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Science at AMNH

English, Sciences, 1 seasons, 124 episodes, 4 days 22 hours 45 minutes
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Current science and the latest research from scientists at New York City’s American Museum of Natural History and guest speakers.
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SciCafe: The Future of Our Oceans with Jeremy Jackson

The worlds’ oceans have changed dramatically in the 50+ years that marine ecologist Jeremy Jackson has been studying them. Overfishing, pollution, and climate change have converted once-thriving ecosystems like coral reefs and mangrove forests into slime-covered wastelands. But Dr. Jackson has shed his former nickname of ”Dr. Doom” and now focuses on the remarkable resilience of the oceans–if only humans can give them time and space to recover. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on June 5, 2019.
20/06/201948 minutes 8 seconds
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SciCafe: Why Dinosaurs Matter with Diego Pol

The Titanosaur, Patagotitan mayorum, is the largest-known dinosaur to ever walk the Earth—weighing more than 10 African elephants. How did it get so big? How did it dominate the prehistoric landscape for millions of years? And what can this extinct animal teach us about our own future on this planet? Join paleontologist Diego Pol as he explores these questions and recounts his journey leading the team that discovered the Museum’s Titanosaur. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on May 1, 2019.
23/05/201946 minutes 48 seconds
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How Policy Can Help Us Fight Climate Change

Climate change may be affecting populations around the world in different ways, but the sobering state of our shared environment should worry everyone. How can we as a global community make changes to our economic, leadership, and policy models to panel of experts discuss the complex realities of climate change and the importance of putting aside cultural and political differences to address the environmental and human costs of our changing ecosystems. This panel is moderated by Ana Luz Porzecanski, director of the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History. Panelists include student and activist Vic Barrett; Erle Ellis, professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland; Afua Bruce, director of engineering for New America’s Public Interest Technology program; Spencer Glendon, senior fellow at the Woods Hole Research Center ; Larry McDermott, executive director of Plenty Canada and Algonquin from Shabot Obaadjiwan F
09/05/20191 hour 41 minutes 4 seconds
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SciCafe: Microbial Worlds of the Deep Sea with Jeffrey Marlowe

Only a fraction of the oceans’ floors has been explored, yet scientists already know that microbial communities are thriving in the extreme and often bizarre landscapes of the deep sea. Harvard University geobiologist Jeffrey Marlowe shares findings from his expeditions to the bottom of the oceans—including investigations of microbes that consume 90 percent of the methane coming up from the seafloor—and highlights the growing need to protect these communities which we’re only just beginning to understand. To see Marlowe’s photos and videos of these rarely-seen landscapes, watch the video version of this SciCafe on the Museum's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQr790zKBW8 The full transcript of this SciCafe is available here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/podcast-scicafe-microbial-worlds-of-the-deep-sea-with-jeffrey-marlowe This program was made possible by OceanX, an initiative of the Dalio Foundation, as part of its generous support of the spec
18/04/201930 minutes 31 seconds
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The Biology of Bias and Future of Our Species

What can science reveal about bias in our education, healthcare, and other social systems? It turns out, quite a bit. This series of short talks from experts in the fields of medicine, law, education, and business explores where bias comes from, the importance of facing the fraught history of bias, and how we might benefit from striving to be “good-ish” rather than “good.” Speakers include: Dolly Chugh, professor at New York University's Stern School of Business; Marianne J. Legato, physician and director of the Foundation for Gender-Specific Medicine; Daniel Braunfeld, Associate Program Director for Special Projects at Facing History and Ourselves; and Jonathan Kahn, the James E. Kelly Professor of Law at Mitchell Hamline School of Law. This lecture took place at the Museum on November 28, 2018, under the title “New Science, New Solutions: The Biology of Bias and the Future of Our Species.” This lecture is generously supported by the Abel Shafer Public Program Fund, a fund created
04/04/201929 minutes 7 seconds
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SciCafe: The Raw Truth About Cooking with Rachel Carmody

For most humans, foods that have been cooked or otherwise processed are a part of everyday life. But what happens on a molecular level when you chop, mash, and sautee your meal? How has cooking given humans an evolutionary edge? And how is new research on the human microbiome challenging information listed on nutrition labels? Harvard University’s Rachel Carmody tackles these questions by studying the past, present, and potential future of how, and why, humans eat the way they do. A video version of this SciCafe is available on the Museum’s YouTube channel. For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit: goo.gl/YTXsce This SciCafe took place at the Museum on March 6, 2019. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.
21/03/201947 minutes 39 seconds
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Probing Asteroids in Space with Harold C. Connolly Jr.

Asteroids can teach us a lot about the origin of our solar system—but they can also pose a potential threat if they come too close to Earth. Join Harold C. Connolly Jr. for an overview of the OSIRIS-REx and Hyabusa2 spacecraft missions that are currently probing the asteroids Bennu and Ryugu—two “potentially dangerous asteroids” whose orbits around the Sun are predicted to come within 5 million miles of Earth. This Frontiers Lecture took place in the Museum's Hayden Planetarium on December 4, 2018. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund. Select Hayden Planetarium Programs are sponsored by JetBlue.
07/03/201929 minutes 56 seconds
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SciCafe: Science Of Love with Bianca Jones Marlin

Oxytocin, the so-called “love drug,” has been the subject of ongoing debate surrounding its impact on the human brain—but what does the latest science show? Bianca Jones Marlin, a neuroscientist and postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University, looks at the brains of female mice to see how oxytocin affects the behavior of mothers, and explores how this research could offer solutions for human children who suffer neglect. You can watch a video version of this SciCafe here: https://goo.gl/5tsBTx For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit: https://goo.gl/BfvAqk This SciCafe took place at the Museum on February 6, 2019. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.
14/02/201931 minutes 29 seconds
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SciCafe: Teaming Up with Robots with Julie Shah

Imagine a robot that knows without being told which tool to hand to an autoworker, or how to match hospital patients with the most appropriate medical staff. The next generation of robotics may be capable of complex tasks like these—able to learn on the job and better anticipate the needs of human coworkers. Join Julie Shah of MIT to find out how scientists are creating smarter, safer robots, and the ways these new technologies have the potential to save both money and lives. A video version of this SciCafe will be available on the Museum’s YouTube channel on Saturday, January 26. For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit amnh.org/podcasts. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on January 2, 2019. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. For information about upcoming events at the Museum, visit amnh.org/calendar.
24/01/201937 minutes 59 seconds
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SciCafe: End of the Megafauna with Ross MacPhee

Woolly mammoths and giant ground sloths are just a few of the strange animals that once roamed Earth, living on every habitable continent. But about 50,000 years ago, these “megafauna” began to disappear. What factors contributed to their disappearance? Why did some species survive while others did not? Ross MacPhee, curator in the Museum’s Department of Mammalogy, takes us on a journey back in time to the world of now-extinct megafauna, and explains what scientists think may have happened. Watch the video version of this SciCafe here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGYJgYZrMcE This SciCafe took place at the Museum on December 5, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. For information about upcoming events at the Museum, visit amnh.org/calendar.
20/12/201847 minutes 50 seconds
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SciCafe: Technology Inspired by Nature with Tak-Sing Wong

What does a carnivorous plant have in common with the design for a water-saving toilet? What about a hungry cell with surgical equipment? It may be surprising to learn that engineers still turn to the natural world for inspiration. For Tak-Sing Wong, a professor of engineering at The Pennsylvania State University, nature is a constant source of inspiration. In our November SciCafe, Wong introduces two cutting-edge technologies that have been directly modeled after natural phenomena. A video version of this SciCafe will be available on the Museum’s YouTube channel on Saturday, November 24. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: Engineering Technologies Inspired by Nature and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
21/11/201839 minutes 35 seconds
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The Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before with Jackie Faherty – AMNH SciCafe

In April 2018, the Gaia space telescope released its second catalog of over 1.3 billion stellar distances, helping astronomers map the Milky Way like never before. Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty takes us on a tour through her current work using Gaia data to visualize and study the galaxy. This SciCafe included brand new visualizations that let you literally fly through the galaxy. A video version with all of Faherty’s data visualizations will be available on the Museum’s YouTube channel on October 27. This SciCafe took place on October 3, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
25/10/201845 minutes 16 seconds
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Jaguar: An Indomitable Beast with Alan Rabinowitz

In celebration of International Cat Day and to honor the legacy of zoologist and conservationist Alan Rabinowitz who died August 5, we’re re-publishing a talk he gave at the Museum in 2014. Rabinowitz shares his journey to conserve the jaguar, a species that despite its past resilience, is now on a slide towards extinction. In a story of tenacity and survival, the big cat expert also reveals better strategies for saving other species, and how to save ourselves from immediate and long-term catastrophic changes to our environment. For a full transcript, visit https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/podcast-jaguar-an-indomitable-beast-with-alan-rabinowitz This lecture originally took place on September 17, 2014. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.
08/08/20181 hour 25 minutes 8 seconds
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Science Throwdown: Sea vs. Land

The world under the waves or the wilds of the land? Which creatures—marine or terrestrial—are the most compelling, intriguing, and inspiring? Comedian and journalist Faith Salie leads two teams of scientific luminaries in this tongue-in-cheek “debate,” featuring categories like “Next Top Predator” and “Sexy Beast.” Panelists include conservationist Carl Safina and animal behavior expert Lori Marino (Team Sea) facing off against zoologist Jarod Miller and primatologist Mireya Mayor (Team Land). Decide for yourself who reigns supreme and let us know on Twitter using the handle @AMNH Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Science Throwdown: Sea vs. Land is made possible by OceanX, an initiative of the Dalio Foundation, as part of its generous support of the special exhibition Unseen Oceans and its related educational activities and public programs.
02/08/201853 minutes 13 seconds
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Planetary Origin Stories with Alycia Weinberger

Swirling disks of dust and gas surround young stars, and these disks contain the building blocks for new planets. It would take 100 million years to see a planet fully form, but luckily there are plenty of planetary systems in development for us to observe. By studying and compiling “snapshots” from nearby star systems, Alycia Weinberger of the Carnegie Institute of Washington takes us on a journey back in time to the origins of planets. For a full transcript, visit https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/podcast-planetary-origin-stories-with-alycia-weinberger This Frontiers Lecture took place on May 14, 2018. For information on upcoming events at the museum, including future Frontiers Lectures, visit AMNH.org/calendar. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
28/06/20181 hour 1 minute 3 seconds
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SciCafe—Orangutans, Obesity, and Human Evolution with Erin Vogel

While wild orangutans in the rainforests of Borneo feed on a remarkable variety of plant life, they also endure unpredictable cycles of feast and famine. Erin Vogel of Rutgers University explains how research on these primates’ diet and health may help us to better understand the evolution of early human diets, as well as provide insight into today’s global obesity epidemic. This SciCafe took place on June 6, 2018. To watch a video version of this lecture, visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tforcdqDWIg For a full transcript of this podcast, visit: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/podcast-scicafe-orangutans-obesity-and-human-evolution-with-erin-vogel Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. This SciCafe event is presented in collaboration witht The Leakey Foundation. SciCafe: Primate Palate: Orangutans, Obesity, and Human Evolution, and relat
21/06/201847 minutes 16 seconds
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Visualizing Planets with Radio Telescopes with Meredith Hughes

Astronomers have discovered thousands of planets in our galaxy, but how much do we understand about how they are formed? Why, for example, are some planets rocky like ours, while others like Jupiter and Saturn are gaseous? Astrophysicist Meredith Hughes of Wesleyan University explains what we know about planet formation in our own solar system, and breaks down how powerful radio telescopes are helping scientists answer questions about distant systems in our galaxy. For a full transcript, visit https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/podcast-visualizing-planets-with-radio-telescopes-with-meredith-hughes This Frontiers Lecture took place on April 9, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
31/05/20181 hour 6 minutes 27 seconds
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SciCafe: Ocean Locomotion with Frank Fish

How can studying ocean life help us to create more efficient technologies? Frank Fish, professor of biology at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, explores how the elegant movements of manta rays and humpback whales are inspiring new and better approaches to engineering. This SciCafe took place on May 2, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: Ocean Locomotion: Bioinspiration from the Sea, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
24/05/201840 minutes 42 seconds
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Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty Breaks Down New Data from the ESA’s Gaia Mission

On April 25th, 2018, the European Space Agency’s Gaia observatory released its second data catalog, which includes the distances to a staggering 1.4 billion stars. Museum Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty explains why these new findings are important to astronomers, and how Gaia’s data can help us unlock our galaxy’s past, present, and future.
17/05/201810 minutes 28 seconds
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SciCafe: Seeing is Believing with Marisa Carrasco

How do our brains make sense of the world our eyes see? How does attention affect our perception? And how is it possible to miss things even if they are right in front of us? In her recent SciCafe talk, Marisa Carrasco, a professor of psychology and neural science at New York University, revealed the surprising answers to these questions and demonstrated firsthand how our brains selectively process complex information. This podcast highlights some of the essential questions Carrasco explores. To experience the full presentation, watch the video version of this SciCafe on the Museum’s YouTube Channel. https://bit.ly/2rbjIgF This SciCafe took place at the Museum on April 4, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
30/04/201814 minutes 51 seconds
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Hubble Space Telescope’s 28 Years of Exploration, with Astrophysics Curator Michael Shara

On April 24, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope was launched into low Earth orbit. Over its 28- year career, Hubble has helped scientists make incredible discoveries, from evidence of dark energy in the early universe to comets whizzing into our solar system. Museum Astrophysics Curator Michael Shara, who worked with the Hubble mission during his time at the Space Telescope Science Institute, discusses how scientists have used Hubble to learn about the cosmos, shares the experience of Hubble’s launch and early days, and looks ahead to the future of this extraordinary telescope and its successor. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.
24/04/201836 minutes 38 seconds
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Fishes That Glow: Exploring Biofluorescence and Bioluminescence in the Sea

To celebrate our new exhibition, Unseen Oceans, we’re “re-surfacing” earlier podcast episodes about our planet’s last frontier: the oceans. In this SciCafe from 2014, John Sparks, curator in the Department of Ichthyology at the Museum and curator of Unseen Oceans, and Research Associates David Gruber (CUNY) and Vincent Pieribone (John B. Pierce Laboratory at Yale), recount their expedition to the Solomon Islands, part of the Museum’s Explore21 initiative, to study biofluorescence and bioluminescence in fishes, and discuss the new technologies that are making such exploration possible. For more about marine biolfluorescence and bioluminescence, visit Unseen Oceans, open through January 6, 2019. For information and tickets, visit: https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/unseen-oceans For a full transcript of this episode, visit https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/podcast-fishes-that-glow-exploring-biofluorescence-and-bioluminescence-in-the-sea Subscribe to the Science@AMNH
29/03/201837 minutes 44 seconds
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The Dolphin in the Mirror

What does a dolphin see when it looks in the mirror? Cognitive psychologist and marine mammal scientist Diana Reiss of Hunter College explains what we already know about bottlenose dolphin intelligence and communication, and describes her teams’ efforts to unlock new anwers by using mirrors, interactive keyboards, and other technology. This James Arthur Lecture on the Evolution of the Human Brain took place at the Museum on March 6, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. For information on upcoming events at the Museum, visit AMNH.org/calendar.
22/03/201858 minutes 53 seconds
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What is Relativity, and Why Should You Care?

In honor of Albert Einstein’s birthday on March 14, we’re re-publishing this podcast primer on his theories of General and Special Relativity—ideas that most people have heard of but few truly understand. Astrophysicist and educator Jeffrey Bennett breaks down the basic tenets of Einstein’s theories and underscores their importance to our modern understanding of the universe. This Frontiers Lecture took place on September 21, 2015. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
14/03/20181 hour 3 minutes 3 seconds
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Strange New Worlds With Elizabeth Tasker

Scientists have only just begun to detect exoplanets—planets orbiting stars other than our Sun—but already these alien worlds have upended the rules previously believed to govern planetary systems. Astrophysicist Elizabeth Tasker takes us on a journey through the surprising diversity of exoplanets, from the TRAPPIST system to “Hot Jupiter” planets, and reveals what new discoveries are on the horizon. This Frontiers Lecture took place at the Museum on February 5, 2018, under the title: Dangerous Worlds. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Read a full transcript of this podcast here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/podcast-strange-new-worlds-with-elizabeth-tasker Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
08/03/20181 hour 2 minutes 26 seconds
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SciCafe: Trilobite Takedown

Although they’ve been extinct for about 252 million years, trilobites still manage to fascinate us today. These fossil arthropods were among the first animals to appear in large numbers, and they lived for almost 300 million years before going extinct. Assistant Curator Melanie Hopkins explains where these diverse creatures fit into the fossil record across the globe, delves into her research on trilobite growth patterns, and discusses the amazing diversity of their shapes. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on February 7, 2018. Watch a video version of this SciCafe on the Museum's YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IMk__N-O-4 Read a full transcript of this podcast here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/scicafe-trilobite-takedown Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The Scicafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. This program is made possible by OceanX, an initiative of
27/02/201842 minutes 21 seconds
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2018 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Artificial Intelligence

Isaac Asimov’s famous Three Laws of Robotics might be seen as early safeguards for our reliance on artificial intelligence, but as Alexa guides our homes and automated cars replace human drivers, are those Three Laws enough? In this podcast, listen in as a panel of experts led by host and moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium, discuss how A.I. is opening doors to limitless possibilities, and if we’re ready for them. You will hear from John Giannandrea of Google; Helen Greiner of the iRobot Corporation and CyPhy Works; Ruchir Puri of IBM Watson; Max Tegmark of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Michael P. Wellman, of the University of Michigan. The 2018 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate took place at the Museum on February, 13 2018. A full transcript of this podcast is available here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/2018-isaac-asimov-memorial-debate-artificial-intelligence A video version will be available on the
15/02/20182 hours 7 minutes 35 seconds
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Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence with Max Tegmark and Neil deGrasse Tyson

Artificial intelligence is growing at an astounding rate, but are we ready for the consequences? Cosmologist and MIT physics professor Max Tegmark guides us through the state of artificial intelligence today and the many paths we might take in further developing this technology. Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson moderates, with an introduction by Ward Wheeler, curator of Invertebrate Zoology and computational science at the American Museum of Natural History. This Frontiers Lecture took place in the Museum’s Hayden Planetarium on January 8, 2018. Max Tegmark will be participating in the 2018 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate happening next week at the Museum. The podcast of that event will be available on February 15.
08/02/201853 minutes 53 seconds
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SciCafe: The Science Behind Football (2018)

Just in time for the Super Bowl this weekend, we’re republishing a podcast about the science behind football. Author Ainissa Ramirez, who spoke at the Museum’s SciCafe a few weeks before the New England Patriots faced off against the Seattle Seahawks at the 2015 Super Bowl, explains how prolate spheroids bounce, why Vince Lombardi was a game theorist, and why woodpeckers don’t get concussions. This podcast was originally published on January 15, 2015. Read a full transcript of this podcast here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/scicafe-the-science-behind-football2 The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
02/02/201847 minutes 49 seconds
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2018 Super Blue Blood Moon: Facts and Tips with Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty

On January 31, 2018, a trifecta of lunar events will cause what’s being dubbed a “Super Blue Blood Moon.” Museum astrophysicist Jackie Faherty explains what causes this phenomenon, provides us some with some viewing tips, and tells us about other cosmic events we have to look forward to in 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.
30/01/201819 minutes 43 seconds
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SciCafe: The Power of Poop

Did you know that some of the bacteria living inside us are essential for our health? Gastroenterologist Ari Grinspan delves into the complex world of the microbiome in the human digestive system. He explains how transplanting bacteria from healthy people to patients with a debilitating, sometimes lethal, disease has had astonishing success—despite a method of transfer that might be a little surprising. This SciCafe took place at the American Museum of Natural History on January 4, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The Scicafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: The Power of Poop and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institute of Health (NIH).
29/01/20181 hour 7 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Demystifying Black Holes with Steven Gubser and Frans Pretorius

Black holes may be among the most mysterious phenomena in the universe, but innovations in astrophysics are bringing scientists ever closer to unlocking their secrets. Princeton University physics professors Steven Gubser and Frans Pretorius review Einstein’s theories of relativity and what they say about the existence of black holes. They explain some of the fantastical properties of black holes, and discuss how recent findings from LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, may provide the first physical evidence of these extraordinary cosmic occurrences. This Frontiers Lecture took place at the Museum’s Hayden Planetarium on December 11, 2017. Read a full transcript of this podcast here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/frontiers-lecture-demystifying-black-holes-with-steven-gubser-and-frans-pretorius Subscribe to the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is pro
11/01/201836 minutes 15 seconds
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SciCafe-The Sixth Extinction: Biodiversity Under Threat

Earth is currently experiencing an unprecedented loss of biodiversity, and it has changed dramatically in recent decades. Museum curator Joel Cracraft presents evidence that the Sixth Extinction is here. Join him as he explains where the planet’s future is heading if we continue on our current path. This SciCafe took place on December 6, 2017. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
27/12/201757 minutes 39 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: The Zoomable Universe with Caleb Scharf

From the farthest edge of the observable universe to the tiniest measurement of the subatomic realm, reality as we experience it is defined by scale. Astrobiologist Caleb Scharf leads a tour through the scale of the universe, and explains how scientists use what we know about scale as an entry point to asking what we don’t know about the nature of reality both here on our earth and out in the cosmos. For a full transcript of this podcast visit: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/frontiers-lecture-the-zoomable-universe-with-caleb-scharf This Frontiers Lecture took place at the Museum on November 13, 2017. For information on upcoming events at the museum, including future Frontiers Lectures, visit AMNH.org/calendar Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
07/12/20171 hour 11 minutes 6 seconds
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SciCafe: Are We Alone in the Universe?

Who can look out into space and not ask the age-old question: Are we alone in the universe? Astronomers have already identified dozens of planets beyond the edges of our solar system which could be like our own Earth. Join astrophysicist Lisa Kaltenegger as she explains the different methods astronomers use to detect exoplanets orbiting distant stars, what these planets would need to support life, and how Earth and its range of species might serve as a Rosetta Stone—a key to detecting the existence of extraterrestrial life. This SciCafe program took place at the Museum on November 1, 2017. Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xoze-pkjxZw Read the full transcript of this lecture here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/amnh-scicafe-are-we-alone-in-the-universe To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
29/11/201737 minutes 32 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Neil deGrasse Tyson and Astronaut Scott Kelly on Life in Space

Scott Kelly is a former Navy fighter pilot and test pilot, an engineer, and a retired NASA astronaut who over four space flights accumulated 520 days living in space, a record at the time in 2015. Talking with Hayden Planetarium Director Neil deGrasse Tyson, Captain Kelly shares a glimpse of life in the uniquely unwelcoming environment of space—and the extreme challenges of long-term spaceflight. Part of the monthly Frontiers Lecture series, this conversation took place at the Hayden Planetarium on October 16, 2017. Read a transcript of this podcast here: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts For information on upcoming events at the museum, including future Frontiers Lectures, visit AMNH.org/calendar. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
09/11/20171 hour 8 minutes 38 seconds
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Joining Forces To Address Wildlife Trafficking with Conservation Biologist Mary Blair

Some animals may be too popular for their own good—whether it’s doe-eyed slow lorises, nocturnal primates often sold as pets, or pangolins prized for meat or medicine. Despite increased enforcement, a profitable market continues to threaten these and other endangered species. Museum conservation biologist Mary Blair, who is working with colleagues to understand the dynamics of illegal wildlife trade, suggests that biologists need to team up with economists and anthropologists to better understand and address wildlife trafficking. For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/joining-forces-to-address-the-threat-of-wildlife-trafficking
02/11/201728 minutes 52 seconds
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SciCafe: Humans And Conflicts With Bears, Oh My!

Anyone who has ever surprised a black bear in their own backyard is already keenly aware of the overlap between human communities and bear habitats. Rae Wynn-Grant, a conservation biologist at the Museum, offered insights into black bear behavior and what humans can do to improve relations with this wide-ranging and adaptable species at a recent SciCafe program, which took place at the Museum on October 4, 2017. For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/scicafe-humans-and-conflicts-with-bears-oh-my Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=en8nXfD3bww To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
26/10/201748 minutes 56 seconds
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A Smashup of Neutron Stars & Einstein’s Theory of Relativity with Astrophysics Curator Michael Shara

Today, scientists announced that they have detected a spectacular collision of two neutron stars some 130 million light years away. The method of discovery is also making news: this was the first time ever that a cosmic event was perceived through both gravitational waves — ripples in space and time — and light—confirming Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which predicted that gravitational waves should travel at the speed of light. More than 1,500 scientists around the world collaborated on this breakthrough, using the U.S.-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory or LIGO, the Europe-based Virgo detector, and some 70 ground- and space-based observatories. Museum astrophysicist Michael Shara, who was part of the research team, explains this thrilling discovery in the latest podcast. For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/a-smashup-of-neutron-stars-einstein-s-theory-of-relativity-with-astrophysics-
16/10/201721 minutes 33 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Why? What Makes Us Curious with Mario Livio

Just listen to little kids pester their parents, “But why?” and you know how ingrained human curiosity is. And a good thing too—it drives scientific research, inspires creativity in art and technology, and is a necessary ingredient in every form of storytelling. But have you ever been curious—about curiosity? How did we humans get to be so inquisitive and why? In this podcast, astrophysicist and best-selling author Mario Livio explores the origins and mechanisms of human curiosity. Part of the monthly Frontiers Lecture series, this talk took place at the Hayden Planetarium on September 18, 2017. For information on upcoming events at the Museum, including future Frontiers Lectures, visit AMNH.org/calendar. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family and the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
12/10/201750 minutes 49 seconds
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Sputnik: Sixty Years Later with Astrophysicist Michael Shara

On October 4, 1957, radio operators picked up beeping sounds from the first man-made satellite ever to orbit the Earth—Sputnik, launched by the Soviet Union. The never-before heard signals ushered in the space age and changed life in space—and on Earth—forever. In this podcast marking the sixtieth anniversary of the launch of Sputnik, Museum Astrophysicist Michael Shara discusses the outsized impact of that beach-ball-sized satellite and those beeps heard ’round world. For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/sputnik-sixty-years-later
05/10/201714 minutes 22 seconds
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Neil deGrasse Tyson and Carolyn Porco on Voyager and Space Exploration

Have you ever pondered that picture of earth as a pale blue dot seen from space? Then you already know something of the work of the space craft Voyager I. In 2012, that same space craft became the first man-made object to leave our solar system and enter interstellar space. Voyager I and its twin Voyager II have continued to gather data from deep space forty years after their launch in 1977. On August 23rd, 2017, PBS aired a documentary–The Farthest–Voyager in Space–that tells the story of these dogged explorers. Two weeks before, on Wednesday, August 9th, the Museum hosted a special preview screening. After which, Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson sat down with Carolyn Porco, a planetary scientist and Voyager team member. This podcast brings you their conversation.
24/08/201758 minutes 8 seconds
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2017 Solar Eclipse Facts and Tips

On August 21st, 2017, most of North America will experience a solar eclipse, with a select area experiencing a total solar eclipse. To learn more about what an eclipse is, and how to safely view this event, we spoke with museum astrophysicist Jackie Faherty. A full transcript of this podcast is available here: http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/2017-solar-eclipse-facts-and-tips To learn more about eclipses and the upcoming event, watch a video of a recent panel discussion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzkVU3obUkI To see the path of totality, and more information on the eclipse, visit eclipse2017.NASA.gov. If you liked this episode, subscribe to Science at AMNH and rate us on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. To listen to our archive of podcasts, visit AMNH.org/podcasts.
15/08/201716 minutes 8 seconds
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SciCafe: Exercise Your Brain

Need some extra motivation to get to the gym? Neuroscientist and exercise enthusiast Wendy A. Suzuki explains how physical aerobic activity can change your brain. Dr. Suzuki gives an overview of her research into how exercise can improve cognitive function and even demonstrates a routine you can follow along at home. This SciCafe lecture took place at the Museum on June 7, 2017. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. For a full transcript of this podcast, visit: http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/scicafe-exercise-your-brain Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5UuBVAfZJw The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
28/06/201743 minutes 48 seconds
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Scicafe: Snakes of Madagascar

In this podcast, join herpetologist Frank Burbrink on a journey to the remote forests of Madagascar, where his team recently discovered several new species of reptiles. Hear tales of life in the field and discover how DNA analysis helps identify new species in the lab. This SciCafe lecture took place at the Museum on May 3rd, 2017. This lecture included many original photographs, which can be seen in the video version by visiting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyfFSpEZ-vE To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. For a full transcript of this podcast, visithttp://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/scicafe-snakes-of-madagascar The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: Ghost Snake Stories in Madagascar, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
31/05/201719 minutes 13 seconds
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Science Throwdown: Sea vs. Space

Into the deep or over the Moon—which is more important, intriguing, and inspiring? Explore the merits of sea vs. space across a range of judging categories with aquanauts Fabien Cousteau and Liz Bentley Magee, and astronauts Mike Massimino and Don Pettit. Hosted by comedian and journalist Faith Salie. This event took place at the Museum on April 13, 2017. For a full transcript of this podcast, visit: http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/science-throwdown-sea-vs.-space
25/05/20171 hour 39 minutes 28 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Our Path to a New Home in the Planets

While the public is fascinated by the idea of Earth-like planets outside of our solar system, there may be some opportunities even closer to home. In this podcast, planetary scientist Amanda Hendrix and science writer Charles Wohlforth highlight the developments and initiatives that have transformed the dream of space colonization into something that could become reality. The duo discuss groundbreaking research and make the case that Saturn’s moon Titan offers the most realistic prospect for life without support from Earth. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on April 3, 2017. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
12/05/20171 hour 6 minutes 57 seconds
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SciCafe: Stress and Human Evolution

How do trauma, poverty, and racial discrimination influence our health? What about our evolutionary history causes our bodies to respond in this way? Biological anthropologist Zaneta Thayer explores the biological mechanisms through which early life stress influences biology and health later on. This lecture took place at the Museum on April 5, 2017. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. For a full transcript of this podcast, visit: http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/scicafe-stress-and-human-evolution Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbgFb0QP2ys The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. This SciCafe event is presented in collaboration with The Leakey Foundation.
23/04/201742 minutes 23 seconds
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Cuba: Threads of Change

Cuba’s political relationship with the United States is changing, and with it, potentially it’s biodiversity. In this podcast, conservation biologist and co-curator of the exhibition ¡Cuba! , Ana Luz Porzecanski, moderates a panel on contemporary Cuba, its people, identity, and biodiversity. You will hear from historian and policy expert Julia Sweig, anthropologist Ruth Behar, environmental lawyer Dan Whittle, and Museum herpetologist and co-curator of ¡Cuba! Chris Raxworthy. This event took place at the Museum on March 9, 2017. ¡Cuba! was developed in collaboration with the Cuban National Museum of Natural History. Major funding for ¡Cuba! has been provided by the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Endowment Fund. Significant support for ¡Cuba! has been provided by the Ford Foundation. Generous support for ¡Cuba! has been provided by the Dalio Ocean Initiative. ¡Cuba! is proudly supported by JetBlue.
20/04/20171 hour 19 minutes 59 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: The Greatest Story Ever Told So Far with Lawrence Krauss

The fundamental laws of the universe are not what we think or perceive—they are weird, wild, and counterintuitive. We all experience the world in a way that is shielded from the deeper realities underlying everyday phenomena. The story of scientist’s efforts to uncover these hidden realities involves the greatest intellectual journey ever taken by humans. A tale ripe with drama and surprise, it has implications for our understanding of space and time, our origins, and our future, ultimately addressing that fundamental question: Why are we here? Join famed theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss for a journey through the unexpected fabric of reality, where fact is often stranger than fiction. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on March 23, 2017. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
13/04/20171 hour 20 minutes 52 seconds
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Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History

Eating one’s own kind is a natural behavior found in thousands of species, including humans. In this podcast, Museum Research Associate Bill Schutt explains new research about this widespread behavior, such as why so many fish eat their young, and when sexual cannibalism can be an evolutionary advantage. This lecture took place at the Museum on February 17, 2017.
06/04/20171 hour 13 minutes 41 seconds
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2017 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: De-extinction with Neil deGrasse Tyson

Biologists today have the knowledge, the tools, and the ability to influence the evolution of life on Earth. Do we have an obligation to bring back species that human activities may have rendered extinct? In this podcast, host and moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson leads a panel of experts in a discussion about this possibility - and the technology needed to get there. You will hear from George Church of Harvard University and MIT, Hank Greely of Stanford University, Gregory Kaebnick of the Hastings Center, Beth Shapiro of University of California Santa Cruz The 2017 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate took place at the Museum on March 29, 2017. Watch a video version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LnAtMeSVeY The late Dr. Isaac Asimov, one of the most prolific and influential authors of our time, was a dear friend and supporter of the American Museum of Natural History. In his memory, the Hayden Planetarium is honored to host the annual Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate — generously endowed
31/03/20171 hour 51 minutes 57 seconds
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SciCafe: The Search for Slow Lorises

Slow lorises may look like big-eyed Ewoks, but their cute countenance has made these primates a target of the illegal wildlife trade. In this podcast, Mary Blair, primatologist and Director of Biodiversity Informatics Research at the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, discusses how research on these endangered animals can contribute to a better understanding of wildlife trafficking and the risk of zoonotic disease spread. This lecture took place at the Museum on March 1, 2017. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. For a full transcript of this podcast, visit http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/scicafe-the-search-for-slow-lorises Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpKUM_rSXhI The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: The Search for Slow Lorises, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the Nationa
23/03/201741 minutes 2 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Gravitons, Exotic Higgs Bosons, or Nothing At All

In 2015, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) achieved a milestone, operating at the highest energy ever used by an accelerator experiment. Particle physicist James Beacham discusses what we’ve learned about gravitons, Higgs bosons, dark matter, and what’s next for the LHC. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on February 6, 2017. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
09/03/20171 hour 41 minutes 8 seconds
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The Lost City of the Monkey God with Douglas Preston

Since the days of the conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about an ancient White City of immense wealth hidden in the Honduran interior. But it was not until 1940 that hundreds of artifacts surfaced and tantalizing stories of the crumbling walls of this lost city were confirmed. In his new book, The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story, bestselling author Douglas Preston ventures deep into the Honduran jungle in a riveting, non-fiction narrative about the unearthing of an ancient lost civilization, while he provides a rich tapestry of historical, economic, social, political, and environmental context for the discovery. This lecture took place at the Museum on January 18, 2017.
23/02/20171 hour 26 minutes 13 seconds
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SciCafe: When Insects Get Intimate

Inspiring fear and fascination alike in humans, insects are capable of incredibly complex behavior like personality, and language. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, behavioral ecologist Marlene Zuk examines the bedroom lives of bugs, showing how six-legged sex lives can be just as interesting as our own. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3a-1G5dI48Q The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
10/02/201736 minutes 22 seconds
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SciCafe: Modifying Mosquitoes with CRISPR

Join Rockefeller University professor Leslie Vosshall as she demonstrates what is—and what will be—possible with CRISPR gene editing. This lecture took place at the Museum on January 4, 2016. To watch a video version, visit the AMNH Youtube Channel, or the SciCafe section of AMNH.tv. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: Modifying the Mosquito with CRISPR, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
26/01/201743 minutes 19 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: The Twisted Universe

You may have heard of the Big Bang – but what was the universe like before that fateful beginning? In this podcast, Brian Keating traces the history and theories that have lead to our current understanding of the universe, and the questions that still remain. This lecture took place at the Museum on December 12, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
12/01/20171 hour 8 minutes 36 seconds
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SciCafe: When Black Holes Collide

When black holes collide, the energy of the event generates intense gravitational waves. These waves were predicted by Einstein in his theories, but scientists have only recently been able to detect them experimentally. In this SciCafe, Barnard College professor and astronomer Janna Levin shares her scientific research on the first recordings of a gravitational wave from the collision of two black holes 1.3 billion years ago. This lecture took place at the Museum on December 7, 2016. Watch a video version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLeQtSR_hrA The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
29/12/201652 minutes 10 seconds
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Yes, Humans are Causing Earthquakes

Since 2009, earthquake activity has increased throughout the central United States, specifically in areas employing new and emerging oil and gas production technologies. Join Dr. Justin Rubinstein, deputy chief of the Induced Seismicity Project at the United States Geological Survey, as he discusses this new breed of human-caused earthquakes. This lecture took place at the Museum on November 10, 2016. The Annual IRIS/SSA Lecture Series is presented in collaboration with the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology and the Seismological Society of America.
22/12/20161 hour 7 minutes 55 seconds
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What a Fish Knows

Myth-busting animal behavior expert Jonathan Balcombe takes us under the sea, through streams and estuaries, and to the other side of the aquarium glass to reveal the surprising capabilities of fishes. This lecture took place at the Museum on October 6, 2016. To listen to our archive of podcasts, visit amnh.org/podcasts.
01/12/20161 hour 5 minutes 46 seconds
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Welcome to the Universe with Neil deGrasse Tyson

Inspired by the popular introductory astronomy course that Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott taught together at Princeton, this lecture by these three astrophyiscists covers it all – from planets, stars, and galaxies, to black holes, wormholes and time travel. This lecture took place at the Museum on October 26, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
17/11/20161 hour 47 minutes 35 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Mapping the Heavens

Astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan, as she explains the science behind the essential ideas of dark matter and dark energy, and provides an understanding of how radical scientific theories gain acceptance. This lecture took place in the Hayden Planetarium on October 3, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
10/11/20161 hour 4 minutes 39 seconds
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SciCafe: Secrets of the Crocodile Mummies

DNA detective work tracing the evolutionary history of crocodiles has led to several surprising discoveries. In this podcast, Evon Hekkala, a professor at Fordham University and research associate in the Museum’s Department of Herpetology, discusses how tissue samples from centuries old museum specimens shed light on the mysterious origins of the Nile crocodile—and may even explain the presence of crocodiles in medieval medicine cabinets. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on October 5, 2016. Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XUjgNUwS3Q The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. Crocs: Ancient Predators in a Modern World was created by Peeling Productions at Clyde Peeling’s REPTILAND.
27/10/201650 minutes 5 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy

What can fashionable ideas, blind faith, or pure fantasy possibly have to do with the scientific quest to understand the universe? Acclaimed physicist and bestselling author Roger Penrose argues that researchers working at the extreme frontiers of physics are just as susceptible to these forces as anyone else. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on September 19, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
13/10/20161 hour 7 minutes 9 seconds
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What Are You Made Of? The Microbiome Study Reveal

Dr. Paul Planet of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Dr. Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, and Museum Curator Rob DeSalle discuss what they have learned so far from an active research project where visitors to the Museum donated their microbes to science. The event was moderated by Mary Harris, host of WNYC's podcast "Only Human." This lecture took place at the Museum on July 14, 2016. Generous support for The Secret World Inside You and its educational resources have been provided by the Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation and the Milstein Family. The Secret World Inside You is proudly supported by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. The Secret World Inside You is supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The media partner for What Are You Made Of? is WNYC’s “Only Human.”
01/09/20161 hour 7 minutes 48 seconds
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The Naturalist

Darrin Lunde, collection manager at the National Museum of Natural History, presents the story of Theodore Roosevelt and how his lifelong passion for the natural world set the stage for America’s wildlife conservation movement. This lecture took place at the Museum on June 29, 2016.
04/08/20161 hour 2 minutes 15 seconds
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SciCafe Special Event: Zika - What You Need To Know

In this podcast, a panel of experts including W. Ian Lipkin, professor and Director of the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University; Catherine Spong, Acting Director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health; and Jay K. Varma, Deputy Commissioner for Disease Control at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, discuss the latest plan of attack for dealing with Zika. This panel, moderated by Museum Curator Susan Perkins, took place at the Museum on June 30, 2016. The SciCafe Special Event: "Zika: What You Need to Know," The Secret World Inside You, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
28/07/20161 hour 11 minutes 22 seconds
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Secret Life Of Scientists LIVE

Meet an all-star cast of scientists who have secrets to share. Hosted by Faith Salie of NPR’s “Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me!,” the program features Museum curators Melanie Stiassny, an ichthyologist, and Mark Siddall, a parasitologist, as well as experimental psychologist Steven Pinker, and nanotech researcher Rich Robinson. The discussion took place at the Museum on May 24, 2016. This program was produced in collaboration with The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers, an Emmy-nominated web series and website from PBS’s NOVA.
21/07/20161 hour 30 minutes 55 seconds
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SciCafe: Explore21 - Cuba

Join Museum scientists Ana Porzecanski and Angelo Soto-Centeno for a lively discussion about their recent expedition to Cuba and the new avenues for scientific collaboration on the island. This lecture took place on June 1, 2016. Watch a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6KsQRZUe3w The Museum’s Explore21 Initiative is generously supported by the leadership contributions of Katheryn P. and Thomas L. Kempner, Jr., Linda R. and William E. Macaulay, and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
23/06/201656 minutes 38 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Our Place in the Universe

Join astronomer Jason Kalirai on a journey through space to uncover the latest evidence about where we sit in the universe and explore the possibility of life on other worlds. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on May 9, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
09/06/201657 minutes 33 seconds
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SciCafe: Just Can't Get Enough - Addiction & the Brain

Psychiatrist Edmund Griffin explains how epidemiology, cocaine-addicted rats, and molecular neuroscience all help to shed light on one of society’s most troubling questions: Why is it that some people just can’t get enough? The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
26/05/20161 hour 13 seconds
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2016 Environmental Lecture and Luncheon: Public Health in a Dynamic Environment

In the annual Environmental Lecture and Luncheon, Lynn Sherr of ABC News’ “20/20” and Museum Trustee and former Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Dr. Margaret Hamburg explore the intersection of the environment and human health. This conversation took place at the Museum on April 20, 2016.
19/05/201647 minutes 40 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Gravitational Waves - Messengers from the Warped Universe

Physicist Nergis Mavalvala discusses how we search for these ripples in space-time and decode the information they carry about events as far back in time as the first moments after the Big Bang. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on April 18, 2016 Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
12/05/20161 hour 25 minutes 16 seconds
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SciCafe: How "Paleo" is Your Diet?

Join molecular anthropologist Christina Warinner as she explores how scientists are reconstructing the ancestral human microbiome to better understand the lives and health of our ancestors. This lecture took place at the Museum on April 6, 2016. Watch a video version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSGenh_KmhU The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. This SciCafe event is presented in collaboration with The Leakey Foundation. SciCafe: How “Paleo” is Your Diet?, The Secret World Inside You, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
28/04/20161 hour 5 minutes 31 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: The Cosmic Web - Mysterious Architecture of the Universe

In this podcast, J. Richard Gott discusses how ambitious telescope surveys are transforming astronomy, what the cosmic web says about the origins of the universe, and the next trillion years ahead. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on March 14, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
14/04/20161 hour 22 minutes 29 seconds
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2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Is the Universe a Simulation?

Listen in as a panel of experts discuss this theory, including David Chalmers, professor of philosophy at NYU, Zohreh Davoudi, theoretical physicist at MIT, James Gates, theoretical physicist at the University of Maryland, Lisa Randall, theoretical physicist at Harvard, and Max Tegmark, cosmologist from MIT. Host and moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium leads this lively discussion about the merits and shortcomings of this provocative and revolutionary idea. The 2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate took place at the Museum on April 5, 2016. The late Dr. Isaac Asimov, one of the most prolific and influential authors of our time, was a dear friend and supporter of the American Museum of Natural History. In his memory, the Hayden Planetarium is honored to host the annual Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate — generously endowed by relatives, friends, and admirers of Isaac Asimov and his work — bringing the finest minds in the world to the Museum ea
08/04/20162 hours 3 minutes 25 seconds
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SciCafe: Swarms of Aerial Robots

Roboticist Vijay Kumar, dean and professor of engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, describes the advantages and the challenges of coordinating and controlling teams of small robots. This SciCafe took place on March 2, 2016. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. Watch a video version of this SciCafe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUeyfLIGtLQ The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
31/03/201652 minutes 25 seconds
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Dinosaurs Among Us: Conversation with Curators

The Museum's Provost of Science Michael Novacek discusses the transition between dinosaurs and birds and its representation in the new Museum exhibition Dinosaurs Among Us. Joining him are Ashley Heers, a postdoctoral fellow in paleontology at the Museum, and Mark Norell, the Chair and Macaulay Curator of the Division of Paleonotology - and curator of the new exhibition. This lecture took place at the Museum on March 15, 2016. Dinosaurs Among Us is open at the Museum from March 21, 2016 to January 2, 2017. The Museum gratefully acknowledges the Richard and Karen LeFrak Exhibition and Education Fund. Dinosaurs Among Us is proudly supported by Chase Private Client. Additional support is generously provided by Dana and Virginia Randt. Photo credit: AMNH/D. Finnin
24/03/201627 minutes 22 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: The Pluto Encounter

Join New Horizons' Deputy Project Scientist Cathy Olkin as she shares the latest scientific findings. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on February 8, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment fund.
10/03/201640 minutes 7 seconds
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SciCafe: Mending a Broken Heart

Join stem cell researcher Jeffrey Karp to understand how scientists are drawing on inspiration from nature to solve medical problems in new and exciting ways. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on February 3, 2016. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. View a video version of this lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0D3h3TWLWI The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: Mending a Broken Heart, The Secret World Inside You, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
25/02/201650 minutes 30 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Searching for the Oldest Stars

In this podcast, join MIT astronomer Anna Frebel for a firsthand account of the science of stellar archaeology. Blending her own research with recent findings in astronomy, Dr. Frebel explains how sections of the night sky are "excavated" in the hunt for for extremely rare relic stars and how this search reveals new details about the early history of the universe. This lecture took place in the Hayden Planetarium on January 11, 2016. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund. Image Credit: ESA/Hubble
11/02/20161 hour 16 minutes 34 seconds
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Scicafe: Amazing Anemones

Join Estefanía Rodríguez, associate curator in the Museum's division of Invertebrate Zoology, for an exciting underwater journey to meet sea anemones, and learn about how much more there is still to be discovered about these marine marvels. This lecture took place at the Museum on January 6, 2016. The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
28/01/201650 minutes 11 seconds
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Toast the Titanosaur

Paleontologist Diego Pol, part of the team that discovered a new Titanosaur in 2014, joins Macauley Curator of Paleontology Mark Norell and Provost of Science Mike Novacek for a chat about the stupendous sauropod and its scientific significance. This lecture took place on January 15, 2016. Generous support for The Titanosaur exhibit has been provided by the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Foundation. Photo: AMNH/D. Finnin
21/01/201658 minutes 50 seconds
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SciCafe: Microbes in the House

In this SciCafe, geneticist Jack Gilbert presents the most exciting and recent discoveries from the invisible world of microbes. SciCafe: Microbes in the House, The Secret World Inside You, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Generous support for The Secret World Inside You and its educational resources has been provided by the Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation and the Milstein Family. The Secret World Inside You is proudly supported by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
30/12/20151 hour 1 minute 1 second
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The Global Surge of Earthquakes

Join Dr. Thorne Lay, professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz, as he discusses how analysis of earthquakes forced researchers to revise longstanding ideas about the behavior of the Earth beneath our feet. This lecture took place at the Museum on November 12, 2015. The Annual IRIS/SSA Lecture Series is presented in collaboration with the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology and the Seismological Society of America.
17/12/20151 hour 19 minutes 4 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Spooky Action at a Distance with George Musser

In this podcast, George Musser, author of a new book about the ability of one particle to affect another across space ("spooky action at a distance") sets out to explore the phenomenon. This lecture took place at the Museum on November 9, 2015. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
03/12/20151 hour 17 minutes 26 seconds
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SciCafe: How the Brain Shows its Feminine Side

Join Bridget Nugent, a researcher from the University of Pennsylvania, to learn about how sex differences are created in the brain. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on November 4, 2015. The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
24/11/201551 minutes 49 seconds
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Thunder & Lightning: Past, Present, Future

In this lecture, author Lauren Redniss considers the danger and beauty of weather, how it informs our history and religions, and the forces that drive meteorological events.  This lecture took place at the Museum on October 29, 2015. 
19/11/201536 minutes 8 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: From Mars to the Stars with Louis Friedman

According to aerospace engineer Louis Friedman, Mars may be the only destination beyond the moon to see human footprints. In this lecture, join Friedman as he discusses his provocative vision for the future of space travel, one in which exploration beyond Mars may cease to be physical, and instead, be virtual. This lecture took place at the Museum on October 19, 2015. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
12/11/201540 minutes 18 seconds
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SciCafe: Seeing Inside Bats with Nancy Simmons and Abigail Curtis

In this SciCafe, curator Nancy Simmons and postdoctoral fellow Abigail Curtis, from the Museum's Department of Mammalogy, take an exciting journey inside the world (and bodies!) of bats. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on October 7, 2015. To watch the accompanying video for this SciCafe, visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfjERb0CNC0 The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
29/10/201537 minutes 18 seconds
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Picturing Spirits in Korea with Laurel Kendall

In this podcast, Museum curator of anthropology Laurel Kendall navigates the journey that Korean shaman paintings make from painters' studios to shrines to private collections and museums, and traverses the borderland between scholarly interest in the material dimensions of religious practice and the circulation of art. This lecture took place at the Museum on September 24, 2015. Photo © AMNH/D. Finnin
22/10/20151 hour 2 minutes 17 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: What is Relativity and Why Should You Care?

Join astrophysicist and educator Jeffrey Bennett as he introduces the basic tenets of Einstein's theory and underscores its importance to our modern understanding of the universe. This lecture took place at the Museum on September 21, 2015. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
08/10/20151 hour 7 minutes 31 seconds
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Humans as Animals with Frans de Waal

Primatologist and ethologist Frans de Waal explores the similarities between humans and other primates in power politics, transmission of knowledge and habits, empathy, and sense of fairness. This lecture took place at the Museum on May 21, 2015. This lecture was presented jointly with ThinkingAnimals.Org
06/08/20151 hour 7 minutes 50 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: One Second After the Big Bang

Join Christopher Tully as he discusses a new experiment called PTOLEMY (Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early-Universe, Massive-Neutrino Yield) and its potential to challenge predictions and properties of neutrinos. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on June 8, 2015. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
23/07/201553 minutes 7 seconds
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SciCafe: Flipping the Genetic Switch

Join geneticist Tuuli Lappalainen from the New York Genome Center to understand how genetic variants shape how our genes are expressed, and how her lab is seeking to uncover the “rules” of human variation. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on June 3, 2015 The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
09/07/201558 minutes 13 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: A Planet for Goldilocks with Natalie Batalha

Kepler mission scientist Natalie Batalha describes the endeavor’s latest discoveries and the possibilities for finding inhabited environments in the not-so-distant future. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on May 11, 2015. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
25/06/20151 hour 9 minutes 4 seconds
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The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack with Ian Tattersall

In this podcast, Curator emeritus Ian Tattersall argues that a long tradition of "human exceptionalism" in paleoanthropology has distorted the picture of human evolution, and leads us through a world of discoveries in the field from past to present. This lecture took place at the Museum on June 9, 2015. To listen to our archive of podcasts, visit amnh.org/podcasts.
18/06/20151 hour 10 minutes 56 seconds
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Colonel Louis Cook: Revolutionary War Hero

Curator Peter Whiteley explores the life of Colonel Louis Cook, the highest-ranking African-American officer and Native American officer in the Revolutionary War, who deserves a more prominent place in American history. This lecture took place at the Museum on April 14, 2015.
05/06/201551 minutes 50 seconds
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SciCafe: Mollusks to Medicine

Mandë Holford, a Research Associate at the Museum and Associate Professor of Chemical Biology at Hunter College, discusses her research into relatively unknown predatory marine snails, such as cone snails, the toxins they produce in their venom, and how those toxins are being used in the search for new medicines for pain and cancer. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on May 6, 2015. The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. This project is supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
21/05/201555 minutes 15 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: How to Take A Picture of a Black Hole

Shep Doeleman, scientist and Assistant Director of the Haystack Observatory at MIT, explores the evidence for black holes, and describes an effort to link radio dishes around the world to form an Earth-sized virtual telescope that will make the first images of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on April 13, 2015. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
07/05/20151 hour 8 minutes 45 seconds
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2015 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate with Neil deGrasse Tyson: Water, Water

Listen in on a discussion between a panel of experts, including Heidi Hammel, Executive Vice President of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy; Tess Russo, a hydrologist at Pennsylvania State University; Ellen Stofan, planetary geologist and Chief Scientist of NASA; Kathryn Sullivan, a geologist at NOAA; and Charles Wald, a retired general from the U.S. Air Force. Host and moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium, leads this lively conversation on the past, present, and future of water. The 2015 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate took place at the Museum on April 28, 2015. 
01/05/20151 hour 47 minutes 49 seconds
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SciCafe: Why Walk on Two Legs? The Pros and Cons of Bipedalism

Museum Curator Brian Richmond and Boston University anthropologist Jeremy DeSilva explore the great advantages of walking on two legs, as well as the unfortunate consequences of evolving bipedalism from a body plan designed to walk on four, not two, legs. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on April 1, 2015. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. This SciCafe event is presented in collaboration with The Leakey Foundation.
23/04/20151 hour 4 minutes 30 seconds
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SciCafe: Explore 21 - Papua New Guinea

In this SciCafe, Brett Benz, Paul Sweet, and Christopher Raxworthy talk about the discoveries they made in Papua New Guinea, as well as the adventures they had along the way. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on March 3, 2015. The Museum’s Explore21 Initiative is supported by the leadership contributions of Katheryn P. and Thomas L. Kempner, Jr., and Linda R. and William E. Macaulay. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
26/03/20151 hour 10 minutes 31 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: Supernova Forensics

In this podcast, Alicia Soderberg reviews new results from Harvard's Supernova Forensics team that increase what we know about supernovas. This lecture took place at the Museum on March 9, 2015. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
12/03/20151 hour 2 minutes 17 seconds
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SciCafe: Mapping the Urban Microbiome, Genome, and Metagenome

In this SciCafe, geneticist Chris Mason talks about his desire to get the gene sequence of every thing and place he sees, and the ways in which we can use the information we get from our bodies as well as our environments. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on February 4, 2015. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. This project is supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
03/03/201551 minutes 5 seconds
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Darwin Goes Digital

In this podcast, dive into the legacy of Darwin and his newly-digitized writings with Randal Keynes, Darwin’s great, great grandson, James Costa, a field biologist and historian of evolution from West Carolina University, and David Kohn, director of the Museum's Darwin Manuscripts Project. To listen to our archive of podcasts, visit amnh.org/podcasts. To learn more about the Darwin Manuscripts Project, visit darwin.amnh.org.
11/02/201550 minutes 28 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: In Search of the True Universe

Astrophysicist and scholar Martin Harwit addresses current challenges in astrophysics research in view of competing national priorities - and he proposes new approaches to the search for the true Universe. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on December 8, 2014. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Endowment Fund.
28/01/201559 minutes 46 seconds
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Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease in the 21st Century

Former President Jimmy Carter and Museum Curator Mark Siddall join Dr. Jane Carlton, director of the Center for Genomics and Systems Biology at New York University, and Dr. Donald Hopkins, vice president of health programs at The Carter Center for a dynamic conversation about the science and politics of disease eradication. Learn more about the eradication of diseases in the Museum exhibition Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease. http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/countdown-to-zero This lecture took place at the Museum on January 12, 2015. Countdown to Zero is presented by the American Museum of Natural History in collaboration with The Carter Center. Countdown to Zero is proudly supported by Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, Lions Clubs International Foundation, Mectizan Donation Program, and Vestergaard. This exhibition is made possible by the generosity of the Arthur Ross Foundation.
20/01/20151 hour 10 minutes 55 seconds
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SciCafe: The Science Behind Football

Scientist and author Ainissa Ramirez explores the science behind football, touching on topics that range from how Vince Lombardi was a game theorist to why woodpeckers don't get concussions. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on January 7, 2015. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
14/01/201551 minutes 20 seconds
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SciCafe: Imaging Space Rocks

Geologist and Museum curator Denton Ebel is joined by Amanda White, a con-focal microscopy specialist, and Ellen Crapster-Pregont, a doctoral candidate conducting her research at the Museum, in a discussion of the 2 and 3-dimensional analysis of these space rocks. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.
24/12/20141 hour 9 minutes 51 seconds
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Glacial Earthquakes: Using Seismic and GPS Observations to Map Changes in Ice

In this podcast, Dr. Meredith Nettles, Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University, discusses these peculiar earthquakes and shows how new data allows us to learn how the ice is affected by changing environments. To listen to our archive of podcasts, visit amnh.org/podcasts. The Annual IRIS Lecture Series is presented in collaboration with the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology and the Seismological Society of America.
18/12/20141 hour 7 minutes 57 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: The Limits of Science and the Search for Meaning

Renowned theoretical physicist Marcelo Gleiser and cognitive scientist Stephen Pinker discuss the limits of knowledge and how much we can actually know of the world. This lecture took place at the Museum on November 3, 2014. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family. Photo: AMNH/R. Mickens
04/12/20141 hour 9 minutes 39 seconds
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SciCafe: Antibiotics and Obesity

In this podcast, physician and microbiologist Martin Blaser discusses how changes in the human microbiome - for example, through antibiotics and hand sanitizers - may be contributing to an increase in chronic conditions including obesity, allergic disorders, and diabetes. For more information on upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe.
20/11/20141 hour 10 minutes 23 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: A Decade at Saturn with Carolyn Porco

In this lecture, Cassini Imaging Team Leader Carolyn Porco discusses the insights the spacecraft gave us into the nature of our planetary system, and Saturn itself. This lecture took place at the Hayden Planetarium on October 20, 2014, and was hosted by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium. Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family. Photo Credit: NASA
06/11/20141 hour 37 minutes 28 seconds
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SciCafe: Islands at the Edge with Jenny Newell and Tina Stege

Join museum curator Jenny Newell, in company with Tina Stege of the Marshallese Educational Initiative, in a discussion about the future of island culture in the face of climate change. For information on upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe.
23/10/201449 minutes 57 seconds
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You Are Here with Astronaut Chris Hadfield

Join former astronaut Chris Hadfield for a description of an orbit around the Earth, from launch to landing, as described and documented in his latest book, You Are Here: Around the World in 92 Minutes. 
16/10/20141 hour 12 minutes 12 seconds
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An Indomitable Beast with Alan Rabinowitz

Alan Rabinowitz shares his own personal journey to conserve a species that is now on a slide toward extinction - despite its past resilience. This lecture took place at the Museum on September 17, 2014.
09/10/20141 hour 31 minutes 14 seconds
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Lonesome George and the Galapagos Today

In honor of the Museum’s special exhibition of Lonesome George, the famed Galapagos tortoise that was the last of his species, join us for an in-depth conversation about biodiversity and conservation, featuring Johannah Barry and Linda Cayot of the Galapagos Conservancy, James Gibbs of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and Arturo Izurieta, director of the Galapagos National Park. The discussion will be moderated by Dr. Eleanor Sterling, Chief Conservation Scientist of the Museum's Center for Biodiversity and Conservation. Lonesome George will be on display at the Museum until January 4, 2015. Find out more here: http://bit.ly/1vyu2ZM Watch a video version of this lecture here: http://bit.ly/YV8dsL Photo: AMNH/D. Finnin
02/10/20141 hour 24 minutes 22 seconds
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Frontiers Lecture: The Copernicus Complex with Caleb Scharf

Renowned astrophysicist and author Caleb Scharf takes us on a cosmic adventure like no other, from tiny microbes within the Earth to distant exoplanets and beyond, asserting that the age-old Copernican principle is in need of updating. The Frontiers Lecture series features prominent astrophysicists, authors, and Museum experts. See upcoming programs here: http://bit.ly/1CoKVuf Support for Hayden Planetarium Programs is provided by the Schaffner Family. Photo: AMNH/D. Finnin
25/09/20141 hour 5 minutes 42 seconds
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Expedition Report: Christopher Raxworthy and Sara Ruane in Madagascar

The Expeditions Report podcast series offers an insider’s look at what it’s like to live and work in the field. In this episode, herpetologists Christopher Raxworthy, associate curator in the Museum’s Division of Vertebrate Zoology, and Sara Ruane talk about their searches in Madagascar for the most elusive of rarely-seen snakes. Learn more about their research here: http://bit.ly/1s8ZgJT Music by Podington Bear from the FreeMusicArchive.org
18/09/201416 minutes 4 seconds
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Expedition Report: Susan Perkins in Saba

The Expeditions Report podcast series offers an insider’s look at what it’s like to live and work in the field. In this episode, Associate Curator and microbiologist Susan Perkins describes her long-term study of malarial parasites and their host lizard, work that draws her back again and again to Saba Island—a relatively unspoiled paradise in the Caribbean. Learn more about Dr. Perkins' work here: bit.ly/1C3ffev Music by Thiaz Itch from FreeMusicArchive.org.
27/08/201413 minutes 10 seconds
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Expedition Report: Estefanía Rodríguez in Antarctica

The Expeditions Report podcast series offers an insider’s look at what it’s like to live and work in the field. In this episode, Assistant Curator Estefanía Rodríguez travels to Antarctica to study sea anemones on a ship that serves as a floating field station – and, on which, sometimes getting there is half the adventure. Read more about Dr. Rodríguez’s work here: bit.ly/1s7ClZF Music by krackatoa from FreeMusicArchive.org. Photo ©NERC CHESSO Project
07/08/201411 minutes 42 seconds
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Expedition Report: Norman Platnick in Chile

The Expedition Report podcast series offers an insider’s look at what it’s like to live and work in the field. In this episode, curator emeritus Norman Platnick discusses his trek through the highly diverse habitats of Chile in search of spider species found nowhere else in the world. To learn more about spiders, visit the American Museum of Natural History's Spiders Alive! exhibit, open through November 2, 2014. Watch videos about Dr. Platnick's research here: http://bit.ly/1o9coWH Music by Podington Bear from FreeMusicArchive.org. Sound effects from SoundBible and FreeSound.org.
24/07/201416 minutes 56 seconds