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Sunday Extra - Separate stories podcast

English, News magazine, 1 season, 892 episodes, 2 days, 2 hours, 12 minutes
About
Sunday Extra presents a lively mix of national and international affairs, analysis and investigation, as well as a lighter touch.
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
4/13/20241 minute, 58 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: David Elliott, 2006

Queensland sheep farmer David Elliott's dinosaur bones discoveries have  reinvigorated Australian palaeontology.
4/13/202421 minutes, 8 seconds
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New China university rankings change the game

Six universities in China have jumped into the top 10 rankings of world universities in terms of scientific impact, and it happened without those institutions changing what they do.
4/13/202413 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Analogue Field Guide

An antidote to your digital diet, Deyan Sudjic’s book The Analogue Field Guide takes the reader on a tour of forgotten treasures of the analogue world. Exploring how technological advances have shaped society and culture and why some beloved inventions stand the test of time.
4/13/202412 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Forgotten History of Western Australia's Cameleers

The State library of Western Australia next week launches its new exhibition uncovering the forgotten history of the cameleers in the state. Often referred to as 'the Afghan Cameleers', this incredibly diverse community, their stories and nationalities have at times been simplified into 'fake' stereotypes.
4/13/202412 minutes, 39 seconds
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Building virtual fortresses

Lithuania's Deputy Minister of National Defence, Greta Monika Tučkutė, was a keynote speaker at the tenth Cybertech Global Conference during the week, where she spoke about "Building Virtual Fortresses".
4/13/20249 minutes, 4 seconds
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Belarus continues mass arrests of dissidents

Since the start of the year, Belarusian security forces have arrested and detained hundreds of people for expressing opposition to the Lukashenko regime in various ways, including donations to help the 1400 political prisoners in jail, which include 171 women
4/13/202414 minutes, 48 seconds
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Tears, tea and bloodshed — can violent men ever change?

This week reporter and Dharawal woman Brooke Fryer goes inside a program that's helping violent men turn their lives around.
4/11/202439 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Mechelle Turvey, 2022

Recognised as WA’s Australian of the Year 2024, Mechelle Turvey represents a truly inspirational response to the cruellest of circumstances. Mechelle called for calm and unity in the wake of her 15-year-old son Cassius’ death, which stirred an outpouring of grief and anger from the indigenous community and beyond.  She now works with the police department in Perth to stamp out ‘robo-cop attitudes’ and to prevent other parents from ever experiencing what she’s been through.
4/6/202422 minutes, 2 seconds
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Lara Ricote's Little Tiny Wet Show

Multi-award-winner, legally deaf and master story-teller Lara Ricote brings her comedy show to the Melbourne festival
4/6/20247 minutes, 24 seconds
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Senate Inquiry Investigates Financial Abuse

Financial abuse is experienced by a striking 16% of Australian women and 7% of men. This kind of controlling and coercive behaviour often hides in the shadow of other types of domestic or family abuse  but can have devastating and long lasting impacts on victims lives. 
4/6/202410 minutes, 32 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
4/6/202449 seconds
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Are fasting diets good for you?

Data linking fasting diets to increased cardiovascular death have raised eyebrows across the research community and caught the attention of the media. But is this alarming research or simple an alarming headline? Clare Collins, laureate professor of nutrition and dietetics at the University of Newcastle, joins us to explore the research and the science behind intermittent fasting.
4/6/202412 minutes, 57 seconds
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Are non-compete clauses holding back the Australian economy?

No longer limited to highly-paid executives, non-compete provisions have recently affected a diverse array of workers including breakdancing instructors, carers, and boilermakers.
4/6/202411 minutes, 14 seconds
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Javier Milei: Argentina’s anarcho-capitalist

The president of Argentina has promised  to close the country’s central bank, replace the peso with the US dollar, and take a chainsaw to public spending by cutting tens of thousands of public service jobs.
4/6/202412 minutes, 27 seconds
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The security crisis for aid workers

The first 6 months of the war in Gaza has seen an unprecedented number of local aid workers killed
4/6/202410 minutes, 59 seconds
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Finding Jean Nassif

He left a trail of defect-riddled apartment buildings across Sydney and debts exceeding $600m to his creditors.
4/5/202434 minutes, 42 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
3/30/20241 minute, 22 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Reverend Jim Colville, 1973

Methodist minister Jim Colville set up Colony 47 in a vacant church, to provide for those in need who were shunned by the church
3/30/202420 minutes, 38 seconds
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The history behind the emergence of Tajik terrorists in Russia

Four men have been charged with terrorism by a Russian court, after allegedly attacking a Moscow Concert Hall, and killing 137 people.
3/30/202418 minutes, 30 seconds
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Should we be worried about Neurotechnology?

Elon Musk's Neuralink is in the headlines again as newly released footage shows quadriplegic participant using the device to play a game on online chess. But is the company as ahead of the curve as their marketing suggests? We check in on the Australian Neurotechnology scene.
3/30/202411 minutes, 7 seconds
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Regional galleries are hosting iconic art collections

The National Gallery of Australia has started sharing iconic pieces from its national collection, with regional art galleries.
3/30/202412 minutes, 46 seconds
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Marlena Fejzo's remarkable gene discovery

Geneticist Marlena Fejzo lost a baby due to extreme morning sickness during her pregnancy, so she set out to find the gene behind HG
3/30/202415 minutes, 1 second
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Senegal's president-elect, straight from prison

On 14 March, Bassirou Diomaye Faye was released after almost a year in prison - then on 24 March he was elected President of Senegal - the day before his 44th birthday.
3/30/202411 minutes, 16 seconds
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Dancing with Bulls

Ruby's barely a teenager, and already she's become a champion bull rider. She's also had eight concussions and multiple brain bleeds. Reporter Tynan King investigates how this extreme sport became her obsession — even as it threatens her life.
3/28/202434 minutes, 17 seconds
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Another Year that Made Me: Lucy Zelić, 2018

Inspiring individuals talk about a pivotal moment in their personal histories. This week, SBS football journalist Lucy Zelić.
3/23/202415 minutes, 40 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Ashley Kalagian Blunt, 2018.

Ashley Kalagian Blunt is a Canadian-Australian author who literally wrote the book on How to be Australian, as well as writing a crime fiction novel and a book about the Armenian genocide.
3/23/202421 minutes, 44 seconds
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Som Tamang's Himalayan dream

As a child growing up in rural Nepal, Som Tamang experienced poverty and child slavery. Today, as an adult he has provided the opportunity for other rural children in Nepal, especially girls, to go to school
3/23/202413 minutes, 44 seconds
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Tweet of the Week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
3/23/20241 minute, 37 seconds
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NT schools could become fully funded with new federal boost

The federal and Northern Territory governments have announced an extra $1 billion for public schools in the state.
3/23/202413 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ralph Heimans at the National Portrait Gallery

'Portraiture. Power. Influence.' is the title of Ralph Heimans' first major exhibition in his home country and it’s just opened at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra. The Australian painter reflects on his time captured the likeness and telling the stories of National treasures and international royalty alike. 
3/23/202415 minutes, 17 seconds
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Berlin’s techno culture has been recognised by UNESCO

Berlin's Techno Culture has just been added to UNESCO’s Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage
3/23/202410 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Amazon is facing a severe drought and record wildfires

The Amazon forests are drying out year by year and this year there's a record number of wildfires
3/23/202412 minutes
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The whistleblower who exposed Facebook

Frances Haugen exposed the fact that Facebook knew from its own internal research that it amplifies hate, misinformation and political unrest.
3/23/202416 minutes, 11 seconds
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04 Stop and Search | The Botched Backyard Operation

There are only two witnesses to Brad Balzan's final moments: the two officers who chased him into his backyard. But their accounts of what happened don't match up.
3/21/202426 minutes, 14 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
3/16/20241 minute, 19 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Holly Dean Johns, 2014

After 7 years in a Thai jail and another 5 years in a WA jail, Holly Deane Johns has turned her life around in a remarkable way.
3/16/202415 minutes
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Feminist Buzzkill: The abortion podcast fighting back

A "coven of hilarious badass feminists who use humor" to bring the conversation about women's reproductive rights into unexpected places.
3/16/202423 minutes, 55 seconds
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Resistance to antibiotics: how do we address it?

The UN WHO rates Antimicrobial Resistance — or AMR — as "one of the top global public health threats facing humanity".
3/16/202426 minutes, 55 seconds
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Why has the 1943 Bengal Famine been forgotten?

What happened, who it happened to, and the question of why there aren't more stories about it are addressed in a new BBC podcast.
3/16/202414 minutes, 58 seconds
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Leaked document from the Vietnamese government sparks human rights concerns

Should Australia be concerned about Directive 24? 
3/16/202411 minutes, 34 seconds
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Hundreds taken in mass abductions in Nigeria

More than 300 people, largely women and children are missing in northern Nigeria, after being abducted.
3/16/202411 minutes, 3 seconds
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03 Stop and Search | The Numbers Game

As the investigation into Bradley Balzan's death continues, serious questions are raised about how the country’s largest police force uses its search powers.
3/13/202434 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Sam Bailey, 1987

Sam Bailey, a then-19-year-old jackaroo, became a quadriplegic as a result of a car crash in the Northern Territory in 1987.
3/9/202421 minutes, 18 seconds
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Sri Lankan comedian jailed for joke about Buddhism returns to Sunday Extra

In September 2023, comedian Nathasha Edirisooriya received 39 days in jail for a joke about Buddhism at a gig.
3/9/202410 minutes
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New investigation into convicts sent to Tasmania

Tasmania was the destination for hundreds of people deported from mainland Australia as criminals in the country's convict era.
3/9/202411 minutes, 40 seconds
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Investigative journalism, live on stage

Die Redaktion is a unique collaboration between Vienna's  Volkstheatre and Austrian investigative start-up, Dossier
3/9/202413 minutes
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How Murgon State High School is revitalising the Wakka Wakka language

Fred Cobbo, Wakka Wakka Traditional Owner tells the story of the co-design process that brought the community closer together.
3/9/202412 minutes
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Using Robot Jellyfish to Explore our Oceans

Robotically enhanced jellyfish could be the answer to our unexplored oceans
3/9/202411 minutes
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Russia's war emigres

Around one million Russians left their country because of opposition to the war in Ukraine. How are they doing? 
3/9/202412 minutes
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Corruption allegations push Portugal to snap election

Portugal is holding its second election in two years, after the Prime Minister stepped down amid corruption allegations.
3/9/202412 minutes, 30 seconds
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Some news about Ockham's Razor and introducing Quick Smart

If you've been wondering where we've been – Ockham's Razor is going on hiatus for a little while.But don't worry, we've got your pod needs covered with Tegan Taylor's other excellent and informative shows, Quick Smart and What's That Rash?Find more episodes of Tegan's podcasts here:Quick SmartWhat's That Rash?Presenter:Tegan TaylorProducer:Tegan Taylor, Rose KerrSound engineer:Bethany Stewart
3/6/20240
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02 Stop and Search | Last Moments Before Gunshots

Brad Balzan is shot dead in his own backyard after a police encounter goes wrong. In episode two of Stop and Search, a new mini-series by Background Briefing, reporter Paul Farrell asks why was he running away, and why did the officers chase him down?
3/6/202427 minutes, 24 seconds
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ANOTHER The year that Made Me: Eddie Izzard, 1969

Inspiring individuals talk about a pivotal moment in their personal histories.
3/4/202413 minutes
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
3/2/20241 minute, 18 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Helen Elliott, 1969

Journalist and literary critic Helen Elliott has written a memoir about the years that made her, growing up in the suburbs of Melbourne.
3/2/202421 minutes, 21 seconds
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Matilda award for excellence in theatre performance

First Nations actor Chenoa Deemal has won a Matilda Award for 'Best Performance in a Leading Role’
3/2/202411 minutes, 12 seconds
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Copyright: the world's greatest money making machine

David Bellos and Alex Montagu take on the history and future of copyright in their new book 'Who Owns This Sentence?'.
3/2/202427 minutes, 18 seconds
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The man who wants scientists to dance their PhD

After Aussie researcher takes home the trophy this year, we speak to the founder of the Dance your PhD Competition. 
3/2/20249 minutes, 25 seconds
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Why aren't GP services Bulk-Billing anymore?

Australian's are paying more out of pocket than ever before to see a GP,  where did things go wrong? 
3/2/202412 minutes, 4 seconds
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Tomorrow Someone Will Arrest You

Julian speaks to Indian poet, writer and activist Meena Kandasamy
3/2/202412 minutes, 15 seconds
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Queensland court finds vaccine mandates unlawful

What precedent does the Queensland judgement set for other lawsuits, and for the imposition of future vaccine mandates?
3/2/202413 minutes, 28 seconds
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Stop and Search | 01 Where's Brad?

A 20-year-old is chased by four plain-clothes police officers into his western Sydney backyard.
2/29/202439 minutes, 15 seconds
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ANOTHER Year that Made Me: Fisayo Soyombo

Nigerian journalist Fisayo Soyombo is a 'seeker, digger & teller of hidden stories; a three-time winner of the Wole Soyinka Award for Investigative Reporting  
2/26/202412 minutes, 25 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
2/24/20241 minute, 30 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Philip Obaji, 2022

Nigerian journalist Philip Obaji’s fearless investigations shone a light on the crimes of Boko Haram and the Russian Wagner mercenaries in Africa
2/24/202422 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Philip Obaji, 2022

Nigerian journalist Philip Obaji’s fearless investigations shone a light on the crimes of Boko Haram and the Russian Wagner mercenaries in Africa
2/24/202422 minutes, 45 seconds
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TOTW

2/24/20241 minute, 46 seconds
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Minefields hinder Ukraine's economic resilience

Mines and unexploded ordnance have contaminated much of Ukraine's grain growing areas
2/24/202414 minutes, 30 seconds
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The changing role of public libraries

As a well known third place, libraries are having to handle an increasingly complex variety of patrons. This is a trend occurring across the country, but it’s presenting additional challenges for rural and regional libraries.
2/24/20249 minutes, 48 seconds
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Millions are stateless across the globe, says UN

Around the world there are 10 million stateless people. In 2014 the UN launched a campaign to end statelessness by 2024, so what has been done in the past 10 years?
2/24/202411 minutes, 48 seconds
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Dozens massacred in PNG as tribal violence errupts

Earlier this week a massacre in Papua New Guinea's Highland region resulting in the death of about 50 people — making it one of the largest massacres in the country's recent history.
2/24/202411 minutes, 48 seconds
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Egypt's dilemma in Gaza

As the war in Gaza continues, Egypt faces a dilemma over how to deal with the humanitarian disaster, and the pressure to accept Palestinians fleeing the fighting.
2/24/202411 minutes, 48 seconds
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Threats of boycott overshadow Iran's election

As Iran prepares for the first elections since the mass protests over the death in custody of Mahsa Amini, the majority of Iranians have indicated they intend to boycott the vote, according to a survey by the Gamaan Institute.
2/24/202413 minutes, 12 seconds
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What's the price of a freebirth?

There are women choosing to “freebirth” completely outside the medical system.
2/22/202437 minutes, 47 seconds
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ANOTHER The Year That Made Me: Andrew Haveron 2007

Here's another guest who chose 2007 for The Year That Made Me
2/17/202415 minutes, 37 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
2/17/20241 minute, 36 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Jo Farrell 2007

From apprentice carpenter to general manager, Jo Farrell has had to build her own path in the very blokey world of construction.So, in 2020 Jo set up ‘Build Like a Girl’ to help girls and women get an easier start in trades than she had.Guest: Jo Farrell, General Manager of Kane Constructions ACT, and the ACT’s Australian of the Year for 2024Producer: Margie Smithurst 
2/17/202425 minutes, 8 seconds
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Forbidden Stories takes up the work of arrested colleagues

Forbidden Stories is a network of journalists who pursue and publish the work of other journalists facing threats, prison, or murder
2/17/202418 minutes, 42 seconds
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If I was Prime Minister

Indigenous school students Aroha Parkinson and Reuben Simpson are this year's winners of the 'If I was Prime Minister' competition
2/17/202410 minutes, 14 seconds
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Does the world court have a gender bias?

Since the International Court of Justice was created in 1945, only five women have ever served on its judging bench
2/17/202411 minutes, 52 seconds
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An Irreverent History of Travel

Shahnaz Habib’s book 'Airplane Mode: An Irreverent History of Travel' is billed as a “witty personal and cultural history of travel from the perspective of a Third World-raised woman of color”.Guest: Shahnaz Habib, author
2/17/202410 minutes, 56 seconds
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A Whistleblower Protection Authority in Australia?

What do whistleblowing protection authorities look like overseas, and what can Australia learn from them?
2/17/202413 minutes
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Satellite tech is picking up landfill methane emissions

There are concerns that emissions from badly managed landfills could exacerbate climate change.
2/17/202413 minutes, 26 seconds
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Meet the AI insiders who say it’s time to ‘accelerate or die’

They have anonymous leaders, manifestos, and even a flag with a snake on it. 
2/15/202434 minutes, 56 seconds
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ANOTHER Year that Made Me: William Yang, 1977

The camera lens of William Yang captured one of the most pivotal cultural moments in Australian history while also breaking photography norms - the gay liberation movement in Sydney during the 1970s and 80s.
2/15/202420 minutes, 51 seconds
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ANOTHER Year That Made Me: Jenny Kee, 1977

Surviving Australia's biggest ever rail accident set this fashion designer on a creative journey she never expected to take.
2/15/202414 minutes, 14 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery callers occupy three distinct regions – the Western, Northern and Eastern Shrike-tits.
2/10/20241 minute, 18 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Lindy Lee 1977

Lindy Lee is one of Australia’s foremost contemporary artists. A painter and sculptor, her distinctive polished-steel and bronze spherical sculptures are prominent in public places around Australia.Coming from a Chinese family and growing up in Brisbane during the White Australia Policy, she has grappled with the idea of belonging throughout her art career. Guest: Lindy Lee, artist Producer: Margie Smithurst     
2/10/202423 minutes, 27 seconds
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Lunar New Year in Bendigo, Victoria

Bendigo in Victoria has been home to a wealth of Chinese heritage and culture since the gold rush in the 1850s. This year, the city brings out it's internationally historic 'Sun Loong' Chinese dragon to celebrate the year of the wood dragon.
2/10/202413 minutes, 2 seconds
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Bobi Wine: The People’s President

Ugandan opposition leader, activist and musician Bobi Wine lost a rigged election in 2021 against the 35 year regime of Yoweri Museveni. The documentary about that election campaign is nominated for an Oscar in 2024.
2/10/202419 minutes, 47 seconds
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Naming Zoozve

The host of the RadioLab podcast, Latif Nasser came across a ‘moon’ of the plant Venus named 2002VE on his child’s bedroom wall chart. He tells the story of how after a huge effort by himself, his podcast team and a group of others, it was officially named Zoozve by the International Astronomical Union.Guest: Latif Nasser, RadioLab podcast host 
2/10/202414 minutes, 13 seconds
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Home2Health one of the only organisations tracking homelessness deaths

2/10/202412 minutes, 38 seconds
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Is this hostage diplomacy?

Is the sentencing of Chinese Australian pro-democracy advocate Yang Hengjun another example of ‘hostage diplomacy’?
2/10/202413 minutes, 30 seconds
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What Senegal's delayed election says about Africa's next generation of politicians

Amidst a flood of 'constitutional coups' within the African continent, a new generation of politicians are emerging who are interested in restoring the rule of law.
2/10/202411 minutes, 12 seconds
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'They use us': The Balinese villagers taking on Russian-backed developers

‘Cities’ are popping up across Bali’s spiritual heartland. Can villagers from Ubud hold back a tsunami of foreign money and preserve the island's culture?
2/8/202432 minutes, 48 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
2/3/20242 minutes
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The Year That Made Me: Bonnie Hancock 2022

Our guest Bonnie Hancock decided during Covid that she wanted to circumnavigate mainland Australia on an ocean surf ski and beat the current world record. That decision, with the logistical, physical and environmental challenges it involved, would push the professional athlete to her limits.It was a remarkable journey of perseverance and determination, now told in her new book ‘The Girl Who Touched The Stars’. Guest: Bonnie Hancock, athlete and author.
2/3/202423 minutes, 11 seconds
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Forest City

Malaysia's Chinese-built 'Forest City' remains almost uninhabited
2/3/20249 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Australian Public Service is drowning in data and faces a record keeping crisis

A deluge of digital records is creating a record keeping crisis for the public service
2/3/202421 minutes, 17 seconds
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The CIA's creative writing group

Johannes Lichtman was invited to lead a creative writing group... at the CIA.
2/3/202412 minutes, 30 seconds
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Young men and women reportedly becoming ideologically seperated

Financial Times data journalist John Burn-Murdoch is reporting that a large ideological divide is opening up between men and women of Generation Z.
2/3/202414 minutes, 10 seconds
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Young men and women reportedly becoming ideologically separated

Financial Times data journalist John Burn-Murdoch is reporting that a large ideological divide is opening up between men and women of Generation Z.
2/3/202414 minutes, 10 seconds
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Second Global Forum on the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence

Slovenia is hosting the 2nd Global Forum on the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence. It's considered one of the only truly global discussions on the topic.
2/3/202412 minutes, 18 seconds
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Pakistan's looming election: The rise and fall of Imran Khan

Pakistan, a muslim-majority country of 241 million people, heads to the polls on the 8th of February.
2/3/202412 minutes, 17 seconds
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Background Briefing presents... Global Roaming

Background Briefing returns to your pod feeds next week.
2/1/20242 minutes, 32 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller is a familiar sight in all states and territories – the Galah.
1/27/20241 minute, 20 seconds
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Three young Australian achievers

Three young Australians of the Year talk about their work and their motivations
1/27/202429 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Dr Graham Grant 1960

Dr Graham Grant began his career as an engineer of medical equipment and went on to study medicine, but continued inventing medical devices. One of the earliest of his many  inventions was a portable incubator for premature babies, which saved them from dying in freezing winter temperatures during transportation to hospitals in the UK. He has received an Order of Australia in this year’s Australia Day Honours for his contributions to biomedical engineering and medicine.  Now 90, he still plays jazz piano.Guest: Dr Graham Grant, anaesthetist, engineer and inventor. Producer: Margie Smithurst
1/27/202421 minutes, 31 seconds
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The "drunken truth" about Iran

Masty o Rasty (The Drunken Truth) is a Persian podcast created by Iranian émigré Raam Emami, which explores everything from psychedelics and depression to sex and identity in Iran.Guest: Raam Emami, podcaster 
1/27/202418 minutes, 37 seconds
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How should we regulate commercial space missions?

On January 8th, 2024 a space mission launched headed for the moon. It held 66 'capsules' of personal mementos people had paid to send on the mission, including human ashes.
1/27/20248 minutes, 40 seconds
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Using AI to create synthetic memories

AI is being used to recreate lost memories
1/27/202418 minutes, 11 seconds
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Roger Stone: Storm maker

Documentary maker reflects on right win stirrer and Trump ally, Roger Stone  
1/27/202413 minutes
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Finland's new president will have to deal with belligerent neighbour Russia

The outgoing Finnish president, Sauli Niinistö, is wrapping up his 12 years in office, unable to run for a third term.
1/27/202414 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: David McBride

Former military lawyer David McBride sought whistleblower protection after leaking defence documents, in relation to the conduct of some Australian service personnel in Afghanistan.
12/16/202321 minutes, 2 seconds
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Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World

Described as an “ultramodern multi-media theatre piece”, Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World received rave reviews in the UK and the US and is coming to Australia for the Sydney Festival in January 2024.
12/16/202323 minutes, 39 seconds
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'Bobi Wine: The People's President'

An award-winning documentary follows the perilous political campaign of Ugandan presidential hopeful Robert Kyagulanyi, popularly known Bobi Wine."Bobi Wine: The People's President" was the recent winner of Best Feature at the 2023 International Documentary Association Awards.The film depicts the transformation of Bobi Wine from music star into politician, member of Parliament, presidential candidate, and victim of political repression.Guest:  Moses Bwayo, journalist and filmmaker 
12/16/202319 minutes, 56 seconds
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Satellites, citizen science and space

What role could you play in the fight against space junk?This week, Mars shares her thoughts on the role of citizen science in space research.
12/16/202311 minutes, 33 seconds
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We need to be creative and courageous to address the AI challenge

The former President of Latvia is in Australia for a series of public talks, on the challenges of regulating AI.
12/16/202317 minutes, 39 seconds
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Summer Season: The Whistleblower who helped catch a paedophile politican

After an electoral officer helped police arrest a popular state minister, her life began to unravel.
12/14/202331 minutes, 35 seconds
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An aspiring doctor from the 'burbs takes on medical schools for elitism | Summer Season

From humble beginnings, Fahad faced hurdles entering medical school. Now, he fights for equal access to medical education. Marty Smiley reports.
12/14/202330 minutes, 53 seconds
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Summer Season: The whistleblower who exposed Australia’s secretive offshore detention system

"Simone" arrived on a remote island to help asylum seekers. But she witnessed something there that convinced her to leak over 2000 documents. Reporters Paul Farrell and Maddison Conaughton investigate what happened.
12/14/202335 minutes, 6 seconds
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How the system failed to save Darcey and Chloe | 02 | Summer Season

When two infants die after being left inside a hot car, their family seek answers to how this could have happened. Reporter Alexandra Blucher tracks down a child safety officer involved in their case, and hears why she believes the girls' deaths could have been prevented.
12/14/202332 minutes, 16 seconds
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How the system failed to save Darcey and Chloe | 01 | Summer Season

Queensland authorities failed to heed multiple serious warnings that a young pair of sisters were in danger, before it was too late. Their grieving family is now desperate to understand why. Reporter Alexandra Blucher investigates.
12/14/202338 minutes, 57 seconds
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False Witness | Summer Season

Reporter Heidi Davoren provides an extraordinary insight into a parenting dispute, where a mother and father come together after a Family Court psychologist harmed their family.
12/14/202336 minutes
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Remy was 12 when she became a drug dealer | Summer Season

As a teenager, Remy learnt to survive by hustling on the streets of Parramatta. Then she hit the bigtime. Reporter Mahmood Fazal investigates what life is like on the other side of the war on drugs.
12/14/202336 minutes, 34 seconds
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Prisoner of the State | Summer Season

In a nursing home lives an elderly man who is being held against his will. We can’t tell you his name. We can’t tell you his age. We can’t even use his real voice, or the voice of anyone involved in his case. Reporter Anne Connolly investigates what happens when the state rules you're incapable of looking after yourself.
12/14/202342 minutes, 21 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
12/9/20231 minute, 11 seconds
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This media start-up is now a must read for news on the war in Ukraine

The Kyiv Independent was established three months before Russia’s invasion and is now one of the most trusted sources of news on the war in Ukraine
12/9/202325 minutes, 49 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Gary Mason

Gary Mason grew up in 1960s Belfast at the beginning of "the Troubles"; three decades of bloody sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland. But what can a life lived at the heart of conflict teach someone about building peace?
12/9/202322 minutes, 27 seconds
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What should rewilding look like in Australia?

Scientists have lots of different ideas about how to conserve our native species. One of these ways is rewilding. 
12/9/202311 minutes, 10 seconds
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Tasmania's overlooked Aboriginal objects

Tens of thousands of Aboriginal objects exist in museum collections overseas.Palawa woman Professor Gaye Sculthorpe located a wrongly labelled Tasmanian Aboriginal water carrier in a Paris museum while researching her family's history. Her research,  whilst working on Tasmanian Aboriginal collections in the United Kingdom and France, also looks at other misidentified or improperly labelled object, and is the subject of  the 2023 Eldershaw Memorial LectureGuest: Professor Gaye Sculthorpe, Deakin University. 
12/9/202311 minutes, 50 seconds
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Aussie TV in 2023

Each year Mitch McTaggart produces a snack-sized compilation of the year on Australian television, The Last Year of Television, which streams on New Year’s Eve on Binge. 2023 is his fifth year of reviewing Australian TV, so expect highlights of the good, the bad and the cringeworthy. Guest: Mitch McTaggart
12/9/202314 minutes, 18 seconds
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Australia's forgotten diplomat: William Roy Hodgson

A war veteran who was once shot (and reported dead) at Gallipoli, William Roy Hodgson would go on to play a key role in drafting one of the United Nation's most historic documents. But his unvarnished approach to diplomacy would see much of that legacy forgotten.
12/9/202312 minutes, 35 seconds
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A one-man consulate and a mysterious list: How to get out of Gaza

Father-of-three Ayman Dhlan started a WhatsApp group to help Australians and their families get out of war-torn Gaza. Now he can barely put his phone down.
12/7/202331 minutes, 21 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
12/2/20231 minute
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The Year That Made Me: Gavin Yuan Gao

Award-winning poet Gavin Yuan Gao lost their beloved mother at five years of age. Through writing, Gavin found a way to maintain a connection to her. 
12/2/202322 minutes, 2 seconds
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Wine fraud through the ages

Think you can tell whether that expensive wine you’re drinking is fake? Or if the vintage wine you’ve bought at auction is the real thing?Wine fraud is as old as wine itself, says Master of Wine and author Rebecca Gibb, whose new book Vintage Crime: A Short History of Wine Fraud charts key episodes in history, including the glut of fake champagne that led to the Champagne riots in 1911, and the fake Burgundy concoctions of notorious wine fraudster, Rudy Kurniawan.  Guest: Rebecca Gibb, author of Vintage Crime: A Short History of Wine Fraud
12/2/202313 minutes, 31 seconds
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If DNA is the sheet music, epigenetics is the conductor

Razia Zakarya is an epigeneticist. But what does an epigeneticist do exactly? Razia is here to explain! Today, why DNA and epigenetics is important for chronic disease research.
12/2/202311 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Last Yakuza

American Jake Adelstein, whose book Tokyo Vice detailed his time as a crime reporter on the Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun and was the basis of the TV series of the same name, has spent his career dealing with the infamous yakuza of Japan.His latest book is a history (of sorts) of the organised crime groups --The Last Yakuza: Life and Death in the Japanese Underworld. Guest: Jake Adelstein, writer
12/2/202314 minutes, 37 seconds
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Georgia's European Dream

Russia continues to cast its shadow over Georgia's hopes to join the EU and NATO.
12/2/202311 minutes, 45 seconds
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Yirrkala Bark Petition repatriation

The ‘missing’ Yirrkala Bark Petition – one of four sent by the Yolngu people of Northeast Arnhem Land to the Commonwealth Parliament in 1963 – will be repatriated to country in a community ceremony on December 7.  Typed on paper and framed by traditional bark paintings, the petitions called for consultation with the local Yolngu clans before any mining proceeded.Guest: Clare Wright,  Professor of History and Public Engagement at La Trobe University
12/2/202312 minutes, 51 seconds
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Hitler, Stalin and Shirley Temple lived in the Australian outback

It might surprise you to learn that the names of pop stars and fascist dictators have been passed down to generations of Indigenous Australians. Reporter Erin Parke heads to the remote Kimberley to meet a man named Bing Crosby, and find out how it happened.
11/30/202340 minutes, 7 seconds
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Background Briefing Presents: Conviction by RNZ

There's a gripping new series by our friends across the ditch at RNZ.
11/26/20232 minutes, 1 second
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller hunts insects in Australia's southern forests – the Scarlet Robin.
11/25/20231 minute, 7 seconds
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Maple Glider: I Get Into Trouble

The Melbourne singer's second album is a deeply personal account of the lasting impact of a fundamentalist religious upbringing, and her effort as an adult to make sense of it.
11/25/20239 minutes, 55 seconds
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The UN could soon play a larger role in tackling tax evasion

Developing nations have secured a bigger international tax compliance role for the UN in a 'historic' vote at the UN General Assembly, which voted overwhelmingly in support of a resolution tabled by African member states. The prospect of a new UN convention threatens the OECD’s ability to set the global tax agenda. 
11/25/202311 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Rodney Fox

Almost sixty years after his life threatening encounter with a great white shark off Aldinga Beach in South Australia, shark conservationist Rodney Fox reflects on the day that changed "everything that came afterwards"
11/25/202321 minutes, 47 seconds
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Making science fun isn't oversimplifying it

Science doesn't have to be restricted to old white men in lab coats. Maddie reckons it's time to make science fun! Without losing it's important messages.
11/25/202311 minutes, 38 seconds
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History’s lessons for the present

Frank van Vree is the new Cleveringa Professor at Leiden University in Holland. The position is named after Rudolph Cleveringa, who became famous after a speech denouncing the invading Nazis' measures to remove all Jewish academics from their posts.In van Vree’s inaugural Cleveringa Lecture, he will talk about the tensions between learning from the past and remembering the past.Guest: Frank van Vree, Emeritus Professor of War, Conflict and Memory Studies at the University of Amsterdam, and the new Cleveringa Professor at Leiden University
11/25/202312 minutes, 12 seconds
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Medicine for the most neglected

“The best science for the most neglected” is a phrase that defines the mission of international non-profit medical research organisation DNDi - the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, which is marking the twentieth anniversary of its founding this week.After Médecins Sans Frontières won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999, it pledged the approximately $1 million USD in prize money to setting up a Neglected Diseases Fund.  Guest: Dr Luis Pizarro, Executive Director of DNDi
11/25/202316 minutes, 39 seconds
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How China wields influence beyond its borders

Award winning investigative journalist Bethany Allen reveals how China has used its economic weight to coerce nations, corporations and multilateral bodies to play by its rules. From punitive sanctions, to covert intelligence gathering, and suppression of dissent, Allen describes how China has sought to expand its influence.
11/25/202314 minutes, 11 seconds
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An aspiring doctor from the 'burbs takes on medical schools for elitism

You might think that all students stand equal at the doorstep of Australia’s universities.
11/23/202330 minutes, 52 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter is heard across the south and east of the country – the Fan-tailed Cuckoo.
11/18/202345 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Amy Sayer

After a promising start to her career was impacted by injury and selection heartbreak, Amy Sayer took a less-trodden path for a professional footballer, enrolling at Stanford University and discovering a love of philosophy.
11/18/202322 minutes, 44 seconds
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A history of transgender in Australia

Transgender Australia: A History Since 1910 is the first book that charts the history of transgender people in Australia from the Twentieth Century onwards.Julian speaks to the author, a cis-gender man, and an older transgender activist, who has seen the language of trans definitions change over time.Guests: Prof Noah Riseman, author of Transgender Australia: A History Since 1910Jenny Scott, transgender activist
11/18/202314 minutes, 23 seconds
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Examining the labels we put on science

First Nations people were the first scientists in Australia. But they don't just stay in the past tense – they're still here, and still actively contributing to science.Today's speaker Maggie Walter is Palawa and she's here to talk about how we think about First Nations science.
11/18/202311 minutes, 46 seconds
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100 years of radio in Australia

100 years ago, on November 23rd, 1923 Sydney radio station 2SB (now ABC Radio Sydney) was the first licensed station to broadcast over the airwaves. It was the beginning of a new era of news and entertainment in the home, transforming Australian cultural life.  Guest: Bruce Carty, former broadcaster, historian and author of “Australian Radio History” 
11/18/202310 minutes, 16 seconds
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The future of forced migration

The global statistics on forced migration are stark. At the end of 2022, 108 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution and conflict -- an increase of 19 million on the year before.Aarathi Krishnan discusses the future of forced migration and what the impending catalysts are ahead of her keynote to the Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law conference.Guest: Aarathi Krishnan, Senior Advisor for Strategic Foresight for UNDP
11/18/202311 minutes, 41 seconds
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The "godfather" of microplastics on how to stop them

Marine biologist Professor Richard Thompson was the first to identify microplastics on an Isle of Man beach 30 years ago. This week, he’s been at the UN Environment Programme headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, where delegates from around the world are working towards an international treaty on plastic pollution. But are policymakers listening to the scientists?Guest: Richard Thompson, Professor of Marine Biology at the University of Plymouth
11/18/202316 minutes, 53 seconds
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How an ADHD diagnosis was the start of Natalia’s life unravelling

Natalia had a job at a prestigious university, $120,000 in the bank, a loving partner, and shared custody of her two sons.Then one day, a little over a year later, she woke up in a psychiatric hospital, where doctors told her she was experiencing what’s known as stimulant-induced psychosis.
11/16/202338 minutes, 19 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller picks at grass seeds in the north of Australia – the Long-tailed Finch.
11/11/20231 minute, 10 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Mark and Judy Evans

In 1993 Mark and Judy Evans bought a dilapidated theme park in northern Queensland, and over the past thirty years they’ve re-made it into one of the state’s most unique tourist attractions. It’s a story of devotion to the project, and devotion to the vision of the man who first built Paranella Park in the 1930’s, Spanish immigrant, Jose Paranella.
11/11/202318 minutes, 2 seconds
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Stoneyard Devotional by Charlotte Wood

The celebrated author on what a cancer diagnosis taught her about life and art.
11/11/202314 minutes, 44 seconds
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Imagine you're a snowflake...

Today's speaker Chelsea explores the extreme cold in Antarctica to bring home something important... Ice cores!  These ice cores can be used to uncover clues about Australia's past. 
11/11/202311 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ukrainian rock band's cultural diplomacy

The Ukrainian rock band Antytila is in Australia as part of a global tour, showcasing their music and gathering support for Ukraine’s ongoing war with Russia. The band has taken time out from serving in the Ukrainian territorial defence force to engage in some cultural diplomacy. Guest: Taras Topolia, band member 
11/11/202311 minutes, 42 seconds
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War crimes whistleblower trial to start

The criminal trial of Afghan war crimes whistleblower David McBride begins in Canberra this week. The former army lawyer who leaked classified information to the ABC that revealed allegations of war crimes by special forces in Afghanistan, faces a life sentence if found guilty. Guest: Kieren Pender, senior lawyer at the Human Rights Law Centre’s Whistleblower Project
11/11/202313 minutes, 14 seconds
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The whistleblowers who stared down threats from Australia's biggest bank

How the Commonwealth Bank tried to stop a royal commission by using dirt files, intimidation, threats and surveillance against whistleblowers and journalists.
11/9/202338 minutes, 4 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
11/4/20231 minute, 39 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery callers were sent in by our wonderful listeners – listen in to guess each one.
11/4/20231 minute, 22 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Bryan Brown

For much of the past 50 years Bryan Brown has starred in a wide range of Australian and international films - titles like The Thorn Birds , A Town Like Alice, Breaker Morant (1980), Cocktail (1988), Gorillas in the Mist (1988) to name just a few. More recently he has added author to his list of accomplishments. His first book, Sweet Jimmy - a collection of short stories - was shortlisted for Best Debut Crime Fiction, Ned Kelly Awards last year. And in 2023 Bryan Brown is releasing his first novel, The Drowning … also in the crime genre
11/4/202322 minutes, 6 seconds
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The last woman in Europe: A retelling of 1984

Julia is a retelling of the dystopian classic1984 from the point of view of Julia, the lover of George Orwell's protagonist, Winston Smith.
11/4/202319 minutes, 14 seconds
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What radio and space research have in common

Today's speaker works with radio of a slightly different sort – radio astronomy! Dr Laura Driessen explains what radio is… and isn't.
11/4/202310 minutes, 53 seconds
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Solomon Islands' offers a first Bachelor of Science degree

Solomon Islands National University is offering the country’s first bachelor of science degree
11/4/202310 minutes, 27 seconds
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Telegram: combatants app of choice

Telegram’s minimal moderation enables extreme content and ideas to be more widely disseminated.
11/4/202316 minutes, 4 seconds
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NSW police stop the practice of suspect targeting

NSW Police will discontinue a policing program that targets people, including children, who police predict may commit crimes
11/4/202313 minutes, 58 seconds
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The whistleblower who believed his employer was covering up an oil spill

Three dead dolphins turn up in an oil spill.
11/2/202333 minutes, 11 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter climbs straight up tree trunks in search of food – the Brown Treecreeper.
10/28/20231 minute, 10 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Akuch Kuol Anyieth

Akuch Kuol Anyieth is working to free her community from the traumas of their past
10/28/202319 minutes, 53 seconds
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'The Deadly Rise of Anti-Science'

A prominent American scientist warns of "anti-science aggression" that he says threatens both individual lives and our collective future. 
10/28/202317 minutes, 52 seconds
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Wombat science

A citizen science project is working to protect the common wombat from various threats, including cats, cars and a skin disease known as sarcoptic mange.
10/28/20238 minutes, 39 seconds
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Big conservation in small spaces

As cities grow, nature becomes more and more fragmented.  So how can we protect native species without big areas to conserve? Brendan Wintle says we need look into smaller places, like your own backyard or the bushland down the street.
10/28/202311 minutes, 14 seconds
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NSW Police are not closing the gap

A new report says the NSW Police is failing to honour its obligation to reduce Aboriginal over-representation in the criminal justice system   
10/28/202312 minutes, 21 seconds
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Can Big Tech stop the live streaming of terrorism?

-When Hamas militants attacked Israel on October 7, many filmed their atrocities with some live streamed on a social media platform. The live streaming of extremist violence is a problem the social media platforms have struggled to counter, and Hamas has further threaten to broadcast the execution of Israeli hostages. So what is being done to try to prevent the live broadcast of terrorist acts?
10/28/202318 minutes, 27 seconds
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The whistleblower who exposed Australia’s secretive offshore detention system

"Simone" arrived on a remote island to help asylum seekers.
10/26/202335 minutes, 43 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
10/21/20231 minute, 22 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: David Marr

One of Australia’s greatest biographers has turned his spotlight onto his own family and discovered some dark and difficult secrets. Marr’s great-great-grandfather was a professional killer of Aboriginals in the Native Police, and he chronicles that and the broader picture of an earlier, brutal Australia in his latest book Killing for Country: A Family Story. Marr joins us to talk about writing the book, but also about his life and how he became such a forensic, unflinching biographer. Guest: David Marr, writer, essayist
10/21/202329 minutes, 25 seconds
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Proportionality in war is a contested notion

What is a proportionate response in war? It's a complex and highly contested concept
10/21/202323 minutes, 12 seconds
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The giant urine battery, and other art-science fusions

Guess what happens when art and science collide?
10/21/202311 minutes, 27 seconds
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Champions in the science classroom

Judith Stutchbury and Donna Buckley won the 2023 Prime Minister's Awards for Science Teaching
10/21/202312 minutes, 6 seconds
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Preserving trust at a time of war

A unique Israeli-Palestinian collaboration is under threat in the latest conflict
10/21/202312 minutes, 6 seconds
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Former Labor leader Bill Hayden has died

The former Labor leader and Governor General, Bill Hayden has died at the age of 90. His Labor colleague and former fellow cabinet minister Kim Beazley, reflects on the life and political career of the man who establish universal health care in Australia.  
10/21/202312 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Whistleblower who brought down Australia's Dr Death

When patients start unexpectedly dying at a regional hospital, nurse Toni Hoffman takes a big risk to blow the whistle on a negligent surgeon.
10/19/202338 minutes, 38 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller appears to be extending its range down the east coast – the Tawny Grassbird.
10/14/20231 minute, 45 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Shivshankar Menon, 1976

Shivshankar Menon continued a long and distinguished family tradition of foreign service for India
10/14/202319 minutes, 55 seconds
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Marine Plants of Australia

Seaweeds are the odorous, often-overlooked cousins of terrestrial plants. But do they deserve greater appreciation?
10/14/202311 minutes, 33 seconds
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The ancient story of Prometheus still has lessons today

Fire has been fundamental for human development - but have you ever stopped to think about how it might be causing us harm?  Fay Johnston wants us to rethink our relationship with fire, through a retelling of a story.
10/14/202311 minutes, 25 seconds
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Letters to Young Radicals

In an era of extremes when moderation seems an increasingly remote concept, and balance even more rarely practised, Professor Aurelian Craiutu has tripled down on moderation in a new book called Why Not Moderation? Letters to Young Radicals. It aims to present moderation as both a “radical virtue” and, interestingly, “a fighting creed.” Guest: Aurelian Craiutu, Professor of Political Science at Indiana University
10/14/202320 minutes, 22 seconds
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Why did the majority of Australians vote No?

Australians have voted overwhelmingly to reject an Indigenous Voice to Parliament.  Professor Matt Qvortrup has been described by the BBC as “the world’s leading expert on referendums”, so what does he think the factors are behind this result? Guest: Matt Qvortrup, Visiting Professor of constitutional law at the ANU College of Law.
10/14/20237 minutes, 8 seconds
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After the Voice vote, what happens next?

After the Referendum for a Voice to Parliament, what should happen next?
10/14/202314 minutes, 13 seconds
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70 years after Emu Field

70 years after the first mainland nuclear test on Australian soil, the descendants of Indigenous people wounded are fighting for an end to nuclear weapons. 
10/14/202313 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Whistleblower who captured the nation — and the man who unmasked her as a fraud

Kathy Jackson was once heralded as a revolutionary who shone a bright spotlight on union corruption but she too was later found to be a fraudster who had misappropriated hundreds of thousands of dollars in union members' money. So who was the man responsible for blowing the whistle on her?  Reporter Annika Blau investigates.
10/12/202329 minutes
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
10/7/20231 minute, 59 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Elizabeth Evatt

Elizabeth Evatt is a towering figure of the Australian legal profession. Her distinguished and trailblazing career has been marked by a series of firsts – among them her appointment as the first Chief Justice of the Family Court, a position she held for 12 years. Elizabeth’s career has also been devoted to law reform, the rights of women, and international human rights advocacy.  Guest: Elizabeth Evatt, AC
10/7/202323 minutes, 4 seconds
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AI, copyright and the uncertain future of human creativity

The stunning advance of generative AI technology appears to present an existential threat to human authors. Can the law protect them?
10/7/202319 minutes, 17 seconds
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Yeast: a manufacturing powerhouse

Bread... Beer... Bioengineering? Yeast really can do it all. Today's speaker Jason Whitfield wants us to consider what our world could look like with emerging bioengineering tech. 
10/7/202311 minutes, 29 seconds
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The unsung heroes who created the Oxford English Dictionary

A new book traces the lives of thousands of contributors who helped create the Oxford English Dictionary  
10/7/202312 minutes, 10 seconds
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New Zealand goes to the polls

New Zealanders will vote in their national elections next Saturday and the incumbent Labour government is predicted to lose to a conservative coalition, with minor parties are expected to take a significant proportion of votes from Labour and the Nationals. The NZ vote will occur on the same day as the referendum in Australia for an Indigenous Voice to parliament, and there are some parallels when it comes to political sentiment around indigenous/race issues. Guest: Luke Malpass, Political Editor, Stuff.co.nz
10/7/202313 minutes, 27 seconds
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Hamas rockets and fighters attack Israeli towns and cities

Hamas carried out a coordinated attack on Israel, firing rockets and with armed fighters infiltrating Israeli towns
10/7/20239 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Whistleblower who helped catch a paedophile politican

After an electoral officer helped police arrest a popular state minister, her life began to unravel.
10/5/202332 minutes, 28 seconds
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INTRODUCING — 'The Whistleblowers', a new series from Background Briefing

In this 6-part series presented by Adele Ferguson, the Background Briefing team brings you the untold stories of ordinary Australians who helped bring some of Australia’s biggest and dirtiest scandals to light.
10/3/20231 minute, 42 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller sports a boldly striped face and head – the aptly-named Striped Honeyeater.
9/30/202350 seconds
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Disability Royal Commission report

The final report of the four year Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability has been released. Julian Morrow speaks to human rights lawyer and disability rights activist, Rosemary Kayess.
9/30/202312 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Eric Philips

Eric Philips has been to the very top and very bottom of the planet some thirty times, most recently in January this year, becoming one of only two people over 60 to have skied unsupported to the South Pole. Over more than 30 years of polar trekking Eric has written a book and produced four documentary films about his expeditions, including the Emmy Award-winning ‘Chasing the Midnight Sun’, filmed in Greenland.
9/30/202321 minutes, 48 seconds
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World Quaker Day

There are fewer than 1800 Quakers in Australia, according to the last census. But despite their small numbers globally , Quakers — also known as the Religious Society of Friends — have played no small part in peace and social justice movements in Australia and around the world. Guest: Nelson File, Quaker and Principal of The Friends' School, Hobart
9/30/20236 minutes
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Deborah Conway and The Book of Life

A "living legend" of Australian music recounts her personal and artistic coming-of-age
9/30/202313 minutes, 10 seconds
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The creatures in the ocean's twilight zone

Diving into the "twilight zone", there's some amazing aquatic creatures.  These fish fascinate today's speaker Yi-Kai Tea. He's even named a few. 
9/30/202311 minutes, 4 seconds
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Anarctic Division inquiry

A senate inquiry is looking into funding challenges and operational decisions at the Australian Antarctic Division following revelations the organisation’s scientific research may be compromised at a time of unprecedented reductions in Antarctic sea ice levels. Guest: Senator Jonathon Duniam, joint leader of the Senate Inquiry into Australian Antarctic Division Funding
9/30/202312 minutes, 43 seconds
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Introducing... Take Me To Your Leader

Background Briefing will return to your feeds next week. 
9/25/20233 minutes
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
9/23/202358 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Geoff Raby

A former Ambassador to China, Geoff Raby has revelled in travel since he set off to Europe backpacking at aged 21.  His academic path as an economist led to a serendipitous career in diplomacy, which took him to China in 1986 for his first diplomatic posting. While there, Geoff developed an appreciation for the contemporary Chinese art of the time, which grew into a significant collection. He also witnessed the dramatic events of Tiananmen Square and absorbed some pertinent geo-political lessons. Guest: Geoff Raby, AO. Former Ambassador to China 2007 – 2011.
9/23/202323 minutes
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Remo Guiffre's Remorandom

Remi Guiffre's biannual curation of snack-sized facts, stories and ideas is called Remorandom
9/23/20235 minutes, 35 seconds
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What fool's gold can tell us about the origins of life

Do you have a favourite mineral? Maybe you love the gleam of a tiger's eye or the sparkle of an amethyst. 
9/23/202311 minutes, 14 seconds
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Norman Gunston 2.0

A new musical, The Dismissal - An Extremely Serious Musical Comedy, features the performance of actor Matthew Whittet as Norman Gunston, with permission from the character’s creator Garry McDonald. Matt’s Gunston 2.0 is the narrator of the Dismissal musical, and amidst all the narration of political and personal backstory, Matt revives the genius of the Gunston character as a comic device.
9/23/202311 minutes, 51 seconds
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"Living with water": Lessons from the New Orleans flood disaster

As climate change increases the frequency and severity of floods, at-risk communities around the world, like the US city of New Orleans, are rebuilding differently 
9/23/202314 minutes, 24 seconds
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Sikh assassination creates Canada-India rift

Canada claims it has intelligence linking the Indian government to the murder of a Sikh activist in Vancouver
9/23/202312 minutes, 58 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter breeds in the Arctic Circle and migrates annually to our shores – the Common Greenshank.
9/16/20231 minute, 16 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Sean Turnell, 2021

Sean Turnell spent 650 days in prison in Myanmar before he was given amnesty and released in November 2022.
9/16/202322 minutes, 34 seconds
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‘Human shield’ hostages to sue the British government and British Airways

Passengers and crew from British Airways flight 149 who were taken hostage in Kuwait in 1990 are suing the British government and the airline
9/16/20235 minutes, 39 seconds
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A peek into the future of glaucoma treatment

Flora Hui's hope for the future is that blindness from glaucoma no longer exists. And as an optometrist and researcher, she's at the forefront of finding better treatments. 
9/16/202310 minutes, 52 seconds
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Paul Radu: The dangerous and difficult journalistic work of covering organised crime

As transnational criminal networks become increasingly advanced and more deeply entrenched in governments and institutions, how can investigative journalists stay on the story?
9/16/202312 minutes, 39 seconds
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Sri Lankan comedian released after being jailed for a joke about Buddhism

Nathasha Edirisooriya is a standup comedian whose most recent gig got her a huge round of applause and 39 days in jail. She was accused of insulting the majority Sinhalese population. We discussed her case on Sunday Extra back in June when she was still in custody in Sri Lanka. Nathasha was eventually granted bail and spoke to Sunday Extra
9/16/202313 minutes, 1 second
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How the Yes vote was won in Ireland

In 2018, Ireland voted to remove the ban on abortion, and in that referendum, the Yes case started out well ahead in the polls, but the No case gained ground during the campaign. Then, in the last days of the Irish campaign, support for the Yes campaign surged back and 66% of Ireland’s 2.1 million voters said Yes. So what were the secrets of the successful Yes campaign, and might they translate to the current situation in Australia?  Guest: Orla O’Connor, Director of the National Women’s Council of Ireland and Co-Director of Together for Yes
9/16/202317 minutes, 4 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's Tweeter? 
9/9/20230
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The Year That Made Me: Lorin Clarke

Lorin Clarke has written a book about life with her late father, comedian John Clarke
9/9/202321 minutes, 57 seconds
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The technology that lets you feel sounds on your skin

How a vibrating tech used in gaming and mobile phones is translating sound into physical sensations for people who are deaf or hard of hearing.       
9/9/20238 minutes, 18 seconds
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What microfluidics can do for you

Microfluidics is an exciting field of science that has the potential to change the way we do drug trials.  Today's speaker Susi Seibt is keen to explore the future applications of this teeny tiny science. 
9/9/202311 minutes, 1 second
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Grajagan: Surfing in the Tiger's Lair

In the early 1970s (in the final flagging years of US involvement in the Vietnam War) a race was underway throughout the Indonesian archipelago of young Western surfers seeking to discover new surf breaks.
9/9/202322 minutes, 21 seconds
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Left is not woke

Woke is a concept that, whether used as a badge of honour or a slur, feels in some ways like it defines the times while also being itself hard to define. Philosopher Susan Neiman has braved the ideological minefield by tackling the subject in her new book, ‘Left is Not Woke’. Guest: Susan Neiman, philosopher, author, and Director of the Einstein Forum in Potsdam.
9/9/202320 minutes, 54 seconds
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Grameen Bank founder Muhammad Yunus facing trial in Bangladesh

Nobel Peace Prize winner and founder of micro credit banking for the poorest people, Muhammad Yunus is facing a criminal trial in Bangladesh
9/9/202312 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Chris Masters, 1987

The veteran ABC investigative journalist talks about his year, 1987, and his most influential reports for 4 Corners including The Moonlight State.
9/2/202320 minutes, 21 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller soars across our deep southern waters – the Black-browed Albatross.
9/2/202333 seconds
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Australia’s first digital computer

In 1955, the first digital computer arrived in Australia in Melbourne, called CSIRAC. It is the world's oldest surviving first-generation electronic computer and the first computer to produce digital music. Our guest was the former Head of the Dept of Computer Science at the Uni of Melbourne and explains how CSIRAC led to the rapid adoption of computing at the university and fostered the discipline. Guest: Dr Peter Thorne, former Head of the Department of Computer Science, University of Melbourne, Chair, Heritage Committee, The Pearcey Foundation
9/2/202312 minutes
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The struggle and triumph of Genesis Owusu

How Kafka, Covid and bushfires inspired the Ghanaian-Australian artist's highly anticipated second album 
9/2/202313 minutes
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How do you brew

What do you love about that first sip of beer? Maybe it's the bitterness, the fizz or the fruitiness?
9/2/202310 minutes, 2 seconds
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Population ageing is shaping Australia’s future but it’s more acute in parts of Asia

The 2023 Intergenerational Report identifies “population ageing” as one of the major forces shaping Australia’s future. In several Asian nations, the same demographic changes are more advanced and forcing a rethink, and there may be lessons for Australia.
9/2/202312 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Ukrainian children being taken to Belarus

The Belarus opposition in exile has given evidence the the ICC of Ukrainian children being taken from their families and sent to Belarus, with the approval of Belarus dictator, Alexander Lukashenko.
9/2/202312 minutes, 1 second
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's sound?
8/26/20231 minute, 24 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Mawunyo Gbogbo, 1995

Inspiring individuals talk about a pivotal moment in their personal histories. This week,
8/26/202314 minutes, 13 seconds
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"Keys to the kingdom": Curator at centre of British Museum theft scandal

The British museum theft scandal has raised the question: just how many museum collections might be at risk from the very people charged with taking care of them?
8/26/20237 minutes, 24 seconds
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Assumptions and consequences: the politics of modelling

Mathematical or scientific modelling is used widely, from manufacturing design, to economic and weather forecasting, and in recent years it has become more critical and controversial, with modelling being used to drive government policy on climate change and the COVID 19 pandemic. That puts the modellers in a powerful position and unfortunately, many of the models built to predict the pandemic were wrong. How should the way models are designed change?
8/26/202316 minutes, 28 seconds
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Thinking of the earth like a vanilla slice

Beneath the cold ice sheets of Antarctica lies the dynamic deep earth. So what happens when the two interact? Today's speaker Niam is eager to find out. 
8/26/202311 minutes, 14 seconds
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India lands on the Moon

India’s successful landing on the south pole of the Moon, days after Russia crashed  on one of its own attempts, has put India firmly in the top tier of the space race. It’s the first time a country has landed on the Moon’s south pole, and India is one of only four countries to manage a landing feat at all. So what does this indicate about India’s space aspirations, and how do their space achievements fit in with in the geopolitics back on earth? Guest: Dr Rajeswari (Raji) Pillai, Director of the Centre for Security, Strategy and Technology (CSST) at the Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi
8/26/202311 minutes, 56 seconds
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Imran Khan and the Pakistan military

Imran Khan’s elevation to prime minister was the culmination of a long political campaign with the help of advantages conferred upon him as the favoured candidate of the military establishment. As Pakistan’s traditional political parties join the generals in cornering Khan, there is no major force calling for full democracy. Guest: Ayesha Jalal, Mary Richardson Professor, History, Arts and Sciences at Tufts University
8/26/202315 minutes, 23 seconds
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A legal service to protect and empower whistleblowers

Whistleblowers play an important role in holding power to account, by speaking up about human rights abuses, government wrongdoing and corporate misfeasance, but all too often it is the whistleblower who faces reprisal. The Human Rights Law Centre’s Whistleblower Project is Australia’s first dedicated legal service to protect and empower whistleblowers who want to speak up about wrongdoing.
8/26/202312 minutes, 7 seconds
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Is the Montana climate change lawsuit a 'gamechanger'?

In what's been heralded as a watershed climate change lawsuit, earlier this week an American district court judge ruled in favour of a group of young environmental activists who had sued their home state of Montana. In what was the first constitutional climate trial in US history, the Held vs Montana lawsuit was filed in 2020 by 16 young Montana residents who argued that state agencies were violating their constitutional right to a "clean and healthful environment" by permitting fossil fuel development without considering its effect on the climate. The Montana attorney general's office said it will appeal what it called an "absurd" ruling. But just what might this win mean for future climate litigation brewing elsewhere around the world? Guest: Zoe Bush, Senior Solicitor in the Environmental Defenders Office
8/19/202311 minutes, 12 seconds
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The greatest living art thief

In one of the most remarkable stories of art theft in history, a Frenchman named Stephane Breitwieser stole hundreds of artworks and valuable objects from around 170 European museums between 1995 and 2001.   But unlike other notorious art thieves, he didn’t steal the works to sell them or make a profit, despite their value being estimated at more than a billion US dollars.  Instead, he kept them, carefully looked after,  in the bedroom and attic of the house he shared with his girlfriend and mother. Guest: Mike Finkel, author of The Art Thief
8/19/202319 minutes, 52 seconds
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Why would we need a celestial lighthouse?

Let's go on a space adventure! Gomeroi woman and astrophysics honours student Krystal explores the scale of our universe.
8/19/202311 minutes
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Why Putin and Russia went to war

Historian Mark Edele's new book explains why and how the war in Ukraine came about.
8/19/202316 minutes, 33 seconds
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Is Antarctic science worth the carbon miles?

That’s the question that Antarctic ecologist Dr Dana Bergstrom tackled when she gave the 2023 Allan Sefton Memorial Lecture at the University of Wollongong. Dr Bergstrom works for the Australian Antarctic Division, studying and identifying risks to Antarctic ecosystems … and she’s been pondering the extent to which one of the risks to Antarctic ecosystems is scientists like her.  Guest: Dr Dana Bergstrom, Senior Researcher, Australian Antarctic Division and Honorary Senior Fellow at the University of Wollongong
8/19/202316 minutes, 45 seconds
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The biggest women's sporting event ever

Record crowds and viewing numbers have made the 2023 Women's World Cup the biggest women's sporting event ever.
8/19/202312 minutes, 37 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Peter Baines, 2005

The charity Peter Baines set up has helped underprivileged kids in Thailand with homes, food, education and future pathways.  
8/12/202316 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Peter Baines, 2005

The charity Peter Baines set up has helped underprivileged kids in Thailand with homes, food, education and future pathways.  
8/12/202316 minutes, 35 seconds
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The kick that ignited Australian women's football

The FIFA Women's World Cup has transfixed Australian audiences in a way that few sporting events in this country have come close. 
8/12/20235 minutes, 46 seconds
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The kick that ignited Australian women's football

The FIFA Women's World Cup has transfixed Australian audiences in a way that few sporting events in this country have come close. 
8/12/20235 minutes, 46 seconds
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OCDiva: Opera with an OCD twist

Yasmin Arkinstall's one-women opera tells the story of living with OCD
8/12/202319 minutes, 14 seconds
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OCDiva: Opera with an OCD twist

Yasmin Arkinstall's one-women opera tells the story of living with OCD
8/12/202319 minutes, 14 seconds
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Safety, science and a platypus

If we had a time machine, we could go back and fix the mistakes we've made. But that probably isn't the best way to prevent mistakes before they happen... Trish Kerin believes everyone has a right to be safe at work and has a creative way to encourage us to spot warning signs early, saving us from mistakes ahead of time.
8/12/202311 minutes, 4 seconds
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Safety, science and a platypus

If we had a time machine, we could go back and fix the mistakes we've made. But that probably isn't the best way to prevent mistakes before they happen... Trish Kerin believes everyone has a right to be safe at work and has a creative way to encourage us to spot warning signs early, saving us from mistakes ahead of time.
8/12/202311 minutes, 4 seconds
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Communicating overdiagnosis

The Dartmouth Institute has an interesting mission: to “improve the communication of medical evidence to physicians, journalists, policymakers, and the public … to help them see through excessive fear and hope created by exaggerated and selective reporting in medical journals, advertising, and the news.” Dr Steven Woloshin is Professor of Medicine and co-director at the Institute, and about to attend the Preventing Overdiagnosis conference in Copenhagen, where he’ll chair a session on communicating about overdiagnosis in mainstream journalism and on social media. Guest: Dr Steven Woloshin, Professor of Medicine and co-director at The Dartmouth Institute.
8/12/202316 minutes, 26 seconds
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Communicating overdiagnosis

The Dartmouth Institute has an interesting mission: to “improve the communication of medical evidence to physicians, journalists, policymakers, and the public … to help them see through excessive fear and hope created by exaggerated and selective reporting in medical journals, advertising, and the news.” Dr Steven Woloshin is Professor of Medicine and co-director at the Institute, and about to attend the Preventing Overdiagnosis conference in Copenhagen, where he’ll chair a session on communicating about overdiagnosis in mainstream journalism and on social media. Guest: Dr Steven Woloshin, Professor of Medicine and co-director at The Dartmouth Institute.
8/12/202316 minutes, 26 seconds
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"Zoom Fatigue": The uncertain future of remote work

Even Zoom wants its workers back in the office. So what does this mean for the future of remote work?
8/12/20239 minutes, 4 seconds
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"Zoom Fatigue": The uncertain future of remote work

Even Zoom wants its workers back in the office. So what does this mean for the future of remote work?
8/12/20239 minutes, 4 seconds
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All in the family: Hun Sen's handover

Cambodia's prime minister Hun Sen will hand power to his son, Hun Manet, on August 22 
8/12/202313 minutes, 23 seconds
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All in the family: Hun Sen's handover

Cambodia's prime minister Hun Sen will hand power to his son, Hun Manet, on August 22 
8/12/202313 minutes, 23 seconds
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Can a rape trial be a positive experience?

Two years ago, Meagan complained to the ABC that our coverage of sexual assault cases was too negative, and it didn't reflect her personal experience.
8/10/202333 minutes, 17 seconds
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Can a rape trial be a positive experience?

Two years ago, Meagan complained to the ABC that our coverage of sexual assault cases was too negative, and it didn't reflect her personal experience.
8/10/202333 minutes, 17 seconds
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TYTMM Sarah Holland-Batt

One of Australia’s most lauded poets, Sarah Holland-Batt spent her teenage years in the US, and had dreams of another career. But that was all up-ended by the diagnosis of her father with Parkinson's and her family’s move back to Australia. His experience in aged care led Sarah to become a vocal advocate for better conditions in aged care facilities, and her latest book of poetry, The Jaguar, is dedicated to her father and won the Stella Prize in 2023. Guest: Sarah Holland-Batt, Professor of Creative Writing, QUT
8/5/202318 minutes, 50 seconds
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TYTMM Sarah Holland-Batt

One of Australia’s most lauded poets, Sarah Holland-Batt spent her teenage years in the US, and had dreams of another career. But that was all up-ended by the diagnosis of her father with Parkinson's and her family’s move back to Australia. His experience in aged care led Sarah to become a vocal advocate for better conditions in aged care facilities, and her latest book of poetry, The Jaguar, is dedicated to her father and won the Stella Prize in 2023. Guest: Sarah Holland-Batt, Professor of Creative Writing, QUT
8/5/202318 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Women’s World Cup is inspiring players in emerging nations

Emerging football nations are aspiring to compete in the Women's World Cup
8/5/202318 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Women’s World Cup is inspiring players in emerging nations

Emerging football nations are aspiring to compete in the Women's World Cup
8/5/202318 minutes, 45 seconds
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When AI surprises a software engineer

We're getting pretty familiar with hearing people talk about AI and what it could mean for our future. Luckily we humans still have the power to shape how that will look. Rashina Hoda is one of those humans and she's hoping to make sure AI is used in an ethical way. 
8/5/202312 minutes
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When AI surprises a software engineer

We're getting pretty familiar with hearing people talk about AI and what it could mean for our future. Luckily we humans still have the power to shape how that will look. Rashina Hoda is one of those humans and she's hoping to make sure AI is used in an ethical way. 
8/5/202312 minutes
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The story of Magabala Books

Magabala Books is Australia's oldest independent Indigenous publishing house.
8/5/202311 minutes, 42 seconds
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The story of Magabala Books

Magabala Books is Australia's oldest independent Indigenous publishing house.
8/5/202311 minutes, 42 seconds
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UFOs in Washington

The US congress last week heard remarkable testimonies by former military officers on the existence of UFOs, or what are now referred to as UAP’s, ‘unidentified anomalous phenomena’. 
8/5/202312 minutes, 18 seconds
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UFOs in Washington

The US congress last week heard remarkable testimonies by former military officers on the existence of UFOs, or what are now referred to as UAP’s, ‘unidentified anomalous phenomena’. 
8/5/202312 minutes, 18 seconds
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Thailand’s most popular party excluded from government coalition

The Move Forward Party won the most votes in the Thailand elections but will be excluded from a governing coalition
8/5/202312 minutes, 7 seconds
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Thailand’s most popular party excluded from government coalition

The Move Forward Party won the most votes in the Thailand elections but will be excluded from a governing coalition
8/5/202312 minutes, 7 seconds
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03 | The outland or the cage

Just after midnight, Marty woke to find three young intruders in his bedroom.
8/3/202333 minutes, 56 seconds
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03 | The outland or the cage

Just after midnight, Marty woke to find three young intruders in his bedroom. Then they started talking to him. He’d now become one of the hundreds of victims of crime in Mount Isa each year. This is the final episode looking at the youth justice system in Queensland - the state with the highest number of children behind bars.
8/3/202333 minutes, 56 seconds
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03 | The outland or the cage

Just after midnight, Marty woke to find three young intruders in his bedroom. Then they started talking to him. He'd now become one of the hundreds of victims of crime in Mount Isa each year. This is the final episode looking at the youth justice system in Queensland — the state with the highest number of children behind bars.
8/3/202333 minutes, 56 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
7/29/202358 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
7/29/202358 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Dr Bruce Powell, 1985

After a horrific accident and subsequent brain injury ended his medical career, Dr Bruce Powell had to reimagine his life and the meaning of care and recovery. 
7/29/202318 minutes, 32 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Dr Bruce Powell, 1985

After a horrific accident and subsequent brain injury ended his medical career, Dr Bruce Powell had to reimagine his life and the meaning of care and recovery. 
7/29/202318 minutes, 32 seconds
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Is a vital system of ocean currents on the verge of collapse?

A new study warns of the forthcoming collapse of critical Atlantic ocean currents
7/29/202311 minutes, 6 seconds
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Is a vital system of ocean currents on the verge of collapse?

A new study warns of the forthcoming collapse of critical Atlantic ocean currents
7/29/202311 minutes, 6 seconds
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When overdiagnosis of mental illness is a problem

When is depression just ‘sadness’? Why are so many children being diagnosed with ADHD and autism? How much access to care are the seriously mentally ill getting? Dr Allen Frances is one of the leading global voices in the discussion about overdiagnosis and mislabelling of mental illnesses. He was also the head of the taskforce that wrote the ‘bible’ of psychiatric disorders in 1994, the DSM-4, and openly regrets the expansion of certain disorders in that edition, which led to a much wider expansion in the next edition Guest: Dr Allen Frances, Professor and Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences at Duke University.
7/29/202316 minutes, 11 seconds
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When overdiagnosis of mental illness is a problem

When is depression just ‘sadness’? Why are so many children being diagnosed with ADHD and autism? How much access to care are the seriously mentally ill getting? Dr Allen Frances is one of the leading global voices in the discussion about overdiagnosis and mislabelling of mental illnesses. He was also the head of the taskforce that wrote the ‘bible’ of psychiatric disorders in 1994, the DSM-4, and openly regrets the expansion of certain disorders in that edition, which led to a much wider expansion in the next edition Guest: Dr Allen Frances, Professor and Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences at Duke University.
7/29/202316 minutes, 11 seconds
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Advancing women's health with mice?

Researchers have a lot of unanswered questions about female reproductive health. Today's speaker has a story of a discovery that will hopefully advance this area of science, but found in a very unlikely place. We have some live shows coming up, and we'd love to see you there! Get your tickets here. 
7/29/202311 minutes, 38 seconds
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Advancing women's health with mice?

Researchers have a lot of unanswered questions about female reproductive health. Today's speaker has a story of a discovery that will hopefully advance this area of science, but found in a very unlikely place. We have some live shows coming up, and we'd love to see you there! Get your tickets here. 
7/29/202311 minutes, 38 seconds
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Time for a new generation of democratic leaders in Myanmar

Is it time for Aung San Suu Kyi to make way for a new generation of leaders of the democracy movement in Myanmar.
7/29/202313 minutes, 50 seconds
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Time for a new generation of democratic leaders in Myanmar

Is it time for Aung San Suu Kyi to make way for a new generation of leaders of the democracy movement in Myanmar.
7/29/202313 minutes, 50 seconds
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Political crisis in Israel

Despite 30 weeks of ongoing protests against the proposal, Benjamin Netanyahu’s hardline government this week passed the first part of a plan for judicial reform, which would curb the influence of the country’s top court over government decisions. Detractors say this will erode democracy and lead to more corruption, but the government says the judiciary has been using its powers politically. Guest:  Eliad Shraga, chair of Movement for Quality Government, Israel
7/29/202310 minutes, 27 seconds
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Political crisis in Israel

Despite 30 weeks of ongoing protests against the proposal, Benjamin Netanyahu’s hardline government this week passed the first part of a plan for judicial reform, which would curb the influence of the country’s top court over government decisions. Detractors say this will erode democracy and lead to more corruption, but the government says the judiciary has been using its powers politically. Guest:  Eliad Shraga, chair of Movement for Quality Government, Israel
7/29/202310 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Australian children stranded in Syrian camps

Australian women and children are among 50,000 people held in detention camps in Syria 
7/29/202313 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Australian children stranded in Syrian camps

Australian women and children are among 50,000 people held in detention camps in Syria 
7/29/202313 minutes, 47 seconds
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02 | The outland or the cage

‘Locked down for hours and hours’: Jaxon explains what life is like inside a juvenile detention centre. 
7/27/202331 minutes, 13 seconds
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02 | The outland or the cage

"Locked down for hours and hours": Jaxon explains what life is like inside a juvenile detention centre. 
7/27/202331 minutes, 13 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter forms large, noisy flocks in the cooler months – the Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo.
7/22/202357 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter forms large, noisy flocks in the cooler months – the Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo.
7/22/202357 seconds
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Here Lies Love, on Broadway

'Love Lies Here', about the rise and fall of Imelda Marcos, is the first Broadway musical with an all-Filipino cast
7/22/202316 minutes, 28 seconds
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Here Lies Love, on Broadway

'Love Lies Here', about the rise and fall of Imelda Marcos, is the first Broadway musical with an all-Filipino cast
7/22/202316 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Lindy Morrison, 2022

Lindy Morrison is back on the drums full time, more than 30 years after the Go-Betweens  
7/22/202315 minutes, 56 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Lindy Morrison, 2022

Lindy Morrison is back on the drums full time, more than 30 years after the Go-Betweens  
7/22/202315 minutes, 56 seconds
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Peeking inside unhappy Aussie knees

How are your knees feeling? There's a pretty good chance one or both of them are sore — after all, knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability globally, and Australia's no exception. Trouble is, we don't really have any way of treating it. But never fear — this week we're hearing from someone who's bringing her engineering background to take a peek inside dodgy knees and see what it might take to fix them. We have some live shows coming up! We're heading to Sydney and the Huon Valley in Tasmania. Check out details here.  This episode was first broadcast in 2022.
7/22/202311 minutes, 47 seconds
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Peeking inside unhappy Aussie knees

How are your knees feeling? There's a pretty good chance one or both of them are sore — after all, knee osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability globally, and Australia's no exception. Trouble is, we don't really have any way of treating it. But never fear — this week we're hearing from someone who's bringing her engineering background to take a peek inside dodgy knees and see what it might take to fix them. We have some live shows coming up! We're heading to Sydney and the Huon Valley in Tasmania. Check out details here.  This episode was first broadcast in 2022.
7/22/202311 minutes, 47 seconds
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Dingo attacks are on the rise. But who is to blame?

As climate change and habitat loss increasingly pushes human and non-human animals up against each other, how might humans and apex predators learn to co-exist?
7/22/202311 minutes, 13 seconds
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Dingo attacks are on the rise. But who is to blame?

As climate change and habitat loss increasingly pushes human and non-human animals up against each other, how might humans and apex predators learn to co-exist?
7/22/202311 minutes, 13 seconds
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The longest war

It’s sometimes called the ‘forgotten war’ because it has been overshadowed by the Vietnam War and the previous World Wars.  But despite lasting just three years, the Korean War is also called the longest war, because no peace deal was ever signed, just an armistice agreement 70 years ago, on July 27, 1953.  That truce might have ended the fighting on the Korean Peninsula, but it didn’t end the hostilities between the two Koreas. Guest: Jongwoo Han, founder and president of the Korean War Legacy Foundation
7/22/202312 minutes, 54 seconds
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The longest war

It’s sometimes called the ‘forgotten war’ because it has been overshadowed by the Vietnam War and the previous World Wars.  But despite lasting just three years, the Korean War is also called the longest war, because no peace deal was ever signed, just an armistice agreement 70 years ago, on July 27, 1953.  That truce might have ended the fighting on the Korean Peninsula, but it didn’t end the hostilities between the two Koreas. Guest: Jongwoo Han, founder and president of the Korean War Legacy Foundation
7/22/202312 minutes, 54 seconds
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A revolution for a new Myanmar

With the eyes of the world on the war in Ukraine, less attention is being paid to the atrocities carried out by the military regime in Myanmar against its people. More than 2 years after the coup, the military is facing growing armed and civil resistance and the exiled Minister of Foreign Affairs in the National Unity Government says there is a revolution underway for a new Myanmar.
7/22/202312 minutes, 7 seconds
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A revolution for a new Myanmar

With the eyes of the world on the war in Ukraine, less attention is being paid to the atrocities carried out by the military regime in Myanmar against its people. More than 2 years after the coup, the military is facing growing armed and civil resistance and the exiled Minister of Foreign Affairs in the National Unity Government says there is a revolution underway for a new Myanmar.
7/22/202312 minutes, 7 seconds
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01 | The outland or the cage

Jaxon stole a car at age ten. Six years later, the Mount Isa teen has a decision to make.
7/21/202332 minutes, 35 seconds
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01 | The outland or the cage

Jaxon stole a car at age 10. Six years later, the Mount Isa teen has a decision to make.
7/21/202332 minutes, 35 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
7/15/20231 minute, 19 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
7/15/20231 minute, 19 seconds
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The Melbourne Cup of camel races

The annual Boulia Camel Cup is the richest camel race in Australia
7/15/20237 minutes, 5 seconds
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The Melbourne Cup of camel races

The annual Boulia Camel Cup is the richest camel race in Australia
7/15/20237 minutes, 5 seconds
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Are Elon Musk's Starlink satellites disrupting important science?

Deep space experts say they've proved Elon Musk's Starlink satellites are leaking enough radiation to interfere with important radio astronomy.
7/15/202311 minutes, 21 seconds
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Are Elon Musk's Starlink satellites disrupting important science?

Deep space experts say they've proved Elon Musk's Starlink satellites are leaking enough radiation to interfere with important radio astronomy.
7/15/202311 minutes, 21 seconds
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What can hot springs tell us about the origins of life?

Do you think we're alone in the universe? Could there be other life out there? And, whether there is or isn't, how does life come to be, anyway? (Is this sounding a little like your mate on a camping trip getting a bit too deep while looking up at all those stars?) Well, this time we're hearing from someone who's trying to unpick the origins of life — here on Earth, and maybe other places too. We've got a bunch of live shows coming up! You can find more details here.  
7/15/202312 minutes, 3 seconds
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What can hot springs tell us about the origins of life?

Do you think we're alone in the universe? Could there be other life out there? And, whether there is or isn't, how does life come to be, anyway? (Is this sounding a little like your mate on a camping trip getting a bit too deep while looking up at all those stars?) Well, this time we're hearing from someone who's trying to unpick the origins of life — here on Earth, and maybe other places too. We've got a bunch of live shows coming up! You can find more details here.  
7/15/202312 minutes, 3 seconds
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The Taiwanese Netflix series making #MeToo waves

Taiwan’s political drama series ‘Wave Makers’ and its #MeToo plot line has triggered actual allegations about Taiwan’s political officials and others.  
7/15/202310 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Taiwanese Netflix series making #MeToo waves

Taiwan’s political drama series ‘Wave Makers’ and its #MeToo plot line has triggered actual allegations about Taiwan’s political officials and others.  
7/15/202310 minutes, 33 seconds
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Why referendums succeed or fail

'The world’s leading expert on referendums' discusses the challenges the referendum for the Voice faces to be successful.
7/15/202319 minutes, 32 seconds
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Why referendums succeed or fail

'The world’s leading expert on referendums' discusses the challenges the referendum for the Voice faces to be successful.
7/15/202319 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ukraine’s chief prosecutor is overseeing 97,000 war crime investigations

Ukraine's Prosecutor General of Ukraine is overseeing the investigation of tens of thousands of war crimes.
7/15/202312 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ukraine’s chief prosecutor is overseeing 97,000 war crime investigations

Ukraine's Prosecutor General of Ukraine is overseeing the investigation of tens of thousands of war crimes.
7/15/202312 minutes, 52 seconds
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'What's your p(doom)?' Why AI experts are calculating our doomsday odds

A growing number of AI industry insiders are guessing at the probability that Artificial Intelligence will lead to a catastrophic scenario for humanity, and calculating their ‘p(doom)’.
7/13/202339 minutes, 58 seconds
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'What's your p(doom)?' Why AI experts are calculating our doomsday odds

A growing number of AI industry insiders are guessing at the probability that Artificial Intelligence will lead to a catastrophic scenario for humanity, and calculating their ‘p(doom)’.
7/13/202339 minutes, 58 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter moves in small groups from tree to tree as it searches for nectar, fruit and insects – the Silvereye.
7/8/20231 minute, 2 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter moves in small groups from tree to tree as it searches for nectar, fruit and insects – the Silvereye.
7/8/20231 minute, 2 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Michael 'Dan' Mori

From 2003 to 2007, United States Marine Corp officer Michael ‘Dan’ Mori was the person appointed by the US military to represent Australian citizen and Guantánamo Bay detainee David Hicks
7/8/202317 minutes, 3 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Michael 'Dan' Mori

From 2003 to 2007, United States Marine Corp officer Michael ‘Dan’ Mori was the person appointed by the US military to represent Australian citizen and Guantánamo Bay detainee David Hicks
7/8/202317 minutes, 3 seconds
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Does sportswashing actually work?

From golf, to tennis, to football – nation states are increasingly using sportswashing to improve their country's image and distract from dubious human rights records. But does this process of reputation laundering actually work? And why has it reached 'fever pitch' in 2023?
7/8/202317 minutes, 31 seconds
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Does sportswashing actually work?

From golf, to tennis, to football – nation states are increasingly using sportswashing to improve their country's image and distract from dubious human rights records. But does this process of reputation laundering actually work? And why has it reached 'fever pitch' in 2023?
7/8/202317 minutes, 31 seconds
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Indigenous voices in water planning

What does it take to survive on the driest inhabited continent on Earth? Indigenous people have tens of thousands of years of knowledge about this, but their place in the conversations about water planning and management are often tokenistic at best, or worse, completely absent. Bradley Moggridge wants to change that. He's a Kamilaroi man and hydrogeologist, and he knows Indigenous knowledge needs to be central to Australia's water future. Want to join the audience at our next live show? We're heading to Melbourne, Tassie and Sydney. Check out details here. 
7/8/202311 minutes, 50 seconds
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Indigenous voices in water planning

What does it take to survive on the driest inhabited continent on Earth? Indigenous people have tens of thousands of years of knowledge about this, but their place in the conversations about water planning and management are often tokenistic at best, or worse, completely absent. Bradley Moggridge wants to change that. He's a Kamilaroi man and hydrogeologist, and he knows Indigenous knowledge needs to be central to Australia's water future. Want to join the audience at our next live show? We're heading to Melbourne, Tassie and Sydney. Check out details here. 
7/8/202311 minutes, 50 seconds
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Lessons from the 1967 referendum

In a recent Australian Book Review essay titled ‘A Referendum in Trouble’, history professor Bain Attwood compares the 1967 referendum, when Australians overwhelmingly voted to support Indigenous rights, with the forthcoming referendum to change the constitution and establish a First Nations Voice - where polls indicate the ‘yes’ vote will struggle to even get a bare majority. Attwood says the huge changes in Australians’ views on race, rights and history since 1967 are a factor.   Guest: Bain Attwood, Professor of History, Monash University  
7/8/202313 minutes, 51 seconds
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Lessons from the 1967 referendum

In a recent Australian Book Review essay titled ‘A Referendum in Trouble’, history professor Bain Attwood compares the 1967 referendum, when Australians overwhelmingly voted to support Indigenous rights, with the forthcoming referendum to change the constitution and establish a First Nations Voice - where polls indicate the ‘yes’ vote will struggle to even get a bare majority. Attwood says the huge changes in Australians’ views on race, rights and history since 1967 are a factor.   Guest: Bain Attwood, Professor of History, Monash University  
7/8/202313 minutes, 51 seconds
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Rejuvenation tech: the race to extend life

A stem cell conference in Boston attracted so many scientists to a talk on rejuvenation technology that police had to be called to clear the aisles.
7/8/202316 minutes, 4 seconds
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Rejuvenation tech: the race to extend life

A stem cell conference in Boston attracted so many scientists to a talk on rejuvenation technology that police had to be called to clear the aisles.
7/8/202316 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Robodebt report and the problem with digitising disadvantage

The Robodebt Royal Commission report exposes the failure of government oversight of the debt recovery scheme despite it being shown to be unfair and unlawful  
7/8/202311 minutes, 55 seconds
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The Robodebt report and the problem with digitising disadvantage

The Robodebt Royal Commission report exposes the failure of government oversight of the debt recovery scheme despite it being shown to be unfair and unlawful  
7/8/202311 minutes, 55 seconds
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The little-known religious code ruling many major public hospitals

Did you know that some of Australia’s largest public hospitals are run according to a religious code of ethics? 
7/6/202339 minutes, 24 seconds
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The little-known religious code ruling many major public hospitals

Did you know that some of Australia’s largest public hospitals are run according to a religious code of ethics? 
7/6/202339 minutes, 24 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
7/1/20232 minutes, 7 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller sweeps across inland skies in search of insect prey – the White-backed Swallow.
7/1/202348 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
7/1/20232 minutes, 7 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller sweeps across inland skies in search of insect prey – the White-backed Swallow.
7/1/202348 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter is a familiar voice of our woodlands and open forests – the Peaceful Dove.
7/1/20231 minute, 14 seconds
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Ibuprofen or paracetamol?

These common pain killing medications are taken for similar reasons but work in slightly different ways.
7/1/202310 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ibuprofen or paracetamol?

These common pain killing medications are taken for similar reasons but work in slightly different ways.
7/1/202310 minutes, 15 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Nguyen Phan Que Mai

A Vietnamese poet and author of novels in both Vietnamese and English, Nguyen Phan Que Mai has received critical acclaim for her stories that draw on recent Vietnamese history.
7/1/202318 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Nguyen Phan Que Mai

A Vietnamese poet and author of novels in both Vietnamese and English, Nguyen Phan Que Mai has received critical acclaim for her stories that draw on recent Vietnamese history.
7/1/202318 minutes, 53 seconds
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Crashes, collisions and earthquakes: an engineering challenge

To protect our heads in a crash or collision, we wear a helmet. But what about if we need to protect a building? That's probably too big for a helmet… Engineer Tatheer explores creative solutions to these big problems. We have some upcoming live Ockham's Razor shows! We're heading to Melbourne, Huon Valley and Sydney. Check them out and join the audience here. 
7/1/202311 minutes, 8 seconds
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Crashes, collisions and earthquakes: an engineering challenge

To protect our heads in a crash or collision, we wear a helmet. But what about if we need to protect a building? That's probably too big for a helmet… Engineer Tatheer explores creative solutions to these big problems. We have some upcoming live Ockham's Razor shows! We're heading to Melbourne, Huon Valley and Sydney. Check them out and join the audience here. 
7/1/202311 minutes, 8 seconds
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A review of the London Review of Books

New York writer and reviewer Ann Manov has reviewed the London Review of Books
7/1/202313 minutes, 25 seconds
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A review of the London Review of Books

New York writer and reviewer Ann Manov has reviewed the London Review of Books
7/1/202313 minutes, 25 seconds
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The deadly legacy of a stem cell charlatan

Medical science institutes that hosted rogue surgeon Paolo Macchiarini won't take responsibility for his work 
7/1/202313 minutes, 13 seconds
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The deadly legacy of a stem cell charlatan

Medical science institutes that hosted rogue surgeon Paolo Macchiarini won't take responsibility for his work 
7/1/202313 minutes, 13 seconds
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The U.S. urged to apologise for the torture of Guantanamo Bay inmates

UN Special Rapporteur, Fionnuala Ní Aoláin has called on the United States to apologise for the torture of Guantanamo Bay prison inmates
7/1/202316 minutes, 6 seconds
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The U.S. urged to apologise for the torture of Guantanamo Bay inmates

UN Special Rapporteur, Fionnuala Ní Aoláin has called on the United States to apologise for the torture of Guantanamo Bay prison inmates
7/1/202316 minutes, 6 seconds
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Fashion victims

Kym Ellery, the founder of collapsed Australian fashion label Ellery Land, tells reporter Rachael Brown that business collapses are sometimes the price of working in the fashion industry.
6/29/202337 minutes, 54 seconds
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Fashion victims

Kym Ellery, the founder of collapsed Australian fashion label Ellery Land, tells reporter Rachael Brown that business collapses are sometimes the price of working in the fashion industry.
6/29/202337 minutes, 54 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller is a colourful inhabitant of the rainforest canopy – the Rose-crowned Fruit-Dove.
6/24/20230
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Tweet of the week

This week's mystery caller is a colourful inhabitant of the rainforest canopy – the Rose-crowned Fruit-Dove.
6/24/20230
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The Year that Made Me: Rebecca Peters, 1996

Inspiring individuals talk about a pivotal moment in their personal histories. This week,
6/24/202318 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Rebecca Peters, 1996

Inspiring individuals talk about a pivotal moment in their personal histories. This week,
6/24/202318 minutes, 47 seconds
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The art of breaking ice

Rachael Mead has written a novel inspired by the true story of the first Australian woman to set foot on Antarctica.
6/24/20238 minutes, 14 seconds
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The art of breaking ice

Rachael Mead has written a novel inspired by the true story of the first Australian woman to set foot on Antarctica.
6/24/20238 minutes, 14 seconds
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Who’s proud of their mental illness?

In a thought provoking piece for The Guardian, journalist Eleanor De Jong wrote a deeply personal article under the heading, “Nobody I’ve been locked up with in a psychiatric hospital felt ‘proud’ of their illness”.  Former Australian of the Year Pat McGorry’s tweet called the piece “brilliant”, adding “It’s a scandal that despite all the “awareness” of mental illness in recent years that severe mental illness like schizophrenia and bipolar are so neglected still.”  Guest: Eleanor De Jong 
6/24/202317 minutes, 45 seconds
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Who’s proud of their mental illness?

In a thought provoking piece for The Guardian, journalist Eleanor De Jong wrote a deeply personal article under the heading, “Nobody I’ve been locked up with in a psychiatric hospital felt ‘proud’ of their illness”.  Former Australian of the Year Pat McGorry’s tweet called the piece “brilliant”, adding “It’s a scandal that despite all the “awareness” of mental illness in recent years that severe mental illness like schizophrenia and bipolar are so neglected still.”  Guest: Eleanor De Jong 
6/24/202317 minutes, 45 seconds
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Mussels: Not exactly cute, but definitely important

When it comes to conservation, it's easy to get excited about protecting creatures that make you go "aww". Like, "aww, what a fluffy koala!", or "aww, what a cute lizard!"
6/24/202311 minutes, 37 seconds
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Mussels: Not exactly cute, but definitely important

When it comes to conservation, it's easy to get excited about protecting creatures that make you go "aww". Like, "aww, what a fluffy koala!", or "aww, what a cute lizard!"
6/24/202311 minutes, 37 seconds
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Cuban mercenaries fighting for Russia?

With tens of thousands of Russian soldiers dying or being injured in the country’s war on Ukraine, Putin has offered immigrants money and citizenship if they enlist. There are reports Cuban immigrants are now joining the army to fight with Russia in Ukraine.  But our guest believes that the Cubans enlisting may not be doing so voluntarily, and that the government in Havana will keep the majority of the money.  Guest: Javier Larrondo, President, Prisoners Defenders
6/24/202312 minutes, 48 seconds
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Cuban mercenaries fighting for Russia?

With tens of thousands of Russian soldiers dying or being injured in the country’s war on Ukraine, Putin has offered immigrants money and citizenship if they enlist. There are reports Cuban immigrants are now joining the army to fight with Russia in Ukraine.  But our guest believes that the Cubans enlisting may not be doing so voluntarily, and that the government in Havana will keep the majority of the money.  Guest: Javier Larrondo, President, Prisoners Defenders
6/24/202312 minutes, 48 seconds
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The persecution of Iranian Baha’i poet Mahvash Sabet

Iranian Baha'i poet Mahvesh Sabet has been jailed and tortured for a third time 
6/24/202311 minutes, 41 seconds
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The persecution of Iranian Baha’i poet Mahvash Sabet

Iranian Baha'i poet Mahvesh Sabet has been jailed and tortured for a third time 
6/24/202311 minutes, 41 seconds
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Did a vacancy tax improve British Columbia’s housing crisis?

As Australia seeks ways to address its housing crisis, and rapidly rising rents in particular, an inner-west Sydney council suggested a vacancy tax on the one in 10 empty homes in the area. We look at British Columbia to see how their ‘Speculation and Vacancy Tax’ has worked over there. Guest: Professor Tsur Somerville, Sauder School of Business, Uni of British Columbia
6/24/202312 minutes, 11 seconds
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Did a vacancy tax improve British Columbia’s housing crisis?

As Australia seeks ways to address its housing crisis, and rapidly rising rents in particular, an inner-west Sydney council suggested a vacancy tax on the one in 10 empty homes in the area. We look at British Columbia to see how their ‘Speculation and Vacancy Tax’ has worked over there. Guest: Professor Tsur Somerville, Sauder School of Business, Uni of British Columbia
6/24/202312 minutes, 11 seconds
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Inside the battle to keep cocaine out of Australia

Reporters Ty King and Mayeta Clark are granted a behind-the-scenes look at the dangerous game of cat and mouse played by cops and cartels.
6/22/202329 minutes, 51 seconds
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Inside the battle to keep cocaine out of Australia

Reporters Ty King and Mayeta Clark are granted a behind-the-scenes look at the dangerous game of cat and mouse played by cops and cartels.
6/22/202329 minutes, 51 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
6/17/20231 minute, 29 seconds
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Tweet of the week

Can you guess this week's tweeter?
6/17/20231 minute, 29 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Denni Francisco

Wiradjuri woman Denni Francisco is the founder of fashion brand Ngali, and winner of the Fashion Designer Award at the National Indigenous Fashion Awards
6/17/202313 minutes, 24 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Denni Francisco

Wiradjuri woman Denni Francisco is the founder of fashion brand Ngali, and winner of the Fashion Designer Award at the National Indigenous Fashion Awards
6/17/202313 minutes, 24 seconds
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Ukrainian Eurovision winners Kalush Orchestra

Since winning Eurovision 2022 Kalush Orchestra have  toured the world raising support for Ukraine’s war effort. 
6/17/20238 minutes, 39 seconds
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Ukrainian Eurovision winners Kalush Orchestra

Since winning Eurovision 2022 Kalush Orchestra have  toured the world raising support for Ukraine’s war effort. 
6/17/20238 minutes, 39 seconds
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The extraordinary story of Kim's Video store

'Kim's Video' is a film about a legendary independent video store in New York,  which ended up in Sicily, Italy
6/17/202317 minutes, 26 seconds
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The extraordinary story of Kim's Video store

'Kim's Video' is a film about a legendary independent video store in New York,  which ended up in Sicily, Italy
6/17/202317 minutes, 26 seconds
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Stone tools and secrets of the past

What’s the most important human invention from history? The wheel? Fire? How about… language and culture? Archaeologist Sam Lin takes us on a tour of very early human history, featuring an item that crops up too regularly to be an accident: an almond-shaped piece of sharpened stone. Sam's talk was first broadcast in February 2022. 
6/17/202311 minutes, 9 seconds
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Stone tools and secrets of the past

What’s the most important human invention from history? The wheel? Fire? How about… language and culture? Archaeologist Sam Lin takes us on a tour of very early human history, featuring an item that crops up too regularly to be an accident: an almond-shaped piece of sharpened stone. Sam's talk was first broadcast in February 2022. 
6/17/202311 minutes, 9 seconds
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Social media documents climate effects on cherry blossom

One study shows how social media can help scientists analyse the effects of climate change on plant pollination. 
6/17/202312 minutes, 40 seconds
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Social media documents climate effects on cherry blossom

One study shows how social media can help scientists analyse the effects of climate change on plant pollination. 
6/17/202312 minutes, 40 seconds
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Sri Lankan comedian arrested for a joke about Buddhism

Sri Lankan comedian Nathasha Edirisooriya has been arrested for comments about Buddhism in her stand-up routine
6/17/202311 minutes, 54 seconds
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Sri Lankan comedian arrested for a joke about Buddhism

Sri Lankan comedian Nathasha Edirisooriya has been arrested for comments about Buddhism in her stand-up routine
6/17/202311 minutes, 54 seconds
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Tracking Donald Trump's criminal charges

What else can we expect from Special Counsel Jack Smith's investigation 
6/17/202313 minutes, 6 seconds
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Tracking Donald Trump's criminal charges

What else can we expect from Special Counsel Jack Smith's investigation 
6/17/202313 minutes, 6 seconds
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False Witness

Reporter Heidi Davoren provides an extraordinary insight into a parenting dispute, where a mother and father come together after a Family Court psychologist harmed their family.
6/16/202336 minutes, 30 seconds
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False Witness

Reporter Heidi Davoren provides an extraordinary insight into a parenting dispute, where a mother and father come together after a Family Court psychologist harmed their family.
6/16/202336 minutes, 30 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter is a colourful and familiar inhabitant of dry woodland – the Red-capped Robin.
6/10/20231 minute, 30 seconds
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Tweet of the week

This week's tweeter is a colourful and familiar inhabitant of dry woodland – the Red-capped Robin.
6/10/20231 minute, 30 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Morrie Hart

Morrie Hart turned 100 in May and on 19 June he’ll step out to carry the Legacy torch for the torch relay marking 100 years of Legacy,
6/10/202317 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Year that Made Me: Morrie Hart

Morrie Hart turned 100 in May and on 19 June he’ll step out to carry the Legacy torch for the torch relay marking 100 years of Legacy,
6/10/202317 minutes, 8 seconds
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Fair use? Warhol in the US Supreme Court

America’s top court recently found that the Warhol Foundation breached copyright of photographer Lynn Goldsmith when it licensed Warhol’s portrait of rock star Prince to Vanity Fair for the cover of a commemorative edition in 2016, after Prince died.  Warhol’s portrait was made in 1984 and was based on a Lynn Goldsmith photo of Prince from 1981.  A majority of the Supreme Court found in favour of Lynn Goldsmith, saying her original work is “entitled to copyright protection, even against famous artists.” Guest: Dr Richard Meyer, Professor of Art History, Stanford University
6/10/202318 minutes, 3 seconds
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Fair use? Warhol in the US Supreme Court

America’s top court recently found that the Warhol Foundation breached copyright of photographer Lynn Goldsmith when it licensed Warhol’s portrait of rock star Prince to Vanity Fair for the cover of a commemorative edition in 2016, after Prince died.  Warhol’s portrait was made in 1984 and was based on a Lynn Goldsmith photo of Prince from 1981.  A majority of the Supreme Court found in favour of Lynn Goldsmith, saying her original work is “entitled to copyright protection, even against famous artists.” Guest: Dr Richard Meyer, Professor of Art History, Stanford University
6/10/202318 minutes, 3 seconds
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Including First Nations voices must be more than just lip service

No one likes having their ideas taken for granted, without recognition or pay. For First Nations Australians, their expansive knowledge is often used without proper consultation or respectful communication.  So how do we tackle the problem?  Tahlia, a Ballardong Whadjuk and Wajarri Yamaji engineering student, shares her thoughts. 
6/10/202310 minutes, 30 seconds
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Including First Nations voices must be more than just lip service

No one likes having their ideas taken for granted, without recognition or pay. For First Nations Australians, their expansive knowledge is often used without proper consultation or respectful communication.  So how do we tackle the problem?  Tahlia, a Ballardong Whadjuk and Wajarri Yamaji engineering student, shares her thoughts. 
6/10/202310 minutes, 30 seconds
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Would rent caps help ease the affordable housing crisis?

The Greens want a rent freeze and rent caps in order to support the federal government's housing future fund
6/10/202311 minutes, 56 seconds
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Would rent caps help ease the affordable housing crisis?

The Greens want a rent freeze and rent caps in order to support the federal government's housing future fund
6/10/202311 minutes, 56 seconds
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A victory for media in Hong Kong

A Hong Kong journalist is released from prison following a surprise appeal from the territory's highest court.  
6/10/202312 minutes, 12 seconds
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A victory for media in Hong Kong

A Hong Kong journalist is released from prison following a surprise appeal from the territory's highest court.  
6/10/202312 minutes, 12 seconds
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Kathleen Folbigg and the history of unexplained deaths blamed on mothers

Kathleen Folbigg's diary entries were used to convict her. It took medical science to quash her conviction
6/10/202313 minutes, 13 seconds
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Kathleen Folbigg and the history of unexplained deaths blamed on mothers

Kathleen Folbigg's diary entries were used to convict her. It took medical science to quash her conviction
6/10/202313 minutes, 13 seconds
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Grim Prospects | 02

In part two of the investigation into the deaths of Ray and Jennie Kehlet, reporters Rebecca Trigger and Ash Davis examine the story of the last man to see the couple alive. And they speak to a police insider who raised concerns about the direction of the investigation back in 2015.
6/8/202336 minutes, 38 seconds
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Grim Prospects | 02

In part two of the investigation into the deaths of Ray and Jennie Kehlet, reporters Rebecca Trigger and Ash Davis examine the story of the last man to see the couple alive. And they speak to a police insider who raised concerns about the direction of the investigation back in 2015.
6/8/202336 minutes, 38 seconds
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Fame seeking shooters and America’s firearm ecosystem

A team of researchers in the U.S. analyzed data from 189 mass shootings between 1966 and 2021, and found that fame seekers – as opposed to those predominantly motivated by personal grievance or revenge, for example – planned their crimes around the novelty of the location and targets. Mass shooters pursuing fame often plan their attacks as “surprises,” which makes them uniquely challenging to prevent. The study is part of ongoing data-based research related to U.S. gun prevalence and violence, and the “firearm ecosystem” in the United States.
6/3/202310 minutes, 58 seconds
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Fame seeking shooters and America’s firearm ecosystem

A team of researchers in the U.S. analyzed data from 189 mass shootings between 1966 and 2021, and found that fame seekers – as opposed to those predominantly motivated by personal grievance or revenge, for example – planned their crimes around the novelty of the location and targets. Mass shooters pursuing fame often plan their attacks as “surprises,” which makes them uniquely challenging to prevent. The study is part of ongoing data-based research related to U.S. gun prevalence and violence, and the “firearm ecosystem” in the United States.
6/3/202310 minutes, 58 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Sinead Burke

In just six short years, Sinéad Burke has graced the cover of British Vogue twice and become a global activist for those with disabilities. 
6/3/202326 minutes, 40 seconds
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The Year That Made Me: Sinead Burke

In just six short years, Sinéad Burke has graced the cover of British Vogue twice and become a global activist for those with disabilities. 
6/3/202326 minutes, 40 seconds
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Finland's electricity boon

Last week in Finland, electricity supply was so abundant that the country’s average electricity price fell into negative territory for a number of hours. It’s not the first time it’s happened, but it’s being described as ‘historic’. So what does this mean for Finland’s energy market and consumers? Guest: Jukka Ruusunen, CEO of Fingrid
6/3/202311 minutes, 3 seconds
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Finland's electricity boon

Last week in Finland, electricity supply was so abundant that the country’s average electricity price fell into negative territory for a number of hours. It’s not the first time it’s happened, but it’s being described as ‘historic’. So what does this mean for Finland’s energy market and consumers? Guest: Jukka Ruusunen, CEO of Fingrid
6/3/202311 minutes, 3 seconds
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The science of ice cream

Here on Ockham's Razor, our soapbox for science, we try to bring you science that's deeply applicable to your daily life.
6/3/20239 minutes, 46 seconds
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The science of ice cream

Here on Ockham's Razor, our soapbox for science, we try to bring you science that's deeply applicable to your daily life.
6/3/20239 minutes, 46 seconds
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While We Watched

While We Watched chronicles the struggle to keep independent reporting alive in India 
6/3/202312 minutes, 49 seconds
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While We Watched

While We Watched chronicles the struggle to keep independent reporting alive in India 
6/3/202312 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ukraine’s nuclear workers confronted an invasion

A new book tells the story of Ukraine’s nuclear power scientists and workers as they confronted Russia's invasion
6/3/202312 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ukraine’s nuclear workers confronted an invasion

A new book tells the story of Ukraine’s nuclear power scientists and workers as they confronted Russia's invasion
6/3/202312 minutes, 23 seconds
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The real dangers of plastic pollution

For years, we have been told that recycling plastic will help reduce pollution, but recent studies show that plastic recycling could actually make things worse. 
6/3/202312 minutes, 1 second