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Sunday Morning Profile

Sunday Morning

English, Current Affairs, 1 season, 536 episodes, 11 hours, 56 minutes
About
News, discussion, features and ideas until midday.
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The mind-body connection to recover faster

Time heals all wounds, the saying goes, but our thoughts play a rather important part in determining how long that recovery time is.
5/18/202428 minutes, 2 seconds
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Deo Kato: Running the length of Africa

Deo Kato is an ultra/trail runner, coach, and activist currently running the length of Africa.
5/18/202419 minutes, 35 seconds
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The headlines we didn’t read

Mary Argue is back guiding us through the latest weird and wonderful headlines from the world of science.
5/18/20247 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Sunday Morning Quiz with Jack Waley-Cohen

Our Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen is back for another Sunday Morning quiz. Jack is the mind behind the questions on BBC quiz show 'Only Connect' which is known for being both difficult to crack and totally obvious. It's Sunday morning, so wake up your brain and have a go!
5/18/20246 minutes, 44 seconds
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Why China’s Cultural Revolution Still Matters

Tania Branigan spent seven years as The Guardians China correspondent and was stationed in Beijing during the Cultural Revolution - where at least two million people died.
5/18/202435 minutes, 47 seconds
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Calling Home: Thomas Powers in LA

We're heading to Hollywood today. Thomas Powers is a Kiwi living in LA.
5/18/202417 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mediawatch for 19 May 2024

A long-running plan to reform the oversight of our media has come to a sudden halt; how public toilets suddenly became political this week.
5/18/202437 minutes, 10 seconds
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Fergus Grady at Cannes

New Zealand's biggest film festival is back for its 18th year. 'The French Film Festival Aotearoa' launches on the 30th of May and will run across the country throughout June.
5/18/202410 minutes, 18 seconds
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Should men use moisturiser?

Dr Michelle Wong is a cosmetic chemist and science communicator who runs the popular Lab Muffin Beauty Science blog where she tests skin products - turning her into a global beauty influencer. She's here to answer our burning questions about the latest and greatest - or not so great - of the beauty world.
5/18/202417 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition is back on Sunday Morning again. This time we're digesting the five-a-day advice - and if we're heeding it.
5/18/202414 minutes, 4 seconds
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Josie Brennan: Fabric Celebrate 25 Years

Fabric-a-brac is a fabric and sewing market that brings the sewing community together to buy and sell with all profits going to local hospices. Josie Brennan joins us to tell us more.
5/11/20249 minutes, 34 seconds
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The headlines we didn’t read

Mary Argue is back guiding us through the latest weird and wonderful headlines from the world of science.
5/11/20247 minutes, 45 seconds
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Suze Wilson: The Glass Cliff

It's been nearly 20 years since the researchers, Michelle Ryan and Alexander Haslam, documented a phenomenon they called the glass cliff. 
5/11/202423 minutes, 27 seconds
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GPS 'jamming' hitting thousands of European flights

With a reported 46,000 aircraft citing sat-nav problems over the Baltic Sea between August and March, suspected Russian GPS "jamming" is now being considered a major threat to air safety. 
5/11/202413 minutes, 36 seconds
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Eat yourself calm: Foods that relieve anxiety

Uma Naidoo, is a Harvard Nutritional Psychiatrist, professional chef, and nutritional biologist. 
5/11/202430 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ashia Ismail-Singer: The Laden Table

Ashia Ismail-Singer's family story has branches from Africa to India, the Middle east, France, the UK and New Zealand.
5/11/202415 minutes, 25 seconds
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Mediawatch: Sunday May 12

Pre-budget teasers increase exposure - and scrutiny; Green MP under pressure over conduct; bid to backstop local news; Gaza coverage attract complaints - and prizes.
5/11/202435 minutes, 33 seconds
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Sleep Position Secrets: How You Sleep Affects Your Health

On your side, your back or your front - the position in which you nod off is having an impact on your health. 
5/11/202421 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Sunday Morning Quiz with Jack Waley-Cohen

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen is back for another Sunday Morning quiz. 
5/11/20248 minutes, 32 seconds
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Rich Preston: UK Correspondent

We're joined by Rich Preston, Senior BBC foreign news journalist and presenter across BBC World TV and the BBC World Service.
5/11/202415 minutes, 18 seconds
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Coronation in the Kingdom of Lochac 

The Kingdom of Lochac is a regional branch of the Society for Creative Anachronism.  They're celebrating their Autumn Coronation this weekend in Christchurch. 
5/4/202414 minutes, 33 seconds
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The headlines we didn’t read

Mary Argue is back guiding us through the latest weird and wonderful headlines from the world of science
5/4/20248 minutes, 21 seconds
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Helen Danesh Meyer: The science of blinking

How blinking can help your sight and why scientists think worsening vision can predict dementia. 
5/4/202416 minutes, 5 seconds
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Naomi Arnold: Te Araroa catch-up

We catch up with journalist and author. Naomi Arnold who’s walking Te Araroa.
5/4/202415 minutes, 40 seconds
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What your favourite Shakespeare play says about you.

Jim asks actor Mark Hadlow if someone’s choice of Shakespeare play gives any clues as to their character
5/4/202414 minutes, 41 seconds
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Mark Vette: How much is too much on vet care? 

Animal behaviorist Mark Vette joins us with advice on how to negotiate the practical and emotional aspects of health spending for our animal companions. 
5/4/202416 minutes, 58 seconds
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Calling Home: Jack Royd-Hall in Estonia

Originally from Manawatu, Jack Royd-Hall is calling home from Tallin, Estonia.
5/4/202420 minutes, 54 seconds
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Mediawatch for 5 May 2024

One opinion poll prompts intense political pushback; new report urges sweeping changes to media, law and funding - and fast; Wairoa Star closes after more than a century in print.
5/4/202444 minutes, 37 seconds
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Are you more suited to being single?

 A new study suggests attachment style could be a major factor. We're joined by Geoff MacDonald, PhD, one of the study's authors.
5/4/202424 minutes, 12 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

It’s Sunday morning, so wake up your brain and have a go!   
5/4/20247 minutes, 22 seconds
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Will bird flu be the next pandemic?

Dr Richard Webby is a prominent infectious diseases researcher at St Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.
5/4/202412 minutes, 16 seconds
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Phil Daoust: Longevity for the late starter

Can a latecomer to health and fitness undo decades of inactivity, excess and intemperance? Journalist Phil Daoust explores his options in a new column, Fit for ever, in The Guardian.
4/27/202424 minutes, 44 seconds
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How AI is helping campaigners in India’s election

Suhasini Raj is a New York Times reporter based in New Delhi.
4/27/202410 minutes, 41 seconds
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Tooth wisdom: from flossing and gargling to halitosis

We're joined once again by Dr. Alpdogan Kantarci, a faculty member at the Harvard University School of Dental Medicine and senior member of staff at the Forsyth Institute, an independent research institute that on the connections between oral health and overall wellness.
4/27/202415 minutes, 43 seconds
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David Robson: Could your anxiety be your superpower?

David Robson is an award-winning science writer specialising in the extremes of the human brain, body and behaviour.
4/27/202415 minutes, 58 seconds
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Why the Camino de Santiago still captivates our imagination

In the film THE WAY, MY WAY, film and documentary producer and director, Bill Bennett tells the true story of his 800-kilometre-long pilgrimage along the Camino de Santiago route through Spain based on his best-selling memoir of the same name.
4/27/202426 minutes, 54 seconds
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Taylor Swift and the Axis chord progression

The Axis Chord Progression is a run of four chords named after Aussie music-comedy trio Axis Of Awesome.
4/27/202416 minutes, 18 seconds
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Mediawatch for 28 April 2024

New media minister rolls in after PM's surprise reshuffle; TV news and current affairs on the way down here, but highly competitive across the Tasman.
4/27/202437 minutes, 9 seconds
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The headlines we didn’t read

Mary Argue is back guiding us through the latest weird and wonderful headlines from the world of science.
4/27/20248 minutes, 52 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master.
4/27/20246 minutes, 30 seconds
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Allan Lichtman: The 13 Keys to the White House

American University's distinguished professor of history, Alan Lichtman has accurately predicted the US presidential contest since 1982.
4/27/202425 minutes, 53 seconds
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Frances Manwaring: Insisting on visibility

Frances Manwaring refuses to accept that we age out of visibility. Her latest book, 'Never Succumb to Beige' is not only a personal philosophy, but a rallying cry to those who fear becoming invisible as they get older.
4/20/202422 minutes, 58 seconds
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The headlines we didn’t read

Mary Argue is back guiding us through the latest weird and wonderful headlines from the world of science including the many universes that could be created with every decision we make - among other things.
4/20/20247 minutes, 36 seconds
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Gavin Strawhan on his debut crime novel, The Call

Best known for his screen work on the likes of Shortland Street, Outrageous Fortune, Nothing Trivial, and Mercy Peak, writer Gavin Strawhan joins us to talk about his debut crime novel centered on a 501-deportee gang, set in a remote coastal New Zealand town.
4/20/202415 minutes, 19 seconds
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The Sunday Morning Quiz with Jack Waley-Cohen

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen is back for another Sunday Morning quiz.
4/20/20246 minutes, 1 second
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Lucy Corry: The campaign for a good muffin

Award winning author, food blogger, Lucy Corry joins us for another foodie catch-up. She wants to reinstate muffins to their former glory...and will stop at MUFFIN!
4/20/202415 minutes, 48 seconds
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The untold story of WWII’s last female spy

Award-winning historical documentary producer and writer Jude Dobson, shares the incredible story of Phyllis "Pippa" Latour, who parachuted into occupied France in 1944 as an undercover agent.
4/20/202430 minutes, 31 seconds
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Calling Home: The kiwi cafe making it big in Hollywood

LA locals have access to steak and cheese pies, flat whites and fresh fruit ice cream, curtesy of the New Zealand themed 'Ponsonby Road Cafe'.
4/20/202416 minutes, 56 seconds
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Mediawatch for 21 April 2024

Stuff is taking over Newshub's 6pm TV news. A bold move for an outfit that's never been a broadcaster before. Will it work? Also: Mediawatch talks to two editors about the latest survey showing another alarming slump in New Zealanders' trust in the news.
4/20/202439 minutes, 49 seconds
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Are floating cities the future of urban living?

Dutch architect, Koen Olthuis has set his sights on the worlds rapidly rising sea levels - not on battling these forces but harnessing them as the basis for a new architectural revolution - water-architecture.
4/20/202428 minutes, 11 seconds
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Professor Al Gillespie: Update and analysis

Waikato University's International Law professor Alexander Gillespie joins us with analysis of the latest developments worldwide.
4/20/202417 minutes, 42 seconds
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Professor Al Gillespie: Iran attack on Israel escalates

Iran has launched dozens of drones and missiles at Israel, in an attack that may trigger a major escalation between the regional archenemies. Iran's Revolutionary Guard confirmed it has targeted specific places in Israel. Iran had vowed retaliation for what it called an Israeli strike on its Damascus consulate on April 1 that killed seven Revolutionary Guards officers including two senior commanders. Israel has neither confirmed nor denied responsibility for the attack. The United States is pledging to back Israel. Waikato University's International Law professor Alexander Gillespie gives us his analysis of the escalating situation.
4/13/202410 minutes, 5 seconds
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Australia correspondent: Bondi mall attack

Six people are confirmed dead after a knife attack on Saturday at Sydney's Westfield Bondi Junction shopping centre. We speak to ABC correspondent Joe Hathaway-Wilson.
4/13/20244 minutes, 57 seconds
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Dr Stephen Best: Restoring sight for all

Ophthalmologist Stephen Best can work modern-day miracles. For the past 25 years, the glaucoma specialist has removed cataracts, prevented blindness, and restored sight to hundreds, if not thousands of people. 
4/13/202410 minutes, 43 seconds
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Boris Heifets: Hope as a powerful placebo

Ketamine - an anaesthetic drug primarily developed as a horse tranquiliser - is also known to be a powerful psychedelic. 
4/13/202423 minutes, 37 seconds
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David Robson: How to lead a life of no regrets

'Should I Stay or Should I Go?' is not confined to The Clash's back catalogue, it's a dilemma we face constantly. 
4/13/202416 minutes, 50 seconds
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The headlines we didn’t read

RNZ producer, Mary Argue, has been reading all the headlines - so you don't have to. She'll discuss everything from the expansion of the universe, the usefulness of beta-blockers, and the debate about AI robot butlers - should they be bipedal?
4/13/20247 minutes, 23 seconds
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Calling Home: Maia Ramsden in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

New Zealand athlete Maia Ramsden is calling home from Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA where she studies at Harvard University.
4/13/202423 minutes, 50 seconds
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Kate Sylvester talks exclusively about the end of an era

In a shock move after 31 years in the industry, fashion designer Kate Sylvester is walking away from the eponymous brand. 
4/13/202420 minutes, 31 seconds
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Mediawatch for 14 April 2024

AUDIO: Mediawatch for 14 April 2024 (in WEB HOLD folder of CoStar) DURATION: TEXT for WEBPAGE: End of TV news as we know it? TVNZ cuts back and Newshub closes down. Newshub's news boss responds; the minister plays for time; a former minister fights back
4/13/202437 minutes, 18 seconds
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Hauser: Rebel with a cause

A cellist is not the first person that springs to mind when you think: Rebel. But Hauser, the classical world's answer to Cher, is just that. 
4/13/202413 minutes, 29 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master. 
4/13/20246 minutes, 41 seconds
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Sam McAlister: The BBC producer behind Prince Andrew’s infamous interview 

In 2019, under extreme scrutiny for his relationship with convicted paedophile Jeffrey Epstein, and facing allegations about his own conduct, Prince Andrew sat down for the infamous interview with BBC's Newsnight. 
4/13/202425 minutes, 5 seconds
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The "Unpolitician" pipped to be the next UK PM

British journalist and former Labour party senior advisor Tom Baldwin is the author of a new biography Sir Kier Starmer: The Unexpected Rise. Sir Keir has become a pivotal figure in British politics. A lawyer by trade, his ascent to the leadership of the Labour Party surprised many. But what makes this man tick? What are the experiences that have shaped his political views and his approach to leadership? Baldwin's book sheds new light on Starmer's formative years, his legal career, and his often-underrated political acumen. Tom joins Jim Mora to explore the influences that have driven Sir Keir, the challenges he's faced, and the path that led him to the helm of the Labour Party.
4/6/202429 minutes, 1 second
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Calling Home: Volcanologist Chris Conway is too tall for Japan

Chris Conway is a volcanologist based in Tsukuba City. Chris works at the Geological Survey of Japan specialising in chemical volcanology. He studies the composition of volcanic rocks and minerals to understand the processes and timescales of magma formation and eruption. Before moving to Japan Chris grew up in Wellington's Lyall Bay obtaining his degree and later PhD at the cities Victoria University. Chris loves his life in Japan but does have one complaint "things generally aren't built for tall people."
4/6/202417 minutes, 45 seconds
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The headlines we didn’t read

RNZ producer, Ayana Piper-Healion, has been reading all the headlines - so you don’t have to.  
4/6/20245 minutes, 15 seconds
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Succession: Love, Ethics, and the Power of Pills

Lucy Prebble, the BAFTA, Golden Globe, and Emmy award-winning writer behind HBO's drama Succession, talks about her play, The Effect.
4/6/202437 minutes, 10 seconds
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Mediawatch for 7 April 2024

We talk to an editor keeping an eye on where public money for public services ends up and the government’s new political action plan gets the media’s attention.
4/6/202435 minutes, 17 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master. 
4/6/20246 minutes, 23 seconds
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The real Alan Bates tells his story

Nearly 1000 British sub-postmasters were wrongly prosecuted or convicted of theft, false accounting and fraud, due to a faulty computer system. The story of the scandal is told in the TV drama Mr Bates vs The Post Office. Alan Bates joins Jim.
4/6/202432 minutes, 32 seconds
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Tali Sharot: The benefits of seeing our lives in a new light

Habituation is a neurological process which helps us to adapt to new environments keeping ready to reap any benefits or negate any hazards. Tali Sharot is a professor of cognitive neuroscience at University College London and the co-author of Look Again: The power of noticing what was always there. She believes there are benefits to seeing the things we are used to in a fresh light
3/30/202427 minutes, 36 seconds
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Robert J. Koester: The Science of search and rescue

Whether an individual is stuck under rubble or has just wandered off the beaten track, it's more than likely the search and rescue team will be using the work of Robert J.Koester to locate the missing person. He's a world leading search and rescue expert and the author of numerous books, including the seminal 'Lost Person Behavior' which has become the go-to guide for planning search and rescue missions around the world. Robert J.Koester joins Jim Mora to discuss his life's work.
3/30/202422 minutes, 37 seconds
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Stacy Gregg’s: The Easter Bunny Hunt

International best-selling author Stacy Gregg has just released two new books for children and pre-teens. 'The Easter Bunny Hunt' is inspired by the adventures of her own cat and dog. And for pre-teens 'Nine Girls' is based on Gregg's own upbringing in Ngaruawahia, set in the political tumult of the 1980's. Stacy chats with Jim about the inspiration behind her new works and what she has planned for her Easter Sunday.
3/30/202410 minutes, 56 seconds
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Dan Weijers: Life inside the Matrix

While there's no denying our lives have become better in many ways thanks to the internet and smartphones - genuine human interaction has dropped drastically, leaving society at large in an epidemic of loneliness. Dystopian sci-fi classic 'The Matrix' came out 25 years ago, yet Dan Weijers argues its themes are more relevant now than ever before. Dan Weijers is a senior lecturer in philosophy at the University of Waikato.
3/30/202422 minutes, 41 seconds
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Mediawatch for 31 March 2024

Gabrielle review lessons for media; Dolphin drama fires up media.
3/30/202433 minutes, 15 seconds
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Mary Argue’s “Headlines we didn’t read”

RNZ producer, Mary Argue, has been reading all the headlines - so you don't have to. She'll discuss everything from how useful a degree is in the modern world to what to eat before a colonoscopy.
3/30/20246 minutes, 3 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master. Jack is the mind behind the questions on BBC quiz show Only Connect which is known for being both difficult to crack and totally obvious. It's Sunday morning, so wake up your brain and have a go!
3/30/20246 minutes, 20 seconds
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Calling Home: Juleigh Parker and Peter Gray from the Great Loop, USA

Maungaturoto locals, Juleigh Parker and Peter Gray are calling home from the USA. They're taking on the Great Loop in their vessel, Plenty. The Great Loop is a system of waterways that encompasses the eastern portion of the United States and part of Canada. The entire loop stretches almost 10,000 km covering the Atlantic Ocean, the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River.
3/30/202417 minutes, 47 seconds
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Alp Kantarci on mouth health

Professor Alp Kantarci helps people understand mouth health and lead healthy lives. He speaks to Jim. 
3/23/202422 minutes, 24 seconds
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Derek Guy: Twitter “Menswear Guy” on fashion as a social language

California-based Derek Guy has made a name for himself via his X, formerly Twitter, account where he comments on menswear and popular culture. 
3/23/202430 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition is back on Sunday Morning again. This week she speaks to Jim about heart health and whether intermittent fasting is worth it.
3/23/20248 minutes, 38 seconds
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April Phillips on her passion for Frank Sinatra

April Phillips joins Jim to discuss the life and music of Frank Sinatra and to hear some of his most iconic work. 
3/23/202412 minutes, 20 seconds
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Rula Lenska previews upcoming New Zealand shows

Coronation Street star Rula Lenksa is coming to New Zealand to star in the stage version of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. 
3/23/202419 minutes, 59 seconds
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Lucy Corry: Autumnal brunch ideas

Award winning author and food blogger Lucy Corry discusses some tasty meal and snack ideas for when the shorter nights draw in.
3/23/202418 minutes, 53 seconds
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Mediawatch for 24 March 2024

Mediawatch looks at the fallout from Winston Peters' criticism of the media in his State of The Nation speech.
3/23/202432 minutes, 8 seconds
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Calling Home: Tony Brook from leafy West London

Former Olympic rower Tony Brook was a member of the gold medal-winning eight-seater team at the 1982 World Rowing Championships in Switzerland. 
3/23/202427 minutes, 10 seconds
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Jack Whaley Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master. 
3/23/20247 minutes, 46 seconds
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Rich Preston: The latest on the Princess of Wales

The Princess of Wales is receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for a cancerous condition that emerged after her abdominal operation.
3/23/20249 minutes, 39 seconds
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David McAlpine: Your noise and hearing questions answered

Following Professor David McAlpine's chat with Jim last week, so many of you got in touch with questions we've asked him back.
3/16/202424 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition is back. She looks at the different types of salt available and assesses their nutritional benefits.
3/16/202412 minutes, 58 seconds
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Is television news dead?

Research NZ have been asking New Zealanders about the importance of having a choice of television channels for news and current affairs and how important it was to have news on television compared with online and other digital platforms.
3/16/20248 minutes, 58 seconds
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Skindred's new reggae album

The band Skindred have just won Best Alternative Act at the 2024 MOBO Awards - MOBO standing for Music Of Black Origin.
3/16/202412 minutes, 29 seconds
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Calling Home: Zara DuCrôs in New York City

Aucklander, Zara DuCrôs, has been living and studying acting in New York for the last three years. When she's not busy auditioning, she works as a children's birthday party entertainer. From gorgeous penthouses on the Upper East Side, to secret Naval bases, she's entertained kids around New York as everything from a Disney princess to a clown.
3/16/202419 minutes, 31 seconds
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The real-life cousins of Dune’s magnificent sandworms

With the second part of Denis Villeneuve's film franchise of Frank Herbert's fantasy novel, Dune, currently in cinemas, we ask if the fictional worms in the movie share anything in common with real worms.
3/16/20249 minutes, 2 seconds
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Add three years to your life by walking just 15,000 steps a week

There has been such a lot of talk about steps in the last decade… but how many should we take for health?
3/16/20246 minutes, 57 seconds
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James Taylor returns to NZ for two shows

Six-time grammy award winner, James Taylor, speaks with Jim Mora about his life and career ahead of his one-off New Zealand show 'An Evening with James Taylor and His All-Star Band' set for April.
3/16/202413 minutes, 40 seconds
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Mediawatch for 17 March 2024

What will government do about the great TV news meltdown?; Stuff deploys AI for DIY news.
3/16/202433 minutes, 49 seconds
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Eliezer Yudkowsky: The AI academic warning

Eliezer Yudkowsky, artificial intelligence researcher, decision theorist and co-founder of Machine Intelligence Research Institute, has a stark warning that we're moving too fast in the field of AI.
3/16/202423 minutes, 35 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master.
3/16/20246 minutes, 29 seconds
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Rich Preston: The latest from the UK

BBC senior reporter, Rich Preston, joins Jim to discuss the Royal families' photo doctoring blunder and the latest on Andrew Tate's extradition to the UK.
3/16/202416 minutes, 48 seconds
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Liam McEwan looks ahead to the Oscars

Entertainment journalist, New Zealander Liam McEwan will be reporting from the Vanity Fair Oscar party this weekend. He joins us from his home in Los Angeles ahead of the big event.
3/9/20247 minutes, 57 seconds
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Marc Wilson: When is our mental health good enough?

Victoria University of Wellington Professor of Psychology, Dr Marc Wilson joins us once again looking at how we decide if life is "good enough" without resorting to therapy, medication or drugs & alcohol to improve it.
3/9/202415 minutes, 49 seconds
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David McAlpine: Is noise cancelling technology safe?

Noise cancelling devices are big business, and it's no surprise with excess noise exposure linked not only to hearing loss but even increased risk of cardiovascular disease and depressive symptoms. But it turns out too much noise reduction comes with its own warnings.
3/9/202435 minutes, 31 seconds
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Peter Antonucci: Life aboard "The World"

Six years spent on board the exclusive private residential ship for millionaires, 'The World', served as the real-life inspiration for former resident turned author, Peter Antonucci.
3/9/202422 minutes, 12 seconds
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Mediawatch for 10 March 2024

TVNZ has proposed big cuts to news that could leave the country with only one daily TV news bulletin and almost no current affairs on TV within weeks.
3/9/202437 minutes, 43 seconds
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Eileen Merriman's new novel 'The Night She Fell'

Doctor turned young adult writer and now adult fiction writer, Eileen Merriman, has a new book out, 'The Night She Fell'.
3/9/202414 minutes, 46 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again.
3/9/20246 minutes, 58 seconds
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Legendary Scottish Formula 1 Driver Jackie Stewart’s crucial latest race

Jackie Stewart is widely regarded as one of the greatest Formula 1 drivers of all time. Following his wife, Helen's diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia, Sir Jackie founded the global charity Race Against Dementia, to fund pioneering research into the prevention and cure of dementia.
3/9/202420 minutes, 2 seconds
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Timothy Heath: Are we entering a 'neomedieval era'

Timothy Heath is a senior international defense researcher at the RAND Corporation. In a recent paper, argued that to understand the risks involved in superpower competition between the US and China, we must understand that we now live in what the authors describe as a "neomedieval era."
3/2/202430 minutes, 33 seconds
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Jenny Lynch: Former NZ Woman’s Weekly editor pens debut novel

The Secrets They Kept is the debut novel by 85-year-old former editor of the NZ Woman's Weekly, Jenny Lynch. The story of a young woman's quest to discover the truth about her mother's unexplained death - and her own identity.
3/2/202417 minutes, 31 seconds
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Catch up on the US presidential race ahead of “Super Tuesday”

Statehouse News Bureau chief Karen Kasler joins us ahead of Super Tuesday, the day when the largest number of US States hold their Presidential Primary elections. Former president Donald Trump is once again the leading republican candidate. His only challenger, former Govenor of South Carolina Nikki Haley currently trails him by almost 100 delegates. This is even though according to Ms Haley's spokeswomen "There are 70% of Americans who don't want another Biden-Trump rematch and 60% of Americans who think Biden and Trump are both too old".
3/2/202418 minutes, 7 seconds
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Royal correspondent Ingrid Seward’s new book explores King

Royal biographer Ingrid Seward joins us to unpick the relationship between King Charles III and his mother the late Queen Elizabeth II. With her unparalleled access and deep understanding of the monarchy, Seward delves into the intricate dynamics of this pivotal relationship within the royal family offering unprecedented insights into the bond between mother and child. Her latest book "My Mother & I" is out now via Simon & Schuster.
3/2/202433 minutes, 59 seconds
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Peter Burling and Blair Tuke pick their best sailing song

On the weekend of March 23rd of SailGP returns to Whakaraupo, Lyttleton Harbour. With the New Zealand team currently in second place just behind Australia, a home win could see them sail to the top of the leaderboard. Legendary sailing duo, best mates Peter Burling (Co-CEO and Driver) and Blair Tuke (Co-CEO and Wing Trimmer) join Jim to talk about life on the waves, and to pick their best sailing song of all time.
3/2/202414 minutes, 44 seconds
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Mediawatch: Apocalypse now?

For years news media bosses warned the creaking business model backing journalism would fail at a major local outlet. It finally happened this week when Newshub’s owners proposed scrapping it. Then TVNZ posted losses prompting warnings of more cuts to come there. Can TV broadcasters pull a crowd without news? And what might the so-far ambivalent government do?
3/2/202440 minutes, 25 seconds
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The most effective exercise to lower blood pressure

A study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests isometric exercises like wall sitting (or wall squats) help reduce blood pressure more effectively than other forms of exercise - including weight training, high-intensity intervals (HIIT), and simple aerobic movements. Dr Jim Wiles is principal lecturer at Canterbury Christ Church University in the UK. He joins Jim on Sunday Morning to discuss the study and whether we should all be incorporating the wall sit into our routines.
3/2/202416 minutes, 26 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master. Jack is the mind behind the questions on BBC quiz show Only Connect which is known for being both difficult to crack and totally obvious. It's Sunday morning, so wake up your brain and have a go!
3/2/20247 minutes, 38 seconds
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Are we still safe in the skies?

Boeing 737 Maxes with loose bolts; on one plane a door plug blew out, leaving a hole in the side of the aircraft. Airbuses too with problems, one only remedied because a passenger noticed four missing screws on the plane's wing. Statistically we're told that being in a plane is 19 times safer than being in a car. Is that still true? Shawn Pruchnicki is a former airline pilot who's now a professor of aviation safety at Ohio State University .
3/2/202418 minutes, 44 seconds
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Russia’s war in Ukraine – Two years on: The humanitarian

Mike Seawright founded the international humanitarian organisation ReliefAid whose work also continues in Gaza, Syria, and Afghanistan. He joins Jim. 
2/24/202411 minutes, 39 seconds
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“Streets of London” singer, Ralph McTell returns to New Zealand

Ralph McTell joins Jim to talk about his six-decade-long career including his knack for songwriting, life on the road, and rubbing shoulders with Jimi Hendrix, Sly Stone and Tom Waits. 
2/24/202431 minutes, 31 seconds
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Music and my cochlear implants

Dr. Amanda Kvalsvig received her first cochlear implant in Christchurch. She joins us for a very special edition of "What I'm Listening To". 
2/24/202418 minutes, 22 seconds
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Dancing is the best exercise for mental health

Dr Alycia Fong Yang joins Jim to explain why we should be hitting the dancefloor over the gym.
2/24/202414 minutes, 32 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master.
2/24/20247 minutes, 21 seconds
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What would you buy if money was no object?

In a recent article for The Times, science editor Tom Whipple pondered what he'd spend his money on if he became infinitely wealthy. He joins Jim. 
2/24/202419 minutes, 9 seconds
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Mediawatch for 25 February 2024

Government 'resets' immigration and welfare; another way to make Google and Facebook to pay for journalism; media milk Kiwi Swifties' stadium FOMO.
2/24/202440 minutes, 52 seconds
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Calling Home: Frank Cawkwell on the Caribbean Island of Grenada

This week's Calling Home guest is Frank Cawkwell who has swapped the Far North town of Maungaturoto for the tropical Caribbean.
2/24/202423 minutes, 21 seconds
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Russia’s war in Ukraine – Two years on: The military response

Dr Jack Watling looks back at two years of brutal warfare and considers what any future opportunities for peace might look like.
2/24/202423 minutes, 42 seconds
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Being symmetrical doesn’t make you more photogenic

 Award-winning science writer David Robson joins Jim to discuss the latest research into the "perfect face".
2/17/202421 minutes, 59 seconds
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Craig Bond: Supermarket rat patrol

Goodnature co-founder and ethical pest control expert Craig Bond joins us on the show to share his top tips for keeping your home - or supermarket! - rat free.
2/17/202423 minutes, 7 seconds
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Nick Fuller: Trends in weight loss

Dr Nick Fuller from the University of Sydney joins Jim to discuss weight loss trends. 
2/17/202420 minutes, 20 seconds
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Mediawatch for 18 February 2024

Auckland's transport turmoil reports lack full facts; publishers pitch to Parliament to make Google and Facebook pay for their news.
2/17/202436 minutes, 33 seconds
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Lucy Corry: The simple delight of Salmagundi

Lucy Corry joins us to discuss Salamagundi - a type of "composed salad" which can include vegetables, meat, seafood, eggs, fruits and pickles. 
2/17/202415 minutes, 1 second
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master.   
2/17/20245 minutes, 24 seconds
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Calling Home: Barbara Rae-Venter

California-based Barbara Rae-Vener is a pioneer in the field of genetic genealogy and her work played a crucial role in identifying Joseph James DeAngelo as the Golden State Killer.
2/17/202429 minutes, 33 seconds
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Do New Zealanders really want a Treaty referendum?

For over thirty years Rangahau Aotearoa Research New Zealand has helped dozens of government and not-for-profit organisations understand what Aotearoans are thinking across a range of social issues. In the lead up to Waitangi Day they conducted a nationally representative survey to uncover people's key issues of concern. Research NZ managing partner Emanuel Kalafatelis joins Jim to discuss the surprising results.
2/10/202410 minutes, 59 seconds
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Are humans allergic to the modern world?

An estimated 30-40% of the global population suffer from allergies, be they hay, peanut, lactose or something less common. That's billions of people, and the number just keeps rising. According to Medical anthropologist and Associate Professor at the Stevens Institute of Technology Theresa MacPhail " Our very old immune systems can't keep up with modern lifestyles and diets. In her book Allergic: Our Irritated Bodies in a Changing World Theresa examines the mostly unwanted phenomenon that has us sneezing, coughing, and carrying around epi-pens. She joins Jim Mora to discuss: What are allergies? Why do we have them? And is there anything we can do about it?
2/10/202439 minutes, 50 seconds
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Research shows people with OCD die younger

Lorena Fernández de la Cruz is a Senior Researcher and Docent Professor at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet, where she leads the Health Consequences and Lifestyle Modification group. Her recent study into OCD revealed that people with the condition are 82% more likely to die earlier than the general population. The study, which looked at 60,000 Swedish people with OCD, comparing them to the non-OCD general population found that for those with OCD the mean age of death is 69 years, whilst the non-OCD population lived to a mean age of 78. Lorena joins Jim to explain the results of the study.
2/10/202412 minutes, 13 seconds
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Calling Home: Chris Bruerton in Oxford, England

In 2010 Chris Bruerton left a teaching job he loved at Burnside High School in Christchurch, to pursue his dream of becoming a professional singer in the UK.
2/10/202426 minutes, 37 seconds
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Eric Bana on dealing with leeches while filming

Force Of Nature: The Dry 2 is in cinemas now. The follow up to the hugely successful The Dry sees five women taking part in a corporate hiking retreat with only four coming out the other side. Australian actor Eric Bana stars as detective Aaron Falk who heads off into the Victorian mountain ranges to get to investigate the disappearance. Filmed on location Eric described filming as "pretty brutal" & "a real physical challenge to cast and crew", but ultimately worthwhile. "We really loved being where we were, once you took the leeches out." He joins Jim Mora to discuss his formidable career, acting techniques and his latest role.
2/10/202418 minutes, 46 seconds
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Mediawatch for 11 February 2024

Waitangi tensions test politicians - and the media; Why is Sky screening more top-dollar sport for free?
2/10/202434 minutes, 22 seconds
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Dr Zazie Todd: How pets benefit our brains

Dr Zazie Todd, Sunday Morning's go-to expert on both cats and dogs joins us once again with more scientific, pragmatic and joyful ways to lead happy lives with our pets. She's the award-winning author of Wag: The Science of Making Your Dog Happy and Purr: The Science of Making Your Cat Happy. She's the creator of the popular blog, Companion Animal Psychology, and she's currently putting the finishing touches to a book on fear and anxiety in dogs, due out this year.
2/10/202421 minutes, 12 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen joins us once again as our Sunday Morning question master. Jack is the mind behind the questions on BBC quiz show Only Connect which is known for being both difficult to crack and totally obvious. It's Sunday morning, so wake up your brain and have a go!
2/10/20246 minutes, 47 seconds
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Good reasons you’re feeling so tired after the holidays

Most of us who took some time off over the holidays will be getting back into the swing of things by now. But why are we feeling so tired? Professor Ian Hickie, Co-Director of Health and Policy at The University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre says that it is not just Kiwis and Australians that are feeling burnt out.
2/10/202418 minutes, 51 seconds
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Ali Harper: Songstress on new Circa Theatre show The Supper

Songstress Ali Harper is currently starring in production The Supper Club at Circa Theatre in Wellington - which is taking audiences back in time to the glitz of the 1920s. The production, directed by Ian Harman and soundtracked by bandleader Tom McLeod, features songs from the glamorous twenties through to the present day The star of the show Ali Harper joins Jim on Sunday Morning to tell us all about the production which runs until 17 February.
2/3/202411 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Following a huge response to her chat last week, Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition joins us once again to answer your questions on the different cooking oils, their benefits and how to make the most of them.
2/3/20248 minutes, 21 seconds
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Will Stone: Can the keto diet improve our mental health?

Will Stone is a health and science reporter at NPR - he joins Jim on Sunday Morning to discuss the keto diet. 
2/3/202421 minutes, 23 seconds
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Karen Kasler: The latest from the US primaries

Our U.S. correspondent Karen Kasler has the latest from the ongoing election campaign.
2/3/202418 minutes, 10 seconds
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Lisa Cam: On her favourite Chinese New Year customs

South China Morning Post journalist Lisa Cam joins Jim to discuss some unique Chinese New Year traditions.
2/3/20249 minutes, 45 seconds
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Jack Whaley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Only Connect quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen was such a hit over the summer that we've invited him back as our resident Sunday Morning question master. 
2/3/20246 minutes, 48 seconds
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Daniel O’Donnell: My favourite Irish song

Daniel O'Donnell joins Jim to discuss his first New Zealand tour since 2017. 
2/3/202413 minutes, 55 seconds
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Calling Home: Sarah and Gavin Steiner (currently) in Morocco

The Steiner family call home from Morocco and talk to Jim about their non-stop travels and the people they have met along the way.
2/3/202420 minutes, 12 seconds
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Mediawatch for 4 February 2024

This week on Mediawatch, does bad news about the economy trump good news? The end of the line for goneburger? 
2/3/202442 minutes, 18 seconds
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Charlotte Ryan: Is music journalism dead?

Music 101 host Charlotte Ryan spoke to Jim about music journalism's shifting sands.
2/3/20248 minutes, 57 seconds
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Russell Howard: British stand-up comedian drops by RNZ Auckland studio

British stand-up comedian Russell Howard is currently on a nine-date Aotearoa tour and dropped into the RNZ Auckland studio to talk to Jim.
2/3/202433 minutes, 27 seconds
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Jamie Tahana: UK Correspondent in London

Former RNZ Maori news editor Jamie Tahana joins us with the latest headlines from London.
1/27/202410 minutes, 21 seconds
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Brian Merchant: Did the luddites have a point?

Technology journalist for the LA Time, Brian Merchant joins us to talk about his book Blood in the Machine and his thinking around how we respond to the current moment of AI job automation.
1/27/202436 minutes, 20 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition joins us once again. In her first chat of 2024, Ali looks at different cooking oils, their benefits and how to make the most of them.
1/27/202418 minutes, 2 seconds
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Crystal Hefner: Behind closed doors at the Playboy mansion

Crystal Hefner, widow of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner opens up about life with the late tycoon in her new memoir, "Only Say Good Things: Surviving 'Playboy' and Finding Myself." The sex, the drugs, the misogyny, Crystal offers a vulnerable and clear-eyed look at her experience with arguably, one of the most influential men of the 20th century.
1/27/202427 minutes, 28 seconds
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Calling Home: Jaime Kruijer in Revelstoke, British Columbia

Calling Home this Sunday is Queenstown native Jaime Kruijer from the Winter sports destination of Revelstoke in British Columbia.
1/27/202420 minutes, 17 seconds
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Mediawatch for 28 January 2024

What you missed over summer: harmless sharks, woke worries, sewage smells and water woes flood the holiday news drought; media cop flak for coverage of Golriz Ghahraman's downfall.
1/27/202432 minutes, 59 seconds
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Jasmin Fox-Skelly: Balancing your oral microbiome

For many of us oral health is a matter of shiny teeth and a nice smile, but science journalist, Jasmin Fox-Skelly has been drilling into the topic and it turns out there's vast array of viruses, fungi and bacteria living in our mouths - which, if kept in balance can prevent conditions from Alzheimer's disease to cancer.
1/27/202418 minutes, 14 seconds
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Jack Waley-Cohen: The Sunday Quiz

Quiz master Jack Waley-Cohen was such a hit over the summer that we've invited him back as a regular Sunday Morning guest. Jack is the mind behind the questions on BBC's infamous quiz show 'Only Connect', known for being both really hard - and at the same time totally obvious. Wake up your brain and have a go!
1/27/202410 minutes, 42 seconds
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Andrew Read: How worrying is the JN1 Variant?

New Zealander Dr Andrew Read is the director of its Institutes of Life Sciences at Pennsylvania State University. He works at the forefront of international research on Covid and specialises in the ways infectious diseases work, He joins us to explore the emergence of the JN1 variant, its worrying ability to target lung cells and what this means in a world of semi-immune populations.
1/27/202414 minutes, 45 seconds
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Sam Hollis: What does a film buff watch over Christmas?

Film buff and regular reviewer for RNZ Afternoons, Sam Hollis shares his top pick for festive film viewing.
12/16/202314 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ruud Kleinpaste: How many bugs are in the average house?

The Bugman, naturalist, columnist and broadcaster, Ruud Kleinpaste takes a look all the creepie-crawlies lurking in out carpets, pantries and bedrooms.
12/16/202320 minutes, 14 seconds
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Ra Charmian: My latest track

Tamaki Makaurau-based, husband-wife duo Ra Charmian introduce us to their new single, 'Papatuanuku He Ataahua Koe' - which is a stunning te reo Maori interpretation of 'What a Wonderful World'. Band members, Ra Charmian Toia-Booth (Ngapuhi, Tainui) and Hayden Booth talk to Jim about how, having both lost their dads this year this track has helped them move through their grief.
12/16/202311 minutes, 30 seconds
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Grand Designs' Kevin McCloud: 'Happiness is not to be found in a suburban McMansion'

Award-winning broadcaster, host of the BBC television series Grand Designs, writer, environmentalist, and storyteller, Kevin McCloud is coming to New Zealand in February for a series of special evening talks and discussions. He talks to Jim Mora about housing, his career and why he prefers New Zealand buildings to those in England.
12/16/202330 minutes, 7 seconds
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Michelle Wong: Your skincare questions answered by a chemist

Dr Michelle Wong a cosmetic chemist and science educator with a PhD in Medicinal Chemistry and runs the popular Lab Muffin Beauty Science blog. She joined us last week to talk about the science of skincare and so many of you got in touch with questions we've asked her back to answer them.
12/16/202320 minutes, 11 seconds
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Mediawatch for 17 December 2020 - Horowhenua special

Covering news all over the country is a struggle for media companies dealing with rising costs and falling income. But some local outlets are surviving - and even thriving. Mediawatch's Hayden Donnel finds out who's doing the business in Horowhenua - and how they're doing it.
12/16/202333 minutes, 57 seconds
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Lucy Corry: Christmas food ideas

Award-winning food writer, author of Homecooked: Seasonal Recipes for Every Day and RNZ's Lifestyle & Entertainment editor, Lucy Corry, the Kitchenmaid has some has some excellent ideas for your festive tables this year including, the best roast potatoes and her very special Chilli Chocolate Pretzel Sandwiches.
12/16/202317 minutes, 50 seconds
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Calling Home: Brendon Johnston in Ranua, Finland

Calling Home this morning is Brendon Johnston in the far North of Finland just below the arctic circle in a place called Ranua. Brendon lives with his partner Natalie, their two boys, and a howl of huskies.
12/16/202328 minutes, 16 seconds
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Dr Al Gillespie: A global murder mystery

Dozens of elite Russians have died in suspicious circumstances over the past few years in what the Sydney Morning Herald has called "a global murder mystery." Waikato University's International Law professor Alexander Gillespie is the author of the multi-volume series The Causes Of War and A History Of The Laws Of War. He speaks to Jim.
12/9/202313 minutes, 47 seconds
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Jeffrey Halley: New government, new year, but same old economy?

Jeffrey Halley is a Kiwi in Jakarta and Singapore who until recently was the senior market analyst for Asia Pacific for the OANDA corporation, with his analysis regularly sought by Bloomberg, the BBC, Reuters, CNBC, MSN, and the New York Times.
12/9/20238 minutes, 3 seconds
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George Packer: America In Crisis

US journalist, novelist and playwright George Packer may be best known for his work in the New Yorker and The Atlantic regarding U.S. foreign policy, and for his book The Assassins' Gate: America in Iraq. The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America, also won the National Book Award for Nonfiction. In his latest book, Last Best Hope: America in Crisis and Renewal, George considers diagnoses America's slide into a failed state, and envisions a path toward overcoming injustices, paralyses, and divides.
12/9/202330 minutes, 38 seconds
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Simone and Malcolm Collins: the pro-birthers trying to grow populations

Last year, billionaire Elon Musk tweeted that population collapse due to low birth rates is a much bigger risk to civilization than global warming. It is a trend occurring in many countries and although fertility remains high in some regions. Today, close to half of the world's population lives in a country where lifetime fertility rates are below replacement levels - with New Zealand's fertility rate declining by about 25% per decade. Musk's view is shared by others who describe themselves as pronatalists, a movement of pro-birth activists. At the centre are Simone and Malcolm Collins. They are co-founders of nonprofit initiative pronatalist.org, podcasters and authors - who say the situation is a "demographic catastrophe." Yet for those whose only cultural reference point for a pronatalist society is 'The Handmaid's Tale' the ideas can seem problematic. Simone and Malcolm Collins join Jim to argue their case.
12/9/202329 minutes, 47 seconds
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Lisa Sanders: How many people end up with Long Covid?

The international consensus is that one in ten people who get Covid will feel long-lasting effects. That would mean that of the 900 or so cases being reported every day in this resurgence we're experiencing, 100 people will not get over this virus anytime soon. Yale University's Dr Lisa Sanders is working hard to unravel the mysteries of Long Covid.
12/9/202318 minutes, 59 seconds
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Mediawatch for 10 December 2023

Parliamentary pomp and ceremony - but no honeymoon; 'From Paper to Platform'- media's online dependence; Todd Niall - local matters really matter
12/9/202336 minutes, 56 seconds
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Michelle Wong: Under the skin of the beauty industry

Fewer wrinkles, a fresher complexion and younger skin are sought by many, but what’s behind beauty industry hype?  Dr Michelle Wong is a science communicator who runs the popular Lab Muffin Beauty Science blog where she tests skin products – turning her into a global beauty influencer. Michelle is a cosmetic chemist and science educator with a PhD in Medicinal Chemistry. 
12/9/202322 minutes, 28 seconds
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Calling Home: Sarah Davison in Barcelona

Calling Home this morning is Sarah Davison in Barcelona. People with long memories may remember her as Fiona Dalgleish who once starred in the popular TV show Country GP. Sarah went to Rangi Ruru Girls' School in Christchurch, then Canterbury University. At age 23 she set off to live in Europe. She was in London for 18 years, worked as a children's presenter on the BBC, acted, sang, narrated documentaries, and made language learning recordings for Oxford University Press. ah went to Rangi Ruru Girls' School in Christchurch, then Canterbury University, and at age 23 she set off to live in Europe. She was in London for 18 years, worked as a children's presenter on the BBC, acted, sang, narrated documentaries and made language learning recordings for Oxford University Press.
12/9/202323 minutes, 30 seconds
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Martyn Craddock: Why retirement homes must be better

Martyn Craddock is the chief executive of United St Saviour's, the charity behind Appleby Blue, a new block of social housing for over-65s in Southwark, South London that's hoping to re-shape how we view housing for older people.
12/2/202316 minutes, 34 seconds
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Gilbert Enoka: Mental skills for sport and life

All Blacks Mental Skills Coach Gilbert Enoka, is moving on to on new pastures. 
12/2/202335 minutes, 38 seconds
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Peter & Josh Solorzano: The brothers making planespotting

You'll find planespotters camped out at most airports around the world watching incoming and outgoing aircraft.
12/2/202312 minutes, 32 seconds
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Sebastian Faulks: On being Homo sapiens

Sebastian Faulks, worldwide bestselling author of Birdsong, is back with a new thriller, inspired, he tells us by a tweet from Richard Dawkins. 
12/2/202333 minutes, 1 second
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Marc Wilson: Do pets actually make us happier?

Victoria University of Wellington Professor of Psychology, Dr Marc Wilson, joins us once again.
12/2/202316 minutes, 11 seconds
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Mediawatch for 3 December 2023

Claims of media 'bribery' derail new government on day one; politics shows off air just as politics hots up; mayor under pressure after rumour-based reports.
12/2/202341 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

After our chat with Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition last week, many of you got in touch with questions. 
12/2/202315 minutes, 26 seconds
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Lisa Kaltenegger: The search for life on other planets

If there was life on other planets, what might it look like, and would they even bother coming to Earth? 
12/2/202325 minutes, 33 seconds
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Terry Hayes onThe 'Year of the Locust’

'I am Pilgrim' was a worldwide bestseller in 2013 and THE Christmas present of the year. Nine years later Terry Hayes, now 72, is gifting his readers a follow up: 'The Year of the Locust'. He returns to the world of intelligence with another spy novel, but this time with completely new characters. Hayes is a former journalist whose investigative work has led him to knock on the doors of the criminal underworld. His writing was noticed by the Mad Max film director in 1979, which led to a screenwriting career and a momentary, glamorous life in Hollywood. One million words later, Terry speaks to Jim.
11/25/202340 minutes, 26 seconds
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Daniel Oppenheimer: Can hand writing survive the digital age?

Perhaps this year's letter to Santa will reap more benefit than just what's under the tree on Christmas morning. Daniel M. Oppenheimer is a professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University in the Department of Social and Decision Sciences. He discusses if the pen is indeed mightier than the laptop.
11/25/202319 minutes, 47 seconds
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Anna Ptaszynski: The strange and interesting world of sport

Anna Ptaszynsk joins Sunday Morning to tackle sport's weirdest rules, its most unlikely heroes, and promises to cover everything from pole-vaulting priests to professional pillow-fighting.
11/25/202333 minutes, 48 seconds
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Catherine de Lange: The best exercise for the mind

Most of us feel better once we get the blood pumping a bit, but are there exercises that work better for our mental health than others? Catherine de Lange is a science author, specialising in bioscience. She has written the book Brain Power: Everything you need to know for a healthy, happy brain. She digs into the science behind exercise and our mental health.
11/25/202317 minutes, 27 seconds
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Mediawatch for 26 November 2023

Parties seal the coalition deal to end long limbo for media; watchdog warns media laws need urgent upgrade; media tuning out of music journalism; Covid response reckons ramp up in inquiry season.
11/25/202339 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition joins us once again. This time she looks at the link between fructose and obesity and also the dangers of fried rice syndrome.
11/25/202316 minutes, 25 seconds
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Kim Hill: The Jim Mora interview

On Saturday, Kim Hill brought the curtain down on a 38-year career at RNZ. After making her name as an unparalleled interviewer, she switched places and let Sunday Morning's Jim Mora ask her questions.
11/25/202331 minutes, 39 seconds
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Rachel McAlpine: Is life worth living after 90?

Is life worth living after 90? Ask the experts! Writer Rachel McAlpine was shocked to the core when her GP predicted she would live to 99. Like most people, she had opinions about very old age but no experience. She asked local people in their 90s about their lives and found their revelations broke all the stereotypes. She also walked the footpaths of Wellington asking people how they see their life unfolding at 90. Her new play The Secret Lives of Extremely Old People erupted from those conversations.
11/19/202311 minutes, 56 seconds
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George Harrison: The reluctant Beatle

Author Phillip Norman has written biographies of many musical greats including Mick Jagger, Elton John, and Eric Clapton. His books on the Beatles are considered by some as definitive. After biographies on John Lennon and Paul McCartney, he now tackles "the quiet one", George Harrison.
11/19/202331 minutes, 34 seconds
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Ben Campbell: What I’m Listening To

We find out what's in the headphones of New Zealand Golfer, Ben Campbell, after his win at the Hong Kong Open.
11/18/202310 minutes, 24 seconds
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Russell Foster: Circadian rhythm and the science of our body

Once considered a fringe science, circadian rhythms have gone mainstream. Professor Russell Foster is the Director of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute at the University of Oxford. His book Life Time: The New Science of the Body Clock, and How It Can Revolutionize Your Sleep and Health, has been a surprise best seller. Jim Mora finds out why.
11/18/202328 minutes, 55 seconds
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Calling Home: Sue McGregor in Zambia

Originally from Green Island, Dunedin, Sue McGregor speaks to us from Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. Sue (or Sister Sue as she's often known) initially thought she'd be there for a year. That was in 2004. She lives in the Presentation Sisters convent and works with people in the city affected by substance misuse.
11/18/202324 minutes, 29 seconds
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Benjamin Rogers: Becoming your own hero

If you want to make your life feel more meaningful, try seeing it as a hero's journey. Researchers have found that the hero's journey is not just for legends and superheroes, but that individuals can achieve greater well-being and resilience by 'restorying' their lives. Lead researcher Benjamin Rogers is an assistant professor in the Management and Organization department at Boston College's Carroll School of Management.
11/18/202315 minutes, 36 seconds
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Mediawatch for 19 November 2023

Media campaign of the century; producers push for tax on streamers; the legacy of a 'true newspaperman'.
11/18/202332 minutes, 35 seconds
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Jack Watling: The Future of Warfare

As conflicts erupt around the world, the technology of war and warfare is evolving. Dr. Jack Watling is no stranger to Sunday Morning on RNZ. Senior Research Fellow for Land Warfare at the Royal United Services Institute, he has regularly provided his expert analysis on the war in Ukraine both from an academic perspective and as someone who has also served on the frontline. In his new book, The Arms of the Future, he examines the ways modern technology is reshaping the weapons of warfare.
11/18/202330 minutes, 17 seconds
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Julian Paton: Blood pressure and links to dementia

High blood pressure has become a focus of attention in many quarters. The condition affects one-third of adult New Zealanders and disproportionately more Maori and Pacific people. It's the biggest risk factor for cardiovascular disease - the leading cause of death here and globally - and researchers are now studying its links to dementia in later life. Professor Julian Paton from the University of Auckland's Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences says it's clear we don't yet know everything about controlling high blood pressure, but his research aims to urgently find a new way.
11/11/202326 minutes, 44 seconds
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Margaret Lovell-Smith: A radical history of Christchurch

With Armistice Day being marked across Europe and the World, we head to Christchurch where the period before, during and after New Zealand's involvement in World War I the city became a flashpoint for pro- and anti-war sentiment. In her book 'I Don't Believe in Murder': Standing up for peace in World War I Canterbury, local writer and historian Margaret Lovell-Smith tells the stories of the people who made Christchurch the leading city in the peace movement, and of the men who refused to fight, enduring imprisonment, hardships and loss of civil rights.
11/11/202313 minutes, 49 seconds
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Mike Seawright: Aid team on the ground in the Gaza

Mike Seawright is the Aucklander who was once an investment banker with a yacht. Then Mike discovered a new purpose in life - he founded the NZ charity ReliefAid, run by hard working volunteers on the ground here, and ReliefAid has also been on the ground in most of the major conflict and natural disaster situations we can think of over the past few years. Now Mike's team are on the ground in Gaza.
11/11/202313 minutes, 18 seconds
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Robinson: My Latest Track

London based New Zealander Robinson introduces us to her sparkling new EP Chasing Nirvana. She chats to Jim about her songwriting, the approaching London winter, and finding her creative groove. She shares her newest. prettiest song yet with Sunday Morning, 'It's All Over You'.
11/11/202313 minutes, 49 seconds
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Calling Home: Liam McEwan in Los Angeles

Ex-Rangitoto College student Liam McEwan is calling home from Los Angeles, California. After humble beginnings at Flea FM in Devonport, he's now made a name for himself interviewing the stars. Elton, Ringo, Miley, and Ariana are among the A-Listers he's interviewed and is working on getting on a first name basis with. He shares his journey to the red carpet, his most memorable celebrity smiles and snubs, and the stars he'd most like to interview.
11/11/202327 minutes, 48 seconds
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George Lockyer: Kiwis on Harley-Davidsons

The Harley-Davidson motorcycle, the most polarising motorbike in the world and also the most legendary, made so by movies like Easy Rider in 1969. One of our most peripatetic writers has just put out a book about them. George Lockyer has already penned Long and Winding Aotearoa, Kiwi Garages, Tales and Trails Down Under and Living The Dream. Now comes Kiwis on Harleys, with stories of 27 New Zealanders who own, collect and sometimes race these noisy, misfiring but mighty machines
11/11/202320 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mediawatch for 12 November 2023

This week Mediawatch looks at how the media have followed the formation of the next government going on behind closed doors.   Also: a push to persuade policymakers to emulate Ireland’s economy - and local media people lamenting the decline of what was the media’s favourite social media platform, Twitter.  [picture id="4KZR3WE_Bury_the_Bird_ad_jpg" crop="original" layout="full"] 
11/11/202337 minutes, 54 seconds
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Barbara Sahakian: New research into avoiding depression

Cambridge University neuropsychologist Professor Barbara Sahakian talks about new research from her team using data from the UK biobank to reach conclusions about mental health. The study used neuroimaging to see the differences in the brain, changing volumes of areas like the hippocampus, vital for memory and learning, and the amygdala, for emotional regulation.   At last count more than 12% of New Zealanders were on antidepressants, 16% of females, 9% of males, 22% of women over age 65. We asked Barbara Sahakian about her latest findings.  [picture id="4MLTFVV_copyright_image_244774" crop="16x10" layout="full"] 
11/11/202310 minutes, 46 seconds
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Anne-Sophie Mutter: Violin virtuoso visits New Zealand

For the very first time in Aotearoa New Zealand, world-renowned violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter joins forces with the NZSO.  [picture id="4KZT4LR_fileadmin_media_presse_2015pix_2_2015_12_ANNE_SOPHIE_MUTTER_01_034_V3_FINAL_jpg" crop="16x10" layout="full"]  Mutter, a longtime friend and collaborator with movie music legend John Williams, will perform Williams’ music from Star Wars, Harry Potter and more in Wellington and Auckland this month.  She joins Jim Mora to talk about music life and why she decided not to retire at 50.  [picture id="4KZT4LR_2022_JWilliams_ASMutterbyHilaryScott_A31A2734_1_jpg" crop="original" layout="full"] 
11/11/202324 minutes, 58 seconds
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Will Flockton: Live in London after pro-Palestinian protests

It's the evening of Remembrance Day, Armistice Day, in the UK. Pro-Palestinian marchers have rallied in London in large numbers, and former defence force generals there have defended their right to do so, in the face of opposition from Home Secretary Suella Braverman. She described the rallies in advance as "hate marches" and accused the police of favouring left-wing groups over right. BBC producer Will Flockton, formally RNZ Morning Report, was there.
11/11/20238 minutes, 20 seconds
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Amiria Grenell: My Latest Track

Award-winning, Otautahi based folk singer and songwriter Amiria Grenell introduces us to her latest single, the gentle track 'Lanterns'. Daughter of legendary country musician John Grenell and known for her crystalline voice Amiria has followed her heritage into a colourful and long-standing career as a touring artist and respected songwriter.
11/4/202311 minutes, 23 seconds
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Calling Home: Honor Harger in Singapore

Originally from Dunedin, Honor Hagar's career has taken her around the world - London, Newcastle, Brighton, Amsterdam, Zagreb, Berlin, and Riga - before she landed in Singapore where she now works in one of the city's most distinctive buildings, the lotus-shaped ArtScience Museum.
11/4/202330 minutes, 18 seconds
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Dr Erica Brozovsky: The surprising origin of gossip

You may have heard the saying 'Gossip is the Devil's radio', but does gossip actually deserve the bad rap it gets? Dr Erica Brozovsky is a sociolinguist, and the host and writer of popular PBS Youtube series 'Otherwords', an educational series about language and linguistics. Erica's videos explore the weird and whacky lesser-known history behind words and language, they've garnered hundreds of thousands of views. She argues that gossip is not only a part of our human nature, a tool that's helped us to build better social connections and community, but it could also be the origin of language itself.
11/4/202323 minutes, 56 seconds
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Adam Grant: The Science of Success

The #1 New York Times bestselling author of Think Again has a new book about what it takes to improve and succeed. Adam Grant is an organizational psychologist, Wharton's top-rated professor for seven straight years, and the New York Times bestselling author of three books that have sold over a million copies and been translated into 35 languages His New Book Hidden Potential: The Science of Achieving Greater Things digs into how we can all rise to achieve greater things.
11/4/202324 minutes, 43 seconds
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Lucy Corry: Homemade Goody Goody Gum Drops Ice Cream

Today marks the start of NZ Ice Cream & Gelato Week. Lucy Corry joins us with her DIY recipe for a Kiwi favourite.
11/4/202314 minutes, 28 seconds
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Mediawatch for 5 November 2023

Rugby in recovery as a media spectacle; keeping it confidential to protect sources; Musk trashing Twitter.
11/4/202335 minutes, 12 seconds
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Toni Childs: ‘It’s all a beautiful noise’

Emmy Award Winner, 3-time Grammy nominated recording artist, installation artist, and environmental activist Toni Childs joins us ahead of her gig with the Corrs next week. She talks about recovering her voice and her upcoming underwater gig on the Great Barrier Reef.
11/4/202310 minutes, 54 seconds
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Robert Brander: The Science of Surf, Sand and Rips

As the weather warms and summer approaches, many of us are looking forward to getting into the ocean. Professor Rob Brander, aka 'Dr Rip', is a coastal scientist, beach safety researcher and science communicator in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at UNSW Sydney in Sydney. His book Dr Rip's Essential Beach Book: Everything you need to know about surf, sand and rips dives into the science of waves and currents, how beaches form and behave, how they respond to storms and climate change, as well as some less common hazards including tsunamis and sharks.
11/4/202329 minutes, 53 seconds
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Jeffrey Halley: An economic temperature check post-election

Jeffrey Halley is Sunday Morning's man on the money. Jeffrey's a kiwi in Jakarta and Singapore who until recently was the Senior Market Analyst for Asia Pacific for the OANDA corporation, with his analysis is regularly sought by Bloomberg, the BBC, Reuters, CNBC, MSN and the New York Times.
10/28/202314 minutes, 54 seconds
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Clare Wilson: How ‘free’ is free will?

Are your choices ever really yours to make? It's an age-old philosophical question, but one that regularly rears its head with advances in our understanding of genetics and neuroscience. Recent publications from two leading neuroscientists have lent wight to the argument that free will is an illusion and that our choices are pre-determined by the make-up of our brain. The theory has thorny implications for moral dilemmas and ideas about crime and punishment. If our choices are not our own, should we agonise over them? And do we have the right to punish people for their so-called decisions? We speak to Clare Wilson - a New Scientist journalist focused on medicine, health policy, and neuroscience - who has taken a deep dive into this philosophical and scientific conundrum.
10/28/202326 minutes, 21 seconds
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Mark Reason: Rugby World Cup Final reaction

Mark Reason, Stuff's senior sports columnist, gives us his post-match analysis of the Rugby World Cup Final between the All Blacks and Springboks.
10/28/202311 minutes, 52 seconds
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Melissa Hogenboom: The brain that changes itself

The first 1000 days are the most important of our lives - why? Because in those first three years of life our brain is rapidly changing and developing, our neuroplasticity is at its peak. It was once thought that this remarkable capacity to remodel ended with youth, but the brain's plasticity is a constant force in shaping who we are. Change can come about unconsciously and, interestingly, through conscious effort. Science journalist and BBC Future reporter Melissa Hogenboom, recently decided to test the theory of mindfulness and its power to physically alter the mind - book ending the experiment with MRI scans. At the end of six weeks, she had the results of her effort to rewire her brain.
10/28/202320 minutes, 53 seconds
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Fiona Hugues: Wishing you a hairy Halloween

No cook likes to be told that their culinary creations look disgusting, but there’s no pretending otherwise with Fiona Hugues’ creepy Halloween cake. Here's how to make it - and some wriggly marzipan maggots.
10/28/20237 minutes, 56 seconds
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Sir Bryan Williams: Rugby World Cup Final reaction

Sir Bryan Williams - former All Black and coach of the Samoan national rugby team - gives us his unbridled take post-Rugby World Cup showdown between the All Blacks and Springboks.
10/28/20237 minutes, 8 seconds
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Christina Persico: Stade de France fulltime

Will it be jubilation or devastation for Kiwi All Blacks' fans? We soak in the atmosphere - whatever it may be - from Stade de France with Christina Persico. Christina is RNZ's Pacific Bulletin Editor.
10/28/20231 minute, 31 seconds
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Zazie Todd: Are we pathologising normal pooch behaviour?

In the space of a few short years, discussions around 'anxiety' and 'feeling anxious' have entered the mainstream. While the rise in anxiety among humans is a well-documented phenomenon, the similarly rapid rise in our companion animals has flown under the radar. Yet, our pets, particularly pooches, are increasingly prescribed anti-anxiety medication. So, are our animals really more anxious? Or are we pathologising normal pet behaviour? The jury is out. Dr Zazie Todd is an animal behaviour expert who founded Companion Animal Psychology in 2012 to explore ways in which science can help us to have happier pets.
10/28/202319 minutes, 17 seconds
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Mediawatch for 29 October 2023

Covering news from all over the country is a struggle for media companies dealing with rising costs and falling revenues. But some local outlets are surviving - and even thriving. Mediawatch's Hayden Donnel finds out who's doing the business in Whanganui - and how they're doing it.
10/28/202331 minutes, 34 seconds
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Christina Persico: Halftime at Stade de France

Christina Persico - RNZ's Pacific Bulletin Editor - is match-side at the Rugby World Cup Final. She joins us at halftime from the Stade France.
10/28/20234 minutes, 47 seconds
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Calling home: Giles Cooper in Hanoi

Cantabrian Giles Cooper has many strings to his bow - lawyer by day, bar owner by night. Arriving in the Vietnamese metropolis of Hanoi in 1999, he opened a New Zealand style café, Puku, and hasn't looked back since.
10/28/202322 minutes, 34 seconds
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Duncan Paterson: Parisian publican

Duncan Paterson is in the eye of the Rugby World Cup storm. He speaks to us from his packed Parisian pub - The Black Sheep Society - a slice of Kiwi paradise on Rue Daval.
10/28/20232 minutes, 48 seconds
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Al Gillespie: Middle East update and China’s economic headwinds

We speak to Al Gillespie about the latest from the conflict in the Middle East and China's 'fantastical' economic statistics. Al Gillespie is a professor of law, specialising in international law related to war, the environment and civil liberties, at the University of Waikato.
10/28/202314 minutes, 2 seconds
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Dr Barbara Barbosa Neves

The team behind a unique research project looking into loneliness in aged care homes in Australia has garnered international attention for its approach. Study lead, Monash University Sociologist Dr Barbara Barbosa Neves worked with award-winning author Josephine Wilson and with illustrator-artist Amanda Brooks to create an academic paper, but with creative non-fiction and comic book-style art. Barbara joins us to talk about the study and how using creatives can help us better understand academic data.
10/21/202331 minutes, 2 seconds
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Mark Reason: The latest from the Rugby World Cup

Mark Reason, Stuff's senior sports columnist brings us the latest from the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, as England take on South Africa.
10/21/202315 minutes, 11 seconds
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The link between sleep and heart health

In a busy world, many of us find it difficult to stick to the recommended 7 to 8 hours each night, but a new report has highlighted what happens in the body if we cut that short - even over a short period. After just six weeks of shortened sleep, the study found, the cells that line our blood vessels are flooded by damaging oxidants. This results in cells that are inflamed and dysfunctional, an early step in the development of cardiovascular disease. Sanja Jelic is the director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Columbia and professor of medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine at Columbia University.
10/21/202313 minutes, 18 seconds
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Mediawatch for 22 October 2023

Take me to your leader - political press pack gets off on wrong foot with our new political leaders; media in the middle of Gaza claims and counterclaims; World Cup fever - and Irish anguish.
10/21/202342 minutes, 25 seconds
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Pinky Agnew: Why don’t more women propose?

In a rapidly changing world many of our customs and traditions, particularly those around partnering remain deep-rooted and unchanged.
10/21/202316 minutes, 27 seconds
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Will Stone: The Benefits of a cold plunge

Reported benefits of a cold plunge include relieving sore muscles, helping recovery post-workout, reducing inflammation, and boosting immunity. Some also report mental health benefits, like reducing anxiety or depression and improving clarity. Author and broadcaster Will Stone dives into the science for us.
10/21/202316 minutes, 13 seconds
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Professor Ali Gillespie

In an address from the Oval Office, President Joe Biden set out his case for U.S. backing of Ukraine and Israel, but how did this play out on the international stage and who will be the major players in fostering - or hindering - peace. Al Gillespie is a professor of law, specialising in international law related to war, the environment and civil liberties, at the University of Waikato.
10/21/202311 minutes, 17 seconds
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Jonathon Coquet: do germs actually help build our immune systems?

The hygiene hypothesis is the idea that kids must be exposed to germs to develop healthy immune systems. Unexpected results from a recent study suggest hygiene hypothesis might not be so clean cut though. Researchers compared laboratory mice with high infectious exposures from birth to 'clean' mice and found little evidence that the antibody response was altered in any meaningful way. The 'dirty' mice had the same, if not greater ability to develop allergic immune responses than the 'clean' mice. Jonathan Coquet, co-author of the study and Associate Professor at the Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden joins Jim Mora to discuss the study's results.
10/14/20238 minutes, 57 seconds
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Gregor Paul: The All Blacks and the Rugby World Cup

We look at the All Blacks' performance in this World Cup with of New Zealand's most respected rugby writers and columnist for the NZ Herald, Gregor Paul.
10/14/20238 minutes, 24 seconds
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Chris Tse: ‘It was a bit of a secret that I liked Celine Dion’

How does a poet laureate celebrate their birthday? If you're Chris Tse, you mark the occasion with a gathering of fellow poets - and by writing a new poem about your love of Celine Dion.
10/14/20238 minutes, 12 seconds
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Jo McCarroll: Vege Patch From Scratch

Jo McCarroll, Sunday Morning regular and NZ Gardener magazine editor has a new book out for anyone wanting to save a bit of money or to grow some fresh healthy food. Vege Patch from Scratch offers easy-to-follow steps for starting and sustaining your very own vegetable garden.
10/14/202327 minutes, 3 seconds
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Lucy Corry: Post-Election Brunch

Celebrating, commiserating, or waiting in anticipation... If you stayed up late Saturday keeping up to date with the election coverage, you'll need a good breakfast to recover. As a bonus, it might help you if you were up early watching the rugby too. Lucy Corry AKA The Kitchenmaid joins us.
10/14/202310 minutes, 45 seconds
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Natasha Frost: The Voice Referendum

On Saturday, 14 October 2023, Australians will have their say in a referendum about whether to change the Constitution to recognise the First Peoples of Australia by establishing a body called the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice. Natasha Frost is the New York Times correspondent based in Melbourne.
10/14/20239 minutes, 24 seconds
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Sir Bryan Williams: Rugby World Cup reaction

Former All Black and coach of the Samoan national team, Sir Bryan Williams joins us with his reaction to events as they unfolded between New Zealand an Ireland in Paris.
10/14/20238 minutes, 39 seconds
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Michael Palin's New Zealand connection: My great uncle Harry’s life and death in WWI

Actor, comedian, broadcaster and author, Michael Palin, has documented the extraordinary life and tragic death of a First World War soldier - his great-uncle Harry in latest book Great-Uncle Harry: A Tale of War and Empire. 
10/8/202326 minutes, 11 seconds
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Jarrod Haar: Should employers be paying for your beach

The latest trend began in Europe, which has now gone global according to the BBC, this new idea that your employer could pay the cost of your holiday instead of increasing wages. We ask Dr Jarrod Haar, Professor of Management and Maori Business at Massey University whether that's something we might see here.
10/7/202310 minutes, 34 seconds
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Dr Whitney Scott: Chronic pain without the pills

What can be done about chronic pain, avoiding or reducing the need for pills? Dr Whitney Scott is a lecturer in clinical health psychology at King's College, and she also works at the INPUT Pain Unit at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital in London.
10/7/202316 minutes, 7 seconds
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Natasha Frost: Australia Update

New Zealander Natasha Frost is the New York Times' correspondent in Melbourne. She joins us with the latest from across the Tasman.
10/7/20239 minutes, 59 seconds
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Otto English: History's fake heroes

Andrew Scott is a political journalist who goes by the pen name of Otto English. His latest book, 'Fake Heroes: Ten False Icons and How they Altered the Course of History' dives into the hidden lives of some of history's biggest names. 
10/7/202331 minutes, 50 seconds
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Gregor Paul: Rugby World Cup Update

Rugby Writer and columnist, Scotman Gregor Paul is in Lyon with the All Blacks, but has been keeping a keen eye on the action at the Stade De France between Ireland and Scotland.
10/7/202311 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ethan Kross: How to master your inner voice

How you talk to yourself can mean the difference between a good day or a day spent wallowing with your head under the covers. Award-winning Professor of Psychology and Management at the University of Michigan Ethan Kross shares his insights and techniques learnt from his more than two decades of research.
10/7/202317 minutes, 21 seconds
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Mediawatch for 8 October 2023

Media shift blame for misleading tax policy headlines; political parties' policies for the media; Rupert Murdoch steps down and starts up the succession - or does he?
10/7/202333 minutes, 7 seconds
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Princess Chelsea: Everything Is Going to Be Alright Tour

Princess Chelsea refers to her 2023 Taite Music Prize winning album as her 'nervous breakdown' album. She speaks to Jim Mora about her journey to personal recovery and reconnecting with fans.
10/7/202318 minutes, 31 seconds
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Michael Vlismas: behind Elon Musk's quarter-trillon fortune

Michael Vlismas' Risking It All sets out to say how Musk's childhood shaped him, and the other themes are perseverance, strategising skills and a remarkable ability to handle pressure.
9/30/202317 minutes, 12 seconds
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Dr Lisa Sanders: Your questions on Long-COVID answered

After her chat on the show a couple of weeks ago, Dr Lisa Sanders from Yale University's Long-COVID clinic joins us once again to answer some of your questions.
9/30/202324 minutes, 31 seconds
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Dr Maya Mathur: BMI and the gap between belief and reality

Assistant Professor at Stanford's Quantitative Sciences Unit has crunched the numbers around weight, BMI and health and found some surprising data.
9/30/202312 minutes, 8 seconds
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Dr Alex Burgoyne: there's something about mindfulness

Dr Alex Burgoyne, a cognitive neuroscientist says there's something else to know about mindfulness.
9/30/202310 minutes, 4 seconds
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Dr Lucy Foulkes: Why ‘therapy speak’ might be making us feel worse

Many of us grew up in a time when mental health just wasn't discussed. These days though mental wellness is being promoted in many aspects of daily life and the language of psychiatry has entered the vernacular.
9/30/202327 minutes, 22 seconds
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Calling Home: Simon Butchard in Warsaw

Calling home this week is Simon Butchard, who grew up in Christchurch but now lives in Warsaw with his wife Ania and their twins.
9/30/202320 minutes, 49 seconds
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Mediawatch for 1 October 2023

The undecided could decide the election; giving youth a voice in the election; ZB's 'straight talking' subscribers' service.
9/30/202336 minutes, 11 seconds
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David Linklater: Is your car spying on you?

Whilst spying seems like a strong word, that's the accusation made in a study by the Mozilla Foundation. David Linklater is the Deputy editor of DRIVEN CARGUIDE at NZME. He joins us with the details.
9/30/202315 minutes, 42 seconds
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Emily Guy Birken: How to buy happiness

How we shop has a greater effect on our happiness than what we buy. Emily Guy Birken is an award-winning writer, author, money coach, and retirement expert. She tells us how to get more bliss for our buck.
9/30/202318 minutes
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Mark Reason: All Blacks win, cause for celebration?

The All Blacks thumped Italy in the RWC, a cause for celebration. Is there also a cause for caution? Sports writer Mark Reason joins Jim, Mark's a senior sports writer for Stuff and Mark's covered every Rugby World Cup since 1991.
9/30/20236 minutes, 6 seconds
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Anna Kornadt: Why we rarely feel our age

The quote attributed to American Baseball plater Satchel Paige, goes "How old would you be if you didn't know what age you were?" Most of us feel an age that bears no relation to our physical age. Anna Kornadt is a professor in psychology at the University of Luxembourg with a focus on aging and lifespan development and head of their Institute of Lifespan Development, Family and Culture.
9/24/202320 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Dr Ali Hill from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition joins us once again. This time we find out if eating eggs can really make us happier.
9/23/20238 minutes, 52 seconds
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Dr Sam Parnia: Life, death and in-between

We may never solve the question of what happens when our hearts stop and electrical activity in our brain flatlines, but science is giving this a good go now. Dr Sam Parnia is a British associate professor of Medicine at New York University's Grossman School of Medicine, where he is also director of research into cardiopulmonary resuscitation, director of the Human Consciousness Project at the UK's University of Southampton and author of the book The Lazarus Effect: The Science That is Rewriting the Boundaries Between Life and Death. He has been studying the moment of death for more than two decades.
9/23/202326 minutes, 55 seconds
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Lavina Good: The Asian Games

Sports journalist, Lavina Good joins us from Hangzhou, China with the latest from the 19th Asian Games.
9/23/202312 minutes, 25 seconds
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Arthur C Brooks: Understanding Happiness

How can we bring more happiness into our lives? How do we translate a yearning for happiness into the sort of action that will enable us to grasp it? How do we live, now, in a less-and-less happy world. A Professor at Harvard Business School, best-selling author of 13 books and writer of the Atlantic Monthly's How To Build a Life column, Arthur C. Brooks joins us. His new book, written in tandem with Oprah Winfrey, is called Build The Life You Want.
9/23/202338 minutes, 45 seconds
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Mark Reason: Rugby World Cup Update

As two of the favourites for the Rugby World Cup - South Africa and Ireland - go head-to-head at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, we go live for the latest from Mark Reason, Stuff's senior sports columnist.
9/23/202313 minutes, 18 seconds
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Calling Home: Brett Sargon in Calgary, Alberta

A curling team from New Zealand have been 'adopted' by a retirement home in Calgary, Alberta. In return for four months of accommodation, the team integrate with the residents; similar to an intergenerational scheme ran in the Dutch city of Deventer They're in Calgary to practice with their eyes on qualifying for the World Men's Curling Championship 2024 in Switzerland, and eventually the 2026 Olympics. Vice-skip Brett Sargon joins us.
9/23/202321 minutes, 27 seconds
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Mediawatch for 24 September 2023

Debate statemates add to election frustration; the current and future state of Stuff; some good - but overdue - news for Dunedin.
9/23/202339 minutes, 30 seconds
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Jack Chen: Do we still need to separate laundry?

Most of us learned to do laundry from our parents, and at some point we were told the story of the red sock making the laundry pink. But according to some, we don't need to separate laundry anymore. Jack Chen, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at Auckland University of Technology joins us.
9/23/20236 minutes, 42 seconds
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Mark Abdelmalek: How much is too much when it comes to showering

Our skin is our first line of defence … and as a culture, we like to keep it clean. But according to Philadelphia dermatologist Dr Mark Abdelmalek a shower a few days a week is probably all we need. He says while long hot showers feel great, they're stripping our body of its natural oils, "culturally, we are over-showering". Mark is a prominent skin cancer surgeon and also the go-to health correspondent for ABC news in the United States, he joins Jim to discuss how much is too much when it comes to showering.
9/23/202312 minutes, 18 seconds
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Lisa Sanders on Long Covid: 'For many people, it's been a terrible journey'

It's been reported that 1 in 5 Covid sufferers in NZ have long-COVID symptoms. Otago University estimate that up to 150,000 New Zealanders may be battling, or have been battling long-COVID, another estimate was up to 300,000 earlier this year. The only publicly funded long-COVID clinic in the country will shut up shop at the end of this month. Dr. Lisa Sanders is a physician, a professor of internal medicine and a longtime New York Times medical columnist and at Yale University's long-COVID clinic, she is doing what she can to understand the mysteries of the disorder.
9/17/202330 minutes, 3 seconds
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David Robson: Great people don’t always give the best advice.

Neuroscience researcher, writer and author David Robson joins us once again. This time he's been looking at advice and where we get it. Interestingly, it's not always the most successful people that are best-placed to give advice.
9/16/202320 minutes, 5 seconds
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Alex Wellerstein: on the world’s nuclear weapon arsenal?

Nuclear weapons have unfortunately been brought to the fore once more with Russia's invasion of Ukraine despite most experts agreeing deployment is unlikely. No nation has detonated a nuclear weapon in conflict since 1945 and many of those weapons are getting pretty old. Alex Wellerstein is a nuclear weapons historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology. He talks to Jim about the state of nuclear weapons and how reliable they are.
9/16/202323 minutes, 41 seconds
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Calling Home: Duncan Paterson in Paris

Duncan Paterson is calling home from Paris, currently the centre of the Rugby World Cup. Duncan's bar is called The Black Sheep Society, a slice of kiwi heaven on the streets of Paris.
9/16/202317 minutes, 22 seconds
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Mediawatch for 17 September 2023

Un-spun numbers don't derail duelling versions of the economy; Stuff keeps AI at arm's length; medical school row - and a made-up university.
9/16/202339 minutes, 12 seconds
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Dr Riley Elliott: Cookiecutter sharks

Most of us had never heard of cookiecutter sharks until a week or so ago, when they managed to sink a catamaran off the coast of Australia. New Zealand marine scientist and Auckland University's shark man Dr Riley Elliott gets his teeth into the details.
9/16/202315 minutes, 39 seconds
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Dr. David Cox: How to best keep hydrated

With summer on the horizon, we talk to neuroscientist and journalist, Dr David Cox to find out how much we should drink every day, and what we should be drinking.
9/16/202315 minutes, 22 seconds
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Gregor Paul: Rugby World Cup Update

Herald rugby writer Gregor Paul joins us with his take on the latest from France in the Rugby World Cup.
9/16/202312 minutes, 56 seconds
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Sarah Peirce: Bringing the thriller Switzerland to the stage

Sarah Peirse is best known for her screen roles as Kate in Rain and Pauline Parker's mother, Honora, in Heavenly Creatures. She reprises her role as the formidable American writer, Patricia Highsmith in the acclaimed thriller Switzerland presented by Auckland Theatre Company which opens at the ASB Waterfront Theatre on September 19.
9/9/202312 minutes, 58 seconds
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Natasha Frost: Our woman in Australia

NY Times Australia correspondent, Natasha Frost joins us from Melbourne with the latest news from across the Tasman.
9/9/20234 minutes, 45 seconds
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Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper: Inspiring young women to look to the stars

As the NZ Aerospace Summit gets underway next week in Christchurch, we're joined by NASA astronaut, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper. Astronaut Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, STS-115 mission specialist, took this self-portrait having just unstowed the forward Solar Array Blanket Box (SABB) on a space walk on the International Space Station. Photo: NASA Heide has performed five spacewalks, she's been up to the International Space station and down to the bottom of the ocean as well, as a Navy dive commander. Her work now is to encourage other young women to pursue careers in space.
9/9/202322 minutes, 35 seconds
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Richard Osman: The Last Devil To Die

Richard Osman has now joined the ranks of those people in the United Kingdom who are referred to as a 'national treasure'. Even if you don't read his books and know his name you will almost certainly know his face if you watch TV, as a droll presence on many panel shows like Would I Lie to You? Or quiz shows such as Pointless. Richard is the also author of the hugely popular The Thursday Murder Club books. His latest book The Last Devil to Die is out now.
9/9/202325 minutes, 26 seconds
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Susan Goldin-Meadow: Gestures are our thoughts hidden

Susan Goldin-Meadow is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago and one of the world foremost experts on gestures. She has found that gestures express substantive information which otherwise might not be conveyed in the speech it accompanies revealing secret thinking to those who pay attention.
9/9/202319 minutes, 48 seconds
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Mediawatch for 10 September 2023

Angst over advocacy adverts and content as official election period begins; AI - coming ready or not for news and music.
9/9/202338 minutes, 21 seconds
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Michael Snyder: Which ‘ageotype’ are you?

You're born, you live, you die - ageing, it would seem, is linear. Wrong. It turns out, the human body tends to age in parts, with some organs more susceptible to the ravages of time than others. However, geneticist Michael Snyder says nailing down which body part will fail first is a bit of a gamble because, "Everybody's ageing differently". But don't despair yet, recent studies have revealed that we are likely to belong to one of four different ageing pathways - and figuring out which 'ageotype' you are, might be the key to staying healthier for longer. Dr Snyder, director of Stanford University's Center of Genomics, joins Jim to discuss.
9/9/202323 minutes, 2 seconds
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Lucy Corry: Hack your snacks for the Rugby World Cup

Getting the snacks in for the game isn't quite as simple for this Rugby World Cup. Early morning match times here in NZ means the usual pizza, chips and dips aren't so appealing. Award-winning food writer Lucy Corry, aka The Kitchenmaid joins us with some inspiration for snacks for watching the Rugby World Cup.
9/9/202314 minutes, 2 seconds
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Mark Reason: Rugby World Cup update

With the Rugby World Cup already in full swing, Mark Reason, senior sports columnist for Stuff joins us from France.
9/9/202311 minutes, 34 seconds
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Bryan Bruce: The Food Crisis

We've faced several crises in recent years, but the one we're currently eyeing might be the most troubling of all. In a new documentary airing Sunday night, Bryan Bruce asks the question, why does food cost so much?
9/2/20237 minutes, 12 seconds
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John F. Bradford: Tensions in the South China Sea

New Zealand, a United States ally and China trade partner, is walking a tight rope as tensions between the economic superpowers ratchet up.
9/2/202321 minutes, 29 seconds
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Sean Lyons on smartphone security

Increasingly, smartphone users are becoming aware, and with it, more concerned about the extent to which their phone is spying on them.
9/2/202320 minutes, 9 seconds
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Howard Fishman on Connie Converse

American folk singer Connie Converse was the "invisible woman of the 20th century", despite being ahead of the curve in every respect.
9/2/202318 minutes, 35 seconds
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Calling Home: Rachel Bickler in Brussels

She may have been born in Aotearoa, but it feels almost inevitable that Rachel Bickler would end up in Brussels the heart of the European Union.
9/2/202321 minutes, 30 seconds
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Mediawatch for 3 September 2023

Mongrel and maths collide as campaigns launch - and media ponder National's tax plan; scrutiny of candidates' online footprints prompts pushback and claims of 'agendas'.
9/2/202337 minutes, 32 seconds
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Rachel Cowgill: Has whistling gone out of fashion?

One hundred years ago, it was common for streets to be filled with whistling the crying call of milkmen and builders on construction sites, everyday people going about their business. So, what happened to this tradition? Professor of Music at the University of York Rachel Cowgill, says while the streets are now quieter, a keen core of whistlers remain.
9/2/202315 minutes, 29 seconds
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Lorin Clarke: Would that be funny? Growing up with John Clarke

Fred Dagg only had three or four years of peak popularity before he left New Zealand for Australia, but he changed comedy in this country and inspired a number of the top comedians today with his casual style.
9/2/202326 minutes, 51 seconds
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Calling Home: John Featherston in San Francisco

Calling Home this morning is Dr John Feathersone, Dean Emeritus of the School of Dentistry at the University of California, San Francisco. He's won numerous national and international awards, including the International Association for Dental Research distinguished scientist award for research into dental caries, and the Norton Ross Award for excellence in clinical research from the American Dental Association. This year he'll receive the American Dental Association's highest award, their Distinguished Service Award.
8/26/202317 minutes, 35 seconds
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Peter Rowlett: Can mathematics help win lotto?

Are there tricks that can maximise your lottery winnings? Should you avoid the number seven, for example or only pick numbers over 31? Mathematician Peter Rowlett from University of Sheffield Hallam in the UK has some psychological strategies that may (or may not) improve your chances when playing the lottery.
8/26/202323 minutes, 15 seconds
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Chris Patten: The last British Governor of Hong Kong

Chris Patten, Lord Patten of Barnes was a top Tory politician, prime ministerial material, and Chairman of the Conservative Party in the UK who went on to be the 28th and last Governor of Hong Kong, from 1992 to 1997. His brief was to make the 1997 handover of Hong Kong to China smooth, but also to protect the rule of law and to safeguard democracy. In the end the politics, as he puts it, were a snake pit. His book, The Hong Kong Diaries, is a journal of his time there, including his thoughts on the situation today.
8/26/202337 minutes, 48 seconds
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Janet Cade: Fidgeting is good for you

We're taught as children not to fidget. Is fidgeting just a sign of being restless? Or is there more to it? What if fidgeting can help us maintain a healthy weight, manage stress, or even add years to your life? Janet Cade, a nutritional epidemiologist at the University of Leeds and her colleagues analyzed survey data from more than 12,000 women over the course of twelve years, uncovering that fidgeting can reduce your risk of long-term ill health as it interrupts the amount of time our bodies stay sedentary.
8/26/202315 minutes, 30 seconds
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Marc Wilson: How could Lucy Letby do the things she did?

Victoria University of Wellington Professor of Psychology, Dr Marc Wilson is back, this time covering the harrowing case of nurse Lucy Letby over the murders of seven babies and the attempted murder of six others in her care at the Countess of Chester hospital in the UK.
8/26/202318 minutes, 53 seconds
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Mediawatch for 27 August 2023

Brought to you by 'partners' - critics question sponsorship deals pushing clients' content into news media; IMANZ - a new umbrella body for independent local media marketing agencies; low key reveal of legislation to push big tech platforms to pay for local news.
8/26/202340 minutes, 15 seconds
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Micheal Dearth: The rise of menu anxiety

A new survey has confirmed what Millennials and Gen Z already knew - ordering food at restaurants can be stressful. For some, it can be so stressful that it's affecting the way they navigate eating out. Almost half of Gen Z and Millennials experience menu anxiety, stemming from everything from the taste, cost, and length of preparation time to the food's environmental impacts. Michael Dearth runs The Grove Restaurant in Auckland. He joins us to talk about how this phenomenon is impacting our eating out culture.
8/26/202312 minutes, 15 seconds
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Bryan Johnson: The tech billionaire reversing his age

Forty-six-year-old Bryan Johnson has spent millions of dollars to slow his body's aging process. He made his millions selling a tech company to eBay and has since pursued ventures in health tech, including his anti-ageing mission, Project Blueprint. He has a team of more than thirty doctors and health experts monitoring his every move, with the goal of reversing the aging process in every one of his organs. Bryan joins us to talk about his anti-aging mission and the potential takeaways for generations to come.
8/26/202326 minutes, 52 seconds
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Mark Reason: The All Blacks worst-ever defeat

The All Blacks have suffered their worst-ever defeat - 35-7 against the Springboks at Twickenham, in front of 80,000 rugby fans. They have a fortnight before they play France in the Rugby World Cup and now there's deep soul-searching for the ABs as they head to a base in Germany. Mark Reason is a senior sports columnist for Stuff. He has covered every Rugby World Cup since 1991 for major media, as well as Olympic Games and many big golf tournaments. He spoke with Jim Mora.
8/26/20236 minutes, 20 seconds
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'I'm ready to saddle up' - Dai Henwood on new stand-up show

Dai Henwood is one of our best-known comedians, star of Dancing With The Stars, Seven Days, Family Feud and Legomasters. Folllowing his cancer diagnosis, he's just finished his latest round of chemo and has gotten together with his mates, some of the biggest names in comedy, to host a night of stand-up comedy to raise money for The Cancer Society.
8/20/202316 minutes, 41 seconds
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Why is the eastern Pacific Ocean cooling?

Scientists have been researching the cooling ocean east of New Zealand for a while, but more recently it has really been getting attention. Dr Pedro DiNezio is an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado's department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. He calls it "the most important unanswered question in climate science".
8/20/202313 minutes, 14 seconds
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Paula Marantz Cohen: Good conversation is a basic human need

A face-to-face amiable debate, the polite airing of contrary view seems to be becoming increasingly rare. Are we losing the art of conversation? Dr Paula Marantz Cohen is the distinguished professor of literature at Drexel University in Philadelphia. Her book Talking Cure: An Essay on the Civilizing Power of Conversation looks at the art of good conversation, how it connects us in ways that social media never can and explains why simply talking to each other freely and without guile may be the cure to what ails our troubled society.
8/19/202331 minutes, 37 seconds
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Fletcher McKenzie: Enthralling tales from New Zealand pilots

What's it like to land a jet on an aircraft carrier or have your Cessna crash in flames in rugged farmland? Aviation expert and pilot Fletcher McKenzie has interviewed dozens of kiwi pilots who've flown all sorts of planes all around the world for his book From the Pilot's Seat: Kiwi Adventurers in the Sky.
8/19/202321 minutes, 50 seconds
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Sarah Gregorius: Women's World Cup final excitement builds

England and Spain go head-to-head at Stadium Australia in the World Cup final later. Joining us for her thoughts on this game is one of our most illustrious footballers. Sarah Gregorius from Lower Hutt played nearly a hundred games for the football Ferns competing in three World Cups and going on to play for AFC Amsterdam. Throughout the tournament, Sarah has provided her unique insight and analysis on Sky Sports and while of course keeping up the day job as the FIFPRO World Players Union as its Director of global policy and strategic relations.
8/19/202323 minutes, 39 seconds
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Calling Home: Dr Nick Laing in Northern Uganda

Dr. Nick Laing, originally from Christchurch has been living and working in Northern Uganda for several years where he is the co-founder and country director of OneDay Health which operates 36 Remote rural health centers in the region.
8/19/202319 minutes, 46 seconds
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Mediawatch for 20 August 2023

Our World Cup runneth over - what legacy will it leave? Lifting the lid on exploitation of migrant workers and human trafficking.
8/19/202342 minutes, 26 seconds
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How the housing crisis is shaping modern relationships.

Jane Austen once said "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." Whilst we'd all be happy to see that idea consigned to the dustbin of literary history, it seems it may have currency again. With some even asking if the requirements of modern dating, and finding a life partner, are becoming reminiscent of Jane Austen's time… because of housing costs. Frances Cook, BusinessDesk investments editor, podcaster and best-selling author of Your Money, Your Future and Tales from a Financial Hot Mess joins us
8/19/202322 minutes, 11 seconds
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Dr Gary McLean: Is covid really in the rear-view mirror?

As the last of the Covid-19 restrictions are dropped in New Zealand, hospitalisations are on the rise and the implications of long covid are only starting to emerge. Throughout the height of the Covid pandemic we talked regularly with New Zealander Dr Gary Mclean, an emeritus professor at London Metropolitan University, and immunology researcher at Imperial College.
8/19/202313 minutes, 58 seconds
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Annie Romanos: ADHD coach on the Kapiti Coast

More and more people are working from home under the watchful eye of strangers - and the strangers are being paid for the privilege. According to Annie, the concept of 'body doubling' is nothing new: People are more likely to stay focused on work if they know others are keeping an eye on them. Annie speaks to Susana about the principle and its link to ADHD treatment.
8/12/202317 minutes, 52 seconds
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Captain Brett Crozier: Maverick navy captain on leadership and loyalty

He was commended and condemned in equal measure, but his decision to fight for his troops ultimately saw him walk the plank. In 2020, Captain Brett Crozier disembarked the US Navy's most powerful aircraft carrier for the last time - relieved of duty after pleading with superiors to protect his sailors from Covid-19. As the virus swept through the ship, his letter begging for help hit the headlines. Two years later he retired. In his new book, 'Surf when you can' he reflects on his life, his work, and that career defining moment.
8/12/202330 minutes, 1 second
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Brett Christopher: Do asset managers own the world?

Following this week's announcement that the government is to partner with US asset managers, Blackrock in a $2bn green energy fund, we're joined by political economist and economic geographer, Professor Brett Christophers who is visiting NZ from the Institute for Housing and Urban Research at Sweden's Uppsala University. He's the author of several books, including Our Lives in Their Portfolios: Why Asset Managers Own the World.
8/12/202331 minutes, 36 seconds
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Karen Kasler: USA Update

Ohio Statehouse News Bureau Chief Karen Kasler joins us once again. She takes a look at USA vs Trump following the indictment handed down against the former president while at the same time under heavy scrutiny by media Trump and Biden are pretty well neck-and-neck in polling for the next US presidential election. And in Karen's home state, Ohioans voted down a proposal that would have made it harder to pass future proposed constitutional amendments in the state, including one in November about abortion rights.
8/12/202317 minutes, 24 seconds
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Mediawatch for 13 August 2023

Reporters' report on crime coverage urges new thinking - and highlights electoral 'crime crackdown' pattern; RNZ's Richard Sutherland calling it quits after 30 years; free sports streaming options on the up.
8/12/202345 minutes, 35 seconds
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Kevin Scharfenberg: A private Island for less than the average family home

Ever dreamed of living on your own private island? Loon Island on Pavilion Lake - a four-hour drive from Vancouver - is currently on the market for less than half the average price for a home in the neighbouring BC city. According to realtor Kevin Scharfenberg, the lake is famous for its brilliant emerald glow in the summer, and that's not the only natural attraction. NASA and the Canadian Space Agency are currently researching a mysterious karst formation that resembles ocean coral. The island listing boasts 175 metres of waterfront panoramic views, two cabins, and a 2015 solar powered house - your own slice of paradise, for $NZ734,000.
8/12/20238 minutes, 43 seconds
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Michael Leon: Startling research on scent and brain function

The link between memory and smell has long been established - but what if you could harness odours to not only maintain cognitive ability as you age, but deter dementia? The result of a University of California Irvine study has indicated just that. For six months a fragrance wafted through the bedrooms of adults 60 years and older. The findings? A 226% increase in cognitive capacity.
8/12/202325 minutes, 29 seconds
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Neil Gemmell: Could the Loch Ness Monster be a giant eel?

The chances of finding a large eel in Loch Ness are around 1 in 50,000 for a 1-metre creature. Researchers at the University of Otago looked at the DNA of Loch Ness inhabitants, concluding that perhaps sightings of Nessie were actually large eels. But now, data scientist Flow Foxon says eels don't get that big. Professor Neil Gemmell is the AgResearch Chair in Reproduction and Genomics at the University of Otago. Neil joins the programme to discuss.
8/6/202320 minutes, 45 seconds
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Dr Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic: In an AI world, what makes us human?

AI can do many things, but what can't in replicate? Dr. Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic is the Chief Innovation Officer at ManpowerGroup in the UK. Tomas' new book is I, Human: AI, Automation, and the Quest to Reclaim What Makes Us Unique.
8/5/202327 minutes, 11 seconds
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Holly Morris: reaching the North Pole

An expedition of women from Arabia and Europe set out to find the North Pole as the ice caps melt. Award-winning filmmaker Holly Morris recorded the mission - it could be the last. She used the latest tech, with first-of-its-kind Virtual Reality/360 footage on Google Jump Halo, and Rylo 360 cameras. Holly is known for her documentary, Babushkas of Chernobyl, about women living in the shadow of the failed nuclear reactor in Ukraine. Holly joins the programme.
8/5/202311 minutes, 35 seconds
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Tony Thorne: What to make of the letter 'X'

The most commonly used letter in the English language is E, followed by A, and R. The least-used letter is Z, followed by Q … But the letter that has made headlines around the world is 'X'. Tony Thorne's been writing, teaching, and broadcasting about linguistic and cultural change for three decades, he joins us to discuss the conflicted nature of the letter, 'X'.
8/5/202319 minutes, 26 seconds
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Dr Rachel Nolan: The drug cartel mythos

The rise in cocaine use across New Zealand has brought cartels back into the public consciousness and headlines around the world. But are they responsible for the reported spike in drug use?
8/5/202326 minutes, 17 seconds
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Bridget Tunnicliffe: Netball World Cup

It was a semi-finals showdown last night, with netball's big four battling it out for a spot in the World Cup Final. The Silver Ferns faced off against the English Roses, while Jamaica's Sunshine Girls went toe-to-toe with the Australian Diamonds. RNZ reporter Bridget Tunnicliffe was court side and joins the programme from Cape Town.
8/5/20237 minutes, 55 seconds
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Mediawatch for 6 August 2023

Political road rage - budget holes & emissions omissions; what went wrong with RNZ's online news - and putting it right,
8/5/202337 minutes, 30 seconds
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Jane Golley: China's economic headwinds, and what it means for us

The world is looking at China in a new way. What was once billed as the next dominant superpower is facing economic headwinds.
8/5/202325 minutes, 19 seconds
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Walter Marsh: The beginning of the Murdoch Empire

Drawing on unpublished archival material and new reportage, author and journalist Walter Marsh's book, Young Rupert pieces together the paper trail giving us a glimpse of the Australian media landscape at an extraordinary tipping point.
7/29/202327 minutes, 54 seconds
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Sarah McMullan: Should we stop going to movies to support the Hollywood strikers?

Is it ethical to watch movies during a strike? Should moviegoers strike too? Will the strike actually kill Hollywood? Sarah McMullan is familiar to the RNZ audience. She watches a lot of films and writes about some of them.
7/29/202311 minutes, 49 seconds
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Mandy Hagstrom: Gender in the gym

How much do we have to exercise, really, to be healthy? And does a lot of the research done in gyms pertain to men, not women? We're joined by our go-to exercise expert, New Zealander Dr Mandy Hagstrom, senior lecturer at UNSW, School of Human Nutrition.
7/29/202316 minutes, 35 seconds
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Katie Steckles: Amazing maths in a maze

At some time or another most of us will enter a maze and try and get out of it again. There's an easy way to do that, believe it or not. Dr Katie Steckles is a Manchester-based mathematician who lectures at a university in Sheffield, speaks at science festivals, and talks on the BBC about matters mathematical as well.
7/29/202323 minutes, 59 seconds
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Calling Home: Jack Boulton in the Orkney Islands, Scotland

Originally from Pukekohe, Jack Boulton now lives in Orkney, completing a PhD on Transitional Engineering studying ways to move petrochemical companies away from carbon use.
7/29/202317 minutes, 46 seconds
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Mediawatch for 30 July 2023

Minister's downfall triggers election speculation - and another resignation at RNZ.
7/29/202330 minutes, 27 seconds
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Lucy Scott: Puppies and sibling recognition

Experts are claiming dogs separated at eight to 12 weeks won't forget about their siblings for up to two years, and these same dogs often recognise their mothers beyond the two-year mark. Dr. Lucy Scott from Veterinary Behaviour Services NZ is a vet with a special interest in behaviour and training.
7/29/202313 minutes, 28 seconds
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Katherine Wu: Are you really eating too fast?

We all know people who wolf their food down, and probably we disapprove. But what if it's not actually all that bad? Dr Katherine Wu, a Harvard-trained microbiologist, and now a staff writer for the Atlantic Monthly joins us.
7/29/202315 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

An Oxford University study has concluded that if all the meat eaters in the UK cut down their ingestion of meat it would be the equivalent of taking 8 million cars off the road. Dr Ali Hill joins us from Otago University's Department of Human Nutrition.
7/29/202317 minutes, 37 seconds
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Jean Twenge: Generations

Dr. Jean Twenge is a Professor of Psychology at San Diego State University, and the author of more than 140 scientific publications. She was last on RNZ six years ago discussing the less happy and more isolated smartphone generation of young people.
7/22/202335 minutes, 52 seconds
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Emery Schubert: Why earworm songs get stuck in our heads

Do you ever hear a snippet of a tune and before you know it, it's on rotate in your head, and you can't seem to shake it for hours... or days, or even weeks? You're not alone. This pesky phenomenon - a catchy tune that runs through a person's mind - is known as an 'earworm'. A study of 240 American university students in 2020 showed 97% had experienced an 'earworm' in the past month. Professor Emery Schubert is from the School of the Arts and Media at the University of New South Wales.
7/22/202313 minutes, 27 seconds
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Johnny Green’s 11,000-strong egg cup collection

At the Easter of 1939, on the cusp of WW2 and when Aucklander Johnny Green was just nine years old, his mother gifted him an egg cup. It featured three ceramic chicks, contained a single chocolate egg, and it meant the absolute world to him. Johnny kept it with him always, even when he joined the British Army, and made the six-week voyage to New Zealand. He now has a collection of more than 11,000 cups which he proudly displays at Sunday markets around Tamaki Makaurau to raise money for Hospice.
7/22/202316 minutes, 1 second
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Stephanie Dowrick: How to beat anxiety

Dr Stephanie Dowrick is an award-winning writer, psychotherapy researcher and coach, public speaker, workshop leader, interfaith minister and the founder of The Women's Press in London. Her latest book Your Name is Not Anxious includes step-by-step guides that explain anxiety is treatable, despite more and more of us being or becoming anxious. Dr Dowrick gives us a preview of what we might learn in the 60-chapter read.
7/22/202326 minutes, 7 seconds
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Calling Home: Aaron Hodges in Buenos Aires

Whakatane-born Aaron Hodges' job as a fantasy writer allows him to live anywhere he wants. So in 2019, he moved to Buenos Aires to learn Spanish, and has been there ever since. Aaron calls home to tell us about life in the vibrant Argentinian capital.
7/22/202315 minutes, 50 seconds
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Mediawatch for 23 July 2023

A triumph on a tragic day; political parties roll out crime control policies; creative interpretations of a pretty prosaic political poll.
7/22/202331 minutes, 32 seconds
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Dan Carter’s new book on leadership and purpose

When All Blacks great Dan Carter retired from the game in 2021, he found no obvious career move at his doorstep. His new book, The Art of Winning: Ten Lessons in Leadership, Purpose and Potential, focuses on a series of hard-learned truths over his career and in the years to follow. Dan Carter tells us more about his new book, which he says, is not about rugby.
7/22/202318 minutes, 44 seconds
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Fay Clark: Do animals feel joy?

We've spoken before on Sunday morning about cats, dogs and cows, and how they reveal their affection for us. Research is making great strides in analysing animals we're familiar with and ascertaining their emotional states. That, of course, will allow us to improve their lives. Even if we then eat some of them. Dr Fay Clark runs the Comparative Challenge Lab at the University of Bristol. Her research is concerned with the mental processes and mental health of animals. Her training is in zoology, biological anthropology, and psychology, and in her lab, in zoos and in the wild she constructs challenges for animals to see how they respond.
7/15/202319 minutes, 51 seconds
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Simon Schama: A history of vaccination

Simon Schama is a pre-eminent historian and the author of The Power of Art, Landscape and Memory and Citizens, the story of the French Revolution. He's a Professor of History and Art History at Columbia University and is a well-recognised face on television from his many series like Civilisation and The History of Now. Well now he's written Foreign Bodies - Pandemics, Vaccines & The Health of Nations. Foreign Bodies is on the face it the stories of the bacteriologists and epidemiologists and other scientists who developed vaccines and saved the lives of millions, often in the face of considerable opposition and prejudice. But it merges that history with the now of Covid and the fear of what is coming next.
7/15/202327 minutes, 51 seconds
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Sarah McMullan: We should watch films in the cinema

The big movies of the year, Barbie, Oppenheimer, Mission Impossible are out now (or soon) and the BBC has teamed up with the Open University in the UK to advocate seeing these films in the cinema. The essential argument is that we are social creatures and it's far better for us to be with other people even if they are loudly scraping popcorn out of a box. It is good for the body and the soul. Sarah McMullan is familiar to the RNZ audience. She watches a lot of films and writes about some of them.
7/15/202315 minutes, 52 seconds
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Joanne Watson: Scone Etiquette

King Charles' former butler Grant Harold has revealed the proper way to drink tea, if you want affect a regal manner. When you stir your tea with a spoon, if that's necessary, you shouldn't move the spoon crudely around the cup clockwise or widdershins. What you do is use a "very gentle back and forward motion." A circular motion risks spillage and noise. Another major revelation from Grant is that scones should not be cut in half. You may employ the Cornish method, with the cream on top, or the Devonshire way, with jam on top, but you must never employ any method of laceration or piercing probe into the middle of the scone itself. Joanne Watson The Old Town Hall Tea Room in Urenui until October last year and she's a bit of a scone aficionado.
7/15/202315 minutes, 57 seconds
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Arthur Edwards: 45 Years as a Royal Photographer

Arthur Edwards MBE is now 82 years of age. He has been a photographer of the royal family for longer than anyone else, certainly in a mainstream media capacity and has worked all that time for The Sun newspaper. Arthur's was behind the lens for many of the photos that come to our minds when summoning up the big images - the formal poses of the Queen and the Duke, Prince Charles through the years, and Diana, that photo of her holding kindergarten children, the first ever taken of her before she was thrust into the limelight. And of course, Diana with her own children, and many in her unguarded moments of fun; latterly William and Kate of course, Harry & Meghan... thousands and thousands of photographs: at Sandringham, Buckingham Palace, Ascot, the ski slopes, the polo fields and wherever he could find a royal personage doing something that looked a bit interesting. Over 45 years he's become part of the royal furniture, although his non-threatening relationship with them all didn't begin amiably. His close relationship with the king was for a long time fraught. Arthur Edwards has published a book that's full of photos, as you'd expect. It's called BEHIND THE CROWN - MY LIFE PHOTOGRAPHING THE ROYAL FAMILY.
7/15/202322 minutes, 32 seconds
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Calling Home: KJ Gilmour in Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland

RNZ Nights listeners may have heard Marc Leishman talking to this year's World Porridge Making Champion on Tuesday. Turns out one of the competition judges is a New Zealander. KJ Gilmour is an award-winning chef from Temuka who now lives and works in Grantown-On Spey in the Cairngorms, Scotland.
7/15/202319 minutes, 8 seconds
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Mediawatch for 16 July 2023

Warnings of a 'mortgage bomb' about to blow up; Australia puts big tech' under more pressure; Mary Holm's 25 years with readers and writers.
7/15/202338 minutes, 16 seconds
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Professor Robin Dunbar: Conversation are better with four

If three's a crowd, it seems four is the ideal when it comes to conversation. Professor Robin Dunbar, an anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist at the University of Oxford has spent decades studying how humans socialise. He is known for "Dunbar's number", a reference to his theory that most of us are only able to sustain about 150 social connections, but his work has also explored how people act in smaller groups. He has found that when it comes to having an enjoyable chat, four is the sweet spot, in fact in groups of five or more, the chances of laughter plummets.
7/15/202322 minutes, 8 seconds
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Roxanne Prichard: When sleep eludes you

We've all experienced those nights at one time or another, when sleep just won't come. Lying awake worrying about things we often have no control over that can doubtless best wait until the light of day. Dr Roxanne Prichard is a Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology at the Center for College Sleep, University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Her research has found that after midnight our minds are less equipped to problem-solve and more prone to find problems. Roxanne takes us through the science that will help calm our mind and body.
7/15/202316 minutes, 4 seconds
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Emanuel Kalafatelis: New Zealanders feeling the pinch

We know that New Zealanders continue to feel the pain of the cost of living crisis. Back in March Research NZ polled on this, and now it has run the numbers again. Joining us is Research NZ managing partner Emanuel Kalafatelis.
7/15/20238 minutes, 40 seconds
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Karen Kasler: Update from the USA

Karen Kasler is the Statehouse News Bureau Chief for public radio and television in Ohio. She joins us with the latest news and views from The United States.
7/8/202316 minutes, 3 seconds
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Mary Jane Copps: Fixing our telephone hang-ups

A recent survey of UK office workers found 76% of millennials and 40% of baby boomers have anxious thoughts when their phone rings. 61% of millennials would like to completely avoid calls, compared with 42% of baby boomers. Telephone anxiety is a real thing, its technical name is telephonophobia. Physical symptoms include nausea, increase in heart rate, shortness of breath, dizziness, and muscular tension. This means phone-anxious people avoid conversations over the phone. Mary Jane Copps is The Phone Lady. She understands that many people don't know how to talk on the phone and is in high demand, teaching them how to do just that.
7/8/202323 minutes, 29 seconds
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Dr Marc Wilson: Psychology

Victoria University Professor of Psychology, Dr Marc Wilson is back to guide us though the psychology that's been making the headlines lately From Lotto Wins to loneliness and if your grip strength is indicative of anxiety or depression.
7/8/202317 minutes, 36 seconds
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Dr. Alan Blackman: Can science do the ironing?

Two pretty ubiquitous tasks in modern life haven't changed much with the advent of technology - ironing clothes and making a cup of tea. Are there ways to speed up these processes? An Australian cleaning expert has claimed that they have a simple hack which means you'll never have to iron again. Chemistry Professor Dr Allan Blackman from Auckland University of Technology s been experimenting in the lab. (Actually, his home!)
7/8/202310 minutes, 24 seconds
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Rosie Grant: Baking recipes from gravestone epitaphs

It's not often we highlight a Tiktok account on the Sunday Morning show, but this one's different. Rosie Grant is a university researcher based in Los Angeles who has a couple of hundred thousand followers on the platform. She makes and bakes recipes that she finds on gravestones in cemeteries and graveyards. Most of the recipes are by women and almost all of them are deserts and sweet treats. Rosie joins us to talk about how she got started and why she loves this particular form of remembrance.
7/8/202324 minutes, 36 seconds
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Calling Home: Meg Prendergast from all over Europe

Often our guests calling home have moved between countries, but this week we're talking to a New Zealander with no fixed abode. Meg Prendergast is a tour manager with Contiki Tours and travels all over Europe. She's currently in the United Kingdom.
7/8/202319 minutes, 12 seconds
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Mediawatch for 9 July 2023

100 days to go; unknown Luxon; Listener goes online and brings back NZ's longest lasting columnist; confusing news on the economy.
7/8/202330 minutes, 34 seconds
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Dr Craig Rodger: What to expect from Solar Maximum

Solar Maximum may be on its way sooner than we thought. The Sun is quickly approaching a major peak in solar activity, and some scientists think that peak could be early by as much as 2 years bringing the timeline towards the end of this year. One of the tell-tale signs is X-class solar flares being on the rise, and one of them has apparently already scored a direct hit on Earth and this past week another one caused a radio blackout for 30 minutes in the Pacific Ocean and the western United States, according to NASA. Otago University's Professor of Physics, Dr Craig Rodger joins us with the details.
7/8/202317 minutes, 12 seconds
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Professor Barbara Sahakian: Reading for pleasure,

The earlier that children start reading for enjoyment, the better it is for their verbal learning, memory, and speech development. A Cambridge University study has found a strong link between reading for pleasure at a young age and school performance later. They're also less stressed, they behave better, they spend less time on screens, and they sleep more soundly. The research used a large database of young people in the United States. One of the report's authors, neuropsychologist Dr Barbara Sahakian is a professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Cambridge.
7/8/202315 minutes, 23 seconds
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William Fajzel: A day in the life of the world

At McGill University's Earth System Dynamics Laboratory in Montreal, Canada, a team has found out how the average person spends each 24 hours.
7/1/202316 minutes, 48 seconds
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William Fajzel: A day in the life of the world

At McGill University's Earth System Dynamics Laboratory in Montreal, Canada, a team has found out how the average person spends each 24 hours. The researchers used a variety of methods including time surveys and labour force surveys conducted in countries like NZ to get an overview of our life experience, our societies and our personal wellbeing. William Fajzel was the lead author of this study.
7/1/202316 minutes, 48 seconds
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Martin Ford: The technology set to change our lives

We know we carry AI in our pockets every day, as people are fond of saying. Author Martin Ford says we're about to see the importance of an invention that's on a par with electricity in terms of its coming effects on our lives.
7/1/202331 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ashley Brown: Championing the cello

ABC Classic has run a poll of Australians to ascertain the nation's favourite classical instrument. The favourite classical instrument is the one that is said to be closest to the human voice, the cello. Ashley Brown is the cellist with NZ Trio.
7/1/20238 minutes, 20 seconds
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Robert Pagliarini: Sudden Wealth Syndrome

Robert Pagliarini is the president of Pacifica Wealth Advisors in California. He has a PhD in financial and retirement planning and specialises in helping clients cope with what he refers to as sudden wealth syndrome, and he wrote another book called the Sudden Wealth Solution.
7/1/202326 minutes, 32 seconds
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Calling Home: Brendan Lynch in The Dolomites, Italy

Brendan Lynch was born in Gore, but he grew up in Timaru. He now lives in a village in a beautiful valley in south Tyrol, up among the famous Dolomites.
7/1/202325 minutes, 32 seconds
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Avi Loeb: Underwater hunt for alien debris

In 2014, an interstellar object - thought to be from another star system - crashed into the Pacific Ocean near Papua New Guinea. Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb is now leading a sea-going search, hoping to pick up fragments of that object.
7/1/202316 minutes, 33 seconds
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Mediawatch for 2 July 2023

The shock of the news - and a critical shortage in the state of the arts; TVNZ top-table changes; reserving the right to be wrong - even in an emergency.
7/1/202332 minutes, 15 seconds
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Nigel Latta: The changing face of intergenerational wealth

New research shows when it comes time for New Zealanders to think about their legacy, money is not top of mind.
7/1/202318 minutes, 11 seconds
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Jack Watling: Putin after Prigozhin

Russia's government is moving to demonstrate it still has control over the country, following a brief mutiny by one of the country's most powerful military groups. Wagner Group leader Yevgeny Prigozhin flew to Belarus in exile on Tuesday (June 27), after his fighters protested of the Russian Military's handling of the Ukraine conflict. Ukraine hopes the chaos caused by the mutiny attempt will undermine Russian defences, as it presses a counteroffensive to recapture occupied territory. Dr Jack Watling is the senior research fellow for land warfare at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), the world's oldest and the UK's leading defence and security thinktank. Originally from New Zealand, he has spent periods of time since this war began on the ground with the armed forces in Ukraine, and has won international media awards for his analysis.
7/1/202325 minutes, 13 seconds
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Jesse Gaynor: Is the wellness industry under the weather?

The $7 trillion dollar wellness movement has encountered a backlash in recent times with many asking if the wellness craze is giving us a new lease on life or is it just an easy way to empty our wallets? Now there's a debut novel, a satire called THE GLOW. "A desperate young publicist tries to save her career by turning the charismatic leader of a grungy retreat center into the hot new self-care brand." The author is Jessie Gaynor, who writes for The New Yorker and the Wall Street Journal. Jessie joins us from Richmond, Virginia.
6/24/202314 minutes, 57 seconds
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Jeffrey Halley: Have we reached peak globalism?

Jeffrey Halley is Sunday Morning's man on the money. Jeffrey's a kiwi in Jakarta and Singapore who until recently was the Senior Market Analyst for Asia Pacific for the OANDA corporation, with his analysis is regularly sought by Bloomberg, the BBC, Reuters, CNBC, MSN and the New York Times. Jeffrey's been at a university in Wales for a while and is now back in Indonesia.
6/24/202313 minutes, 15 seconds
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Greg LeMond: The Last Rider

The Tour de France is one of the world's great sporting events and in the minds of most cycling journalists, the best-ever race of the Tour took place in 1989 when American Greg Lemond made one of the greatest comebacks in the history of sport, with dozen of shotgun pellets in his body and carrying a terrible secret in his heart. His winning margin in the end was 8 seconds, after racing more than 3,000 kilometres. He was 50 seconds behind as the last short sprint into Paris began. Against him were two recent former champions, Laurent Fignon and Pedro Delgado. That incredible race is now the subject of a new documentary The Last Rider , out in cinemas throughout NZ. Greg LeMond won the Tour three times and the World Road Race Championships twice and he joins us from Knoxville, Tennessee.
6/24/202332 minutes, 44 seconds
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Jo McCarroll: Are used coffee grounds in the garden a miracle

Our compost bins are full of coffee grounds, and some gardening experts not only advocate that, but also recommend sprinkling coffee grounds directly on the garden. But in the latest New Scientist they claim this is another myth saying used coffee grounds may be doing our plants more harm than good. NZ Gardener editor Jo McCarroll takes us through the pros and cons.
6/24/20237 minutes, 34 seconds
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Mediawatch for 25 June 2023

Surgery, equality and equity; starling survey results score easy exposure; independent local radio pioneer 1XX changes hands - but the mission remains the same.
6/24/202337 minutes, 14 seconds
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Dr David Beresford: How to avoid insect bites

Although our biting insects take a break in Winter, this week saw the shortest day of the year, so forgive us for looking ahead to the warm summer months. Are insects more likely to bite you when you're on the move, or when you're sitting down or standing still? Dr David Beresford, Professor of Biology at Trent University in Canada, has been looking into this very question.
6/24/202317 minutes, 3 seconds
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Frank Gardner, BBC Security correspondent on Wagner group rebellion

BBC's Frank Gardner talks to Jim about the implications of the short-lived mutinous march on Moscow by the Wagner mercenaries who've been engaged in some of the fiercest fighting of the war in Ukraine. Frank Gardner is the BBC's Security Correspondent and the author of best-selling books about his assignments.
6/24/202316 minutes, 31 seconds
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Coen Lammers: The largest inclusive event on the planet

The Special Olympics World Summer Games are currently taking place in the historic Olympiastadion in Berlin. The event hosts 7000 athletes from 200 countries, supported by 20,000 volunteers and an expected 300,000 spectators. The New Zealand delegation of 39 athletes with an intellectual disability have been competing here across 9 sports. Powerlifter Ryan Stewart from Dunedin was the first New Zealand athlete to claim a medal with bocce player, Aaron Campbell from Levin claiming New Zealand's first gold. Journalist Coen Lammers joins us with the latest.
6/24/202310 minutes, 22 seconds
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Watering plants myth debunked: 'If a plant needs water, water it'

The journal New Scientist has dispelled some old wisdom about the need to water your garden early in the morning before the day warms up. It says that's not necessary, and sometimes it's not a good idea - same with watering in the early evening. How can this long-agreed-on idea be wrong? Editor of NZ Gardener, Jo McCarroll joins us.
6/18/202315 minutes, 7 seconds
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Dr. Ali Hill: The Nutrition Edition

Dr Ali Hill join us for our regular nutrition chat. She makes sense of the headlines that claim will make us look better, feel better and live longer. Could what they call NR be a magic ingredient for our health? Or taurine? What about seaweed, or even a diet of just fast food?
6/17/202318 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ray Algar: Top athletes live longer

A study from the International Longevity Centre in the UK has found that if you compete at the Commonwealth Games, you'll live significantly longer, on average, than other people. On of the report's authors, health and fitness researcher, Ray Algar takes us though the findings.
6/17/202319 minutes, 23 seconds
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Calling Home: Mimi Todhunter in Venice

This Sunday, Mimi Todhunter is calling home from Venice.
6/17/202320 minutes, 41 seconds
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Mediawatch for 18 June 2023

Mediawatch looks at the response to the revelation of 'inappropriate editing' of online world news at RNZ - and asks two experts what may come out of the investigation into how it happened. Also: Mediawatch asks about claims that state-sponsored offshore disinformation campaigns could be undermining our media.
6/17/202343 minutes, 57 seconds
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Jack Watling: Ukraine Conflict update

Dr Jack Watling is joining us again on the situation in Ukraine as the battles resume with improved weather on the ground, and a long summer of warfare seeming to be in store.
6/17/202315 minutes, 32 seconds
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Georgina Griffiths: What to expect from El Nino

The Little Girl is going away, and the Little Boy has arrived.
6/10/20239 minutes, 45 seconds
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Susannah Stevens: What are the best times to exercise?

 There have been various studies about whether it's best to exercise early or late in the day. Now there's new research.
6/10/202327 minutes, 24 seconds
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Jacinta Parsons: How to love solitude

After recently separating from her partner, she discovered a new loneliness.
6/10/202324 minutes, 21 seconds
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Chanelle Moriah: This is ADHD

It's said that 15-20% of people, perhaps up to a quarter of the population, are in some category of neurodivergence.
6/10/202319 minutes, 36 seconds
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Calling Home: Lucy Balfour in Doha

Lucy Balfour was born and raised in Canterbury. She danced for 10 years with the Royal New Zealand Ballet before moving to London and joining the renowned dance company, Rambert in 2013.
6/10/202322 minutes, 22 seconds
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Mediawatch for 11 June 2023

How stories about the war in Ukraine ended up with a pro-Russian slant on RNZ's website; reports of crime are on the up but does the story change when reporters run the numbers before running a story?
6/10/202338 minutes, 56 seconds
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Michael Hurst talks with Jim Mora

Michael Hurst is one of our finest and most versatile actors, with a haul of awards for television and film both locally and internationally. He's directed more than 90 professional stage productions, and TV shows including Spartacus, West Side, My Life is Murder, 800 Words, The Brokenwood Mysteries and Power Rangers. Michael joins Jim Mora ahead of a spectacular Auckland Theatre Company production of King Lear, to mark its 30th anniversary. Playing the King, Michael is joined on stage by his wife Jennifer Ward-Lealand. Jim Mora talked to Michael ahead of the final rehearsals for the play, which opens this coming week.
6/10/202326 minutes, 7 seconds
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Lucien Johnson: A creative life

Internationally renowned composer and saxophonist Lucien Johnson joins us ahead of his co-created show with Hannah Tasker-Poland, The Most Naked, A Cabaret of Skin and Bone opening at Q Theatre in Auckland.
6/10/202317 minutes, 37 seconds
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Alan Gilmore: What's bugging Betelgeuse?

One of the brightest stars in the sky is behaving strangely, pulsating from bright to dim twice as quickly as usual. At the moment Betelgeuse is very bright in the night. What's going on? If anyone knows it'll be Alan Gilmore. Alan's one of our most distinguished astronomers; he once ran the Mt John Observatory and is still involved with the near-asteroid programme at Mt John with his wife, Pam.
6/3/202311 minutes, 52 seconds
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Andre Solo: Your sensitivity is your superpower.

Are you sensitive, maybe overly sensitive, you think? There's a new book for you, it's called 'Sensitive: The Hidden Power of the Highly Sensitive Person in a Loud, Fast, Too-Much World'. In a world where sensitivity is often regarded as a weakness, co-author of the book, Andrew Solo joins us to tell us what sensitivity actually is, and why it's a help and not a hindrance in getting through day-to-day living.
6/3/202325 minutes, 33 seconds
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Venice Harris: My latest track

At just 16 years of age, Tauranga's Venice Harris has already travelled the world starring in big stage musicals like Annie, Les Miserables and The Sound of Music. Her talent's taken her to Australia, the Philippines, Singapore and Japan. Many New Zealanders will have seen her in the lead role of Matilda which came to Auckland. She joins us to introduce her new track Tug of War.
6/3/202313 minutes, 25 seconds
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Zazie Todd: More cat chat

Animal behaviour expert Zazie Todd is back again. This time to talk cats. Zazie's the award-winning author of Wag: The Science of Making Your Dog Happy, and Purr: The Science of Making Your Cat Happy. She created a popular blog, Companion Animal Psychology, she co-hosts The Pawsitive Post in Conversation podcast, and she has a column at Psychology Today. She's also a certified dog trainer. Zazie Todd lives in British Columbia with her husband, one dog, and two cats.
6/3/202327 minutes, 56 seconds
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Jennifer Sutton: Visiting your heart in a museum

Imagine how it would be to visit a museum, and see your own heart in a display case. That's what's happened to Jennifer Sutton at the Hunterian Museum in London, 16 years after the heart she was born with was removed as she underwent transplant surgery.
6/3/202316 minutes, 47 seconds
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Mediawatch for 4 June 2023

Mediawatch talks to the radio industry's top spokesperson who called on commercial companies to curb their rivalry - and the brains behind a small music radio network spreading around the country - but without ads. Also: a controversial proposal to change the way our media content is regulated.
6/3/202333 minutes, 18 seconds
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Michelle Gomez: Ticking off her New Zealand bucket list

Michelle Gomez has appeared in innumerable British sitcoms and American dramas. In recent times she's been a baddie: as Missy, aka The Master, Dr Who's female nemesis, and Lilith in the hit show The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina. Michelle also played the angry Miranda Croft in HBO's The Flight Attendant. She's in Auckland as one of the stars of Wintergeddon at the Auckland showgrounds this coming weekend. It's the first big Armageddon event since Covid, with 70,000 fans expect through the doors to meet the celebs and celebrate the many fantasy, scifi and gaming universes that so many people immerse themselves in.
6/3/202321 minutes, 41 seconds
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Jackie Clarke: Divas and Legends

If there's one singer in New Zealand you might apply the phrase 'Prima diva' to, it would be Jackie Clarke. Having been in The Ladykillers and When The Cat's Been Spayed she was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to entertainment and named Top Female Artist by the Variety Artists Club of New Zealand. She's heading all over New Zealand on her new Prima Diva Tour.
6/3/202321 minutes
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Clementine Valentine: My Latest Track

Marking the last Sunday Morning of NZ Music Month 2023, art-pop duo Clementine Valentine join us to introduce their new single 'Endless Night'
5/27/20235 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ashley Ward: Making sense of our senses

How we see the world is not just what we see, or hear, or smell. Dr Ashley Ward is Professor of Animal Behaviour at the University of Sydney. He has studied creatures great and small on travels that have ranged from the Serengeti plains in Africa to the Antarctic Ocean.
5/27/202324 minutes, 33 seconds
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Faivaeselopepe Anric Sitanilei: Celebrating Samoan malofie in new documentary

In Tautua: Inked in Service, RNZ Social Media Journalist Faivaeselopepe Anric Sitanilei undergoes the transformative process of receiving the traditional Samoan malofie, also known as the tatau. A celebration of heritage, tradition, and dedication to family and community, the documentary unveils the evolving role of the tatau in a changing world, and its testament to Samoan heart and spirit.
5/27/202315 minutes, 27 seconds
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Scott Walker & Sir Richard Taylor: The creatures in The Tank

The trailer for our latest homegrown creature feature, The Tank racked up more than a million views in its first week of release in the U.S. It marks a return to NZ and to directing here by Scott Walker.
5/27/202326 minutes, 19 seconds
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Melody Thomas: The Good Sex Podcast

A new podcast aims to break down taboos around sex and relationships. The Good Sex Project launches today, and host Melody Thomas joins us.
5/27/202325 minutes, 35 seconds
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Calling Home: Ian Hickling in Barbados

Ian Hickling is calling home from Barbados, off the north-east coast of South America, our in the Caribbean Sea about 1000 kilometres from the coast of Venezuela. Those of who've not been to Barbados may think it's tiny, but in fact it's the size of greater Wellington if you add in the Hutt Valley and Porirua. Barbados is an independent British Commonwealth nation. Bridgetown, the capital, sees a lot of cruise ships, and tourists enjoy the brilliant beaches, and quite a lot besides.
5/27/202325 minutes, 19 seconds
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Mediawatch for 28 May 2023

Lessons for Loafers Lodge investigation in the long game of the UK's Grenfell saga; new fund backing business and economics coverage; an hour of Gower (and friends . . . and his issues).
5/27/202344 minutes, 35 seconds
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Kennedy Warne: Exploring humanity's relationship with the sea

Kennedy Warne, the founding editor of New Zealand Geographic connects his lifelong exploration of the underwater world with a global story of humanity's relationship with the sea in his new book Soundings.
5/27/202327 minutes, 51 seconds
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Josh Gerstein: DeSantis and the race for Republican hearts

The Governor of Florida, Ron DeSantis has launched his bid to be the next US president. What makes this move big news is of course his rivalry with Donald Trump for the hearts and votes of conservative Americans. We discuss his prospects with POLITICO'S Josh Gerstein.
5/27/202315 minutes, 38 seconds
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Michael Vercoe: My current song

David Curtis, a 13-year-old Wellington schoolboy in 1970 was the youngest singer ever to make the NZ Top 20 charts as they were then, and the record sold 170,000 copies on vinyl. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree then with our next guest. Michael Vercoe is David's son, and a musician. He joins us to share his third single call Vegas.
5/20/202315 minutes, 11 seconds
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Clive Fernandes: Kiwisaver Trends

We hear about the amount of money we'll need in retirement and for many people it seems like a long way from reality. The KiwiSaver advisory firm National Capital has released its first KiwiSaver Value for Money Report. Managing director Clive Fernandes joins us.
5/20/202316 minutes, 29 seconds
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Jarkko Okkonen: ‘Frost Quakes’ explained

We are the shaky isles, but at the opposite end of the world some places we don't think of as shaky are becoming more so. A town in northern Finland was hit this year by 26 frost quakes in 7 hours. That's a world record. They've just confirmed the data on this. So what are frost quakes? Jarkko Okkonen joins us from the Geological Society of Finland.
5/20/202311 minutes
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Clare Cock-Starkey: How much is a dollop?

When they say in recipes to add a dash of salt or a pinch of salt; how much is that, exactly? How about a dollop, a drizzle of olive oil, that's quite a common instruction, or a smidgeon? A smidgeon is actually a precise measurement. Many of these words are. Claire Cock-Starkey has made a name for herself writing books of curiosities: about hyphens and hashtags, how they regarded death in mediaeval England, and ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs. Two of her previous titles have been How to Skin a Lion and Penguins, Pineapples and Pangolins. The new title from Claire is 'The Curious History of Weights & Measures' published by Bodleian Library Publishing.
5/20/202322 minutes, 32 seconds
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Christall Lowe: Kai and family

The gathering of food and people to share a meal is at the heart of Award-winning food photographer Christall Lowe's family life. Her book KAI - Food stories and recipes from my family table, is a homage to life, food, flavours and memory. This week Christall's book won the Judith Binney Prize for illustrated non-fiction at the Ockham book awards
5/20/202323 minutes, 15 seconds
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Dr Grainne Cleary: A bird behaviouralist’s first visit to New Zealand

Regular listeners will remember Irish wildlife ecologist and bird behaviouralist Grainne Cleary who is usually based in Melbourne. Grainne has made it to Aotearoa for the Auckland Writers Festival and has had a chance to check our birdlife for the very first time - find out what she thinks.
5/20/202318 minutes, 31 seconds
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Mediawatch for 21 May 2023

Gore blimey - a little local political difficulty pulls national media focus; Politicians seeking platforms for political reveals.
5/20/202332 minutes, 23 seconds
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Calling Home: Tai Wynyard in Shanghai

Usually on Calling Home we talk to kiwis who've been living overseas for quite a while. We thought we'd change tack this week and get some first impressions of a radically different place to live. Basketball star Tai Wynyard, the youngest-ever Tall Black to step onto the court and play for his country, has taken his family to China, to play for the Shanghai Sharks.
5/20/202317 minutes, 40 seconds
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Does book banning have the opposite effect?

One woman who knows all about banned books, and the attention they inadvertently draw, is Dr Emma Smith, Professor of Shakespeare studies at Oxford University. She's the author of Portable Magic: A History of Books and Their Readers.
5/14/202324 minutes, 7 seconds