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Snoozecast

English, Old Time Radio, 1 season, 886 episodes, 6 days, 6 hours, 30 minutes
About
Welcome to Snoozecast, the podcast designed to help you fall asleep. New episodes are released every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Snoozecast is meant to be played as you get into bed.
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Mighty Gneiss

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast Original story about the friendship between two boulders on a mountain slope. In this gentle tale, you will meet Mighty Gneiss, an ancient and steadfast rock, and Little Rock, a curious and enthusiastic granite boulder. Their bond grows through shared experiences and geological lessons, highlighting themes of connection, change, and the enduring nature of friendship. As you listen, you'll be transported to a high altitude land where the ancient and the ephemeral coexist. The Teton Range, known for its rugged peaks and stunning vistas, rises sharply above the Jackson Hole Valley in Wyoming. The Grand Teton is the highest peak within the range, standing at 13,775 feet or 4,199 meters. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/22/202430 minutes, 57 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 30

In the previous episode, the Nautilus became trapped by an impenetrable wall of ice. Captain Nemo explains that they face either being crushed or suffocating, as their air supply will only last two more days. The crew, led by Captain Nemo, attempts to break free by attacking the thinner parts of the ice with pickaxes and screws, but progress is slow. As the air quality worsens, they struggle with lack of oxygen. Nemo devises a plan to inject boiling water to raise the temperature and prevent the ice from solidifying. The crew works tirelessly, and despite the worsening conditions, they finally break through the ice and the Nautilus ascends to the surface, bringing in fresh air. We’ll pick up right as the nautilus surfaces' — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/19/202428 minutes, 48 seconds
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The Library of Lost Sounds

Tonight, for our monthly Snoozecast + Deluxe Bonus Episode, we’ll read a Snoozecast original, The Library of Lost Sounds, in which a bored ten-year old girl suddenly finds herself in a mysterious realm far from the department store she was shopping at with her mother. If you’d like to learn more about our premium subscriptions, go to snoozecast.com/plus. — read by 'V' — Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/18/20247 minutes, 10 seconds
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Princess Minon-Minette

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast-adapted version of the story “Princess Minon-Minette” found in “The Pink Fairy Book” edited by Andrew Lang. This episode first aired back in 2021. Originally found in the “Library of Genius and Fairies”, this story was written by French aristocrat and writer of the late 1600s Madame de Murat. She published many stories that she first debuted at the fashionable literary salons of her time, and was considered one of the leaders of the “fairy-tale vogue.” After several years of success and recognition, Madame de Murat was imprisoned and then exiled, being accused of debauchery and “shocking practices and beliefs”. Although she failed at an attempt to escape wearing the disguise of men’s clothing, she did continue to write her body of works for several years after that. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/17/202437 minutes, 15 seconds
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Saboteurs on the River | Penny Parker

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Saboteurs on the River” written by Mildred A. Wirt and published in 1943. In this story, Saboteurs dynamite a bridge, and a man named Burt Ottman is accused of the crime based on evidence supplied by Penny. Penny feels that Burt is innocent, so she plans to find the culprits in order to exonerate Burt. Penny seeks the help of a man named Old Noah who lives in an ark filled with animals while he awaits the second great flood. Old Noah plays a role in bringing the saboteurs to justice. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to check out our other Penny Parker series episodes by searching for our show titled “Snoozecast Presents: Penny Parker” wherever you listen to Snoozecast. Or, you can find Penny at snoozecast.com/series. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/15/202434 minutes, 15 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 18

Tonight, we’ll read the 18th chapter of “Anne of Green Gables”, the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne to the Rescue”. In the previous chapter – Anne meets Diana secretly by the Dryad's Bubble, where Diana tearfully tells Anne that her mother forbids their friendship. They have an emotional farewell, exchanging heartfelt promises and a lock of hair. Anne, devastated, decides to return to school, where her imaginative presence is warmly welcomed back by her classmates. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/12/202431 minutes, 37 seconds
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The Treasure Seeker | Conclusion

Tonight, we’ll read the conclusion to the fairy tale “The Treasure Seeker.” You can find the first half of this story which we aired last week. This episode first aired in 2021. In the first half, we learn of Peter Bloch, who was once a prosperous inn-keeper and master cook, but is now a poor man. He hears of a mysterious dark spirit, The Treasure Seeker of the Mountain, and directions on how to find an amazing treasure trove of hidden wealth. Although he has an unhappy marriage with the Dame Ilse, Peter also has a sweet daughter named Lucia. His love for Lucia motivates him to seek the treasure in order to change their fortunes in life for the better. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/10/202428 minutes, 44 seconds
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Rio de Janeiro | Darwin's Voyage

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from the second chapter of British naturalist Charles Darwin’s “The Voyage of the Beagle”. This chapter explores Rio de Janeiro and it’s surrounding environment. “The Voyage of the Beagle” is the title most commonly given to the book published in 1839 as Darwin’s “Journal and Remarks”, bringing him considerable fame and respect. If you’d like to start from the beginning, the first of this series aired on June 10th, 2024. Rio de Janeiro is a seaside city in Brazil, with almost 7 million residents. Now, it is famous for its beautiful resort beaches, its Carnival, samba dancers, street art, its weather and its huge Christ the Redeemer statue atop Mount Corcovado. In this episode, Darwin explores the ecology, geology and in his words, the “shimmering tropical splendor” in Brazil. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/8/202430 minutes, 58 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 8

Tonight, we’ll read the 8th chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel and is considered the 31st chapter as part of that work as a whole. Our last episode was the chapter titled “Consequences” in which Amy organizes a successful fair to raise money for the family of an impoverished artist, displaying her leadership and generosity. Laurie surprises everyone by buying a large quantity of items, significantly contributing to the funds raised. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/5/202435 minutes, 9 seconds
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The Treasure Seeker | Opening Half

Tonight we’ll read "The Treasure Seeker", a story found in the "Crimson Fairy Book" written by Andrew Lang and published in 1903. In this story, a party of shepherds sat one night telling of the strange things that had happened to them in their youth. One of their stories was more exciting than expected, regarding a mysterious dark spirit who was The Treasure Seeker of the mountain. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/3/202432 minutes, 13 seconds
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With the Night Mail

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “With the Night Mail” an early sci-fi novella set in the year 2000, written by Rudyard Kipling, and published in 1905. This story describes an airship postal worker making a routine night run from London to Quebec. In this universe, the Aerial Board of Control (or A.B.C.), a fictional supranational organization dedicated to the control and aid of airship (also known as dirigible) traffic across the entire planet. In our age of commonplace intercontinental air travel, one needs to bear in mind that Kipling wrote this story at a time when the first successful powered flight, which lasted a total of 12 seconds, took place only two years prior. An airship, or dirigible is a type of lighter-than-air aircraft that can navigate through the air flying under its own power. They use buoyancy from a lifting gas that is less dense than the surrounding air to achieve the lift needed to stay airborne. In early dirigibles, the lifting gas used was hydrogen, due to its high lifting capacity and ready availability, but the inherent flammability led to hydrogen airships being rendered obsolete. The alternative lifting gas, helium gas is not flammable, but is rare and relatively expensive. Significant amounts were first discovered in the United States and for a while helium was only available for airship usage in North America. Airships were the first aircraft capable of controlled powered flight, and were most commonly used before the 1940s; their use decreased as their capabilities were surpassed by those of aeroplanes. From the 1960s, helium airships have been used where the ability to hover for a long time outweighs the need for speed and maneuverability, such as advertising, tourism, camera platforms, geological surveys and aerial observation. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/1/202433 minutes, 43 seconds
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Persuasion pt. 7

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Persuasion”, the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen, and published in 1817. The story concerns Anne Elliot, a twenty-seven year old Englishwoman, whose family moves in order to lower their expenses and reduce their debt, by renting their home to an Admiral and his wife. In the last episode, Anne Elliott is distressed by the frequent mention of Captain Wentworth, whom she realizes is the same man she once knew years ago. She steels herself for his arrival in the area, aware that she must learn to cope with his presence. The Musgroves, grateful for the care Captain Wentworth showed to their deceased son, are eager to meet him. Anne faces an emotional trial when Captain Wentworth arrives and quickly earns the admiration of the Musgrove family. However, Anne narrowly avoids meeting him due to a child's accident, which consumes her attention. Despite the child's recovery, Anne remains tense about seeing Wentworth. The Musgroves' praise of him deepens her turmoil, as she navigates her complex feelings and memories. When Anne finally sees Captain Wentworth briefly, she struggles with the realization that their long separation has not lessened her emotional response to him, despite her attempts at rationalizing the passage of time and the changes it brings. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/28/202433 minutes, 12 seconds
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The Wild Garden

Tonight, we’ll read from “The Wild Garden” by William Robinson, published in 1870. This episode first aired in 2021. Robinson was an Irish gardener and journalist whose ideas about wild gardening spurred the movement that led to the popularizing of the English cottage garden. He was a champion of the "wild garden", who vanquished the high Victorian pattern garden of planted-out bedding schemes, which used tropical plants grown in greenhouses. Modern gardening practices first introduced by Robinson include: using alpine plants in rock gardens; dense plantings of perennials and groundcovers that expose no bare soil; use of hardy perennials and native plants; and large plantings of perennials in natural-looking drifts. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/26/202446 minutes, 48 seconds
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The Lighthouse Keeper's Secret

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original titled “The Lighthouse Keeper’s Secret” where in a remote lighthouse, the keeper rescues a shipwrecked woman, who has amnesia and believes she is searching for hidden treasure. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/24/202432 minutes, 11 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 29

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Captain Nemo informs the crew that the weather is improving and plans to go ashore for observations. The narrator tries to bring Ned Land, but the Canadian refuses. After breakfast, they head to shore, traveling a league inland to a peak with observation instruments. During the journey, they see various southern whales. Reaching the summit after a difficult climb, Captain Nemo takes barometric readings and declares they are at the South Pole. He raises a black banner with a gold "N," claiming the land in his name. The next day, preparations to depart are made. The Nautilus encounters an iceberg, and after a terrible collision, it becomes trapped at an angle. The crew works to free the submarine, eventually righting it, but still surrounded by ice. As they navigate through the icy tunnel, they are dazzled by the refracted light. After another collision and the realization that all exits are blocked, Captain Nemo confirms they are trapped by shifting ice. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/21/202433 minutes, 40 seconds
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The Heavenly Pits

Tonight, for our monthly Snoozecast+ Deluxe bonus episode, we invite you to explore “The Heavenly Pits” with us. This story, written by Snoozecast, features a biologist whose solo expedition into a legendary sinkhole transitions from scientific exploration to mystical journey. If you would like to learn more about what Snoozecast’s premium subscription service offers, please go to snoozecast.com/plus. “Karst tiankengs” are colossal sinkholes formed in China. Tiankeng is Manderin for “Heavenly Pits”. These geological formations are not just natural wonders; they are also ecological hotspots. They contain ancient forests that seem to be teeming with life, and may conserve long-lost DNA of endangered species for researchers. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/20/20247 minutes, 15 seconds
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The Three Golden Apples

Tonight, we’ll read the story “The Three Golden Apples” written by Nathaniel Hawthorne and found in “A Wonder Book” originally published in 1851. This episode first aired in 2021. This is Hawthorne's retelling of Hercules’ search for three golden apples. Along the way he meets the Old Man of the Sea, a six-legged man creature and the mighty giant, Atlas. This story also features the Hesperides. In Greek mythology, they are the nymphs of evening and golden light of sunsets. The Hesperides love to sing, and they spend their time tending to Queen Hera’s apple orchard. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/19/202442 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Clocks of Rondaine

Tonight, we’ll read the story “The Clocks of Rondaine” adapted by Snoozecast and originally found in the compilation “Fanciful Tales” compiled by Frank R. Stockton and published in 1894. A clock or chronometer is a device that measures and displays time. The clock is one of the oldest human inventions, meeting the need to measure intervals of time shorter than the natural units such as the day, the lunar month, and the year. Devices operating on several physical processes have been used over the millennia. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/17/202431 minutes, 41 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 17

Tonight, we’ll read the 17th chapter of “Anne of Green Gables”, the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “A New Interest in Life”. Anne invites her best friend, Diana Barry, to tea at Green Gables. Anne is thrilled to host her first tea party and plans everything meticulously, including serving Marilla's prized raspberry cordial. However, Anne unknowingly serves Diana a different drink, currant wine, thinking it is the cordial. As they enjoy their time together, Diana drinks three glasses of the wine and becomes quite drunk, much to Anne's confusion. Diana's mother accuses Anne of deliberately intoxicating Diana and forbidding her daughter from ever associating with Anne again. Marilla quickly realizes the mix-up and tries to explain, but Mrs. Barry is unforgiving. Anne is devastated at her loss of friendship with Diana. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/14/202424 minutes, 19 seconds
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Bicycle Etiquette for Ladies and Gentlemen

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt about bicycle etiquette from “Twentieth Century Culture and Deportment for the Lady and Gentleman at Home and Abroad” by Maud C. Cook published in 1899.This episode originally aired in 2021. Bicycles and horse buggies were the two mainstays of private transportation just prior to the advent of the automobile. The grading of smooth roads in the late 1800s was stimulated by the widespread advertising, production, and use of bicycles along with horse buggies. By the turn of the century, when this book was written, cycling clubs flourished on both sides of the Atlantic, and touring and racing became widely popular.  — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/12/202442 minutes, 32 seconds
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Cape Verde Islands | Darwin's Voyage

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from the first chapter of Charles Darwin’s “The Voyage of the Beagle”. This chapter explores around the islands of Cape Verde. “The Voyage of the Beagle” is the title most commonly given to the book published in 1839 as Darwin’s “Journal and Remarks”, bringing him considerable fame and respect. This was the third volume of “The Narrative of the Voyages of H.M. Ships Adventure and Beagle”, the other volumes of which were written or edited by the commanders of the ships. “Journal and Remarks” covers Darwin's part in the second survey expedition of the ship HMS Beagle. Due to the popularity of Darwin's account, the publisher reissued it later in 1839 as “Darwin's Journal of Researches”. A republication of the book in 1905 introduced the title “The Voyage of the "Beagle"”, by which it is now best known. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/10/202431 minutes, 11 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 7

Tonight, we’ll read the 7th chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel and is considered the 30th chapter as part of that work as a whole. Our last episode was the chapter titled “Calls” in which Amy March, the youngest of the March sisters, navigates her social life and responsibilities. Amy is given the task of calling on the various high-society women in their town, a duty she undertakes with a mixture of determination and trepidation. As she visits each home, Amy observes and interacts with the women, learning valuable lessons about social etiquette, personal ambition, and the complexities of adult relationships. During her calls, Amy encounters a range of characters, from the pretentious and insincere Mrs. Chester to the more genuine and kind-hearted Mrs. Moffat. These interactions provide Amy with insights into the social expectations and superficial judgments that often govern society. Despite feeling somewhat out of place and intimidated, Amy maintains her composure and grace. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/7/202444 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Seaside Princess from Brazil

Tonight, we’ll read a Brazilian fairy tale called “The Seaside Princess from Brazil” or “Why the Sea Moans” from the collection by Elsie Spicer Eells’s “Fairy Tales from Brazil” published in 1917. This story was originally adapted and published by Snoozecast in 2021.The author Spicer Eells was an American researcher of folklore and a writer who traveled in the early years of the twentieth century across the Atlantic basin. Having traveled in the 1920s and ‘30s to various countries as a researcher at The Hispanic Society of America in New York, Eells was the author of numerous collections of short stories and legends based on the oral tradition of various regions she visited, including the Brazilian one we found.‍ — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/5/202433 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Rainbow

Tonight, we’ll read the beginning of “The Rainbow”, a novel by British author D. H. Lawrence. “The Rainbow” tells the story of three generations of the Brangwen family, a dynasty of farmers and craftsmen who live in the east Midlands of England, on the borders of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. The book spans a period of roughly 65 years from the 1840s to 1905, and shows how the love relationships of the Brangwens change against the backdrop of the increasing industrialisation of Britain. The first central character, Tom Brangwen, is a farmer whose experience of the world does not stretch beyond these two counties; while the last, Ursula, his granddaughter, studies at university and becomes a teacher in the progressively urbanised, capitalist and industrial world. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/3/202431 minutes, 58 seconds
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Persuasion pt. 6

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Persuasion”, the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen, and published in 1817. The story concerns Anne Elliot, a twenty-seven year old Englishwoman, whose family moves in order to lower their expenses and reduce their debt, by renting their home to an Admiral and his wife. In the last episode, Anne Elliot visits Uppercross and is struck by the stark contrast between the concerns of the Musgroves and those of her family at Kellynch Hall. Despite the short distance between the two places, the conversations and interests at Uppercross revolve around local and everyday matters like hunting, household management, and social gatherings, rather than the weighty and publicized affairs of Kellynch. Anne learns a humbling lesson about her own insignificance outside her familiar circle and resolves to integrate herself into Uppercross life, finding solace in the genuine sympathy of her friend Lady Russell. Anne's stay at Uppercross proves manageable, as she gets along with her sister Mary, enjoys the company of her nephews, and recognizes Charles Musgrove's amiable nature, despite his lack of intellectual zeal. She often acts as a mediator between her sister and the Musgroves, trying to balance their complaints and grievances. Anne's spirits are lifted by the change of scenery and subjects, and the visit of the Crofts, the new tenants of Kellynch Hall, stirs her emotions as they mention Captain Wentworth, a significant figure from her past. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/31/202432 minutes, 8 seconds
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Cooking with Chocolate

Tonight, we’ll read from “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes” by Miss Parloa. The Maya believed that cacao was discovered by the gods in a mountain along with other delectable foods, for their divine use. According to Maya mythology, the Plumed Serpent gave cacao to the Maya after humans were created by the divine grandmother goddess. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/29/202431 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Crow's Nest

Tonight, we’ll read a selection from “The Crow’s Nest”, also known as “On the other side of the latch” by Sara Jeanette Duncan, who also published as Mrs. Everard Cotes and Garth Grafton. Duncan worked as a travel writer for Canadian newspapers and a columnist for the Toronto Globe and eventually the Washington Post. Later she made a journey to India and married an Anglo-Indian civil servant thereafter dividing her time between England and India. She wrote 22 works of fiction, many with international themes and settings. Unlike her travel writing, The Crow’s Nest is a memoir of description and not action as Duncan spends her time in recovery at a mountain house in Simla, India as she undergoes a rest cure for tuberculosis. In the passage we’ll read tonight, Duncan pauses contemplating her current situation and turns her attention to the garden at the home where she is exiled. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/27/202433 minutes, 43 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 28

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Arronax and the crew of the Nautilus reach the South Pole. They encounter a scattered icebergs and various wildlife. Captain Nemo expresses uncertainty about their exact location and decides to take bearings. We pick up right after Arronax’s and Captain Nemo’s last conversation where they discuss the importance of taking observations the next day, as it marks the equinox and the last opportunity for six months to determine their position at the South Pole before the polar night descends. The captain expresses confidence that if they can see the sun exactly cut by the northern horizon at noon, it will confirm their location. Despite potential mathematical errors due to the equinox not necessarily beginning at noon, the captain is optimistic that their bearings will be accurate enough. They agree to reconvene after breakfast to choose a suitable observation post ashore. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/24/202430 minutes, 43 seconds
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The Buddha's Path

Tonight, we’ll read from “The Buddha’s Path of Virtue: A Translation of the Dhammapada” by F. L. Woodward. This episode first aired in 2021. The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures. This particular translation by Woodward was published by The Theosophical Society, which was founded by Madame Helena Blavatsky. You can listen to some of her travel memoir in our episode from January 2020 titled “Madame Blavatsky Visits Bombay | From the Caves and Jungles of Hindustan.” — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/22/202432 minutes, 45 seconds
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Koofy: Diary of a Robot Vacuum Cleaner

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original titled “Koofy: Diary of a Robot Vacuum Cleaner”. Koofy, a diligent vacuum cleaner from the KFY company performs his daily routines with humility. Initially a source of joy and fascination for the family’s toddler and baby, Koofy’s role takes an unexpected turn as the children’s reactions shift from amusement to cautiosness. Facing the possibility of retirement, Koofy finds solace and wisdom from some of the other kitchen appliances in their late night conversations. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/20/202435 minutes, 45 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 16

Tonight, we’ll read the 16th chapter of “Anne of Green Gables”, the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Diana is Invited to Tea with Tragic Results”. In the last episode, Anne attends school and is oblivious to Gilbert Blythe’s attempts to get her attention, which culminates in him teasingly calling her “Carrots”. Infuriated, Anne reacts impulsively by breaking her slate over Gilbert’s head, an act that causes a significant stir among their classmates. Anne is publicly shamed by Mr. Phillips, the teacher which deeply humiliates her and solidifies her resolve not to return to school under such disgrace. The incident also cements her animosity towards Gilbert, despite his attempts to apologize. She eventually decides to return to school when she realizes how much she would miss Diana. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/17/202436 minutes, 4 seconds
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Rumpelstiltzkin

Tonight, for our monthly Snoozecast+ Deluxe bonus episode, we’ll read a Snoozecast Original, inspired by the Brothers Grimm tale “Rumpelstiltskin”. In this reimagined version, a country miller’s daughter is thrust into the realm of kings and gnomes due to her father’s loud boasts. Greta must navigate royal demands and mystical deals to protect what is most precious to her. The tale of Rumpelstiltskin, with its origins steeped in European folklore, has been captivating audiences for centuries. First formally recorded by the Brothers Grimm in the early 19th century, the narrative explores the motifs of bargaining and naming, language and promises. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/16/20247 minutes, 14 seconds
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Canoe Cookery

Tonight, we’ll read from “Canoe and Camp Cookery : A Practical Cook Book For Canoeists, Corinthian Sailors and Outers” by H.H. Soulé [Soul-ay] under the pen name Seneca, published in 1893. This episode first aired in 2021. Canoes were developed by cultures all over the world. Until the mid-1800s the canoe was an important means of transport for exploration and trade, and in some places is still used as such. A canoe, in American English, is a lightweight narrow vessel, typically pointed at both ends and open on top. In British English, the term "canoe" can also refer to a kayak, while canoes are then called Canadian or “open” canoes to distinguish them from kayaks. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/15/202435 minutes, 1 second
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Daughter of the Sky

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Daughter of the Sky: The Story of Amelia Earhart” written by Paul L. Briand and published in 1960. As the New York Times wrote in their review of the book when it was published “While so many were struggling to keep themselves or their business intact, this fine, calm young woman from 1928 to 1937, experienced a whole series of spectacular successes.” Earhart was an American pioneer of aviation. In 1937 she disappeared over the Pacific Ocean while attempting to become the first female pilot to circumnavigate the world. During her life, she embraced celebrity culture and women's rights, and since her disappearance has become a cultural icon. Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean and she set many other records. Recently, in 2024, a company that operates unmanned underwater vehicles found via sonar what appears to be the remains of an airplane on the ocean floor near Howland Island. The object, shaped like her particular plane, was located along the path she had been expected to fly in the Pacific Ocean. More exploration, however, is necessary to confirm whether this is indeed Earhart's missing aircraft. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/13/202432 minutes, 45 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 6

Tonight, we’ll read the 5th chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel. Our last episode was the chapter titled “Domestic Experiences” in which Meg navigates her life as newlyweds with John. She also grapples with the expectations placed upon her (and which she places on herself) as a married woman, striving to embody the ideal of a "good little wife." Meg faces challenges as she navigates the complexities of married life, but also finds moments of joy and fulfillment in her role, learning the importance of compromise, communication, and mutual respect. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/10/202443 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Red House Mystery

Tonight, we’ll read from “The Red House Mystery” by A. A. Milne, published in 1922. This episode is dedicated to Kerry, who first recommended the author Milne to us. It was Milne’s only mystery novel, and yet it was immensely popular. It falls into the “locked room” whodunnit category. The setting is an English country house, where Mark Ablett has been entertaining a house party. The black sheep of his family arrives from Australia and a mystery ensues. There is a preface to this book by the author that reads “My dear Father, Like all really nice people, you have a weakness for detective stories, and feel that there are not enough of them. So, after all that you have done for me, the least that I can do for you is to write you one. Here it is: with more gratitude and affection than I can well put down here.” — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/8/202451 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Patagonia

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Patagonia” a story written by Henry James and published in 1888. Like many of James’s other stories, its origins were inspired by an anecdote relayed to him over the dinner table. It features a young woman on a long sea voyage going to meet the man to whom she is betrothed. This story also exemplifies two themes James is well known for. One being the contrasts between old and new worlds of America and England. The other is of the ‘new type’ of woman or the ‘self-made girl’ who pushes against the boundaries of social convention – at a cost to herself. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/6/202431 minutes, 46 seconds
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Persuasion pt. 5

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Persuasion”, the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen, and published in 1817. The story concerns Anne Elliot, a twenty-seven year old Englishwoman, whose family moves in order to lower their expenses and reduce their debt, by renting their home to an Admiral and his wife. In the last episode, Admiral and Mrs. Croft visit Kellynch to the great satisfaction of all parties. The deal of the renting of Kellynch Hall is settled. Mary complains that she is feeling unwell and Anne must stay with her instead of heading straight to Bath with Sir Walter and Elizabeth. Anne is pleased with the opportunity to be useful and not go to Bath so soon. Lady Russell and Anne share concern that Mrs. Clay plans to travel to Bath with Sir Walter and Elizabeth. She warns Elizabeth of the danger that their father may fall for the young woman, but Elizabeth rejects the notion as ridiculous and offensive. When Anne visits Mary, she finds her in a sour mood as is usual. Anne patiently perseveres in cheering up her sister, and the two take a walk to visit the Musgroves. We will pick up at the beginning of chapter 6. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/3/202433 minutes, 17 seconds
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Soria Moria Castle

Tonight, we’ll read the classic Norwegian folk tale “Soria Moria Castle” originally written by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe, and collected in “The Red Fairy Book”. In this story, a poor, lazy son named Halvor is offered the opportunity to go sailing at sea. A storm blows the ship far off course. Halvor eventually finds a mysterious land and starts his journey towards a castle. According to legend, the path to the castle is not clearly marked, and the journey is solitary because all people are different and therefore cannot reach the goal in the same manner. One of the most common values expressed is the idea of a common person rising above the circumstances of his birth and finding his own happiness and success. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/1/202432 minutes, 33 seconds
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At Home in the Smokies

Tonight, we’ll read a section from “At Home In the Smokies”, a History Handbook for Great Smoky Mountains National Park produced by the National Park Service and written by Wilma Dykeman and James Stokely. The Great Smoky Mountains, a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains, are renowned for their breathtaking beauty and rich history. Straddling the border between North Carolina and Tennessee, they boast the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the most visited national park in the United States. This majestic area draws millions of visitors each year with its ancient mountains, diverse ecosystems, and vibrant display of wildflowers, which bloom year-round. The Smokies are named for the natural fog that often hangs over the range, appearing as large smoke plumes from a distance. This mist is caused by vegetation exhaling volatile organic compounds, a phenomenon that adds to the mystical quality of the landscape. For tonight’s selection we’ll be reading the section titled “Birth of a Park” — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/29/202437 minutes, 45 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 27

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Arronax is puzzled over the direction in which the Nautilus is heading, wondering if Nemo is aiming to reach the South Pole. They are so far south that there are only a few hours of darkness per night. The Nautilus navigates through icebergs, and Arronax sees cities in their “surprising” shapes.As the submarine progresses, ice forms over its surface, and Arronax realizes that they have become trapped in a kind of vice. Nemo however, is confident that it will come loose, and that they will be able to go even further south. The Nautilus descends into the icy depths of the sea. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/26/202431 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Bad Little Owls

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Bad Little Owls” from the “Told at Twilight” series by John Breck. It was published in 1923. This episode first aired in May of 2021. A group of owls is called a parliament. This term supposedly originates from C.S. Lewis’ description of a meeting of owls in “The Chronicles of Narnia.” Many of the avian collective nouns originate in an anonymously published book from 1486 titled “ The Book of Hawking, Hunting, and Blasing of Arms”, later discovered to be written by a nun named Juliana Barnes. Some of the many terms from this book still in use today are an “exaltation of larks”, a “murmuration of starlings”, a “watch of nightingales”, a “sedge of herons”, and an “unkindness of ravens”. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/24/202434 minutes, 35 seconds
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Olive and the Endless Rain

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original tale about a furry friend. After 2 weeks of rain showers, Olive, the family’s “sassy senior” jack russell terrier takes it upon herself to bring an end to the ongoing downpour with the help of some other city creatures. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/22/202439 minutes, 24 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 15

Tonight, we’ll read the 15th chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne’s Confession”. In the last episode, Marilla believes Anne lost Marilla’s special brooch and accuses her of lying. To punish her, Marilla disallows Anne to attend the much anticipated Sunday school picnic. Eventually, after much despair, Anne confesses for the crime she did not commit. Then Marilla finds that she herself lost her brooch when she finds it. Anne then gets to attend the Sunday school picnic after all. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/19/202447 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Spelling Bee

Tonight, for our monthly Snoozecast+ Deluxe bonus episode, we invite you to immerse yourself in a tale crafted by Snoozecast, set at a one room school house in the 1910s. If you would like to learn more about what Snoozecast’s premium subscription service offers, please go to snoozecast.com/plus. A spelling bee is a competition in which contestants are asked to spell a broad selection of words, usually with a varying degree of difficulty. To compete, contestants must memorize the spellings of words as written in dictionaries, and recite them accordingly. The concept is thought to have originated in the United States, and is almost exclusive to the English language. Historically, the word “bee” has been used to describe a get-together for communal work, like a husking bee, a quilting bee, or an apple bee. Why was it referred to as a “bee”? The word bee probably comes from the dialectal “been” meaning "help given by neighbors". This in tern originated from Middle English’s “bene”, meaning "prayer", "boon" or "extra service by a tenant to his lord". Spelling bees became widespread across the United States during the 19th century, as a way to motivate students to learn standardized spelling. These spelling bees were usually held within individual schools and towns, and were not nationally organized. Soon after the dawn of the 20th century, the "first national spelling bee" was held. Marie Bolden, a young Black student from Cleveland, was named the first champion in 1908. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/18/20247 minutes, 11 seconds
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The Ugly Duckling

Tonight, we’ll read “The Ugly Duckling”, a Danish fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen, originally published in 1843. Snoozecast originally aired this episode back in 2021. Unlike most fairy tales, this one is completely Andersen's invention and owes no debt to humanity’s vast cultural catalog of fairy tales or folklore. Apparently Andersen grew up awkward and tall, with a big nose and feet. Furthermore, speculation suggests that Andersen may have been the illegitimate son of Prince Christian Frederik who later became king of Denmark. Being a swan in the story was a metaphor not just for inner beauty and talent in that case, but also for secret royal lineage. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/17/202433 minutes, 8 seconds
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Charles Augustus Milverton pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The first half aired last week. In the first half, Holmes was hired by the débutante Lady Eva Blackwell to retrieve compromising letters from a blackmailer named Milverton. The accused was known as "the king of blackmailers" where he would demand great sums in exchange for avoiding the release of letters that would cause great scandals. Holmes, intrigued by the challenge and the injustice of Milverton's actions, agrees to take on the case. He sees it as an opportunity to thwart a master blackmailer and bring him to justice. As Holmes delves into the matter, he learns more about Milverton's methods and reputation. Milverton is known for his ruthlessness and lack of scruples; he preys on the secrets and vulnerabilities of others for his own profit. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/15/202439 minutes, 24 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 5

Tonight, we’ll read the 5th chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel. Originally, Alcott had it published as a second book but in later publishings the two were combined. Our last episode was the chapter titled “Literary Lessons” in which Jo, consumed by her writing fervor, neglects basic needs as she delves into her craft. She shifts focus from romances to thrillers inspired by a chance encounter. Entering a contest, she wins $100, enabling her to send Beth and Marmee for a seaside retreat. Her new genre proves lucrative, supporting her family. Though facing revisions and mixed reviews, she ultimately earns several hundred dollars from her published novel. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/12/202452 minutes, 40 seconds
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The Herbal Handbook

Tonight, we’ll read from “The Complete Herbal” written by Nicholas Culpeper, published in 1653. Culpeper was an English botanist, herbalist, physician and astrologer. This episode first aired in April of 2021. Culpeper cataloged hundreds of outdoor medicinal herbs. He attempted to make medical treatments more accessible to lay persons by educating them about maintaining their health. Ultimately his ambition was to reform the system of medicine by questioning traditional methods and knowledge and exploring new solutions for ill health. The systematisation of the use of herbals by Culpeper was a key development in the evolution of modern pharmaceuticals, most of which originally had herbal origins. Culpeper's emphasis on reason rather than tradition is reflected in the introduction to his Complete Herbal. He was one of the best-known astrological botanists of his day, pairing the plants and diseases with planetary influences. Culpeper believed medicine was a public asset, not a commercial secret, and the prices physicians charged were far too high compared with the cheap and universal availability of nature's medicine. For this, he was considered a radical, and even accused of witchcraft. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/10/202448 minutes, 30 seconds
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Charles Augustus Milverton pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to “The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The second half will air next week. In this story, Holmes is hired by the débutante Lady Eva Blackwell to retrieve compromising letters from a blackmailer named Milverton. The accused was known as "the king of blackmailers" where he would demand great sums in exchange for avoid the release of letters that would cause great scandals. The character of Charles Augustus Milverton was based on a real-life blackmailer, Charles Augustus Howell. He was an art dealer who swindled an unknown number of people. Doyle's literary inspiration often came from his natural interest in crime, and he had no tolerance for those that preyed on the innocent and unsuspecting. The character of Charles Augustus Milverton was based on a real-life blackmailer, Charles Augustus Howell. He was an art dealer who preyed upon an unknown number of people, and died in 1890 from circumstances as bizarre as those found in the author’s imagination. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/8/202431 minutes, 48 seconds
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Persuasion pt. 4

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Persuasion”, the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen, and published in 1817. The story concerns Anne Elliot, a twenty-seven year old Englishwoman, whose family moves in order to lower their expenses and reduce their debt, by renting their home to an Admiral and his wife. In the last episode, Sir Walter Elliot considers a Navy tenant for Kellynch Hall, dismissing the idea due to his disdain for the Navy's influence on social status and appearance. However, flattery sways him. Mr. Shepherd, his advisor, proposes Admiral Croft, emphasizing his respectability and lack of children. Despite initial reservations, Sir Walter agrees due to the Admiral's suitable social standing. Meanwhile, Anne Elliot's unresolved feelings for Captain Wentworth resurface. Seven years ago, Anne's engagement to Captain Wentworth was thwarted by familial pressure and societal expectations, particularly from Lady Russell. Heartbroken but obedient, Anne acquiesced, sacrificing her own happiness for perceived social propriety. We will pick up towards the end of chapter 4. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/5/202435 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Velveteen Rabbit | Redux

Tonight, we’ll read the complete story of “The Velveteen Rabbit”, a British children's book written by Margery Williams in 1922. It chronicles the story of a stuffed rabbit's desire to become real through the love of his owner. Snoozecast first aired a version of this story that didn’t include the ending back in 2019. Many listeners requested the ending, so we rerecorded it in 2021, and are rebroadcasting it now. We hope you enjoy it as much this lovely tale as much as we do!  — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/3/202443 minutes, 41 seconds
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Nibbles Poppelty-Poppett

Tonight, we’ll read “Nibbles Poppelty-Poppett, The Story of a Mouse” written by Edith B. Davidson and published in 1911. In this story, Nibbles the mouse sets out to seek his fortune. Along the way, he encounters a peculiar inn run by guinea pigs, where he struggles to find food until he meets a sleepy but hospitable Salamander. After a hearty meal, the Salamander shares his love for coziness and poetry with Nibbles. If you enjoy this sort of story, be sure to find the other recent Snoozecast episode by this author, titled “The Bunnikins-Bunnies and the Moon-King”. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/1/202439 minutes, 46 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 26

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, the Nautilus passes through the Sargasso Sea, an underwater lake where currents meet, filled with aquatic plants. During this time, Aronnax wonders if Nemo will ever release them. He sees little of Nemo, and they spend much of their time on the surface. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/29/202432 minutes, 32 seconds
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The House of Mirth

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The House of Mirth,” a 1905 novel by American author Edith Wharton. Snoozecast first aired this story in 2021. It tells the story of Lily Bart, a beautiful but impoverished New York City socialite. The commercial and critical success of “The House of Mirth” solidified Wharton's reputation as a major novelist. The central theme of “The House of Mirth” is essentially the struggle between who we are and what society tells us we should be. Thus, it is considered by many to be as relevant today as it was in 1905. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/27/202442 minutes, 50 seconds
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Prairie Eclipse

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original about two sisters who experience the eclipse of 1918 as it passed over their part of Kansas. In a quiet prairie town, Alice and Pearl find themselves caught in the path of a total solar eclipse. Together, they lay on a quilt in the farm field as day turns momentarily to night. In this story, set in the year 1918, the sisters used “smoked glass” as a prudent way to protect the eyes to view the eclipsing of the sun as the moon moves over it. Now, we know that smoked glass is unfortunately not sufficient protection, and recommend eclipse watchers to wear specialized solar glasses. Smoked glass was invented during the first telescopic viewing of a total solar eclipse by King Louis XIV of France. This method remained popular through the early 19th century, but by 1932 smoked glass started to fall out of favor. Either way, if you are in the path of totality, you do not need to use protection during the brief period of time when the sun is completely covered by the moon, referred to as “the totality.” — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/25/202426 minutes, 45 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 14

Tonight, we’ll read the fourteenth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne’s Confession”. In the last episode, titled “The Delights of Anticipation,” Anne excitedly shares with Marilla her plans for a Sunday school picnic. Eager for her first taste of ice cream, Anne persuades Marilla to let her attend, who agrees to prepare a basket of food. Despite Marilla's attempt to temper Anne's excitement, Anne insists on embracing anticipation rather than heeding advice from conservative figures like Mrs. Rachel. She also admires Marilla's amethyst brooch, her most treasured possession, and requests to hold it briefly. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/22/202432 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Farmer's Luck

Tonight, in our special monthly Snoozecast+ Deluxe bonus episode, we invite you to immerse yourself in a tale crafted by Snoozecast, drawing inspiration from an ancient Chinese Taoist parable. If you would like to learn more about what our premium subscriptions offer, go to snoozecast.com/plus. Our story centers on a farmer who embodies the Taoist principle of withholding judgment towards the events unfolding in his life. He understands that labeling occurrences as either good or bad fortune is futile, recognizing the inherent uncertainty of life. This timeless parable gained traction in the West largely due to the efforts of the self-styled "philosophical entertainer," Alan Watts. Renowned for his interpretations and popularizations of Buddhist, Taoist, and Hindu philosophies, Watts played a significant role in bridging Eastern thought with Western audiences. His lectures continue to resonate even after his passing, finding renewed popularity through regular broadcasts on public radio and more recently, on the internet. The majority of his recorded talks date back to the vibrant cultural landscape of the 1960s and early 1970s. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/21/20247 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Golden Mermaid

Tonight, we’ll read the fairy tale “The Golden Mermaid” from the “Green Fairy Book”. In this story, three princes are sent on a quest by their father, to find who it is who steals the golden apples from the King's tree. The youngest son befriends a wolf who is in reality a magician. With the aid of the wolf, the prince sets out to attempt an impossible task. Snoozecast first aired this story back in March of 2020. Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm were German academics, linguists, and folklorists. Their legacy is enshrined in their monumental work, "Grimm's Fairy Tales," which comprises folk stories collected from oral traditions across Germany and Europe. Despite facing adversity in their early lives, they dedicated themselves to scholarship and preserving cultural heritage. Their profound impact on literature transcends generations and borders. Through meticulous research and dedication, they compiled and edited tales that continue to enchant and inspire readers worldwide. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/20/202430 minutes, 45 seconds
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Carolus Rex

Tonight, we’ll read from the opening to “History of Charles XII” written by French writer and philosopher Voltaire. It was first published in 1731. In this first major historical biography from the author, Voltaire tells the story of a warrior king who was the embodiment of the archetypal ‘hero’. Voltaire’s Charles was a leader both admirably strong and unabashedly tyrannical. Charles XII, also known as Carl XII or Carolus Rex, was the king of Sweden and what is now Finland. Charles assumed power at the age of 15. His reign lasted for about 20 years, ending in the year 1718. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/18/202431 minutes, 41 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 4

Tonight, we’ll read the fourth chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel. Originally, Alcott had it published as a second book but in later publishings the two were combined.   Our last episode was the chapter titled “Artistic Attempts” In it, Amy grows serious in her undertaking to become a real artist. Aunt March has enrolled her in a drawing class, and as a result she experiments with many methods as the results collect around the house.  Amy then invites her drawing class for lunch. Determined to provide a proper meal, she promises to cover expenses. Despite initial support from her mother, Jo finds the plan frivolous. Preparation proves challenging: costs soar, and the weather dampens spirits. None of the guests show up, leaving the family to salvage what they can of the meal. Hope lingers for the next day, but with no provisions at home, Amy ventures out for a lobster. She manages to persuade one guest to join, salvaging the occasion. Though embarrassed, the family accommodates the unexpected guest. Amy and her friend enjoy a pleasant day together, despite the setbacks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/15/202432 minutes, 33 seconds
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Vegetable Candy

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from “Candy-Making Revolutionized: Confectionary from Vegetables” by Mary Elizabeth Hall, printed in 1912. Long-time listeners may recall that this episode first aired back in 2020. Confectionery is the art of making confections, which are food items that are rich in sugar and carbohydrates. It can be divided into two broad categories: bakers' confections and sugar confections. Before sugar was readily available in the ancient western world, confectionery was based on honey. Honey was used in ancient civilizations to preserve perishable and delicate fruits and flowers. The ancient Persians, followed by the Greeks, made contact with the Indian subcontinent and spread sugar agriculture from what was thought of as the native Indian "reeds that produce honey without bees". Generally, confections are low in micronutrients and protein but high in calories. Many confections are considered empty calories and ultra-processed foods. Hall wrote that her hope was that through this book “ the more vegetable candy is made, the less unhealthful confectionery there will be consumed. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/13/202431 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Wishing Well | Penny Parker

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Wishing Well” written by Mildred A. Wirt and published in 1942. In this story, an old abandoned estate is the location of a wishing well known for actually granting wishes. Penny investigates and discovers not only the secret of the well, but also a valuable treasure. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to check out our other Penny Parker series episodes by searching for our show titled “Snoozecast Presents: Penny Parker” wherever you listen to Snoozecast. Or, you can find Penny at snoozecast.com/series. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/11/202436 minutes, 25 seconds
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Persuasion pt. 3

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Persuasion”, the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen, and published in 1817. The story concerns Anne Elliot, a twenty-seven year old Englishwoman, whose family moves in order to lower their expenses and reduce their debt, by renting their home to an Admiral and his wife. In the last episode, Mr. Shepard and Lady Russell draw up a plan for Sir Elliot to get out of debt. They decide that he must "retrench" by seriously cutting back on his expenditures, which the gentleman refuses to do. They then suggest that Sir Elliot move out of his home in order to rent it out. The plan is agreed to by Sir Elliot, with his stipulations that it not seem like he is renting it for cost-savings but rather as a favor to the renter. It is further agreed to that during this time they will stay in the city of Bath, which has a lower cost of living and where their more limited budget will go farther. We will start back in with an abbreviated opening to chapter 3, where Sir Elliot is discussing the matter further with the group. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/8/202431 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Wild

Tonight, we’ll read "The Wild", sometimes known as “Walking”, a lecture by Henry David Thoreau first delivered in 1851. It is a transcendental essay that analyzes the relationship between man and nature, trying to find a balance between society and our raw animal nature. Thoreau read the piece a total of ten times, more than any other of his lectures. This episode first aired back in 2021.  — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/7/202430 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Bunnikins-Bunnies and the Moon King

Tonight, we’ll read the story titled “The Bunnikins-Bunnies and the Moon King” written by Edith B. Davidson, and published in 1912. In this early science-fiction story geared towards children, the Bunnikin-Bunnies go on a family vacation to the Moon, via the Milky Way. While traveling to the moon was not possible when this book was published in 1912, scientists were diligently laying down groundwork for the future accomplishments. In 1903, a Russian study showed that physical space exploration was theoretically possible using rockets. And by the end of the 1910s, an influential paper from the US discussed reaching extreme altitudes through rocketry. As for the Bunnikins-Bunnies, you will soon learn that their means of transportation was not on a rocketship, but on a vehicle that looked much like a fishing boat, but with large wings. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/5/202431 minutes, 50 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 25

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. Have you ever wished that a continuing Snoozecast story was easily available as a playlist so you could either start from the beginning, or play multiple episodes from just that story in a row, so that you don’t need to go searching through the catalog? In case you didn’t know, we also produce standalone versions of these stories as its own separate Snoozecast podcasts, for easy listening. Just search for “Snoozecast Presents” to find all the options available. And if you subscribe to Snoozecast+, you get complete access to all these series, ad-free. To learn more, go to snoozecast.com/plus . In the last episode, the captives aboard the Nautilus awaken one day to learn that they are now underground, inside an extinct volcano. The cave is used by Nemo as a place of refuge, where he sources the elements needed to produce the electricity that makes the Nautilus run. While Nemo spends the day loading up the reserve stock of sodium they keep down there, Arronax, Conseil, and Ned explore the volcanic island. They forage for food including a beehive full of honey, before returning the ship. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/2/202431 minutes
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Madam Blavatsky Visits Bombay | From the Caves and Jungles of Hindustan

Tonight, we’ll read the opening section from FROM THE CAVES AND JUNGLES OF HINDOSTAN, written by Helen Blavatsky and published in 1883. This episode first aired in January of 2020. Madame Blavatsky was a Russian occultist and philosopher who traveled around the world, including India, before moving to New York City. She co-founded the Theosophical Society in 1875 and gained an international following from the esoteric religion that the society promoted. Madame Blavatsky was a controversial figure, championed by supporters as an enlightened guru and derided as a fraudulent charlatan by critics. Her Theosophical doctrines influenced the spread of Hindu and Buddhist ideas in the West as well as the development of Western esoteric currents like the New Age Movement. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/29/202431 minutes, 11 seconds
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Forest Runes | Woodcraft

Tonight, for our final selection in our “Woodcraft” series, we will read selections of the author’s poetry, published as “Forest Runes” by George Washington Sears and published in 1887. Sears was a writer and adventurer who penned essays on hunting, fishing, and camping for popular journals and magazines. Runic alphabets are native to the ancient Germanic peoples, before they adopted the Latin alphabet. The earliest runic inscriptions found on artifacts give the name of either the craftsman or the proprietor, or sometimes, remain a linguistic mystery. Due to this, it is possible that the early runes were not used so much as a simple writing system, but rather as magical signs to be used for charms. Although some say the runes were used for divination, there is no direct evidence to suggest they were ever used in this way. The name rune itself, taken to mean "secret, something hidden", seems to indicate that knowledge of the runes was originally considered esoteric, or restricted to an elite. The Bluetooth logo is the combination of two runes that are the initials of Harald “Bluetooth” Gormsson's who was a king of Denmark from the Viking Age. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/27/202430 minutes, 1 second
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 13

Tonight, we’ll read the thirteenth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “The Delights of Anticipation”. In the last episode, titled “A Solemn Vow and a Promise,” Marilla is dismayed to hear about the wildflowers on Anne's Sunday school hat, and of course she lectures Anne about them. Though Anne points out many girls at church had bouquets pinned to their dresses—and many had artificial flowers on their hats—Marilla is worried about the bad impression Anne must have made. Marilla may have been more anxious than usual because she is about to bring Anne with her to meet Diana Barry, who lives close by and is Anne's age. As she has done in the past, she warns Anne of the importance of impressing Diana's strict mother. Out in the garden the two girls stare bashfully at each other until Anne breaks the silence by asking, "Do you think you can like me a little—enough to be my bosom friend?" It's an odd and startling question for someone Anne has just met, but Diana laughs and agrees. Diana says in response that, "I heard before that you were queer. But I believe I'm going to like you real well." — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/24/202424 minutes, 5 seconds
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The Princess of Babylon pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Princess of Babylon”, found in the The Strange Storybook by Mrs. Lang, published in 1913. The first half aired last week. This story first aired way back in 2020. The story is taken from a lesser known philosophical tale by Voltaire, written in 1768. Voltaire was a French Enlightenment writer, philosopher, satirist, and historian. Famous for his wit and social critiques, he was an advocate of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and separation of church and state. In the first episode, the king holds a competition of the world’s rulers who were interested in marrying his daughter, the princess. The games would be impossibly difficult. A handsome and magical stranger appears out of seeming thin air to win the games, however he is suddenly called away to care to matters at home. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/22/202434 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Sleep Crown

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original story about a family who is visited by the fairy Luminastra Slumbornia, who gives the gift of peaceful sleep. Like Luminastra, all fairies are a type of mythical being, a form of spirit, often with metaphysical, supernatural, or preternatural qualities. Let’s define those three common fairy qualities. The system of metaphysics is a philosophical branch dealing with the first principles of things. This includes abstract concepts such as being, knowing, substance, cause, identity, time, and space. And whereas a supernatural force is one that is beyond scientific understanding or the laws of nature, a preternatural force is one which is simply beyond what is normal or natural. An example would be to say that “autumn arrived with preternatural speed.” — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/20/202430 minutes, 5 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 3

Tonight, we’ll read the third chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel. Originally, Alcott had it published as a second book but in later publishings the two were combined. Our last episode was the chapter titled “The First Wedding” and it is Meg’s sweet, little wedding we attend. All of the March sisters look lovely as they’ve grown into themselves more over the last three years. When Laurie asks what happened to the fancy wine that his grandfather sent, Meg tells him that they have put a little aside for medicinal use and have given the rest away. Meg then asks Laurie to promise her to never drink alcohol. It is a tall order, but he can’t refuse her. As Meg departs to her new home down the road, she asks her family to keep her in their hearts. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/17/202438 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Midwinter Owl Prowl

Tonight, for our monthly Snoozecast+ Deluxe bonus episode, we’ll read an original story that is about the dark side of birdwatching. And by dark, we simply mean that it is done in the cold and silence of a winter night. For the residents of Russell Mills, it’s the night of the first annual “Midnight Owl Prowl”. Expert and amateur birders alike convene at midnight at Parsons Field, guided by a RMNRT volunteer, with hopes to spot the elusive Snowy Owl. Mostly solitary and nocturnal birds of prey, owls are typified by their upright stance, large, broad heads, binocular vision, binaural hearing, sharp talons, and feathers adapted for silent flight. Another notable feature of owls is their facial discs. These are the concave collection of feathers on owl’s faces surrounding their eyes. These facial discs collect sound waves and directs those waves towards the owl's ears. Owls can actually adjust their disc feathers to enable them to focus and locate prey by sound alone under snow, grass, and plant cover. In many species, these discs are placed asymmetrically, for better directional location. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ Deluxe to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/16/20247 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Princess of Babylon pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to “The Princess of Babylon”, found in the The Strange Storybook by Mrs. Lang, published in 1913. The second half will air next week. The story is taken from a lesser known philosophical tale by Voltaire, written in 1768. The story focuses on Amazan, a handsome, unknown shepherd, and Formosanta, the Princess of Babylon, whose love and jealousy drive them to travel the world. Through their travels they encounter the basic values of the Enlightenment. This episode first aired in January of 2020. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/15/202430 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Sleuths

Tonight, we’ll read a light-hearted O. Henry short story that creates a pastiche out of the popular Sherlock Holmes stories. In this story, a man searching for his missing sister in New York realizes the official police detective can’t help him. Only one man can: the famous private consulting detective named Shamrock Jolnes. Although many of O. Henry’s stories involve crimes or contain some elements of mystery, the author never actually wrote detective fiction. The character of Shamrock Jolnes also appears in O. Henry’s short stories "The Adventures of Shamrock Jolnes" and "The Detective Detector". In reading about these stories, we found different but similar terms like pastiche, parody, spoof and satire. While both parody and pastiche imitate the works of others, pastiche does so respectfully. It is used to highlight and pay homage to the original works while not stealing directly from it. Parody, on the other hand, mocks and ridicules the original works. It exaggerates its form and language, often replacing serious subjects with silly ones. And whereas a parody imitates a specific work, a spoof imitates a general genre. Finally, satire is similar to parody in that it uses ridicule, exaggeration and irony, but instead of poking fun at a specific creative work, it comments on society, religion and politics. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/13/202425 minutes, 43 seconds
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Persuasion pt. 2

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Persuasion”, the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen, and published in 1817. The story concerns Anne Elliot, a twenty-seven year old Englishwoman, whose family moves in order to lower their expenses and reduce their debt, by renting their home to an Admiral and his wife. The novel was well-received at it’s debut, but its greater fame came decades later, and continues to this day. In the first episode, we read chapter 1, in which we meet Sir Walter Elliot, a 54-year-old man of distinct ancestry, and his three daughters. The father prides himself on his good looks and family lineage. His eldest daughter, who most resembles him in personality and looks, is named Elizabeth. At 29 she is unmarried but attractive. His youngest daughter, Mary, has married a respectable local man. And then there is the middle child- Anne. She is also unmarried like Elizabeth, but at 27 years old has grown less attractive with age. Sir Walter feels that Anne is inferior to her sisters and often overlooks her. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/10/202433 minutes, 24 seconds
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Mr. Midshipman Easy

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Mr. Midshipman Easy,” an 1836 novel by Frederick Marryat, a retired captain in the Royal Navy. The novel is set during the Napoleonic Wars, in which Marryat himself served with distinction. This episode first aired in February of 2021. At fourteen, the naive Jack Easy leaves the luxury of his family estate in England and sails into a world of adventure aboard the sloop of war HMS Harpy. At first, Jack finds it hard to bear the discipline of naval life and is always getting himself into trouble. But soon he is bravely taming a band of mutinous seamen as the Harpy chases Spanish ships on the Mediterranean. This episode is dedicated to our many listeners who have requested Roald Dahl stories. Alas, he is not in the public domain yet for us to read. However, this particular author was listed as a literary influence on Dahl. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/8/202434 minutes, 14 seconds
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Dickens Visits Boston

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “American Notes” a travelogue written by Charles Dickens detailing his trip from the year 1842. While there he acted as a critical observer of North American society, almost as if returning a status report on their progress. Having arrived in Boston, he travelled as far south as Richmond, Virginia, as far west as St. Louis, Missouri and as far north as Quebec, Canada. The city he liked best on his trip? Boston. The inspiration for this episode came from our recent “Helen Keller” episode. Her autobiography references a story within another section of tonight’s book as inspiring Helen’s mother to seek out specialized education for her daughter. Dickens’s American journey was also an inspiration for his novel “Martin Chuzzlewit”. If you’ve been listening to our “Woodcraft” series of episodes lately, you may have heard mention of how the Woodcraft author named one of his famous hand-crafted canoes after a Chuzzlewit character. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/6/202432 minutes, 42 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 24

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Aronnax accompanies Nemo on an expedition at night without lanterns or anyone else. The two walk in darkness toward a red light for a couple miles before they climb up a platform of man-made stones and pillars. Aronnax realizes that the mountain they are climbing is a volcano, still emitting lava. They are visiting the fabled underwater ruins of Atlantis. The two men contemplate the scene and the history while the moon rises, before returning to the Nautilus as the sun rises. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/3/202430 minutes, 7 seconds
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Around the World in 80 Days

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Around the World in 80 Days,” a novel by Jules Verne published in 1872. In this story, Phileas Fogg of London and his newly employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a 20-thousand pound wager ( over two million pounds now) set by his friends. It is one of Verne's most acclaimed works.  — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/1/202432 minutes, 59 seconds
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Helen Keller's Autobiography

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “The Story of My Life” written by Helen Keller and published in 1903. The book details her early life, and especially her education. Helen Keller was an American author, disability rights advocate, political activist and lecturer. Born in Alabama, she lost her sight and her hearing after a bout of illness when she was still a baby. She had limited communicative capability as a little girl. Her mother became inspired after reading a travelogue from Charles Dickens that described a similar girl being educated. This led the family on a quest to find such education for their daughter. Finally, at the age of seven, Helen met her first teacher and life-long companion Anne Sullivan. Sullivan taught Keller language, including reading and writing. Keller later became the first deafblind person in the United States to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. In 1920, Helen Keller helped to found the American Civil Liberties Union. She traveled to over 40 countries with Sullivan, making several trips to Japan and becoming a favorite of the Japanese people. Keller met every U.S. president of her time, and was friends with many famous figures, including Alexander Graham Bell, Charlie Chaplin and Mark Twain. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/30/202431 minutes, 50 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 12

Tonight, we’ll read the twelfth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “A Solemn Vow and Promise”. In the last episode, titled “Anne’s Impressions of Sunday-School”, Marilla shows Anne the new dresses she has made for her, all of which are embarrassingly unfashionable. The next day, Anne goes to church and Sunday school alone, wearing one of her new ugly dresses. On the way, she picks a bunch of flowers and decorates her otherwise plain hat with them, an eccentric adornment meant to make up for the dress, but that causes other churchgoers to scoff. After church, Anne reports to Marilla that the service did not impress her. She says that the whole experience was quite unimaginative. Anne was able to survive the boring morning only by daydreaming. Marilla scolds Anne for her inattention at church but inwardly agrees with her. Although she never articulates her own criticisms of the minister and the Sunday school teacher, she, like Anne, has always felt that the church service is rather uninspiring. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/27/202425 minutes, 15 seconds
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The Maiden of the Mist

Tonight, we’ll read “The Maiden of the Mist” or “Anne of Geierstein”, by Sir Walter Scott, published in 1829. It is set mainly in Switzerland, shortly after the Battle of Tewkesbury in the 1400s. This episode originally aired in January of 2021. In this story, two exiles are on a secret mission to the court of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, hoping to gain his help in regaining the English crown from Edward IV. The two Englishmen get into difficulties in the Swiss mountains. They meet Countess Anne and her family, who are involved in the politics of the newly independent Swiss Confederation and plan to confront Charles with complaints about his conduct towards the Swiss nation. This book is part of a long series called The Waverley Novels. For nearly a century, they were among the most popular and widely read novels in Europe. Because Scott did not publicly acknowledge authorship until later, the series takes its name from Waverley, the first novel of the series released. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/25/202430 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Princess and the Pea

Tonight, for our 801st episode, we’ll read a Snoozecast original sleep story, inspired by the classic fairy tale “The Princess and the Pea”. First published by H.C. Andersen in 1835, the tale features a princess who is tested to become wife to a lonely prince. At under 400 words long, it is triflingly short. Yet though it be small, it has served as the inspiration for many culturally popular works. The story was adapted to the musical stage in 1959 as Once Upon a Mattress, with comedian Carol Burnett playing the play's heroine, Princess Winnifred the Woebegone. The musical was revived in 1997 with Sarah Jessica Parker in the role. The story has been adapted into three films as well a television production starring Liza Minelli. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/23/202430 minutes, 40 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the second chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel. Originally, Alcott had it published as a second book but in later publishings the two were combined. If you haven’t listened to the first part to the book, you can search in your podcast player for “Snoozecast Presents: Little Women”. You will find a standalone series available so that you can refresh your memory or start from the very beginning if you’d like. Our last episode opens after three years have passed since the conclusion of “Little Women”. Meg is about to get married. The war has ended, and Mr. March and Mr. Brooke have returned home. In the meantime, Meg has learned more about keeping house, and Amy has taken over Jo’s job caring for Aunt March. Jo has continued to write stories for the newspaper, while Laurie has passed the years at college. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/20/202427 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Amaterasu Particle

Tonight, for our monthly Snoozecast+ Deluxe bonus episode, we’ll read an original story about a mysterious cosmic ray that has baffled scientists around the globe. Where did it come from? What exactly was it? In our story, the phenomenon turns out to carry good fortune to the people of earth. Although the story begins and ends in science fiction, most of the science discussed including cosmic rays, interstellar distances and special relativity are not among other things. Cosmic Rays are high energy particles, usually protons, that originate from various sources within the Milky Way as well as from extragalactic sources . An international team of scientists use specialized equipment to detect, and study these rays which provide insight into the most energetic processes occurring in the universe. These processes include supernova explosions, active galactic nuclei and other astrophysical phenomena. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/19/20247 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Snow Queen pt. 3

Tonight, we’ll read the third part of a fairy tale called “The Snow Queen” by Hans Christian Andersen. The story centers on the struggle between good and evil as experienced by Gerda and her friend, Kay. The first part originallyaired on January 4th, 2021. This story is one of Andersen's longest and most highly acclaimed tales. It was also the inspiration for the Disney movie “Frozen.” In the second part, we follow little Gerda on her journey to find her friend Kay. She is bewitched and talks with flowers, and then gets caught up with a family of robbers. A raven tries to help her and leads her to a castle where he thinks he has seen her Kay. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/18/202444 minutes, 12 seconds
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Turning In | Woodcraft

Tonight, we’ll read our second-to-last selection in our “Woodcraft” series, published by George Washington Sears, under the pen name "Nessmuk." Sears was a writer and adventurer who penned essays on hunting, fishing, and camping for popular journals and magazines. This episode will feature the last chapter of the “Woodcraft” book. Next month, for the final episode in the series, we will read selections of the author’s poetry, published as “Forest Runes”. In this episode, the author discusses his preference for clinker-built canoes over other styles. A Clinker-built (also known as lapstrake) is a method of boat building in which the edges of hull planks overlap each other. Clinker-built ships were a trademark of Northern European navigation throughout the Middle Ages, particularly of the longships of the Viking raiders and traders. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/16/202428 minutes, 48 seconds
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Persuasion pt. 1

Tonight, to start off “Persuasion”, our latest addition to the Friday rotation of four ongoing stories, we shall read the opening to the book. Or rather, we shall “re-read” the opening, as we have once before read the opening to this novel, several years ago now. This was the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen, along with being considered her most mature and refined writing. “Persuasion” was published in 1817. The story concerns Anne Elliot, a twenty-seven year old Englishwoman, whose family moves to lower their expenses and reduce their debt by renting their home to an Admiral and his wife. The novel was well-received at it’s debut, but its greater fame came decades later, and continues to this day — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/13/202431 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Snow Queen pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the second part of a fairy tale called “The Snow Queen” by Hans Christian Andersen. The story centers on the struggle between good and evil as experienced by Gerda and her friend, Kay. The first part originally aired on January 4th, 2021. The story is one of Andersen's longest and most highly acclaimed stories. It was also the inspiration for the Disney movie “Frozen.” In the first part, we meet best friends, Gerda and Kay. We also learn of the wicked mirror that splinters into tiny pieces over the land. The shards sometimes land in unknowing people’s eyes or hearts, and cause them to be cold-hearted and mean-spirited. This happens to the little boy, Kay. Then he gets whisked away by the Snow Queen’s sled. Gerda goes in search of him, and meets a kindly witch. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/11/202444 minutes, 22 seconds
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The Priory School pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Adventure of the Priory School” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The first half aired last week. In last week’s episode, Holmes is approached by Dr. Thorneycroft Huxtable, the headmaster of the prestigious Priory School. Huxtable seeks Holmes's help in locating the missing Lord Saltire, the young heir to the Duke of Holdernesse. Lord Saltire disappeared under mysterious circumstances from the school. The Duke tells Holmes that he does not think that his estranged wife has anything to do with his son's disappearance, nor has there been a ransom demand. Holmes and Dr. Watson go hunting on the moor for clues. They find a bicycle track, but it is not the German school master Heidegger's. Almost everything observable has been obliterated by cow tracks (of which there are many tracks). We will pick up as they continue their search. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/9/202454 minutes, 53 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 23

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, harpooner Ned Land expresses his disappointment to Aronnax about their failed escape plan. Aronnax then fills him in about Nemo's treasure-filled “bank” of shipwrecks at the bottom of the sea. Although Land hopes for another chance, they realize that the Nautilus is departing. We will pick up where Nemo invites Aronnax alone to go with him on an underwater excursion. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/6/202432 minutes, 7 seconds
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The Snow Queen pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the first part out of three episodes to the fairy tale “The Snow Queen” by Hans Christian Andersen. The other two parts will air in the next two weeks. All three episodes first aired in January of 2021. The story centers on the struggle between good and evil as experienced by Gerda and her friend, Kay. The story is one of Andersen's longest and most highly acclaimed stories. It was also the inspiration for the Disney movie “Frozen.” — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/4/202445 minutes, 48 seconds
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The Priory School pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to “The Adventure of the Priory School” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The second half will air next week. Doyle ranked this story tenth in his list of his twelve favorite Holmes stories. In this story, Holmes is approached by Dr. Thorneycroft Huxtable, the headmaster of the prestigious Priory School. Huxtable seeks Holmes's help in locating the missing Lord Saltire, the young heir to the Duke of Holdernesse. Lord Saltire disappeared under mysterious circumstances from the school. If you can stay awake, you will find a plot that is filled with twists and turns, showcasing Holmes's keen observational skills and his ability to connect seemingly unrelated clues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/1/202448 minutes, 39 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 11

Tonight, we’ll read the eleventh chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne’s Impressions of Sunday School”. In the last episode, titled “Anne’s Apology”, Anne spends the entire next day sulking in her room, avoiding food and nursing her wounded pride. Concerned for Anne, Matthew, who hasn't been upstairs in four years, secretly creeps into her room after Marilla leaves. He persuades Anne to apologize to Mrs. Rachel, knowing Marilla won't change her mind about the punishment. Anne, less furious but still reluctant, agrees to apologize to please Matthew. Satisfied with his success, Matthew hurries away to avoid Marilla's disapproval of his interference. Anne and Marilla then visit Mrs. Rachel's house, where Anne initially displays shame and remorse. However, midway through the walk, her demeanor shifts to dreaminess. At Mrs. Rachel's, Anne theatrically apologizes, confessing to being a wicked and ungrateful girl. Mrs. Rachel readily accepts the apology, attempting to make amends for her own thoughtlessness by predicting Anne's red hair may turn auburn. Marilla, uneasy about the dramatic apology, senses that Anne enjoyed the punishment. Despite feeling it backfired, Marilla refrains from chastising Anne, and on their way home, Anne's simple gesture of holding Marilla's hand evokes a rush of unexpected maternal warmth, prompting Marilla to regain emotional control by emphasizing good behavior. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/30/202325 minutes, 44 seconds
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Lewis & Clark

Tonight, we’ll read from The Journals of Lewis and Clark. The Lewis and Clark Expedition, from 1803 to 1806, was the United States expedition to cross the newly acquired western portion of the country. The Corps of Discovery was a select group of Army and civilian volunteers under the command of Captain Meriwether Lewis and his close friend Lieutenant William Clark. This episode first aired in December of 2020. President Thomas Jefferson commissioned the expedition shortly after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 to explore and to map the newly acquired territory, to find a practical route across the western half of the continent, and to establish an American presence in this territory before other powers tried to claim it. The campaign's secondary objectives were scientific and economic: to study the area's plants, animal life, and geography, and to establish trade with local American Indian tribes. The expedition returned to Jefferson, with maps, sketches, and journals in hand. — read by 'M' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/28/202330 minutes, 17 seconds
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Adrian and the Unicorn's Reality

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original story called “Adrian and the Unicorn’s Realm”. This is the follow up story to last month’s episode titled “Adaline and the Unicorn’s Realm.” In this story, Adrian, a budding artist with a penchant for vibrant designs, stumbles upon an otherworldly revelation guided by a mysterious figure. He discovers the enchanting potential of his own creations to transport him into a realm beyond imagination, where a unicorn emerges as a mystical guide between the tangible and the extraordinary. In the study of classical antiquity, unicorns are not found in Greek mythology, but rather in the accounts of their natural history. Greek writers of natural history were convinced of the reality of unicorns, which they believed lived in India, a distant and fabulous realm for them. The earliest description described them as wild asses, fleet of foot, having a horn over two feet in length, and colored white, red and black. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/25/202344 minutes, 45 seconds
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Good Wives ch. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the first chapter to “Good Wives” written by Louisa May Alcott. This is also known as the second half of the “Little Women” novel. Originally, Alcott had it published as a second book but in later publishings the two were combined. This book picks up three years later as Meg is preparing for her wedding. As always, Snoozecast episodes on Fridays are on a rotation of four current books. When one finishes, we will replace it with something new. This way you can be assured that any series on Fridays will always come out at least once a month. Another detail about Snoozecast is that we have many different series available separately from our primary Snoozecast show. If we are still adding new episodes to a series, it is fully available for anyone to listen to. Once a series is completed, it will eventually be made only fully available to our Snoozecast+ listeners. To find a list of current series available for free, and which ones are only fully available to our premium subscribers, go to snoozecast.com/plus. Because “Good Wives” is a continuation of “Little Women”, we have decided to make the “Snoozecast Presents: Little Women” standalone series available to the public again as well, so that you can refresh your memory or start from the very beginning if you’d like. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/23/202343 minutes, 32 seconds
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Baxter's Midnight Flight

Tonight, for this monthly Snoozecast+ Deluxe bonus, we’ll read an original story about a curious kitten named Baxter. He accidentally falls whiskers over paws into Santa’s sack during a midnight visit, and is soon whisked away to fall off lands to see new sights. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/22/20237 minutes, 13 seconds
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Armadale

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from Wilkie Collin’s 1864 novel “Armadale.” It is the third of his four 'great novels' of the decade: after “The Woman in White” and “No Name”, and before “The Moonstone.” This is Snoozecast’s third-and-a-half time featuring Collins’ work. If you enjoy this episode, you can also find our “Moonstone” episode from March 2019, our “Woman in White” episode from December 2019, and the “Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices” from July 2020, which Collins co-wrote with his friend Charles Dickins. This episode first aired in December of 2021.  — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/21/202331 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ma’ame Pélagie

Tonight, we’ll read the short story “Ma'ame Pélagie” written by Kate Chopin [Show-Pan]. Chopin was an American author of short stories and novels based in Louisiana. Her major works were two short story collections (of which this story is found) and two novels. One of those novels, “The Awakening” is what she is best known for today. Snoozecast read an excerpt back in 2019, but it has been much too long since we have read any more from this author. Kate Chopin lived in a variety of locations, based on different economies and societies. These were sources of insights and observations from which she analyzed and expressed her ideas about late 19th-century Southern American society. She based many of her stories and sketches on her life in Louisiana. They expressed her unusual portrayals (for the time) of women as individuals with separate wants and needs. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/19/202332 minutes, 45 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 42 Finale

Tonight, we shall read the final part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. This has been our longest running series as we started reading it way back in the summer of 2019. Welcome to all our newer listeners, and a sincere thank you to our listeners that have been following along throughout these four years. In the last episode, Darcy and Elizabeth take a long walk together alone. They are joyful to learn that they both would like to be married. Elizabeth discovers that she has Lady Catherine to thank for Darcy’s visit, for she had told him of Elizabeth's refusal to promise not to accept him. Darcy also explains how her previous reproofs of him made him realize how rude and spoiled he had been. He made it his aim to show her he had changed. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/16/202341 minutes, 39 seconds
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The Precious Fishing Hook

Tonight, we’ll read a Japanese tale adapted by Snoozecast called “The Precious Fishing Hook” or “The Happy Hunter and the Skillful Fisher.” It was originally found in “Japanese Fairy Tales” compiled by Yei Theodora Ozaki. If you enjoy this sleep story, be sure to check out our other ones that come from the same book. “The Bamboo-Cutter and the Moon Child” is a two-parter that first aired in April of 2019. “Momotaro” also aired in April 2019. “The Fisher-Boy Urashima” aired in May of 2020. And this particular story originally aired in November of 2021. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/14/202336 minutes, 45 seconds
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Westward Hoboes

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Westward Hoboes” written by Winifred Hawkridge Dixon and published in 1921. In this story, two early 1920s girls from Boston set out to tour the West all by themselves, equipped with a sturdy car, a camping outfit, courage and a sense of humor. A hobo is an old-fashioned term for a migrant worker in the United States. Hoboes, tramps, and bums are generally regarded as related, but distinct. A hobo travels and is willing to work. A tramp travels, but avoids work if possible. A bum neither travels nor works. Following these definitions, it seems that the protagonists should have been referred to as tramps instead of hoboes, as they were only traveling, not working. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/12/202331 minutes, 36 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 22

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, the submarine the Nautilus glides quickly through the Mediterranean Sea, to the chagrin of Ned Land, who was really hoping to make his escape. Aronnax and Conseil were less eager, but agreed to go with Ned. Soon, however, they find themselves in the rough seas of the Atlantic. Ned is not swayed, and insists that they must make their break that night, at 9 pm. While Aronnax wrestles with conflicted feelings on this, he prepares himself to leave. As the time approaches, the submarine suddenly stops. There is no sign of Ned where Aronnax waits in the salon. Nemo suddenly appears and launches into an impromptu Spanish history lesson, where we will pick up the story. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/9/202328 minutes, 19 seconds
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The Nutcracker

Tonight, we’ll read an adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ “The Nutcracker of Nuremberg” story, originally published in 1844. Dumas’ version of The Nutcracker was itself adapted from the original, written by E.T.A. Hoffman. However it was Dumas adaptation that gave inspiration to the famous “Nutcracker” ballet composed by Tchaikovsky. This episode originally aired in December of 2021. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/7/202347 minutes, 19 seconds
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Canoes, the Poor Man's Yacht | Woodcraft

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “Woodcraft” published by George Washington Sears, under the pen name "Nessmuk." Sears was a writer and adventurer who penned essays on hunting, fishing, and camping for popular journals and magazines. This chapter is called “Canoeing”. In contemporary times, the author lives on not just through his writing but through his canoe. In fact, one of the most celebrated canoes in American canoeing annals and referred to as “the Nessmuk”. Historic replicas of this canoe can be purchased so that canoeists can paddle in one just like the one commissioned by the author for his famous 1880 Adirondack cruise. This type of craft has come to be generically known as the Adirondack Pack canoe, and is the best way to obtain the smallest, lightest solo recreation paddle craft. Incredibly handy to paddle and transport, the Nessmuk is still known to surprise paddlers with her quickness and seaworthiness. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/5/202330 minutes, 45 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 10

Tonight, we’ll read the tenth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne’s Apology”. In the last episode, titled “Mrs. Rachel Lynde Is Properly Horrified”, Anne has been settling in at Green Gables for the last couple weeks, when Mrs. Rachel Lynde pays a visit. She would have visited sooner, but had been laid up with a bout of grippe, which is an archaic term for the flu. Mrs. Lynde sees any orphan as suspicious as a rule, and when Anne comes in from playing outside, she is messy, dirty, and in ill-fitting orphanage clothes. The lady does not hold her tongue on how she perceives Anne- as a homely, pathetic creature with “hair as red as carrots”. Anne in return also does not hold back- and calls Mrs. Lynde fat, clumsy and without imagination. Later, Marilla talks to Anne privately and insists that while Mrs. Lynde may have deserved what she got, she was still Anne’s elder and must be treated with an expected amount of courtesy. Otherwise, it would harm not only Anne’s reputation in the community but also Marilla’s. Thus, Anne would need to muster up the courage to apologize — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/2/202328 minutes, 5 seconds
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Entertaining Luncheons

Tonight, we’ll read from “For Luncheon and Supper Guests” written by Alice Bradley published in 1923. “Luncheon” is the formal word for lunch, a light mid-day meal. In the Middle Ages, before electric lighting and industrialization, the mid-day meal was large and considered dinner. There was no lunch, so later in the evening a lighter meal was had called “supper”. But by the 1800s, the large meal of dinner was pushed into the evening and thus, not only was supper squeezed out, but there was a need for something to eat in between breakfast and dinner. Up until the early 1800s, luncheon was generally reserved for ladies, who would often have lunch with one another when their husbands were out. The meal was often made up of left-overs from the previous night's plentiful dinner. Beginning in the Victorian era, afternoon tea supplemented this luncheon at four o'clock. This episode first aired in November of 2021. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/30/202346 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Clock Strikes Thirteen | Penny Parker

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Clock Strikes Thirteen” part of the “Penny Parker” anthology written by Mildred Wirt, also known by Mildred Benson. It was originally published in 1942. Penny Parker was a high school student turned sleuth who also sporadically worked as a reporter for her father's newspaper. In this story, Penny investigates mysterious riders who are bothering farmers at night. Meanwhile, a man makes a suspiciously generous donation to the Riverview orphan's camp. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/28/202328 minutes, 43 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 9 Finale

Tonight, we’ll read the final part to “The Boxcar Children” written by school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and originally published in 1924. We are reading this original, full version, and in it the children’s last name is Cordyce. Later, in 1942, the stories were revised shorter, and the children’s last name was changed to Alden. As Warner wrote the story, she read it to her first grade class and rewrote it many times so the words were easy to understand. Some of her pupils spoke other languages at home, so the book gave them a fun story that was easy to read. Warner once wrote that the original book "raised a storm of protest from librarians who thought the children were having too good a time without any parental control! That is exactly why children like it!" In the last episode, the children and their grandfather are reunited. He is not only overjoyed to invite them to live with him (rather than out in an old boxcar in the woods) but he happens to live in a mansion with plenty of extra room. We will pick up on the tail-end of their grand tour of their new home. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/25/202326 minutes, 2 seconds
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In the Mist of the Mountains

Tonight, we’ll read from “In the Mist of the Mountains,” by Australian novelist and children’s writer Ethel Turner, published in 1906. Her best-known work is her first novel, Seven Little Australians (1894), which is widely considered as a classic of Australian children's literature. Turner was awarded a number of prestigious literary awards and could be considered one of Australia's best-loved authors. This story is set in a tiny mountain vacation town during tourist season. This episode first aired in November of 2021. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/23/202333 minutes, 38 seconds
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Adaline and The Unicorn's Realm

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original story, unveiling the tale of a girl briefly transported into a mysterious and enchanting reality. As an adult, she grapples with a dual existence—navigating her public persona as an acclaimed artist while nurturing a clandestine passion for rediscovering the mystical realm. Commissioned for conventional paintings, she conceals a world teeming with vibrant and fantastical creations. The unicorn is a legendary creature that has been described since antiquity as a beast with a single large, pointed, spiraling horn projecting from its forehead. In European literature and art, the unicorn has for the last thousand years or so been depicted as a white horse-like animal with a long straight horn with spiralling grooves, cloven hooves, and sometimes a goat's beard. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it was commonly described as an extremely wild woodland creature, and a symbol of purity and grace. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/21/202336 minutes, 17 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 41

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Elizabeth’s father stuns her with his congratulations on her upcoming engagement. He reads a letter he received from Mr. Collins in which Elizabeth is cautioned not to go forward with an engagement to Darcy against Lady Catherine's wishes. Mr. Bennet thinks this is simply a ridiculous rumor because he is certain that Elizabeth hates Darcy and that Darcy is indifferent to her. Elizabeth fakes laughter to hide her embarrassment about her father's misjudgment while she privately wonders if her father might be on to something. Could she have overestimated Darcy's interest? A few days later, Darcy and Bingley visit Longbourn. They all go for a walk and Elizabeth and Darcy soon find themselves alone. Elizabeth cannot contain her gratitude any longer for all that Darcy suffered and sacrificed for Lydia. Darcy tells Elizabeth that he did everything for her. Darcy says his feelings for her have not changed since his rejected proposal. Elizabeth confesses that her feelings have significantly changed. Darcy is overjoyed. That is where we will resume our story. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/18/202329 minutes, 48 seconds
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The Golden Pumpkin Pie

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast+ Deluxe original story about uncovering a special pumpkin pie recipe to feed the community at Thanksgiving. Faced with the impending sale and demolition of Acorn Hollow's textile mill, Emma O'Connell decides that the way to bring everyone together is through their stomachs. A day of Thanksgiving in America had been a sporadic occurrence for most of the country’s history, typically being an autumn harvest feast although sometimes occurring at other times of the year. A Thanksgiving feast was primarily a social gathering, although sometimes some prayer was involved. It wasn’t until 1863, when President Lincoln proclaimed that November 26th would be a national Thanksgiving Day, to be observed every year on the fourth Thursday of November. Today, Thanksgiving is a time when many families come together, and many churches are open for special services. We have both Native Americans and immigrants to thank for the opportunity to observe a day of thanksgiving. — read by 'V' — This has been written exclusively for our Snoozecast+ Deluxe listeners. To learn more, go to Snoozecast.com/plus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/17/20237 minutes, 12 seconds
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Aunt Susanna's Thanksgiving Dinner

Tonight, we’ll read the short story “Aunt Susanna’s Thanksgiving Dinner” written by Lucy Maud Montgomery in 1907. This is a heart-warming holiday tale from the author of “Anne of Green Gables.” Maud was a prolific writer, with over 500 short stories and poems to her name, along with some 20 novels. This episode originally aired in November of 2021. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/16/202330 minutes, 47 seconds
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Stormy

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Stormy, Misty’s Foal” a children's novel written by Marguerite Henry and published in 1963. The Chincoteague pony, also known as the Assateague horse, is a breed of horse that developed, and now lives, within a semi-feral island population off the US states of Virginia and Maryland. The Chincoteague pony is one of the many breeds of feral horses in the United States, but it was made famous by the series of pony books written by this author about Misty, the mother of Stormy. The story describes events on the island during a powerful hurricane of 1962.  — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/14/202336 minutes
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 21

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, their submarine has navigated into the Mediterranean. Ned Land expresses his firm desire to escape the Nautilus, now that they have made it to European territory. Aronnax feels conflicted. He doesn’t like being held captive, however he is thrilled at the scientific exploration he has been allowed to make. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/11/202331 minutes, 41 seconds
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Cinderella

Tonight, we’ll read the fairy tale “Cinderella” taken from the old French tale by Charles Perrault originally published in 1697. This version has also been lightly adapted by Snoozecast. "Cinderella", also known as "The Little Glass Slipper", is a folk tale about the triumphant reward of a persecuted heroine. Thousands of variants are known throughout the world, since ancient times. This episode first aired in November of 2021. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/9/202337 minutes, 49 seconds
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Going It Alone | Woodcraft

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “Woodcraft” published by George Washington Sears, under the pen name "Nessmuk." Sears was a writer and adventurer who penned essays on hunting, fishing, and camping for popular journals and magazines. This chapter is called “A Ten Day’s Trip in the Wilderness- Going It Alone.” At 40 years old, Sears served in the Civil War. Five years later he traveled up the Amazon River in Brazil. At the age of 59, a little more than 5 feet tall, weighing less than 105 pounds, and weak with tuberculosis, Sears decided to see if the Adirondack lakes and forests could improve his health. Only then is when his experiences (and plentiful writings) as an Old Adirondack Woodsman began. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/7/202330 minutes, 45 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 9

Tonight, we’ll read the ninth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Mrs. Rachel Lynde is properly horrified”. In the last episode, titled “Anne’s Bringing-Up Has Begun”, Anne learns from Marilla that she can indeed stay at Green Gables permanently. Anne is so happy, she cries. Marilla instructs Anne to memorize the Lord’s prayer. Anne asks Marilla if she might find “a kindred spirit” in Avonlea. Marilla says there is another girl named Diana who is Anne’s age. Anne is excited to meet her, and excited to now officially be “Anne of Green Gables”. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
11/3/202327 minutes, 38 seconds
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Cat Tales

Tonight, we’ll read stories from “Pussy and Doggy Tales” written by English author and poet Edith Nesbit, published in 1899. Nesbit wrote or collaborated on more than 60 books of children's literature under the name E. Nesbit, along with being a political activist. This particular collection of stories follows the lives of various cats and dogs and will appeal to all of our animal-loving listeners. This episode originally aired in October of 2021. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
11/1/202332 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Kennel Maid

Tonight, we’ll read about the love between a kennel maid who is betrothed to a confirmed bachelor. It comes from the opening to the 1928 novel by Eden Phillpotts titled “Children of Men”. Phillpotts was an English author who maintained a steady output of more than three books a year for a half century. Many of his novels were about rural life. Eden is best known as the author of many novels, plays and poems about Dartmoor. His Dartmoor cycle of 18 novels and two volumes of short stories still has many avid readers despite the fact that many titles are out of print. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/30/202331 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 8

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Boxcar Children” written by school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. In the last episode, the children gather wild ginseng around their woodland home to sell to local pharmacies. Violet comes down with a fever and is taken to the doctor’s home. While she is being cared for there, the doctor secretly calls for the grandfather to come. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/27/202333 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Old Hawthorne Place

Tonight, for the final in our 5th annual Spooky Sleep Story Series, we’ll read a Snoozecast original story about a fictional New England town and the brother and sister who go out on a trick or treating adventure within it. While this is the end of this years spooky sleep stories, be sure to check out our freely available – called “Snoozecast Presents: Spooky Stories” or go to snoozecast.com/series to listen directly from our website. If you are a premium subscriber of Snoozecast+, all of our podcast series, including that one, are available to you ad-free.  — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/25/20231 hour, 11 seconds
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The Persian Throne

Tonight, we’ll read about the Persian empire at the zenith of its expansion from the book “The Retreat of the Ten Thousand” by Carl Witt, published in 1896. The ancient Persian or Iranian empire was the largest empire the world had ever seen at its time, spanning from the Balkans and Egypt in the west to Central Asia and the Indus Valley in the east. In the modern era, this empire has been recognized for its imposition of a successful model of centralized, bureaucratic administration; its multicultural policy; building complex infrastructure, such as road systems and an organized postal system; the use of official languages across its territories; and the development of civil services. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/23/202331 minutes, 47 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 40

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, soon after Jane accepts Bingley’s marriage proposal, Lady Catherine De Bourgh makes a surprise visit to Elizabeth. She says almost nothing to Mrs. Bennet, coolly inspecting the rooms and property, then asks Elizabeth to take a walk. Lady Catherine rudely interrogates Elizabeth. She simply cannot believe that Darcy would choose Elizabeth as a wife, and thus, she thinks he must have been tricked by her. Elizabeth boldly asserts her freedom of mind and freedom from the class concerns of Lady Catherine. In doing so, Elizabeth suggests that individuals can define themselves regardless of class or social prejudices. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/20/202334 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Harvest Festival

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast+ Deluxe original story about a visit to a harvest festival, by a grandfather and his two grandkids. They have a delightful afternoon of rides, games and treats, before an evening fireworks display that they barely stayed awake for. We think you may have trouble staying awake for it too! — read by 'V' — This has been written exclusively for our Snoozecast+ Deluxe listeners. To learn more, go to Snoozecast.com/plus.
10/19/20237 minutes, 7 seconds
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A Haunted Island

Tonight, as part of our Spooky Sleep Story Series, we’ll read our own lightly adapted version of Algernon Blackwood’s “A Haunted Island” from “The Empty House and Other Ghost Stories” published in 1906. In this story, our narrator is left alone for a few weeks at an island lodge in the middle of a lake in Canada, where he thinks he will focus on his studies, but soon begins to see and hear strange things. Tune in every Wednesday this month for sleep stories of the darker variety– lightly adapted and read in a way to evoke a mood of spookiness, without actually causing a fright. Catch up on previous years by finding our free podcast “Snoozecast Presents: Spooky Stories” or if you are a premium subscriber, look for “Snoozecast+” or “Snoozecast+ Deluxe: Spooky Stories” instead to listen ad-free — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/18/202331 minutes, 41 seconds
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The Solitary Cyclist pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The first half aired last week. In the first episode,Holmes is contacted by a beautiful young music teacher named Violet Smith. She's worried about a stranger who follows her when she bicycles to and from the train station each weekend. Violet Smith and her mother were living in poverty until few months ago, when two supposed friends of her uncle from South Africa, came to announce that he asked them to take care of his closest relatives. One the two men, Carruthers, is affable. He offers Violet an excellent wage to live in his house and teach music to his daughter, and he seems to grow fond of the young woman. The other one, Woodley, is rough and overly forward. Watson, asked by Holmes to visit and collect information, figures out that the mystery cyclist disappears by hiding in a hedge along the property of Mr. Williamson, a defrocked clergyman. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/16/202335 minutes, 41 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 20

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, while the passengers aboard the Nautilus approach the mysterious Arabian Tunnel that will whisk them to the Mediterranean, Ned insists on taking a detour in a dinghy to pursue a dugong. A dugong is actually a peaceful vegetarian, similar to a manatee, but in Jules Verne’s imagination it is a monstrous beast with large tusks. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/13/202332 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Raven

Tonight, for the next in our 5th annual “Spooky Sleep Story Series”, we shall read the narrative poem "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, published in 1845. The poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a distraught lover who is paid a mysterious visit by a talking raven. The lover, often identified as a student,[1][2] is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further antagonize the protagonist with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". By the way, “a bust of Pallas” refers to a sculpture of Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom. The fact that the narrator has one in his bedroom represents his interest in learning and scholarship, and also can be taken as representing his own rational, sane mind. The Raven, by landing on the bust when it flies into the room, signifies a threat to the narrator’s ability to understand the reasons (if any) behind the Raven’s coming and its message. That the Raven stays on top of the bust of Pallas at the end of the poem, never flitting, suggests that irrationality has taken up a permanent home in the narrator’s formerly rational mind. Poe claimed to have written the poem logically and methodically, with the intention to create a poem that would appeal to both critical and popular tastes. The poem makes use of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references. Its publication made Poe popular in his lifetime, although it did not bring him much financial success. It remains one of the most famous poems ever written. Tune in every Wednesday this month for sleep stories of the darker variety- like classic horror literature and ghost stories, read in a way to evoke a mood of spookiness, without actually causing a fright. Catch up on previous years by finding our free podcast “Snoozecast Presents: Spooky Stories” or if you are a premium subscriber, look for “Snoozecast+” or “Snoozecast+ Deluxe: Spooky Stories” instead to listen ad-free. — read by 'V' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/11/202318 minutes, 39 seconds
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The Solitary Cyclist pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to “The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The second half will air next week. In this adventure, Holmes and Watson are visited by a young lady named Violet Smith. She explains that her father's recent passing left her financially destitute and that her only other relative, an uncle named Ralph Smith, lives in Africa. One day, she meets two men visiting from South Africa, who claim to be friends of her now-deceased uncle. They claim that Ralph also passed on in poverty like his brother, but asked them to take care of his relatives. This was not one of Doyle’s favorites- he criticized himself for mentioning in this story that Violet Smith's visit to Holmes occurred on Saturday, April 23, 1895. In actuality, the 23rd of April that year fell on a Tuesday. — read by 'N' — Sign up for Snoozecast+ to get expanded, ad-free access by going to snoozecast.com/plus!
10/9/202337 minutes, 39 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 8

Tonight, we’ll read the eighth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne’s Bringing Up is Begun”. In the last episode, Marilla begins her program of moral and social education for Anne at bedtime. Anne expresses a distaste for God due to the insult of purposely giving her red hair. Marilla encourages Anne to create her own spontaneous prayer. Anne’s prayer is full of flowery speech, regarding her hopes for Green Gables to become her home, and to become pretty when she grows up. She ends the prayer by saying, “Yours respectfully, Anne Shirley.” Marilla resolves to send Anne to Sunday school as soon as possible. — read by 'N' —
10/6/202332 minutes, 49 seconds
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The Metamorphosis

Tonight, to start off our 5th annual “Spooky Sleep Story Series”, we shall read the opening to “The Metamorphosis”, written by Franz Kafka and first published in 1915. Tune in every Wednesday this month for sleep stories of the darker variety- like classic horror literature and ghost stories, read in a way to evoke a mood of spookiness without actually causing a fright. Catch up on previous years by finding our free standalone podcast series “Snoozecast Presents: Spooky Stories” or if you are a premium subscriber, look for “Snoozecast+” or “Snoozecast+ Deluxe: Spooky Stories” instead to listen ad-free. “The Metamorphosis” is referred to as a masterpiece of existential literature because of how it demands the reader to accept the absurdity of our lived modern human reality. Although some of the events may be fantastical, the ideas about existence, and humanity are highly relatable. — read by 'V' —
10/4/202336 minutes, 46 seconds
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Camp Cookery | Woodcraft

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “Woodcraft” published by George Washington Sears, under the pen name "Nessmuk." Sears was a writer and adventurer who penned essays on hunting, fishing, and camping for popular journals and magazines. The author was born in Massachusetts in 1821 as the oldest of 10 children. A young Narragansett Indian named Nessmuk ("wood drake") befriended him and taught him hunting, fishing, and camping. Later Sears took that as his pen name, and also as the name of a couple of his canoes. This episode refers a few times to an Old Woodsman who enjoys smoking “navy plug”. Th name for this strong, dark tobacco was given because sailors would fill a long canvas tube with tobacco (or tightly wrap rope around tobacco) and sometimes add flavourings like rum, fruits and spices. Then the tube was twisted tight, mimicking the pressing process. This technique created a dense roll, or “plug” of tobacco about an inch thick which could be cut into smaller pieces or coins. — read by 'N' —
10/2/202332 minutes, 19 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 7

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Boxcar Children” written by school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. The Boxcar Children tells the story of four orphaned children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny. They create a home for themselves in an abandoned boxcar in the forest. In the last episode, encouraged by the doctor, Henry spontaneously joins a community running race at a nearby town’s annual event. Little does Henry know that the race that he has won was sponsored by his own grandfather, James Henry Cordyce. His grandfather didn’t seem to realize this either, even though he was searching for his missing grandchildren. Also, sister Jessie and Violet resourcefully create printed letters for little Benny to start to learn how to read. — read by 'V' —
9/29/202330 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Mariposa Barbershop | Sunshine Sketches

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from the 1912 book Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town, from a chapter called “The Speculations of Jefferson Thorpe”. You won’t need to listen to the first episode in order to listen to this episode, as they are non-sequential vignettes. However, if you would like to find the first episode in this series, it aired on August 23, 2019. This humorous and affectionate account of small-town life in the fictional town of Mariposa is inspired by the author’s experience living in Ontario, Canada. The book illustrates the inner workings of life in Mariposa—from business to politics to steamboat disasters. In this vignette, we learn about the town’s barbershop, and the leisurely art of the afternoon shave. This episode first aired in September of 2020. — read by 'N' — Support us: Listen ad-free
9/27/202330 minutes, 59 seconds
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Autumn | Dorothy Wordsworth's Journal

Tonight, we’ll read the final excerpt in our series from Dorothy Wordsworth’s personal journals. This was one which she kept the year 1805. It was published a century later in 1897. Wordsworth was an English author, poet, and diarist. This particular journal was from a mountainous “ramble” her and her brother took around the Lake district of Cumbria, England. The story of this "ramble," written by Dorothy, was afterwards incorporated in part by her brother William in his prose “Description of the Scenery of the Lakes”—another instance of their literary copartnery. If you enjoy this episode, please check out the Winter, Spring and Summer journal episodes that aired recently, and our other episode featuring this author titled “First Steps | A Scottish Tour” that we rebroadcast on January of 2023. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/25/202330 minutes, 33 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 39

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Bingley visits the Bennets, and then he keeps coming back for more visits. Soon, Jane and him are ecstatic and engaged to be married. Elizabeth is overjoyed for her sister, but assumes that she must not be in Darcy’s favor any longer, after everything that happened. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/22/202337 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Garden's Lullaby

Tonight, as we launch our new premium subscription service Snoozecast+, we’ll read a sleep story we created about a stroll through a lush garden before bedtime. It will feature roses, lilies, Swiss chard, lavender, tomatoes, primroses and more. This has been written exclusively for our Snoozecast+ Deluxe listeners. To learn more, go to Snoozecast.com/plus. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/21/20236 minutes, 58 seconds
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Some Premium Snoozenews

 Today is a big day for this little sleep story podcast as we launch Snoozecast+. Join the co-hosts of Snoozecast as they dish out the inside scoop.
9/21/20233 minutes, 25 seconds
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Stonehenge

Tonight, we’ll read from “Stonehenge: Today and Yesterday” written by Frank Stevens and published in 1916. Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire , England. One of the most famous landmarks in the United Kingdom, Stonehenge is regarded as a British cultural icon. The whole monument, now in ruins, is orientated towards the sunrise on the summer solstice. This episode first aired in September 2021. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/20/202330 minutes, 24 seconds
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The Secret Pact | Penny Parker

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Secret Pact” part of the “Penny Parker” anthology written by Mildred Wirt, also known by Mildred Benson. This series of stories aren’t consecutive so don’t worry if you didn’t hear the first episode. You can pick up on this one just fine! Penny Parker was a high school student turned sleuth who also sporadically worked as a reporter for her father's newspaper. In this story, Penny wants to write a story about a strange tattoo she sees on a sailor, but neither her father's nor her school's newspaper agree to the idea. She decides to start a new newspaper in the abandoned Morning Press building and enlists the help of a few close friends. She soon finds herself in over her head and courting trouble. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/18/202334 minutes, 34 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 19

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, the Nautilus cruises through the Persian Gulf towards the Red Sea. This confuses the three captives onboard, because at the time this novel was written, the Red Sea was a dead end. The Suez Canal was only in the process of being built to connect the Red Sea with the Mediterranean Sea. After a couple days admiring the sea life in the Red Sea, Nemo visits Aronnax. We will pick up in the middle of their conversation discussion things like the history and navigational difficulties within the Red Sea. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/15/202331 minutes, 55 seconds
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The Man in the Brown Suit

Tonight, we’ll read from the 1924 detective novel “The Man in the Brown Suit” written by Agatha Christie and adapted by Snoozecast. We will open with a mysterious and glamorous prologue set in Paris, regarding a dancer and a count. Then we will learn about young Anne Beddingfield, who decides to live a life of freedom and adventure. She moves to London on her own and soon finds life to be more adventurous than she expected. This episode first aired in September of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/13/202335 minutes, 36 seconds
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A Tail of Belonging

Tonight, we’ll read “A Tail of Belonging”, a Snoozecast original sleep story dedicated to our listener on Spotify who asked for more dog-themed sleep stories.  The term “pound” for an animal shelter comes from the old British Saxon word “pinfald” or “pund”. An animal pound is a place where stray livestock were impounded. Animals were kept in a dedicated enclosure, until claimed by their owners, or sold to cover the costs of impounding. The village pound was a feature of most English medieval villages, and they were also found in the English colonies of North America and in Ireland. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/11/202328 minutes, 28 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 7

Tonight, we’ll read the seventh chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne Says Her Prayers”. In the last episode, Marilla Cuthbert, the stern and pragmatic woman was at first dismayed to find that not only have been given a girl instead of a boy orphan, but that this girl is the particularly imaginative and talkative Anne Shirley. Initially hesitant about keeping Anne due to her unconventional and spirited nature, Marilla has been monitoring Anne's behavior closely. She witnesses Anne's passionate enthusiasm for learning and her ability to charm others in the community. The chapter ends with Marilla making a significant decision: she decides to keep Anne at Green Gables and give her a chance to prove herself. This marks a turning point in the story, as Marilla's change of heart opens the door to a new chapter in Anne's life. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/8/202320 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Castle on the Lake

Tonight, we’ll read “The Castle on the Lake”, from a Danish fairy tale called “The Green Knight” found in “The Olive Fairy Book” compiled by Andrew Lang. The story was originally found in a book written by Evald Tang Kristensen.  Working first as a schoolteacher and later solely as a collector of folklore, Tang Kristensen assembled and published a huge amount of detailed information as he visited country people throughout his native land. His labors eventually were supported by his state government, allowing him to travel as the official folklore collector and resulted in a wealth of data. He himself recorded some 3,000 songs, 2,700 fairy tales, 2,500 jokes, 25,000 legends, numerous sayings, poems and riddles as well as tens of thousands of descriptions of traditions and everyday life. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/6/202337 minutes, 15 seconds
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Camp-Fires | Woodcraft

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “Woodcraft” published by George Washington Sears, under the pen name "Nessmuk." Sears was a writer and adventurer who penned essays on hunting, fishing, and camping for popular journals and magazines. Here is some Nessmuk lore: This book we are reading from tonight, Woodcraft, has remained generally in print ever since it was published in 1884. There is a mountain in Northern Pennsylvania named after him- Mount Nessmuk. And finally, his hand-crafted canoe, the Sairy Gamp, was named after the Charles Dickens character Sarah Gamp. Sarah was a comic fictional character in Charles Dickens’s novel Martin Chuzzlewit. She was a high-spirited Cockney nurse-midwife of questionable training. The canoe Sairy Gamp was later acquired by the Smithsonian Institution. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/4/202329 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 6

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Boxcar Children” written by school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. The Boxcar Children tells the story of four orphaned children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny. They create a home for themselves in an abandoned boxcar in the forest. In the last episode, Henry gets more work to do from the doctor, this time with his siblings picking cherries at the doctor’s home orchard. The doctor and his mother wonder at these hard-working and good-natured children. Where do they come from? Who are their parents? Then the doctor notices an advertisement in the newspaper asking for anyone to notify a James Henry Cordyce if they find four missing children that match the mystery children’s ages. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
9/1/202331 minutes, 32 seconds
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The Fish Prince

Tonight, we’ll read the Hindu folk tale “The Fish Prince.” It comes from “Wonder Tales from Many Lands” by Katherine Pyle, published in 1920, and is adapted by Snoozecast. This story features an ancient and still popular item of jewelry called a bangle. Bangles are circular in shape, and, unlike bracelets, are not flexible. Although people in some parts of India used to wear a thick single bangle as protection during battle, they are now worn mostly as adornment by women in many parts of the world. The oldest bangle was recently found to be at least 50,000 years old. It was masterfully crafted out of green stone by a species of early hominid that lived side by side with both homo sapiens and neanderthals. This episode originally aired in August of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/30/202332 minutes, 25 seconds
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Summer | Dorothy Wordsworth's Journals

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from Dorothy Wordsworth’s personal journal, which she kept the year 1802. It was published a century later in 1897. Wordsworth was an English author, poet, and diarist. She was the sister of the Romantic poet William Wordsworth, and the two were close all their adult lives. This particular journal was from a period that the siblings were staying in the village of Grasmere, England. The Wordsworths, part of the 'Lake Poets' group known for living near Grasmere lake, lived in Grasmere for 14 years and called it "the loveliest spot that man hath ever found." Another of the “Lake Poets” is mentioned frequently in this journal- their friend the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. If you enjoy this episode, please check out the “Winter” and “Spring” journal episodes that aired recently, and our other episode featuring this author titled “First Steps | A Scottish Tour” that we rebroadcast on January of 2023. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/28/202334 minutes, 31 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 38

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, soon after Wickham and Lydia leave, Mrs. Bennet hears rumors that Bingley is returning to Netherfield. Mr. Bennet refuses to visit him, however. Not long after, however, Bingley and Darcy visit the Bennets. Mrs. Bennet gives a warm welcome to Bingley and almost none to Darcy. She then goes on to speak glowingly about Lydia's marriage to Wickham, much to Elizabeth's mortification. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/25/202331 minutes, 10 seconds
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Stage-Coach Views | Thoreau's Cape Cod

Tonight, we’ll read a selection from “Cape Cod” by Henry David Thoreau, published in 1908. Thorough was an American naturalist, essayist, poet, and philosopher. A leading transcendentalist, he is best known for “Walden”, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience" , an argument for disobedience to an unjust state. Thorough traveled to Cape Cod in Massachusetts four times, which inspired this “excursion” or travel book. This episode originally aired in August of 2021. If you would like to hear more Thoreau on Snoozecast, check out “The Wild” from March of 2021, along with “Walden” parts 1 and 2, which both aired in 2019. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/23/202333 minutes, 24 seconds
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The Quilt of Happiness pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to the short story “The Quilt of Happiness” by Kate Douglas Wiggin, originally published in 1901. If you haven’t listened to the first half, you will find it aired just last week. Wiggin was an American educator, author and composer. She wrote children's stories, most notably the classic children's novel “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm”, and composed collections of children's songs — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/21/202340 minutes, 31 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 18

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Nemo proposes an expedition to the Ceylon pearl fisheries. Aronnax explains pearls to Ned Land, including their value, shape, size, types, and method of harvesting. The group reach the vast oyster beds and follow Nemo to a deep grotto where he shows them an enormous oyster. Nemo opens the oyster’s shells to reveal a pearl the size of a coconut. When Aronnax reaches to touch it, Nemo stops him, revealing his intention to allow the giant pearl to continue to grow.They also spot an Indian free diver attached to a canoe, but the diver does not see them, as he steals oysters in hopes of finding pearls as well. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/18/202331 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Bird King and the Mermaid

Tonight, we’ll read a sleep story called “The Bird King and the Mermaid,” adapted by Snoozecast from “The Story of Tremsin, the Bird Czar, and Nastasia, the Lovely Maid of the Sea” found in “Cossack Fairy Tales”, published in 1916.  The Cossacks are a group of predominantly Orthodox Christian people who speak a slavic language and originated in Eastern Europe. They played an important role in the historical and cultural development of both Ukraine and Russia. This episode originally aired in August of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/16/202333 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Quilt of Happiness pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to the short story “The Quilt of Happiness” by Kate Douglas Wiggin, originally published in 1901. We’ll finish the story next week. Wiggin was an American educator, author and composer. She wrote children's stories, most notably the classic children's novel “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm”, and composed collections of children's songs. She started the first free kindergarten in San Francisco, and also established a training school for kindergarten teachers with her sister. Kate Wiggin devoted her adult life to the welfare of children in an era when children were commonly thought of as cheap labor. If you enjoy this episode, you can also listen to our “Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm” episode from April of 2020. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/14/202331 minutes, 30 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 6

Tonight, we’ll read the sixth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Marilla Makes Up Her Mind”. In the last episode, Marilla and Anne travel by carriage on a 5 mile journey to visit the woman who picked an orphaned girl instead of a boy for the Cuthberts. Realizing that Anne would keep chatting anyway, Marilla asks Anne to tell her about her past. Anne says she would prefer to tell what she imagines about herself, as her imagination is so much richer than her history, but she agrees to tell her story. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/11/202321 minutes, 31 seconds
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North and South

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to the social novel “North and South,” published in 1854 and written by Elizabeth Gaskell. The novel’s protagonist, Margaret Hale, is forced to leave her home in the tranquil, rural south, to settle with her parents in Milton, a fictional industrial town in the north. Elizabeth Gaskell, often referred to as Mrs Gaskell, was an English novelist, biographer and short story writer. Her novels offer a detailed portrait of the lives of many strata of Victorian society Her work is of interest to social historians as well as readers of literature. This episode first aired August of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/9/202333 minutes, 31 seconds
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Getting Lost | Woodcraft

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “Woodcraft” published by George Washington “Nessmuk” Sears. Sears was a sportswriter and an early conservationist. His stories popularized self-guided canoe camping and what is today called ultralight camping or ultralight backpacking. Canoeing had been popularized by a Scottish lawyer in the 1860s, but the typical canoe trip of the day employed expert guides and heavy canoes. Sears, who was 5 feet 3 inches tall and weighed little more than 100 pounds had a lightweight solo canoe built. He named it after a Charles Dickens character and used it to travel alone for months at a time through the Adirondack wilderness of New York. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/7/202332 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 5

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Boxcar Children” written by school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. The Boxcar Children tells the story of four orphaned children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny. They create a home for themselves in an abandoned boxcar in the forest. In the last episode, Henry gets more work to do from the doctor, this time organizing his garage. He ends up impressing the doctor. He suggests that when he next comes to work, the cherry trees need picked, and if he knows any other hard workers, he can bring them along. The next day is Sunday, so instead of working for the doctor, Henry spends the day with his siblings damming water from their creek to build a swimming pool. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/4/202331 minutes, 30 seconds
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Kashtanka the Mutt

Tonight, we’ll read an 1886 short story titled “Kashtanka” by Anton Chekhov, and adapted by Snoozecast. It is a sincere and simple story about loyalty, about a dog named Kashtanka who experiences life with two very different masters. It has been speculated that the story is a veiled biography of the author himself. This episode first aired in August of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
8/2/202345 minutes, 23 seconds
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Spring | Dorothy Wordsworth's Journal

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from Dorothy Wordsworth’s personal journal, which she kept the year 1798. It was published a century later in 1897. Wordsworth was an English author, poet, and diarist. She was the sister of the Romantic poet William Wordsworth, and the two were close all their adult lives. Modern readers often perceive Dorothy as a first-rank nature writer. In her assumption of humans as companions rather than overlords of nature, she is arguably also an early environmentalist. If you enjoy this episode, please check out the “Winter” journal episode that aired last month, and our other episode featuring this author titled “First Steps | A Scottish Tour” that we rebroadcast on January of 2023. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/31/202331 minutes, 2 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 37

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Mrs. Gardiner sent a detailed reply to Elizabeth explaining how Darcy worked on the situation with Lydia and Wickham. Wickham had been planning on dumping Lydia the first chance he could get, which would have ruined Elizabeth’s reputation along with her family’s. So Wickham paid Wickham a fortune to bribe him to marry Lydia. Elizabeth still shows compassion towards Wickham by accepting him as now part of the family, while not being again fooled by his manipulative and cunning ways. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/28/202332 minutes, 28 seconds
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Rapunzel

Tonight, we’ll read the German fairy tale “Rapunzel” lightly adapted by us from “The Red Fairy Book,” and attributed to The Brothers Grimm. Some researchers have proposed that the earliest possible inspiration for the “Maiden in the Tower” archetype is to the pre-Christian European (or proto-Indo-European) sun or dawn goddess myths, in which a “light deity” is trapped and then rescued. If you are still awake after Rapunzel, you will find another hair-themed fairy tale titled “Ricky with the Tuft” from “The Tales of Mother Goose,” by Charles Perrault. This episode first aired July of 2021 — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/26/202337 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Dancing Men pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Adventure of the Dancing Men” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. If you haven’t listened to the first part, it aired just last week. This story is considered one of the detective's most famous and memorable cases. In the previous episode, Hilton Cubitt arrives at Baker Street and tells Holmes and Watson his strange tale. The appearance of childish drawings is mysteriously frightening his wife, Elsie Cubitt nee Patrick. Cubitt had married the American Elsie a year earlier, but one of the conditions of marriage was that Cubitt was not to ask his wife about her life prior to their meeting. It was a strange request, but being a gentleman, was one Cubitt was willing to agree to. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/24/202338 minutes, 31 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 17

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Nemo invites the captives on another underwater expedition, this time, it is to The Coral Kingdom. Also, Aronnax starts to think that the captain does not just love being away from humanity by being underwater- he may seek revenge against humanity as well. The conversation of escaping the ship is discussed by Aronnox and Ned. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/21/202330 minutes, 29 seconds
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Emily Dickinson | Nature Poetry

Tonight, we’ll read selected poems from Emily Dickinson, starting with a collection about nature. Little-known during her life, Dickinson has since been regarded as one of the most important figures in American poetry. Evidence suggests that Dickinson lived much of her life in isolation. Considered an eccentric by locals, she developed a penchant for white clothing and was known for her reluctance to even leave her bedroom. Dickinson never married, and most friendships between her and others depended entirely upon correspondence. Her poems were unique for her era. They contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. In early editions, including this one, Emily Dickinson's poems were edited by her friends, better to fit the conventions of the times. Thus some of the uniqueness is best understood by viewing her direct handwriting on the page, or by reading more recent editions. This episode first aired in July of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/19/202344 minutes, 13 seconds
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The Dancing Men pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to “The Adventure of the Dancing Men” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The second half will air next week. This was one of Doyle’s favorites- he ranked it third in his “top 12” list of Holmes stories, out of 56 total stories. In this story, Holmes has to decipher the code hidden in what appears to be a child’s drawing. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/17/202334 minutes, 26 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 5

Tonight, we’ll read the fifth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Anne’s History” Written for all ages, this book recounts the adventures of an eleven year old orphan named Anne Shirley on Prince Edward Island, Canada. In the last episode, Anne relishes the picturesque beauty of Green Gables, even while bracing herself for the painful reality of being taken away from it later that same day. Matthew lets Marilla know that he is going to hire a farm boy to help him for the summer, implying that they don’t technically need to return the orphan girl for a boy. Marilla sets off to visit Mrs. Spencer with Anne to figure out how the mistake could have happened. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/14/202323 minutes, 24 seconds
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Emily of New Moon

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from “Emily of New Moon” written by L. M. Montgomery. Similar to the author’s other series “Anne of Green Gables,” this is the first in a series of novels about an orphan girl growing up on Prince Edward Island.  Emily is a heroine with a love for the beauty in nature and art, loyalty to her friends, a thirst for knowledge, and a passionate dedication to her writing. This episode aired in July of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/12/202331 minutes, 40 seconds
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Knapsacks and Ditty-Bags | Woodcraft

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Woodcraft” published by George Washington “Nessmuk” Sears. Sears was a sportswriter for Forest and Stream magazine in the 1880s and an early conservationist. His stories popularized self-guided canoe camping and what is today called ultralight camping or ultralight backpacking. Growing up in Massachusetts, he took his pen name from a Native American who had befriended him in early childhood. A period of factory labor while still a child left him with a fondness for the writing of Charles Dickens. At nineteen he signed on for a three-year voyage on a whaler headed for the South Pacific; it was the same year that Herman Melville shipped out of the same port bound for the same whaling grounds. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/10/202333 minutes, 1 second
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The Boxcar Children pt. 4

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Boxcar Children” written by school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. The Boxcar Children tells the story of four orphaned children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny. They create a home for themselves in an abandoned boxcar in the forest. In the last episode, Jess and the children start fixing up their new boxcar home and exploring their forest neighborhood. Henry goes out and gets a job. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/7/202332 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Valiant Little Tailor

Tonight, we’ll read from Grimms' Fairy Tales by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm titled “The Valiant Little Tailor.” This episode originally aired in July of 2021. In this story, the tailor starts out having achieved a very small feat and ends up a hero. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/5/202340 minutes, 32 seconds
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Baking Powder Bread

Tonight, we’ll read from “The New Royal Cook Book by Royal Baking Powder Co.” published in 1920. When the first truly American cookbook was published in 1792, the recipes included used three possible types of leavening: baker's yeast, emptins (from the leavings of brewing beer), and pearlash. The effectiveness of such leavenings varied widely. At that time, reliable commercial products were not available. The creation of shelf-stable chemical combinations of sodium bicarbonate and cream of tartar is seen as marking the true introduction of baking powder later in the 1800s. Although cooks had used both sodium bicarbonate and cream of tartar previously in recipes, they had to purchase the ingredients individually from chemists and store them separately to prevent them from reacting prematurely. Regardless of the expiration date, the effectiveness can be tested by placing a teaspoon of the powder into a small container of hot water. If it bubbles vigorously, it is still active and usable. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
7/3/202332 minutes, 30 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 36

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Lydia and Wickham arrive at Longbourn. Lydia is giddy over her marriage, mocking her older sisters for failing to get married before she did. While gloating about the details of her wedding, Lydia reveals to Elizabeth that Darcy attended the ceremony. Lydia quickly apologizes: it was supposed to be a secret. Elizabeth burns with curiosity and writes to Mrs. Gardiner for more details. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/30/202331 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Great Gatsby

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “The Great Gatsby,” a 1925 novel by American writer F. Scott Fitzgerald. Set in the Jazz Age on Long Island, the novel depicts narrator Nick Carraway's interactions with mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and Gatsby's obsession to reunite with his former lover, Daisy Buchanan. This episode first aired in June of 2021. The novel was inspired by youthful romance and riotous parties the author had recently experienced. “The Great Gatsby” was a commercial failure that many critics thought was sub-par to Fitzgerald’s previous work. Now, it is widely considered to be a literary masterwork and a contender for the title of the Great American Novel. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/28/202340 minutes, 43 seconds
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Winter | Dorothy Wordsworth's Journal

Tonight, we’ll read from Dorothy Wordsworth’s personal journal, which she kept the year 1798. It was published a century later in 1897. Wordsworth was an English author, poet, and diarist. She was the sister of the Romantic poet William Wordsworth, and the two were close all their adult lives. Dorothy Wordsworth had no ambitions to be a public author, yet she left behind numerous letters, diary entries, topographical descriptions, poems, and other writings. Dorothy Wordsworth's works came to light just as literary critics were beginning to re-examine women's role in literature. Her observations and descriptions have been considered to be as poetic if not more so than those of her brother. If you enjoy this episode, please look for our other episode featuring this author titled “First Steps | A Scottish Tour” that we rebroadcast on January of 2023 — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/26/202332 minutes, 27 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 16

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, electricity temporarily fails on the submarine, and the captives onboard are enchanted at the view of bioluminescent marine life surrounding them in the dark. Later, Captain Nemo spies something that disturbs him at a distance. In response, he apparently slips a sleeping potion into the captives breakfast so that they sleep deeply through the disturbance. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/23/202332 minutes, 30 seconds
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Ali Baba

Tonight, we’ll read a story called “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” from “The Arabian Nights: Their Best-known Tales” by Smith, Wiggin, and Parrish. It has become one of the most familiar of the "Arabian Nights" tales, and is where the phrase “Open, Sesame!” comes from. This folk tale was added to the “One Thousand and One Nights” anthology in the 18th century by its French translator. This translator heard it from a Syrian storyteller who travelled to Paris. This episode originally aired in June of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/21/202337 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Gyro-Hat

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to the humorous short story “An Experiment in Gyro-Hats” written by Ellis Parker Butler and published in 1910. Butler was a prolific American writer, although his writing was mostly a part-time endeavor for him as he was also a banker. Butler was also known as an always-present force in the New York City literary scene. A gyroscope is a device used for measuring or maintaining orientation. It is a spinning disc in which the axis of rotation is free to assume any orientation by itself. While in this story a gyroscope is used in a hat, real life applications include the Hubble telescope, submarines, and smartphones. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/19/202334 minutes, 14 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 4

Tonight, we’ll read the fourth chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Morning at Green Gables.” Written for all ages, this book recounts the adventures of an eleven year old orphan named Anne Shirley on Prince Edward Island, Canada. In the last episode, we learn that Marilla, unlike her brother Matthew, does not shrink from voicing her surprise upon seeing a girl orphan, instead of a boy, at her front door. As the Cuthberts talk about Mrs. Spencer’s mistake, Anne realizes she is not wanted. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/16/202325 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Doilied Breakfast Table

Tonight, for our 700th episode, we’ll read excerpts from “The Myrtle Reed Cook Book” written by Myrtle Reed and published in 1916. Reed was an American author, poet, journalist, and philanthropist. She was a diagnosed insomniac with prescribed sleeping potions, called sleeping drafts in her day. This episode originally aired in June of 2021. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/14/202331 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Silken Ladder | Penny Parker

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Clue of the Silken Ladder” part of the “Penny Parker” anthology written by Mildred Wirt, also known by Mildred Benson. This series of stories aren’t consecutive so don’t worry if you didn’t hear the first episode. You can pick up on this one just fine! Penny Parker was a high school student turned sleuth who also sporadically worked as a reporter for her father's newspaper. In this story, Penny discovers a strange silken ladder and learns how it is used in burglaries. Her story, and what it exposes, earns her a much-needed raise in pay at the newspaper. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/12/202332 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 3

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Boxcar Children” written by first grade school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. The Boxcar Children tells the story of four orphaned children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny. They create a home for themselves in an abandoned boxcar in the forest. In the last episode, we explore the children’s new boxcar home in the woods, and they are introduced to a new member of their family- a lost but friendly dog with a thorn in his paw. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/9/202333 minutes, 7 seconds
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A Retrieved Reformation

Tonight, we’ll read "A Retrieved Reformation", a short story by American author O. Henry first published in 1903. This episode first aired in June of 2021. The story we will read shows how love can change anyone for the better. It describes the events which lead up to the reformation of an ex-convicted burglar. As usual, the ending of this O. Henry is worth hearing for the twist. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/7/202335 minutes, 21 seconds
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The Corn Field | Farm Flowers

Tonight, for our final episode in this series, we’ll read about more wildflowers on the farm, including cornflowers and charlock in the hay-field, from “Flowers of the Farm” written by Arthur O. Cooke and published in 1900. In the last episode of this series, which aired last week, we read about dandelions and common grasses that grow wild around British farmlands.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/5/202334 minutes, 33 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 35

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, we learn the details of the deal. Wickham is basically ransoming Lydia, and Mr. Bennet feels obliged to pay a small sum every year in return for Wickham actually marrying her. Otherwise, they would apparently live together unmarried and thus tarnish the reputations of all her other unmarried sisters. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
6/2/202330 minutes, 54 seconds
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Golden King Midas

Tonight, we’ll read a short story called “The Golden Touch” from “A Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1910. This episode is dedicated to our patron Kathryn, who was craving something from Greek mythology, and our listener, Sue, who suggested this particular book. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/31/202341 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Hay-Field | Farm Flowers

Tonight, we’ll read about more wildflowers on the farm, including poppies in the hay-field, from “Flowers of the Farm” written by Arthur O. Cooke and published in 1900. In the last episode, which aired last week, some plants found in the foldyard of the farm were discussed. A fold was a pen or enclosure for cattle or sheep, and the inference is that it must often have been a temporary structure, made by fastening hurdles, bars or ‘fleaks’ to fixed stakes. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/29/202331 minutes, 31 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 15

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Arronax, Conseil and Ned encounter the Papuan people from the island, and the people are unfriendly to the visitors. The three intruders retreat to the Nautilus. When Aronnax tells Nemo about the natives, the captain is unconcerned. He says “Savages? Where are there not any?” Soon, the native people storm the vessel and try to get inside. However, Nemo has cleverly set up an electrified cable on the stairs so that anyone who touches it is merely shocked. The Papuans retreat, the tide pushes the Nautilus out to sea exactly as Nemo has planned, and the vessel continues its journey. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/26/202330 minutes, 31 seconds
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Pinocchio

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Adventures of Pinocchio” by Italian writer Carlo Collodi, published in 1883. This episode originally aired in May of 2021. Pinocchio was carved by a woodcarver named Geppetto as a wooden puppet but he dreams of becoming a real boy. He is notably characterized for his frequent tendency to lie, which causes his nose to grow. Pinocchio is a cultural icon. He is one of the most re-imagined characters in children's literature. His story has been adapted into many other media, notably the 1940 Disney film Pinocchio. Collodi often used the Italian Tuscan dialect in his book. For example, the name of Pinocchio’s father, Gepetto, comes from the diminutive for Geppo, the Tuscan pronunciation of ceppo, meaning a log, stump or block. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/24/202332 minutes, 48 seconds
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Three Handsome Weeds | Farm Flowers

Tonight, we’ll read about handsome weeds and wildflowers from “Flowers of the Farm” written by Arthur O. Cooke and published in 1900. In the last episode, which aired last week, the wallflower was discussed among other flowers. Wallflowers are perhaps more commonly known today as people who gravitate to the sidelines of social gatherings. However, the wallflower is the common name for a genus of flowering plants called Erysium, part of the cabbage family of plants. It includes more than 150 species, both popular garden plants and many wild forms. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/22/202332 minutes, 38 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 3

Tonight, we’ll read the third chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Marilla Cuthbert is Surprised.” Written for all ages, this book recounts the adventures of an eleven year old orphan named Anne Shirley on Prince Edward Island, Canada. In the last episode, we learn that all women scare timid Matthew, except for his sister Marilla, and his neighbor Mrs. Rachel. He rides his horse and buggy to the train station to pick up the orphan boy that turns out to be a talkative girl. Instead of insisting that she turn back around due to the mistake, he chooses to let her ride all the way home, and let the more assertive Marilla give the bad news. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/19/202324 minutes, 46 seconds
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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “Tess of the d’Urbervilles,” a novel by Thomas Hardy, published in 1891. Hardy's writing often explores what he called the ""ache of modernism"", and this theme is notable in Tess, which as one critic noted portrays ""the energy of traditional ways and the strength of the forces that are destroying them"". The book, now considered a major work of it’s time, received mixed reviews when it first appeared, in part because it challenged the sexual morals of late Victorian England. — read by 'V' — Listen Ad-Free on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
5/17/202332 minutes, 49 seconds
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In the Coppice | Farm Flowers

Tonight, we’ll read the opening section to “Flowers of the Farm” written by Arthur O. Cooke and published in 1900. Coppicing is a traditional method of woodland management which exploits the capacity of many species of trees to put out new shoots from their stump or roots if cut down. In a coppiced wood, which is called a copse, young tree stems are repeatedly cut down to near ground level, resulting in a stool. New growth emerges, and after a number of years, the coppiced tree is harvested, and the cycle begins anew. Pollarding is a similar process carried out at a higher level on the tree in order to prevent grazing animals from eating new shoots. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/15/202331 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Boxcar Children” written by first grade school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. The Boxcar Children tells the story of four orphaned children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny. They create a home for themselves in an abandoned boxcar in the forest. In the first episode, we learn that the only relative for the orphans to live with would be their supposedly hard-hearted grandfather, whom they never met because of his disapproval of their parents' marriage. So instead, the children strike out on their own into the woods. We will pick back up at the end of the first episode, where Jessie sees it is about to rain, and finds an abandoned boxcar for her siblings to shelter in, just in time. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/12/202330 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Sugar Boiler's Assistant

Tonight, we’ll read from “The Bread and Biscuit Baker’s and Sugar Boiler’s Assistant” written by Robert Wells and published in 1890. This episode originally aired in May of 2021. Candy is made by dissolving sugar in water or milk to form a syrup, which is boiled until it reaches the desired concentration or starts to caramelize. The type of candy depends on the ingredients and how long the mixture is boiled. Candy comes in a wide variety of textures, from soft and chewy to hard and brittle. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/10/202347 minutes, 50 seconds
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Cranford

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Cranford”, a novel by the English writer Elizabeth Gaskell, first published in 1853. The work slowly became popular and from the start of the 20th century it saw a number of dramatic treatments for the stage, the radio and TV. The fictional town of “Cranford” is based on the author’s childhood home town of Knutsford in England. The stories within portray the old-fashioned class snobbery prevalent in country towns at the time. Charles Dickens encouraged Gaskell to turn her stories into the completed novel. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to our August 2021 episode “North and South” from the same author. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/8/202331 minutes, 29 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 34

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, much is changing as the Bennet family worries about Lydia’s fate. Mr. Bennet has decided that Elizabeth was right and he must be stricter with his remaining young daughters. Mrs. Bennet is besides herself with self-pity and grief. Jane and Elizabeth spend much of their time together wondering what they should have done differently, to avoid Wickham’s wicked influence on their family.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/5/202333 minutes, 13 seconds
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A Voyage to the Moon

Tonight, we’ll read “A Voyage to the Moon” written by Edgar Allen Poe. It was intended by the author as a hoax when it was originally published in 1835 titled as "The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall." The story is regarded as one of the early examples of the modern science fiction genre. Jules Verne acknowledged Poe as the creator of the "scientific novel." This episode originally aired in May of 2021.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories
5/5/202345 minutes, 51 seconds
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Lulu's Triumph

Tonight, we’ll read the short story “Lulu’s Triumph” written by Matilde Serao and published in English in 1907.  In this character study, Lulu meets a young man at the races, and they start courting. Lulu talks about her expectations to her sister, Sofia, who is older and more serious than she. Matilde Serao was a Greco-Italian writer. She was the first woman editor of an Italian newspaper. Serao never won the Nobel Prize in Literature despite being nominated on six occasions. Read by 'V' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
5/2/202349 minutes, 27 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 14

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Aronnax, Conseil and Ned obtain permission to row ashore to a nearby deserted tropical island. After only eating seafood, Ned in particular is craving to hunt down some land food. They feast on local flora and fauna for several days.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/28/202333 minutes, 32 seconds
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The Forest of the Freed

Tonight, we’ll read a story from a short story collection titled “Mrs. Spring Fragrance” written by Sui Sin Far, published in 1912. The story we will read, about two children who find themselves lost in a magical forest, was originally titled “The Banishment of Ming and Mai.” This episode originally aired in April of 2021. The author Sui Sin Far was the pen name of Chinese-British-Canadian-American writer Edith Maude Eaton. The work is notable for being the earliest book of fiction published in the United States by an author of Chinese descent. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/26/202331 minutes, 37 seconds
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Desert Oases

Tonight, we’ll read about desert oases from a book written by H. J. Llewellyn Beadnell and published in 1909. In ecology, an oasis is a fertile area of a desert that sustains plant life and provides habitat for animals. Surface water may be present, or water may only be accessible from wells or underground channels created by humans.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/24/202332 minutes, 32 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the second chapter to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This chapter is titled “Matthew Cuthbert is Surprised.” Written for all ages, it recounts the adventures of an eleven-year-old orphan named Anne Shirley on Prince Edward Island, Canada. In the first episode, we meet busybody Rachel, who checks in on Marilla Cuthbert. They live in a small town on Prince Edward Island in Canada. Marilla lives on her farm with her brother Matthew, and they are both growing older. They decided to adopt an orphan boy, which shocks Rachel. Rachel tries to frighten Marilla with terrible orphan stories from the news, but Marilla has a cooler head. Also, she reasons, at least the orphan isn’t going to be a girl.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/22/202339 minutes, 32 seconds
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A Girl of the Limberlost

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “A Girl of the Limberlost” by Gene Stratton-Porter, published in 1909. This episode first aired in April of 2021. The story takes place in Indiana, in and around the Limberlost Swamp. Even at the time of its publication, this impressive wetland region was being reduced by heavy logging, natural oil extraction and drainage for agriculture. The author, Stratton-Porter, was considered one of the most popular woman novelists of the era. Elnora Comstock is an impoverished teenager who lives with her widowed mother, Katharine Comstock, on the edge of the Limberlost swamp. Elnora’s mother treats her neglectfully, and makes her to go to her first day of high school at a new school unprepared. She is wearing ugly, out-dated clothes, and doesn’t have proper books or tuition. Luckily, Elnora is a plucky and good-hearted young woman. She also has loving neighbors who want to help her. And that is where we will start.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/19/202332 minutes, 7 seconds
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The Empty House pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Adventure of the Empty House” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of 1903’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. The first half aired last week. Doyle ranked "The Adventure of the Empty House" sixth in his list of his twelve favorite Holmes stories out of 56 total stories. In the first half, the year is 1894, and it is three years after the apparent death of Sherlock Holmes. An apparently unsolvable locked-room murder takes place in London: Ronald Adair was in his sitting room at the time. The motive does not appear to be robbery as nothing has been stolen, and it seems that Adair had not an enemy in the world. It seems odd that Adair's door was locked from the inside. Dr. Watson, having retained an interest in crime post- Holmes, visits the scene. He runs into an elderly book collector, knocking several of his books to the ground. The encounter ends with the man snarling in anger and going away. However, that is not the last that Watson sees of him, for a short time later, the man comes to Watson's study to apologize. Once in, he transforms himself into Sherlock Holmes, astonishing Watson so much that he faints to the ground.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/17/202341 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Boxcar Children pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Boxcar Children” written by first grade school teacher Gertrude Chandler Warner and published in 1924. This episode originally aired in August of 2021, and we will continue to the end of this book over time. The Boxcar Children tells the story of four orphaned children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny. They create a home for themselves in an abandoned boxcar in the forest. They eventually meet their grandfather, who is a wealthy and kind man (although the children had believed him to be cruel). As she wrote the story, Warner read it aloud to her classes and rewrote it many times to make it easy to understand and enjoyable. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/14/202346 minutes, 15 seconds
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Baking Cakezzz

Tonight, we’ll read about baking cakes from the “Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Volume 4” This episode originally aired in March of 2021. The Woman’s Institute was founded by Mary Brooks Picken in Scranton, PA. Born in Kansas in 1886, Picken wrote the first dictionary to be published by a woman in the English language, beyond the over one hundred other books she wrote. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/12/202346 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Empty House pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to “The Adventure of the Empty House” written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as part of “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”. It was first published in 1903. The second half will air next week. Public pressure forced Conan Doyle to bring the sleuth back to life, and explain his apparently miraculous survival after his struggle with Professor Moriarty in "The Final Problem". This is the first Holmes story set after his supposed demise in Switzerland, as recounted in "The Final Problem". Read by -N- Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/10/202339 minutes, 45 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 33

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Elizabeth and her aunt and uncle hurry home after hearing the terrible news about Lydia running off with Wickham. There is plenty of time as they travel to consider the situation from all angles, and try to reassure each other from too much worry. They arrive at Longbourne and reconnect with the rest of the family. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/7/202332 minutes, 30 seconds
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Cloudland

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from “Meteorology, The Science of the Atmosphere” by meteorologist Charles Fitzhugh Talman, published in 1922. This episode first aired in April of 2021. The word meteorology, stemming from the Ancient Greek, means "the study of things high in the air." Though study of meteorology dates back millennia, significant progress did not occur until the 18th century. Prior attempts at prediction of weather depended on historical data. It was not until after the elucidation of the laws of physics and more particularly, the development of the computer, allowing for the automated solution of a great many equations that model the weather, in the latter half of the 20th century that significant breakthroughs in weather forecasting were achieved. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/5/202331 minutes, 42 seconds
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Mr. and Mrs. Dove

Tonight, we’ll read the 1921 short story “Mr. and Mrs. Dove” written by New Zealand author Katherine Mansfield. In this story, Reginald is a young man who works on a fruit farm in Rhodesia, but is currently back home in England for one more day. There, he visits his friend Anne with the pet doves, who he is in love with. Now known as Zimbabwe, Rhodesia was a state located just north of South Africa, colonized by Britain. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/3/202334 minutes, 32 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 13

Tonight, we’ll read the next part of, “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, it’s the New Year and Aronnax keeps himself busy studying on the submarine as usual. The Nautilus enters dangerous waters and gets stuck on a reef. Seeing as they're already stuck on land, Ned and Conseil convince Aronnax to ask Nemo to let them go ashore to explore, hunt, and reconnect with solid ground.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
4/1/202333 minutes, 50 seconds
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Johnny Town-Mouse

Tonight, we’ll read a selection of mouse-featured Beatrix Potter stories, starting with “Johnny Town-Mouse” and followed with “The Tale of Two Bad Mice” and “The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse.” This episode first aired in March of 2021. Beatrix Potter was an English writer, illustrator, natural scientist, and conservationist best known for her children's books featuring animals. Though Potter was typical of women of her generation in having limited opportunities for higher education, her study and watercolours of fungi led to her being widely respected in the field of mycology. In all, Potter wrote thirty books; the best known being her twenty-three children's tales. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/29/202335 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Elements of Style

Tonight, we’ll read the first part to the writing style guide “The Elements of Style”, written by William Strunk Jr. in 1918, published in 1920. Strunk was a professor at Cornell University and wrote the book for use at the university. He is best remembered for the version of this guidebook, enlarged in 1959 by his student, New Yorker writer E.B. White. Now in its fourth edition, it is the most frequently assigned book on college syllabuses, and continues to earn both praise and criticism over a century after its first publication. This episode is guest narrated by Stephen Frost of Stereo Couture, who specialize in producing music, sound, and voices for animation. If you are interested in learning more, please go to https://stereocouture.com/ — read by J — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/27/202343 minutes, 6 seconds
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Anne of Green Gables pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Anne of Green Gables” the classic 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Written for all ages, it recounts the adventures of an eleven year old orphan named Anne Shirley on Prince Edward Island, Canada. The novel recounts how Anne makes her way through life with two middle-aged siblings, the Cuthberts, in school, and within the town. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/24/202327 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Odyssey

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Odyssey,” from the Samuel Butler translation, is one of two ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. This episode first aired in March of 2021. “The Odyssey” is one of the oldest works of literature still read by contemporary audiences. It follows the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the Trojan War. After the decade of war itself, his journey lasts for an additional perilous decade. In his absence, he is assumed dead, and his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must contend with a group of rude suitors competing for Penelope's hand in marriage. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/22/202345 minutes, 30 seconds
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All About Gemstones

Tonight, we’ll read all about gemstones from the book “Jewels and the Woman” written by Marianne Ostier and published in 1958. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to check out our other jewelry episode featuring this author titled “The Story of Jewels” which aired in November 2022. Gemstones are classified into different groups, species, and varieties. For example, ruby is the red variety of the species corundum, while any other color of corundum is considered sapphire. Other examples are the emerald (green), aquamarine (blue), red beryl (red), goshenite (colorless), heliodor (yellow), and morganite (pink), which are all varieties of the mineral species beryl. Gemstones may also be classified in terms of their "water". This is a recognized grading of the gem's luster, transparency, or "brilliance". Very transparent gems are considered "first water", while "second" or "third water" gems are those of a lesser transparency. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/20/202334 minutes, 32 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 9 Finale

Tonight, we’ll read the final part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. Pooh is naive and slow-witted, but he is also friendly, thoughtful, and steadfast. Although he and his friends agree that he is "a bear of very little brain", Pooh is occasionally acknowledged to have a clever idea, usually driven by common sense. These include riding in Christopher Robin's umbrella to rescue Piglet from a flood, and discovering "the North Pole" by picking it up to help fish Roo out of the river In the previous episode, we finished chapter 9, in which piglet was entirely surrounded by water.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/17/202323 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Dancing Maiden Charan

Tonight, we’ll read a story called Charan, The Dancing Maiden, taken from the book “Korean Folk Tales” written by Im Bang and translated to English by James Gale and published in 1913. This episode first aired in March of 2021. Im Bang was born in 1640, the son of a provincial governor. He was a great scholar and a disciple of one of Korea's first famed writers. When he was eighty years old, he became governor of Seoul, and held other high cabinet positions as well. In 1722 he played a part in a disturbance of the government and was exiled to North Korea. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/15/202333 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Dream

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Dream” a 1924 novel by H. G. Wells about a man from a Utopian future who dreams the entire life of a 19th century Englishman named Harry Mortimer Smith. In circa 4,000 A.D., a biologist named Sarnac is taking a holiday among mountains and lakes with his lover, Sunray. With four other holiday travellers, they visit some 2,000-year-old "ancient remains that had recently been excavated" in a nearby valley. A little later, after a brief afternoon nap, Sarnac awakens from "a very vivid dream." The rest of the novel consists of Sarnac's recounting of the dream, with occasional discussion of its particulars with his companions. Sarnac's dream brings with it total recall of the complete life of Harry Mortimer Smith, from the point of view of the achieved Utopia of 2,000 years later.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/13/202332 minutes, 5 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 32

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Elizabeth is shocked to read a letter with wretched news from home- her sister Lydia has run off with Wickham. This will cause scandal to befall not only Lydia but the rest of her sisters. Immediately after reading the letter, Darcy pays a visit and tries to comfort her. She is inconsolable. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/10/202336 minutes, 31 seconds
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A Little Princess

Tonight we’ll read the opening to A Little Princess, a children's novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, published in 1905. It is considered one of the top children’s books in the US of all time, along with Burnett’s other book, “The Secret Garden”. This episode first aired in February 2020. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/8/202334 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Drawbridge | Penny Parker

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to the 1940 mystery “Danger at the Drawbridge”, part of the “Penny Parker” anthology written by Mildred Wirt, also known by Mildred Benson. The first episode was “The Green Door” and aired on December 5th, 2022. These stories aren’t consecutive so don’t worry if you didn’t hear the first episode. You can pick up on this one just fine! Along with being the heroine of the series, Penny Parker was a high school student turned sleuth who also sporadically worked as a reporter for her father's newspaper. Benson was a journalist and prolific writer, under many pseudonyms, who is best known for creating the Nancy Drew series. The author Benson favored Penny Parker over all the other books she wrote, including Nancy Drew. Her obituary quoted her as saying, " 'I always thought Penny Parker was a better Nancy Drew than Nancy is."  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/6/202334 minutes, 30 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 12

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, our narrator Arronax and his companions watch the underwater world float by, including some shipwrecks. Nemo appears after a long absence and tells Aronnax they're headed for the island of Vanikoro, the site of two famous shipwrecks back at end of the 18th century and early in the 19th century. We will pick up where Nemo and Arronax are discussing this.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/4/202332 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Art of Breadmaking | Breadtime

Tonight, we’ll read “A treatise on the art of making good wholesome bread of wheat, oats, rye, barley” by Friedrick Accum, published in 1821. Accum was a German chemist, whose most important achievements included advances in the field of gas lighting, efforts to keep processed foods free from dangerous additives, and the promotion of popular chemistry. Following an apprenticeship as an apothecary, he opened his own commercial laboratory enterprise in London. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
3/2/202332 minutes, 40 seconds
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Surprise House

Tonight, we’ll read “Surprise House” written by Abbie Farwell Brown and published in 1917. This children’s story depicts a legacy left by an eccentric old lady to her grand-niece. Brown was a prolific American author of children’s stories and poems, who spent her entire life living in her family’s Beacon Hill Boston home. Her family was at that time the 10th generation to live in New England. Brown also penned the official song of the “Girl Scouts of the USA.” This episode is guest narrated by Shann Vander Leek of the Anxiety Slayer podcast and academy. If you are interested in learning more, please go to anxietyslayer.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/28/202325 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 28 Finale

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. In the last episode, we delve into the concept of how thoughts, good or bad, have power to change one’s experience of life. While Colin and Mary were filling their heads with happy magic and their lungs with moorland breezes, Master Craven was hiking across Europe and starting to find a change of heart as well. In a peaceful and quiet moment he remembers home and opens his mind to the possibility of good things again. He dreams his deceased wife calls to him to come home to the garden. And the next day, he heads home. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/25/202328 minutes, 30 seconds
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Little Thumbelina

Tonight, we’ll read a story from Hans Christian Andersen called “Little Thumbelina.” Thumbelina is about a tiny girl and her adventures with marriage-minded toads, moles, and doodlebugs. She successfully avoids their intentions before falling in love with a flower-fairy prince just her size. This episode originally aired in February 2021. Hans Christian Andersen was born in Denmark in 1805 to a shoemaker. An only child, Andersen shared a love of literature with his father, who read him fables and fairy tales. Together, they constructed panoramas and toy theatres, and took long jaunts into the countryside.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/22/202342 minutes
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A World of Green Hills

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “A world of green hills : Observations of nature and human nature in the Blue Ridge” written by Bradford Torrey and published in 1898. The Blue Ridge extends as far south as Georgia and as far north as Pennsylvania. From there it dwindles to hills, however the band of ancient rocks that form the core of the Blue Ridge continues northeast through the New Jersey and eventually reaches The Berkshires of Massachusetts and the Green Mountains of Vermont. This mountain range is known for having a bluish color when seen from a distance. Trees put the "blue" in Blue Ridge, from the isoprene released by them into the atmosphere. This contributes to the characteristic haze on the mountains and their perceived color. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/21/202331 minutes, 32 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 8

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. In the previous episode, we finished chapter eight, in which Christopher Robin plans to lead an expotition to the north pole and then we just started chapter nine, in which piglet was entirely surrounded by water.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/17/202326 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Swiss Family Robinson

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to Swiss Family Robinson, a novel by Johann David Wyss, about a Swiss family shipwrecked in the East Indies en route to Australia. This episode first aired in February 2020. Wyss, a Swiss pastor, originally wrote this book to entertain and instruct his four sons. Years later, one of his sons, persuaded his father to allow him to complete and edit the unfinished manuscript. It was published in Zurich in 1812. — read by M — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/15/202331 minutes, 30 seconds
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Manly Exercises

Tonight, we’ll read from “Walker’s Manly Exercises and Rural Sports” written by Donald Walker and published in 1855. Walker was a Victorian author of several books, including this one and Exercises for Ladies. He helped to introduce British society to an unfamiliar topic in the early nineteenth century: physical education. The birth of modern physical education teaching can be traced to teachers in the 1800s who focused on nurturing a child's ability to use their body for self-expression, in combination with approaches from the 1960s, which featured spatial awareness, effort, and relationships. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/13/202332 minutes, 32 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 31

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Elizabeth and Mrs. Gardiner pay a visit to Pemberley and have an awkward tea with shy Miss Georgiana Darcy and conniving Miss Caroline Bingley. We will pick up right after Darcy has made an entrance. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/10/202333 minutes, 31 seconds
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Wild February

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “In New England Fields and Woods”, written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. This episode first aired in February 2020. Robinson was, in his time, one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection is part of the late winter-time section. You can find other episodes featuring Robinson by searching on snoozecast.com. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/8/202331 minutes, 34 seconds
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Urania

Tonight, we’ll read from “Urania”, an early science fiction novel by Camille Flammarion and published in English in 1890. This excerpt depicts an imaginary voyage through the universe. The title of this books refers to one of The Nine Muses who presided over Astronomy. Urania’s celestial glance was said to have inspired and directed the chorus of the Spheres. Nicholas Camille Flammarion was a French astronomer, prolific author and free thinker. Besides astronomy and science fiction, Flammarion was interested in exploring realms of consciousness and reality beyond our own. This is the second Snoozecast episode featuring Flammarion. You can also listen to “Mysterious Psychic Forces” from October 2022. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/6/202332 minutes, 30 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 11

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Aronnax, Conseil, Nemo and another sailor from the Nautilus embark on their hunting expedition to the underwater forests of Crespo Island in their underwater suits. They see diverse landscapes and all sorts of creatures, and also, take a long nap before continuing their wondrous trek. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/4/202330 minutes, 42 seconds
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Aponibolinayen and the Sun

Tonight, we’ll read a folktale called “Aponibolinayen and the Sun”, from the book “Philippine Folk Tales” published in 1916, compiled by anthropologist Mabel Cook Cole. This story originally aired on January 1st, 2021. This story comes from the Ting-yen or Itneg people, who live in a mountainous region in the Philippines. The Itnegs believe in the existence of numerous supernatural powerful beings. They believe in spirits and deities, the greatest of which they believe to be Kadaklan who lives up in the sky and who created the earth, the moon, the stars, and the sun. Tonight, we’ll read about the sun in particular and how he came to be married to a special mortal woman with magical powers. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
2/1/202334 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Final Problem pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Final Problem”, written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The first half aired last week. As with all of our Sherlock series, this story contains some darker elements and themes that may not be appropriate for all listeners. In the first episode, Holmes is considering retiring from his private detective work, but learns about a criminal genius named Professor Moriarty, who orchestrates a huge amount of crime that happens in London and in Europe. Holmes set about gathering evidence to bring down the whole gang. The work of Holmes though, had not gone unnoticed by Moriarty, who threatens him to back off. Soon Holmes evades three attempts at his life before meeting up with Watson. Watson agrees to hide surreptiously in Europe with him while they wait for Holmes’ plans for the police to catch the whole enterprise comes to fruition in a few days time. We will start back in the story on the train where Holmes is in disguise as an elderly Italian man and has narrowly avoided being caught by Moriarty. Holmes is now discussing the plan with Watson. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/30/202327 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 27

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. In the last episode, Mary and Colin explore the many empty rooms of their manor on rainy days. Colin expresses his desire for his father to finally come home so he can give up the secret and reveal his newfound vitality. Colin has become so well that he starts to believe that the magic he has been espousing may be another word for God. Mrs. Susan Sowerby, Dickon’s mother, also makes a surprise visit to their garden. They find her to be instantly trustworthy and charming.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/27/202333 minutes, 55 seconds
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New Amazonia

Tonight, we’ll read the opening chapters of “New Amazonia: A Foretaste of the Future”, written by Elizabeth Burgoyne Corbett under the pen name “Mrs. James Corbett” and first published in 1889.  Categorized as “feminist utopian”, it was one element in the wave of utopian and dystopian literature that marked the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In her novel, Corbett envisions a successful suffragette movement eventually giving rise to a breed of highly evolved "Amazonians" who turn Ireland into a utopian society.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/25/202332 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Final Problem pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Final Problem”, written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The second half will air next week. It is one of 12 stories in the cycle collected as “The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes”. As with all of our Sherlock series, this story contains some darker elements and themes that may not be appropriate for all listeners. The story, set in 1891, introduces the criminal mastermind Professor Moriarty. It was intended to be the final Holmes story. Conan Doyle felt the stories were distracting him from more serious literary efforts and that this was the only way of getting his career back on track. "I must save my mind for better things," he wrote to his mother, "even if it means I must bury my pocketbook with him." Conan Doyle later ranked "The Final Problem" fourth on his personal list of the twelve best Holmes stories. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/23/202338 minutes, 31 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 7

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. In the previous episode, we read the second half of chapter seven, in which Kanga and Roo came to the forest, and Piglet had a bath. Then we started chapter eight, in which Christopher Robin plans to lead an expotition to the north pole. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/20/202331 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Trees of Paradise

Tonight, we’ll read The Trees of Paradise, an excerpt from “Plant Lore, Legends and Lyrics” by Richard Folkard. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/18/202332 minutes
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The Palace Under the Waves

Tonight, we’ll read “The Palace Under the Waves” found in the book “Swiss Tales” published in 1920. We will also read a story called “The Fairy in the Cuckoo Clock.” The first story features undines, a category of elemental beings associated with water, stemming from the alchemical writings of Paracelsus. Later writers developed the undine into a water nymph in its own right, and it continues to live in modern literature and art through such adaptations as Danish Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid". Paracelsus believed that each of the four classical elements – earth, water, air and fire – is inhabited by different categories of elemental spirits, liminal creatures that share our world: gnomes, undines, sylphs and salamanders respectively. He describes these elementals as the "invisible, spiritual counterparts of visible Nature ... many resembling human beings in shape, and inhabiting worlds of their own, unknown to man because his undeveloped senses were incapable of functioning beyond the limitations of the grosser elements. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/16/202332 minutes, 40 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 30

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Darcy suddenly appears while Elizabeth and the Gardiners continue to explore the grounds of his home Pemberley. He joins them in their walk, proving remarkably polite. Elizabeth is immediately embarrassed but Darcy tells her that he has just arrived to prepare his home for a group of guests that includes the Bingleys and his own sister, Georgiana. He asks Elizabeth if she would like to meet Georgiana, and Elizabeth replies that she would. After Darcy leaves them, the Gardiners comment on his good looks and manners, so different from the account of his character given by Elizabeth. — read by V — Take the stress out of mealtime with America’s #1 meal kit service. Go to https://hellofresh.com/snoozecast21 and use code SNOOZECAST21 for 21 free meals plus free shipping! Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/13/202332 minutes, 30 seconds
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Across Asia on a Bicycle

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Across Asia on a Bicycle,” published in 1894 and written by Thomas Allen and William Sachtleben. This episode first aired on January 13, 2021. This book is made up of a series of sketches describing a bicycle journey around the world and specifically across Asia. Allen and Sachtleben set a record for the longest continuous land journey ever made around the world. The day after they graduated college in St. Louis, Missouri, the two friends set out on their journey. Almost three years later, they rolled back into New York on their wheels, having, as they write, “put a girdle round the earth.” — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/11/202328 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Island of Dr. Vermont

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Dr. Vermont’s Fantasy”, written by Hannah Lynch and published in 1896. Lynch was an Irish feminist, novelist, journalist and translator. She spent much of her working life in Paris, having also lived in both Spain and Greece. Lynch then returned to lecture in Ireland and was a part of the Paris salons of the Belle Epoque as well as the Irish Literary Revival in Dublin. read by 'N' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/9/202330 minutes, 30 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 10

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Aronnax receives an invitation to go hunting in Nemo's "forests of Crespo Island" the next morning. Conseil and Ned are invited too. At breakfast, Nemo explains to Aronnax that these forests are underwater and that he has designed special suits for them to walk around down there freely. We will pick up with them getting changed and prepared for their expedition. read by 'N' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/7/202331 minutes, 27 seconds
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First Steps | A Scottish Tour

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Recollections of a Tour Made in Scotland A.D. 1803”, a travel memoir by Dorothy Wordsworth. This episode originally aired in 2020. Wordsworth’s six-week, 663-mile journey through the Scottish Highlands with her brother William Wordsworth and mutual friend Samuel Taylor Coleridge has been called a masterpiece and one of the best Scottish travel writings during a century which saw hundreds of such examples. Dorothy wrote Recollections for family and friends and never saw it published in her lifetime. The three travelers were important authors in the burgeoning Romanticism movement and thus the trip itinerary was in part a literary pilgrimage to the places associated with Scottish figures significant to Romanticists. Dorothy's descriptions and judgments of the countryside and landscapes were a mixture of her own personal aesthetics and the in-fashion aesthetics of the sublime, beautiful and picturesque—in fact, Recollections is considered today a classic of picturesque travel writing. Venturing to Scotland in 1803 was not an easy trip and the thirty-year-old Dorothy would experience much of the rougher nature of Scottish life: a depopulated rural land due to industrialization and emigration, along with rough roads, coarse lodgings and sometimes meager food. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/4/202342 minutes, 52 seconds
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Popcorn Recipes

Tonight, we’ll read “Pop Corn Recipes” by Mary Hamilton Talbott, published in 1916. Corn was domesticated about 10,000 years ago, in what is now Mexico. Archaeologists discovered that people have known about popcorn for thousands of years. Fossil evidence from Peru suggests that corn was popped as early as 4,700 BC. Through the 19th century, popping of the kernels was achieved by hand, on stove tops. During the Great Depression, popcorn was fairly inexpensive at 5–10 cents a bag and became popular. Thus, while other businesses failed, the popcorn business thrived and became a source of income for many struggling farmers, including the Redenbacher family. The snack was popular at theaters, much to the initial displeasure of many of the theater owners, who thought it distracted from the films. Their minds eventually changed, however, and Popcorn became more profitable than theater tickets.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1/2/202333 minutes, 1 second
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The Secret Garden pt. 26

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. In the last episode, Dickon teaches Colin strengthening exercises. We get to see the happenings at the Secret Garden through the eyes of the Robins on their nest. And the staff at the Manor grow increasingly perplexed by Colin and Mary’s healthy transformation. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/30/202233 minutes, 32 seconds
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Treasure Island

Tonight, we’ll read “Treasure Island”, by listener suggestion, an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson. We first aired this on December 28, 2020. “Treasure Island” is a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold." Its influence is enormous on popular perceptions of pirates, including such elements as treasure maps marked with an "X", schooners, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen bearing parrots on their shoulders. — read by M — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/28/202246 minutes, 26 seconds
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North of Boston | Robert Frost

Tonight, we’ll read poems from “North of Boston” a collection from Robert Frost first published in 1914. Most of the poems resemble short dramas or dialogues. It is also called a book of people because most of the poems deal with New England themes and Yankee farmers. Known for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech, Robert Frost frequently wrote about settings from rural life in New England in the early 20th century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. Frequently honored during his lifetime, Frost is the only poet to receive four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. Read by 'N' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/27/202231 minutes, 27 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 6

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. In the previous episode, we read the second half of chapter six, in which eeyore had a birthday and got two presents. Then we read the first half of chapter seven, in which Kanga and Roo came to the forest, and Piglet will, apparently, have a bath. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/23/202231 minutes, 31 seconds
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Balsam Fir

Tonight, we’ll read “Balsam Fir”, a Snoozecast original. This episode originally aired on December 23, 2019. Experience tromping through an evergreen tree farm to pick the perfect tree to bring home.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/21/202230 minutes, 29 seconds
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A Christmas Carol | Stave One

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “A Christmas Carol” a novella by Charles Dickens originally published in 1843. The story recounts how Ebenezer Scrooge, an elderly miser, is visited by the spirits of Christmas and is in the process, transformed. Dickens wrote “A Christmas Carol” during a period when the British were exploring and re-evaluating past Christmas traditions, including carols, and newer customs such as Christmas cards and Christmas trees. It captured the zeitgeist of the mid-Victorian revival of the Christmas holiday. Dickens had acknowledged the influence of the modern Western observance of Christmas and later inspired several aspects of Christmas, including family gatherings, seasonal food and drink, dancing, games and a festive generosity of spirit. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/19/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 29

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Elizabeth leaves on her summer holiday with her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner. Their tour of Derbyshire takes them near Pemberley. Mrs. Gardiner suggests they visit the estate. Elizabeth consents to go only when she learns that Darcy will not be there. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/16/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Gift of the Magi

Tonight, we’ll read “The Gift of the Magi” a short story by O. Henry, followed by the poem “The Night Before Christmas.”  Published in 1905, this O.Henry story tells of a young husband and wife and how they deal with the challenge of buying secret Christmas gifts for each other with very little money. “The Night Before Christmas” is formally titled “A Visit from St. Nicholas” and written by Clement Clarke Moore, anonymously published in 1844.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/14/202233 minutes, 30 seconds
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Geographic Map Drawing

Tonight, we’ll read from “Lessons in Chalk Modeling, the New Method of Map Drawing” written by Ida Cassa Heffron and published in 1900.  Geography is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena of Earth. It is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks an understanding of Earth and its human and natural complexities—not merely where objects are, but also how they have changed and come to be. While geography is specific to Earth, many concepts can be applied more broadly to other celestial bodies in the field of planetary science. One such concept, the first law of geography, is "everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." Geography has been called "the world discipline" and "the bridge between the human and the physical sciences." read by -V- Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/13/202233 minutes, 29 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 9

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Captain Nemo and Professor Arronax smoke seaweed cigars together as they chat in the saloon. Nemo explains that the Nautilus is the perfect ship both due to its electrical power and the fact that, travelling below the surface of the water, it is unimpeded by things like storms, just as he is rich enough to be unimpeded from financial constraints. As “captain, builder, and engineer” of the vessel, Nemo has utmost faith in it. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/9/202231 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Influence of the Stars

This episode is brought to you by our Patreon Supporters and by heavenly bodies.  Tonight, we’ll read the opening to The Influence of the Stars published in 1904. It was written by Rosa Baughan, the eldest daughter of an eminent London newspaper man. She soon established a reputation of her own - as one of the most intriguing spiritualists in Victorian Britain. In her short life, she published more than twenty titles devoted to graphology, divination and astrology.  This episode first aired on November 20, 2020.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/7/202231 minutes, 27 seconds
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Behind the Green Door | Penny Parker

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to the 1940 mystery “Behind the Green Door”, part of the “Penny Parker” series written by Mildred Wirt, also known by Mildred Benson. Benson was a journalist and prolific writer, under many pseudonyms, who is best known for creating the Nancy Drew series. Along with being the heroine of the series, Penny Parker was a high school student turned sleuth who also sporadically worked as a reporter for her father's newspaper. The author Benson favored Penny Parker over all the other books she wrote, including Nancy Drew. Her obituary quoted her as saying, " 'I always thought Penny Parker was a better Nancy Drew than Nancy is." read by -V- Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/6/202234 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 25

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. In the last episode, Dickon tends the vegetable garden he keeps at home in the evenings, after working on the flowery Secret Garden in the daytime. Sometimes his mother, Mrs. Sowerby, keeps him company. Dickon shares the secret with her, and she bakes rolls for the children to satiate their voracious appetites while they are gardening. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
12/3/202232 minutes, 59 seconds
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The Opal

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast “The Opal”, a fairy tale about how the gemstone was formed. This story originally aired on December 7th, 2020. Depending on the conditions in which it formed, precious opal may be iridescent with white, black, or nearly any color of the visual spectrum as a background color. Black opal is considered to be the rarest, whereas white, gray, and green are the most common. Opal was rare and very valuable in antiquity. In Europe, it was a gem prized by royalty. Until the opening of vast deposits in Australia in the 19th century the only known source was beyond the Roman frontier in Slovakia. Opal was also said to grant invisibility- if wrapped in a fresh bay leaf and held in the hand- and thus it was considered the gemstone of thieves. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/30/202238 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Million Dollar Bond Robbery | Poirot

Tonight, we’ll read “The Million Dollar Bond Robbery”, a short story written by Agatha Christie and published in 1924 as part of her “Poirot Investigates” series. In this story, a million dollars of bonds disappear from under a young man’s nose and he is being held accountable. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to our first Poirot story, “The Western Star” which aired in June of 2022 and “The Cheap Flat” which aired in August . By the way, a “portmanteau” has two meanings. One is the way it is used in this story- a large suitcase or trunk that opens into two equal parts. The other way is as a word that blends the sounds and combining the meanings of two others, for example motel which combines ‘motor’ and ‘hotel’, podcast which combines ‘iPod’ with ‘broadcast’ or of course, Snoozecast which contains ‘getting cozy’ with bedtime. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/29/202230 minutes, 30 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 5

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. In the previous episode, we read the second half of chapter five, in which Piglet met a Heffalump, and also the first half of chapter six, in which eeyore had a birthday and if he is lucky, he may get two presents. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/25/202234 minutes, 31 seconds
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An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast the second and final part of “An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving”, a short story written by Louisa May Alcott. This story originally aired on November 23rd, 2020. Please find the first part of this story that aired on Monday. In part one, the Bassett parents rush off when they hear that the grandmother was very ill, just as a snowstorm was starting. This left all the children to manage the farmhouse on their own. Luckily, they are a resourceful and industrious group. We’ll pick up with oldest sister Tilly and Prue in the kitchen, as they are starting their first attempt at a Thanksgiving feast on their own. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/23/202229 minutes, 24 seconds
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An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast the opening half from “An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving”, a short story written by Louisa May Alcott. This story originally aired on November 16th, 2020. The second half will air in our next episode. “An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving” is a simple story set in the early 1800s, featuring a country family in New Hampshire. It’s full of idyllic and peaceful descriptions from an earlier time.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/21/202245 minutes, 21 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 28

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. In the last episode, Lydia is overjoyed when the wife of Colonel Forster invites her to Brighton. Kitty is peevish not to be included. Elizabeth secretly advises her father not to allow Lydia to go, but he does not take her concern seriously. Before the departure of the regiment, Elizabeth meets Wickham. She sees a new side of him she is less impressed with. He seems concerned to learn that she doesn’t think that Darcy is so bad after all.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/18/202233 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Devoted Friend

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast the story of “The Devoted Friend,” written by Oscar Wilde and published in 1910. This episode originally aired on November 9, 2020. Wilde was an Irish poet and playwright. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, and the circumstances of his criminal conviction for his homosexuality. In this fable, told by a linnet, or songbird in the finch family, to teach a water rat some life skills, Hans is an innocent gardener and the devoted friend of a wealthy but manipulative Miller. In this story, Wilde pokes fun at a society where charity is less about love and more about ensuring that the wealthy benefit.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/16/202242 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Story of Jewels

Tonight, we’ll read about the history of jewelry around the world, from “Jewels and the Woman” written by Marianne Ostier and published in 1958. Ostier was the principal designer and artistic driving force behind Ostier Inc., the New York jewelry firm she founded in 1941 with her husband Oliver. Marianne was an accomplished artist of painting and sculpture when she married Oliver, a third-generation Austrian court jeweler. The couple emigrated to the United States following the Nazi annexation of Austria in 1938. The majority of the firm’s output was bespoke jewelry for private clients with few pieces ever produced in quantity. As a result, Ostier’s work may be less well known today than some of their contemporaries, but at the time they were considered one of the finest jewelry houses in New York. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/14/202231 minutes, 27 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 8

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Captain Nemo takes Aronnax on a tour of his private natural history museum. Nemo's cases are filled with rare specimens drawn from the seas of the world: corals, shells, starfish and lots of pearls. His collection is priceless. As much as Aronnax enjoys all of this, he's keen to learn how the Nautilus itself is powered. So Nemo sits him down to explain, seated from within his sparsely furnished captain’s quarters. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/11/202232 minutes, 32 seconds
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Washington Square

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast the opening to “Washington Square”, written by Henry James and published in 1880. This episode originally aired on November 18, 2020. The novel recounts the conflict between a dull but sweet daughter and her brilliant, unemotional father. The plot of the novel is based upon a true story told to James by his close friend, a British actress. The book is often compared with Jane Austen's work (who of course, wrote “Pride and Prejudice”) for the clarity and grace of its prose and its intense focus on family relationships. This is the second time Henry James is featured on Snoozecast. You can find “The Turn of the Screw” back in October 2019. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/9/202244 minutes, 41 seconds
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The Fairy City | Australian Fairy Tales

Tonight we’ll read another Australian fairy tale called “The Fairy City” written by Hume Cook and published in 1925. You can certainly pick up straight away on this episode, however if you’d like to listen to the first chapter of “Australian Fairy Tales” please find “The Magic Well” which aired on October 19th, 2022. James Newton Haxton Hume Cook, the author, was an Australian politician who served in Parliament for almost a decade. This story features aspects of urban planning and civil engineering- a professional engineering discipline that deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of the physical and naturally built environment, including public works such as roads, bridges, canals, dams, airports and more. It is considered the second-oldest engineering discipline after military engineering,[3] and it is defined to distinguish non-military engineering from military engineering. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/7/202233 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 24

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. In the last episode, Colin claims the secret garden as his own, and in doing so Colin chooses to follow in his mother's footsteps and dedicate himself to nature and happiness. He is inspired by Mary and Dickon, and decides to become a scientist who devotes his life to the study of Magic. We will resume our story with a gathering of Ben, Dickon and Mary, lead by Colin. It is part lecture, part ministry, part mystical rite held in the secret garden. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/4/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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North Dakotan Biscuits and Gems

Tonight, we’ll read about baking biscuits and gems from the “Civic League Cookbook” from North Dakota in 1913. Gems are little muffin-like cakes that were popular in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. They were most often made using graham flour, and had very few other ingredients – some just required graham flour, water and salt. Graham flour is named after Sylvester Graham , a minister who is considered one of America’s earliest and most vocal advocates of dietary reform. Foreshadowing the modern health food movement, he believed that natural foods in the purest form – whole grains, vegetables, fruits and nuts – were the pathway to a healthy life. Graham recommended using coarsely ground, whole-wheat flour to make bread, rather than white flour, which often contained chemical additives. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11/2/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Haunted Orchard

Tonight, for our final episode of this year’s spooky sleep story series, we’ll read “The Haunted Orchard” written by British author Richard Le Gallienne and published in 1912. Born Richard Thomas Gallienne, the author changed his last name to “Le Gallienne” after college when he began working in an accountant’s office. Soon after he attended a lecture by Oscar Wilde, Le Gallienne abandoned his job to become a professional writer and poet. Five years later, he met Wilde, they had a brief affair and a longer friendship. Le Gallienne married three times and had two children including famous and successful stage actress and director Eva Le Gallienne. After becoming a resident of the United States, he eventually settled in the French Riviera in the 1940s. During the war he refused to write propaganda for the local German and Italian authorities and, with no income, once collapsed in the street owing to hunger. He persevered, however, and continued to write into his 70s. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/31/202236 minutes, 28 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 4

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. In the previous episode, we read chapter four and the first half of chapter five, in which we are introduced to Eeyore, who has lost his tail, and Pooh finds one. Also, Piglet meets a Heffalump.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/28/202230 minutes, 59 seconds
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Madeleines | Proust

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from French writer Marcel Proust’s monumental “In Search of Lost Time” which is seven volumes long, and first published in 1913. “In Search of Lost Time” follows the narrator's recollections and experiences in the late 19th-century and early 20th-century high-society France, while reflecting on the loss of time and lack of meaning in the world. This series does not necessarily need to be followed in order. Rather than being plot driven, it is more of a meditation on memories, consciousness and ambiance. The first episode aired on May 9th, 2022, and is titled “Overture.” The second episode, “The Magic Lantern” aired on July 11, 2022. The third episode, “M. Swann” aired on September 12, 2022. A madeleine de Proust is an expression used to describe smells, tastes, sounds or any sensations reminding you of your childhood or simply bringing back emotional memories from a long time ago.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/26/202233 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Castle of Otranto

Tonight, for our 600th episode, and the next in our October spooky sleep story series, we’ll read an excerpt from “The Castle of Otranto”, a novel by Horace Walpole. First published in 1764, it is generally regarded as the first gothic novel. Set in a haunted castle, the novel produced a new style that has endured ever since, and has shaped the modern-day aesthetic of the goth subculture. Although in later editions of this novel’s publication the author acknowledged his authorship, in the first publication the story was purported to be a recently discovered ancient manuscript from the time of the Crusades. Many years later it was discovered that the main character, Manfred, was inspired by the real medieval King of Sicily by that name. This historic Manfred is remembered for being noble, handsome and intellectual, along with being ex-communicated by three different popes. This excerpt opens on a scene where Princess Isabella is fleeing through the castle from the wicked Manfred. He had recently asked her to marry him on the same evening her own fiance, Manfred’s own son, died by a giant helmet falling from the sky upon him. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/24/202235 minutes, 27 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 27

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. Our Friday rotation is capped at four series now, so that each episode will only be one month out from the next of a particular story. If you’d like to listen to this series or some of our others in order, please go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, younger sisters Lydia and Kitty share some capital news about Wickham- that he is still an eligible bachelor. When they arrive home, Mr. Bennet is glad to see Elizabeth and Jane, Mrs. Bennet wants to hear about the latest fashions, and Kitty and Lydia want to walk to Meryton to see the officers. To avoid seeing Wickham, Elizabeth chooses not to accompany them. Later, Elizabeth tells Jane how Darcy proposed to her and also shares the part of Darcy's letter about Wickham. Elizabeth and Jane agree not to publicize Wickham’s misdeeds, for the sake of Darcy and his sister. They agree, Wickham will soon leave along with the regiment with no harm done. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/21/202233 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Magic Well

Tonight we’ll read an Australian fairy tale called “The Magic Well” written by Hume Cook and published in 1925. The author wrote this preface: “The Stories in this little book have been set down almost in the same words in which they were told. How the telling of them came about is a very simple matter. Having three children, each of whom loved a Fairy Tale, it somehow became the fashion, on Sunday evenings, to tell them a story. On one occasion, when the youngest member was just about to be taken to bed, his sister said; “None of the books about Fairies ever say a word about Australia! Are there any Australian Fairies, Father?” Somewhat hastily, perhaps, I answered: “Why, yes, of course! Whole tribes of them!” Instantly the order went forth: “Then you will please tell us about them the very next time you tell us a story!”  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/19/202242 minutes, 30 seconds
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Mysterious Psychic Forces

Tonight, as part of this month’s spooky sleep story series, we’ll read from “Mysterious Psychic Forces” written by Camille Flammarion and published in 1907. Nicolas Camille Flammarion was a French astronomer, mystic and prolific author, including popular science works about astronomy, several notable early science fiction novels, and works on psychical research. He has been described as being obsessed by life after death, and also with life other worlds, like that on Mars, and he seemed to see no distinction between the two. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/17/202232 minutes, 39 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 7

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Captain Nemo gives Dr. Aronnax a tour of the Nautilus after a seafood lunch. First they visit the ship's library, an incredible vault of books comparable in size to anything similar on land. The captain offers Dr. Aronnax a cigar made of materials from the sea, which he thoroughly enjoys. They move on to the salon. It contains a remarkable collection of reproductions of classic artwork and sculptures, and sheet music of the world's best composers. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/14/202232 minutes, 54 seconds
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Arthur Drives the Saxons from his Realm | King Arthur

Tonight, we’ll read another story from our King Arthur series. This one, “Arthur Drives the Saxons from His Realm” comes from a book edited by Rupert S. Holland and published in 1919. The Saxons were a group of Germanic peoples whose name was given in the early Middle Ages to a large former country in what is now Germany. In the late Roman Empire, the name was used to refer to Germanic coastal raiders, and as a name similar to the later "Viking". In contrast, the British "Saxons", today referred to in English as Anglo-Saxons, became a single nation bringing together migrant Germanic peoples and assimilated Celtic Britons populations. The term "Anglo-Saxon", combining the names of the Angles and the Saxons, came into use by the eighth century to distinguish the Germanic inhabitants of Britain from continental Saxons. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/12/202234 minutes, 31 seconds
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Carmilla

Tonight, as part of our fourth annual spooky sleep story series, we’ll read the opening to “Carmilla”, an 1872 Gothic novella by Irish author Sheridan Le Fanu. Our series will run every Monday of October. This is one of the early works of vampire fiction, predating Bram Stoker's Dracula by 26 years Le Fanu presents the story as part of the casebook of Dr. Hesselius, whose departures from medical orthodoxy rank him as the first occult detective in literature. Occult detective fiction is a subgenre of detective fiction that combines the tropes of the main genre with those of supernatural, fantasy and/or horror fiction. The occult detective is employed in cases involving ghosts, demons and other supernatural elements, and the detectives are sometimes portrayed as having psychic or other magical powers. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to “The Hound of the Baskervilles” episode from last October, which would also be considered occult detective fiction, if only Sherlock was not so good at solving mysteries at the end. Also, you can find our reading of “Dracula” from October 2020. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/10/202234 minutes, 32 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 23

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911.  In the last episode, the children are confronted by the cantankerous gardener, Ben Weatherstaff, who is angry to find them in the garden he has kept shut up for so long. He had never seen Colin in person, but had only heard fanciful tales about the boy. They have a reckoning, and Ben is commanded to keep their secret as well.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/7/202234 minutes, 31 seconds
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Wheat to Win the War

Tonight, we’ll read about cooking alternatives to wheat, from the 1918 pamphlet “Foods That Will Win the War”. Although the United States did not have food rationing in World War I as it did in World War II, it did rely heavily on propaganda campaigns at the time to persuade people to curb their food consumption. Through slogans such as "Food Will Win the War", "Meatless Meals", and "Wheatless Wednesdays", the United States Food Administration under Herbert Hoover reduced national consumption by 15%. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/5/202233 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Willows

Tonight, to kick off our fourth annual Spooky Sleep Stories series, we’ll read the opening to the novella “The Willows” written by Algernon Blackwood and first published in 1907. This year’s series of classic horror stories will air every Monday this October. In this story, two friends are midway on a canoe trip down the River Danube. The natural environment, for example the river, sun and wind— is personified with powerful and ultimately threatening characteristics. Most ominous are the masses of dense willows along the river banks, which "moved of their own will as though alive." This is one of Blackwood's best known works and has been influential on a number of later writers. Horror author H.P. Lovecraft considered it to be the finest supernatural tale in English literature. "The Willows" is an example of early modern horror and is connected within the literary tradition of weird fiction. — read by 'V' — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
10/3/202256 minutes, 24 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 3

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. In the previous episode, we read chapters two and three, in which Pooh west visited and got into a tight place. And also where he and Piglet went hunting, and nearly caught a Woozle. As Pooh says about Woozles, "It is either Two Woozles and one, as it might be, Wizzle, or Two, as it might be, Wizzles and one, if so it is, Woozle. Let us continue to follow them." — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/30/202234 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Greek Interpreter pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to "The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter", one of the 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The first half aired last week. In the opening to this story, we learn that Holmes has an older brother named Mycroft. This brother sometimes has even more uncanny deductive skills, and yet does not pursue detective work because he doesn’t have the energetic ambition of Sherlock. Sometimes, Sherlock will turn to Mycroft for help solving a case. In this instance, Mycroft asks Sherlock to look into a situation that occurred to Mycroft’s neighbor, a Greek interpreter named Melas. Melas was not allowed to see where he was taken, and was threatened by a thug named Latimer if he should talk. We will pick up the story as Melas describes to Holmes the interior of the home he has been taken to. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/28/202235 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Story of the Herons pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the second half of “The Story of the Herons,” from a collection titled “Moonshine and Clover” written by Laurence Housman and published in 1922. The first half aired last week. In the previous episode, a princess was cursed to fall in love at first sight to whatever creature she saw. She was kept safely away, blind to the world, except for occasional walks in the forest with a blindfold on. A wicked fairy takes her blindfold off, and she falls in love with a heron that happens to be fishing in front of her. The loving parents of the princess choose to allow the princess to be turned into a heron to be with her mate. The good fairy explains that if the heron falls in love with her on a level deeper than a heron typically could, like on a human level, they could both be transformed into humans instead of birds. Soon after, it is learned that the heron princess has laid two eggs in her nest.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/26/202240 minutes, 30 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 26

Tonight, we shall read the next part to “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. Our Friday rotation is capped at four series now, so that each episode will only be one month out from the next of a particular story. If you’d like to listen to this series or any of our others in order, please go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, Elizabeth bids her friends at the parsonage at Rosings goodbye, and on her way home from her vacation, picks up her sister Jane who was staying in London with the Gardiners. Elizabeth wants to share the news with Jane about Darcy, but is hesitant to do so in that it also means sharing disappointing news about Bingley as well. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/23/202231 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Greek Interpreter pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to "The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter", written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is one of 12 stories in the cycle collected as “The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes”. Out of all 56 Sherlock stories, Doyle ranked "The Greek Interpreter" seventeenth in a list of his nineteen favorites. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/21/202231 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Story of the Herons pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read “The Story of the Herons,” from a collection titled “Moonshine and Clover” written by Laurence Housman and published in 1922. Housman was an openly gay man during the Victorian era when homosexuality was severely stigmatized. He was an activist for both the women's right to vote and for the acceptance of gay people in society. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to “The First Voyage | Sinbad the Sailor” which aired on July 18, 2022. Herons are long-legged, long-necked, long-billed freshwater and coastal birds. They include egrets, which are differentiated simply by their typical white feathers instead of grey. Although herons resemble birds in some other families, such as the storks and cranes, herons differ from these in flying with their necks retracted, not outstretched. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/19/202232 minutes, 23 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 6

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, Professor Arronax panics about the oxygen levels in the cell, which must be diminishing. To his relief, he realizes that there is a novel system of ventilation on the vessel. Painfully hungry, the men await their next meal impatiently. They shout, but nobody answers. When, after two hours, the door finally opens, Ned attacks the person who comes inside. Arronax is shocked to hear the stranger addressing him politely in perfect French, and yet clearly not as a native speaker.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/16/202234 minutes, 29 seconds
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Numeration

Tonight, we’ll read from “Elements of Arithmetic” written by Augustus De Morgan and published in 1846. De Morgan was a British mathematician and logician. He was also known as a brilliant and witty writer. Personally, he was an atheist at a time when his expression of belief limited his academic career early. The prejudice didn’t last forever and because of his mathematical legacy, there is a crater on the moon named after him. The history of arithmetic includes the period from the emergence of counting before the formal definition of numbers and arithmetic operations over them by means of a system of axioms. Arithmetic — the science of numbers, their properties and their relations — is one of the main mathematical sciences. It is closely connected with algebra and the theory of numbers. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/14/202233 minutes, 33 seconds
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M. Swann | Proust

Tonight, we’ll read “M. Swann” the next part in our series from French writer Marcel Proust’s monumental “In Search of Lost Time” which is seven volumes long, and first published in 1913. “In Search of Lost Time” follows the narrator's recollections and experiences in the late 19th-century and early 20th-century high-society France, while reflecting on the loss of time and lack of meaning in the world. This series does not necessarily need to be followed in order as rather than being plot driven, it is more of a meditation on memories, consciousness and ambiance. The first episode aired on May 9th, 2022, and is titled “Overture.” The second episode, “The Magic Lantern” aired on July 11, 2022. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/12/202233 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 22

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. If you’d like to listen to this story’s episodes in order, go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, the children spend an absolutely glorious spring day together in the secret garden. Mary and Dickon learn that Colin always uses a wheelchair simply because he feels so tired and weak, but not because he cannot walk. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/9/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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Terra Nova [rebroadcast]

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast Terra Nova, a Snoozecast original, which originally aired on May 15, 2020. In this short story, a young man meets a trio of travellers who provide a new perspective on the isolated village he wants to leave. Set in Canada’s Gros Morne National Park, a World Heritage Site, this tale draws inspiration from The Tablelands. The striking, desert-esque landscape is notable for illustrating the theory of plate tectonics.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/7/202229 minutes, 37 seconds
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Sleeping Beauty [rebroadcast]

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast the story of "Sleeping Beauty", which originally aired in 2019. It is a classic fairy tale about a princess who is cursed to sleep for a hundred years by an evil fairy, where she would be awakened by a handsome prince. The earliest known version of the story is found in the narrative “Perceforest”, composed in the 14th century. "Perceforest" provides an original Genesis of the Arthurian World. — read by M — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/5/202232 minutes, 12 seconds
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Rocky Mountain Lady [rebroadcast]

Tonight, we shall rebroadcast "A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains", a travel book, by Isabella Bird, describing her 1873 trip to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. This episode originally aired in 2020. The book is a compilation of letters, that Isabella Bird wrote to her sister, Henrietta. Women were scarce enough in the Western United States of the late nineteenth century, and a middle-aged English lady traveling alone, by horseback, was quite a phenomenon.  Bird was a nineteenth-century British explorer, writer,photographer,and naturalist. From early on, Bird was frail and suffered from headaches and insomnia. Doctors recommended open air and exercise, so Bird learned to ride horseback.  — read by V —  Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
9/2/202232 minutes, 19 seconds
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Breadtime [rebroadcast]

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast an episode about the basics of bread making, which originally aired in 2020. The text is from 1925’s Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery, written by The Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences. This institute was founded by Mary Brooks Picken in Scranton, PA. An expert on fashion, Picken also wrote the first dictionary to be published by a woman in the English language. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/31/202231 minutes, 15 seconds
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Maggie's Start Date [rebroadcast]

Tonight, we’ll rebroadcast a Snoozecast original titled “Maggie’s Start Date” which originally aired in 2020. Maggie is the Green family’s loyal dog, however she may have ambitions beyond being household pet.. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/29/202248 minutes, 39 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 25

Tonight, we shall read the next part of “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. Our Friday rotation is capped at four series now, so that each episode will only be one month out from the next of a particular story. If you’d like to listen to this series or any of our others in order, please go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, Elizabeth has finished reading Darcy’s letter, and is considering it over and over again in her mind. As she considers, she starts to have a very different view of what had taken place over the last year. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/26/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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Sunset | Tales of the Setting Sun

Tonight, we’ll read the opening fairy tale from “The Descent of the Sun: A Cycle of Birth” published in 1903. This book was purportedly translated from unidentified Sanskrit manuscripts by F. W. Bain. More likely, the stories were only inspired by ancient Hindu myths. While the stories may have been a literary hoax, they are still charming fantasy tales in their own right. They help us to consider the nature of existence -- the concepts of creation, reincarnation, the power of attraction and the triumph of love. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/24/202235 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Only Crab in the Sea

Tonight, we’ll read a story from “Just So Stories” by British author Rudyard Kipling published in 1902 titled “The Crab That Played with the Sea”. The book is a collection of origin stories. Kipling began working on the book by telling the first three chapters as bedtime stories to his daughter Josephine. These had to be told "just so" (exactly in the words she was used to) or she would complain. The stories illustrate how animals obtained their distinctive features, such as how the leopard got his spots. This particular story explains the ebb and flow of the tides, as well as how the crab changed from a huge animal into a small one. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/22/202230 minutes, 30 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 5

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, professor Aronnax, his devoted servant Conseil and the harpooner Ned Land are cast overboard and lost at sea after their confrontation with the giant mechanical narwhal. They find themselves on a floating metal island that turns out to be the beast they imagined they were hunting. Eventually, the vessel begins to sink and, just in the nick of time, the men are snatched and dragged into the belly of the craft by masked men.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/19/202233 minutes, 43 seconds
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Violin Making

Tonight, we’ll read about selecting wood from “Violin Making” written by Walter H. Mayson and published in 1909. The modern violin was first known in 16th-century Italy. The name fiddle is often used regardless of the type of music played on it, and the genres are not limited to western classical music, folk, country and jazz music along with plenty of non-Western music as well. Violinists and collectors particularly prize the fine historical instruments made by certain well known families and makers, like Stradivari for example. The quality of their sound has defied attempts to explain or equal it, though this belief is disputed. The current record amount paid for a Stradivari violin is £9.8 million or $15.9 million US in 2011. This book was published posthumously by the English violin maker, who started his fiddle making career at the age of 39. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/17/202235 minutes, 28 seconds
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At The Bay

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to the short story “At the Bay” written by Katherine Mansfield, published in 1922. Mansfield was a New Zealand writer, widely considered one of the most influential and important authors of the modernist movement. Her works are celebrated across the world, and have been published in 25 languages. This story, based on her childhood growing up in the suburbs of New Zealand, represents Mansfield’s best mature work, a luminous example of her literary impressionism. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/16/202233 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 21

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. If you’d like to listen to this story’s episodes in order, go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, Dickon comes to Misselthwaite Manor to meet Colin with Mary. The three children start devising their plan to covertly bring Colin into the secret garden. Mr. Roach, the head gardener, is ordered by Colin to be sure that all servants and groundskeepers are away at the times he decides to be pushed in his wheelchair outdoors with the children. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/12/202232 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Cheap Flat | Poirot

Tonight, we’ll read “The Cheap Flat”, a short story written by Agatha Christie and published in 1924 as part of her “Poirot Investigates” series. In this story, Captain Hastings meets a couple at a party who have just rented a flat in a fashionable district for an implausibly cheap price. Poirot becomes intrigued and sets out to investigate. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to our first Poirot story, “The Western Star” which aired on June 8, 2022. We have also read from two of her novels as well- “The Mysterious Affair at Styles” in 2019 and “The Man in the Brown Suit” in 2021. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/10/202242 minutes, 50 seconds
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Sleep and Poetry | Keats

Tonight, we’ll read poems by John Keats starting with one titled “Sleep and Poetry.” John Keats’ poems are a major part of English Romantic poetry. They portray settings loaded with symbolism and sensuality, and draw heavily on Greek and Roman myth along with romanticised tales of chivalry. Keats died in 1821 at the young age of 25, having written the majority of his work in less than four years. In his lifetime, sales of Keats's three volumes of poetry probably amounted to only 200 copies. The compression of his poetic apprenticeship and maturity into so short a time is just one remarkable aspect of Keats's work. Keats was convinced that he had made no mark in his lifetime. Aware that he was dying, he wrote "I have left no immortal work behind me – nothing to make my friends proud of my memory – but I have lov'd the principle of beauty in all things, and if I had had time I would have made myself remember'd." Keats's ability and talent was acknowledged by several influential contemporary allies. His admirers praised him for having developed a style which was more heavily loaded with sensualities, more gorgeous in its effects, more voluptuously alive than any poet who had come before him. While not appreciated during his lifetime, he has gone on to become one of the most loved of the Romantic poets, and has provided inspiration to many authors after him. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/8/202235 minutes, 26 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. In the previous episode, we read chapter one, in which we were introduced to Winnie-the-Pooh and some bees, and the stories began. Pooh is all out of honey and thinks of the idea to steal some from the bees. To paraphrase Pooh: "That buzzing-noise means something…If there's a buzzing-noise, somebody's making a buzzing-noise, and the only reason for making a buzzing-noise that I know of is because you're a bee." — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/5/202234 minutes, 36 seconds
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Life of Liszt

Tonight, we’ll read about the musical genius Franz Liszt as a child piano prodigy from the book “Life of Liszt” written by Ludwig Nohl. Liszt was a Hungarian composer, pianist and teacher of the Romantic era. He gained renown during the early nineteenth century for his virtuoso skill as a pianist. Since he often appeared three or four times a week in concert, it could be safe to assume that he appeared in public well over a thousand times during one eight year period. During his virtuoso heyday, Liszt was described by the writer Hans Christian Andersen (who has written many fairy tales featured by Snoozecast) as a "slim young man...[with] dark hair hung around his pale face". He was seen as handsome by many, with a German poet writing concerning his showmanship during concerts: "How powerful, how shattering was his mere physical appearance". — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/3/202232 minutes, 20 seconds
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Felicia and the Pot of Pinks

Tonight, we’ll read the fairy tale “Felicia and the Pot of Pinks” written by Madame d’Aulnoy and found in the Blue Fairy Book edited by Andrew Lang. The “pot of pinks” in this story refers to a type of dianthus flower know as “garden pinks.” Its name is not due to the color pink but rather to the serrated edges of the petals, which look like they were cut with pinking shears. In fact, the color pink may be derived from this particular flower. If you enjoy this story, be sure to listen to our many other fairy tales written by Madame d’Aulnoy including The Yellow Dwarf, Princess Belle-Etoile, The White Cat and The White Doe. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
8/1/202234 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Moon Maid

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Moon Maid”, a fantasy novel written by Edgar Rice Burroughs and published in 1926. This novel constitutes a future history, and in it Burroughs' vision of what the 20th century held in store for humanity, which could be considered a kind of retroactive alternate history. In Burroughs's vision, in 1967 the planetary rulers send a first manned spacecraft to the Moon—coinciding very near to the actual 1969 date of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. Of course, in Burrough’s version, the moon turns out to be teeming with life. This is the second time Snoozecast has featured early science fiction from Burroughs. You can also listen to “A Princess of Mars” that aired on June 14, 2019. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/27/202233 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Crowning of Arthur | King Arthur

Tonight, we’ll read another story from our King Arthur series. This one, “The Crowning of Arthur and the Sword Excalibur” comes from a book edited by Rupert S. Holland and published in 1919. If you’d like to listen to this whole anthology easily in order, go to snoozecast.com/series. Excalibur is the legendary sword of King Arthur, sometimes also attributed with magical powers or associated with the rightful sovereignty of Britain. Excalibur and the Sword in the Stone (the proof of Arthur's lineage) are in some versions said to be different, though in other incarnations they are either the same or at least share their name. Several similar swords and other weapons also appear in this and other legends. Historically, a sword identified as Excalibur (or rather, Caliburn, at the time) was supposedly discovered during the purported exhumation of Arthur's grave at Glastonbury Abbey in the year 1191. That same year, either this or another sword claimed as Excalibur was given as a gift of goodwill by the English king Richard I of England to his ally the King of Sicily. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/25/202236 minutes, 23 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 4

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, the sailors on The Abraham Lincoln keep a keen eye on the water, searching for the sea monster. Every time someone thinks they might see something, a great rush of excitement washes over the ship, only to subside into disappointment shortly after. The ship spends three months in the deep Pacific, scouring every inch of the ocean. Eventually, Farragut announces that if the monster is still not found after three days, they will have to abandon the mission. They are about to turn back on the final day, when Ned Land, the harpoon leader, spots the object of their search. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/22/202230 minutes, 55 seconds
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The Crooked Man pt. 2 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to "The Adventure of the Crooked Man", one of the 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is one of 12 stories in the cycle collected as “The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes”.  In the first episode, which aired last week, we learn about Colonel Barclay, a man who had risen up the ranks to become the leader of a squadron. He and his wife enjoyed the power and popularity stemming from such a position. Their standing in the community made the case all the more shocking when Barclay was found dead and Mrs. Barclay was the only one present. She was suspected of murdering him because they had been arguing when he died. We will pick up with Holmes discussing with Watson how he would like to prove Mrs. Barclay’s innocence because he thinks there is more to the story.  — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/20/202236 minutes, 18 seconds
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The First Voyage | Sinbad the Sailor

Tonight, we’ll read the first voyage from “Sinbad the Sailor” edited by Laurence Housman and published in 1900. Housman was a prolific English writer and playwright, an activist and an illustrator during the Victorian era. Turning from visual art to writing when his eyesight began to fail, he also advocated tirelessly for the women’s right to vote, and believed that men should be an active participant of the suffrage movement. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to find our episode titled “The Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor” that aired on January 13, 2020. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/18/202231 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 20

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. If you’d like to listen to this story’s episodes in order, go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, Mary shares the full secret of the garden with Colin- that Dickon will come visit him tomorrow, that she has already been inside the garden itself, and that they will take him there as well.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/15/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Crooked Man pt. 1 | Sherlock Holmes

Tonight, we’ll read "The Adventure of the Crooked Man", written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Out of 56 total stories, Doyle ranked "The Adventure of the Crooked Man" 15th in a list of his 19 favorite Sherlock Holmes stories. Although "Elementary, my dear Watson" is known popularly as a catch-phrase of Sherlock Holmes, the character never says this in any of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's stories. In The Adventure of the Crooked Man, though, he comes his closest to it in the following dialog: "I have the advantage of knowing your habits, my dear Watson," said he. "Excellent!" I cried. "Elementary," said he. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/13/202230 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Magic Lantern | Proust

Tonight, we’ll read “The Magic Lantern,” the next part in our series from French writer Marcel Proust’s monumental “In Search of Lost Time” which is seven volumes long, and first published in 1913. “In Search of Lost Time” follows the narrator's recollections and experiences in the late 19th-century and early 20th-century high-society France, while reflecting on the loss of time and lack of meaning in the world. This series does not necessarily need to be followed in sequential order as it is more about an ambiance than a plot. However, in the first episode, which aired on May 9th, 2022, the narrator recalls his childhood, bedtimes, bedrooms of his memories, and the peculiar states of consciousness related to sleep. This episode features memories about the magic lantern the narrator’s family gives him as a child to help him with his insomnia. Magic lanterns were an early form of a slide projector.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/11/202233 minutes, 26 seconds
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Winnie-the-Pooh pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “Winnie-the-Pooh” a children’s story written by A.A. Milne and published in 1926. This collection of short stories features an anthropomorphic teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, along with his friends Christopher Robin, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, Rabbit, Kanga, and Roo. The book was well received at release, a commercial success, and has been translated into over 50 languages, including Latin. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/8/202230 minutes, 30 seconds
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Schoolroom Cakes

Tonight, we’ll read recipes on schoolroom cakes along with tea cakes and biscuits from “The Cake and Biscuit Book” by Elizabeth Douglas, published in 1903. When this cookbook was published, most American students attended a one-room schoolhouse. A single teacher would typically have students of all ages in one class. The youngest children sat in the front, while the oldest students sat in the back. Students memorized and recited their lessons, and when they were lucky, they ate home baked treats like the ones here. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/6/202231 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Otter Opal pt. 2

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Otter Opal”, a Snoozecast original. The first half aired last week. In the last episode, we met two sea otters named Tumma and Nutsmn as they floated above the kelp forest. Their days are spent sleeping, eating, napping, playing and racing. Tumma excels at all activities, except for the swim races. He has felt frustration at frequently coming in almost last. We also learn that sea otters often have a favorite stone that they keep in a pocket of their fur, and Tumma finds himself an extraordinary one. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/4/202230 minutes, 30 seconds
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Pride and Prejudice pt. 23

Tonight, we shall read the next part of “Pride and Prejudice”, written by Jane Austen. If you’d like to listen to this series in order, please go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, alone at the parsonage, Elizabeth mulls over what Fitzwilliam has revealed to her that Darcy saved a friend from an imprudent marriage. She assumes that the friend is Bingley and the imprudent marriage is to her sister Jane. Suddenly, Darcy enters and abruptly declares his love for her. His marriage proposal focuses upon her social inferiority, and Elizabeth’s initial politeness transforms into an angry accusation.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
7/1/202232 minutes, 30 seconds
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Dinner Party Etiquette

Tonight, for our 550th episode, we’ll read about dinner party etiquette from the book “Our Deportment” written by John H. Young and published in 1881. The word “deportment” has fallen out of usage starting in the twentieth century, but is defined simply as “a person’s behavior or manners.” It comes from the similar French word déportement. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/29/202231 minutes, 25 seconds
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The Otter Opal pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the first half to “The Otter Opal”, a Snoozecast original. The second half will air next week. In this story, we shall meet two dreamy sea otters named Tumma and Nutsnm as they float above the kelp forest.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/27/202230 minutes, 29 seconds
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea pt. 3

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. In the last episode, we learn that Captain Farragut and his crew on the Abraham Lincoln are led by their faith that the monster exists, and that they will find it. All believe in the monster except Ned Land, a French Canadian and the best harpooner around. A surly man, Land is drawn to Aronnax since they both share French culture. Land says that he has never seen a narwhal puncture a ship. Aronnax tries to persuade Land with mathematical calculations that an infinitely powerful creature could inhabit the depth of the seas. Land is not fully swayed. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/24/202232 minutes, 22 seconds
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Rock Temples

Tonight, we’ll read about hermit caves and rock temples from “The Subterranean World” written by G. Hartwig and published in 1871. A hermit is a person who lives in seclusion. Eremitism plays a role in a variety of religions although in modern colloquial usage, "hermit" denotes anyone living apart from the rest of society, for any reason. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/22/202233 minutes, 16 seconds
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Frithiof the Bold

Tonight, we’ll read the tale of Frithiof the Bold, found in “Northland Heroes” written by Florence Holbrook and published in 1909. The author was an educator, author and speaker involved in the peace movement during the early years of the 20th century. She was an ardent pacifist, a suffragist, and a believer in public education as the foundation for a democratic society.  — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/20/202240 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Secret Garden pt. 19

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to “The Secret Garden”, a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett published in 1911. If you’d like to listen to this story’s episodes in order, go to snoozecast.com/series. In the last episode, Mary is the first to suggest to Colin that his illness is, perhaps, largely the work of his imagination. Colin offers that he will go out into the fresh air- if she and Dickon agree to accompany him. Mary does agree, and lulls him to sleep with another story of the secret garden. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/17/202233 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Western Star pt. 2 | Poirot

Tonight, we’ll read the second half to “The Adventure of ‘The Western Star,’” a short story written by Agatha Christie, published in 1912 as part of her “Poirot Investigates” series. We read the opening half to this story last week. In the first episode, Hercule Poirot receives a visit from Miss Mary Marvell, the famous American film star on her visit to London. She has received three letters, handed to her by a Chinese man, which warn her to return her fabulous diamond jewel, the "Western Star", to where it came from – the left eye of an idol – before the next full moon. Her husband, Gregory Rolf had bought the jewel from a Chinese man in San Francisco three years ago and had given it to her. Poirot asks Mary Marvell to leave the jewel with him but she declines. She is going to stay at Yardly Chase, the home of Lord and Lady Yardly next Friday to discuss the making of a film there and Mary is determined to wear her diamond there. Next Friday happens to be the next full moon. — read by N — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/15/202236 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Portrait of a Lady

Tonight, we’ll read the first chapter to “The Portrait of a Lady” written by Henry James and published in 1880. It is one of James's most popular novels and is regarded by critics as one of his finest. This is the story of Isabel Archer, a spirited young American woman who inherits a large sum of money. The novel reflects James's continuing interest in the differences between the New World and the Old, often to the detriment of the former. It also treats in a profound way the themes of personal freedom, responsibility, and betrayal. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/13/202236 minutes, 29 seconds
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Little Women Finale ch. 23 "Aunt March Settles the Question"

Tonight, we’ll read the final chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, titled “Aunt March Settles the Question.” The sequel book “Good Wives,” is often published as one combined book with “Little Women” as a parts one and two. You can listen to the whole series in order at snoozecast.com/series. In the previous episode, Beth continues her slow recovery, and Mr. March surprises his family by coming home to visit on Christmas Day. — read by V — Support us: Listen ad-free on Patreon Get Snoozecast merch like cozy sweatshirts and accessories Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
6/10/202243 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Western Star | Poirot pt. 1

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to “The Adventure of ‘The Western Star,’” a short story written by Agatha Christie, published in 1912 as part of her “Poirot Investigates” series. We shall read the conclusion episode to this story next week. In this story, a famous American film star consults Poirot about a series of letters threatening that her celebrated diamond called ‘The Western Star’ will be stolen on “the ni