris Murphy: Backblocks', S.H.Ervin Gallery, Sydney, until 26 March 2023 Links Idris Murphy's website Idris Murphy at King Street Gallery Previous podcast interview with Idris Murphy: Episode 131 Henri Matisse Clip of the American writer I refer to in the episode at about 6:40 - Etel Adnan - on beauty  Susan Sontag - 'On Photography' Jeanette Winterson Annie Dillard Rose Wylie John Berger  The quote we refer to is from his book 'and our faces, my heart, as brief as photos' Bono - 'Surrender' Nick Cave Badger Bates Tickets to Artist Talk with Nick Stathopoulos at AGNSW Subscribe to the TWP monthly newsletter  Installation photo - S.H.Ervin Gallery (see below for individual works) 'Somewhere in France 1', 2017, acrylic and collage on aluminium, 151 x 141cm ANU Art Collection 'Somewhere in France 2', 2017, acrylic and collage on aluminium, 151 x 141cm ANU Art Collection 'Somewhere in France 3', 2017, acrylic and collage on aluminium, 151 x 141cm ANU Art Collection 'Half Moon at the New', 2015, acrylic on aluminium, 153 x 153cm Courtesy of the artist and King Street Gallery 'Weipa Harbour Storm', 2005, acrylic and collage on board, 120 x 120cm 'Low tide Boodery National Park', 2015, acrylic and collage on board, 150 x 150cm Private collection
3/18/202335 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ep 139: Yvette Coppersmith

For those of you interested in portraiture in Australia, Yvette Coppersmith needs no introduction.   She has painted dozens of portraits, including a collection of fascinating self-portraits, and is regularly shortlisted in the country's most competitive portrait awards. In 2018 she was awarded the one that would place her in Australian art history - the Archibald Prize. What has captured my attention more recently, though, are Yvette’s abstract works, particularly a body of work I saw in her exhibition ‘Presage’ at Sullivan + Strumpf in Sydney last year. They were thickly textured, swirling abstractions and how she came to create that show is as interesting as the paintings themselves. Yvette has been painting for over 20 years and her work is held in many public and private collections. In addition to winning the Archibald Prize, she has won the Metro 5 Art Award and has been a finalist multiple times in nearly every prestigious portrait prize in Australia, including the Doug Moran, Portia Geach, and Darling Portrait prizes. In this episode we follow her career from her early photorealistic works to her present-day experimentation with paint and genre, encompassing still lifes and interiors along the way. To hear the conversation click 'play' below the above photo. See below for images of the works we talk about in the show. Photograph of Yvette Coppersmith by Mel Savage Links Yvette Coppersmith's website Yvette Coppersmith on Instagram Yvette Coppersmith at Sullivan + Strumpf 'Presage' exhibition at Sullivan + Strumpf Roger Kemp 2019/20 retrospective at the National Gallery of Victoria Talking with Painters YouTube channel Sign up to the Talking with Painters newsletter 'Self-portrait after George Lambert', oil and acrylic on linen, 122 x 101.5cm, 2018 Winner Archibald Prize 2018 'Nude Self-portrait after Rah Fizelle', oil on linen, 91.5 x 66cm, 2016 Finalist, Portia Geach Memorial Award, 2016 'John Safran', oil on plywood, 120cm x 90cm, 2009 Archibald Prize finalist 2009 'John Safran', oil on plywood, 120cm x 90cm, 2009 Archibald Prize finalist 2009 'In the Garland, portrait of Paul Capsis', oil on linen, 22.5 x 111.5cm, 2007 Finalist, Archibald Prize, 2008 'Untitled Movement (Scarlet Lake)', oil on jute, 76.5 x 61cm, 2022 Photo: Matthew Stanton   'Untitled Movement (Triptych)', oil on jute, 3 x 122.5cm x 91.5cm Photo: Simon Hewson 'Arrangement with Grey and Yellow', oil on linen 61cm x 46cm , 2014 'Geranium and Succulents', oil on linen, 80cm x 59.5cm, 2015 Posthumous Portrait of Edith Morris, oil on linen, 86.5cm x 63.5cm, 2020 Photo: Matthew Stanton Collection of Melbourne Girls Grammar School  
2/27/202357 minutes, 13 seconds
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Ep 138: Anthony White

The gestural marks in Anthony White's work are often bold and demanding of the viewer's attention. These abstract works vary from swirling lines in saturated colour, to textured surfaces and more formal collaged constructions. What is not apparent on the surface of the canvas is the time the artist has spent reading, writing and researching in the lead-up to their creation. Newspapers and books play as much a role in his work as the paint itself and writing his own thoughts on social and political issues and current events are crucial to his creative process. In this podcast conversation we touch on those ideas but Anthony also makes many insightful observations about the creation itself. Born in Australia, Anthony is now Paris-based and is represented by several galleries in Europe and Australia. His first museum show, titled 'Mobilising Material', was held at the Mark Rothko Art Centre in Latvia in 2022. He also returned to Australia last year on a creative fellowship at the National Library of Australia where he researched Sidney Nolan‘s commissioned mural of the Eureka Stockade. (See below for a link to his presentation relating to that research) He has been awarded the Marten Bequest Travelling scholarship, amongst other residencies, and his work is held in public and private collections internationally. A video relating to this interview will be uploaded to the YouTube channel in the coming months. Click on 'play' below the above photo to hear the podcast episode. Photo supplied by the artist Links Website Anthony White on Instagram Anthony White at Metro Gallery Anthony White at Boullier Fine Art Anthony White at Artscape Luxembourg Mobilising Material Exhibition at the Mark Rothko Art Centre, Latvia  National Library of Australia Creative Fellowship presentation 2022 (YouTube) Click here for my US highlights Instagram reel  Subscribe to the TWP newsletter  'Lampedusa', 2019, oil and ripolin enamel on linen, 150 x 120cm 'The Landscape is never Innocent (after Mannalargenna)', 2018, oil and ripolin on linen Finalist and Highly Commended in 2018 Glover Prize 'Sanctuary' 2016, oil and shellac on linen, 120 x 100cm 'Federation Peak II', 2020, oil on linen, 150 x 120cm Finalist 2021 Glover Prize 'Ghost series XIII' 2022, acrylic and flash on linen, 90.5 x 90.5cm 'Proletariat', 2017, 91.5 x 91.5cm
2/2/202351 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 137: Paul Newton (part 2)

Most artists know that painting a portrait in a tradition where colour and form appear realistic takes years of training where trial and error play an important part. This is part 2 of my interview with leading portrait painter Paul Newton. He makes the analogy of a painter being like a cook and it's an appropriate one. And like a celebrity chef printing his secret recipes in a cookbook, Paul shares in this episode many of the lessons he's learnt through his years of experience. In the first of this two part conversation, Paul spoke with me about how he became an artist and the stories behind several of his stunning portraits. In this episode, we talk more about the creation of his paintings.  Amongst other things, we talk at length about colour, he shares the pitfalls when using photographic references, the challenges of painting backgrounds and he shares an interesting approach on how to see work with fresh eyes, something crucial for portraitists painting in a realistic style. Paul is a fifteen-time Archibald finalist (including twice People's Choice and Packing Room Prize winner), has 6 works in the National Portrait Gallery's collection and has painted dozens of commissions of notable people from politicians to movie stars. Although there are already some video clips of Paul talking with me on the Talking with Painters Instagram and Facebook pages, I’ll  be publishing a longer video on the YouTube channel in coming weeks. To hear the podcast episode click 'play' beneath the above photo. Links Click here for the TWP website if listening through your podcast app Hear Part 1 of this conversation here Paul Newton's website Paul Newton on Instagram Paul Newton on Facebook Robert Hannaford John Singer Sargent Diego Velazquez 'Pope Innocent X' by Diego Velazquez, Doria Pamphilj Gallery 'Lady Agnew of Lochnaw' (hi-res), John Singer Sargent, National Galleries of Scotland Graeme Inson  'Self portrait 2022', oil on linen, 35.5cm x 36cm Progress photos of 'Self Portrait 2022' The palette sheet Paul refers to at the beginning of the episode. ‘Portrait of Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness’oil on linen, 215 x 142.2cmFinalist Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2022 'Self portrait in lockdown, 2021' Finalist, Darling Portrait Prize 2022 ‘Maggie Tabberer 1999’ Oil on canvas, 213.5 x 106.5cm 'Our Lady of the Southern Cross - Help of Christian’ oil on Belgian linen 2011, 200 x 80cm Domus Australia chapel Rome 'St Mary of the Cross Mackillop', 2010 oil on Belgian linen 235 x 180cm, Domus Australia chapel, Rome Beethoven death mask study
12/28/202253 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 136: Paul Newton (part 1)

It was the 80s. Paul Newton had finished a science degree and was a singer in a band. He sensed, though, that this was not meant to be his life's work. 'I'm a bit of a perfectionist and unless I can do something really well I find it frustrating to do it at all'. So he decided to change course and he put that perfectionism to good use; he is now one of Australia’s most highly skilled and accomplished portrait painters. If you are interested in the Archibald prize,  you no doubt will have seen a Paul Newton portrait. He’s been a finalist 15 times, a People's Choice winner twice and Packing Room winner twice. But those portraits are just the tip of the iceberg. He has been painting the portraits of notable people for over 30 years, spanning the arts, business, law, sport, the church, the military and more. From Hugh Jackman to  Kylie Minogue, from former prime minister Bob Hawke to former governor general Sir William Deane, from David Gonski to Frank Lowy, Roy and HG to David Campese, Maggie Tabberer and even Saint Mary Mackillop.   Paul has six works in the National Portrait Gallery's collection, has been awarded art prizes in the US and his many  commissions include 32 pictures for the interior of the Domus Australia Chapel in Rome. In this first of a two-part episode we talk about how he became an artist and the stories behind many works including his portraits of Hugh Jackman and Deborra Lee-Furness, Roy and HG and Maggie Tabberer. In the next episode we'll dive into other works but also talk more about technique including an in-depth discussion about his use of colour. To hear the episode click on play beneath the above feature photo. Latest YouTube videos and Newsletter Signup link Sign up for the Talking with Painters newsletter Tributes flow for Nicholas Harding Maria Stoljar takes you to the opening of Sydney Modern (3 minute video) Richard Lewer talks with Maria Stoljar about his commissioned work for the AGNSW Links Paul Newton's website Paul Newton on Instagram Nigel Thomson Norman Rockwell Max Meldrum Roy and HG Maggie Tabberer Hugh Jackman Deborra-Lee Furness David Campese John Singer Sargent 'Portrait of Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness' oil on linen, 215 x 142.2cm Finalist Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2022 'Roy and HG (John Doyle and Greig Pickhaver)' Oil on canvas 137.5 x 124 cm Finalist Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2001, Packing Room Prize winner, People's Choice winner (L) 'Maggie Tabberer 1999' Oil on canvas, 213.5 x 106.5cm (R) 'Maggie Tabberer 2020' Oil on linen, 213.5 x 130.5 cm 'David Campese II', 2000, oil on canvas, 125.0 cm x 115.0 cm Collection: National Portrait Gallery The Beethoven death mask study which Paul talks about at 27min 15sec
12/20/20221 hour, 11 minutes, 29 seconds
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Ep 135: Belinda Street

It's hard to define what makes a good landscape painting but, if you investigate the backstory, you might find the artist has a close connection with that place. In Belinda Street's October show at Straitjacket Artspace, 'Keep your feet on the ground and your thoughts at lofty heights', her bond with the alpine landscape was obvious, particularly with Mt Kosciuszko in NSW. Her repeated exploration of that mountain has led to exciting reimaginings in paint. A winner of one of Australia's most significant landscape painting prizes, the Paddington Art Prize, Belinda evokes a reverence for this natural environment through expressive mark making and dramatic use of colour. It was this body of work which we talked about in front of an audience as part of the Newcastle Art Gallery Society art program and which I'm bringing to you in this podcast episode. We also touched on Belinda's early career, the representational and the abstract in her work, juggling motherhood and an art practice, as well as many aspects of her process including colour preferences, how she sees work with fresh eyes and ways of achieving a flow state in the studio. The conversation was recorded at Newcastle City Hall on 5 October 2022.  Click 'play' beneath the above photo to hear the interview. You can also see my YouTube video here of Belinda at Straitjacket Artspace which we filmed the day before our talk. Upcoming shows Group show 'Darlings' at Curatorial & Co, Sydney, 30 November - 10 December 2022 Links Belinda Street's website Belinda Street on Instagram Exhibition at Straitjacket Artspace Toby Cedar https://youtu.be/5Lh5gM2GsSM 'Yellow Box Gully', 2019, oil on canvas, 100 x 150cm Winner 2019 Paddington Art Prize 'Organ Pipes 2', oil on board, 51 x 61cm 'Along the Organ Pipes Track 3', oil on canvas, 100 x 150cm 'Walking Kunanyi 2', oil on canvas, 40 x 40cm 'Renewal', acrylic on board, 40.6 x 30.5cm 'Parrots of Central Australia' (12 panels in total) this panel: Major Mitchells Cockatoo, acrylic on canvas 'Mr Toby Cedar', oil on canvas, 180 x 150cm
11/27/202246 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 134: Nicholas Harding (2019)

We lost one of our greatest artists last night. Nicholas Harding - landscape, still life and portrait painter - and my heart sank when I heard the news.  It’s early afternoon and already there are many tributes coming through in the newspapers and social media. It’s clear he will be greatly missed by many. When I started this podcast, Nicholas Harding was on my wish list and when he agreed to an interview three years later I felt like I had hit the jackpot. I was right. He was one of the most  authentic, warm and thoughtful guests I’ve interviewed and it was a privilege to meet him in his studio.  Although Nicholas was a highly acclaimed painter with sell out shows, he spoke with me in a grounded and humble way. He was humorous and not afraid to reveal moments of self doubt. He was also open about the cancer treatment he’d undergone the previous year and, in what seems typical of his nature, he was more interested in sympathising with those who were worse off than himself.  It’s this interview which was first published in 2019 that I’m posting again to the podcast. I also made a video from our conversations that day. (link below). There is no doubt that Nicholas will be remembered as one of Australia’s most gifted painters of the 21st century. He won many major art prizes including the Archibald prize (in which he was a finalist 19 times) and a few months ago he won the Wynne prize with his painting 'Eora', one of the most complex, immersive landscapes that you will ever see, manipulating impasto paint to represent nature yet still retaining an astonishing abstract quality. He was particularly interested in light; how it came through differently depending on the foliage, how it  landed on the ground, how it created various kinds of shadows and how different it was to the light in England where he spent the first nine years of his life. I spoke with him at the Art Gallery of NSW shortly after he won the prize and that conversation is a video (link below) and is included in episode 127 of the podcast. Nicholas has also been recognised for his wonderful drawings and in this episode we talked about works he made from life of well known actors while they were in theatre rehearsals and performances. Those drawings were later published in the book ‘From the Wings’. Nicholas' works are held in many public institutions including the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of NSW, the National Portrait gallery and the Art Gallery of South Australia. My condolences to Nicholas' wife Lynne and son Sam. Nicholas was remembered by family and friends a few weeks after this episode was published and I was honoured to be asked by his wife Lynne to film the afternoon where moving tributes were made by Lynne and his son Sam as well as artists, actors and musicians who knew him well. You can see that video below. Vale Nicholas. Thank you for making this world a more beautiful place. Video Links My conversation with Nicholas in his studio (2019) My interview with Nicholas at the Art Gallery of NSW (2022) My Instagram walk through of the exhibition 'Landscape and Birds' at Olsen Gallery, 2020 My YouTube video of the exhibition 'From the Wings' at Olsen Gallery, 2020 My YouTube video of tributes to Nicholas Harding in Sydney https://youtu.be/ZcDwuWpE3QI   https://youtu.be/NWezJHrg9P4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfSo9xcFrEQ&t=81s  
11/2/20221 hour, 17 minutes, 31 seconds
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Ep 133: Fred Fowler

There is something mesmerising about Fred Fowler’s paintings. The multitude of small, colour-filled shapes scattered across a monochrome background raise a lot of questions. Is that a pink cat? A cactus? An alien? Next to a mobile phone tower? Are they related? Other amorphous elements seem purely abstract but still somehow evoke a response; a memory, an emotion. The viewer is taken into an alternate space where objects might be floating or fixed but often not identifiable. Ultimately it's a sensory experience which demands multiple viewings so it's not surprising that these works fly off gallery walls in sell-out shows. Fred's work is held in the National Gallery of Australia and, although his roots are in graffiti art and graphic design, as soon as he began his studies at the Victorian College of the Arts it became clear to him the direction he should take. In this interview he talks about that transition, the artists who have influenced him and the thoughts behind his work, openly sharing the struggles and doubts. It was a revealing and enjoyable conversation.  Fred is represented by Sophie Gannon Gallery and Jan Murphy Gallery. To hear the podcast interview click on play beneath the above feature photo. A short Youtube video of Fred in his Melbourne studio will be uploaded to the Talking with Painters YouTube channel in the coming weeks. Photo supplied by the artist Upcoming shows Solo show at Sophie Gannon Gallery, Melbourne, 2023 Links Fred Fowler website Fred Fowler on Instagram Fred Fowler at Jan Murphy Gallery Fred Fowler at Sophie Gannon Gallery Banksy 'The Element of Crime', Lars von Trier 'Cut Piece' - Yoko Ono Francis Bacon Ramellzee (YouTube documentary) 'In the Making, artist series' which includes part of Fred's video work 'Plc Ntrvw' Digital work 'Samizdat 4' (cropped) 2021 as appears on Instagram 'Mooloomba Rd, Point Lookout' (2020), synthetic polymer paint and oil paint on wood panel,  90 x 100cm   'In this sunset' (2021), synthetic polymer paint on wood panel, 100 x 90 cm 'Overgrown' 2020, synthetic polymer paint and oil paint on wood panel, 100 x 90 cm 'Tarkine (study)' (2019), oil paint and gold leaf on wood panel, 70 x 60 cm 'Above Cylinder Beach' (2018), oil stick on wood panel, 60 x 70cm Still from 'Samizdat 4' 2021, digital, looping See video on Instagram (cropped) here Dimensions: 1078 × 606 Duration: 0:15 Blockchain: Ethereum 'Cultural amnesia (Liquid State)' 2012, spraypaint and synthetic polymer paint on wood panel, 100 x 130cm
10/15/202253 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 132: Jacqui Stockdale and ‘Heads of the Family’

Jacqui Stockdale is a previous podcast guest . I asked her back onto the show after I saw a series of moving portraits she posted on Instagram.  Her stepfather, George Stirling, was nearing the end of his life and Jacqui was painting the portraits of family and friends who were visiting over that difficult time. George passed away in June.  The works were swiftly painted alla prima, mostly in one sitting from life or an iPhone image, and the resulting group of over twenty portraits is titled 'Heads of the Family'. In this episode Jacqui talks with me about the experience of painting those works which include a self-portrait and portrayals of George from life. Jacqui’s work crosses many disciplines which defy description spanning from painting, sculpture, photography, collage and performance and her imagery includes portrayals of Ned Kelly, lots of masks, naked figures and horses heads. She has painted the portrait throughout her career and in 2018 was one of only twenty artists to be  commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery to mark its 20th year.  Jacqui is represented by Olsen Gallery in Sydney. Current and upcoming shows, as well as images of paintings we talk about in this episode, are listed below. Above portrait photo of Jacqui Stockdale by Ilona Nelson (cropped) Current and upcoming exhibitions 'Nudes of Chong', Rose Chong Costumier, Gertrude St, Melbourne, current until 24 September 2022 'The Outlaw's Inn', Benalla Art Gallery, Benalla, Victoria, November 2022 Links Subscribe to the Talking with Painters Newsletter Jacqui Stockdale website Jacqui Stockdale on Instagram Jacqui Stockdale at Olsen Gallery Previous podcast interview with Jacqui Rick Stirling, George's brother George Stirling Jacqui Stockdale, Self Portrait Drawings of George Stirling Jacqui Stockdale's mother, Maree Stockdale George Stirling's sister Trish Stirling 'An artist practising' - self portrait  
9/20/202244 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ep 131: Idris Murphy

'Colour, for me, is the main game' Idris Murphy tells me as we sit in his studio in Sydney's southern suburb of Kurnell, a stone's throw from Botany Bay. On various easels around the room are works in progress. His distinctive energetic brushstrokes, often using metallic paint, the carefully placed collage pieces and thin lines scratched into the wet surface are just part of what makes up his arresting work. And yes, colour takes centre stage - in this case bringing life to the landscape of the Northern Territory's East MacDonnell ranges which he has visited and revisited. Idris Murphy is one of Australia's leading landscape painters and his work sits between representation and abstraction. He was inspired from an early age by the work of Matisse but, as he later explored what it meant to paint the Australian landscape, it was the way the Indigenous artists saw the land that influenced him to take into account both traditions. In recognition of his career, the survey show 'Idris Murphy: BACKBLOCKS' has just opened at the Drill Hall Gallery in Canberra. Curated by gallery director Terence Maloon, the exhibition includes important works from the last 30 years of more than 50 years of work. The exhibition will also travel to Orange Regional Gallery and S.H Ervin Gallery and a monograph will be available in early 2023. Idris has won the Gallipoli Art prize, has exhibited in 40 solo shows and group shows including a previous major travelling survey exhibition in 2009-2010. His work is held in the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of NSW and other state and corporate collections. His love of literature, poetry and philosophy also comes through clearly in our conversation and you can find references to the works he mentioned in the podcast episode in the links below. I’ll also be uploading a short video we filmed on the day of the interview onto the Youtube channel and this website in the coming weeks.  Idris is represented by King Street Gallery on William in Sydney. To hear the podcast interview, click 'play' beneath the above feature photo Upcoming shows and talks Survey show, 'BACKBLOCKS', Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, August 19 to October 16, 2022The above survey show will then travel to Orange Regional Gallery and S.H Ervin Gallery Group show 'Earth Canvas', Australian National Museum, Canberra 25 August to 20 October 2022Solo show 'NOW AND THEN' Mitchell Fine Art, Brisbane, 18 October to 5 November 2022 Links Idris Murphy (website)Idris Murphy at King Street Gallery on William George Steiner - 'Real Presences'Hilary Spurling - ‘The Unknown Matisse’Lloyd ReesKevin ConnorPatrick White Colin LanceleyPhilip Guston John McDonaldVideo by Sean O'Brien 'Idris Murphy – Empyrean: scattering of stars'Annie Dillard Frank AuerbachKen WhissonJack Green (ANU art collection)John BergerFowler's Gap Research Station - UNSWBadger Bates (Artist Profile magazine)Christopher Neve ‘Unquiet landscape’Giorgio Morandi Piero Della FrancescaAlberto GiacomettiRoss LaurieMartin Buber - ‘I and Thou’ Gallipoli Evening, 2013, acrylic and collage on board, 130 x 120cmWinner Gallipoli Art Prize 2014 Evening Tide 2020, acrylic & collage on aluminium, 141 x 151cmImage courtesy of the artist and King Street Gallery on William Afternoon to Evening Fowlers Gap 2009 acrylic & collage on board 120 x 110cmImage courtesy of the artist and King Street Gallery on William Somewhere in France 2 2017 acrylic & collage on aluminium 151 x 141cmImage courtesy of the artist and King Street Gallery on William Works in progress which we talk about in the podcast episode at about 1hr 12mins Work in progress which we talk about in the podcast at about 1hr 22mins
8/25/20221 hour, 44 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 130: Luke Sciberras (uncut)

For over 25 years, previous podcast guest Luke Sciberras has been immersing himself in landscapes across the world, returning to his studio to draw on the smaller works created from life. His paintings are bold and have a commanding presence. Many of those works, as well as drawings and prints, have been brought together for the first time in two excellent survey shows. The exhibitions, titled 'Luke Sciberras: Side of the Sky', are running concurrently at Campbelltown Arts Centre and Bathurst Regional Art Gallery in NSW and include works sourced from public and private collections around the world. A beautiful monograph also accompanies the exhibitions (link below). The shows end on 7 August 2022. I interviewed Luke in 2019 in his studio in Hill End, NSW - an old stone church built in the 19th century - and the conversation we recorded is episode 64 of the podcast. I also recorded video on that day and this episode is the full audio recording from that video. The popular 4 minute YouTube video made from the recording can be seen on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel. Luke has exhibited in over 40 solo shows, his work is held in the collection of the Art Gallery of NSW and many regional galleries and in corporate and private collections. This conversation was recorded in the lead up to Luke’s show with his Sydney gallery, King Street Gallery on William, which was called ‘Rose into View’. To hear this episode click on 'play' beneath the above photo. Current exhibition Survey exhibition ‘Side of the Sky’ Campbelltown Arts Centre and Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, current until 7 August 2022 Links Luke Sciberras websiteLuke Sciberras on InstagramLuke Sciberras at King Street Gallery on WilliamLuke Sciberras at Scott Livesey GalleriesTalking with Painters YouTube video ‘Luke Sciberras talks with Maria Stoljar in his studio’Talking with Painters podcast episode 64Maria Stoljar Instagram video at Campbelltown Arts Centre's 'Luke Sciberras: Side of the Sky' Monograph 'Luke Sciberras: Side of the Sky' https://youtu.be/htLK3TzbUNo 'White Christmas, Bell, NSW', 2020oil on board160 x 244 cm; 162.5 x 246.5 cm framedImage: Art Gallery of NSW website Finalist Wynne prize 2020 'North Facing, Belle Ile', 2018oil on board120.00 x 160.00 cmImage: Scott Livesey Galleries website 'Shelly Beach (Portsea)'2020oil on board120.00 x 120.00 cmImage: Scott Livesey Galleries website
7/25/202222 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 129: Daniel Boyd

Most artists remember their first show. Maybe they were lucky enough to sell a few works, usually to family and friends. Daniel Boyd remembers his. It was in the year he graduated from university, 2005, but family and friends didn’t stand a chance. The entire exhibition was bought by the National Gallery of Australia.  Daniel describes himself in those university days in Canberra as ‘a shy young First Nations man from Far North Queensland’. That reserved nature still comes through even though I was speaking with him at the exhibition 'Treasure Island' which celebrates his career with over 80 works in one of Australia's most important art institutions, the Art Gallery of NSW. Daniel's First Nations heritage is central to his work. His ancestors were part of the Stolen Generation. Forced to let go of their culture and language, they lived in fear that if they shared it with their children they would be taken away from them. In an interview in the Gallery's Look magazine Daniel said that that forced  withholding of culture meant that he always felt there was something missing and it was at university that he tried to make sense of that. One of the striking aspects of Daniel's work is the way he both reveals and obscures his subject. Using a pointillist technique, he places a multitude of translucent dots over the image creating a series of convex lenses, as he refers to them, and while you can see the image through these lenses the rest of the image is painted out. Although this creates a visually alluring effect, there’s more to this technique than just the physical use of the material. There are concepts behind it which relate to ways of seeing and perception and which are interestingly explored in the book accompanying the exhibition (see link below). The show has been curated by Isobel Parker Philip, Senior Curator of Contemporary Australian Art and Erin Vink, curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art, both at the Art Gallery of NSW. Daniel has exhibited in over 30 solo shows, has won the Bulgari Award amongst others, and his work is held in many other public institutions including the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and the Natural History Museum in London. Click play beneath the above feature photo to hear the podcast episode. Current exhibition 'Treasure Island', Art Gallery of NSW, current to 29 January 2023 Links Daniel Boyd on Instagram Daniel Boyd at Roslyn Oxley9 GalleryEdouard GlissantDaniel Boyd: 'Treasure Island', (book accompanying the exhibition) at the Art Gallery bookshop also available through many other online booksellers Untitled 2014 , oil, pastel, archival glue on canvas 315 x 224 cm Collection Art Gallery of New South Wales Winner of the Bulgari Art Award 2014 Photo: AGNSW 'Untitled (FS)' 2016, 215.0 x 343.0 cmoil, charcoal and archival glue on linenCollection: Art Gallery of NSW 'Untitled (PI3)' 2013 Oil and archival glue on linen 214 x 300 cm Private Collection 'We Call them Pirates Out Here' 2006 oil on canvas 226 H x 276 W x 3.5 D cm Museum of Contemporary Art Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the Coe and Mordant families, 2006 Daniel Boyd Untitled (WWDTCG) 2020 Oil, charcoal, pastel and archival glue on canvas 87 x 87 cm Collection of Anthony Medich, Sydney Installation view of the Daniel Boyd: Treasure Island exhibition on display at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, 4 June 2022 – January 2023, photo © AGNSW, Jenni Carter.
7/3/202221 minutes, 42 seconds
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Ep 128: Sam Leach

In 2010 Sam Leach won the Archibald and Wynne Prizes, two of Australia's most famous awards for portraiture and landscape painting, becoming only the third person in the prizes' history to win both in the same year. The two artists to achieve this rare distinction before him were 20th century greats Sir William Dobell and Brett Whiteley. I remember seeing those two small paintings hanging in the Art Gallery of NSW and being struck by their beauty and exquisite detail. The debate surrounding his Wynne Prize painting that year, which caused a small media storm, is something we dive into in this episode. I've been intrigued by Sam’s work ever since then. His art delves into the areas of science and nature, and in more recent years, he's used Artificial Intelligence and machine learning to initiate his paintings. It was fascinating to hear him talk about this approach. With a distinctly surrealist feel, Sam's work also reveals his continued interest in the Dutch masters of the 17th century which began in his early career. In his current show at Sullivan+Strumpf in Sydney, moody utopian landscapes team up with incongruous elements such as huge 'bubbles' and globular and tubular forms often hinting at or including a human presence. Other works depict animals, particularly polar bears, created from machine learning. These paintings, and the rather comical-looking Polar Bear Detector devised by Sam (where you can test how closely you resemble a polar bear) encourage us to see ourselves and the creatures with which we share the planet from a new perspective. The exhibition, with the unsettling title  ‘Everything Will Probably Be Fine’, continues until 16 July 2022. Sam has exhibited in 30 solo shows nationally and across the globe, has won several other awards apart from the Archibald and Wynne, and his work is held by many private and public collections including Australia's National Portrait Gallery. A short video of Sam talking about his work will be uploaded to the Talking with Painters YouTube channel in the coming weeks. Scroll down for images of the works we discuss in this episode. Press play to hear our conversation and scroll down for images of the works we talk about in this episode. Above feature photo supplied by the artist Current shows 'Everything is going to be fine', solo show, Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney, until 16 July 2022'Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes Exhibition', Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, until 28 August Links Sam Leach (website)Sam Leach (Instagram)Sam Leach at Sullivan+StrumpfSam Leach talks with Professor Kate Crawford (Sullivan+Strumpf magazine article)Professor Mandyam Svrinivasan talks about his work and his portrait by Sam Leach in the National Portrait Gallery (National Portrait Gallery video) 'Machine-assisted memory of Harewood Farm, Meadows', 2022oil on linen, 51 x 51 cmFinalist Wynne Prize 2022, Art Gallery of NSWImage: AGNSW website 'Tim Minchin', 2010oil and resin on wood, 60 x 38 cmWinner of the Archibald Prize 2010Images: AGNSW website 'Proposal for landscaped cosmos', 2010 oil and resin on wood, 32.2 x 29.9 cmWinner of the Wynne Prize 2010, Art Gallery of NSW Images: AGNSW website 'Large Bubble', 2022oi on linen, 240 x 175cmImage courtesy the artist and Sullivan+Strumpf 'Polar Bear With Optimised Bananas', 2022oil on linen, 51 x 51cmImage courtesy the artist and Sullivan+Strumpf 'Polar Bear Detection I', 2022 oil on linen, 51 x 51 cmImage courtesy the artist and Sullivan+Strumpf 'Professor Mandyam Srinivasan', 2014oil and resin on plywood (frame: 65.5 cm x 50.5 cm, support: 61.0 cm x 46.0 cm)Collection: National Portrait Gallery 'Two Bubbles', 2022, oil on linen, 51 x 51cm. Image courtesy the artist and Sullivan+Strumpf
6/13/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 127: Blak Douglas, Nicholas Harding, Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro

It's that time of the year! The winners of the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes have been announced at the Art Gallery of New South Wales and in this episode you'll hear my interviews with each of those artists about their winning works: Blak Douglas (Archibald Prize)Nicholas Harding (Wynne Prize)Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro (Sulman Prize) The Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition at the Art Gallery of NSW runs until 28 August 2022 and will then travel to Victoria and regional NSW until July 2023. Congratulations to all the winners and finalists! Links Blak Douglas - episode 68 Talking with Painters (podcast and YouTube video)Blak Douglas in his studio - TWP YouTube ChannelBlak Douglas delivering his Archibald winning painting on the loading dock - TWP YouTube channelNicholas Harding - episode 65 Talking with Painters (podcast and YouTube video)Nicholas Harding in his studio - TWP YouTube ChannelClaire Healy and Sean Cordeiro (website) Blak Douglas, 'Moby Dickens', synthetic polymer paint on linen, 300 x 200 cm Winner of the Archibald Prize 2022© the artist image © AGNSW, Mim Stirling Nicholas Harding,  'Eora', oil on linen, 196.5 x 374.8 cm Winner of the Wynne Prize 2022© the artist, image © AGNSW, Mim Stirling Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, 'Raiko and Shuten-dōji', acrylic gouache, jute and tape on helicopter shell, 159.5 x 120 cm Winner of the Sulman Prize 2022© the artists, image © AGNSW, Mim Stirling
5/25/202223 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 126: Del Kathryn Barton – ‘the women who fell to earth’

One of Australia’s most significant artists returns to the podcast! Del Kathryn Barton spoke with me the day before the opening of her spectacular exhibition ‘the women who fell to earth’ at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, showing until 28 May 2022. Internationally renowned, Del is well known in Australia for having won the country's most famous art prize twice - the Archibald Prize - and her works are held in many private collections and public institutions. This year the National Gallery of Australia acquired her largest single-panel work she has made to date, 'my heart is blazing 11 hours', and we talk about the work in this episode. Although difficult to describe in words, Del's work often depicts a female sensuality which is at the same time beautiful and confrontational - set in an intricately detailed imaginary world. She is also a self-described optimist and the work hanging in this exhibition is a testament to that, with vivid colour bursting from the canvas. We also discuss other art forms she has recently been engaged in, including a major project she has been developing over the last 4 years which has now come to fruition. Del's first feature film 'Blaze', a very personal work which she directed and co-wrote, is debuting at the Tribeca Film festival in June and it's one of only 10 films selected in the International Narrative competition. It has also been selected for Official Competition in the upcoming Sydney film festival, again one of only ten films selected internationally. You'll also hear about the origins of her arresting timber sculptures included in the exhibition. Large shell forms inlaid with exquisite materials which reference very personal themes. To hear the conversation press 'play' beneath the above feature photo. You can hear the previous 2019 podcast interview where Del talks about her life and art here. Scroll down for a short video of highlights of this conversation and footage of the exhibition on the Talking With Painters YouTube channel.  Current exhibition 'the women who fell to earth' at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 6 May to 28 May 2022'Blaze at the Tribeca Film Festival on 9, 10 and 17 June 2022'Blaze' at the Sydney Film Festival, 17, 18 and 19 June 2022 Links to things we talk about on the show Del Kathryn Barton on InstagramDel Kathryn Barton at Roslyn Oxley 9Del Kathryn Barton at Albertz Benda Talking With Painters YouTube channel'Blaze' at the Tribeca Film Festival'Blaze' at the Sydney Film Festival https://youtu.be/_y8sm9WuHRI the women who have gathered for the earth, 2021-22acrylic on linen203 x 353 cmSource: Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery website the women who came from the earth, 2022acrylic on linen203 x 303 cm her earth nature, 2022acrylic on linen243 x 203 cmSource: Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery website of her own nature, 2022Cambia Ash with Cambia Ash and Rock Maple inlay, Abalone Blue and White Fresh Water mother of pearl inlay, hardwax oil, blackened steel190 x 100 x 80 cm
5/11/202240 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 125: Steve Lopes -‘Encountered’

See video highlights of this conversation on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel It's not often that an artist gets to see almost a quarter of a century of their work in one space but in this episode Steve Lopes tells me what that feels like. The impressive survey exhibition 'Encountered', curated by Kon Gouriotis and now showing at the S.H.Ervin Gallery in Sydney, brings together 120 of Steve Lopes' works including over 80 paintings and drawings, sketchbooks, prints and collages. This is a must-see exhibition especially for those interested in figurative painting. In my previous interview with Steve, he expressed the view that to be successful, a painting requires a gritty element - a bit of 'poison'. When I visited the exhibition a couple of weeks ago, though, it wasn't only that grittiness that struck me but also the humanity evident in the works, not only in the figures but also in the environments they inhabit. Desolate wartime landscapes hinting at the loss of human life, a dog wandering across a suburban backlot, figures enigmatically positioned on a coastal landscape; these scenes exude an air of melancholy but often also a familiarity. Steve has exhibited in close to 40 solo shows across Australia and in London and Hong Kong. He has won the Gallipoli Art Prize, the Kings School Art Prize and has been shortlisted in many others. His work is held in the National Gallery of Australia, the Parliament House Collection, the State Library of NSW and many other public and private collections. We met at the S.H.Ervin gallery as the exhibition was being installed and we talked about a selection of works (pictured below), the story behind them as well as insights into his practice. The show continues at the S.H.Ervin Gallery until 8 May 2022 and will then travel to Orange Regional Gallery where it will run from 21 May. To hear the podcast episode click 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Time stamps for each painting 3:30 Trench Life8:25 Aurora Track12:45 Creek Bed Study16:00 Uncommon Figures27:15 Warren Ellis etching and painting29:49 Railway Club Exhibition details Survey exhibition 'Encountered', S.H Ervin Gallery, Sydney, 26 March to 8 May 2022, then touring to:Survey exhibition 'Encountered', Orange Regional Gallery, 21 May to 17 July 2022 Links Steve Lopes websiteLopes at Stella Downer Fine ArtLopes at Mitchell Fine ArtLopes at Queenscliff GalleryLopes at Penny Contemporary Talking with Painters 2019 interview with Steve Lopes Guy Warren Euan MacleodLuke Sciberras'Aesop' by Jusepe di Ribera acquired by the AGNSW https://youtu.be/TYVbEWHnUbc 'Trench Life', 2015, oil on canvas, 130 x 180cm 'Aurora Track', 2017, 130 x 130 cm, oil on canvas 'Exposed Wood, Mont St Quentin', 2017, 140 x 160 cm, oil on canvas, Gallipoli Club CollectionWinner 2018 Gallipoli Art Prize 'Creek Bed Study', 2018, oil on canvas, 90 x 90cm 'Uncommon Figures', 2020, 152 x 153 cm, oil on canvas 'Warren Ellis', 2017, oil on canvas, 180 x 130cm 'Warren Ellis', 2017, intaglio etching on Hahnemühle paper, 70 x 50cm 'Railway Club', 2020, oil on canvas, 100 x 120cm
4/10/202236 minutes, 12 seconds
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Ep 124: Marikit Santiago

Marikit Santiago is one of Australia's most impressive artists, combining a skilful representational painting technique with powerful imagery. Mythology, Disney, her Filipino heritage, religion, guilt, motherhood and family are examples of the subject matter she draws from and her upcoming show, 'For us sinners' at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in Sydney, is set to contain some of the most impactful work she has produced to date. What's equally striking is the contrast between her painting style and the surface on which she often chooses to paint: found cardboard, typically in the form of flattened packing boxes complete with rips, creases and packing tape! Marikit won the Art Gallery of NSW's Sulman prize in 2020 with her work ‘The Divine’, a painting of her three children who were also her collaborators. We talk in this episode about how they contribute to her practice and why that collaboration is so important to her work. Apart from winning the Sulman, Marikit has been a finalist in many other prizes including the Archibald prize twice.  She has exhibited in 6 solo shows and her upcoming exhibition at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art is her first institutional show. It is curated by Micheal Do and opens on 26 March 2022. We recorded this conversation in Marikit's garage studio with her stunning recent work, Thy Kingdom Come, leaning precariously against the easel. Rich with cultural and religious symbolism, as well as quite a few cartoon characters, the complex painting had been finished the day before our interview, after nine months' work. To hear the podcast episode click 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Scroll down for a short video of Marikit in her studio from the Talking with Painters YouTube channel . Current and upcoming exhibition Solo exhibition 'For us sinners', 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Sydney, 26 March to 15 May 2022 Archibald Prize 2021, currently showing at Cowra Regional Art Gallery, NSW, until 1 May 2022 Links Marikit SantiagoMarikit Santiago on Instagram Egon SchieleRodel TapayaJojit SolanoBalikbayan BoxAida Tomescu video https://youtu.be/C2hpafMF09g Thy Kingdom Come, 2021 – 2022, interior paint, acrylic, oil, pyrography, pen, gold leaf on found cardboard (pen and paint markings by Santi Mateo Santiago and Sarita Santiago), collaboration with Maella Santiago, 167cm x 307cm. Courtesy of the artist and The Something Machine, Bellport, New York. Photo credit: Garry Trinh Tagsibol/tagsabong, 2019, acrylic, oil, pyrography, pen and paint on found cardboard144.5 x 214 cmFinalist, Sulman Prize, 2019, Art Gallery of NSW Filipiniana (self-portrait in collaboration with Maella Santiago Pearl), acrylic, interior paint, pen and oil on found cardboard110.5 x 100.7 cmPhoto: Garry TrinhFinalist Archibald Prize AGNSW 2021 The divine, acrylic, oil, pen, pyrography and 18ct gold leaf on ply179.5 x 120.5 cmWinner Sir John Sulman Prize, AGNSW, 2020 The Serpent and the Swan, 2021, interior paint, acrylic, pyrography, oil and Dutch metal gold leaf on found cardboard, 162cm x 77cm x 2cm.Photo: Garry Trinh The Serpent and the Swan, 2021 interior paint, acrylic, pyrography, oil and Dutch metal gold leaf on found cardboard, 162cm x 77cm x 2cm.Photo: Garry Trinh
3/21/202258 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 123: Summer Series – Tom Carment

I interviewed the acclaimed artist Tom Carment for the podcast in 2019 and this episode is the extended audio recording from video I filmed in his studio. A lot was going on creatively for Tom at the time. It was at about the same time as his book ‘Womerah Lane: Lives and Landscapes’ was released and his solo show at King Street gallery in Sydney was about to open. As soon as I arrived at his Womerah Lane terrace I saw that it was overtaken by preparations for that show. Once Tom has created his work he then makes their frames from beautiful Tasmanian blackwood and the frames were in various states of completion throughout the dining area and the studio. By coincidence, I’m publishing this episode as Tom is going through the very same process in the lead up to his next show with King Street Gallery which opens on 22 March 2022. It's taken over two months to make the frames. They are works of art in themselves with each corner joined with wooden keys and he thinks carefully about which work would best suit the timber of each unique frame. When I spoke with Tom he had been living in Adelaide where he and his wife Jan had pared back their belongings and rented a one-bedroom worker's cottage where they had only intended to stay for a year. But since then Covid took hold and his upcoming show is called ‘Two years in South Australia’. It's a beautiful body of work and what struck me in particular was a series of exquisite works of the lighthouse on Corny Point, Yorke peninsula, where he camped for several weeks and which he observed and painted at different times of the day. Tom has won numerous art prizes (including the Gallipoli, Mosman and NSW Parliament Plein Air Painting Prize) and has been shortlisted countless times in others including the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes and the Salon des Refuses. He has exhibited in over 25 solo shows and his work is held in public and private collections internationally. ‘Womerah Lane’, the latest of several books he has written, was shortlisted in the NSW Premier’s literary awards last year. You can see the edited video version of this recording on my YouTube channel here and listen to the previous podcast episode (ep 78) where Tom talks with me about his life and how he became an artist here. To hear this podcast episode click on 'play' beneath the above photo. Upcoming show Solo show 'Two years in South Australia' at King Street Gallery, Sydney, 22 March to xx April 2022 Links Tom Carment websiteTom Carment at King Street Gallery 'Womerah Lane: Lives and Landscapes'YouTube Video of Tom Carment edited from this recording https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcvytTVt3Is 'Corny Point Lighthouse II', oil on marine ply, 16 x 21cm 'Yellowtail Mackeral on Robert's plate', oil on linen, 30.5 x 38cm 'Plane Tree, Mount Lofty, winter morning', oil on marine ply, 30.5 x 38cm 'Returning surfer, Berry Bay', oil on linen, 25 x 30cm 'Sugar Bananas', oil on linen, 25 x 30cm Works mentioned in the podcast episode Yellow tail and snapper paintingsat 5:45 of the podcast episode One of the typewriter paintings - discussed at 7:45 of the episode'Sally’s Underwood', oil on linen, 2017, 41 x 51cm Mount Lofty paintings - discussed at 10:25 Piccadilly road - Adelaide Hills paintings discussed at 12:15 Portrait of James Scanlon in the studio - discussed at 12:45 'Katoomba portrait – James Scanlon' oil on linen, 32 x 25 cmFinalist in the Archibald prize 2019, Art Gallery of NSW
2/27/202215 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 122: Summer Series – Nicole Kelly

This is the second episode of my summer series where I’m bringing you longer conversations with past podcast guests, from recordings when taking video of the artists for the Talking with Painters YouTube channel. The video of this episode's fabulous artist, Nicole Kelly, is the second most watched on the channel, which currently has over 150 videos*. Nicole Kelly is an acclaimed Sydney artist, having won multiple art prizes, and you can find out more about her career and how she became an artist in my original 2019 podcast interview (episode 75).  In this episode she talks about working en plein air, how she sources colour for her work, the importance of making mistakes and lots more. Her next solo show ‘Opacity of Time’ with her Melbourne gallery, This Is No Fantasy, opens on 25 February 2022 and I’ve included a selection of the exciting works going into that show below. Nicole also has a solo show coming up in August with Arthouse Gallery in Sydney and her work will be included in a curated show ‘Quintet: 5 southern Sydney Artists’ at Hazelhurst Arts Centre in September. Its hard to explain what I love about Nicole's work but there’s a kind of mystery and romance to her paintings through her use of colour and mark which draws me in every time. To hear this episode press 'play' beneath the above feature photo. * The most watched video is the first 'loading dock' video where I interviewed entrants to the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes at the Art Gallery of NSW in 2019. Link to the YouTube channel in links below. Upcoming shows Solo show, 'Opacity of Time', This Is No Fantasy, Melbourne, opening 25 February, 2022Solo show, Arthouse Gallery, Sydney, opening 18 August 2022Group show 'Quintet: 5 Southern Sydney artists', Hazelhurst Arts Centre, opening 10 September 2022 Links Nicole Kelly (website)Nicole Kelly (Instagram)Nicole Kelly at This is No FantasyNicole Kelly at Arthouse GalleryVideo of Nicole Kelly made from the recording in this episodeTalking with Painters YouTube channelTalking with Painters podcast interview of Nicole Kelly - episode 75 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6yRDLvAeGA 'Night walker', 2022oil on polyester, 167 x 198cm Double self (Valley between doubt and dream), 2021. Oil on polyester, 138 x 152cmFinalist Portia Geach Memorial Award 2021 'Last song', 2022135 x 227.5 cm, oil on polyester 'Poppy and Matisse', 2022oil on polyester, 89 x 73.5 cm 'To the sky something lost' 2019 oil on polyester 123.5 x 169.5 cm (framed) ‘Studio nude (self portrait)’, 2019, oil on polyesterFinalist 2019 Portia Geach Memorial Award
2/14/202214 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ep 121: Summer Series – Joshua Yeldham

In podcast episode 101 I spoke with leading Australian artist Joshua Yeldham in the lead-up to his sell-out show ‘Providence’ at Arthouse Gallery in Sydney. I remember being fascinated by his approach to painting and his views on the creative process. We also recorded a separate video and this episode is the first of my 2022 Summer Series which is a collection of extended audio recordings from videos I've taken of my podcast guests. Joshua's works are extraordinary. His paintings often involve an element of carving into the wooden surface of the work and in some cases he inserts pieces of cane which add a further dimension to the work. But it's the physical method of doing that work which enhances his creative process and you'll hear him explain this and many other aspects of his practice in this episode. If you're in Sydney you can see several stunning Yeldham works in Arthouse Gallery's Summer group show which also includes work of podcast guests Colin Pennock, Susan Baird, Nicole Kelly, Jo Bertini, Michaye Boulter and Belinda Fox as well as many other skilled artists. The exhibition continues until 29 January 2022. See below for a short video version of this episode filmed in Joshua's Sydney studio. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ocg2oLZ008 Links Joshua Yeldham (website)Joshua Yeldham at Arthouse GalleryTalking with Painters interview, Episode 101My video walk through of Joshua Yeldham's exhibition 'Providence' at Arthouse Gallery in 2020 Episode 101 YouTube video
1/14/202222 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ep 120: Robert Malherbe

Whether it’s a moody vase of flowers, a reclining nude or the incredible ridges of the Blue Mountains, Robert Malherbe depicts his subject matter in sensuous, fluid brushstrokes which give the impression the painting was completed only moments ago. Working from life, it is vitality which Robert aims to capture in his work and by painting alla prima and completing the work in one session, the viewer ultimately witnesses the movement and life which has been captured in each brushstroke. He has won the NSW Parliament Plein Air Art Prize and the Manning Art Prize and has been shortlisted in the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes multiple times as well as being shortlisted in many others. He is represented in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and New York, has had 25 solo shows and his work is held in many public and private collections. We met in his studio in Sydney (he also has a studio in the Blue Mountains) and there was a series of recent breathtaking works lining the walls. In this podcast episode you can hear Robert talk with me about his early career in animation, how he learnt to paint, how and why he paints alla prima and much more. To hear the podcast episode click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Upcoming shows Upcoming exhibition at BDDW gallery, New York Links to things we talk about in the show Robert MalherbeRobert Malherbe on Instagram Robert Malherbe at Jan Murphy Gallery Robert Malherbe at Michael Reid GalleryRobert Malherbe at James Makin GalleryRobert Malherbe at BDDW GalleryYouTube Video 'En Plein Air'Nick StathopoulosPhiljames 'Govetts Leap', 2021, oil on board45.8 x 61 cmFinalist Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2021 'Figure 34', 2021, oil on polyester canvas46.0 x 51.0 cm 'Self-portrait', oil on linen, 91 x 91 cmFinalist Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2017 'Michael Reid' oil on linen, 103.5 x 83.5 cmFinalist Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2018 Robert Malherbe, Philjames 'Last waltz at the Doomsday Ball' oil on linen91 x 71 cmFinalist Sulman Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2017 'Nude 25', 2019, oil on canvas51.0 x 41.0 cm 'White Flowers in Glass', 2021oil on polyester56 x 46 cm 'Flowers 2', 2019oil on linen76.0 x 60.0 cm
12/19/202151 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ep 119: Justin Paton, curator of ‘Matisse: Life and Spirit’

A video version of this episode can be viewed here Justin Paton is the co-curator of the most exciting exhibition to arrive on Sydney’s doorstep since our world was upturned by the pandemic. ‘Matisse: Life and Spirit, Masterpieces from the Centre Pompidou, Paris’, now showing at the Art Gallery of NSW, is an uplifting collection of paintings, drawings and sculptures which not only brings with it excitement, joy and optimism, but also is immediate in its nature.  “As these works have come out of their crates I’ve really had the feeling that the paintings are almost making themselves before your eyes … he’s not giving you a sealed off, finished, product”, Justin tells me in this podcast episode. “He’s showing you his thinking. He wants you to feel as though you’re looking over his shoulder as he revises, adjusts, amends a line, sands something back’. And this proximity to Matisse is not only felt in the works themselves, but in the way they are presented to us. His sculptures and paintings seem to talk to each other and the breathtaking space which evokes the artist's Chapel of the Rosary in Vence takes us a step closer to what he might have felt in the moments of its creation. The space is designed by renowned Australian architect Richard Johnson. Justin Paton is the head curator of international art at the Art Gallery of NSW. He talks with me about the exhibition, from the early works from the Fauvist period and Matisse's time connecting with the Australian artist John Russell to the later cut-out works and how they came about. He also talks with me about the ‘Matisse Alive’ exhibition which he also curated. Justin is also an acclaimed writer and his books include ‘How to look at a painting’ (which was adapted into a TV series) and more recently  ‘McCahon Country’ about the works of the famous New Zealand painter Colin McCahon. To hear our conversation click on ‘play’ beneath the above photo. The exhibition ‘Matisse: Life and Spirit’ continues until 13 March 2022. You can buy tickets here. ‘Matisse Alive’ is a free exhibition and continues until 3 April 2022. Links Justin Paton on InstagramMatisse: Life and SpiritJohn RussellChapel of the Rosary, Vence https://youtu.be/gl6DyqbCxg0 Justin Paton talks with Maria Stoljar about 'Matisse: Life and Spirit' Installation view of ‘Matisse: Life & Spirit Masterpieces from the Centre Pompidou, Paris’ exhibitionPhoto © AGNSW, Mim Stirling Installation view of ‘Matisse: Life & Spirit Masterpieces from the Centre Pompidou, Paris’ exhibitionPhoto © AGNSW, Mim Stirling
12/9/202112 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ep 118 Fiona Verity and Julie Nicholson from the Art Wank podcast

Fiona Verity and Julie Nicholson have a lot in common; they were both born in the UK, both met their husbands while backpacking in Australia, are both emerging artists and are both very funny. But they also have distinctly different personalities and it's this contrast that makes their arts podcast 'Art Wank' so interesting and entertaining. They interviewed me earlier this year and when I heard they were exhibiting at The Other Art Fair in Sydney I thought it was the perfect opportunity to interview them back. So here it is! A fun chat about their lives, their podcast and their art. See below for details of The Other Art Fair, examples of their beautiful work and for links to the podcast and other things we chatted about in the show. Photo of Fiona and Julie by Jasmine Higgins Upcoming show The Other Art Fair, Sydney, 2-5 December 2021 Links to things we talked about in the show Julie Nicholson websiteJulie Nicholson on InstagramFiona Verity on YouTubeFiona Verity on InstagramArt Wank podcast on InstagramArt Wank podcast on Apple PodcastsArt Wank podcast's interview with meThe Other Art FairPittwater Artists TrailWilamina Russo (mentor and podcaster)Debbie MackinnonWilloughby Arts CentreJudith White JULIE NICHOLSON'Creek', 2021, acrylic, oil stick and pastel on canvas FIONA VERITY'Beer needs nuts'80x120cm Acrylic, charcoal and collage on polycotton  JULIE NICHOLSON'Through the sheltered creek' 116x80cm FIONA VERITY'Look longer, think more'114 x 114 cm Acrylic, charcoal and Collage on polycotton  JULIE NICHOLSON'Time Stamp' acrylic, oil stick and oil pastel on canvas 75x95cm Fiona Verity'it’s easy like Sunday Morning'80x120cmAcrylic, charcoal and Collage on polycotton 
11/28/202154 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 117: Julian Meagher

The impacts of COVID have challenged the world in a multitude of ways, but for Sydney artist Julian Meagher they appear to have sharpened his focus.  Over the last 14 months, with no other deadline than his upcoming show at Yavuz Gallery, he has taken the opportunity to free himself from the usual demands of an imminent exhibition and created a body of work which has explored exciting new directions.  Jules is well known for his beautiful portraits and still life works - painted in thin layers of translucent oil paint and often mistaken from afar as watercolour - but his stunning large scale landscapes over recent years are now taking centre stage and incorporate elements of abstraction to the point where in some works the representational drops off altogether.  And yet there is a strong link to the mysteries of the natural world in his work. Ideas surrounding the moon and tidal forces, sleep cycles, dreams, heartbeat rhythms and light rays drive his landscape paintings adding to their symbolism and allure. I caught up with Jules last week at his Sydney studio where he works among other high level creatives. In this podcast episode we talked about how it all started (his first career might surprise you), his ideas, his techniques and the unexpected energy required to create these still works.  He has exhibited in close to 30 solo shows and has been shortlisted in many major art prizes in Australia including the Archibald (four times), Wynne, Doug Moran, Glover and Shirley Hannan.  To hear our conversation press play beneath the above feature photo. See below for a short video of highlights of this episode from the Talking with Painters YouTube channel. Upcoming show Solo exhibition, 'The small hours', Yavuz Gallery, Sydney, 18 November to 18 December Links to things and people we talked about in the show Julian Meagher website Julian Meagher at Yavuz Gallery Julian Meagher at Edwina Corlette Julian Ashton Art School Philip Wolfhagen on Talking with Painters Robert Hannaford Jasper Knight https://youtu.be/QtFOx0IGmsQ ' Fozzy', 2021, oil on linen, 56.5 x 46 x 3.5 cmfinalist, Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2021Image: Art Gallery of NSW 'Slow Wave Cycle (Barragga Lake) #8', 2021, oil on linen, 152 x 123cmImage courtesy of the artist Slow Wave Cycle (Barragga Lake), 2021, oil on linen, 245 x 198 cmImage courtesy of the artist 'The small hour #3', 2021, oil on linen, 183 x 152cmImage courtesy of the artist Julian Meagher, Slow Wave Cycle (Marrickville), 2021, oil on linen, 245 x 198 cmImage courtesy of the artist 'Daniel Johns', 2015, oil on linen, 122 x 91 cmFinalist, Archibald Prize 2015Image: Art Gallery of NSW Rapid Eye Movement #5, 2021, oil on linen, 51 x 41 cmImage courtesy of the artist
11/15/20211 hour, 5 seconds
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Ep 116: Aida Tomescu (uncut)

See the YouTube video version of this podcast episode here Fresh out of Sydney lockdown, the incredible works of Aida Tomescu are showing both in Sydney with Fox Jensen Gallery and in Hong Kong with Flowers Gallery in two outstanding exhibitions. To add to this, in early December 2021, Orange Regional Gallery will be exhibiting what promises to be a blockbuster Tomescu show, looking at the artist's latest large works and how they connect to a group of key paintings and etchings from the past twenty years. Tying in with these shows, I recently came across some footage I’d taken in the lead up to Aida’s 2019 show with Fox Jensen Gallery, ‘The Open Wounds of White Clouds’. Watching the video again, I soon realised there were many timeless gems in that conversation which I had never published, so here is the full exchange. We filmed this conversation in Aida's studio in August 2019, in the midst of many dynamic works lining the walls and with Aida standing in front of the triptych titled ‘Sewn onto the Stones in the Sky’. That work has since been acquired by the Art Gallery of NSW (see below) and Aida talks in this episode about her approach to that work. Scroll down to see the video version of this episode as well as four previous videos of Aida currently on the channel. To hear the audio podcast conversation click 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Current and upcoming shows 'A Long Line of Sand', Fox Jensen Gallery, Sydney, current until 30 October 2021'In a Carpet Made of Water', Flowers Gallery, Hong Kong, current until 'Unfolding Presence', Orange Regional Gallery, Orange, opening 3 December, 2021 Useful Links Aida Tomescu websiteAida Tomescu at Fox Jensen GalleryAida Tomescu at Flowers GalleryEpisode 33 Talking with Painters podcast: Aida TomescuEpisode 65 Talking with Painters podcast: Aida Tomescu on Tony TucksonBook tickets for 'The Artist Speaks' series - Art Gallery of NSWYoutube video of this episode Video version of this episode https://youtu.be/6K1yIMmG3Kk Previous YouTube videos https://youtu.be/pbSNWrtdOdY Aida Tomescu - extended interview of episode 33 of the Talking with Painters podcast https://youtu.be/9D7B1W3cH3c Aida Tomescu talks with Maria Stoljar in her studio https://youtu.be/IbhHjZ0YZxI Aida Tomescu's 2019 show 'The Open Wounds of White Clouds' https://youtu.be/BJ8052xpX8c Maria Stoljar talks with Aida Tomescu about the AGNSW exhibition Tuckson: The Abstract Sublime 'Sewn onto the Stones in the Sky'oil on Belgian linen200 x 460cm overallCollection: Art Gallery of NSWPurchased with funds donated by Ken Cole AM and Rowena Danziger AMPhoto: Andrew Jensen 'A Long Line of Sand IV', 2021 oil on Belgian linen200 x 306 cm (diptych)each linen panel 200 x 153cmPhoto courtesy of Fox Jensen Gallery A Long Line of Sand III, 2021 oil on Belgian linen206 x 480cm (triptych)Photo: Andrew Jensen Gloria, 2021oil on Belgian linen. 200 x 460 cm (triptych)Fox Jensen Gallery, SydneyPhoto: Andrew Jensen Into a carpet made of water, 2021Oil on Belgian linen200 x 153 cmFlowers Gallery exhibition, Hong Kong, 2021Photo courtesy of the Gallery A Long Line of Sand I, 2021 oil on Belgian linen200 x 460 cm (triptych)Photo courtesy of Fox Jensen Gallery
10/17/202133 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ep 115: The Archibald Winners

Scroll down for transcript If you’ve been listening to this podcast over the years, you would probably know I’m a self-confessed Archibald tragic. I'm fascinated by the depiction of the human face and figure in paint and that is exactly what the prize celebrates each year at the Art Gallery of NSW. The Archibald Prize is Australia's most famous portrait prize and is now in its 100th year. This episode is a compilation of clips from my conversations with Archibald winners where they talk about how they felt about winning, what it did for their career or about the painting itself. I've also included a clip from my conversation with biographer Scott Bevan where we talked about what was arguably the most controversial Archibald win - the 1943 winning portrait by William Dobell of fellow artist Joshua Smith. To hear the podcast episode click 'play' beneath the above photo. Scroll down for the transcript. See below for a list of podcast guests, the year they won the prize and their portraits. Click on the name to go to the full interview. Guy Warren  1985 Davida Allen  1986 William Robinson  1987 and 1995 Francis Giacco  1994 Wendy Sharpe  1996 Lewis Miller   1998 Euan Macleod 1999 Nicholas Harding  2001 Del Kathryn Barton 2008 and 2013 Guido Maestri 2009 Ben Quilty 2011 Tim Storrier  2012 Louise Hearman 2016 Tony Costa 2019 Vincent Namatjira 2020 Peter Wegner 2021 Scott Bevan 'Archie 100' exhibition - Art Gallery of NSW Guy Warren ‘Flugelman with Wingman’, 1985, oil on canvas, 225 x 178cmWinner of the Archibald Prize 1985Image: Art Gallery of NSW website Davida Allen ‘Dr John Arthur Mckelvie Shera’, 1986, oil on canvas, 230.5 x 187cmWinner, 1986 Archibald Prize, AGNSWImage: Art Gallery of NSW website William Robinson  ‘Self-portrait with stunned mullet’, 1994, oil on linen, 197 x 164cmWinner Archibald Prize 1995QUT Art Collection. Donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program by William Robinson, 2011. William Robinson  ‘Equestrian self-portrait’, 1987, oil on linen, 141 x 192cmWinner Archibald Prize 1987QUT Art Collection. Donated through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program by William Robinson, 2011  Francis Giacco ‘Homage to John Reichard’ (1994) oil on marine ply 202cm x 188cmImage: Art Gallery of NSW website Wendy Sharpe: ‘Self portrait – as Diana of Erskineville’, 1996, oil on canvas, 210 x 172cm, winner of Archibald prize 1996.Image: Art Gallery of NSW website Lewis Miller: ‘Portrait of Allan Mitelman no 3’, 1998, oil and charcoal on canvas, 213.4 x 183cmImage: Art Gallery of NSW website Euan Macleod: ‘Self-portrait: head like a hole’ 1999 oil on canvas 180 x 137cmImage: Art Gallery of NSW website Nicholas Harding: ‘John Bell as King Lear’, 2001, oil on canvas on board, 177 x 105cm (winner Archibald Prize 2001)Image: Art Gallery of NSW website ‘you are what is most beautiful about me, a self portrait with Kell and Arella’ 2008, synthetic polymer paint, watercolour, gouache and pen on polyester canvas, 280 x 180cm (winner Archibald Prize 2008)Image: Art Gallery of NSW website ‘hugo’, 2013, watercolour, gouache and acrylic on canvas, 200 x 180cm (winner Archibald Prize 2013)Image: Art Gallery of NSW website Guido Maestri: ‘Dr Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu’, 2009, oil on linen, 203 x 172.4cmWinner Archibald Prize 2009, Art Gallery of NSWCollection: National Portrait Gallery, Australia Ben Quilty: ‘Margaret Olley’, 2011, oil on linen, 170 x 150cmWinner Archibald Prize 2011Photo: AGNSW Tim Storrier: The Histrionic Wayfarer (after Bosch), 2012, acrylic on canvas, 182 x 122 cm Winner Archibald Prize 2012Photo: Art Gallery of NSW website Louise Hearman: ‘Barry’ (2016) oil on masonite 69.5cm x 100cmPhoto: Art Gallery of NSW website Tony Costa: 'Lindy Lee',
9/20/202158 minutes, 45 seconds
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Ep 114: Kim Leutwyler

Many Australians may have seen Kim Leutwyler’s work without ever having set foot in a gallery. In 2019 her impressive Archibald painting of television presenter Faustina Agolley was splashed across Sydney to promote the prize. The striking image was on a huge banner above the entrance of the gallery, on bus shelters around the city, in newspapers and even on the front cover of a magazine. Kim is no stranger to the Archibald Prize - she’s been shortlisted in five out of the last seven years. And her sitters all have one thing in common; they are people she admires and who are making a mark in the queer community. Using bold colour in a distinctive style, Kim involves her sitters in the process, depicting them with an exciting combination of realism and abstraction. Always innovating and moving forward, she is constantly pushing towards pure abstraction, exploring and experimenting along the way. Kim has a fabulously positive outlook and is a regular finalist in many major Australian art prizes and has exhibited widely across Australia and the US. This episode was recorded remotely during the 2021 Sydney lockdown. See below for a short video from this episode. To hear the podcast episode click 'play' on the above photo. Above portrait photo courtesy of the artist Links to things we talk about in the episode Kim Leutwyler's website Kim Leutwyler with Nanda Hobbs Kim Leutwyler with 33 Contemporary Kim Leutwyler at Bluethumb Faustina Agolley Trixie Mattel Tenebrism Kehinde Wiley Marc Etherington Robert Rauschenberg Gamblin's 'Torrit Grey' Click here for tickets to 'The Artist Speaks' series at the Art Gallery of NSW referred to in the introduction of this episode. https://youtu.be/LvVPsBYf90I Faustina the Fuzz, 2019, oil and acrylic on canvas, 30” x 30”Finalist Archibald Prize 2019 Trixie Mattel, 2019, oil and acrylic on canvas , 60” x 40”Finalist Portia Geach Memorial award 2019 Brian with pink, blue and yellow, 2020, Oil on canvas, 48 x 36"Finalist Archibald Prize 2020 Kim, 2021, oil on canvas, 110 x 101.5 cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2021 Rhi, 2021, oil on canvas, 40" x 30" Werrong with Pink and Blue, 2020, oil and acrylic on canvas, 48"x 36" Danger Zone, 2020, oil and acrylic on canvas , 38in x 46inCollaboration with Marc Etherington Watson, 2018, oil and acrylic on canvas, 60” x 40”  
8/31/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ep 113: Georgia Spain

One of Georgia Spain's paintings was taking up more than its fair share of her Tasmanian studio. So she thought one way of freeing up some room would be to send it to the Art Gallery of NSW in Sydney as an entry into the Sir John Sulman Prize. A few weeks later she found out it had been shortlisted and a week after that, to her astonishment, it won. It was the first time she had entered the prize. In selecting the winning work, guest judge Elisabeth Cummings said the painting was a strong, confident image full of energy and movement and that the artist's use of the figure was imaginative and very much her own. This recognition was not a one-off. Georgia was one of five to receive the Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship less than a year earlier and won the Women's Art Prize Tasmania in the same week as winning the Sulman. I got the impression, though, that, although the accolades were welcome, what was more important was to continue to create and explore without placing too much importance on them or on commercial success. Although only 27, Georgia has exhibited in five solo shows across Tasmania, NSW and Victoria. She is also a singer and songwriter and her album ‘Trouble Isn’t Something You Can Hold’, recorded in 2017, draws from major life experiences and helped her through tragic times. Georgia was born in London and lived in Ireland until she was nine before migrating to Australia. She now lives in Tasmania with her partner. To hear our conversation press 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Portrait photo supplied by the artist Links to things we talked about in the show Georgia Spain on Instagram Solo show 'One to Another' at Egg and Dart GalleryBrett Whiteley Travelling Art ScholarshipSir John Sulman PrizeGeorgia's album 'Trouble Isn't Something You Can Hold'YouTube video of Georgia's song 'Parasite'Oscar Lush on Instagram 'Getting down or falling up', acrylic on canvas, 180.6 x 187.5 cmWinner: Sir John Sulman Prize, 2021 'Six Different Women', 2021, acrylic on canvas, 110 x 95cmWinner: Women's art Prize, Tasmania, 2021 'Pantomime', 2021, acrylic on canvas 134.5 x 113cm 'Standing, Waiting, Kissing, Waving, etc.', 2021, acrylic on canvas150 x 200cm
8/3/202142 minutes, 39 seconds
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Ep 112: Jo Bertini

Jo Bertini's recent exhibition at Sydney’s Arthouse Gallery, ‘Songs of Dry Hills’, alluringly portrayed the landscape she is drawn to repeatedly - the desert. Her love of that landscape and its First Nations People has led her to spend months at a time not only in the deserts of Australia but also those of India and the US. She has built an intimate connection to these lands and their people through thousands of hours of drawing and painting directly from her subjects. The paintings in her recent show were big and bold, but it wasn't just the scale that caught your attention. Standing in front of the works the viewer was drawn into an other-worldly landscape where earth colours are replaced with a kaleidoscope of hues including accents of shining iridescent paint. Jo has been exhibiting for over 30 years, in hundreds of solo and group shows, and her work is held in private and public collections across the world. She is also an acclaimed portraitist with work in the National Portrait gallery, as well as an art educator, lecturer and writer. Jo comes from a family of well known painters and photographers including the modernist photographer Olive Cotton and her mother, the sculptor Anne Ferguson, has been her greatest mentor. To hear the conversation press 'play' beneath the above photo. I also filmed Jo in her studio in Sydney - her larger studios are in country NSW and in New Mexico, USA, where she has lived for the past 5 years. See below for videos from the Talking with Painters YouTube channel . Upcoming show Solo exhibition at GOCA, University of Colorado, April to August 2022 Links to things we talked about in the show Website of Jo Bertini Jo Bertini at Arthouse Gallery Australian Desert Expeditions 'Fieldwork', book of Bertini's drawings and gouache paintings 'Dry Wash', oil on French polyester canvas, 124.5 x 154.5cm 'Desert garden in the land of enchantment', oil on French polyester canvas, 155.5 x 155cm 'Casting a Wish Beneath the River', oil on Belgian linen, 201 x 155cm 'Hidden River of Sand', oil on Belgian linen, 202.5 x 206.5cm Kitty Kantilla and Freda Warlapinni at Milikapiti (Snake Bay), 2003, oil on canvas, 152 x 135cmCollection: National Portrait Gallery, Australia 'Lachuben Rabari - Old and New', 2016, oil on canvas on vintage woven wedding shawl 130 x 92 cm 'Sand Sky', oil on French polyester canvas, 93.5 x 135cm 'The Language of Wind', iridescent pigment and oil on French polyester canvas, 99.5 x 175.5cm Selection of pencil, charcoal and gouache sketches from 'Fieldwork', published by Zabriskie Books, 2014
7/10/202157 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ep 111: Joanna Logue – ‘Alone on the Marsh’

'Everyone has a COVID story' Joanna Logue told me when we spoke recently about her show with Scott Livesey Galleries in Melbourne. Part of Joanna's story is that, for the first time in her career, she wouldn't be attending the opening of her show. The paintings had travelled to Australia from her home in Mount Desert Island in the USA without her. Joanna is a previous podcast guest and creates breathtaking landscapes which spill over towards abstraction. In this episode we talk about her stunning recent body of work in 'Alone on the Marsh' which draws on the landscape of her home in Maine with its rugged marshes, waterways and dense vegetation. We also touch on the hardships brought by COVID - the homesickness, grief at the loss of a loved one back home and the dislocation caused by social and political unrest. In spite of the difficult times, Joanna also talks about a silver lining and how her painting may not have taken the course it did were it not for the events of the past year. Press 'play' beneath the above photo to hear the podcast episode. You can also see a short video from our conversation below. Above photo supplied by the artist Current exhibition 'Alone on the Marsh', Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne, 22 May to 19 June 2021 Links Joanna LogueJoanna Logue's exhibition at Scott Livesey GalleriesJoanna Logue at King Street Gallery on William Jan Pinkerton https://youtu.be/w9q6iaxTr74 TANGLE POND 1, 2021, oil on linen, 100.00 x 126.00 cm SOMES POND, 2021, oil on birch board, 41.00 x 51.00 cm BREAKNECK CREEK , 2021, oil on linen, 130.00 x 130.00 cm MARSH SONG II, 2021, oil on linen, 65.00 x 140.00 cm
6/15/202125 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 110: Robin Eley

We’ve all been there. You see an artwork and think 'surely, that is a photo'. But as you get closer and read the description, you accept it is made of paint, expertly applied, creating the illusion of reality. I am in awe of the artists who work in this way because it calls for painstaking labour and the technique is certainly not suited to every painter. Australian artist Robin Eley, based in Los Angeles, is highly skilled in every step of the process, producing work which leaves many viewers incredulous. For Robin, the task of creating the reference material is often the most important, and the time consuming execution of the painting requires expertise finessed over years of practice. Robin has been shortlisted in many Australian art prizes including the Archibald, the Doug Moran National Portrait prize (where he has been awarded runner up and highly commended) and the Eutick Memorial Still Life prize. His work is held in private collections and public institutions around the world.   In this episode you'll hear how Robin came to painting, which he didn’t embark on until he was 27, after a career as a commercial illustrator. A teacher of art, he is generous in sharing his knowledge as many of his Instagram and Facebook followers would know.  His most recent body of work has to be seen to be believed - paintings of masterpieces including the Mona Lisa and Girl with a Pearl Earring, wrapped in plastic. The illusion even continues beyond the canvas support where he has extended the sides irregularly to heighten the appearance of the plastic turning around the edges of the work.  He has also created other innovative works including 'The Binary Project' (see link below to YouTube video) which involved the participation of thousands of people around the world. The ambition of that work is typical of this artist, though; he is always pushing the boundaries of what a painting can be. To hear my conversation with Robin click 'play' beneath the above photo. Scroll down for a short video with excerpts from the podcast interview. Above photograph of Robin Eley courtesy of the artist. Upcoming exhibition Solo exhibition, 2022, New York - details to be confirmed later this year. Links Robin EleyRobin Eley on InstagramRobin Eley on Facebook'The Binary Project' on YouTube'Alla Prima' by Richard SchmidtMichael ZavrosDavid Korins https://youtu.be/-HDlVIO-jPU Robin Eley talks with Maria Stoljar 'Mona Lisa (wrapped), oil on linen, gesso and marble dust 'Girl with a Pearl Earring', oil on linen, gesso and marble dust 'Self Portrait', 2010, oil on Belgian linen, 39" x 25"Runner Up, Doug Moran portrait Prize, 2010 'Polaroid', 2010, oil on Belgian linen, 24.5" x 18.5"Finalist, Eutick Memorial Still Life Award, 2011 'Plastic', 2011, oil on Belgian linen, 35.5" x 35.5" 'Silent Respiration', 2012, oil on Belgian linen, 24.5" x 18" 'The Deep Marine', 2012, oil on Belgian linen, 31.5" x 24" 'Bibliography', 2012, oil on linen-bound hard cover books, 70 x 48 cmFinalist, 2012 Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW Part of 'The Binary Project'
5/24/20211 hour, 18 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 109: Filippa Buttitta (with Louisa Chircop)

In early 2020, as COVID was sweeping the world, Filippa Buttitta (pictured right) was facing her own personal crisis. She had been working on her entry for the Archibald prize when she had trouble with her eyesight and was finding it difficult painting the fine details of her work. Thinking she needed an eye test, she visited her optometrist which led to a swift hospital admission and the shocking diagnosis of an aggressive brain tumour. In the past year she’s had to make decisions which go to the heart of one's purpose in life and which also highlight the importance of creativity.  This episode is about those choices but it’s also about Filippa's life as a skilled artist.  She's been painting for over 30 years, and has been a regular finalist in many art prizes including the Archibald (with a stunning portrait of the late Judy Cassab) as well as the Black Swan and Portia Geach and last year she was noted as one of the artists who had been selected the most times in Australian art prizes in that year.  Her entry into the Archibald this year is a fascinating portrait of her surgeon Professor Charlie Teo who has provided not only medical care prolonging her life but compassion and empathy along the way.   You’ll also be hearing from her close friend, artist Louisa Chircop (pictured above left), who joins us in this conversation. Louisa is a previous podcast guest and has been a rock for Filippa throughout this time. She is also entering the Archibald with a portrait of Filippa.  She was one of seven artists who requested Filippa to paint her portrait this year and even though many portrait sitters have in the past agreed to having their portrait painted by more than one artist for the Archibald, Filippa has only said yes to Louisa. We recorded this episode in Filippa’s studio in Sydney which also operates as a private gallery where she has exhibited her own work and that of fellow artists. From time to time you might also hear Filippas’ beautiful budgerigar, Sky. To hear the podcast conversation click 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Scroll down for a video of Filippa talking with Maria Stoljar in her studio. Links to people we talk about in this episode Filippa ButtittaLouisa ChircopJudy CassabTony CostaProf. Charlie TeoDawn Fraser https://youtu.be/BL3Aebwbzvc Filippa Buttitta talks with Maria Stoljar in her studio 'Dr Charlie Teo Removing my Brain Tumour', 2021, oil on Italian linen, 140 x 155cm 'Judy Cassab - portrait of an artist', oil on Italian linen, 113 x 85cmFinalist Archibald Prize, 2015 'Tony Costa In His Studio', 2020, oil on Italian linen, 214 x 168cm 'Turbulent Waters', 2010, oil on Belgian linen, 214 x 127cm By Louisa Chircop'Filippa Buttitta - Post second brain tumour surgery', 2021, pencil, watercolour, gouache, watercolour markers and photomontage on polyester, 200cm x 137cm
5/6/202142 minutes, 24 seconds
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Ep 108: Guido Maestri

A riverbank in the Australian bush would be the perfect plein air location for many artists. A rushing stream, long tree trunks and a deep vista where the artist's eye can gather information into the distance. But what is more fascinating for leading Australian artist Guido Maestri, is what the substance he is applying to the canvas is capable of doing in response. Ever since art school he has been exploring the materiality of paint, whether it’s an Archibald-winning painting, a non-descript laneway or a bird as roadkill, it’s this passion which drives the work whether it’s in the landscape or back in his Sydney studio. Although some might think of him as a portrait painter - he's an Archibald Prize winner - his subject matter lies more in his expressive landscapes and breathtaking still life works. He's also a sculptor and his various interpretations of the classic bust are captivating. He has exhibited in over 25 solo shows to date and the Art Gallery of NSW has just announced the acquisition of his fabulous work 'the rain song' which was a finalist in last year's Wynne Prize. After years of plein air painting, Guido's studio work now plays a more significant role. The result is a growing body of outstanding works created through observation, imagination and a letting go of previous constraints. His show 'short stories', opening on 8 April at Yavuz Gallery in Sydney, is a testament to this way of painting. We recorded this interview outside Mudgee in country NSW, near the banks of a river among the sounds of birds and the wind in the casuarina trees. Guido had planned a day's painting after the interview and he set up a large canvas near the riverbank which he fixed to an easel to keep it stable. I was fortunate to film him setting up and painting that day and I've posted a video to the Talking with Painters Youtube channel of that work. After the interview we also had the opportunity to see the construction progress of the spectacular new regional Art Gallery in Mudgee which is almost completed. Guido was born in the town and spent the first few years of his life there. An exhibition of his current works will hang on its walls when it opens its doors to the public. That show is scheduled for August this year. To hear me talk with Guido about how he became an artist and his approach to painting, click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo or listen however you get your podcasts. Scroll down to see the video of Guido starting a painting outside of Mudgee, NSW. Upcoming shows Solo show 'short stories', Yavuz Gallery, 8 April - 1 May 2021Solo show and inaugural exhibition of the Mid-Western Regional Arts and Cultural centre, Mudgee, scheduled for August 2021 Links to things we talked about in the podcast Guido MaestriGuido Maestri at Yavuz GalleryGuido Maestri at Jan Murphy Gallery Guido Maestri at Sophie Gannon GalleryJames DrinkwaterGeoffrey Gurrumul YunupinguJennifer ByrneJude RaeLuke SciberrasDavid GriggsNeo RauchSally Anderson https://youtu.be/P-MXZ5g98Zs 'The rain song', 2020, oil on linen, 198 x 244cmFinalist, Wynne Prize, 2020Collection: Art Gallery of NSW, purchased with funds provided by the Art Gallery of NSW Society.Photo: AGNSW website 'neo's tree', 2021, oil on linen, 168 x 138cmPhoto courtesy of the artist 'LL 16' 2020, oil on linen, 168 x 138cmFrom the exhibition 'the lane' with Jan Murphy Gallery, 2020Photo courtesy of the artist 'Wreck No 21', 2016, oil on linen, 51 x 61cmPhoto courtesy of the artist Feral no. 13', 2015, oil on linen 61 x 71cmPhoto courtesy of the artist 'Shattered (Griggs)', 2016, oil on linen, 71.5 x 81.5cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2016Photo: Art Gallery of NSW website 'JB reading', 2020, oil on linen, 43.5 x 43.5cmFinalist 2020 Archibald PrizePhoto: Art Gallery of NSW website 'Dr Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu', 2009, oil on linen, 203 x 172.4cmWinner Archibald Prize 2009,
4/6/202141 minutes, 35 seconds
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Ep 107: Guy Warren

'National treasure', 'legend,' 'inspiration'. These were just some of the reactions from my Instagram followers when I posted that I would be interviewing Guy Warren. Guy is about to turn 100 years old.  He has no less than 5 shows opening this year.  But he is also plain spoken, practical, down to earth and modest. In typical style he seemed pleased when I told him of the Instagram reaction, but he quickly changed the subject.  Guy has had an extraordinary career.  He has won numerous awards including the Archibald prize, exhibited in over 50 solo shows and a phenomenal 6 survey shows (with more to come this year), and received two honorary doctorates, the Order of Australia and the Australia Medal. His work is included in many public, private and corporate collections across the world. Although his paintings include portraiture and abstraction, much of his work is concerned with the landscape. His paintings reflect his interest in the idea that we humans belong to and are part of the landscape. This is a view which he formed when posted in Bougainville in World War II and it has echoed through his work down the decades. The fact that Guy will soon be turning 100 meant that I was one of many requesting an interview. Even so, he was generous with his time and shared his recollections of the Great Depression and WWII, of the tumultuous changes in the artworld in the 50s and 60s, and of his travels to Alice Springs, New Guinea and London.  We talk about the successes but also a couple of regrets. To hear the podcast episode click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo.  You can see excerpts from this conversation in a short video below. Upcoming shows 'The 100th year', King Street Gallery on William, Sydney, 16 March to 10 April 2021'From the Mountain to the Sky: Guy Warren drawings', National Centre for Drawing, National Art School, Sydney, 17 April - 22 May Gallery Lane Cove, Sydney, survey show, date TBAUniversity of Wollongong Gallery, Wollongong, date TBASolo show, Nicholas Thompson Gallery, Melbourne, 30 November to 18 December Links to things and people we talk about in this episode Guy Warren at King Street Gallery on WilliamGuy Warren at Nicholas Thompson GalleryTony TucksonKlaus FriedebergerErwin FabianFred Williams Bert FlugelmanIan FairweatherJoanna Logue David Attenborough https://youtu.be/VH-NAeOMf94 'To Jamberoo with love #1', 2020, acrylic on linen, 40 x 50cm Image courtesy of King Street Gallery on William and the artist 'Time out #1', 2020, watercolour on paper, 57 x 77cmImage courtesy of King Street Gallery on William and the artist 'Bush walk', 2015, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 60cmImage courtesy of King Street Gallery on William and the artist 'Gaia at Badgery's', 1990, synthetic polymer paint on linen, 274 x 274cmImage: National Gallery of Australia Collection 'Flugelman with Wingman', 1985, oil on canvas, 225 x 178cmWinner of the Archibald Prize 1985Image: Art Gallery of NSW website 'Prisoner', 1962Image: Canberra Museum and Gallery collection 'Hobart series no.8', 1979, watercolour on hand made paper, formed and manipulated Collection Art Gallery of NSWImage: Art Gallery of NSW website XrLGNKVQuEdskIFGVyo3
3/14/202158 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 106: Vincent Namatjira

The name Namatjira is a famous one. Vincent Namatjira’s great-grandfather, Albert Namatjira, was one of Australia’s great painters, uniquely depicting Australia's desert landscapes in vibrant watercolour. Although he didn't know about his connection with the famous artist in his childhood - he was in foster care and removed from his culture - Vincent has made his own way to success. But this time it was through portraiture. Painting for the first time in 2012, he would soon become a regular finalist in Australia's most famous portrait prize, the Archibald, ultimately winning it in 2020. He was the first indigenous artist to win the Archibald but, as Vincent would say, 'it only took 99 years'. His winning painting, 'Stand strong for who you are’ was a portrait of the artist with Adam Goodes, the indigenous AFL player who became renowned for speaking out against racism. Vincent saw parallels between Adam's life and his own which he talks about in this conversation. The subjects of Vincent's portraits are wide-ranging; from his great-grandfather, aboriginal elders and politicians to the Queen, Captain Cook and Vladimir Putin. Painted in an expressive style, his works also encapsulate his unmistakable humour. In one work he places himself in the royal carriage with the Queen and in another is cutting a birthday cake with Donald Trump. Everyone is on a level playing field. Vincent lives in the Indulkana community in the APY lands, about 400 km south of Alice Springs and is one of about 30 artists connected to its arts centre, Iwantja Arts. He has received significant acclaim. Apart from winning the Archibald Prize, he won the Ramsay Art prize in 2019, has received an Order of Australia for his contribution to indigenous visual arts, his works have been acquired by the British Museum and significant institutional collections across Australia and he has exhibited in solo shows and international art fairs. I interviewed Vincent at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia where he had been commissioned to paint the museum’s Foyer wall. It’s a huge 15m work called 'P.P.F (Past-Present-Future)' and depicts people who have been influential in his life. It is a spectacular work and will remain in the foyer for the next two years. To hear our podcast conversation click on 'play' below the above photo. Scroll down for images of works we talk about on the podcast. Above photo of Vincent Namatjira by Daniel Boud, standing in front of P.P.F. (Past-Present-Future), 2021, commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 2021, supported by Veolia Environmental Services, image courtesy the artist; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; and Iwantja Arts, South Australia © the artist, Links Vincent Namatjira at Iwantja ArtsVincent Namatjira at This is No Fantasy Albert NamatjiraKunmanara 'Jimmy' PompeyAdam Goodes'The Final Quarter' documentary 'Stand Strong for who you are', 2020, acrylic on linen, 152 x 198cmWinner Archibald Prize 2020, Art Gallery of NSWImage: AGNSW website 'P.P.F. (Past-Present-Future)', 2021, synthetic polymer paint,  commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 2021, supported by Veolia Environmental Services, image courtesy the artist; Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney; and Iwantja Arts, South Australia © the artist, photograph Daniel Boud 'Studio self-portrait', 2018, acrylic on linen, 152 x 198cm, Highly commended in the Archibald Prize 2018, AGNSWImage: AGNSW website 'The Royal Tour (Vincent and Elizabeth)', 2020, acrylic on linen, 67 x 91cmImage courtesy of the artist and Iwantja Arts 'Prime Minister series, 2016, 'Seven Leaders series', 2016 and 'The Richest series', 2017acrylic on canvasImage courtesy of the artist and Iwantja Arts 'Welcome to Indulkana', 2018, acrylic on canvas, 122 x 304cmImage courtesy of the artist and Iwantja Arts
2/25/202132 minutes, 39 seconds
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Ep 105: Summer Series – Tony Costa

Tony Costa won the Archibald prize in 2019 with his stunning painting of contemporary artist Lindy Lee. I caught up with him a few weeks later in his studio in Sydney and our podcast conversation from that day is episode 70 of the podcast. I also recorded video in Tony's studio which I edited down to about 5 minutes, with lots of painting wisdom ending up on the cutting room floor. So in this episode I'm bringing you the full conversation. Tony has been painting for over 50 years. Apart from winning the Archibald prize, in portraiture he is a regular finalist in the Doug Moran and Kilgour prizes as well as many others, but it’s in landscape that he is particularly prolific. He has won the Paddington Art prize for landscape painting and repeatedly returns to the Royal National Park in Sydney’s south where he has found endless inspiration. His first solo exhibition since winning the Archibald opens at Art Atrium in Sydney on 15 May 2021 and will consist of oils, watercolour and ink works based on areas within the Royal National Park. To hear our 2019 conversation click 'play' beneath the above photo of Tony in his studio. You can see the video in Tony's studio below. I also filmed an interview with Tony in the Art Gallery of NSW not long after the Archibald announcement was made and you can see that video below also.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wmdfFrmK70 Tony Costa talks with me in his studio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybBqm0uLilI Tony Costa talks with me at the Art Gallery of NSW shortly after winning the Archibald Prize One of two drawings Tony made in preparation for his winning portrait The second drawing The hospital bed which serves as the working surface Head study of Lindy Lee Tools used in painting The one paint brush in the studio Painting palette 'Hacking River No 5 Royal National Park'
2/1/202126 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ep 104: Summer Series – Susan Baird

In 2019 I travelled 4 hours west of Sydney, past the Blue Mountains, driving through winding bush roads until I arrived at Hill End, the historic goldmining village which is now also known for its inspiring artist's community. It was there that I interviewed Susan Baird who a few years earlier had fallen in love with the town and now has a home and studio there, deep in the bush. We recorded a previous podcast interview where Susan talked with me about how she became an artist and developed her career. It's one of the most downloaded episodes on the podcast and you can hear it here. We also recorded video which I edited down for a YouTube video. I've since realised, though, that those video recordings are just as valuable as the podcast interview itself and that's why I'm bringing you this 'Summer Series' of longer recordings from videos. What you'll hear in this episode is the full audio recording from the video shoot. Susan's next solo show is coming up in June 2021 at Arthouse Gallery in Sydney and she has small works in the Gallery's current group show (January 2021). She is also represented by Flinders Lane Gallery in Melbourne and it was in the lead up to her last show with Flinders Lane that we recorded this interview. You can hear the podcast interview by pressing 'play' below the above feature photo or listen on your favourite podcast app. Scroll down to see stills of the places and works we talk about in this episode as well as the 2019 YouTube video. https://youtu.be/c0_IZpOiHVE YouTube video 'Bowman's Cottage', Hill End, NSW The shearing shed Susan Baird in her studio (formerly the property's hay shed) The studio ‘Studio Window, Bowman’s Cottage’, 2019, Oil on linen 137 x 97cm Finalist Calleen Art Award 2019 ‘Bush Telegraph’, 2019, oil on linen, 102 x 102cm
1/14/202126 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 103: Summer Series – Euan Macleod

My recent conversation with leading artist Euan Macleod is the first in a summer series of extended audio recordings from videos I’ve taken of my podcast guests. As is the way with videos, a lot of great material gets lost in the editing process so I’m bringing you the longer version of our conversations recorded during filming. I caught up with Euan in September 2020 at his knockout show ‘Figure in a dissolving landscape' at King Street Gallery on William in Sydney. I previously interviewed Euan in 2016 about his life and how he became an artist. Although we share him with New Zealand, where he was born, he’s one of our most celebrated and respected artists. He has been awarded the Archibald, Wynne Sulman and Gallipoli prizes just to name a few. His exhibition at King Street Gallery was strong and dramatic - figures in icy environments which were inspired by Euan’s trip to the Tasman glacier in New Zealand in February 2020. Click on 'play' beneath the feature photo to hear the podcast episode. See the YouTube video of this extended interview here See my video walkthrough of the exhibition here See below for images of works we talk about on the podcast. 'Social distancing', 2020, oil on polyester, 120 x 84cm 'Pull up', 2020, acrylic on polyester, 84 x 120cm 'Camp site', 2020, acrylic on polyester, 100 x 124cm 'Figure in a dissolving landscape' [triptych], 2020, oil on polyester, 200 x 424cm 'Lake', 2020, earthenware, 40 x 55 x 16cm , La Paloma Pottery 'Aspiring', 2020, earthenware, 32 x 51 x 4cm, La Paloma Pottery
1/1/202123 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ep 102: Antonia Perricone Mrljak

Antonia Mrljak's art exudes a dynamic force. It mirrors her personality - one of energy, vibrancy and a sure sense of direction. She is one of Australia's most exciting emerging abstract artists. But it wasn't until after a career in fashion and creating a family that, almost by accident, she discovered that painting was the perfect way for her to express her experiences. Her Sicilian background and childhood strongly influence her work and this interview is as much a story of the journey of second generation Australians as it is the ability to succeed in art through sheer passion. Enterprisingly, she painted live at Sydney Contemporary in 2019 creating a nine metre high work in front of thousands of viewers attending the art fair. Antonia is represented in both Sydney and Melbourne by major commercial galleries and has a busy post-COVID year in 2021. Scroll down for details of upcoming shows. We recorded this podcast interview in Antonia's studio in Sydney surrounded by her recent work. To hear our conversation click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Scroll down to see a short video of Antonia in her studio and at her exhibition at Nanda\Hobbs gallery on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel. Upcoming shows James Makin Gallery, launch and catalogue release, 11 December 2020 Nanda\Hobbs, group show, 'Place', January 2021 James Makin Gallery, summer group show, January 2021 James Makin Gallery, solo show, 2021 Nanda\Hobbs salon show (special edition), April 2021 Becker Minty, solo show, 2021 https://youtu.be/DMnb7YduKLw Antonia Mrljak talks with Maria Stoljar in her studio - YouTube video 'Ritual', 2020, oil on linen, 183 x 152cm 'Girl with fig', 2020, 183 x 152cm 'The clouds moved so quickly it left the sky blue', 2020, oil on linen, 146 x 146cm 'A garden of rust and desire', 2020, oil on linen, 157 x 158cm 'I have come home I', 2020, oil on linen, 183 x 152cm 'No rules', 2020, oil on linen, 152 x 122cm
12/11/202041 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ep 101: Joshua Yeldham

Joshua Yeldham's imagery is steeped in nature. His large works range from portraying the landscape with its stunning mystical trees, to figures with a tribal aesthetic, to his iconic owls which he has famously painted and sculpted multiple times over the years, even as a self portrait.  As you get closer to these works you realise they are intricately composed with astonishing detail. And the marks aren’t limited to paint. They’re often created through carving into the board or paper and in some cases even by inserting pieces of cane into the surface which protrude to create an exciting visual experience. The sculptural quality of Joshua's work is both beautiful and technically outstanding. His works often reference the landscape near his home on Sydney’s Pittwater where untouched bushland converges on the Hawkesbury River, a short boat trip from his home. Nature plays a crucial role in his art and he spends significant periods of time connecting with it. Although he experienced a challenging time at boarding school, his life took an adventurous turn when he completed his schooling in Switzerland - from risking his life in the mountains of Venezuela to living in an abandoned double decker bus in the Australian desert. His early successes even took him to L.A. after receiving an Emmy for a film he wrote, directed and produced in his early 20s. He has exhibited in over 30 solo shows, including a well-received survey show, and his work is highly sought after in Australia and internationally.  To hear my conversation with Joshua press 'play' beneath the above photo. Scroll down to see a short video of Joshua in his studio where he talks with me about his influences, work and where he shows me how he uses a rotary tool to carve into his work. His powerful exhibition 'Providence' was held at Sydney’s Arthouse Gallery in November 2020, opening shortly after this interview was recorded. For more information about Joshua's work, visit his website here. https://youtu.be/5Ocg2oLZ008 Joshua Yeldham talks with Maria Stoljar in his studio 'Monstera Deliciosa Owl', 2020, acrylic and cane on hand-carved board, 210 x 159cm 'Yeomans Bay - Bird Rock', 2020, acrylic and cane on hand-carved board, 202 x 246cm 'Angophora - Yeomans Bay', 2020, acrylic and cane on hand-carved board 'Providence', 2020, acrylic cane and instrument on hand-carved board, 202 x 246cm 'Self portrait - Morning Bay', 2013, instrument, cane, shells and oil on carved board 200 x 244cmFinalist, The Archibald Prize, 2013, AGNSW 'Mother tree - Morning Bay' 2017, acrylic on hand-carved paper, 210 x 210 cm Finalist, The Wynne Prize, 2017, AGNSW
11/9/20201 hour, 28 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ep 100: Archibald Wynne and Sulman tour

An edited version of this episode is also a video which you can see here: When I started this podcast in July 2016 with no knowledge of audio recording - let alone how to start a podcast - I never imagined that four years later I would have interviewed close to a hundred painters, as well as curators and authors, and have a YouTube channel with over 100 videos filmed on my iPhone. Building up this podcast would not have been possible, though, without the encouragement of those close to me and the time and generosity of my guests as well as many others' support in the wonderful Australian arts community. It has also been a privilege to get to know so many of you listeners either through messages, comments on social media or meeting you in person. Even if we haven't had any contact, you are the reason I keep doing the show so thank you for listening. I couldn't think of a better place to celebrate the centenary episode than the Art Gallery of NSW where about a quarter of my podcast guests are finalists in the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes. So I'd like to say a big thankyou to the Art Gallery of NSW who allowed me in with my selfie stick to film and speak in front of these works.  You can listen to this episode as an audio guide if you are at the gallery (scroll down for a map of where the works are), watch the edited version as a video here or just listen as an audio episode - all the works are reproduced below. Click here to see the map if you are looking at this on your podcast app. Next to each artist's name is a time marking for each painting so you can skip forward or back. https://youtu.be/C0DniKUU7Uo The Sulman Prize 1. Joanna Braithwaite (3:12) 'Hoopla' oil on canvas 175 x 198.5 x 2 cm 2. Alan Jones (4:00) Painting 266 (Mike Kenny Oval), acrylic on board, 144 x 157.5cm 3. Katherine Hattam (5:00) 'History and fiction', oil on linen, 152 x 152cm 4. Paul Ryan (5:57) 'Three imaginary boys', oil on linen, 138 x 153cm 5. Abdul Abdullah (7:04) 'We didn't start the fire', oil on linen, 198.5 x 163cm 6. Marikit Santiago (winner) (8:05) 'The divine', acrylic, oil, pen, pyrography and 18ct gold leaf on ply, 179.5 x 120.5cm The Wynne Prize 7. Aida Tomescu (9:20) 'Silent spring', oil on linen, 200.5 x 307 x 6.5 cm 8. Del Kathryn Barton (10:30) ' I take it down to the flow', bronze, acrylic-painted MDF plinth 190 x 75 x 55 cm 9. Tim Storrier (11:35) 'The plague year (an itinerant's repose), acrylic on canvas, 107 x 300cm 10. Natasha Bieniek (12:30) 'Lalla', oil on gold mirror Dibond, 57 x 43.5cm 11. Luke Sciberras (13:20) 'White Christmas, Bell, NSW', oil on board, 160 x 244cm 12. Lucy Culliton (14:30) 'Gunningrah, Bottom Bullock', oil on canvas, 183 x 183cm 13. Hubert Pareroultja (winner) (15:15) 'Tjoritja (West MacDonnell Ranges, NT)', acrylic on canvas, 183 x 244cm 14. Guy Maestri (16:12) 'The rain song', oil on linen, 198 x 244cm The Archibald 15. Dee Smart (17:50) 'I'm here', oil on birch wood board, 59 x 49cm 16. Marc Etherington (19:20) 'Sleeping beauty (portrait of Michael Reid OAM), acrylic on canvas, 221 x 191cm 17. Vincent Namatjira (20:15) 'Stand strong for who you are', acrylic on linen, 152 x 198cm 18. Blak Douglas (21:15) 'Writing in the sand', synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 250 x 250cm 19. Abdul Abdullah (22:20) Untitled self-portrait, oil and aerosol on linen, 183 x 163cm 20. William Mackinnon (23:15) 'Sunshine and Lucky (life), acrylic and oil on linen, 220 x 160cm 21. Jonathan Dalton (24:15) 'Angela', oil on linen, 168 x 132.5cm 22. Nick Stathopoulos (25:05) 'Ngaiire', acrylic and oil on linen, 96.5 x 96.5cm 23. Wendy Sharpe (26:10) 'Magda Szubanski - comedy and tragedy', oil on linen, 183 x 147cm 24. Peter Wegner (26:55) 'Chef's coat, Graeme Doyle', oil on alumnium, 118.5 x 118.
11/1/202032 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 99: Wendy Sharpe and ‘Magic’

You can also watch this episode as a video here. To hear the episode as an audio podcast click on 'play' above. Leading artist Wendy Sharpe talks with me in her Sydney studio about her fabulous show 'Magic' at King Street Gallery on William. We also talk about the controversy around her Sulman finalist painting ‘The Witches’ in 2016, her involvement in the innovative SBS show Life Drawing Live, the story behind her striking Archibald portrait of Magda Szubanski and lots more.  I previously interviewed Wendy on the podcast in 2018 where we talked about her life and how she became an artist. You can hear that episode here. 'Magic' continues at King Street Gallery on William until 24 October 2020. https://youtu.be/7ESdZSoJGuo Artist Wendy Sharpe talks with Maria Stoljar 'Fluid Time', 2020, oil on linen, 84 x 92cm 'Walking home', 2020, oil on linen, 145 x 170cm 'Night Magic', 2014, oil on linen, 183 x 145cm 'The Witches', 2016, oil on linen, 160 x 146.5cmFinalist, Sir John Sulman Prize, 2016 'Wheel of Fortune', 2020, oil on linen, 125 x 125cm 'Erskineville station', 2018, oil on canvas, 145 x 183cmFinalist Sir John Sulman Prize 'Hocus pocus', 2020, oil on linen, 147 x 183cm 'Forever is composed of nows', 2020, oil on linen, 145 x 160cm 'Other people's monsters', 2019, oil on linen, 125 x 125cm Wendy with the papier mache sculpture which she made and which appears in her paintings. 'Magda Szubanski - comedy and tragedy' 2020, oil on linen, 183 x 147cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2020 Sketches Wendy made in preparation for the Szubanski Archibald portrait Jan Matejko'Stanczyk', 1862, oil on canvas, 120 x 88cm
10/21/202033 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ep 98: Wayne Tunnicliffe, curator of ‘Streeton’

In the late 19th century, impressionism swept through the art world. In Australia, a group of young artists embraced the new movement - they would meet in artist's camps and paint en plein air. Among them was a young Arthur Streeton who would in due course become one of Australia's most loved and respected artists.   Wayne Tunnicliffe has curated an outstanding retrospective of Streeton’s work. Wayne is Head Curator of Australian art at the Art Gallery of NSW, and the retrospective gathers together over 150 of Streeton’s works, some not seen in public in over 100 years. This is Streeton as he has never been seen before. Wayne had the idea for the exhibition when he was curatorial adviser to an exhibition of Australian impressionists at the National Gallery in London. It was clear to him that Streeton stood out as the most significant landscape painter in the group. It makes sense that this retrospective is held at the Art Gallery of NSW. Not only does the Gallery have the largest collection of Streetons anywhere in the world, but they started buying his work in 1890 when he was an emerging artist at only 23 years of age.  In this episode we explore Streeton's life: his early years, his meeting some of the key figures in Australian art, his experience of life in London and during WWI, and his later years back in Australia. We also dig deep into a couple of the works with Wayne providing some fascinating insights. To hear the interview press 'play' beneath the above feature photo. You can see images of the works we talk about below. Streeton opens at the Art Gallery of NSW on 7 November 2020 and runs until 14 February 2021. To purchase tickets to the exhibition click here. https://youtu.be/JRvUErfm87Y Video excerpt from the podcast interview with Wayne Tunnicliffe on the forthcoming exhibition 'Streeton'. Here we talk about the iconic painting 'Fire's On' from the AGNSW's collection. To hear the full audio podcast episode (and more about this painting) click on the 'play' button under the feature photo at the top of this page. 'Golden Summer, Eaglemont', 1889, oil on canvas, 81.3 x 152.6cmNational Gallery of Australia, Canberra, purchased 1995 ‘Still glides the stream, and shall for ever glide’ 1890, oil on canvas, later mounted on hardboard, 82.6 x 153 cm Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, purchased 1890 Photo: Jenni Carter, AGNSW 'Spring', 1890, oil on canvas on plywood, 81.4 x 152.6cmNational Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Gift of Mrs Margery Pierce, 1978 'Fire's on', 1891, oil on canvas 225.5 x 164 cm, Art Gallery of New South Wales Purchased 1893 Photo: Jenni Carter, AGNSW 'From McMahon's Point - fare one penny' 1890 oil on canvas 117.7 x 97.5 cm National Gallery of Australia, Canberra Purchased 1972 ‘The purple noon’s transparent might’ 1896 oil on canvas, 123 x 123 cm National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, purchased 1896 33-2 Photo: National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 'The Grand Canal' 1908 oil on canvas, 93 x 169 cm Collection of Susan Clarke, Victoria Photo: Glen Watson Arthur Streeton 'Balloons on fire' 1918 oil on canvas 63.4 × 76.2 cm National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Gilbee Bequest, 1918 Photo: National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
10/11/202052 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 97: Jude Rae and ‘424-428’

After months of disruption and pessimism wreaked by the global pandemic, seeing Jude Rae's exhibition '424-428' at The Commercial in Sydney was as uplifting as the paintings themselves. The towering concrete walls of the gallery would ordinarily overpower an exhibition of five paintings but the exquisite works easily took command of the space. Viewing the exhibition will be an experience I'll never forget. The genre of still life has a rich tradition in the history of painting; from those Cézannian apples and Margaret Preston's flowers to the skulls of the Dutch painters reminding us that one day we’re all going to die. They say so much more than mere objects on a table. The subjects of Jude Rae's still life paintings, however, aren’t flowers or fruit. They range from gas cylinders and milk crates to plastic buckets, bottles and spaghetti jars. She's attracted to these objects not necessarily because of any intrinsic beauty but because of the potential they present to her as a painter. 'They give me work to do', she says. Jude's work is not limited to still life. She's an acclaimed portraitist and has won the Portia Geach Memorial Award for portraiture twice. Last year her portrait of Sarah Peirse was highly commended in the Archibald prize. She also paints mood-filled architectural interiors and both the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the High Court of Australia recently acquired excellent examples of those works. Jude is a previous podcast guest and you can hear more about her  life and how she became an artist in episode 28. We met at the gallery for this interview where I also filmed Jude talking about her work. Scroll down to see that video. You can also see my 2017 video of Jude in her studio here. To hear Jude Rae speak with me on the podcast about her recent work press 'play' beneath the above photo. Show Notes Jude RaeJude Rae on Instagram https://youtu.be/oLtDUCMTxhs Jude Rae talks with me about her exhibition '424-428' 'SL425', 2020, oil on linen, 112 x 137.5cmPhoto: Felicity Jenkins 'SL426', 2020, oil on linen, 122 x 137.5cmPhoto: Felicity Jenkins 'SL427', 2020, oil on linen, 122 x 137.5cmPhoto: Felicity Jenkins 'SL424', 2020, oil on linen, 112 x 137.5cmPhoto: Felicity Jenkins 'SL428', 2020, oil on linen, 112 x 137.5cmPhoto: Felicity Jenkins Detail of 'SL428' in progress (unfinished) 'Interior 370 (foyer I)', 2017, oil on linen, 260 x 198cmCollection: Art Gallery of NSW 'SL189', 2006, oil on linen, 1050 x 1350mm Installation view Jude Rae: 424 - 428, at The Commercial, Sydney, 2020 (photo: The Commercial)
9/21/202039 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 96: Scott Bevan on William Dobell

Reading Scott Bevan’s biography of 20th century artist William Dobell is like viewing one of Dobell’s portraits; Scott takes us behind the exterior of the subject and into their inner life. He just uses words instead of paint. Scott is a journalist, TV and radio presenter, musician and biographer. In this podcast interview, I talk with him about the life of Dobell in the context of the changing art world of the 20th century.  In particular, we go back seventy seven years to when William Dobell famously won the Archibald Prize with a portrait of his friend Joshua Smith. With less than flattering facial features and elongated arms and neck , the painting was a clear and challenging departure from the more traditional portraits of the previous years. Almost every Australian held a view on that painting. Some were excited, some were shocked - others were even angry. In an unprecedented turn of events, two entrants who missed out on the prize started a court action to try to stop Dobell from receiving the prize money. Those events in 1943 would not only change the course of art in Australia but would traumatise Dobell and Smith for years to come. In ‘Bill: The Life of William Dobell’, Scott takes us into Dobell’s life through the people who knew him, both in Sydney and in the town of Wangi Wangi where he ultimately found peace from the scrutiny surrounding the events of 1943. Most of all he brings to life the complex artist that was William Dobell with enthusiasm and empathy. To hear the podcast episode, click play beneath the feature photo above. To purchase a copy of the book click on the book's title in the show notes below. Photo: Scott Bevan stands in front of a painting by Susan O'Doherty Show Notes Scott Bevan'Bill: The Life of William Dobell'Sir William DobellJulian AshtonGeorge LambertHenry TonksWilliam OrpenJoshua SmithMargaret Olley 'Bill: The Life of William Dobell' by Scott Bevan 'Portrait of an Artist (Joshua Smith)' before it was destroyed by fireWinner of Archibald Prize 1943 'The Duchess Disrobes', 1936, oil on plywood, 35.5 x 27cmCollection: Art Gallery of NSW Mrs South Kensington, 1937, oil on wood panel, 38.2 x 33.2cm Collection: Art Gallery of NSW 'Margaret Olley', 1948, oil on hardboard, 114.3 x 85.7 cm boardCollection: Art Gallery of NSWWinner Archibald Prize 1948 'Storm Approaching, Wangi', 1948, oil on cardboard on composition board, 32.9 x 56cmWinner Wynne Prize 1948
9/1/20201 hour, 15 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ep 95: Louisa Chircop

Creating her work through intuition, Louisa Chircop takes us into another world - the world of her subconscious. Dreamlike landscapes containing disembodied limbs, headless figures and mysterious forms - some representational others more abstract - create a surrealist atmosphere which draws the viewer closer to see what the artist has unearthed and portraits take on an extra layer of meaning. Her work crosses painting, mixed media, photomontage and sculpture and she has exhibited in nine solos shows. She has won several prizes including the James Gleeson Prize for Surrealism twice and her work was acquired for the Kedumba Collection, one of Australia’s most highly regarded public collections of contemporary drawing. Louisa has also been a finalist in many other prizes including the Portia Geach Memorial Award and the Dobell prize for Drawing. Figures and characters from art history also come through in her work and her deep knowledge of the history of art is something she passes on to her university students who she lectures in painting and drawing. Recording this interview in Louisa's studio in Sydney was a thoroughly enjoyable experience. Her enthusiasm is infectious as you will hear in this interview. To listen to the podcast episode click play beneath the photo above. A short video of Louisa in her studio will be uploaded to the Talking with Painters YouTube channel and to this website soon. Above photo of Louisa in her studio by Simone Silverman Show Notes Louisa ChircopLouisa Chircop on InstagramRoy JacksonJuz KitsonHans BellmerKiata MasonIdris MurphyHieronymus Bosch's Garden of Earthy DelightsPhilip Guston Movers and Shapers on InstagramHazelhurst Arts Centre https://youtu.be/nt4j7czd-BA Louisa Chircop in the studio 'Juz Kitson Imitating Venus', 2018, oil on canvas, 220 x 167cm 'Shower and Demons' (Study for self portrait - A Shower with St Anthony) 2020, mixed media and photomontage on Arches, 76 x 56cm 'Bacon whispers sweet nothings' (Bacon murmure des mots doux) 2019, mixed media and photomontage on Arches 56 x 76cm 'Morther Dreaming - right/wrong' 2016, mixed media on Arches, 56 x 76 'A Garden of Earthly Delights - Happiness is like glass, it soon breaks (Panel 1)', 2017, mixed media and photomontage on Arches, 130 x 102cm 'Juz Kitson - Love and Interrogation', 2018, oil on canvas, 167 x 130cm
8/11/202051 minutes, 53 seconds
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Ep 94: William Mackinnon and ‘Learning to love the wind’

William Mackinnon is a previous podcast guest. In this episode we talk about his show with Hugo Michell Gallery, 'Learning to love the wind' coming up in a few weeks. We also talk about his life in Ibiza, Spain, where he lives with his wife and young son, and how this body of work has developed in these times of change, both global and personal. You can hear more about William's interesting life and work in episode 38 of the podcast. I'll be uploading a short video centring around this exhibition to the website, social media and the Talking with Painters YouTube channel soon. Upcoming show 'Learning to love the wind', Hugo Michell Gallery, Adelaide, Australia, 3 September - 3 October 2020 https://youtu.be/I_lbk1rB1OA 'The New Family', acrylic oil and enamel on linen, 260 x 200cm 'Post-traumatic growth', acrylic, oil and enamel on linen, 260 x 200cm 'Burke and Wills (ii)', acrylic oil and enamel on linen, 200 x 450cm 'Foggy brain / teething', acrylic oil and enamel on linen, 200 x 300cm
7/21/202039 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ep 93: Belinda Fox

Belinda Fox's work is extraordinary. Whether it’s an intricate bird in mid-flight or abstract geometric forms, she combines paint, printmaking, drawing, wax and collage to produce works of great detail and beauty. When she was only in her twenties Belinda became a master printer at Port Jackson Press, collaborating with leading Australian artists. It wasn't long before she decided to become a full time artist and since that time she’s won multiple art prizes, been awarded many grants and residencies and has exhibited in over 25 solo shows across the world. Primarily working in watercolour, her experience in printmaking has led her to experiment beyond traditional works on paper to produce unique works with an ethereal quality. Her upcoming show 'Fragment(ed)' with Gallery Smith in Melbourne opens in July 2020 and her next show will take place in Berlin with Michael Reid in October. Earlier this year she exhibited with Maybaum gallery in San Francisco and she has been with Sydney's Arthouse Gallery since 2003. Belinda grew up in the country town of Mildura in Victoria and now lives in the Hague in the Netherlands. We recorded this episode by Zoom during the 2020 coronavirus lockdown. We talk about her time as a master printer, why she turned to painting, the grounds of her paintings, her interest in humanitarian issues and when she reflects that in her work, studio life, homeschooling in lockdown and a lot more. Click 'play' below the above feature photo to hear the podcast interview. Scroll down for a short video with highlights of the podcast interview. Upcoming shows 'Fragment(ed)', Gallery Smith, Melbourne, Australia, 23 July - 22 August, 2020'Add it Up', Michael Reid Galleries, Berlin, Germany, 16 October - 14 November, 2020 Show Notes Belinda FoxBelinda Fox on InstagramBelinda Fox at Gallery SmithBelinda Fox at Arthouse GalleryBelinda Fox at Michael ReidBelinda Fox at Maybaum GalleryPort Jackson Press 'Back to the Start' - Monograph of Belinda FoxMelinda SchawelLuke SciberrasJohn OlsenDorothy NapangardiJoshua YeldhamDavid LarwillNeville French https://youtu.be/JhKCr3jnYGU Artist Belinda Fox talks with Maria Stoljar 'Tapestry VI', 2017, watercolour, drawing, ink on board, 110 x 100cmPhoto: Hein van Liempd 'The News Pounded I (hard and soft), c2020, watercolour, ink, encaustic wax, drawing on board, 110 x 100cmPhoto: Hein van Liempd 'Fragment 14', 2020, watercolour, ink, drawing on board, 30 x 29.5cm (with shelf)Photo: Hein van Liempd 'Tilt II' 2017, archival pigment print on paper mounted to dibond aluminium, 240 x 194cmPhoto: Hein van Liempd 'The News Pounded II' (up and down)' watercolour, ink, drawing collage, woodcut on board, 110 x 360cmPhoto: Hein van Liempd 'Waiver', 2019, watercolour, ink, encaustic wax, drawing on board, 130 x 120cmPhoto: Hein van Liempd
6/22/202045 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 92: Tim Maguire

Tim Maguire is one of Australia’s leading contemporary artists, acclaimed internationally for his astonishing large scale paintings.  From afar, they are familiar subjects; flowers in a tight composition, translucent grapes, an inquiring snail. But up close, multiple layers of transparent paint and a fascinating combination of large brushstrokes and expressive splashes transport the viewer to another world. Maguire’s work is held in Australia's major public collections, dozens of corporate and private collections and he has exhibited in over 80 solo shows around the world from France, Germany and the UK to New York and China and right across Australia including a knockout survey show at Newcastle Art Gallery in 2017. His practice also crosses printmaking, light box works and film which were included in that exhibition. Travel has also been an essential part of his life as an artist and he has spent a large part of his adult years in Europe, especially the UK and France. He and his wife, artist Adrienne Gaha, now live and work between Australia and France. In his exhibition 'Small Worlds' at Martin Browne Contemporary in Sydney, he revisits his earlier interest in 17th century Dutch still life subject matter but with a different approach. Created over the period of the recent Australian bushfires and the onset of coronavirus, the work took on an unexpected significance for the artist which he relates in this interview. We talk about his time studying in Europe, his early work, printmaking, his colour separation process and lots more. To hear the podcast interview press ‘play’ beneath the above photo or listen however you get your podcasts. Scroll down to see a YouTube video of Tim Maguire talking with Maria Stoljar about his exhibition 'Small Worlds' which was held in June 2020 at Martin Browne Contemporary in Sydney. Current Show 'Small Worlds' at Martin Browne Contemporary, current until 21 June 2020. Show Notes Tim MaguireTim Maguire at Martin Browne ContemporaryTim Maguire at Tolarno GalleriesTony CraggJörg ImmendorffGerhard RichterJan DibbetsAdrienne GahaBarnett NewmanJosef AlbersClement GreenbergAustralian Print Workshop https://youtu.be/ky8tB0OE2d0 Tim Maguire talks with Maria Stoljar about his exhibition 'Small Worlds' 'Untitled 20200403', 2020, oil on canvas, 202 x 192cm Untitled 20200203', 2020, oil on canvas, 162 x 182cm Detail of above work, 'Untitled 20200203', 2020, oil on canvas 'Untitled 94U39', 1994, diptych, oil on canvas 200cm x 400cm, Permanent collection, Art Gallery of NSW 'Untitled 20070401', 2007, oil on canvas, 180 x 285cm 'Untitled 20180501, 2018, oil on canvas, 135 x 120cm 'Untitled 98U42', 1998, oil on 9 MDF panel, 180 x180cm 'End of century (Fin de siècle)', 1992, oil on canvas, 5 panels, 91.8 x 517.5cm (overall)National Gallery of Victoria, permanent collection 'Under Bridges I' 1989, lithograph on paper, image 43 x 43cm, paper 76 x 56cm, edition of 25 'Untitled 98U57', 1998, oil on canvas, 249 x 208.4National Gallery of Victoria, permanent collection
6/4/20201 hour, 6 minutes, 18 seconds
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Ep 91: Colin Pennock

Colin Pennock's work could be described as landscape painting but it certainly doesn’t fall into that category in any traditional sense.  Although there's almost always a horizon line, or the remnants of one,  he throws the traditional ideas of sky, land and sea into ambiguity. The glorious pieces of impasto paint which are so distinctive in his work provide a fragmented way of seeing the world and it’s almost impossible for the viewer not to feel some response to the energy and movement generated in his work. Colin has painted for 35 years and has exhibited in over 20 solo shows. He won the Mosman Alan Gamble Memorial Art Prize and has been finalist in many others. He was Arthouse Gallery's featured artist at Sydney Contemporary last year and his show The Modernist 2020 with Scott Livesey Galleries in Melbourne opened a few days after this interview was recorded in May 2020. Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Colin has lived and worked in many places across the globe from London to New York and across Australia, but it’s in Queensland's idyllic Noosa Hinterland where he and his wife, jewellery designer Katrina Pennock, have settled for the last 10 years. I talk with Colin about his life and work, including his experiences working as a teenage police officer during the Troubles in Northern Ireland, witnessing the horror of 9/11, finding his visual language in Australia, colour, composition and more. He is represented by galleries in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and London (see below). Scroll down to see a short video of excerpts from the podcast interview and footage of Colin in his studio. Above photo by Carl Warner Current show The Modernist 2020, Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne, 14 May - 6 June 2020 Show Notes Colin Pennock at Scott Livesey GalleriesColin Pennock at Arthouse GalleryColin Pennock at BMG ArtColin Pennock at Serena MortonColin Pennock on InstagramMarc Chagall https://youtu.be/a84ETfKRukc 'Summer's conversation', 2020, oil on linen, 183 x 183cmPhoto courtesy of Scott Livesey Galleries 'After you've taken your share', 2019, oil on linen, 142 x 142cmPhoto courtesy of Arthouse Gallery 'Along the river bank', 2020, oil on linen, 140 x 140cmPhoto courtesy of Scott Livesey Galleries 'Starting with what we have' 2019, oil on linen, 202 x 202cmPhoto courtesy of Arthouse Gallery 'Twenty twenty', 2020, oil on linen, 200 x 200cmPhoto courtesy of Scott Livesey Galleries
5/17/202055 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ep 90: Emily Imeson

A true plein air painter, Emily Imeson has spent the last two years living a nomadic lifestyle travelling around Australia with her partner in their beloved Troopy 4WD.   For much of that time Emily’s studio has been the Australian outback. Whether she's using the side of the car as an easel or working flat on the ground of the Australian desert, she is engulfed by her surroundings and transfers that experience onto the canvas. A few days before COVID caused a lockdown in Australia, I visited Saint Cloche Gallery in Paddington to see Emily‘s latest solo show. Called 'Take Me There', it was a collection of works she created on her travels. They were powerful and evocative paintings.  She has exhibited in six solo shows across Australia and has had work in many more group shows and last year she was awarded the Macquarie Group Emerging Artist prize. What struck me most when I spoke with Emily, though, was her close connection with nature and the Australian environment and her understanding of the significant relationship Indigenous communities have and have had with the land. Her aim is to convey that connection to the viewer and to remind us that we were always meant to be closely connected with nature.  Scroll down for video of highlights of the podcast interview. To hear the podcast interview click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Feature photo courtesy of the artist Upcoming show Solo online exhibition at Edwina Corlette Gallery, Brisbane, 13 - 26 August, 2020 Show Notes Emily ImesonEmily Imeson InstagramEmily Imeson at Saint Cloche GalleryEmily Imeson at Edwina Corlette GalleryEmily Imeson at AK Bellinger GalleryEmily Imeson at Lonely Goat Gallery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ya1IId8GJLg&feature=youtu.be 'Blue Bonnets', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 125 x 140cm 'Alive in the Dead of Night', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 123 x 123cmWinner Macquarie Group Emerging Artist Prize, 2019 (acquisition) 'Dances with Shadows', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 90 x 115cm 'On the Run', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 110 x 190cm 'Acacia Bloom and Troopy Dust', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 95 x 115cm
5/4/202052 minutes, 31 seconds
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Ep 89: Lucas Grogan

There’s no mistaking a Lucas Grogan work. Whether it’s a mural, an ink drawing or an intricate quilt, his detailed monochromatic patterns are unique and his carefully chosen lines of text are loaded with meaning and humour. Although he’s only in his 30s, he’s exhibited in over 20 solo shows and has been working as a full time artist since 2012.  His work is held in numerous private and public collections including the National Gallery of Australia. His survey show, Long Story Short, was three years in the making and opened in his home town of Maitland at the Maitland Regional Art Gallery at the end of February. Unfortunately it coincided with the disruption brought by COVID-19 and closed a few short weeks later, almost two months before the scheduled end date. Nonetheless, it is a triumph and Lucas filmed a walk through of the show before it closed. The team at Maitland Regional Art Gallery is also bringing together more digital content relating to the show which will be available on their website.   Lucas' next solo show opens at the end of July, 2020, at Hugo Michell Gallery in Adelaide. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' on the above feature photo. Scroll down for a short video from the conversation which includes footage from his survey show. Photo courtesy of the artist Current and Upcoming shows 'Long Story Short', Maitland Regional Art Gallery, now online Solo show, Hugo Michell Gallery, Adelaide, 30 july - 29 August 2020 Show Notes Lucas Grogan at Hugo Michell GalleryLucas Grogan at Martin Browne ContemporaryMaitland Regional Art GalleryNational Gallery of Australia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7y0buiKQjk 'A Deliberation', 2014, ink, watercolour and acrylic on archival mount board, 152.5 x 102cm,National Gallery of Australia collection 'A Curator Asked', 2018, acrylic and ink on mount board, 28 x 21cm, private collection 'A library #4'(detail), 2017, ink and acrylic on marine ply, 2 panels, 244 x 244cm, private collection Installation photo of 'A Library #1', 'A Library #2', 'A Library #3', 'A Library #4' and 'A Library #5' at Maitland Regional Art Gallery 'The Shroud', 2016, cotton on Italian wool, Venetian lace, Chux and cotton, 259 x 239cm, artist collection
4/15/202040 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 88: Peter O’Doherty and ‘The distance between us’

Since episode 87 the world has changed. Those huge changes to our whole society and way of life, brought about by the threat of COVID-19, have coincided with the opening of Peter O'Doherty's show at King Street Gallery on William, prophetically called 'The distance between us'. I was planning to film a short video at the opening, asking Peter about his show, but this instead turned into a phone interview which I decided to post as an episode. In addition to his show we also talk about the impacts of the virus both on the visual arts and music industries. This interview was recorded on Thursday 19 March and posted on 23 March and a lot had changed in the intervening 4 days including the temporary closing of the doors of King Street Gallery on William. The show is still online and you can see it here . My goal in the next weeks and months is to keep us connected by continuing to bring you the stories of Australian painters through the podcast and social media. If you haven't already you can connect with me on any of these platforms: InstagramFacebookYouTubeTwitterLinked In A short video of Peter's show will be posted on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel soon! Photo (cropped) by Riste Andrievski Current Show 'The distance between us', King Street Gallery on William, Darlinghurst, Sydney Show Notes Peter O'Doherty on Talking with PaintersPeter O'Doherty at King Street Gallery on WilliamPeter O'Doherty on FacebookPeter O'Doherty Talking with Painters video on YouTube Susan O'DohertyReg MombassaLeo Robba's exhibition at King Street Gallery on WilliamDog Trumpet websiteDog Trumpet on Facebook Edgecliff high rise, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 198x167cm Red block Bondi, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 61x61cm Pot and stove top, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 61x61cm Hotel sink #1, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 61x61cm
3/22/202019 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ep 87: Davida Allen in conversation with William Robinson

Davida Allen and William Robinson, two of Australia's leading painters, are not only both Archibald winners and Queenslanders but have been friends for over 40 years. Although they share their thoughts about the art world and their work, their painting styles and personalities are very different - which might be part of the secret to their long friendship. Davida's current show with Philip Bacon Galleries in Brisbane runs until 28 March 2020 and William Robinson will be showing with the Gallery later this year. This interview focuses on Davida's show and an in-depth interview with William Robinson will be posted closer to his exhibition. Bill is one of Australia’s most important internationally acclaimed painters so to obtain his insights into Davida’s work was a privilege.  Apart from winning the Archibald, Davida is also a four time finalist in the prize and has had 3 major survey exhibitions of her work, most recently in 2018. She’s had over 20 solo shows and her work is held in nearly every major state gallery as well as the National Gallery of Australia and the MOMA in New York. She’s also a novelist and has written and directed an internationally acclaimed film. William Robinson is one of Australia's most significant painters. He has won the Archibald prize twice, the Wynne prize twice and his work is held in over 30 public collections across the world. He is the first Australian artist to have a gallery dedicated to his works – the William Robinson Gallery is located in historic Old Government House in Brisbane. We met in William Robinson’s magnificent studio at his home in Brisbane. To hear our conversation click on the play button beneath the above photo. Current and upcoming shows Davida Allen, solo show, Philip Bacon Galleries current until 28 March 2020William Robinson, solo show, Philip Bacon Galleries, 23 June - 18 July 2020'By the Book', William Robinson Gallery, 2 July - June 2021 Show Notes Davida Allen at Philip Bacon GalleriesWilliam Robinson at Philip Bacon GalleriesWilliam Robinson at Australian GalleriesWilliam Robinson GalleryBetty ChurcherRay HughesRembrandtEdgar DegasSam NeillPicassoHenri SennelierPhilip Bacon Davida Allen interviewed by Sarah Kanowski on ABC's Conversations Davida Allen works Davida Allen 'Dr John Arthur Mckelvie Shera', 1986, oil on canvas, 230.5 x 187cmWinner, 1986 Archibald Prize, AGNSW Davida Allen 'Watching chooks', 2020, oil pastel on Saunders Waterford paper, 75 x 100cm Davida Allen 'Philip Bacon, art dealer, reading a letter from Barry Humphries', 2003, oil on canvas, 206 x 150Finalist 2003 Archibald Prize, AGNSW Davida Allen 'DEATH of my father' 1982, oil on canvas, 165.4 x 280cmPermanent Collection, National Gallery of Victoria Davida Allen 'I dream of Sam Neill when I go to bed', 1986, gouache and black chalk, 50 x 71.6cmPermanent Collection, National Gallery of Victoria William Robinson Works William Robinson 'Self-portrait with stunned mullet', 1994, oil on linen, 197 x 164cmWinner Archibald Prize 1995QUT Art Collection. Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by William Robinson, 2011. William Robinson 'Equestrian self-portrait', 1987, oil on linen, 141 x 192cmWinner Archibald Prize 1987QUT Art Collection. Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by William Robinson, 2011  William Robinson 'The blue pools: Springbrook to Beechmont', 2000, oil on linen, 203 x 259cm QUT Art Collection. Purchased 2013 William Robinson 'Farmyard with Corner Shed', 2016, gouache on paper, 46 x 61cm
3/8/202041 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 86: Ian Fairweather (part 2): Ann Thomson

Few other artists have captured Australia's imagination quite like Ian Fairweather. This is the second part of a double episode on this 20th century artist. In the last episode I interviewed Claire Roberts, co -editor of the book 'Ian Fairweather A Life in Letters' and we talked about the events of Fairweather’s life from his early childhood.  In this episode I talk with Ann Thomson, one of Australia's leading contemporary artists who I have previously interviewed on this podcast. Ann met Fairweather on several occasions with her then husband, photographer Robert Walker. They visited him on Queensland's Bribie Island where he lived for the last 20 years of his life before he died in 1974.  He’s considered one of Australia’s most important artists. Although he was often described as an outsider or a recluse - he lived on Bribie Island in self-made huts apart from the rest of the community - he was actually quite sociable through his letters and welcomed friends who came to visit. He famously sailed off into the open sea from Darwin on a raft he built himself, heading for Portuguese Timor over 600km away.  It would be 16 days before he would reach land after his raft sailed off course and he had almost lost his life. The RAAF were called in and an obituary appeared in the newspaper. It became an international story. What he told Ann Thomson when she asked about the ordeal is priceless. The memories of Ann Thomson are interesting, insightful and humorous and gave me a better idea of the man who was Ian Fairweather. To hear the podcast click on 'play' beneath the above photo. Click here to hear my interview with Claire Roberts. Click here to purchase the book 'Ian Fairweather A Life in Letters' Photograph of Ann Thomson by Greg Weight (cropped) Selected works House by the Sea, 1967 Epiphany, 1962 Gethsemane, 1958Kite Flying, 1958Monastery 1961 'Ian Fairweather A Life in Letters'Co-edited by Claire Roberts and John ThompsonPublished by Text Publishing
2/23/202037 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ep 85: Ian Fairweather (part 1): Claire Roberts

Learning about someone through their letters is a fascinating exercise and this is precisely what Claire Roberts set out to do when she amassed over 700 letters of the celebrated 20th century artist Ian Fairweather. Together with cultural historian John Thompson, Roberts has produced a brilliant book 'Ian Fairweather A Life in Letters' which not only gives us an insight into Fairweather's life in his own words but provides context by setting periods of letters in chapters with their own introduction. The book is published by Text Publishing. Claire Roberts is an art historian, curator and Associate Professor of Art at the University of Melbourne, specialising in modern and contemporary Chinese art and the cultural flows between Australia and Asia. It was the author Murray Bail who suggested she write this book.  He had written a monograph on Fairweather and had already located many letters but while that monograph focussed on Fairweather's art, this book looks more at the man himself.  354 letters are ultimately included in this publication and the book was 12 years in the making. Fairweather lived an unusual life. Although he was born in Scotland in 1891, the last 20 years of his life he lived on Queensland’s Bribie Island in a hut he made himself with a thatched roof and dirt floor and photos of his huts are included in the book. However, the event which is probably the reason I became interested in Fairweather in the first place is the famous raft story where Fairweather sailed off into the open sea from Darwin heading for Portuguese Timor on a triangular raft he built himself and which was not much bigger than he was. What happened next was incredible. He’s without a doubt one of Australia’s most important artists, with his works held in almost every state and national institution as well as the Tate in London and other international museums. In the next episode of the podcast I talk with artist Ann Thomson who actually met Fairweather on several occasions. She brings him to life and reinforces many of the observations Claire Roberts makes in this episode.  Fairweather has been described as a recluse and a hermit but, as you will hear from Claire's careful consideration of his life, it's a little more complicated than that. To hear the podcast episode press 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Click the link below to purchase the book. Purchase 'Ian Fairweather A Life in Letters' (2019) Links to things we talk about in this episode Associate Professor Claire RobertsMurray BailThe Slade School of Fine Art Henry TonksLafcadio HearnErnest FenollosaMacquarie GalleriesBribie IslandAnn ThomsonRobert Walker Roy Churcher Lawrence DawsMargaret OlleyThe Drunken Buddha by Ian Fairweather Links to selected major works in Australian Galleries House by the Sea, 1967 Epiphany, 1962 Gethsemane, 1958Kite Flying, 1958Monastery 1961 Ian Fairweather A Life in Letters (2019)Co-edited by Claire Roberts and John ThompsonPublished by Text Publishing
2/22/202047 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ep 84: David Griggs

Stepping into David Griggs' Sydney studio in the lead up to his show at Roslyn Oxley9 gallery was a sensory experience. The scale of his paintings is large and the colour is bold. The word 'psychedelic' has been used more than once in describing his work and it certainly applies to his show about to hit the Sydney art scene. It’s fabulously called Mankini Island. David’s a painter, sculptor and filmmaker, has exhibited in over 25 solo shows and has been hung in the prestigious Archibald Prize eight times.  A large part of who he is as an artist stems from his time in the Philippines where he lived for over 10 years. Many of the works he produced there were included in the powerful survey exhibition ‘Between Nature and Sin’ which travelled across Australia over about two years. Through his Archibald portraits he’s been open about his experiences with depression and in this episode he shares his views on how he manages and overcomes it. Mankini Island opens at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery on Friday, 7 February 2020. To listen to the podcast episode click 'play' beneath the above photo. Scroll down to see a short video of Maria Stoljar talking with David Griggs in his studio Upcoming Shows Mankini Island, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 7 to 29 February, 2020 Show Notes David Griggs on Instagram David Griggs at Roslyn Oxley9 GalleryDavid Griggs at Station GalleryDavid Griggs at Gag ProjectsMatthys GerberJose LegaspiPaul PfeifferAlexie Glass-KantorArtspace https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mFxeocSOQI&t=4s David Griggs talks with Maria Stoljar in his studio 'Karl Heffter', 2020, oil on canvas, 168 x 168cm 'Tracing the antiquity of Jewish alchemy with Alexie Glass-Kantor', 2019, oil on canvas, diptych, each panel 290 x 148.5cmFinalist Archibald prize 2019 Naturalistic Scientism, 2019, acrylic, resin, oil paint on fabric on canvas, 199x367cm NEW YORK LONDON PARIS ROME MANILA CITY JAIL, 2009, Photographic documentation The Bleeding Hearts Club #3, 2006, acrylic on canvas, 320 x 400cmNewcastle Art Gallery Collection 'TV Moore', 2013, acrylic on canvas, 280 x 255cmFinalist, Archibald Prize 2013
2/2/202053 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 83: Philip Wolfhagen

Driving to Philip Wolfhagen's home outside Launceston, Tasmania, was a dreamlike experience. Unlike the dry landscape of drought-affected NSW (we recorded before the onset of the bushfire crisis), there were green farmlands rolling down to a plain with hills in the distance. If it had been dusk I would have felt I was driving through a Wolfhagen painting because capturing the landscape surrounding his property is a large part of Philip's practice. In particular he beautifully captures that moment of twilight, often with a hint of melancholy, through his expert use of colour and superb application of paint.  However, there is more to Philip Wolfhagen than painting. His interests span from music to gardening and building and these other pursuits feed into his work. I thoroughly enjoyed this conversation where we talked about those subjects as well as many others, especially his use of colour. He is one of Australia's most acclaimed and respected contemporary landscape artists. He has exhibited in over 40 solo shows, has won the Wynne prize and the Lloyd Rees art prize amongst other awards, was highly commended in last year’s Hadley’s art prize and has been awarded the Centenary Medal for contribution made to the Arts.   A major survey of his work travelled the country in 2013-14 and his paintings are held in nearly every major state and national public art institution in Australia as well as many private and corporate collections both in Australia and internationally. To listen to the podcast episode press play beneath the above feature photo. Upcoming shows Solo show, Bett Gallery, October 2020Sydney Contemporary International Art Fair with Dominik Mersch Gallery, 10 - 13 September, 2020 Links Philip WolfhagenPhilip Wolfhagen at Bett GalleryPhilip Wolfhagen at Dominik Mersch GalleryPhilip Wolfhagen at Philip Bacon Galleries Colin McCahon A Litany of Vapours, 2007, oil and beeswax on linen, 7 panels200 x 107cm (each), 200 x 941cm (overall)National Gallery of Australia collection Studio journal, 30 July 2007, gouache, ink on paper Delirium Stage VIII, 1990, oil on canvas, 126 x 105cmNational Gallery of Australia collection Third Exaltation, 2011, oil and beeswax on linen, 200 x 214cmPrivate collection Transitory Light, 2017, oil and beeswax on linen, 57 x 46cmTasmanian Museum and Art Gallery collectionWinner Lloyd Rees Art Prize 2017 Studio shot, works in progress, January 2020 Winter Nocturne IV, 2006, oil and beeswax on linen, 200 x 214cmWinner of 2007, Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of NSW Approaching the Cusp  2019, oil and beeswax on linen, 3 panels46 x 171cm overall, Collection of the artistHighly Commended, Hadley's Art Prize 2019 Night Beacon VI,  2005, oil and beeswax on linen, 200 x 210cmNational Gallery of Victoria collection
1/19/202056 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ep 82: Best of 2019

Looking back at the artists of 2019! Listen to this podcast episode for highlights of my conversations with the amazing Australian painters listed below. Click on the artist's name to hear the full interview - and most have a video on their page too! Luke Sciberras Nicholas Harding Kiata Mason Del Kathryn Barton Blak Douglas Neil Frazer Tony Costa Nicole Kelly Tim Storrier Susan Baird Tom Carment Kathrin Longhurst Ben Quilty
12/31/201936 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 81: Lisa Slade, curator of ‘Quilty’

This is not the first time curator Lisa Slade has brought the paintings of Ben Quilty to viewers in Australia, but of those previous exhibitions none has had the depth and breadth of the survey show ‘Quilty’ which has arrived at the Art Gallery of NSW. Distilling fifteen years of creative energy, Slade has brought together an exhibition which not only presents these works to the viewer in a compelling way, but evokes curiosity and creates meaning. The exhibition originated in the Art Gallery of South Australia and travelled to Queensland Art gallery before ending with a Sydney showing. As the Assistant Director, Artistic Programs of the Art Gallery of South Australia, Lisa Slade has also curated exhibitions of many other artists. She has known Ben Quilty for over 20 years forming a strong friendship over that time. This interview therefore not only covers how the show came together and what a curator does but you'll hear about Ben Quilty's life and work from the perspective of someone who knows him well. To hear the podcast conversation press 'play' beneath the above photo or listen however you get your podcasts. The exhibition 'Quilty' is free and is showing at the Art Gallery of NSW until February 2, 2020. Above photo provided by the Art Gallery of South Australia 'Self-portrait after Afghanistan', 2012, oil on canvas, 130 x 120cmPhoto provided by AGNSW 'Margaret Olley', 2011, oil on linen, 170 x150cmPhoto: AGNSW website 'Kandahar' 2011, oil on linen, 140 x 190cmPhoto: Australian War Memorial ' 'Fairy Bower Rorschach' 2012, oil on linen, 241 x 520cm (overall)Photo: AGNSW website 'The Last Supper', 2016, oil on linen, 205 x 268.5cmPhoto provided by AGNSW 'The Last Supper 2017', 2017, oil on linen, 420 x 265cmCollection of the Art Gallery of NSWPhoto: AGNSW/ Mim Stirling
12/8/201932 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 80: Ben Quilty

If you are interested in the arts in Australia you will know of Ben Quilty. He is one of the country's most acclaimed contemporary artists. In the last 15 years he has shot to prominence not just as an artist - although he’s won the Archibald Prize, Doug Moran National Portrait Prize and the Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship - but as an observer and commentator on social and political issues which concern us all. Whether it's issues faced by our indigenous communities, our involvement in wars on foreign soil, and their consequences, or the cruelty of the death penalty imposed on Myuran Sukamaran and on Andrew Chan and Quilty's campaign to save their lives, he pours maximum energy in highlighting the inequities and injustices in our world through his actions, words and art. His belief that art can instigate positive change is inspiring. The excellent survey show 'Quilty' has just landed in Sydney – via Adelaide and Brisbane – and the Art Gallery of NSW is the perfect venue for it given Quilty's HSC major work was hung there in 1991 as part of Art Express and 20 years later he won the gallery's Archibald Prize. He has since become a trustee of the Art Gallery. The exhibition is free and includes works over a 15 year period. The next podcast episode is with Lisa Slade, the curator of the exhibition and close friend of Quilty, who gives an interesting perspective from a curator's point of view. That episode will be online in a few weeks. To hear the podcast interview click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Above feature photo:: AGNSW/ Mim Stirling Current exhibition: 'Quilty, Art Gallery of NSW, current to 2 February 2020, free admission Show Notes Ben Quilty at Jan Murphy GalleryBen Quilty at Tolarno GalleriesBen Quilty on InstagramMargaret OlleyTony Albert Ben Quilty (centre) with Lisa Slade ( Assistant Director Artistic Programs AGSA and curator of 'Quilty') and Justin Paton (Head Curator International Art AGNSW)Photo taken at the exhibition 'Quilty' at the AGNSW 'The Last Supper 2017', 2017, oil on linen, 420 x 265cmCollection of the Art Gallery of NSWPhoto: AGNSW/ Mim Stirling 'Margaret Olley', 2011, oil on linen, 170 x 150cmWinner Archibald Prize 2011Photo: AGNSW 'Kandahar' 2011, oil on linen, 140 x 190cmPhoto: Australian War Memorial 'Captain S. after Afghanistan' 2012, oil on linen, 210 x 230cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2012Photo: AGNSW/ Mim Stirling Self-portrait, after Afghanistan, 2012, oil on linen, 130 x 120cmPhoto: AGNSW/ Mim Stirling 'High Water Mark', 2016, oil on canvas170.5x 160.4cmCollection of the National Gallery of VictoriaPhoto: National Gallery of Victoria
11/16/201941 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 79: Kathrin Longhurst

During the Cold War, the Soviet Bloc and the West were separated in various ways but probably none so dramatically as the Berlin Wall. Erected in 1961, it separated East and West Germans for 28 years.   Kathrin Longhurst was born on the eastern side of that wall and experienced, first-hand, what life was like behind the Iron Curtain. It was a life that would influence the direction of her work as an artist many years later.   A figurative painter and a feminist, her work often parodies the Communist propaganda art which she would see in the streets in East Berlin - but instead of images of triumphant soldiers and workers, she would depict strong, defiant women using military imagery and female sexuality to brilliant effect.  She also paints larger-than-life head and shoulder paintings - from the intense portrayals of children going through tough times in her Forging of a Human Spirit series to her current incredible work focussing on female refugees which were lining the walls of her studio when I met her. Kathrin moved to Australia almost 20 years ago after meeting her Australian husband and became a full time artist in the early 2000s after a career in the corporate world. She has exhibited in over 15 solo shows, has been a finalist in the Archibald Prize, Portia Geach Memorial Award, the Doug Moran National Portrait prize and many other prizes and her work is held in major collections in Australia and overseas. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' beneath the above feature photo. You can also see a short video of Kathrin Longhurst below and on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel . Above feature Photo by Bernie Meyers @breeze.pics Upcoming shows 'Painting the Figure Now' - Zhou B Art Centre, Chicago, current to November 13, 201930th Anniversary Curated Group Exhibition 30 x 30, Flinders Lane Gallery Melbourne, 3 - 21 December 2019Creator and Muse Group  Exhibition Zhou B Art Centre Chicago, May 2020Solo Exhibition Flinders Lane Gallery Melbourne, July 2020'Woman', group exhibition, James Baird Gallery Canada, October 2020 Show Notes Kathrin Longhurst Kathrin Longhurst with Nanda HobbsKathrin Longhurst with Flinders Lane GalleryKathrin Longhurst with Gallery oneKathrin Longhurst on Instagram Socialist realismPortrait Artists AustraliaProject 504Nick StathopoulosMichael Simms‘Eat that Frog’ by Brian Tracy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CBr0XuIbm4&t=11s 'Self: past present and future', 2018,' oil on canvas, 180 x 180cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2018 'Mariama', 2019, oil on linen, 180x180cmFinalist Portia Geach Memorial Award, 2019 Poster Girl, 2011, oil on canvasFinalist Portia Geach Memorial Award, 2011 'Grenade girl', 2015, oil on canvas, 92x122cm Finalist Sir John Sulman prize, 2015 'Ode to Feminism', 2018, triptych, oil on canvas, 180 x 540cm (see below for individual panels)The Bennett Collection of Women Realists (USA) 'Ode to Feminism', 2018, panel 1 of triptych, oil on canvas, 180 x 180cm 'Ode to Feminism', 2018, panel 2 of triptych, oil on canvas, 180 x 180cm 'Ode to Feminism', 2018, panel 3 of triptych, oil on canvas, 180 x 180cm
11/3/201953 minutes, 11 seconds
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Ep 78: Tom Carment

Tom Carment has been painting and writing for over 45 years but it was in his mid twenties that he decided his work would be created solely from life. Changing light and weather conditions, sitter fatigue and repeated packing of materials became daily concerns. His work crosses landscape, portraiture and still life and if you visited the Art Gallery of NSW in 2019 for the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes you may have noticed that there was a Carment work shortlisted in every prize – a rare accomplishment for any artist. The winner of numerous art prizes including the Gallipoli, Mosman and NSW Parliament Plein Air Painting Prize, Tom has been shortlisted in the Archibald 11 times and hung in the Salon des Refusés over 20 times. He has had over 25 solo shows and his work is held in public and private institutions in Australia and overseas. He’s also an acclaimed writer and his most recent book – ‘Womerah Lane: Lives and Landscapes’ - is a memorable collection of stories over the time he has lived in Sydney's inner city suburb of Darlinghurst including pictures of many of his paintings.  His solo show opens at King Street Gallery at the end of October 2019 and when I visited him at his Womerah Lane terrace he was in the process of framing dozens of oil paintings with beautiful Tasmanian blackwood. In this podcast episode you will hear how he started out, his time in Lavender Bay in the 70s living next door to Brett Whiteley, how he only started painting still life at 60, as well as portraiture, landscape, process and more. Just click 'play' under the feature photo. Scroll down to see a short video of Tom Carment talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio. Upcoming Solo show King Street Gallery, Sydney, 29 October to 23 November 2019Book launch of 'Womerah Lane: Lives and Landscapes', King Street Gallery, Sydney, 9 November 2019 Show Notes Tom CarmentTom Carment at King Street GalleryWomerah Lane: Lives and LandscapesRobert GrayCaspar David FriedrichBrett WhiteleyWendy WhiteleyTim StorrierAlbert MarquetGiorgio MorandiGuy WarrenAntonio Lopez GarciaDiego VelazquezJ M Coetzee Centre for Creative PracticeAlbrecht Dürer https://youtu.be/HcvytTVt3Is Tom Carment talks with Maria Stoljar in his studio 'Afternoon Shadow William Street', 2014, oil on linen, 96 x 100cmWinner NSW Parliament Plein Air Art Prize 2014 'James Scanlon, Katoomba Portrait', 2019, oil on linen, 32 x 25cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2019 'Self portrait at 60', 2015, oil on linen, 20 x 15cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2015 'James Scanlon, at William Street', 1989, oil on linen, 42 x 33cm 'Singer typewriter in Don's shed, Perth', 2019, oil on linen, 43.5 x 53.5cmFinalist Sulman Prize 2019 'Where I scattered my Father's ashes, Oratunga, SA', 2019, watercolour on paper, 45.3 x 52cmFinalist Wynne Prize 2019 'Two red onions', 2016, oil on linen, 15 x 20cm 'Two eggs I', 2017, oil on linen, 15 x 20.5cm 'Winter sea, Sorrento', 2018, oil on nine wood panels, 15 x 19cm (average size) 'Night Road', 1975, oil on canvas, 168.7 x 216cmPermanent collection of the Art Gallery of NSWFinalist Wynne prize 1975
10/14/20191 hour, 23 seconds
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Ep 77: Susan Baird

As a child, it never occurred to Susan Baird that she might one day be a painter. She left school at 16 and, after a year of study, found a job working for a graphic designer who also enjoyed painting. It was through seeing him paint that the course of her life shifted entirely. By the age of 18 she'd exhibited in her first solo show in Sydney's premier art district. She went on to study in New York and Sydney and has been painting for over 35 years. She has exhibited in over a dozen solo shows, many more group shows and has been shortlisted in art prizes on over 20 occasions. Primarily working in landscape en plein air, Baird's works reflect the beauty peculiar to this country with colour used expertly through years of experience – using brushes, palette knives and even squeegees to transport us into the dreamlike world she portrays. Her solo show ‘All Around Me’, which opens at Flinders Lane Gallery in Melbourne on 15 October 2019, centres around a place she’s been visiting for over 10 years and where she now owns a home: the historic NSW town of Hill End. In this podcast episode we talk about creativity in childhood, the allure of Hill End, painting techniques, motherhood and much more. To hear the podcast episode click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo. A video filmed in Baird's home in Hill End will be posted on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel and this website by early October 2019. Above feature photo by photographer Sheridan Nilsson. Upcoming shows Solo show, 'All Around Me' at Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, 15 October - 2 November 2019Solo show, Arthouse Gallery, Sydney Show Notes Susan BairdSusan Baird on InstagramSusan Baird at Flinders Lane GallerySusan Baird at Arthouse GalleryNew York Studio SchoolGraham NicksonKevin ConnorLloyd ReesHill EndLuke SciberrasJoanna LogueLewis Miller https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0_IZpOiHVE Susan Baird talks with Maria Stoljar in Hill End 'Bush Telegraph', 2019, oil on linen, 102 x 102cm 'Keeping Watch', 2018, oil on linen, 25 x 60cm 'Gentle Shift, Hill End', 2010, oil on linen, 25 x 30cmHonourable mention and winner of People's Choice award, Paddington Art Prize, 2010 'After the Rain', 2019, oil on linen, 140 x 140cm 'Studio Window, Bowman's Cottage', 2019, Oil on linen 137 x 97cm Finalist Calleen Art Award 2019 'Paper Mache', 2019, oil on linen, 102 x 102cm
9/22/201947 minutes, 54 seconds
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Ep 76: Tim Storrier

Tim Storrier's work sweeps you into his imagination: burning ropes in the desert, clothes wrapped around a torso-shaped void, mood-filled skies with clouds that go on forever. One of Australia's premier artists, his paintings often take the form of a memento mori - a reminder of our mortality - with detritus strewn across the landscape to remind us of what is left after life has moved on. He has been painting for over 50 years and in 1968 was the youngest artist ever to win the Sulman prize at 19 years of age. He has since won the Sulman a second time and has been awarded the Archibald Prize, the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize and Archibald Packing Room Prize. His work is held in most Australian national and state art institutions and in private collections across the world. He has exhibited in dozens of solo shows including a stunning survey show in 2011 at S.H.Ervin Gallery, was a trustee of the Art Gallery of NSW for most of the 90s and has been awarded a member of the Order of Australia for service to the arts. He’s also known for being forthright and at times controversial and I thoroughly enjoyed meeting him at his historic home in Bowral in the Southern Highlands of NSW. We talk about finding one’s voice, his friendships with John Olsen and Brett Whiteley and he talks of the aftermath of Whiteley’s death - he was the person the police called to identify Brett Whiteley’s body -  as well as his views on the Archibald and post modern art (not all positive!). To hear the podcast interview press play below the above feature photo. Scroll down for video of Maria Stoljar talking with Storrier in his home and studio. Above photo of Tim Storrier by Gary Grealy Photography Upcoming show Sydney Contemporary (international art fair), Carriageworks, Australian Galleries, 12-15 September, Sydney Show Notes Tim StorrierTim Storrier at Australian GalleriesTim Storrier at Philip Bacon GalleriesJohn FordSir John Sulman PrizeJohn OlsenBrett WhiteleyWendy WhiteleyPeter KingstonRussell DrysdaleJohn ConstableJohn Singer SargentMemento MoriArchibald PrizeDoug Moran National Portrait PrizeDamien Hirst | 10 Questions | TIME (YouTube)Natasha Bieniek in her studio (Talking with Painters)Sam FullbrookPablo PicassoGeorges Braque https://youtu.be/tjTcgSp69AY Tim Storrier talks with Maria Stoljar - YouTube video Noon (light line), 2014, acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 122 cm 'Night Passage', 1981, type C photograph on metallic photographic paper, 80 x 122 cm 'The Empire of the Coals (blue night run)', 2016, acrylic on canvas, 107 x 244 cm 'The Great Tumble', 2016, acrylic on canvas, 183 x 91 cm 'The Departure Expected (self portrait)' 2009, acrylic on canvas, 198 x 92 cm The Histrionic Wayfarer (after Bosch), 2012, acrylic on canvas, 182 x 122 cm Winner Archibald Prize 2012 'The Arcadian Repose', 2015-16, acrylic on canvas, 200 x 300 cm Finalist Wynne Prize 2017 'The Lunar Savant (Portrait of McLean Edwards)', 2017, acrylic on canvas, 198 x 91 cm Winner Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2018 'The Water Dance', 1998, acrylic on canvas, 183 x 304.5 cm 'Suzy 350', 1968, oil on board, 121.6 x121.6 cm Winner Sulman Prize 1968
8/25/20191 hour, 1 minute, 24 seconds
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Ep 75: Nicole Kelly

Nicole Kelly is one of Australia’s most interesting emerging artists. Her landscapes and portraits are filled with reminiscence and emotion. She’s had 10 solo shows, has won the coveted Brett Whiteley travelling art scholarship, Hurford Hardwood portrait prize, as well as other prizes, and has been finalist in many others. I spoke with her in her studio in Sydney where she was creating work for her November show with Arthouse Gallery in Sydney. We also filmed some video on that day which will be uploaded to the website soon. Nicole grew up in the Sutherland Shire in southern Sydney and now lives in Thirroul, south of Sydney.  She didn’t paint or draw much as a child and in fact was more interested in photography in high school and particularly the work of Bill Henson. After school, encouraged by photographer and academic Ella Dreyfus, she decided to apply for the National Art School. Press play beneath the feature photo above to hear us talk about her time at National Art School, in Paris and a lot more about her paintings and process. Upcoming exhibitions Solo show, Arthouse Gallery, Sydney, 7-23 November 2019Group show, Portia Geach Memorial Award, SH Ervin Gallery Sydney, current until 15 September 2019Group show, 'Southern Swell' Hazelhurst Regional Gallery, Sydney, 23 November 2019 to 2 February 2020Group show, 'Love', Tweed Regional Gallery, Murwillimbah, 6 September to 17 November 2019 Show Notes Nicole KellyNicole Kelly on InstagramNicole Kelly at Arthouse GalleryNicole Kelly at This Is No Fantasy Bill HensonElla DreyfusWillem De KooningChaim SoutineAlberto GiacomettiFrank AuerbachRembrandtEl GrecoTom Carment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6yRDLvAeGA 'An Amorous field' 2018, oil on polyester, 183 x 236cm 'Jumaadi + Clouds + Rain' , 2017, 150 x 130cm, oil on polyesterWinner of Hurford Hardwood Portrait Prize 2018 'Studio nude (self portrait)', 2019, oil on polyesterFinalist 2019 Portia Geach Memorial Award 'Lauren's song', 2018, oil on polyester, 107 x 112cmFInalist, Black Swan Portrait Prize 2018 'The last of the day runs pink' 2019, oil on polyester, 122 x 122cmSalon des Refuses, SH Ervin Gallery, 2019 'Bedroom Window (Lauren and Poppy), oil on polyester, 122 x 123cmFinalist, Vincent Prize 2019
8/4/201948 minutes, 42 seconds
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Ep 74: The Archibald

Here's your guide to the paintings of the 13 podcast guests whose works were shortlisted in the 2019 Archibald prize. Go to episodes 72 and 73 for the Wynne and Sulman guides! Click here for an overview of how to use this guide Click here for images of the Archibald Prize finalists Click here to see the gallery map below if you are looking at this on your podcast app. Feature Photo: 'Lindy Lee', (detail), oil on canvas, 182.5 x 152cm, Tony Costa, winner of Archibald prize 2019 Click on the artist's name below to go to their podcast episode and see the video. The time marking shows where the artist's work is mentioned in the episode and the number in brackets is the number of the work in the AGNSW. 1:25___ Jude Rae (41) 3:35___ Jonathan Dalton (14) 6:40___Prudence Flint (22) 9:38___Tony Costa (winner) (13) 13:05___Blak Douglas (18) 15:50___Paul Ryan (43) 18:13___Marc Etherington (20) 21.11___Loribelle Spirovski (44) 23:35___Laura Jones (27) 25:10___ Vanessa Stockard (45) 27:54___Natasha Bieniek (5) 29:51___ Natasha Walsh (49) 32:45___Euan Macleod (34)
7/17/201935 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ep 73: The Wynne

Here's your guide to the paintings of the seven podcast guests whose works were shortlisted in the 2019 Wynne prize. Go to episodes 72 and 74 for the Sulman and Archibald guides! Click the play button underneath the photo to hear the podcast episode and scroll down for video of the Wynne winner Sylvia Ken. Click here for an overview of how to use this guide Click here for images of the paintings in the Wynne prize Click here to see the Gallery Map if you are looking at this on your podcast app. https://youtu.be/n7FwTgsPOCY Artist Sylvia Ken talks with Maria Stoljar Gallery map of the AGNSW - Archibald, Wynne Sulman prizes exhibition Click on the artist's name below to go to their podcast episode and see the video The time marking shows where the artist's work is mentioned on the podcast and the number following the name is the number of the work in the AGNSW. 0:55___Marc Etherington (61) 3:08___Ken Done (63) 4:34___ Blak Douglas and Elaine Russell (62) 7:38____Natasha Bieniek (54) 10:06___Abdul Abdullah (52) 11:56___Michaye Boulter (55) 13:39___Sylvia Ken (winner) (65)
7/17/201915 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ep 72: The Sulman

Here's your guide to the paintings of the six podcast guests whose works were shortlisted in the 2019 Sir John Sulman prize. Go to episodes 73 and 74 for the Wynne and Archibald guides! Click here for an overview of how to use this guide Click here to see the Sir John Sulman finalist paintings. Feature photo: 'The first girl that knocked on his door' (detail) oil on canvas, 153 x 122.5cm, McLean Edwards, winner of the Sir John Sulman prize, 2019. Click on the artist's name below to hear their podcast interview and see the podcast video. The time marking shows where the artist's work is mentioned on the podcast and the number following the name is the number of the work in the AGNSW. 1:12___John Bokor (84) 3:37___Paul Ryan (104) 6:10___Ken Done (87) 8:00___McLean Edwards (winner) (88) 10:38__Alan Jones (91) 13:19__Abdul Abdullah (81)
7/17/201916 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ep 71: Archibald Wynne and Sulman 2019

This year twenty podcast guests were selected as finalists in the Archibald, Wynne, and Sulman prizes, which are exhibited every year at the Art Gallery of NSW, with a total of 26 paintings between them. In the next three episodes I'm going to talk to you about those works. Scroll down to see some tips on how to listen to these episodes. How to use episodes 72-74: As an audio guide at the Art Gallery of NSW (until 8 September 2019) or any gallery the exhibition travels to. scroll down for a map of the gallery rooms and list of finalists. (or click here if you're looking at this on your podcast app) There is a time marking for each painting so you can skip forward or back.To hear the complete podcast interview and view video of the artist click on the artist's name in the list below.Tips - download the podcast episodes onto your phone before you go (in case the wi-fi's not great) and take a screenshot of the map! Listen while you look at the paintings online on the gallery's websiteclick here for the Archibald paintingsclick here for the Wynne paintingsclick here for the Sir John Sulman paintings Just listen! It'll still be fun. The guides The Archibald guide is here The Wynne guide is here The Sulman guide is here Gallery Map Map of location of podcast guest paintings at the AGNSW. (Click here if you are looking at this on your podcast app) Episode 72: SULMAN FINALISTS 1:12 ___John Bokor(84) 3:37____Paul Ryan(104) 6:10___ Ken Done (87) 8:00____McLean Edwards (88) 10:38___Alan Jones (91) 13:19___Abdul Abdullah (81) Episode 73: WYNNE FINALISTS 00:55___Marc Etherington (63) 3:08___ Ken Done (61) 4:34____Blak Douglas (62) 7:38____Natasha Bieniek (54) 10:06___Abdul Abdullah (52) 11:56___Michaye Boulter(55) 13:39___Sylvia Ken(65) Episode 74: ARCHIBALD FINALISTS 1:25____Jude Rae (41) 3:35____Jonathan Dalton (14) 6:40____Prudence Flint (22) 9:38____Tony Costa (13) 13:05___Blak Douglas (18) 15:50___Paul Ryan (43) 18:13___Marc Etherington (20) 21:11___Loribelle Spirovski (44) 23:35___Laura Jones (27) 25:10___Vanessa Stockard (45) 27:54___Natasha Bieniek (5) 29:51___Natasha Walsh (49) 32:45___Euan Macleod (34)
7/17/20192 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ep 70: Tony Costa

Tony Costa says winning the Archibald makes the invisible artist visible but you wouldn’t have called him invisible before he won the prize this year.  He’s been painting for over 50 years, and in addition to the Archibald has won several other awards including the Paddington Art Prize for landscape painting and has been shortlisted in others including another three times in the Archibald, in the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize, the Wynne Prize, the Sulman Prize, the Kilgour Prize, and the list goes on. Costa paints in an expressionist style. His whole practice is about trapping energy and a large part of his method is guided by an eastern philosophy - seeking to enter into the world of nothingness and distancing himself from any thought process. This process is applied whether it's a landscape or a portrait. His methods are neither traditional nor predictable and I found our conversation incredibly interesting and eye opening with a good dose of humour thrown in. This podcast interview was recorded in Tony's beautiful studio in Sydney. To hear it, press play beneath the above feature photo. I first met Tony at the Art Gallery of NSW shortly after his win was announced. You can see my 5 minute interview with him on that day here. Scroll down for a short video of Tony Costa talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio. Current shows Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes, Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, current until 8 September 2019Salon des Refusés, S.H.Ervin Gallery, Sydney, current until 28 July 2019 Show Notes Tony Costa at Art AtriumDesiderius OrbanKevin ConnorFred CressJohn Firth SmithColin LanceleySyd BallRodney MilgateIan FairweatherFred WilliamsNeo-expressionismTransavanguardiaMimmo PaladinoEnzo CucchiFrancesco ClementeSandro ChiaRoberta Bell- AllenClement GreenbergLucian FreudPhilip GustonRembrandtJohn PeartLindy LeeClaudia Chan ShawDavid FairbairnBen Quilty Lloyd ReesJeanette Siebols https://youtu.be/-wmdfFrmK70 Tony Costa talks with Maria Stoljar in his studio 'Lindy Lee', 2019, oil on canvas,182.5 x 152cm Winner Archibald Prize 2019 'Fallen Tree Port Hacking River RNP', 2014, gouache on paper, 135 x 114cm Winner Paddington Art Prize 2014 'Claudia Chan Shaw', 2018, oil on canvas, 182.5 x 152cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2018 'Simon Chan', 2017, oil on canvas, 183 x 152cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2017 'David Fairbairn', 2015, oil on canvas, 152 x 122cm Finalist Archibald Prize, 2015 Portraits of David Fairbairn in Costa's studio - finalists in the Archibald Prize, Kilgour Prize and Doug Moran National portrait prizes. 'Hacking River Audley RNP' vinyl on paper, 152 x 114cmSalon des Refusés, S.H Ervin Gallery, 2019 'Angophora RNP', 2014, gouache on paper, 151 x 114cmFinalist Wynne Prize 2014 Costa's first painting created at 13 years of age which he talks about in the opening minutes of the interview
6/23/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ep 69: Neil Frazer

Neil Frazer is a landscape painter but don't expect pictures of rolling hills or calming seascapes. His powerful work depicts the harsh and dangerous environments in our world, where the sea smashes against jagged rocks and freezing glaciers slide past uninhabitable snowy peaks.  It’s the physicality and energy of these places that he’s aiming to convey and he does so spectacularly. He combines an impasto technique with layering and glazing to produce a complex visual experience and his compositions often involve intriguing negative spaces which contribute to the drama and mystery of his work. He has exhibited in dozens of solo shows in Australia and New Zealand and his latest solo show, Liquid Light, opens at Martin Browne Contemporary in Sydney on 30 May 2019. Although he grew up in New Zealand, he has spent half his life in Australia where he completed his Masters degree after previous postgraduate study in New York. In this episode you'll hear about how and why his work moved from abstraction to figuration and why he doesn't believe there is a significant difference between the two, why he's drawn to his subject matter and plenty about his technique and process. To hear the podcast episode click 'play' under the feature photo above. Scroll down to see a short video of Frazer talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio. Upcoming shows 'Liquid Light', Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney, 30 May - 23 June 2019 Show Notes Neil Frazer at Martin Browne ContemporaryNeil Frazer at Philip Bacon GalleryFrancisco GoyaFrank AuerbachJackson PollockMilton Resnick Paula Cooper GalleryDonald JuddJoel ShapiroElizabeth MurrayClifton PughTim StorrierEuan MacleodJoanna Braithwaite https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fy97smrExOc&t=79s Neil Frazer in his studio 'Guiding Light', 2019, acrylic on canvas, 182 x 182cm 'Birds Eye', 2011, acrylic on canvas, 168 x 168cm 'Travelling Light', 2017, acrylic on canvas, 152 x 152cm 'Grotto Blue-Green' 2016, acrylic on canvas 152 x 152cm 'Fourth Gorge', 2011, acrylic on canvas, Finalist Wynne Prize 2011 'Bravo', 2003, oil on linen
5/26/201948 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 68: Blak Douglas

Blak Douglas is well known for his brightly coloured landscapes with their trademark seven-tiered sky but he’s also an accomplished portraitist. At the time of writing, his work hangs in the Art Gallery of NSW in both the Archibald and Wynne prizes which are arguably the most famous portrait and landscape awards in Australia. His paintings always have something to say about social justice, often with irony and humour playing an important part and with his Aboriginal identity central to his work.  He’s won several awards and has been finalist in many others including three times in the Archibald prize and his work is held in various public collections including the National Gallery of Australia. His grandmother, Clorine Morthem,  was one of the stolen generation, taken at 13 years of age and institutionalised in Cootamundra Girls home, something that has had repercussions down the generations.  His father’s ancestors are the Dunghutti people from northern NSW and his mother was from an Irish Australian background. Although his name given at birth is Adam Hill, he took on the name Blak Douglas in recent years to reflect those two sides of his ancestry. I spoke with him in his Redfern studio which he shares with other artists and this conversation starts at an earlier time, when his parents first met. Press play under the feature photo above to hear the podcast episode. Scroll down to see a short video of Douglas in his studio. Current events Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes, Art Gallery of NSW, 11 May to 8 September 2019 Show notes Blak DouglasBlak Douglas on Instagram Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Co-operativeAunty Jean SouthUncle Roy KennedyAunty Elaine RussellAunty Esme TimberyHetti Perkins 'White shells, black heart', 2019, synthetic polymer paint and shells on canvas, 195 x 195cmFinalist Archibald Prize, 2019 'Six Finger Salary', 2009, synthetic polymer on cotton canvas, 100 x 130cmFinalist Wynne Prize 2009 'Uncle Roy Kennedy', 2018, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 195.5 x 195.5cmFinalist Archibald Prize 2018 'Smoke and mrrors (Uncle Max Eulo), acrylic on canvas, 214 x 214cmFinalist Archibald prize 2015 'Ashes, damper and kangaroo stew for dinner', 2019, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 94.5 x 124.5cm (collaboration with the late Elaine Russell)Finalist Wynne prize 2019 'Three strikes and you're out', synthetic polymer on canvas 150 x 200cm 'Upstanding Citizen', 2018, synthetic polymer on canvas, 120 x 100cm
5/5/201952 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ep 67: Del Kathryn Barton

Del Kathryn Barton is undoubtedly one of the biggest names in Australian art today. Her work is hotly sought after internationally and, in Australia, she is probably best known for the rare achievement of having won the Archibald prize twice - no mean feat in a race where women have only won the award 12 times in close to 100 years. Her paintings are instantly recognizable. Figures with drawn hands and faces look out of the picture with mesmerising eyes, existing in an imaginary world. That world is filled with colour and exquisite detail. Barton has exhibited in over 20 solo shows including a 4-month major survey of her work at the National Gallery of Victoria last year and her work is held in many public institutions and private collections. However,  painting forms only part of her life’s work and, although we also talked about her film-making, we didn't touch on her photo montages, sculptures and installations and her current New York show 'sing blood-wings sing'  which includes a 10m long work in 5 panels of the same name. We met in one of her Sydney studios where I was lucky enough to see 10 or so works in mid-completion for her upcoming October show at Roslyn Oxley 9 in Sydney. She is warm and honest and openly speaks about dark times. However, as with her work, she seems to find a balance between the light and dark and laughter is always closeby. To hear our conversation press 'play' beneath the above feature photo. Current and upcoming shows Albertz Benda, New York, NY, 'sing blood-wings sing'  current to 13 April 2019 Roslyn Oxley9, solo show, October 2019 Show notes Del Kathryn Barton at Roslyn Oxley9 Del Kathryn Barton at Albertz Benda Archibald prize Hugo Weaving Cate Blanchett Marc Etherington  The Nightingale and the Rose at ACMI (with short videos on the making of the film) The Nightingale and the Rose (book)  The Nightingale and the Rose by Oscar Wilde Brendan Fletcher   'Self-portrait with studio wife', 2018, acrylic on linen, 203 x 183cm (finalist Arhibald Prize 2018) 'the preservation of the shimmer self', 2018- 2019, 240 x 200cm 'come of things', 2010, synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour and pen on polyester canvas , 240 x 360cm (permanent collection, Art Gallery of NSW) 'you are what is most beautiful about me, a self portrait with Kell and Arella' 2008, synthetic polymer paint, watercolour, gouache and pen on polyester canvas, 280 x 180cm (winner Archibald Prize 2008) 'hugo', 2013, watercolour, gouache and acrylic on canvas, 200 x 180cm (winner Archibald Prize 2013) 'Mother (a portrait of Cate)', 2011, watercolour, gouache, acrylic and pen on polyester canvas, 240 x 180cm (finalist Archibald Prize 2011) 'wilder grew her song' 2011-2012 acrylic gouache watercolour and ink on polyester canvas 'Weird Seed' 2017, acrylic on french linen, 180 x 160cm  
4/14/20191 hour, 24 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 66: Kiata Mason

Through her art, Kiata Mason takes us into her world and her way of seeing. Her still lifes are filled with the objects from her home, collected over generations, and portraits contain reminders of the past. She plays with colour and perspective to convey her subjects not quite the way they exist in reality but with an ever present optimism and empathy mixed with a bit of kookiness. She has a Masters degree in drawing from the National Art School and this forms the foundations of her painting. Last year she won the Muswellbrook Art prize for works on paper and she’s also been a finalist and semi-finalist in many major painting prizes including the Sulman, Doug Moran, Black Swan and Paddington art prizes. She has exhibited in five solo shows and has another two coming up this year but still sees herself in the early stages of her career as a painter. Her work crosses still life, portraiture and landscape. I recorded this episode in Kiata's studio in the back room of her home in Lake Cathie just south of Port Macquarie in NSW's mid north coast. She lives at times a rather isolated life but this is not only due to the geography of where she lives.  As the full-time carer of her grandmother suffering from Alzheimer’s, a cup of tea with a friend is a rare event and even a trip to the shops is a major operation. Kiata grew up in various parts of NSW including Sydney, Newcastle, Port Macquarie and Armidale. She was surrounded by strong women particularly her mother and grandmother who had a background in theatre and were always interested in the arts. To hear the episode press play under the feature photo above. I filmed a short video of Kiata in her studio and you can see it below. Upcoming shows PLC Artist-in-residence - Adelaide Perry Gallery  Residency culminating in show of works  - April 2019 Group show, Arthouse Gallery 20 June - 6 July Solo show, Muswellbrook Arts Centre, July 2019 Solo show, AKBellinger Gallery, date TBA Show Notes Kiata Mason on Instagram Kiata Mason with Amber Creswell Bell Kiata Mason at AK Bellinger Gallery Kiata Mason at Arthouse Gallery Drill Hall Gallery National Gallery of Australia  David Hockney Pierre Bonnard National Art School https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwZ3OJquz8E 'The artist's table', 2018, acrylic on canvas, 94.5 x 126cm (finalist Sir John Sulman Prize 2018) 'Gathering what we have', 2018, acrylic on canvas, 94 x 94cm 'Grandmother Bea', 2017, arcylic on canvas (semi-finalist Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2017) 'Patchwork rocks', 2018, acrylic on canvas, (finalist Paddington Art Prize 2018) 'Rainy Day in the Studio', 2018, acrylic on canvas, 156 x 126cm 'The whole world in a room', 2018, acrylic on canvas, 125 x 156cm
3/24/201958 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ep 65: Nicholas Harding

Nicholas Harding is one of Australia's most celebrated artists. He has been awarded the Archibald prize, the Archibald People's Choice award, the Kilgour prize and the Dobell drawing prize amongst others. His work crosses portraiture, landscape and still life. Harding's oil paintings are created with a glorious impasto technique, he uses gouache to capture the lifesize portraits of many a famous sitter and he is renowned for his magnificent ink drawings. He has had over 30 (often sell-out) solo shows, major survey shows of his work have been held at the S H Ervin Gallery and the National Portrait Gallery and his work is in the collections of many public institutions including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the National Gallery of Australia, the National Portrait Gallery, and in private and corporate collections around the world. One of the major impacts on his work was coming to Australia after spending the first 8 years of his life in England and, in particular, his observation of the different light and how its glare created contrasts which were so different to the muted tones of England.  It was his time in the bush and the beaches as a child which caused him later to move further from the English influence to make Australia the subject of his work. In this episode we talk about his influences, painting from memory, the strengths and weaknesses of using photographic references, failing in order to succeed, making art during the dark times and much more. To hear the episode press 'play' under the feature photo above or listen however you get your podcasts. See short video of Harding in his studio below. Current Upcoming shows Destination Sydney Re-Imagined (together with work by Wendy Sharpe and Jeffrey Smart)  at S H Ervin Gallery until 17 March 2019 Solo show at Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane, 20 August - 14 September 2019 Show Notes Nicholas Harding Nicholas Harding on Instagram Nicholas Harding at Olsen Gallery Nicholas Harding at Philip Bacon Galleries Nicholas Harding at Sophie Gannon Gallery Simone de Beauvoir Memento mori Willem De Kooning Mark Rothko Howard Hodgkin JMW Turner Vincent van Gogh Henri de Toulouse Lautrec Russell Drysdale Brett Whiteley Lloyd Rees Arthur Boyd Sidney Nolan Francis Bacon Chuck Close Malcolm Morley Frank Auerbach Leon Kossoff Walter Sickert John Bell Robert Drewe Catherine Hunter Anna Volska John Olsen   John Singer Sargent Hugo Weaving https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWezJHrg9P4&t=7s 'Treatment, day 49, (sorbolene soak)', 2018, (finalist Archibald prize 2018) 'John Bell as King Lear', 2001, oil on canvas on board, 177 x 105cm (winner Archibald Prize 2001) 'Robert Drewe (in the swell)' 2006, oil on linen, 138 x 123cm  (finalist Archibald Prize 2006) 'Anna Volska and Georgia', 2015, gouache and watercolour on paper, 168 x 76cm 'John Olsen, AO, OBE', 2017, oil on linen, 198 x 138cm (finalist, Archibald prize, 2017) 'Estuary figures (swim-ring, towel and hat) 2013, oil on Belgian linen, 112 x 107cm 'Lagoon (canoe)' 2011 - 2012, oil on Belgian linen, 138 x 138cm 'Wilpena wattle', 2016, oil on linen, 172.5 x 172.5 cm (finalist Wynne prize 2016) 'Wilpena eucalypt and wattle', 2017, oil on linen, 183 x 245cm (finalist Wynne prize 2017) 'Eddy Avenue 3' , 2001, ink on paper, 132 x 149cm.  (Winner Dobell Prize for Drawing, collection of the Art Gallery of NSW) 'Bunjalung Pandanus 2018' ink on paper, in the studio (Instagram @nicholas0harding) Drawings, paintings and etchings from theatre rehearsals and performances (Instagram @nicholas0harding) Ink drawings created during period of chemotherapy treatment (instagram @nicholas0harding)  
3/10/20191 hour, 17 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ep 64: Luke Sciberras

If you've ever met Luke Sciberras you’ll know he’s larger than life. Full of joie de vivre and good humour, he attacks life with gusto from his fabulous garden to his renowned cooking skills so it’s no surprise that this life force is also manifested through his art. He's known chiefly for his landscape paintings which are created with layers of glorious colour and a variety of marks. His drawings and plein air works have an immediacy which take us into his experience - whether it's a boab tree a bird or a portrait. His art is always interpreted from life or from drawings made en plein air and brought back into the studio. But paradoxically what is most important to him as a landscape painter is in fact people. Those who are the custodians or owners of the landscape are just as important to him as the landscape itself and he needs to connect with them in order to create his work. He’s painted landscapes around the world from Europe to China but it’s in Australia that he’s spent most of his painting life – interpreting the landscapes of far northern Queensland to Bruny Island in Tasmania, from the Kimberley coast in Western Australia to the central desert areas where he’s created his art with the indigenous people of those lands. He's had 40 solo shows, his work has been hung in the Art Gallery of NSW, is contained in the collections of many regional galleries, in corporate and major private collections and his upcoming show of paintings from Western Australia’s Kimberley coast opens at King Street Gallery on William in Sydney in March 2019. I spoke with Luke in historic Hill End about 4 hours from Sydney where he has his studio in the midst of a wonderful artists' community. To hear the interview press 'play' beneath the feature photo above. See a short video of Luke in his studio below. Upcoming show Solo show 'Rose into view' at King Street Gallery on WIlliam 19 March - 13 April 2019 Show notes Luke Sciberras Luke Sciberras on Instagram Luke Sciberras at King Street Gallery on William Luke Sciberras at Scott Livesey Galleries Wedderburn artistic community Suzanne Archer David Fairbairn Elisabeth Cummings Al Poulet Giorgio Morandi John Peter Russell Belle Île Euan Macleod Catherine Hunter Margaret Tuckson Garry Shead Martin Sharp Ann Thomson Guy Warren Gria Shead Tim Storrier Hill End Russell Drysdale Donald Friend Margaret Olley John Olsen Jeffrey Smart Bullecourt Charles Bean John Olsen Wendy Whiteley Brett Whiteley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htLK3TzbUNo 'Fireflies, Bullecourt', 2017, oil on board, 160 x 360cm 'Pinnacles Between, Belle Île', 2018, oil on board, 160 x 240cm Sun up, WA, 2018, oil on board,120 x 160cm 'Spring Sun - HIll End', oil on board, 2016, 60 x 85cm                                          'Gallipoli Study 6, 2014, gouache and pastel on paper, 40 x 55cm 'Goanna', 2018, etching, 71 x 53cm   'Wedgie' 2012, mixed media on paper, 76 x 56cm Ink on paper, Instagram, @luke_sciberras 'Buffalo country, Katherine, NT', 2016, oil on board, 124.5 x 162.5cm, finalist Wynne prize 2016
2/24/20191 hour, 11 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ep 63: Tony Tuckson (part 2): Artist Aida Tomescu

In episode 62 I spoke with senior curator Denise Mimmocchi about the late abstract expressionist artist Tony Tuckson and the exhibition ' Tuckson:the abstract sublime ' which is currently showing at the Art Gallery of NSW. The exhibition continues until 17 February 2019. In this episode I look at a few of the paintings themselves with artist Aida Tomescu.  I spoke with Aida about her own life and art in episode 33 where you can hear a great story of her arrival in Australia from communist Romania and her rise to becoming one of our most respected painters. She has won many awards including the Wynne prize, the Sulman prize and the Dobell prize and has exhibited in over 30 solo shows. We talk about the paintings, paint, what the paint’s doing, guessing the intention of the artist and ponder on what effect it’s having on the viewer. You don’t have to see the exhibition to appreciate these episodes but if you get a chance to go why not listen to it as you’re walking around? You’ll see I’ve marked at the top of this page the point where we speak about each work so you can see them in any order you like. The book accompanying the exhibition, edited by curator Denise Mimmocchi, 'Tuckson' is widely available including from the Art Gallery of NSW bookshop. Images are reproduced with the kind permission of the Art Gallery of NSW. To hear the episode just press 'play' under the feature photo above. Scroll down to also see a YouTube version of this episode with images Here are the works we talk about in this episode 2:29      White lines (vertical) on ultramarine 1970 - 73  (room 4) 9:55      Yellow (room 3) 15:10    Untitled  [Late Drawing No.19 ] (room 3) 20:20   Untitled  [White Sketch] 1970 - 73 (room 3) 24:20   Swirl c1962 - 65 (room 2) 28:10   Untitled 1973 (room 4)   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ8052xpX8c&t=1061s John Anthony TucksonWhite lines (vertical) on ultramarine (1970—1973)diptych: styrene-based house paint, polyvinyl acetate and pigment on hardboard213.5 x 244.6 cm board overallArt Gallery of New South WalesGift of Annette Dupree 1976© Estate of the artist. Licensed by Copyright AgencyPhoto: AGNSW John Anthony TucksonYellow 1970—1973synthetic polymer paint on composition board(a-b) 213.5 x 244 cm overallNational Gallery of Victoria, MelbournePurchased with funds donated by Loti Smorgon AO and Victor Smorgon AC, 2011 John Anthony TucksonLate drawing, no. 19 (TD 353) 1968—1973charcoal on cartridge paper228 x 76 cmCollection of Watters Gallery John Anthony TucksonNo title [White sketch] circa 1973synthetic polymer paint213.5 x 91.5 cmCollection: National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Bequest of Lucy Swanton 1982 John Anthony TucksonSwirl circa 1962—circa 1965PVA on hardboard122 x 182.2 cmPrivate Collection, Sydney John Anthony TucksonUntitled 1973synthetic polymer paint and charcoal on hardboard214 x 122.5 cmArt Gallery of New South WalesArt Gallery of New South Wales Foundation Purchase 2013© The estate of the artist. Licensed by Copyright AgencyPhoto: AGNSW
2/3/201935 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ep 62: Tony Tuckson (part 1): Curator Denise Mimmocchi

Denise Mimmocchi, senior curator of Australian art at the Art Gallery of NSW, has brought together a magnificent exhibition of the abstract works of the late Tony Tuckson: 'Tuckson: the abstract sublime' showing at the Art Gallery of NSW until 17 February 2019. Tony Tuckson, who died about 45 years ago, is considered by many to be one of Australia’s most significant abstract expressionist artists but he kept his art under wraps for most of his painting life. In this episode I spoke with the Art Gallery of NSW’s senior curator of Australian art (and mastermind of this show) Denise Mimmocchi and we talk about his life and career. You can then follow on in episode 63 and listen to my conversation with renowned Australian abstract artist Aida Tomescu where we talk about a few of the works in depth. If you happen to be in Sydney before the show ends and get a chance to get there you could listen while you look. You’ll see in the notes to episode 63 that I’ve marked the point where we speak about each work so you can skip ahead to any work you like. Images of all the works I talk about with Aida are also reproduced on the page of episode 63 with the kind permission of the Art Gallery of NSW. The exhibition is current until 17 February 2019. Details here. The book 'Tuckson' (pictured below) is available at the Art Gallery of NSW book shop. The book 'Tuckson' by Denise Mimmocchi is available at the AGNSW bookshop  
2/3/201925 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 61: Michaye Boulter

From the age of 2, when she sailed with her parents from Australia to Canada, Michaye Boulter's life has never been far from the sea. Spending weeks at a time in her childhood sailing  on the ocean spending time staring out at that vastness, Michaye’s very being is connected with the water. So it’s no surprise that she paints what she knows. In her recent show, ‘Shelter’, at Sydney’s Arthouse Gallery, her works of Tasmanian seascapes were breathtaking. They depict the Australian coastlines and ocean often with no sign of human life when the sun is not out in full force, creating a low light which darkens the land making the sky and the water the main players in her work. We talk about her childhood memories but also about her current work and studio practice. Notably she's been a finalist in the prestigious Glover landscape prize 7 times as well as many others. She's had 20 solo shows and her work is also held in various public and private collections around Australia, including the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and Parliament House, Canberra. We start this conversation at a time when Michaye was just 2 years old when her parents built a boat  when they were living in Brisbane in Queensland and they decided to take the family back to Canada with Michaye and her baby sister on board.  It would be the start of a childhood of travel and life on the sea. To hear the podcast episode press 'play' beneath the feature photo above. Scroll down to see a short video of Michaye talking about her work at Arthouse Gallery. Upcoming show Solo show at Handmark Gallery, Hobart, Tasmania, December 2019 Show notes Michaye Boulter at Arthouse Gallery Michaye Boulter at Handmark Gallery The Glover Prize Caspar David Friedrich's 'The Monk by the Sea' Langridge Gerhard Mausz Linda Fredrich https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZ3fjK5stjU 'Cloudy Bay Lagoon', 2017, oil on linen, 122 x 152cm , (finalist Glover Prize 2017) 'Incoming', 2018, oil on linen, 152 x 188cm 'Reveal', 2018, oil on linen, 92 x 112cm 'Portal', oil on hand beaten steel, 42 x 62 x 6cm 'Present', 2018, oil on linen, 122 x 152cm Gerhard Mausz in his workshop hand beating steel which form the support for a number of Boulter's works. 'Blue hour' oil on wood, eucalypt, brass, LED light, 22 x 24 x 25cm (box dimensions, 146 (overall height), collaboration with Linda Fredheim
12/17/201849 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ep 60: Justin Williams

Press 'play' above to hear the podcast episode and click here or scroll down for YouTube video! Over the last six years Justin Williams has not only been exhibiting all over Australia but in Europe and the US, with his work hanging in galleries in New York, L.A, Paris, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Athens and London. Williams depicts the world outside the mainstream, usually set in nature or a seemingly imaginary or folkloric world.  He's interested in the characters who represent the archetypal outsider such as Baba Desi, the wizard living in the Dandenongs and 'The Family' cult leader Anne Hamilton-Byrne. He feels, though, that not all outsiders live on the fringes of society and that it could include all of us to some extent. From working on fishing trawlers to single handedly building his own cabin in the forest, Williams does not seek out the safety of the comfortable life and it's only been relatively recently that he has found a stability of sorts in comparison to his earlier, less predictable, life. His current show Arcana II, showing at Galerie L'Inlassable in Paris, depicts scenarios inspired from a tarot card reading by a Parisian clairvoyant. The works are mysterious with a hint of foreboding. Powerful colour combinations and brushwork makes the viewer linger. He believes he is a relatively unknown in Australia but that that has given him the freedom to work without restraint. It was a  thoroughly enjoyable conversation. To hear it just press play beneath the feature photo above! Scroll down to see a short video of Williams in his studio. Current and upcoming events 'Arcana part II', Galerie l'inlassable, Paris until December 22, 2018 Solo show at SADE LA, May 2019 Show Notes Justin Williams at Silas Von Morrisse Gallery Justin Williams at Galeries l'inlassable Andy Warhol Pablo Picasso Jean-Michel Basquiat The Family sect (Anne Hamilton-Byrne) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0py0oSjQXkU 'Love at the end' 2018, oil on canvas, 205 x 207cm (This is the painting we talk about at about 26m50s - when we're talking about colour) 'Apple orchard orgy', 2016, oil monad pigment on canvas, 214.3 x 198.1cm In the studio - progress shot of 'Apple orchard orgy' (we talk about this at 30m)   Works from The Attachment Series, 2012   'Devola', 2017, oil , pigment, enamel, sand on canvas, 203 x 152cm 'Sphinx with head basket, 2014, stoneware ceramic, 25 x 13 x 13cm
12/3/201845 minutes, 40 seconds
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Ep 59: Melinda Harper

Melinda Harper is one of Australia's leading abstract artists. Her works, filled with geometric forms and often with an explosion of colour, have been fascinating art lovers for over 30 years. Whether its hundreds of rectangles crammed onto the canvas or wavy forms filled with psychedelic stripes, your eye is going to be subjected to a feast of colour and form. In this episode we talk about, amongst other things, colour, why she paints in oils when acrylics would appear to be the obvious choice, and how, when she was at art school, her approach was not at all in fashion. Harper has been exhibiting for over 30 years and has had over 25 solo shows. In 2015, one of Australia's leading art institutions, Heide Museum of Modern Art, held a major survey of her work called 'Colour Sensation: The Works of Melinda Harper'. Her work is contained in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria, Art Gallery of NSW and other public and private collections. I caught up with Harper at her home near the town of Castlemaine, in the beautiful goldfield regions of Victoria. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' under the feature photo above. A short video of Harper in her studio will be posted to this website, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube soon. Show Notes Melinda Harper at Olsen Gallery Judy Chicago Judy Chicago's installation 'The Dinner Party' Hans Hofmann Jackson Pollock Lee Krasner Hans Hofmann's painting 'Pre-dawn', 1960, National Gallery of Australia Marcel Duchamp Hans Hofmann website demonstrating the 'push and pull' theory  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ct8FlM4jq50 'Untitled', 2011, oil on canvas 'Untitled', 2003, oil on canvas, 180 x 150cm 'Untitled', 1998, oil on canvas, 183 x 152cm (Permanent Collection, Art Gallery of NSW) 'Untitled', 2000, oil on canvas, 183 x 152.3cm (Permanent collection, National Gallery of Victoria) 'Untitled', 1999, oil on canvas, 121 x 110cm (private collection, Melbourne)      
11/19/201844 minutes, 31 seconds
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Ep 58: Natasha Walsh

Natasha Walsh is one of Australia’s most exciting emerging artists. A few months ago, over a period of about 12 weeks, she won three prestigious art awards; the Kilgour Prize, the Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship and the Mosman Art Prize. She’s also been a finalist in the Archibald Prize for the last 3 years in a row with stunning self portraits. And she’s only 24. But the road to this success has not been smooth. Experiencing dyslexia as a child, she struggled both academically and socially in her early years and had to learn strategies to fit in. There’s also been an intermittent struggle with depression and she speaks openly about those experiences and how they have impacted her fascinating self portraits. Painting on canvas has never really interested her. She’s  more interested in transforming materials into ideas. Those materials have ranged from wax and copper to marble. Walsh displays wisdom beyond her years and it was great to meet her. Press 'play' which appears beneath the feature photo to hear the podcast episode. Scroll down to see a short video of Walsh in her studio. Current and upcoming shows Mosman art prize (winner) Mosman Art Gallery current until 18 November 2018 Archibald Prize, Geelong Gallery current until 18 November 2018 Dominik Mersch Gallery, 2019, date TBA Show notes Natasha Walsh Natasha Walsh at Dominik Mersch Gallery Archibald Prize Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship Mosman Art Prize Kilgour Prize National Art School https://youtu.be/4AkEXoIyAhg 'Numb to touch - (self portrait)', oil on copper, 40.5 x 28cm (finalist Archibald prize 2018) View of 'Numb to touch (self portrait)' in perspex frame (photo courtesy of Natasha Walsh Instagram page) 'Within the studio (self-portrait)' oil on marble 10cm x 10cm (winner Kilgour prize 2018) Three of the twenty works in 'Timepiece', exhibition at Dominik Mersch Gallery in 2017, all oil, pigment and goat's milk on copper. Installation view of 'Timepiece' exhibition at Dominik Mersch Gallery, Sydney, 2017 'luciana, 1936', oil, bee's wax and dammar resin on panel 'Self portrait' oil on copper 25 x 22.5cm  (finalist Archibald prize 2016) 'One minute til midnight’, 2017, oil on copper, (finalist Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2017) ‘The Scent of rain (self portrait)' 2017,  oil on copper 25 x 22..5cm (finalist Archibald prize 2017)
11/4/201851 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ep 57: Joe Furlonger

Joe Furlonger is one of  Australia’s most respected painters, with his work crossing landscape, figures and portraiture. He's probably best known for a particular kind of landscape which he returns to time and time again. He paints those flat areas of the Australian farmlands and bush, the places where at first glance there doesn't seem to be much going on, where the horizon seems to stretch out forever. Places like Moree and the Darling Downs.  But he always seems to find a way to interpret those spaces which injects an excitement into the image and that invariably involves multiple layers of paint energetically applied. Furlonger's not concerned with traditional rules of landscape painting or the restrictions of gaining an exact likeness in portraiture. His methods appear to be instinctive in one sense but, on the other hand, also drawn from keen observation. What emerged from talking with him, though, was his constant struggle to avoid stagnation and his desire to always be looking for a new approach until even that method is exhausted and it’s time to move on. He’s a multi award winning artist and has had 35 solo shows. His work is held in the National Galleries of Australia and Victoria and the Art Gallery of NSW as well as many other public and private collections. We recorded this conversation when his work was hanging in Defiance Gallery's show  'Six Artists | Seven Days' which was brought about together with the Australian Wildlife Conservancy when six artists were taken to one of the AWC's sanctuaries  in Newhaven in the Northern Territory. Scroll down to see a short video taken at the gallery. To hear the interview press 'play' beneath the feature photo above. Upcoming shows Nock Art Gallery, Hong Kong, 2019, date TBA Show Notes Joe Furlonger at Defiance Gallery Ann Thomson on Talking with Painters Kevin Connor Sidney Nolan Pablo Picasso Ernst Kirchner Pierre Bonnard Lucian Freud Ray Hughes Australian Wildlife Conservancy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=we_hFi9ijkg&t=47s 'Grainfield Cultivation Moree' 2014 acrylic bound pigment on canvas, 118 x 133cm (finalist Wynne prize 2014) 'Desert, Newhaven XXI', 2018, mixed media on paper, 29.5 x 21cm 'Self-portrait at Moree', 2014, acrylic bound pigment on canvas, 162 x 120cm (finalist Archibald prize 2014) 'South East Queensland - Red Soils', 2004, colour woodcut on cream wove paper, 54.5 x 89.8cm (permanent collection, AGNSW) 'Figure', 1994, gouache on thick white wove paper, 50 x 40.5cm (permanent collection, AGNSW)   'Boats in Monsoon, Burnett Heads', 2017, acrylic bound pigment on canvas, 111.5 x 137cm    
10/21/201858 minutes, 54 seconds
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Ep 56: Jacqui Stockdale

Jacqui Stockdale paints, sculpts, collages, creates animations, has staged live performances and produces exquisite portrait photography. When I visited her Melbourne studio I was bowled over by a huge horse she had sculpted – a life-sized Phar Lap in the middle of the studio piled high with a large collection of masks on its back; masquerade masks which she first came upon on a trip to india and kept collecting. Bright, expressive and slightly creepy. Horses and masks feature again and again but her work is never predictable. She’s always shaking it up a bit, adding a touch of shock value along the way. Her photographic art work 'Historia', of a topless female Ned Kelly, would have raised the eyebrows of one or two historians. Over the time she spent in Sydney in the late 90s she painted prolifically and was awarded five art prizes in less than two years and has won several prizes since then including the Moran Contemporary Photograhic award. She has exhibited in 20 solo shows and has a show coming up at Sydney’s Olsen gallery in November 2018. Stockdale's work is held in public institutions including the National Gallery of Australia, many private collections, and has even been hung in the Louvre in Paris. She is also one of only 20 artists recently commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery to create work for its 20th anniversary. This conversation was recorded before an audience at Town Hall Gallery in Melbourne on 22 September 2018 in the midst of a show brought together by the artist Ilona Nelson, through her creative project 'This Wild Song'. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' under the feature photo above. Scroll down for a short video of Stockdale in her studio.  More videos of podcast guests can be seen on the  Talking with Painters YouTube channel. Feature photo by Martin Nahon (cropped) Current and Upcoming events  Group show 'This Wild Song', Town Hall Gallery, current to 21 October 2018 'Jacqui Stockdale', Olsen Gallery, 21 November - 9 December 2018 Show Notes Jacqui Stockdale at This is No Fantasy Jacqui Stockdale at Olsen Gallery Jacqui Stockdale on Instagram This Wild Song - Ilona Nelson Lewis Miller on Talking with Painters Hugh Ramsay John Singer Sargent Nora Heysen Diego Velazquez Ned Kelly Paul Kelly Rose Chong Costumiers Sidney Nolan MONA Mofo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GBipC3_Hcg 'Mind over matter', 2010, oil on linen 'Duel of the Mount I', 2018, C Type Print, 130 x 100cm 'Duel of the Mount II' 2018, C Type Print, 130 x 100cm 'The Quiet Stage', oil on linen, winner Kings School Art prize 1998 'Two Birds of a Feather', 1998 'Historia', 2016, Type C Print, 140 x 110cm 'Kelly', 2016, C Type Print, 140 x 110cm 'Man of Quinn', 2016, Type C Print, 140 x 110cm  
10/7/201847 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 55: Alexander McKenzie

In Alexander McKenzie's paintings the sun hides below the horizon and a low light illuminates the mysterious landscape. It might be a manicured garden or a hill covered in trees and there will probably be water nearby. Perhaps the sea, a lake, a channel. Perfectly still but brightly reflecting the sky. One thing's for sure. You're going to venture in for a closer look. At first it might look familiar but as you get closer you realise it’s not a place that you're likely to find on this earth.  You’ll discover things you didn’t notice at first glance; a closed gate with its key lost in the painting, a bridge taking you to another place, a red flag warning you to reconsider. Those elements are not accidental. They’ve been deliberately placed by the artist who is himself looking for answers where spirituality is key. Even the symbols in his portraiture lend themselves to a metaphoric interpretation. He’s had twenty five solo shows in Australia and the UK, has been a finalist in the Archibald six times, seven times in the Wynne Prize and is hugely popular. McKenzie’s shows often sell out and his superb mid-career survey show ‘The Adventurous Gardener’ currently at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery in Sydney has been what could be called a blockbuster for a regional gallery, with 2000 people going through the doors on the first weekend. We recorded this episode in McKenzie's studio with some of his paintings in progress propped up on milk crates against the walls destined for Martin Browne Contemporary and his November solo show. To hear the conversation press 'play' beneath the feature photo above. Or listen however you get your podcasts. Scroll down to see a video of McKenzie talking about his survey show 'The Adventurous Gardener'. Current and upcoming events 'The Adventurous Gardener', Hazelhurst Regional Gallery, current to 21 October 2018 Solo show, Martin Browne Contemporary, 15 November - 9 December 2018 Show Notes Alexander McKenzie Alexander McKenzie at Martin Browne Contemporary Julian Ashton Art School Leonardo Da Vinci Claude Monet Edouard Manet Paul Klee Dutch Golden Age painting John Bokor King Street Gallery Blake Prize Matt Corby https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzVHMan9j7Y 'More than many sparrows', 2018, oil on linen, 197 x 350cm Initial sketch for 'More than many sparrows' 'Matt Corby', 2014, oil on linen, 197 x 153cm 'Man moves mountain', 2014, oil on linen, 229 x 198cm  (Finalist Wynne prize, 2014) 'In danger of knowledge', 2017, oil on linen, 137 x 228cm 'Firestarter', 2011, oil on linen (finalist Wynne prize 2011) 'Andrew Upton', 2010, oil on linen, 198 x 228cm (Archibald finalist 2010)
9/25/20181 hour, 9 minutes
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Ep 54: Ann Thomson

Ann Thomson is one of Australia's most significant artists. She’s been painting for over 60 years, has exhibited in over 40 solo shows and there’s no sign of her slowing down. Her works are filled with colour and movement which command the viewer’s attention. They’re all about feeling and touch, delving into abstraction in her unique way. She’s won the Wynne prize, the Geelong Contemporary art prize, the Kedumba Drawing prize, the Tattersall's art prize and others. She’s also an acclaimed sculptor and, as with her paintings, likes to work in large scale.  Her incredible installation selected for the Seville Expo in 1992 was 11 metres high and took 3 months to complete when it was shipped over to Spain. I had a great conversation with Ann in her huge studio in Sydney’s eastern suburbs. We talked about why we need musicians and artists, what makes a strong painting, how to tap into creativity and lots more. Her work is included in the forthcoming show '6 artists | 7 days' at Defiance Gallery which opens on 23 September 2018. Thomson grew up in Brisbane and this episode starts at a time when she was 9 years old, during WWII, when her school had been closed down amid fears of enemy attacks. Press 'play' beneath the feature photo above to hear the podcast interview. Scroll down to see video of Thomson in her studio.   Feature photo of Ann Thomson above (cropped)  by Greg Weight   Current and upcoming events National Art - Part one, group show, National Art School, current to 27 October 2018 Mary Place Group Exhibition, Defiance Gallery, current to 20 October 2018 Six artists | Seven days, the AWC Newhaven exhibition, group show, Defiance Gallery, 23 September to 19 October Exhibition with Joe Furlonger at Nock Art Gallery 2019, date TBA Show notes Ann Thomson at Defiance Gallery Ann Thomson at Nodrum Gallery Ann Thomson at Stephane Jacob Gallery John Molvig Betty Churcher Caroline Barker Robert Helpmann Kenneth Noland Anthony Caro Claude Monet Exhibition at Musee de l'Orangerie - American Abstract Painting and the last Monet National Art School (formerly East Sydney Technical College) John Passmore Watters Gallery John Olsen Tim Storrier Piet Mondrian Ian Fairweather Grace Clifford Australian Wildlife Conservancy Cite Internationale des Arts Noel McKenna Joe Furlonger Fiona Mcdonald   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubcRerANudU&t=2s 'Ebb Tide' 1987, oil on linen, 400 x 550cm 'Breakwater', acrylic and collage on linen, 2014, 91 x 122cm  (Winner Tattersall's Art Prize 2016) 'The Glowing', 2015, acrylic on linen, 122 x 153cm 'Newhaven I' 2018, acrylic on canvas, 122 x 153cm Water and Air series Vase V 2018, painting on ceramic 17.5 x 18.5 x 18.5 Fish Trap series V 2018, oil stick on paper, 25 x 25cm 'Australia Felix' (detail) 1992, installation, Seville 'Australia Felix' (detail) 1992, installation, Seville
9/9/20181 hour, 6 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ep 53: Laura Jones

What do you imagine when you think of a painting of flowers by a woman artist? It might be a Margaret Olley still life set in her crowded Paddington terrace or a Margaret Preston with a striped tablecloth or it might be a close up Georgia O'Keefe with all its erotic interpretations. But it might also be considered less serious - just a pretty picture painted in a domestic setting. It was partly for that reason that Laura Jones initially resisted the flower as subject matter, until it was clear to her that that’s what she should be painting. Her exploration of the flower has developed over the years and took an interesting direction in her spectacular recent show ‘Too Much, Not Enough’ at Sophie Gannon Gallery. The show sold out quickly and a waiting list is in place for collectors. Jones is also a passionate environmentalist and her show at Olsen gallery last year resulted from residencies in the Great Barrier Reef after a severe bleaching event. Those works were both awe-inspiring and shocking. In this episode, we talk about the flowers and the reef as well as Jones' portraiture and a lot about process and colour. Jones grew up in Kurrajong near the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney. This episode starts off with her talking about a time when she was studying for her Masters at the College of Fine Art at the UNSW, working part time as a florist and planning to move into a new studio which was to become the creative Birmingham studios in the Sydney suburb of Alexandria. Feature photo above (cropped) by Rachel Kara Upcoming events 'Laura Jones', Olsen Gallery, 17 November - 8 December Solo show with Olsen Gallery 2019, date tba. Show notes Laura Jones Laura Jones at Olsen Gallery Laura Jones at Sophie Gannon Gallery Leah Fraser at Arthouse Gallery Abdul Abdullah Alan Jones Ben Quilty Euan Macleod Nicholas Harding Elisabeth Cummings Marieke Hardy YouTube video with audio from the interview with footage from 'Too Much Not Enough', show at Sophie Gannon Gallery (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgPxcoQmXi8 'Healing Flower' 2018, oil on linen, 183 x 152cm 'Banksia Speciosa on Striped Cloth' 2016 oil on linen (from 'Wildflowers' exhibition) 'Symbiosis' 2017, oil on linen, diptych, 152 x 244cm overall, pictured in the studio 'Capricorn', 2017, oil on linen, 152 x 122cm 'Back to You' 2018, oil on linen, 183 x 152cm 'Marieke reading' 2015 oil on linen 142 x 112cm 'Jenna' 2015, oil on linen, 71 x 61cm 'Selfie', 2016, oil on linen, 71 x 61cm
8/27/201855 minutes, 13 seconds
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Ep 52: Gina Kalabishis

Gina Kalabishis's work is about relationships and connection; connecting with nature and connecting with each other. Her recent show at Flinders Lane Gallery, 'Bundanon Floor to Sky', drew on her time spent within the landscape of Bundanon, the gift that artist Arthur Boyd and his wife Yvonne gave to the Australian people. Bundanon is a property of over 1000 hectares on the Shoalhaven river in NSW which offers residencies to artists and writers, an extensive education program and much more. From her time at Bundanon, Kalabishis has produced an astonishing body of work. Her triptych 'Bundanon Floor to Sky - You are always a part of me now (after Van Morrison)', which is over three and a half metres long, immerses the viewer into that lush landscape from the roots of the trees to the sky above. Other works in the series, too, explore the area from the ground all the way up to the troposphere, far above the landscape. Kalabishis also combines ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement, with native Australian plants, taking them out of the domestic setting into the landscape. Bones and shells also form part of the imagery which she creates through a combination of sculpture and digital technology. Last year she was awarded the Eutick Memorial Still Life Award and has won many other awards including the Rick Amor drawing prize. She has exhibited in 18 solo shows and her work is held in the National Gallery of Australia and many other institutions and private collections. Kalabishis grew up in Melbourne - her parents were Greek migrants - and this conversation starts with her memories of work experience at the National Gallery of Victoria when she was 16.  It was 1985 and the ‘Golden Summers’ exhibition was showing  at the gallery. The exhibition was very popular at the time and included works by Australian impressionists of the Heidelberg school including Arthur Streeton and Tom Roberts. Kalabashis talks about her recent exhibition and generously reveals much about her process which takes advantage of 21st century technology. To hear Maria Stoljar's conversation with Gina Kalabishis press 'play' under the feature photo above. Recent exhibition 'Bundanon Floor to Sky', Flinders Lane Gallery, 17 July - 11 August 2018 Show notes Gina Kalabishis Gina Kalabishis at Flinders Lane Gallery Gina Kalabishis on Instagram Eutick Memorial Still Life Award Bundanon Trust Arthur Streeton Tom Roberts Eugene Von Guerard Van Morrison Norman Sparnon Michael Kiwanuka Nick Cave Else Torp Lost by Frederick McCubbin Irene Hanenbergh Bundanon Siteworks 2018 Anya Mckee Art Spectrum Luke Istomin on Instagram https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gCFCuYbiWM 'Passing Pulpit Rock - Distant Sky (after Nick Cave and Else Torp)' 2017, oil on linen, 124 x 86cm (winner of the Eutick Memorial Still Life Award 2017) 'Romeo and Juliet (after Dire Straits)', 2018, oil on linen, 153 x 122cm   'Bundanon Floor to Sky - You are always a part of me now (after Van Morrison)', 2018, oil on linen, 215 x 366cm   'Lost - found (after McCubbin)', 2015, pastel on velour paper, 50 x 35cm 'Marion' 2013, oil on linen, 121 x 137cm
8/12/201854 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ep 51: Marc Etherington

There's the Archibald portraits but there’s also the other stuff; a painting of a home aquarium where a scuba diver is caught in the tentacles of an octopus, the cast of Seinfeld are looking for their car in that famous episode, Michael Jackson and Bubbles the chimp sit in a cloud while a jet skiier zooms along a lake below. There are also the stills from movies and TV shows from Jaws and Rambo to Magnum PI and the Dukes of Hazzard. Welcome to the wonderful world of Marc Etherington’s art. Etherington is a self-taught artist who took up painting when he was housebound one snowy winter in Canada 12 years ago. He's been selected as a finalist in the Archibald Prize for the last four years in a row and twice for the Sulman Prize. His portraits of artists Del Kathryn Barton, Ken Done and Paul Williams stopped me in my tracks in the Art Gallery of NSW and the story behind this year's self-portrait 'Me and Granny' reveals as much about his personality as his painting skill. His use of colour and composition combine with his imagination to take us into an alternate reality at times nostalgic, absurd or humorous but always tapping into something we can connect to. Pop culture references from 80s and 90s TV shows and movies are interpreted in his distinctive style and trigger memories for those who loved them. He's been in over 20 group shows, has had 6 solo shows and his much awaited show 'Couch Potato' opens at Michael Reid in Sydney on 9 August 2018, about a week after this podcast goes online. This interview was recorded in Etherington's home in Sydney where he had wooden sculptures he’d been working on on the bookcase nearby. He’s self-effacing, honest and committed to his art and it was a thoroughly enjoyable interview.  To hear it, press 'play' beneath the feature photo above. Upcoming events Solo show 'Couch Potato' Michael Reid Gallery, Sydney, 9 - 28 August 2018 Sydney Contemporary, Sydney, 13 - 16 September 2018 Show notes Marc Etherington at Michael Reid Marc Etherington on Instagram Del Kathryn Barton Ken Done Ken Done video on Talking with Painters YouTube Channel Paul Williams Lynda Draper Idris Murphy Kate Etherington on Instagram https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL-4x7TEdeo 'Del Kathryn Barton and Magic Dog', 2015, acrylic on canvas, 89 x 120cm, finalist Archibald Prize 2015 'King Ken (Ken Done in his studio)', 2016, acrylic on canvas 155.5 x 201cm, finalist Archibald Prize 2016 Paul (Paul Williams in his studio), 2017, acrylic on canvas, 144 x 164cm, finalist Archibald Prize 2017 'Me and Granny', 2018, acrylic on canvas, 143 x 163.5cm, finalist Archibald Prize 2018 Seinfeld painting 'The first time I met Michael Jackson was in the belly of a crocodile' acrylic on plywood 2016 work 'If I met Chuck Norris at Comic Con' Instagram caption: 'This is me and my future dog called Granny. I'm not gonna stop carving these until I find him. Which hopefully is soon because my hands hurt' Painting of Robert Smith, singer of The Cure, with sculpture of his chewing gum collection 'That's life though', 2017, acrylic on canvas, 140 x 160cm,  finalist in Sulman Prize, 2017 Selection of iPhone paintings for upcoming show 'Couch Potato' at Michael Reid Sydney (photo: Instagram page of Michael Reid @michaelreidart)
7/29/201837 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 50: Andrew Lloyd Greensmith

If you are an Archibald tragic like me, you might have first noticed Andrew Lloyd Greensmith's work when it was hanging in the Art Gallery of NSW last year in that arresting portrait of 102 year old Eileen Kramer. It was his first ever Archibald entry and he has been selected this year again with his portrait of lecturer and feminist Susan Carland. What you might not know about Greensmith, though, is that he’s also a renowned plastic and reconstructive surgeon and was the leader of one of the teams which worked together to separate Bangladeshi conjoined twins Krishna and Trishna, who were joined at the head, in 2009.  That complex operation was a success and made world headlines. Greensmith still works as a surgeon but is increasingly turning his attention to painting and now spends up to two days a week in his studio. In this interview, we talk about his life, doubts and fears as an artist, but also a lot about the painting process -  colour, glazing, the pitfalls of using photographs, how the knowledge of anatomy helps in painting a realist portrait and lots more.  It was an incredibly informative and interesting conversation. To hear it press 'play' below the feature photo or listen however you get your podcasts. You can see a short video of Greensmith in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel here. Current event Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes 2018, Art Gallery of NSW, until 9 September Show notes Raymond Ching David Kassan David Kassan on Instagram Eileen Kramer Video of Greensmith with Eileen Kramer on Lateline (expires 28 July 2018) Cesar Santos Cesar Santos on Instagram Susan Carland Yvette Coppersmith Video of Andrew Greensmith talking with Maria Stoljar on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwfLddLa5B0 'The inner stillness of Eileen Kramer', 2017, oil on linen, 86 x 51cm 'The serenity of Susan Carland', 2018, oil and walnut alkyd on wood panel, 103 x 83cm Works in progress in Greensmith's studio  
7/15/201848 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ep 49: Bernard Ollis

Bernard Ollis's art takes you on a journey. It might be down a windy road down a back lane in Sydney, across a bridge in Paris or you might find yourself in a park or a swimming pool or a fishing boat and you might meet people or animals along the way. But you’ll also be turning corners and seeing what’s beyond the buildings and fences around you without ever leaving that 2D plane. His wonderful use of perspective and colour takes us to a moment in twisted space which is surprising and brimming with optimism. He’s had over 50 solo shows exhibiting from London to Paris to Berlin to Shanghai to Auckland and right across Australia. Many major art institutions have acquired his work and his paintings are held in many private collections. He’s also found time to make his mark in art education holding leading positions in universities and is well known for his time as the director of the National Art School in Sydney, a position he held for over a decade. He continued painting throughout that time but for approximately the last 10 years he's been a full time artist working 7 days a week. Ollis was born in Bath, England and grew up in a working class family.  This episode starts at a point in our conversation when he was in his early twenties after he had completed his qualifications at  Cardiff College of Art and Design and was considering his next step. Would it be a Diploma of Education, a course in Art Therapy or should he pursue the almost impossible dream of getting into the Royal College of Art? To hear the podcast episode press 'play' under the feature photo above. You can see a short video of Ollis in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube Channel here. Current events  'Being There', Harvey Galleries, Sydney, 29 June - 8 July 2018 Show notes Bernard Ollis Bernard Ollis at Harvey Galleries (Sydney) Bernard Ollis at Mitchell Fine Art (Brisbane) Bernard Ollis at Linton & Kay Galleries (Perth) Bernard Ollis at Falls Gallery (Etchings) (Blue Mountains) Bernard Ollis at Penny Contemporary (Tasmania) Bernard Ollis at 12 Gallery, (Auckland) Royal College of Art, London Sir Peter Blake David Hockney Cyclone Tracy National Art School Pablo Picasso Georges Braque Paul Klee John McDonald Vincent Van Gogh Edvard Munch Johannes Itten Henri Matisse Brett Whiteley Peter Booth Aida Tomescu Wendy Sharpe Wendy Sharpe on Talking with Painters Video of Bernard Ollis talking with Maria Stoljar on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibClT-JjL8E&t=30s 'Rhodens Lane, Sydney', oil on linen, 100 x 153cm 'Self portrait after Matisse', 2017, oil on canvas 'Self portrait with brushes', 2015, mixed media, 156 x 122cm 'Enchantment', oil pastel on paper, 80 x 140cm 'Ponte Vecchio Florence Night' 2016, mixed media, 102 x 141cm 'Marrakech Bathroom' 2017 oil pastel on Arches paper, 52 x 36cm
7/1/201855 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ep 48: Dee Smart

You may know Dee Smart from the popular Australian television series Water Rats or Home and Away or from her feature film roles but you can now add the Archibald prize to that list. She has been shortlisted in the famous portrait prize two years in a row, this year with a striking painting of choreographer and dancer Meryl Tankard. She took up drawing and painting over 15 years ago and honed her craft while still acting. It  was inspiring to hear her talk openly about the catalyst for taking that direction – in the middle of a struggle with post-natal depression. She has had three shows including most recently an exhibition of beautiful mixed media works of the underwater world of Gary the crab which she’s planning to make into a children’s book 'Blue bottle bubbles'. She's also delving into abstraction and her work will be included in at least two shows later this year. We talk about her journey to becoming a painter and her inspirational attitude towards her future as an artist - a wonderful mix of curiosity and determination. She’s one of the most dynamic, down to earth and funny women you’ll ever meet and we had a lot of fun recording this interview. To hear the interview press play under the feature photo above. A short video of Smart in her studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel can be seen here. Current and upcoming events Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, until 9 September 2018, then touring Australia. November group event to be curated by Carley McLaren, details TBA Christmas group show, St Cloche Gallery, Paddington, date TBA Show notes Dee Smart Dee Smart on Instagram Archibald Prize Meryl Tankard Pina Bausch Hayes Gordon Walcha Gallery Ballet Wings Ballet Wings on Instagram St Cloche Gallery Andrew Marsh Dee Smart talks with Maria Stoljar in her studio on the talking with Painters YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4oaKBm9weQ&t=6s 'Lunch in the Outback', acrylic on canvas, 108.5 x 108.5cm, finalist Archibald Prize 2018 'The mayor of Bondi', oil and acrylic on canvas, 77 x 77cm,finalist Archibald prize 2017 'pink jelly so wanted to dance with Gary but his claws...', 76cm x 96cm, mixed media, from the Blue Bottle Bubble series. 'the serenity of garys pink garden sometimes brought on an almighty howl...he felt a million after that' 76 x 96cm, mixed media. Abstract work in progress 'I go walkin around midnight' (based on Smart's midnight walks with her father in country South Australia)  
6/17/201845 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 47: Steve Lopes

Steve Lopes is not looking to make a pretty picture. For a work to be enduring he believes 'there has to be a level of poison in it', some gritty quality that keeps you coming back. His powerful painting which won the Gallipoli Art Prize this year contains that little bit of poison. It lures the viewer with an evocative sunset only to reveal the reminders of battle trenches and detritus scattered across the landscape. Lopes has been painting figurative work for over twenty years starting at a time when it was decidedly unfashionable. He has been acknowledged by art critic John McDonald as 'one of the most dedicated artists you'll find anywhere' and his outstanding works in his distinctive figurative style have captured the attention of art collectors and institutions alike. He seeks to deal with the figure and the landscape together, depicting the relationship we have with our surrounds and does that in any way he can get the paint onto the surface, always looking for a way to push it further. He has exhibited in 30 solo shows across Australia and in London and Hong Kong and his work has been hung in many more group shows. His work is held in the National Gallery of Australia, the Parliament House Collection and other public institutions and private collections. Lopes is also known for his portraiture, recognised as a finalist in the Doug Moran Portrait Prize, Black Swan Prize the Percival Portrait Painting prize and has been selected in the Salon des Refusés exhibition several times. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' under the feature photo above. A short video of Lopes in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel can also be seen below. Current and upcoming events Solo show 'Impossible Find' at Stella Downer Fine Art, Sydney, 10 July to 4 August 2018 Salient Contemporary Artists on the Western front, a touring group exhibition showing at New England Regional Art Museum  until 3 June 2018.  Further touring dates TBA on exhibition website. Group show 'Jamberoo Mountain Road' at Shoalhaven Regional Gallery Solo show at Linton and Kay Galleries, Perth, date TBA Show notes Steve Lopes Steve Lopes at Stella Downer Fine Art Steve Lopes at Linton and Kay Galleries Steve Lopes at Mitchell Fine Art Gallery Alan Oldfield Lucian Freud Piero della Francesca Henri Matisse Gallipoli Art Prize Excerpt from 'Your Friend the Enemy' documentary by Bruce Inglis Jan Senbergs Fred Williams Rover Thomas Jeffrey Smart Euan Macleod Frank Auerbach Chuck Close Paul Gauguin Paul Cezanne Marlene Dumas Duck Print Fine Art https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPFwYQtDEt4 'Exposed Wood, Mont St Quentin', 2018, oil on canvas, 140 x 180cm, winner of the Gallipoli Art Prize 2018, collection of the Gallipoli Club. 'Warren Ellis', 2018,  oil on canvas, 180 x 130cm  (finalist Percival Painting Prize 2018) Portrait of Warren Ellis, 2017, etching, 70 x 50cm edition 20 'Man with bird', 2001, paper etching, 76.4 x 56.2cm, collection of the National Gallery of Australia 'The Nek, Foxhole', oil on canvas, 180 x 130cm 'The Late Riser', 2017, 120 x 130cm, oil on canvas 'Votive Landscape and Figure', 2017, oil on canvas, 100 x 100cm
6/3/201849 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ep 46: John Wolseley

John Wolseley is one of Australia’s most important artists.  He portrays the Australian landscape and its ecosystems from the roots of a tree to a whole floodplain; from trees, birds and fish to a tiny beetle. Using a variety of techniques, he says he creates a kind of inventory or document of the state of the earth, revealing both the energy and beauty of it. To do that he physically immerses himself in nature, spending long periods at a time camping and observing the country from Tasmania to central Australia to Arnhem land. Wolseley has had over 25 solo shows and the exhibition Midawarr | Harvest is currently travelling around the country. It is a collection of his works and those of aboriginal elder Mulkun Wirrpanda with whom he has developed a special bond over many years. His work is held in most important Australian art institutions and of course many private collections. But probably the most interesting part of our conversation is where he talks about literally collaborating with nature to produce his work. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' below the feature photo above. A short video with audio of John talking about his work and video of his Australian Galleries show can be seen on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel and is also below. Current and upcoming events: 'Midawarr | Harvest: the Art of Mulkun Wirrpanda and John Wolseley', Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, opening 4 August 2018 'The Great Beetle Show', Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, October 2018 Show notes: John Wolseley John Wolseley at Australian Galleries John Wolseley at Roslyn Oxley 9 Gallery Nomad Art Gallery Mulkun Wirrpanda at Nomad Art Gallery Midawarr|Harvest: The art of Mulkun Wirrpanda and John Wolseley - National Museum of Australia Jakob von Uexküll Seamus Heaney Heartlands and Headwaters, exhibition by Wolseley at the National Gallery of Victoria Lloyd Rees William Blake John Wolseley talking about watercolour on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FsnMSGU03w 'Distant glimpses of the great floodplain seen through a veil of trees and hanging vines' 2017, watercolour, graphite and colour pencil, ink, oil paint, dry pastel, abrasion, scratching out and nature printing, with collages of frottage, wood relief, linocut and intaglio, printed Japanese tissue papers on woven paper, 10m in length. 'Buwakul climbing a tree beside the flood plain on Garranari' 2016, watercolour graphite and rakushuishi atsukuchi (Japanese tissue), 222 x 140cm 'Insect life stories No 14: Kamarooka grey box beetle' 2017, three relief print from found wood, chine-collé over watercolour, edition 10, 53cm x 28cm 'Beetles in the salt - Lake Tyrrell' 2014 - 18, watercolour and etching on paper, 130 x 220cm 'Ephemeral water with new growth - Murray-Sunset National Park' (2009 - 2012), collection of National Gallery of Victoria, watercolour, charcoal and pencil, main panel 153.4 x 327cm sheet,
5/20/201849 minutes, 40 seconds
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Ep 45: Wendy Sharpe

Wendy Sharpe is one of Australia’s most acclaimed and significant painters. She won the Art Gallery of NSW’s Sulman prize in 1986 and has been powering through the art world ever since. She went on to win Australia’s most well-known art award, the Archibald prize, she’s won the Portia Geach - twice - and many other awards. She’s reportedly been finalist more times than any other artist in the Sulman prize and this year is no exception with her brilliant work 'Erskineville train station'. Sharpe has had 57 solo shows, has received many major commissions which include Australian Official War Artist to East Timor, the first woman to do so since World War II. Her work is bold, energetic, vibrant – spanning from a suburban street, to a circus tent, taking in scenes from around the world from China to Egypt, and even Antarctica. We weren’t able to cover everything she’s done in her career but in this episode you’ll hear us talk about women in the arts, including the dreaded term ‘woman painter’, the real and the imagined and lots of insights into the wonderful process of painting. We met in her huge studio in St Peters in Sydney an absolute Aladdin's cave of materials, art books, posters, sketchbooks, and mountains of painting rags. She was engaging, interesting and generous with her knowledge of painting and I really enjoyed meeting her. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' below the feature photo above. Two videos of Sharpe in her studio and talking about the exhibition 'Salient Western Front'  on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel can be seen below. Current and upcoming events Finalist Sulman prize at Art Gallery of NSW, 12 May - 9 September 2018 'Salient: contemporary artists at the Western front' travelling exhibition currently showing at New England Regional Art Museum until 3 June 2018 Solo show 'Secrets' Maitland Regional Art Gallery, 26 May - 19 August 2018 Solo show 'Paris Windows' King Street Gallery on William, 14 August - 8 September State Library of NSW - artist in residence - exhibition 2018 date tba Show notes: Wendy Sharpe Wendy Sharpe at King Street Gallery on William  Sulman prize Albert Tucker Archibald Prize Portia Geach Memorial Award Venus Vamp Ash Flanders Circus Oz Bernard Ollis Video of Wendy Sharpe in her studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wwe-9U5G1Wg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfSQ6roLcEs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sXWFbWjnBY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ESdZSoJGuo 'Erskineville train station', 2018, oil on canvas, 145 x 83cm 'Self portrait - as Diana of Erskineville', 1996, oil on canvas, 210 x 172cm, winner of Archibald prize 1996. 'Three o'clock in the morning', 1997, oil on canvas, 30cm x 30cm 'Mr Ash Flanders, actor', oil on linen, 164 x 152cm 'Anything goes (Venus Vamp - burlesque star)', 2013, oil on canvas, 152 x 122cm
5/7/20181 hour, 2 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 44: Tim Allen

Imagine you're out in the wilderness at least an hour’s walk from any sign of human life. It could be very hot, it could be freezing, and in front of you lies a canyon or a snow bank or a river glittering in the sun. Just you, the landscape and your paints. This is how Tim Allen often starts off his expressive landscapes and it’s become an important part of his practice. Allen won one of Australia’s most watched landscape prizes last year; the Paddington Art prize. He has also won the Kedumba drawing award and has had 19 solo shows across Australia. In this episode you’ll hear him talk about how Chinese brush painting fits in with his work, his interesting methods when it comes to brushes and he talks about another type of wilderness - the wilderness years before he started his Masters degree. We recorded this episode in his studio in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney, surrounded by his works which would be sent to Defiance Gallery in Sydney a few days later for his exhibition 'Contour, weathered'. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' beneath the feature photo, above. A short video of Allen in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel can be seen below. Current events Solo show 'Contour, weathered' at Defiance Gallery, Sydney 18 April 2018 to 18 May 2018 Show notes Tim Allen Tim Allen on Instagram Tim Allen at Defiance Gallery Paddington Art prize Kevin Connor Willem De Kooning Arthur Streeton 'Fire's On', 1891, by Arthur Streeton Tim Allen talks with Maria Stoljar in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJ-8dWd1HAs 'Swoon' 2018, oil on linen, 122 x 122cm 'Buoyant', 2016 - 2018, oil on linen, 136 x 183cm 'Detach', 2018, oil on linen 136 x 167cm 'Apsley Gorge', 2017, mixed media on paper, 95 x 79cm Working plein air at the Snowy river    
4/17/201856 minutes, 51 seconds
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Ep 43: ‘Salient: Contemporary artists at the Western Front’

See the Talking with Painters YouTube video below In 2017 a group of twelve Australian artists travelled to Belgium and France to the first World War battlefields of the western front. They created work en plein air, in their hotel rooms and in their studios, documenting their impressions of what they saw and experienced. This powerful exhibition has just started its tour around Australia at New England Regional Art Museum (NERAM) in Armidale, NSW. In this episode you’ll hear from artists Wendy Sharpe,  Amanda Penrose Hart and Euan Macleod as well as historian historian Brad Manera, who had previously travelled with many of the artists to Gallipoli. I also interviewed them on camera and made a short video about this exhibition which you can see here. For details of where the exhibition is showing go to www.salientwesternfront.com. The other nine artists in the exhibition: Deirdre Bean Harrie Fasher Paul Ferman Michelle Hiscock Ross Laurie Steve Lopes Ian Marr Idris Murphy Luke Sciberras To hear the podcast interview press 'play' below the feature photo above. Feature photo (left to right): Euan Macleod, Amanda Penrose Hart, Wendy Sharpe and Brad Manera Show notes: Salient Western Front website New England Regional Art Museum Salient Western Front on Instagram Euan Macleod on Talking with Painters Wendy Sharpe Amanda Penrose Hart on Talking with Painters Käthe Kollwitz 'Salient - Contemporary artists on the western front' video on the Talking with Painters  Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfSQ6roLcEs 'Moving forward', Euan Macleod 'Mouquet farm', Amanda Penrose Hart 'Evelyn Chapman with Ruined Church', Wendy Sharpe 'Crossing smoking hole', Euan Macleod 'Messines Ridge', Amanda Penrose Hart 'Self portrait with Menin Gate', Wendy Sharpe
4/8/201829 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 42: Lottie Consalvo

Lottie Consalvo is not only a painter. She works across performance art, photography, video and sculpture.  She’s had 9 solo shows in painting alone in just 8 years and has had many more performances and group shows. In 2015 she was one of only 10 artists chosen to take part in a residency in Sydney with world famous performance artist Marina Abramovic and her solo exhibition of painting and sculpture ‘In the remembering’ opened recently at Heide Museum of Modern Art, one of Australia's most important museums.  What's most surprising is that this is all at only 32 years of age. In this podcast episode, recorded in front of a live audience at Newcastle Art Gallery, we talk about her life and how she got where she is.  She also talks about the way she has brought her painting and performance art together particularly in her work 'Ages and Ages', currently hanging at Heide Museum of Modern Art, pictured above. It was fascinating to hear about the private performance she carried out within that space in order to complete the work. To hear the interview press 'play' or 'subscribe' beneath the feature photo above. You can see a short video of Consalvo including footage of her in her studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel here. Current shows 'In the remembering', Heide MOMA, Melbourne, 10 March - 17 June 2018 Show notes: Lottie Consalvo Lottie Consalvo at Dominik Mersch Lottie Consalvo on Instagram Museum of Modern Art, Heide Kaldor Public Art projects - Marina Abramovic Consalvo painting in Holy Holy music video 'Willow Tree' Newcastle Art Gallery Lottie Consalvo talks about her work on the Talking with Painters Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeawssZJxdU 'in silence' 2017, acrylic on board, 180 x 366cm 'The sound of a heart falling', 2016, acrylic on board, 180 x 122cm 'a distant silence', 2017, acrylic on board, 180 x 122cm 'still 1', 2017, 60 x 60cm, acrylic on board 'Deep in Your Remembering', 2017, 250 x 300cm, acrylic on polyester 'A Constructed Remembering' 2017, Video still, Single channel video 17:05 mins It's too early to love you: music torture piece - ALASKA PROJECTS< Sydney 2014
3/25/201851 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ep 41: Megan Seres

Although she first went to art school at 15, it wasn’t until she was 38 that Megan Seres started on her path to become a practising artist - when she enrolled in Sydney's National Art School. Then in 2016, encouraged by a friend, she reluctantly entered the prestigious Doug Moran National Portrait Prize and was shocked when it was announced she'd won. The winning portrait of her daughter Scarlett dressed as a colonial girl thrust her into the limelight and she has been creating works which have been catching the attention of art lovers ever since. In the last few weeks alone she has been shortlisted in both the Percival Tucker Portrait prize and the Wyndham Art Prize. In this podcast episode, she talks about the struggles she faced in becoming an artist, recalls the overwhelming experience of winning the Doug Moran portrait prize and talks about the aftermath of that win, including the decisions she had to make regarding the direction her work was taking. The interview was recorded in her studio in beautiful Gerringong, on NSW’s south coast. A video of Seres talking with Maria Stoljar in her studio from the Talking with Painters YouTube channel can be seen below. Current and upcoming events 'Out Front', group show, contemporary artists, diverse practices, by Melbourne gallery initiative Here We See - Gallery There, pop-up group exhibition, 424 Smith St, Collingwood, VIC, 8 March to 8 April 2018 Percival Portrait Painting Prize, Perc Tucker Regional Gallery,  Townsville, QLD, 27 April - 15 July 2018 Wyndham Art prize, Wyndham art gallery, Werribee, VIC, 29 March 2018 Group shows at A K Bellinger Gallery, Inverell, date TBA Four commissioned portraits of the founding women of Adderton: house and heart of mercy, opening to the public November 2018 Show notes: Megan Seres Julian Ashton Art School National Art School John Bloomfield Ella Dreyfus Euan Macleod Euan Macleod on Talking with Painters Bill Henson Louise Hearman Louise Hearman on Talking with Painters Marion Borgelt Doug Moran National Portrait Prize Why entering the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize is a life changer and one worth considering by Megan Seres Liquin by Winsor and Newton Megan Seres talking with Maria Stoljar in her studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Khunw7NjiLE 'Scarlett as colonial girl', 2016, winner of the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2016 'The rest is silence (Brendan Cowell as Hamlet)', 2009, oil on linen, 91.5 x 91.5cm 'Veil "04' 2018, oil an dmidxid media on board, wooden frame, 39 x 31.5cm 'The Submissive Self is a Shadowed Self #02' 2018, oil and mixed media on board, wooden frame, 40x 40cm   'The danger of a single story', 2017, Mosman Art Prize finalist  
2/26/201857 minutes, 19 seconds
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Ep 40: Peter O’Doherty

If he doesn’t have a paintbrush in his hand it’s likely he’ll have a guitar because Peter O'Doherty is as much a musician and songwriter as he is a painter. It wasn't long after leaving high school that he filled in for a guitarist of his brother's band who had gone on holidays and ended up never leaving. That band was Mental As Anything which rocketed to fame in Australia in the late 70s and 80s. During those years he taught himself to paint and that life - immersed in music and art - continues to this day. O'Doherty's paintings are mostly landscapes, many of them focussing on the manmade environment: fibro houses, red brick apartment blocks, cityscapes, quintessentially Australian. But he has also painted domestic still lifes: retro armchairs, a closeup of the washing up in the kitchen sink. His work has been recognised with awards including the Paddington art prize and he has exhibited in over 30 solo shows in Australia and New Zealand. But what I found most fascinating about our conversation were the parallels he drew between painting and music which added an extra dimension to how I view his work. To hear the conversation press play under the feature photo above. A short video of O'Doherty talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio is now on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel Upcoming events Solo exhibition 'Somewhere to live', King Street Gallery, 27 February to 24 March 2018 Links to things and people we talk about in the show Peter O'Doherty at King Street Gallery on William Kurt Schwitters Mental as Anything Reg Mombassa (aka Chris O'Doherty) on Talking with Painters Susan O'Doherty on Talking with Painters Dog Trumpet Rover Thomas Mark Rothko Paul Klee Piet Mondrian Jean Michel Basquiat Charlie Parker Thelonious Monk Dizzy Gillespie Grandmaster Flash https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULlT4GyhqbY   'North east corner Dee Why', 2017, acrylic on canvas, 137 x 152cm 'New apartments' 2017, acrylic on canvas, 61 x 61cm  We talk about this painting at 'Windows',  2017, acrylic on board, 40 x 40cm  We talk about this painting at 28m45s   'Gums', 2017, acrylic on canvas, 46 x 40cm   We talk about this painting at 30m45s 'Coke sign', 2017, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40cm 'Kingsford red block', 2017, acrylic on canvas, 182 x 213cm 'Striped Lounge Chair', 2012, acrylic on canvas, 122 x 122cm 'In The Sink', 2015, acrylic on canvas, 122 x 137cm  
2/25/201840 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ep 39: Renee French

Born in the US and currently living in Australia, Renee French is an artist acclaimed for her hundreds, if not thousands, of drawings in the form of original works, art books, graphic novels, underground comix and children's books which she has created over the last 25 years. Her art has been exhibited in solo shows in New York, Los Angeles and Tokyo (several which sold out) as well as in many group shows. And now there is a waiting list for her paintings. They are effectively sold before they are started even though she has only been painting full time for a year. Free from the restrictions of narrative, she now paints characters whose images speak for themselves; a mummified bunny, a cute chihuahua, a bird with an elongated beak and bulging eyes, a raccoon smoking a cigarette. French's imagination brings to life these creatures which stare out at the viewer with soulful eyes. French has over 100,000 followers on Instagram, many who tune in to her live video feeds where she paints and answers questions about her process and technique - often with a TV series like Neighbours or Blue Heelers playing in the background. You'll often see her works labelled with the hashtags 'pop surrealism' and 'low brow art' on Instagram - art movements which have been influenced by surrealism and popular culture. We spent hours talking and laughing and this interview starts at the relatively recent point when she decided to learn to paint.  We talk about  Instagram, why Australia made her want to be a painter, galleries in the age of the world wide web and lots more. Press 'play' below the feature photo above to hear the interview. See a short video of Renee French's work from the Talking with Painters YouTube channel below. Upcoming events Exhibition at Beinart Gallery, Melbourne, November 2018 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Renee French on Instagram Renee French at Adam Baumgold Gallery Renee French blog Julian Ashton Art School Brett Whiteley Baby Bjornstrand Ben Smith Nick Stathopoulos on Talking with Painters Alla prima painting The Archibald prize David Gulpilil by Craig Ruddy (Archibald prize winner 2004) Neighbours Blue Heelers A Country Practice All Saints Gregory Jacobsen Suzanne Archer on Talking with Painters Martin Sacks La Luz de Jesus Gallery Giant Robot Store Beinart Gallery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30I_4tf6vg8 'The Peepers', 2018, acrylic on panel, 5" x 5" 'Chihuahua No 112', acrylic on pane, 6" x 6" 'Nessie', 2018, acrylic on panel, 5" x 5" Work in progress, acrylic on panel, 6" x 6"
2/11/201853 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ep 38: William Mackinnon

William Mackinnon's landscapes are at the same time familiar and unexpected. Car headlights illuminate a dark country road revealing improbable markings; a coastal scene viewed through a tangle of gums unveil pink and aqua islands in the distance; a suburban setting is dominated by a flattened brick path and geometrically striped grass verge. He calls them ‘psychological landscapes’ which explore his environment and his response to it, using everyday imagery to evoke human experiences. Through his use of materials and colour he takes us into his mind’s eye. And it’s fascinating. Like many artists before him he went through a period of learning and exploration in his twenties, working in jobs which exposed him to great art. He spent time working and studying in London but went on to work for two years in Australia’s remote communities facilitating the work of Aboriginal elders. It was this experience which ultimately led him to find his own voice as an artist - although not in the way you might expect. In this podcast episode he describes that experience. We also talk about how he became an artist and how he goes about a typical day's work. Mackinnon has exhibited in Australia regularly since he was 19, with over a dozen solo shows and many more group shows.  His works are held in various private and public collections.  His much anticipated solo show ‘Twin Palms’ opens at Jan Murphy Gallery on 27 February 2018. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' below the feature photo. A short video of Mackinnon talking about his work form the Talking with Painters YouTube channel can be seen below Feature photo - Mackinnon with his work 'The World is as you are', 2016, acrylic oil and enamel on linen, 212 x 317cm Current and upcoming events Solo show 'Twin Palms' at Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane, Qld, 27 February - 24 March 2018 Work included in 'Triennial', National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, until 15 April 2018 Links to things and people we talk about on the show William Mackinnon William Mackinnon at Jan Murphy Gallery William Mackinnon at Hugo Michell Gallery William Mackinnon on Instagram Katherine Hattam Katherine Hattam on Talking with Painters Roger Kemp Tim Maguire Papunya Tula Fitzroy Crossing Naata Nungurrayi Philip Guston David Hockney David Hockney on artsy.net Sunshine Bertrand Video of William Mackinnon talking about his recent work on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZogU5D8K_4 'Exit', 2013, acrylic, oil and automotive enamel on linen, 200 x 360cm 'The dance between making it happen and letting it happen' 2017, acrylic, oil and enamel on linen, 160 x 130cm 'Strange Country', 2016, acrylic oil and enamel on linen, 150 x 200cm 'Hopes and fears', 2016, acrylic oil and enamel on linen, 150 x 200cm 'Landscape as self-portrait/Cracks drains shadows and sparkles', 2017, acrylic, oil and enamel on linen, 198 x 168cm 'Show me the way', 2017, acrylic, oil and enamel on linen, 61 x 91cm
1/28/201836 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 37: Vincent Fantauzzo

Vincent Fantauzzo is one of Australia's most popular portrait artists.  He has won the Doug Moran National Portrait prize, is a four time winner of the Archibald People's Choice award and was recently commissioned to paint the official portrait of former prime minister Julia Gillard for the Parliament House collection. But his wasn't a smooth path to success. He grew up in a tough neighbourhood where you literally had to fight to get by and he learnt to survive by becoming someone that went against his true nature. Unaware he had dyslexia, he struggled at school and was kicked out at 13 years of age.  He worked from job to job but never stopped drawing and ultimately realised that was what he did best. How he got into and finished university is a story in itself. He is now an adjunct professor of that university, RMIT. In this episode he also tells the story behind many of his famous portraits: of actor Heath Ledger, film director Baz Luhrmann, acclaimed actress Asher Keddie (who is also his wife) and former prime minister Julia Gillard. He also talks about his passion to take art to people who might have never set foot in a gallery. Press 'play' above to hear the interview.   Current and upcoming events Work included in 'Heath Ledger: A Life in Pictures', Art Gallery WA until 18 January 2018 Unveiling of  portrait of the Hon. Julia Gillard AC at Parliament House Links to things and people we talk about on the show Vincent Fantauzzo Vincent Fantauzzo on Instagram Archibald Prize Doug Moran National Portrait Prize Heath Ledger Baz Luhrmann Asher Keddie Julia Gillard AC Nic Cester Matt Moran Harley House  'Heath', 2008, oil on canvas, 106 x 140cm (Collection of the Art Gallery of NSW, highly commended and winner of the Archibald Prize People's Choice award 2008. Portrait of Heath Ledger) 'Off Screen', 2010, oil on canvas, (Winner Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2010. Portrait of Baz Luhrmann) 'Love face', 2013, oil on linen, 174 x 304cm, (Winner Archibald Prize People's Choice 2013 - portrait of Asher Keddie) 'All that's good in me (self-portrait as son Luca)', 2014, oil on linen, 160 x 260cm, (Winner Archibald Prize People's Choice 2014) 'Matt Moran', 2011, oil on canvas, 200 x 150cm, (Winner of the Archibald Packing Room Prize 2011) Fantauzzo working on his portrait of Nic Cester, in Strachan Lane, Melbourne CBD, outside the restaurant he co-owns, Harley House. (Image from Fantauzzo's instagram page)  
12/10/201748 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ep 36: Paul Ryan

Paul Ryan has had a huge year – 3 solo shows across Australia with Nanda Hobbs, Edwina Corlette and James Makin galleries as well as work being shown with all three at Sydney Contemporary. He has exhibited his work in over 20 solo shows. He’s won numerous art prizes and has been shortlisted many times – 13 times in the Archibald Prize - and on two occasions he achieved the rare distinction of being a finalist in the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes in the Art Gallery of NSW in the one year. His work is characterised by the liberal application of paint, mainly with a palette knife, producing stunning portraits, figures and landscapes. Ryan lives and works in Thirroul, a coastal oasis south of Sydney, where his paintings share space with his surfboards. It's this landscape, with the backdrop of a dramatic escarpment, that Paul paints time and time again, often through the lens of Australian colonial history which has been inspired by literature and music. This subject has not been without controversy, however. In 2010 his show ‘No Country for Dreaming’ was briefly shut down after negative reactions within some parts of the Aboriginal community and he talks about that in this episode. Ryan also talks movingly about his adoption as a child and how that’s impacted his life and art. He also gives many insights into his process and techniques. A short video of Paul Ryan talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio can be seen on the Talking with Painters Youtube channel here Upcoming events Solo show at Edwina Corlette Gallery, Brisbane, February 2018 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Paul Ryan at Nanda Hobbs Contemporary Paul Ryan at Edwina Corlette Gallery Paul Ryan at James Makin Gallery Paul Ryan on Instagram Elisabeth Cummings The Commonwealth of Thieves by Thomas Keneally Wanting by Richard Flanagan Tony Albert Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy Noah Taylor Adam Cullen Bill Callahan Vivid Sydney Ashley Frost Richard Tognetti Jon Frank Saudade Paul Ryan talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaUm5EsNWic 'Thirteen Noahs', 2015, oil on mixed found and bought objects (Finalist Archibald Prize 2015, Art Gallery of NSW) 'Blue Mountains Noah', 2015, 79 x 68cm, oil on found framed painting (Winner of the Herford Hardwood Portrait Prize 2015) Painting hanging in Ryan's studio which we discuss in the podcast at 18:45 'Cullen - Been Feudin', 2012, oil on linen, 244 x 198cm (Finalist 2012 Archibald Prize, Art Gallery of NSW) Artwork Ryan and Cullen created together during a sitting for Ryan's Archibald painting of him discussed in the podcast at 21:40 'Not a Sound Out of the Hills No More than Smoke', 2010, oil on linen, 168 x 122cm  (Winner of Paddington Art Prize 2010) 'The Hunt, Bulli' 2017, oil on linen, 122 x 122cm Album Art for Bill Callahan's album Apocalypse discussed at 32mins of the podcast
11/26/201741 minutes, 1 second
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Ep 35: Prudence Flint

Prudence Flint paints women. Usually in an interior setting and often in an intimate, solitary moment. Her subject might be in the bathroom, showering, or lying on a bed staring at the ceiling or in the kitchen drinking a glass of water. She explores that moment in time in a unique way, through her use of light, colour, portrayal of space and magnificent use of distortion. Flint has won many art awards including the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize, the Portia Geach Memorial Award and the Len Fox Painting Award. Her work has also been shortlisted many times - thirteen times in the Portia Geach alone. If you have an interest in painting in Australia, it’s very likely you’re familiar with her work. In this episode, Flint talks about her life and how she found her way to her subject matter and painting methods.  She also gives interesting insights into the workings of the inner critic - something most artists have encountered. Her approach to that is inspired and taps into the mysteries of the creative process. See a short video of Flint's studio and work in her latest show at Australian Galleries on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel here. Upcoming Events Solo show 'Bedsit' at Australian Galleries, Sydney, 14 November to 3 December 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Prudence Flint Prudence Flint at Australian Galleries Prudence Flint at Bett Gallery Jenny Watson Vivienne Shark LeWitt Doug Moran National Portrait Prize Archibald Prize Urszula Dawkins Video of Flint's studio and show 'Bedsit' at Australian Galleries https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOTbvBR1fCM 'Baby', 2015,  oil on linen, 105 x 90.5cm (Finalist in Archibald Portrait Prize 2015) 'Shower', 2016, oil on linen, 117 x 97cm (Finalist in 2016 Archibald Portrait Prize) 'A Fine Romance #9', 2004, oil on linen, 117 x 82cm (Winner of Doug Moran National Portrait Prize 2004) 'Large Tartan Blanket' 2016, oil on linen, 109 x 142cm (Finalist in the 2016 Doug Moran National Portrait Prize) 'Wash' 2015, oil on linen, 108 x 90cm (Winner of the Len Fox Painting Award 2016)
11/12/201759 minutes, 34 seconds
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Ep 34: Ken Done

Ken Done has the most widely recognised name and work of any living Australian painter. His paintings are about the good things in life - happiness, joy, beauty. And they're about colour.  Lots of colour. He had his first solo show 37 years ago when he was 40 after a successful career in advertising. Since then he has had nearly 100 solo shows, received an Order of Australia, gained celebrity status in Japan and has been a finalist on multiple occasions in the Archibald, Wynne, Sulman, Dobell and Mosman art prizes. But of course, Done is also known for his successful lines of clothing, homewares and other products all emblazoned with his artworks. From t-shirts to bedlinen his work has appeared on more than just a canvas.  His business at one point boasted 15 stores across Australia, licensing arrangements in Japan and America and employed 150 people.  Its turnover was in the millions. For many years, though, Done has concentrated purely on his painting, where his passion lies. In this episode Done talks about his early life, career, and how he started off exhibiting in Sydney ultimately avoiding the conventional gallery system. He also generously reveals a lot about his process and materials, talking in detail about several paintings.  We also talk about the curious situation in which the 'art establishment' (Done wonders who they may be) has chosen to largely ignore his work. The interview was recorded in Done's harbourside home where he has his studio and lives with his wife of more than 50 years, Judy. To hear the podcast interview click on 'play' beneath the above feature photo. To see my video of Done in his studio, just scroll down. Current and upcoming events Current exhibition of 'Paintings you probably haven't seen' in conjunction with the release of the publication of the book with the same title, Ken Done Gallery, Sydney Links to things and people we talk about on the show Ken Done The Argonauts Club Jeffrey Smart Emile Bonnard Peter Brock Gerard Richter Julian Schnabel Milton Avery Billy Connolly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kV2xMjr1bj4 'Dr White Reef', 2016, oil and acrylic on linen, 184 x 244cm 'Sunday' 1982, oil on canvas, 102 x 82cm 'The cabin studio', 1980, oil on canvas, 76 x 289cm 'Sydney' 1980, oil crayon on paper, 45 x 30cm 'Me', 1992, oil, acrylic and oil crayon on canvas 102 x 76cm. National Portrait Gallery collection 'Roll of honour' 2011 oil and acrylic on canvas 152 x 122cm (from Mosman Gallery exhibition 'ATTACK: Japanese Midget Submarines in Sydney Harbour') 'Studio Reef', 2012, oil and acrylic on linen, 183 x 152cm 'Night Dive I' 2012, oil acrylic and oil crayon on linen, 120 x 181cm 'Edge of reef', 2007, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 200
10/29/201757 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ep 33: Aida Tomescu

Click here to hear extended interview on YouTube She fled communist Romania in 1980, arriving in Australia knowing no-one. But Aida Tomescu has gone on to become one of Australia's most important abstract painters. She has exhibited in over 30 solo shows - including a major survey of her work in 2009 with the Drill Hall Gallery - and her work is held in many public and private collections both in Australia and internationally. Tomescu has also won many awards including the Sulman, Wynne and Dobell prizes - but you get the impression that, although she appreciates that recognition, she doesn't see those awards as her greatest achievements. It became clear in our conversation that her primary aim is to convey meaning through her work and that appears to have been a lifetime pursuit. We talk about her childhood in Romania, her arrival in Australia and the challenges she faced and how she quickly connected to the Australian art scene. Tomescu also explains what she calls 'found' colour, why she isn't chasing texture in her paintings and also gives some great advice for art students (which is also relevant for the rest of us!). This episode has been edited for the podcast but a longer version can be heard on YouTube here. Tomescu's show 'Under the Iron of the Moon' opens at Jensen gallery in Sydney on 19 October 2017 and we talk about the work in that exhibition as well as her beautiful Wynne finalist painting 'Bribie'. Images of all the works we talk about are posted below. Upcoming Events 'Under the Iron of the Moon' at Jensen Gallery, Sydney, 19 October to 9 December, 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Aida Tomescu Aida Tomescu at Jensen Gallery Titian Paul Cezanne Gallery A, Sydney (1964 - 1983) Piet Mondrian Sulman Prize Wynne Prize Dobell Drawing Prize Ian Fairweather Camille Pisarro Giorgio Morandi Heide Museum of Modern Art Jean-Paul Sartre Extended Talking with Painters interview of Aida Tomescu on YouTube https://youtu.be/IbhHjZ0YZxI https://youtu.be/pbSNWrtdOdY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D7B1W3cH3c 'Angels and Bed' (I, II, III, IV) 2017, oil on linen, each 46 x 36cm 'Piatra' 2000, oil on canvas, 183 x 153cm (winner of Wynne prize 2001) 'Under the Iron of the Moon', 2017, oil on linen, diptych, 183 x 306cm 'Bribie', 2015, oil on linen, 183 x 153cm One of five paintings from 'Quintet', 2017, oil on linen 'Negru IV (A candle in a dark room)' and 'Negru III (A candle in a dark room)' 2002, white pastel and charcoal on aquatint, 123 x 80cm each, winner of Dobell drawing prize 2003 'Messiaen' 2013 oil and pigments on canvas, 184 x 154cm
10/16/201757 minutes, 57 seconds
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Ep 32: Vanessa Stockard

Vanessa Stockard's work is powerful. If you look into the eyes of her ‘Self-portrait as new mum’ which is hanging in the Archibald Prize this year you’ll probably see something different to the person standing next to you. Her expert use of colour and mixture of some looser and other more deliberate marks makes it one of those beguiling paintings where the expression is so subtle that it’s open to multiple interpretations. She's been painting for over 20 years, had over 15 solo shows in Australia and the US and has been in many more group exhibitions, but this year Stockard has really stepped it up a gear with her selection as a finalist in both the Archibald Prize and the Portia Geach Memorial Award. She lives in Bowral in the southern highlands of NSW with her husband and 18 month old daughter in the beautiful and fabulously eclectic home her husband William Wolfenden designed and built. The plans included a roomy studio where she spends as much time as she can, constantly exploring new ideas. In this episode, we talk about what it’s been like being a parent for the first time, why she forced herself to do dozens of self portraits, life at boarding school and why humour is so important in her life.  We also talk about Instagram, taking risks and her fascinating Derek Milkwood series - all with a good dose of humour. She's vivacious, funny and incredibly talented  -  don't miss this interview! See a short video of Stockard taken on the day of the interview on the Talking with Painters Youtube channel here Current events Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes, Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney until 22 October 2017 'Inside out', AK Bellinger Gallery, Inverell Links to things and people we talk about in the show Vanessa Stockard Vanessa Stockard on Instagram Vanessa Stockard at Van Rensburg Galleries Vanessa Stockard at AK Bellinger Gallery Viola Dominello Fred Williams Archibald Prize - AGNSW Portia Geach Memorial Award Derek Milkwood on Instagram Video of Vanessa Stockard in her home and studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnolcxUOXlU 'Self-portrait as new mum', 2017, acrylic on wood panel, 50 x 50cm (finalist Archibald Prize) Recent self-portraits, 2017 'Yellow rose' 'Austin Rose' Stockard's recent portrait of daughter Isobel 'Sound Awake', 2017, 60 x 60cm, acrylic on wood panel 'Murchison Party Nightmare', 2017, acrylic on wood panel, 50 x 45cm  (mentioned in the podcast at 33m45s) From the Derek Milkwood series (mentioned in the podcast at 36m 50s) Self portrait - finalist in the Portia Geach Memorial Award 2017    
9/27/201745 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 31: Jonathan Dalton

In 2007, Archibald prize finalist, Jonathan Dalton, decided to let go of the photography business he had built up in his homeland of Ireland and started teaching himself to paint. Just two years later he won two of the country's major art prizes. It was clear he had taken the right path. With the prize money he and his wife spent time travelling and lived in Spain for a few years before arriving in Australia. In the last few years he has exhibited in five solo shows in Ireland, Spain, China and Australia. His success continues here with his selection as a finalist in the 2017 Archibald prize with a magnificent work titled ‘Lottie and James’ - a portrait of artists Lottie Consalvo and James Drinkwater. It was the first time he had entered the prize. Dalton's aim is to take the viewer beyond photorealism to what he calls ‘theatrical realism’. He imbues his works with a sense of drama, causing the viewer to wonder what’s going on beyond the picture plane.  His exhibition with Nanda Hobbs Contemporary earlier this year was a perfect example of this theatricality where he turned the traditional still life on its head. In this episode we talk about how he got started, the Archibald experience and the benefits and limits of photography when using photographs as a reference in painting. He also gives great insights into his painting techniques as well as revealing a lot about his process. He also tells of how online poker helped him in the early days of taking up painting! See a short video of Dalton in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube below. Current and Upcoming events Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney current until 22 October 2017 '9 Hours Underground', Artesian4, Wilson Car Park, Opera House, Sydney, 25 - 29 September 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Jonathan Dalton Jonathan Dalton at Nanda\Hobbs Contemporary Jonathan Dalton on Instagram Archibald Prize at the Art Gallery of NSW Lottie Consalvo James Drinkwater Michelangelo Leonardo Da Vinci Ralph Hobbs Giles Alexander Chuck Close Alan Jones Video of Jonathan Dalton in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCAvaoHUf5g 'Lottie and James', 2017, oil on linen, 154 x 167cm 'Big Bowl', 2017, oil on canvas 182 x 213cm 'Beauty Imperfect 5' 2017, oil on board, 55 x 60cm Portrait of Esther (we talk about this painting at 25:15) Work in progress -  (we talk about this painting at about 26m) 'Awaiting Judgment', oil on linen, 76 x 101cm 'A lady without name and her daughter', 2016, oil on board, 91 x 120cm 'An end of innocence', 2016, oil on board, 55 x 60cm
9/18/201743 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ep 30: Amanda Penrose Hart

Armed with her favourite palette knife which she’s used for the last 10 years, Amanda Penrose Hart dynamically captures the landscape in paint both en plein air and in her studio. She won the Gallipoli Art Prize this year with her painting ‘The Sphinx, Perpetual Peace' and her upcoming show at King Street Gallery on William in Sydney will be her 25th solo show. She has won and been shortlisted in other art awards and her portraits have been recognised in the Portia Geach Memorial Award and the Salon des Refusés on numerous occasions. Over the years Hart has depicted countless landscapes. From the coastal vistas of Moonee Beach in northern NSW and Bruny island in Tasmania, to the drier landscapes of Fowler's Gap, Hill End and Sofala, Hart captures the landscape with a sweep of paint which captures the mood of her surroundings. She's also been involved in projects with other well known Australian painters, travelling to historic sites including Anzac Cove in Turkey and the Western Front in France, returning home with plein air paintings and ideas for new works. In this episode Hart talks about how she got started, those painting trips, commissions and how to get bugs off oil paintings as well as lots more - all with a wonderfully dry sense of humour! To hear the podcast interview just click 'play' below the feature photo at the top of the page, press  'subscribe' - or listen via your favourite podcast app! Current and upcoming events 'New Paintings', ReDot Fine Art Gallery, Singapore,  30 August 2017 'High Tide', King Street Gallery on William, Sydney, 12 September 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Amanda Penrose Hart at King Street Gallery on William Amanda Penrose Hart on Instagram Robert Linnegar Elisabeth Cummings at King Street Gallery on William Wendy Sharpe at King Street Gallery on William Peter Anderson 'Your Friend the Enemy' - Gallipoli project (Artist Profile Magazine) Preview of documentary 'Your Friend the Enemy' produced and filmed by Bruce Inglis (Vimeo)  Brad Manera, historian Roderick 'Roddy' Meagher AO QC Luke Sciberras Alan Jones      'The Sphinx, Perpetual Peace', oil on linen, 153 x 214cm  Winner of 2017 Gallipoli Art Prize 'Shark Island' 2017, oil on canvas, 95 x 180cm 'Bay' 2017, oil on canvas, 38 x 52cm 'Sofala', 2017, oil on canvas 90 x 120cm 'The Red Scarf', oil on paper, portrait of Elisabeth Cummings 'Roddy Meagher' 2011, oil on canvas, 80 x 100cm 'Pearly', 2017, oil on canvas, 38 x 51cm 'Fields of France' 2017 oil on board 24 x 73cm 'Looking Towards Lone Pine', 2015, oil on canvas, 38 x 52cm Drawings from Moonee Beach, April 2016  (APH Instagram)  
9/5/201745 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 29: James Drinkwater

He’s a musician, singer, songwriter, poet and sculptor but of course James Drinkwater is primarily a painter and one of the most exciting contemporary artists creating work in Australia today. Drinkwater started his art training at 10 years of age and now, at 33, has exhibited in 20 solo shows in Australia, London, Singapore and Berlin. He’s been awarded the coveted Brett Whiteley Travelling Art scholarship and Marten Bequest scholarship, has won a number of art prizes and been finalist in many others including three times in the Wynne prize. In this episode of the podcast we talk about what artistic influences he had as a child growing up in Newcastle, his time overseas and the fascinating stories behind two of his impressive Wynne finalist paintings: 'Passage to Rungli Rungliot' and 'Encrusting the Marvellous Heart'. He also talks about his optimistic outlook which seeks out beauty in the world and how nearly every aspect of his life contributes to his art. Upcoming Events Sydney Contemporary, Sydney, September 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show James Drinkwater at Nanda Hobbs Contemporary James Drinkwater at NKN Gallery James Drinkwater on Instagram Anne Von Bertouch Judy Cassab Lottie Consalvo at Dominik Mersch Gallery Marten Bequest Scholarship Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship Damien Minton on Instagram Sunday Painting/ James Drinkwater/ Berlin - Video by Osvaldo Budet Lottie Consalvo - Evenings in Residence (Kaldor Public Art Projects) Adam Cullen Jasper Knight Ralph Hobbs Holy Holy - That Message (Youtube) Conrad Marca-Relli Wynne Prize Video of James Drinkwater talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqXjOI1gAD4 'Passage to Rungli Rungliot' 2016, oil on board, 180 x 360cm 'Encrusting the marvellous heart', diptych, 2015, oil and collage on hardboard, 180 x 244cm 'Long day in Figaro Beach' 2016, mixed media on board, 140 x 120cm 'Encrusting the Marvellous Heart 3', 2015, mixed media on paper, 59 x 42cm 'Thus far and no further', 2017, oil on studio debris on hardboard, 140 x 122cm 'The rogue sun was kicking trees', 2017, oil, copper and studio debris on hardboard, 140 x 122cm
8/21/201750 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ep 28: Jude Rae

Jude Rae is as interested in faces as she is in gas bottles and airports with her work crossing genres from portraiture to still life and architectural interiors. Amongst the very few artists to have won the Portia Geach Memorial Award for portraiture twice, she was also awarded the Bulgari Art Award last year with her painting 'SL 359', a meditative still life. She has exhibited in over 45 solo shows across Australia, New Zealand, Germany and the US, has been involved in many more group shows and her work is held in major public and private collections across Australia and internationally. We talk about growing up in an artistic home (her father, David Rae, was a painter whose work is held by the Art Gallery of NSW), the challenges of portrait commissions and illusion and materiality in painting.  She also talks about her interest in the viewer looking beyond the narrative a painting might suggest and tells of how she came about painting those gas bottles! You can see a short video taken on the day of the interview on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (and below) Upcoming events 'Jude Rae: A Space of Measured Light' Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, ACT, 18 August to 15 October 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show: Jude Rae Jude Rae at Jensen Gallery David Rae at the Art Gallery of NSW Frank Watters  Cy Twombly Cy Twombly's Le Panto Cycle (YouTube) Diego Velazquez Portia Geach memorial award Professor Ian Chubb AC Bulgari Art Award Jude Rae at the Drill Hall Gallery Video of Jude Rae talking with Maria Stoljar in her studio - Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ORE9JQfJgs 'SL359' 2016, oil on linen, 1530 x 1220mm, winner Bulgari Art Award 2016 'Self Portrait (the year my husband left )' 2008, acrylic and oil on linen, 153 x 198cm, 2008 Portia Geach Memorial Award winner 'SL 341' 2014, oil on linen, 500 x 540mm 'Sarah Peirse', 2014, oil on linen, 710 x 660mm, Archibald finalist 2014 'Dr Ian Chubb' 2011, oil on linen, 900 x 1200mm 'SL 315' 2013, oil on linen, 1220 x 1370mm 'Interior 371 (Foyer II)', 2017, oil on linen, 1500mm x 2600mm (left);  'Interior 370 (Foyer I)', oil on linen, 2600 x 1980mm (right) 'T5 (Heathrow #247)', 2010, oil on linen, 180 x 240cm 'Interior 278 (Munich I), 2011, oil on linen, 1550 x 1980mm
8/7/201740 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ep 27: Joanna Logue

Joanna Logue is an award-winning painter whose work distinctively reflects her experience of the countryside and bushland. Through her sensual application of paint, she transports the viewer into a dreamlike landscape. She has exhibited in 34 solo shows and her work has been included in over 65 group shows. Her work is held in public and private collections and she has received many commissions. As this podcast goes online her solo show ‘Heartland’ hangs in Sydney's King Street Gallery on William. In this podcast episode, Logue talks about her early life growing up in a small town of NSW before moving to Sydney, she tells of how her relationship with her twin sister impacted her early years, and generously gives many insights into her painting process. She also talks about how she changed her approach to painting from one of seeking perfectionism in the early years to her free and visceral approach today where 'there are no rules'. To hear the interview press 'play' above. To see a short video of Logue talking with Maria Stoljar in the lead up to her exhibition click here. Feature photo:  Joanna Logue with Cinnamon in front of 'Heartland I' (left) and 'Merri Creek' (photo courtesy of the artist) Current show 'Heartland', King Street Gallery on William, Sydney, 18 July - 12 August, 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Joanna Logue Joanna Logue at King Street Gallery Joanna Logue at Anna Pappas Gallery Simonne Logue Guy Warren at Olsen Gallery Idris Murphy Idris Murphy at King Street Gallery Hill End artists in residence Donald Friend Russell Drysdale Arthur Boyd Bruny Island residency Camie Lyons at Olsen Gallery Camie Lyons on Instagram Susan Baird Susan Baird at Arthouse Gallery Elisabeth Cummings Elisabeth Cummings at King Street Gallery Martin Pera Kym Bonython Video of  Joanna Logue talking with Maria Stoljar on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fgh43pBbhg 'Heartland I, 2017, oil on linen, 130 x 170cm 'Bruny II', 2016, oil on board, 50cm x 5cm 'Heartland II', 2017, oil on linen, 130 x 170cm 'Bruny I', 2016, oil on board, 50 x 50cm 'Lake George', oil on paper, 50 x 260cm 'Gundagai Bridge', 2016, acrylic on Fabriano paper, 63 x 267cm, 'On the way to Tarrawarra', 2016, oil on linen, 60 x 240cm   Recent paintings in response to the landscape of Mount Desert Island, Maine, USA    
7/24/201744 minutes, 51 seconds
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Ep 26: Jordy Kerwick

He only started painting about 18 months ago, but Jordy Kerwick has caught the attention of art dealers and curators across the world. As this episode goes online, his first solo show opens at Lindberg Galleries, in Melbourne, Australia. His next will be in New York's Anna Zorina Gallery and will be followed by another five group shows which are coming up in Europe and the US. Kerwick attributes part of his success to the power of Instagram, where he has a substantial following - and it's growing daily. It's there that he's connected and made friends with other artists which has fuelled his love of painting with the exchange of images and ideas. But just a glance at his work is enough to see why he is in such hot demand. His mark making, brushstroke and use of colour create an emotion and vibrancy which has drawn in his followers. Hear in this conversation how Kerwick's wife Rachael was a major influence in his taking up painting, how his sons inspire him both in his art and in his life, and how music and Instagram have played a role in making him one of Australia's most exciting emerging artists. To hear the podcast conversation with Jordy Kerwick and Maria Stoljar press 'Play' above and scroll down to see the works we talk about on the show and a short video taken on the day of the interview. Photos courtesy of the artist and Lindberg Galleries Upcoming solo shows Solo show at Lindberg Galleries, '4th Time Around', Melbourne, from 6 to 22 July 2017 Solo show at Anna Zorina Gallery, New York, date TBA Links to things and people we talk about on the show Jordy Kerwick at Lindberg Galleries Jordy Kerwick at Anna Zorina Gallery Jordy Kerwick on Instagram Heide Museum of Modern Art John and Sunday Reed  Sidney Nolan Arthur Boyd Rhys Lee on Instagram Henri Matisse Andrew Salgado on Instagram Cy Twombly Adam Lee on Instagram  Justin Williams on Instagram Ina Gerken on Instagram Video:  Jordy Kerwick shows Maria Stoljar his recent work on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kf2eaHFDRg 'Time of the Assassins', oil on canvas 'Williamstown Winter', oil on canvas, 71 x 91cm Flowers 1-6, oil on canvas, 60 x 70cm 'She Smiled Sweetly', oil on canvas, 71 x 91cm 'Protagonist', oil on canvas, 90 x 106cm 'Sunset in Daylesford', oil on canvas, 40 x 50cm 'Untitled', oil on canvas, 35 x 46cm Portraits 'There is No Wolf Like the Present', oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm 'Good Luck Charm #3", 2016, oil, acrylic on canvas, 91.4 x 76.2cm 'Untitled', oil on canvas, 70 x 90cm
7/5/201748 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ep 25: Natasha Bieniek

At only 32 years of age, Natasha Bieniek has been awarded the Wynne prize for landscape painting, the Portia Geach Memorial award for portrait painting and the Metro art award, has been a five time finalist in the Archibald prize, a three time finalist in the Doug Moran National Portrait prize and has been shortlisted in many others. Impressive as that is, what's more amazing about Bieniek’s work is its size. Her winning Wynne prize painting 'Biophilia' was only 9cm square and her portrait of Wendy Whiteley, which was highly commended by the trustees in the 2016 Archibald prize, is only  13.5cm x 18.5cm. She is without doubt a master of the miniature. Bieniek has exhibited in six solo shows, across Australia and overseas, and in many group shows. The National Portrait Gallery held an exhibition in 2014, ‘In the Flesh’, where 14 of her miniature portraits were included, borrowed from private collections. In our conversation, Bieniek reveals how it was not all smooth sailing at the beginning and talks about how nature in the urban environment has inspired her work. She also provides details about her process which reveal the intensive labour involved in creating her exquisite paintings. To hear Maria Stoljar's conversation with Natasha Bieniek press 'play' above and scroll down to see the works they talk about on the podcast Video of Natasha Bieniek in her studio can be seen on YouTube here Upcoming events Sydney Contemporary, Sydney, as part of a group show curated by Dianne Tanzer and This Is No Fantasy  - September 2017 Links to things and people we talk about on the show Natasha Bieniek at This is No Fantasy + Dianne Tanzer Gallery Natasha Bieniek at Jan Murphy Gallery Natasha Bieniek on Instagram Victoria Reichelt Wynne Prize Portia Geach Memorial Award Archibald Prize Michael Brand Wendy Whiteley Wendy Whiteley and the Secret Garden by Janet Hawley Brett Whiteley Natasha Bieniek talks with Maria Stoljar in her studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y17eJu-IKEk 'Wendy Whiteley', 2016, oil on wood, 13.5 x 18.5cm, finalist Archibald prize 2016 Detail of 'Wendy Whiteley' 'Biophilia', 2015, oil on dibond, 9 x 9cm, winner of Wynne prize 2015 'Sahara' 2014, oil on wood, 13.5 x 18.5cm, winner of Portia Geach Memorial Award 2015 'Jennifer (St Columba Falls, Pyengana)', 2017, oil on dibond, 9 x 14cm 'Eleanor', 2015, oil on dibond, 9 x 9cm 'Gardenia', 2014, oil on wood, 6 x 8cm 'Kumiko' 2016, oil on dibond, 9 x 14cm  
6/22/201738 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ep 24: Lewis Miller

Lewis Miller is one of Australia's greatest living portrait artists. He won Australia's most famous portrait award, the Archibald prize, in 1998 and has been a finalist 17 times. As well as winning and being shortlisted in many other art awards, his works are held in numerous public and private art collections in Australia and internationally. He has had 30 solo shows and his work has been included in over 90 group shows. Painting from life, he has masterfully captured the likeness of notable sitters including High Court justices, a Nobel laureate, the first man to climb Mount Everest, as well as many artists and friends. In addition to his portraits and nudes, he paints exquisite still lifes which glow from the canvas. He was appointed by the Australian War Memorial as a war artist in the Iraq conflict in 2003 and another commission saw him travel the globe to draw and paint over 60 portraits of scientists and technicians involved in the Human Genome Project. In this episode of the podcast, Miller talks about his Archibald win, why he doesn't seek to flatter his sitters, what appeals to him about painting oysters, fish and pomegranates, as well as providing many insights into his materials and methods. To hear the conversation press 'play' above and scroll down to see the works we talk about on the show and a short video taken on the day of the interview.  Upcoming events 2018 solo show with Heiser Gallery, Brisbane Links to people and things we talk about in the show Lewis Miller at Australian Galleries Lewis Miller at Heiser Gallery Peter Miller William Dargie CBE Victorian College of the Arts Allan Mittelman Archibald Prize Ray Hughes Natasha Walsh Lucian Freud's portrait of Queen Elizabeth II Michel Lawrence documentary on the making of portrait of Bernard Teague The Hon Bernard Teague AO The Hon Kim Santow AO The Hon Robert French AC Sir Edmund Hillary KG ONZ KBE The Hon Susan Crennan AC QC Rick Amor Tom Alberts  Australian War Memorial Peter Churcher Will Dyson Nora Heyson AC George Lambert Sir Ivor Hele CBE Francis Bacon Paul Cezanne Vincent Van Gogh Edgar Degas Video of Lewis Miller  in the studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQR0VHC6pJo 'Small Self Portrait', 2011, oil on copper, 17 x 12cm 'Portrait of Allan Mitelman no 3', 1998, oil and charcoal on canvas, 213.4 x 183cm 'Self portrait in 20 panels', 2015, oil on Belgian linen, 205 x 155cm 'A self portrait in 54 panels', 2015, oil on Belgian linen 216 x 65cm 'Portrait of Bernie Teague', 2016, oil on Belgian linen, 138 x 108cm   Portrait of Susan Crennan AC QC is in the feature image above 'Two Sardines', 2014, oil on Belgian linen, 13 x 36cm 'Blue swimmer crab' 2014, oil on Belgian linen, 30 x 51cm 'Pomegranate, lemon and oyster shell' 2017 oil on Belgian linen, 28 x 41cm 'Still life with oyster shells II', 2015, oil on Belgian linen, 25.5 x 56.5cm 'Still life with prawns', 2016, oil on Belgian linen, 50.5 x 100cm 'Arrangement with Spoons II', 2013, oil on Belgian linen, 35.5 x 76cm 'Nude in Yellow Chair', 2013, oil on Belgian linen, 102 x 132cm
6/8/201750 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ep 23: Michael Simms

With his work currently hanging in Flinders Lane Gallery alongside other leading emerging artists, Michael Simms' career has taken a leap since he completed his classical training at Sydney's Julian Ashton Art School in 2014. In the last 12 months alone he has won three art prizes; the Cambridge Studio Gallery portrait prize, the Cliftons Sydney Art prize and the Cliftons People's choice award.  He was finalist in seven others including the Black Swan Prize for Portraiture and the Percival Tucker Portrait Prize, has exhibited in two solo exhibitions and has been in a number of group shows. But his path forward has not always been as clear as it is today and he talks openly about the uncertainty he experienced after leaving university when he struggled to find direction.  An unexpected 21st birthday present and advice he received from a life drawing teacher led him to enrol at Julian Ashton Art School where he became 'addicted' to drawing and painting and was awarded a scholarship. In our conversation he also talks about his portraits of Paul Capsis and Thomas Keneally and describes his process and approach to colour and light which feature strongly in his breathtaking portraits and landscapes. To listen to the podcast episode press 'play' above or listen on your podcast app.  The works, as well as links to things and people we talk about in the episode, are below. Current and upcoming events 'Exploration 17' at Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, 23 May - 17 June 2017 'Medley II' at Gaffa Gallery, Sydney, 11 - 24 October 2017 'Interfacing' with Tom Christopherson at Stanley Street Gallery, Sydney, 12 September - 6 October 2018 Links to people and things we talk about on the show Michael Simms Michael Simms on Instagram Tony Johanssen Julian Ashton Art School Rod Wong Cambridge Studio Gallery Paul Capsis Paul Capsis performing with Conchita Wurst at the Sydney Opera House (YouTube) Thomas Keneally Anh Do's 'Brush with Fame' Flinders Lane Gallery Rene Magritte Nick Stathopoulos Lucy West-Sooby Marie Mansfield Mertim Gokalp Kathrin Longhurst Video: Michael Simms shows his recent work to Maria Stoljar on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dk-Vw7QzmdA 'Transcendence' 2016, oil on polyester, 82 x 50cm Paul Capsis II, 2017, oi on polyester, 44 x 58cm   Paul Capsis, 2017, Charcoal on paper, 80 x 50cm Progress shots of development of 'Paul Capsis' 'Thomas Keneally' 2016, oil on polyester, 103 x 82cm 'Love Stick', 2017, oil on polyester, 92 x 102cm 'Temporal', 2017, oil on polyester, 46 x 61cm 'Reverie', 2017, oil on polyester, 51 x 40cm 'Genevieve Lemon' 2016, Charcoal on paper, 50 x 50cm 'Santa Fe Sunset' 2017, oil on wooden panel, 23 x 30cm 'Glimmer' 2016, oil on wooden panel, 21 x 29cm 'Sea Cliff Bridge 1' 2017, oil on wooden panel, 20 x 25.5cm
5/25/201739 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 22: Suzanne Archer

Suzanne Archer has been an influential artist in Australia for over four decades, producing superb works across painting, drawing and sculpture. Born in Surrey, England, Archer has lived in Australia nearly all her adult life. For the past 30 years she has lived in the bushland suburb of Wedderburn, on the outskirts of Sydney, in a thriving artist's community. She made her mark in the art world relatively quickly after arriving in Australia in the 60s and has gone on to win many art prizes including the Wynne prize for landscape painting, the Dobell prize for drawing and the Kedumba drawing prize. There were two surveys of Archer's work over 2016/2017 which displayed its impressive depth. She has had 40 solo shows and been involved in over 150 group shows over her career. In this podcast interview, Archer talks about how her first solo show in Sydney resulted in a media response involving not only newspaper reviews but appearances on television, how the Sydney University veterinary laboratory played a role in her work and she reveals many details of her creative process. Press play (or subscribe) above to hear the podcast episode and scroll to see the paintings we talk about and a short video taken on the day of the interview. Upcoming events Over the next two years Archer will be exhibiting in solo exhibitions with Nicholas Thompson Gallery, Victoria, and at Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery and Maitland Regional Art Gallery, both in NSW. Things and people we talk about in the show Suzanne Archer at Nicholas Thompson Gallery Suzanne Archer on Instagram 'The Story of Art' by E.H Gombrich Thirroul Watters Gallery David Fairbairn 'Suzanne Archer: The Alchemy of the Studio' at Macquarie University Art Gallery 'Formulas for Painters' by Robert Massey Suzanne Archer in her studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eg2nq_XPiqc 'Derangement' 2010, winner of Dobell prize for drawing Waratahs - Wedderburn, 1994, winner of Wynne prize 'Velocipede' 2016, oil on canvas, 240 x 240cm 'China Joy' 2016, oil on canvas, 240 x 330cm 'Referencial - Reverential', 2011, ink, charcoal & pastel on paper, 77 x 113cms 'Vivarium', Artist's Book, 2013, timber,leather,metal fittings,paper,acrylic paint, closed 22cm x 31cm_open 22cm x 311cm 'Blindfold', 2011, bisque-fired clay with acrylic paint, 20 x 22 x 11cm 'Witness', 2012, bisque fired clay, acrylic paint, embroidery thread, 18.5 x 18 x 11.5cm 'Dodo and Rider' 2009, mixed media, 67 x 87 x 45cm 'Win a trip', 1969, paper collage with cardboard surround, 30 x 30cm Archer in her studio, 1969, photograph taken at the time of her first solo show at Clune Galleries, Sydney            
5/11/201738 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ep 21: McLean Edwards

One of Australia's most outstanding painters, McLean Edwards had his first solo show at 16 years of age when he was still at high school. Since then he has had 30 solo exhibitions with his most recent, 'Marsupials', about to open in New York at Olsen Gruin Gallery. He is a five time Archibald Prize finalist and has been included in the Archibald as a sitter four times. His compelling paintings invite us to enter another world where his characters' lives and motives are limited only by our imaginations. In this podcast interview, Edwards talks about how that first solo show came about, why he was later kicked out of art school and why he doesn't usually take portrait commissions. He also reveals interesting background details about his Archibald finalist portraits of Tim Storrier and Cate Blanchett. To hear the podcast interview press 'play' above and see below for the paintings we talk about and a short video taken on the day of the interview. Upcoming events Solo exhibition, 'Marsupials', Olsen Gruin, New York, May 13 - June 11, 2017 Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne, November, 2017 Things and people we talk about on the show McLean Edwards at Olsen Gallery McLean Edwards at Olsen Gruin McLean Edwards on Instagram Canberra School of Art David Williams Dadaism National Gallery of Australia Sidney Nolan Donald Friend Norman Lindsay Nigel Thomson Archibald Prize Tim Storrier Cate Blanchett Andrew Upton Sam Leach William Dobell Dobell's winning Archibald portrait of Margaret Olley Hughes Gallery Nicholas Harding Tim Olsen 'For the Love of God' by Damien Hirst (diamond skull) Ken Done McLean Edwards on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrV0KMyQK4s 'Marsupials #2', 2017, oil on linen, 61" x 66.5" 'Tim Storrier', 2010, oil on canvas, 183 x 168cm 'Cate Blanchett and Family', 2006, oil on canvas, 159cm x 150cm 'Hourglass' 2017, oil on linen, 54" x 78" 'Train Stop' 2013, oil on canvas 168 x 152cm 'Art Student #18' 2016, oil on canvas, 107 x 97cm 'Nabokov's Mistress #1' 2012, oil on canvas, 183 x 213cm 'The Cavalry' 2014, oil on canvas, 124 x 102cm 'Ghost Drop' 2013, oil on canvas, 122 x 183cm Drawings posted by Edwards on Instagram - ink, coloured pen, texta
4/27/201734 minutes, 20 seconds
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Ep 20: Alesandro Ljubicic

Alesandro Ljubicic's nature-inspired paintings appear to be emerging from the canvas. He uses an impasto technique, applying thick layers of paint, to create extraordinary works which entice the viewer in for a closer look. Ljubicic has had seven solo shows, has been involved in many more group shows and has been a finalist in various art competitions including the Doug Moran National Portrait prize, the Mosman art prize and Paddington art prize. His paintings range from the representational to the pure abstract and he keeps pushing the limits of what he can do with oil paint. His recent work ranges from very large semi abstract paintings up to four and a half metres wide to smaller abstract works which can be up to 8cm deep in paint and essentially lie somewhere between painting and sculpture. Ljubicic also has a mind for business.  He founded the Sydney Art store when still at art school. In the podcast interview he tells the story of how that started and why it's still important to him to keep that business as his day job despite his success as an artist. To hear the interview, click play under the feature photo (above) or subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or with your podcast app! To see a short video of Alesandro Ljubicic talking with Maria Stoljar in his studio, go to the Talking with Painters YouTube channel here Feature photo by Mark Jezercic Upcoming events Solo exhibition, 'Intrinsic Nature', Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne, 27 April - 20 May 2017 Sydney Contemporary, Carriageworks, Sydney, 7-10 September 2017 People and things we talk about on the show Alesandro Ljubicic Alesandro Ljubicic on Instagram Alesandro Ljubicic at Scott Livesey Galleries Alesandro Ljubicic at Michael Reid National Art school Lucy Culliton Sydney Art Store Art2Muse Sean Cook - Mr Cook Flowers Monika Radulovic on Instagram Alesandro Ljubicic on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-0iuK1RwiE     'Linen Ash Rose" #1, 60cm round, oil on linen 'Linen Magnolia' 4.5 x 1.8m, triptych, oil on linen Midnight Ash Rose #2 - 65x65cm Oil on Linen Over DiaBond Oil on birch panel, 25 x 30cm Oil and resin on linen mounted to panel, 25 x 30cm Oil and resin on linen mounted to panel, 25 x 30cm Oil & resin on linen mounted to panel, 25 x 30cm                
4/12/201736 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ep 19: Loribelle Spirovski

Loribelle Spirovski's career is rising. Fast. Although she only began painting seriously about five years ago, in just over the last two she won the Cambridge Studio Gallery Art prize and has been a finalist in 18 other art competitions including the Black Swan Art Prize, Muswellbrook Art Prize, the Portia Geach Memorial Award and was semi finalist twice in the Doug Moran National Portrait prize. She will be showing her work in three solo shows and two group shows over the next 12 months. Born in the Philippines, Spirovski came to Australia when she was nine and studied to become an art teacher, never imagining she could become a practising artist. However, she soon realised teaching was not for her, and during a period of despondency, took to painting. She has not turned back.  Relentlessly researching renowned artists and their techniques she has embarked on an exciting path of exploration, constantly taking risks and producing impressive works along the way. In this interview she talks about how she taught herself to paint, the struggles she faced and why the rejection of her painting 'Vers la Flamme' for the Archibald prize in 2015 was to cause her to rethink her whole approach. We also discuss how she met her partner, acclaimed concert pianist, Simon Tedeschi, who has become her muse and source of much of her subject matter and how their relationship and the music in their lives has impacted her work. Click here to see a short video of Loribelle Spirovski on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel. Upcoming events Solo show at Gaffa Gallery, Sydney, NSW Group show 'Emerging 2017' with Gosford Regional Gallery, East Gosford, NSW, 8 April - 21 May 2017 Group show 'Practise what you teach', Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, Sydney, NSW, 29 April - 4 June 2017 Solo exhibition arising from current residency with Fairfield City Museum and Gallery, Sydney, NSW - date TBA Solo show with Cambridge Studio Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria - date TBA Links to things we talk about on the show Loribelle Spirovski Doug Moran National Portrait Prize Olsen Gallery Photorealism Black Swan Prize Portia Geach Memorial Award Cambridge Studio Gallery Art prize Diego Velazquez John Singer Sargent Ray Turner  Simon Tedeschi Dmitri Shostakovich Alexander Scriabin Sergei Rachmaninoff Synaesthesia Olivier Messiaen Loribelle Spirovski on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvR3UxOCwrk 'Etudes', oil on canvas and linen, 40 x 30cm each, finalist, Mosman Art Prize 2016   'Vers la Flamme', oil on canvas, 120 x 90cm   We talk about this painting at 17:50 of the interview. 'Memento Mori - Mens Rea' oil on canvas, 61 x 76cm 'Simon', 2017, oil on linen, 51 x 51cm   Winner Cambridge Studio Gallery Portrait Prize 2017. 'Hell-tempered clavier', 2017, oil and acrylic on canvas, 120 x 120cm 'Homme 8', oil and acrylic on canvas paper, 29 x 42cm 'Icarus' oil on panel, 41 x 41cm 'Femme' triptych, 2017,  oil and acrylic on canvas paper, finalist Wyndham art prize 'Mother and Child' 2017, oil and acrylic on canvas 120 x 90cm Works on paper, all pen, 21 x 29cm, clockwise from top left:  Mohawk, Sketch after Bacon, Hunger 1, When two become one, Scream, Pieta 'Black widow', Copic marker and pen on paper, 21 x 29cm   'Time Traveller' 2015, oil on canvas, 120 x 60cm This was the painting accepted as a semi-finalist in the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize. It's discussed in the interview at 12:15
3/30/201738 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 18: Jenny Sages

Jenny Sages was born in Shanghai, China, to Russian parents. Her family migrated to Australia in the 40s when she was a teenager. After studying at the Franklin School of Art in New York she returned to Australia where she worked as a freelance illustrator and writer, mainly in fashion and travel, for various magazines including Vogue. It wasn’t until the early 80s, when she went on a trip to the remote Kimberley ranges in Western Australia, that her career in fine art really began.  It was there that she fell in love with the people and landscape of the Australian outback and she began her career as a full time painter. It was the beginning of annual trips to remote communities of the Northern Terrirtory and Western Australia where she became friends with aboriginal artists including those amongst Australia's most famous - Emily Kngwarreye and Gloria Petyarre. Sages not only paints the Australian landscape but is also an acclaimed portraitist and creates intricate abstract works. Apart from winning the Wynne prize for landscape painting she was awarded the Portia Geach prize for portraiture twice and the Archibald People’s Choice award.  She was also selected as a finalist in the Wynne, Archibald and other prizes many times (a staggering 20 times for the Archibald) and she’s been the subject of several documentaries.  The National Portrait Gallery also held a touring exhibition of her portraits in 2011. Press play above to hear our conversation which is on the Talking with Painters podcast. To see Sages talk about her current work in progress and to see inside her studio have a look at the short video posted on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel here. Links to things we talk about on the show: Jenny Sages at King Street Gallery The Kimberley  Emily Kngwarreye Gloria Petyarre Wynne Prize Archibald Prize Jenny Sages' works at the National Portrait Gallery Paths to Portraiture - National Portrait Gallery Paths to Portraiture - Documentary by Catherine Hunter Anna Akhmatova Nick Stathopoulos Jenny Sages on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efGF9mDP0rI 'My Jack', 2011, encaustic oil and pigment on board, 120 x 170cm 'After Jack', 2012, encaustic and pigment on board, 120 x 190cm 'It's all in the doing of it' 2016, encaustic, pigment and oil on board, 30 x 20cm   'Emily Kame Kngwarreye with Lily', 1993, oil on canvas, 213.5 x 182.5cm Collection: National Portrait Gallery Untitled (Study for 'Emily Kame Kngwarreye with Lily') 1993, charcoal on paper, 30.4 x 22.8cm Collection: National Portrait Gallery 'Gloria Tamer Petyarre', 2005, encaustic, oil and pigment on board, 80 x 244cm 'The blue one' 2016, encaustic pigment and oil on board, 30 x 25cm 'Each morning when I wake up I put on my mother's face' 2000, 150 x 100cm
3/16/201728 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ep 17: Belynda Henry

Acclaimed artist Belynda Henry has been painting professionally for over 20 years and has exhibited in over 25 solo shows across Australia.  Her works inspire an emotional response from many of her viewers achieved through her masterful use of colour, shape and brushstroke. Her shows sell out quickly, often within the first hour of the works becoming available, and she receives many commissions. Henry predominantly paints landscapes but she was also a finalist in the Archibald prize for portraiture in 2016.  She has been selected as a finalist in many other art competitions including four times in the prestigious Wynne prize for landscape painting. Our conversation took place in Henry's studio in a secluded valley on the central coast of NSW so the sounds you hear in the background are the birds of the Australian bush. We not only hear about how she achieved success in the art world but also of advice she received from significant people in her life which helped her get there.  She also talks about how to juggle commissions within an art practice, balancing painting and motherhood, she generously shares information about her process and gives motivational advice to those starting out. Click here to see Henry in her studio on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel. Press 'play' above to hear Maria Stoljar's conversation with Belynda Henry and scroll down to see the works they talk about on the show. Upcoming events: Solo show at Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, September 2017.  Details to be posted on the Gallery website. DEN FAIR  contemporary design event, Melbourne, 8-10 June 2017 Solo show at Australian Galleries, Sydney, 2018. Details to be posted on the Gallery website Links to things we talk about on the show: Belynda Henry Belynda Henry at Flinders Lane Gallery Belynda Henry on Instagram Wynne Prize Archibald Prize Carla Hananiah Arthouse Gallery Liquitex spray paint Arches Paper Louise Olsen John Olsen Belynda Henry on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGBB75h2NCE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ul11Ew6il4w 'Bushland 3', gouache and pastel on Arches 640 gsm paper, 57 x 38cmhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ul11Ew6il4w 'Islands five', 2016, acrylic and pastel on polyester canvas, 218 x 171.5cm 'Mountain Study 5', gouache and watercolour on Arches 640 gsm paper, 38 x 29cm 'Louise Olsen, a beautiful summary', 2016, acrylic and pastel on polyester canvas, 157 x 116cm 'Garden Study 3', gouache, acrylic and pastel on 640gsm Arches paper, 78 x 58cm 'Overcast day', oil and pastel on canvas, 66cm x 66cm 'Ocean Study 1', gouache and watercolour on Arches paper, 38 x 28cm 'Valley Views', gouache, watercolour, acrylic and pastel on Arches 640 gsm paper, 78 x 58cm Work in progress in Henry's studio. We discuss the work leaning against the wall at 17:30 and 19:10 of the interview
3/1/201736 minutes, 24 seconds
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Ep 16: Harley Oliver

Harley Oliver was introduced to art at an early age. Born in New Zealand, he grew up in London with a history of painters in his family. He started oil painting at the age of eight so it was no surprise that he ended up at the Wimbledon art school.  But he studied there in the late sixties and early seventies when painting landscapes, which he was exploring at the time, was not in fashion and certainly not encouraged. Harley’s interests then moved to film and television and in our conversation he talks about how his career as an editor and producer brought him ultimately to Australia. Along the way he has always found time for painting and in the last few years his art has taken centre stage. Since 2014 he has had two solo shows of his impressive work at Stanley Street Gallery in Sydney.   Links to things we talk about in the show: Harley Oliver Stanley Street Gallery Wimbledon College of Arts Gold or a blue dress? Amanda Keller Anh Do's Brush with Fame Talking with Painters video clip of Harley Oliver on YouTube (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T72wOfeZrk8   'Red Carpet', 2014, oil on linen 'Queen Victoria', 2014, oil on linen 'They Married', 2016, oil on linen "She was a dancer', 2016, oil on linen 'Somebody's boyfriend', 2016, oil on linen 'They had red shoes', 2016, oil on linen 'I think he died', 2016, oil on linen 'Everybody Smoked', 2016, oil on linen Work in progress - studying reflections Portrait by Oliver's great great great grandfather Samuel Massey, of Massey's wife and child, c.1838
2/15/201738 minutes, 10 seconds
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Ep 15: Alan Jones

Alan Jones' work crosses over painting, sculpture and collage. His most recent show was of exquisite painted wooden collages, many of which depicted the coastal landscape of Moonee Beach in NSW. With 22 solo shows and over 130 group shows under his belt, Jones has received many awards, including the Kilgour Prize, Mosman Art prize, Paddington Art Prize and Brett Whiteley Travelling Scholarship and has been finalist in many others.  His portraits have been hung in Australia's prestigious Archibald Prize three times including last year with his portrait of Pat Corrigan. His work took a personal twist when he was living in Windsor near the Hawkesbury river in Sydney.  An amazing coincidence, which we talk about in this episode, set him on the path of exploring his ancestry and bringing his art closer to home. In this episode of the podcast, Jones also talks about his experiences of painting Pat Corrigan and Adam Goodes for the Archibald and gives insights into his process and techniques. You can see a short video clip of Jones in his studio taken on the day below Feature image: Alan Jones in his studio with painting, collage and soft sculpture. Upcoming Yellow House, Butt Naked Salon II, Sydney 29 November - 1 December 2017 Links to things and people we talk about in the show Alan Jones Alan Jones at Olsen Gallery Wyalkatchem National Art School John Peart Brett Whiteley Richard Diebenkorn Philip Guston Kilgour prize Mosman Art Prize Archibald Prize Pat Corrigan Adam Goodes Talking with Painters YouTube clip of Alan Jones in his studio (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdCnkDtAfKc Painting 172 (Moonee Beach), 2016, acrylic on board, 112.5cm x 70cm Robert Forrester #2, 2013, oil and acrylic on polyester, 194cm x 179cm Painting 131 (North Coogee), 2015, acrylic on linen, 112.5cm x 117.5cm Pat, 2016, acrylic on board, 153cm x 140cm Adam, 2014, oil and acrylic on linen, 171cm x 156cm Painting 207 (The Domain), 2016, acrylic on board, 86cm x 90cm 'This is Our Land Now #1', 2010-11, plywood and clocks, 263cm x 55cm x 55cm Wyalkatchem Hotel, 2011, plywood and hoop pine, (h)81cm x (w)308cm x (d)148cm  
2/2/20170
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Ep 14: Reg Mombassa

Reg Mombassa, also known as Chris O’Doherty, has been exhibiting his paintings and drawings at Sydney’s Watters Gallery, nationally and internationally for over 40 years. In 2007 there was a major survey of his work at the SH Ervin Gallery in Sydney. He is also one of the leaders of a group of artists which created designs for the Mambo surf clothing label in the 80s and 90s.  A recent documentary aired on the ABC in Australia looked at those artists and their influential and anti authoritatrian approach. But of course Mombassa is renowned not only as an artist but also a musician. In 1976 he founded the iconic Australian band Mental as Anything with fellow art student Martin Plaza and in 1990 he formed his band Dog Trumpet with his brother Peter O’Doherty. The music in the introduction to this episode is from the song ‘Made in the World’ from their album Medicated Spirits. Mombassa has also had a creative input into major public events such as the Sydney Olympics closing ceremony and Sydney New Year's Eve celebrations and has won awards for his poster and album cover works. His paintings are held in ­major Australian art institutions including the National Portrait Gallery and the Art Gallery of NSW.   Upcoming shows and events Upcoming Dog Trumpet gigs can be found here Port Fairy Folk Festival 10-13 March 2017, Port Fairy, Victoria Blue Mountains Music Festival , 17-19 March 2017, Blue Mountains NSW Solo show at Watters gallery, 14 June - 1 July 2017, East Sydney, NSW Links to people and things we talk about in the show Reg Mombassa (Chris O'Doherty) 'Made in the World' - YouTube Watters Gallery Claudia O'Doherty National Art School Neil Evans Martin Plaza Mental as Anything Peter O'Doherty Dog Trumpet Mambo: Art Irritates Life Mambo Graphics National Portrait Gallery Art Gallery of NSW Patrick White The Landscapes of Reg Mombassa -  Antipodean Scenery: Views from the eyes of a car Reg Mombassa's miniature paintings on the Talking with Painters YouTube Channel (below) Reg Mombassa's sketchbooks on the Talking with Painters YouTube Channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkkvZnDPU-A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNikvjSVnek 'Australian Jesus helps Noah with his Ark' (2009) charcoal and colour pencil on paper, 36cm x 56cm Poster, 'Mambo Faith/ Australian Jesus at the football' (1996) 'Organism/Field shrine, east Auckland' (1991), house paint and oil on board, 28cm 25cm 'Looking north from the lodge at Waiheke heights' (2014), charcoal and coloured pencil on paper, 25cm x 36cm 'Self portrait with high pants', oil on canvas, 90cm x 70cm (2007) 'Self Portrait with Spots and Veins' (2003), synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 76cm x 56cm National Portrait Gallery 'Self portrait with a lumpy coat' (1986) oil on copperplate, Art Gallery of NSW 'Two young persons in a modern interior' (1974) Synthetic polymer paint on hardboard 71cm x 55.5cm Art Gallery of NSW   'Rough barked apple tree, Gumboil'(2004) coloured pencil and charcoal on paper   'Gums and patchy bark, Willow Springs' (2008) charcoal and coloured pencil on paper 35cm x 50cm 'Iron bark with bole and bush Cassilis' (2011) charcoal and colour pencil on paper, 38cm x 46cm  
1/19/20170
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Ep 13: The Cutting Room Floor

When I started this podcast I thought 40 minutes should be the maximum length of each episode, but that meant leaving out some interesting parts of the conversation. So here are a few clips from those interviews which didn't make it into the original episodes - a mixture of ideas on painting, life experiences and childhood memories. The artists are: Francis Giacco Katherine Hattam Louise Hearman George Raftopoulos Abdul Abdullah Joanna Braithwaite Nick Stathopoulos John Bokor Lucy Culliton Susan O'Doherty Euan Macleod Juliet Holmes à Court I've had an enjoyable 6 months getting the last 12 episodes to you and look forward to bringing you more in 2017 after a bit of a break -  I'll be back in late January with some more conversations with great Australian painters. So, until then, keep safe and thanks for listening! Maria Stoljar   Works we refer to in this episode:  Abdul Abdullah 'You see monsters' Abdul Abdullah Type C print 2014 Lucy Culliton 'Good Room Spring' 2010  
12/20/201624 minutes, 3 seconds
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Ep 12: Juliet Holmes à Court

Juliet Holmes à Court is a Sydney painter who has been exhibiting regularly since 1991.  Her work is all about capturing the sense or feeling of her subject. Her paintings are filled with light and movement and take the viewer to a place where the tangible becomes intangible. She has had 13 solo shows, four since 2006 with Australian Galleries, Sydney. She has been included in many more group shows and has received numerous art prizes. She’s also been finalist in many other competitions including eight times in the Portia Geach portrait prize. In our conversation, we discuss her approach to painting, including the importance of taking risks in creating art. She also talks about her techniques and views on teaching. She’s one of the most sought after teachers in Sydney - her classes often have waiting lists and her workshops at the Art Gallery of NSW sell out quickly. She lives and works on Scotland Island, which is an island in Pittwater, in northern Sydney. Her home is literally among the gum trees which she’s transformed almost singlehandedly into an eclectic space which reflects her creative life. You can see short videos of my visit on the day of our interview on the Talking with Painters Facebook and Instagram pages. A short video of Holmes à Court at her Scotland island home and studio is on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel. Juliet is currently working towards a 2017 exhibition which will be held at the Palm House of Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens.  A short video about the collaboration behind that exhibition can be seen here. Events 'Trembling Man - Two artists and a Poet', Palm House, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney - July 2017.  See a short video about this collaborative exhibition here Links to things we talk about in the show: Juliet Holmes à Court Scotland Island Julian Ashton Art School National Art School Lloyd Rees Youtube - Juliet's painting in process Ann Thomson JMW Turner The Burning of the Houses of Parliament by JMW Turner Pierre-Auguste Renoir Art Gallery of NSW Juliet Holmes à Court on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd5OAq5_MNU 'All around and beneath it' (2016) Oil and wax on canvas 80cm x 80cm   'Cool wind to the Ocean' (2010) 120cm x 65cm Oil and wax on canvas   'Blue Breaks over Green' (2008) 80cm sq Oil and wax on canvas   Quiet Settles in the Evening (2015) 76cm x 138cm oil and wax on canvas   'Rain chiselling the Earth' (2012) 140cmsq oil and wax on canvas   'Scotland Island Pathway' Mosman Art prize finalist 2016, oil on canvas   'Take your tired eyes to the blue blue' (2012) 160cmsq oil and wax on canvas   Silvery morning crossing (2008) 150cmsq oil an wax on canvas
11/24/201632 minutes, 58 seconds
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Ep 11: Euan Macleod

Euan Macleod is one of Australia's and New Zealand's most significant artists. He is best known for his powerful and symbolic paintings which set figures in a landscape. He has won many art awards including the Archibald, Wynne, Sulman, Blake, Tattersall's and Gallipoli art prizes.  He has had over 100 solo shows and been involved in over 200 group shows across Australia and internationally. His works are held in almost every major public collection in Australia and of course many private collections. Macleod's work has taken him all over the world, including remote places like Central Australia and Antarctica, and he has just returned from a trip to Yellow Mountain in China. We talk about his approach to landscape and figure painting and his views on interpretation of his work. He also shares information about his process and technique and talks about the unsettling experience of winning the Archibald in 1999. Scroll down to see a short video of Macleod in his studio. Feature photograph by Andrew Merry Current exhibitions: 'A fragment of a memory of travel' - Watters Gallery, Sydney,  2-19 November 2016 'Euan Macleod - Painter' (travelling survey exhibition)  Links to things we talk about in the show Euan Macleod Watters Gallery Huangshan, China (Yellow Mountain) Archibald Prize https://youtu.be/SZf4XehR4BA 'Impasse' 2011 Oil on polyester 150 x 180cm   'Self Portrait (Blue Centre)'  2007  Oil on canvas 137 x 180cm   'Figure Sitting On Boat In Desert'  2007  Oil on canvas 150 x 180cm 'Climbing' 2011 Oil on polyester 137 x 180cm 'Self-portrait: head like a hole' 1999 oil on canvas 180 x 137cm Works in progress from China trip - plein air paintings, studies and works on canvas  
11/11/201639 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ep 10: Susan O’Doherty

Susan O'Doherty is a contemporary painter who also works in mixed media assemblages which she creates with found objects.  Her work often deals with social issues but also examines the nature of time, recollections and past experiences. She has exhibited in over 25 solo shows across Australia and New Zealand and has been involved in many more group exhibitions. Her current work deals with the issues she's been focussing on in the last few years, particularly the treatment of women in our society and the violence which exists not only in our communities but also in the home. She addresses these themes in her upcoming Sydney show 'Pinned to the Wall'. Her work is also touring the country in another show, ‘Moving House’, which is a collaboration with her partner, artist Peter O’Doherty, and looks at life when the family is frequently on the move. She also painted over 450 portraits for her 2008 show '900 Eyes - Domestic Lives' and we talk about how she went about preparing for that exhibition. Susan also gives great insights into the nature of creativity and what it means to make art. All works we mention in the show are on this page. Feature photo:  Susan O'Doherty in front of her painting 'A Relationship' Upcoming exhibitions 'Pinned to the Wall' at  Spot 81 Gallery from 23 November to 4 December 2016 and then travelling to Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery from 3 March to 22 April 2017 'Moving House' at Maitland Regional Art Gallery in 2017 Links Susan O'Doherty Exhibition 'Moving House' (2014) Henri Matisse Exhibition '900 Eyes' (2008) Robert Hughes Peter O'Doherty Colin McCahon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1ywJ2ovR38 'Out of Step' 2015 acrylic on canvas 167 x 152cm   'Walking on Eggshells' 110cm x 120cm x 10cm mixed media assemblage   'Wallflowers' 130cm x 109cm x 8cm  mixed media assemblage   'Pinned to the Wall' 110 x 120 x 30cm   Part of the exhibition '900 Eyes - Domestic lives', 2008, Manly Art Gallery and Museum   Susan O'Doherty in front of her mixed media assemblage 'A Beautiful home' (2015)  
10/27/201635 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ep 9: Lucy Culliton

Lucy Culliton is a contemporary realist painter who creates works across landscape, still life and portraiture. To give you an idea of Lucy Culliton's popularity, in 2014 Sydney's Mosman Art Gallery held a major survey of her work which contained over 100 works. That exhibition attracted more than 20,000 visitors. This year she was named as a finalist in all three Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes at the Art Gallery of NSW and she has been a finalist in those competitions many times before. She has received many art awards including the Portia Geach Memorial award, the Mosman Art prize and the Kedumba drawing prize.  She has exhibited in over ten solo exhibitions and her work is held in many public and private collections including the National Gallery of Australia and the Art Gallery of NSW. I met Lucy Culliton at her home in Bibbenluke, a small town in south eastern NSW.  She showed me around her property and introduced me to her many animals. She also opened up her studio to my iphone!  You can see a short video taken on the afternoon below. In our conversation Lucy talks about her childhood years when she would draw horses over and over again.  She talks about how her dyslexia affected her first job in graphic design and what caused her to leave that career to pursue a career as a full time painter. We also discuss how she met dealer Ray Hughes who would represent her for many years until his gallery closed its doors last year and how her animals have played a large role in her life and continue to inspire her work. Upcoming shows 'The Popular Pet Show', National Portrait Gallery, Canberra, ACT, 4 November 2016 to Monday 13 March 2017 Solo exhibition with Beaver Galleries, Canberra, ACT,  10 November 2016 to 27 November 2017 Lucy has another two solo shows scheduled for next year with King Street Gallery in Sydney (May) and with Jan Murphy Gallery in Brisbane (November). Links Lucy Culliton at King Street Gallery Lucy Culliton at Beaver Galleries Lucy Culliton at Jan Murphy Gallery Work with the Hughes Gallery (now closed) Aida Tomescu Frank Auerbach Leon Kossof Susan Rothenberg Lucian Freud Chaim Soutine Richard Diebenkorn Margaret Preston Fred Williams Euan McLeod McLean Edwards Talking with Painters YouTube clip of Lucy Culliton  (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLnPXkQAbMU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-CJnh9yn3s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5QAAeeGE-2Q 'Monaro/Ando' oil on canvas 170.5 x 170.5cm (Wynne Prize finalist 2016)   Lucy Culliton in her studio with Mayday   'Ray in Paris' oil on board 200 x 80cm  (Archibald prize finalist 2011)   'Spark Plugs' (2008) oil on board, 80cm x 80cm   'Pigeons' oil on canvas 148.5cm x 148.5cm (Sulman prize finalist 2016)   'Lucy and fans' (2016) oil on canvas, 170.5 x 170cm  (Archibald prize finalist 2016)   'Cactus' (2004) oil on canvas, 116cm x 102cm   'Hartley Landscape, view from the studio' (2002) oil on canvas 200 x 120cm - this is the painting hanging in the Good Room which we talk about in our conversation        
10/13/201635 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ep 8: John Bokor

John Bokor is an award winning landscape and still life artist. He grew up in Sydney and lives in Bulli, NSW. He has had over a dozen solo exhibitions and his work is held in many public and private collections. Equally prolific in drawing and painting, Bokor's art depicts everyday life and his environment with an emotion and vibrancy which makes the viewer take notice. He has won several art prizes including the NSW Parliament Plein Air Painting Prize and Eutick Memorial Still Life Award and he has been finalist in many others. In our interview, Bokor talks about his education in Sydney and travels overseas where he was inspired by Bonnard's bath paintings, we ponder over whether you can ever say what makes a piece of art 'good', he reveals much about his process and he explains his motivational 'anti pep-talk' which he gives his art students. John Bokor's solo show at King Street Gallery opens on 8 November and continues until 3 December 2016. You can see a short video of Bokor's sketchbooks below. Feature photo of John Bokor by Julianna Kolenberg                                         Photos of paintings (except Quiet Street Bulli) by Michael Bradfield Show Notes  (things and people we talk about in the show) John Bokor  Aida Tomescu Elisabeth Cummings John Peart Bill Brown Vincent Van Gogh Paul Cezanne Pierre Bonnard at the Musee d'art Moderne de la Ville de Paris Arthur Streeton John Bokor on the Talking with Painters YouTube channel (below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHdfYGxsNUc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kStPpQ96V_s Still life with Pen Jar Oil on canvas 'Quiet Street Bulli'        Oil on Board 'Hot Chocolate'        Oil on linen 'Milk'        Oil on canvas 'Kitchen Sink'         Charcoal, wash and collage on paper 'Morning Interior'         Charcoal, wash and gesso on paper
9/29/201634 minutes, 21 seconds
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Ep 7: Nick Stathopoulos

Nick Stathopoulos has been a finalist many times in Australia's Archibald and Doug Moran Portrait prizes and his 2016 portrait 'Deng' of refugee lawyer Deng Adut was awarded the Archibald Prize's People's Choice award. Last year his painting of writer Robert Hoge was shortlisted in the renowned BP Portrait Award in London which attracted over 400,000 visitors.  The portrait was also reproduced on the cover of the Times. His art career spans many fields including illustration, book cover design, computer game design, animation, screenwriting, film making and sculpture and this is all on top of an arts/law degree. He has won several awards for his illustration work but has found a real passion in hyper realist painting of portraits and still lifes. In this interview Nick talks about how children's television of the 60s provided him with the inspiration to draw toys, cars and machines as a child, he explains why he can never eat another Freddo frog and reveals how he came to name his 2009 show ‘Toy Porn’. He generously discusses his art techniques in detail from the first sketches and meeting with the sitter to the final portrait. He also gives moving accounts of how he came to paint Deng Adut and Robert Hoge and the emotional impact those experiences had on him. Nick has works included in a forthcoming group show '40/40 Project' at Wagner Gallery,  Paddington, Sydney opening on 19 November 2016. Show notes  (links to things we talk about in the show) Nick Stathopoulos Gerry Anderson Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres Secret Knowledge by David Hockney David Hockney's Secret Knowledge (BBC production) Deng Adut - University of Western Sydney video Robert Hoge - Australian Story BP Portrait award Archibald Prize  Wagner Gallery Video below was taken two years after the podcast interview where I caught up with Nick in his kitchen in Sydney. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7DKlMw85pY 'Robot Power!' (2011) Acrylic and oil glaze on canvas, 90 x 60 cm   'Ugly - Portrait of Robert Hoge' (2014) Acrylic and oil on linen   Deng (2016), acrylic and oil on linen 137.5cm x 137cm   Stathopoulos' thumbnail sketches in preparation for his  portrait of Deng Adut   'And our friends are all aboard' Acrylic and oil glaze on canvas 61cm x 61cm (from Toy Porn 2)   'Can I be of Service' (2011) Acrylic and oil glaze on canvas 61cm x 61cm (from Toy Porn 2)   '(GM) Square Meals' (2008) acrylic and oil glaze on canvas 60cm x 60cm   Nick Stathopoulos at home with his painting 'Don't touch that dial!'
9/15/201637 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ep 6: Joanna Braithwaite

Joanna Braithwaite grew up in Pleasant Point, a small country town in New Zealand, and has been living in Australia for over 16 years. In the last few weeks she has been named as a finalist in both the Sulman and Mosman art prizes and has been a finalist in many more including the Archibald and Portia Geach prizes. Her solo exhibition 'Social Animal' is currently showing at Martin Browne Contemporary in Sydney's Paddington. Although Joanna’s work includes paintings with figures and still life, it’s safe to say her predominant subject is that of animals. From birds, reptiles and fish to bears horses, elephants, sloths and particularly dogs, Joanna has expertly captured creatures in paint. But she hasn’t just represented them as we find them in the world as you can see from these images and you will hear all about her approach in this interview. We talk about the lengths to which she went to study the anatomy of animals in her early art career including a trip to an abbatoir. She also talks about what she’s aiming to convey in her work and how humour plays an important role. She also recalls her meeting with Australian author Colleen McCullough whose portrait she painted (and which was shortlisted) for the 2014 Archibald Prize. All the paintings we mention in the show are reproduced in this post so you can see what we're talking about! Scroll down for a video of Joanna's show 'Hullabaloo' at Martin Browne Contemporary in September 2020  (after the podcast episode was recorded). Current Shows 'Social Animal' (solo exhibition) Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney, NSW 'Archibald Wynne and Sulman' Prizes, 2016  Art Gallery of NSW - 16 July - 9 October 2016, Sydney, NSW Mosman Art Prize, Mosman Art Gallery, Sydney NSW - 20 August - 25 September 2016, Sydney NSW Show notes (links to things and people we talk about in the show) Joanna Braithwaite (at Martin Browne Contemporary, Sydney, NSW) Joanna Braithwaite (at Milford Galleries, Queenstown, NZ) Joanna Braithwaite (at Bowen Galleries, Wellington, NZ) Archibald, Wynne and Sulman prizes, AGNSW Neil Frazer Colleen McCullough https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3AEgBMFvP4&t=1s Joanna Braithwaite's show Hullabaloo' at Martin Browne Contermporary, September 2020 (after the podcast episode was recorded) 'Frozen Assets' 2016 110.5x110.5cm Social Climbers, 2016, 196cm x 196cm 'Working Class' 2016 190.5x190.5cm 'Thought Bubble' 107x91cm 'Bright Spark' 2014, 198cm x 198cm
8/31/201629 minutes, 34 seconds
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Ep 5: Abdul Abdullah

Abdul Abdullah is a four time Archibald finalist and this year he has paintings hanging in both the Archibald and Sulman prizes in the Art Gallery of NSW. He has won several art prizes including the Blake Prize for Human Justice in 2011 and has been finalist in many others. Abdul's art delivers a strong message. Issues of identity and the current political environment concerning  the Muslim community in Australia are front and foremost in his work. We talk about how he sees 9/11 impacted the Muslim community and how after that event 'it became apparent that in the popular imagination Muslims in Australia had become the 'bad guys''.  We also talk about the 2005 Cronulla riots and how he came about painting retired police officer Craig Campbell for the Archibald. He also gives insights into his painting process and photographic art. Abdul's work is currently included in four shows in Victoria and NSW with another three coming up over the next few weeks, including a solo show in Melbourne in November. Current and upcoming exhibitions: 'Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes' 2016 - Art Gallery of NSW  - 16 July - 9 October 2016, Sydney, NSW 'Painting, more painting'  - Australian Centre of Contemporary Art  - 29 July - 25 September 2016, Melbourne, Victoria 'Coming to terms' (solo exhibition) - Fehily Contemporary/Mossgreen Sydney -  4 August - 3 September 2016, Sydney NSW 'The Public Body' - Artspace - 25 August - 23 October 2016, Sydney NSW 'Burden' - (solo exhibition) - Fehily Contemporary - 9 November - 3 December 2016, Melbourne, Victoria 'Jogja Calling' - 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art - 22 October to 17 December 2016, Sydney, NSW 'Basil Sellers Art prize 5' - Ian Potter Museum of Art- 19 July - 6 November 2016, Melbourne, Victoria Show notes  (links to things and people we talk about in the show): Abdul Abdullah Fehily Contemporary Abdul-Rahman Abdullah (Abdul's brother) Archibald prize Sulman prize Indonesian artist Hahan Tracey Moffatt 'Hero cop Craig Campbell left behind by the Cronulla riots' SMH, January 17 2016 SBS documentary:  Cronulla Riots - The day that shocked the nation 'Combatting Prejudice with Art' - Abdul Abdullah - TEDx Youth Sydney Blake Prize for Human Justice Ian Strange https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef16UOVL2F4 'The Cost' oil and resin on board 180cm x 180cm 'Everything is fine' oil and resin on linen 100cm x 100cm
8/12/201631 minutes, 14 seconds
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Ep 4: George Raftopoulos

George Raftopoulos held his first solo show when he was still in his third year of university at only 20 years of age. He has been exhibiting ever since in Australia and internationally in New York, Hong Kong and Paris. He has a relentless energy and rebellious attitude which comes through in his art. I had been aware of Raftopoulos' work for some time but it wasn't until I started following him on Instagram that I really got a sense of what his art was about. His prolific output, imagination, humour and bold aesthetic were something I used to look forward to on my feed. Then suddenly one day he deleted it all!  I thought - what is going on? Well, I found out in this interview. We talk about his early years when his was the only Greek family in the small NSW town of Grenfell, the moment in his teenage years which defined which direction his life would take, his process, inspiration, purpose and the effect of the internet on the art world. Scroll down to see a short video made in 2018 of Raftopoulos passing on his thoughts on painting and creativity to art students in Sydney. Links to people and things we talk about in the show George Raftopoulos George Raftopoulos on Instagram John Olsen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNCf5h8NXB8 George Raftopoulos in front of his recent work 'The Raw RΩAR'   'Aeschylus of the Underworld' 150 x 180cm, oil on polyester (2010) 'The ROSE of no mans LAND', 2017, mixed media on Japanese linen, 183cm x 183cm 'BANGAREE' 'ProtoTYPOS' 'GRECCO corroborree'
8/5/201630 minutes, 31 seconds
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Ep 3: Louise Hearman

Louise Hearman is the winner of the 2016 Archibald Prize. In this interview she talks about her early beginnings and her wins in the Doug Moran and Archibald prizes
7/23/201627 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ep 2: Katherine Hattam

Katherine Hattam is a multi award winning painter and printmaker whose works are held in most of Australia's major public collections including the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and Art Gallery of NSW. She has exhibited in over 20 solo shows and many more group shows and has won numerous art prizes including the Banyule and Robert Jacks drawing prizes. In this conversation, Hattam begins by talking about the experience of growing up as the daughter of Melbourne art collectors and modern art patrons Hal and Kate Hattam.  Hal Hattam was a gynaecologist and later a successful painter in his own right and Kate Hattam was once reported to be the 'highest paid woman in Australia' in her job as the advertising manager of the upmarket Melbourne department store Georges. They held an extensive art collection of works of their artist friends which included Arthur Boyd, Fred Williams, John Brack, Clifton Pugh, Charles Blackman and Jan Senbergs. Portraits of her parents painted by Clifton Pugh and John Brack can be found in the National Portrait Gallery. Hattam's career initially focussed on drawing but her work eventually turned to painting and mixed media. In this interview she also talks about her techniques and preferred mediums, balancing motherhood and her art career and themes which arise in her paintings. See below for a list of current and upcoming exhibitions and scroll down further for links to people and things we talked about in the show. A video taken after this interview in March 2020 at Katherine's exhibition at Sydney's Arthouse Gallery can also be seen below. Current and upcoming exhibitions: 'Visiting Painting' - Horsham Regional Art Gallery - 16 July to 11 September 2016, Horsham, Victoria 'National Works on Paper' - Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery - 16 July to 11 September 2016,  Mornington Peninsula, Victoria '72 Derwents' - solo show - Arthouse Gallery - 12 August 2016, Rushcutters Bay, Sydney, NSW Bruny Island Art Prize - Bruny Island Arts - 24 September - 2 October 2016, Bruny Island, Tasmania 'Art of Parts' - Art Gallery of NSW - 17 September - 13 November 2016, Sydney, NSW Show notes:  (links to people and things we talked about in the show) Katherine Hattam Portrait of Hal Hattam by Fred Williams Portrait of Kate Hattam by Clifton Pugh Fred Williams Charles Blackman John Perceval Arthur Boyd Jan Senbergs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJqZoskqNws&t=10s The Integrity of the Personality, mixed media, (2014) Art Gallery of New South Wales 'Today' Mixed media on linen 198 x 110cm 'Double Helix' 120 x 240cm 'Yellow Chair' Lithograph, 73 x 50cm 'Love On' 2006, oil paint, pencil and collage on linen, 50 x 60cm
7/16/201632 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ep 1: Francis Giacco

Most Australians have heard of the Archibald prize, the nation's most famous portrait prize, partly because of the controversies which seem to follow it. When Francis Giacco won in 1994, that year was no exception. In this conversation, he recalls the day he won and how the win influenced his career.  Francis is a contemporary realist painter and lives in Sydney.  He has won and judged numerous art competitions. In 2014 he won the prestigious Percival Prize for Portraiture with his portrait of Charles Blackman. He has had many solo shows in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane and his work was selected to appear in the ABC production of Rake.  In this interview, Francis talks about his childhood influences, travels overseas, teaching at Julian Ashton Art school, his art process, people he has met along the way and how his painting was eerily affected just prior to his diagnosis with lymphoma five years ago. Show notes: Francis Giacco Julian Ashton Art School Jeffrey Smart Brian Dunlop Justin O'Brien Kunsthistorisches museum, Vienna Johannes Vermeer's 'The Art of Painting' Jackson Pollock's 'Blue Poles' Archibald prize Margaret Olley Doug Moran Portrait Prize Australian Galleries   'Homage to John Reichard' (1994) oil on marine ply 202cm x 188cm 'Sunset Siesta' (2015) 'Charles Blackman' 2010
6/17/201631 minutes, 7 seconds