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Reset with Sasha-Ann Simons Profile

Reset with Sasha-Ann Simons

English, Talk, 1 season, 2003 episodes, 16 hours, 22 minutes
About
WBEZ's daily talk show brings listeners the news and conversations that matter most to their day-to-day lives.
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New York’s Chanel Beads On Their Debut Album

Chanel Beads is an experimental band that hails from the DIY scene of New York. They just released their debut album Your Day Will Come. It features an array of tracks full of electronic drums, droning violins and heavily-processed vocals. Reset chats with Chanel Beads front person Shane Lavers to learn more about the band and this newest release. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/25/202414 minutes, 9 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: May 24, 2024

Chicago City Council approves another $1.3 million to resolve two lawsuits involving police misconduct during 2020 protests. Northwestern University’s president testifies about pro-Palestinian protests before Congress. Reset goes behind the headlines of those stories and much more in our Weekly News Recap. The panelists today are ABC 7 anchor Ravi Baichwal, WBEZ city politics reporter Mariah Woelfel, and Alex Nitkin, reporter with the Illinois Answers Project. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/24/202446 minutes, 2 seconds
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CPS Explores What Safety Looks Like Without School Resource Officers

Earlier this year, the city’s Board of Education unanimously voted to remove school resource officers, or SROs, from school buildings. Since then, Chicago Public Schools has come up with a new school safety plan without police officers, that instead explores alternatives that focus on mediation over punishment. Reset checks with Chalkbeat reporter Reema Amin to learn more about this new safety plan. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/24/202413 minutes, 38 seconds
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Is CPS Failing To Support Migrant Students?

There are nearly 9,000 migrant children attending CPS schools. This influx of students is shining a light on CPS’ lack of resources, particularly for Spanish-speaking children. Reset sits down with Chalkbeat reporter Reema Amina and Block Club Chicago reporter Mina Bloom about their latest work investigating how CPS is falling short in meeting the needs of all their students. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/23/202412 minutes, 31 seconds
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Some Illinois Families Will Get $120 Per Kid In Grocery Money This Summer

When school lets out for the summer break, many students can lose access to consistent meals. But now, kids experiencing food insecurity will be eligible for a seasonal grocery benefit. Reset digs into why the Summer EBT program is a big deal — and what other resources families can use this summer. We talk with Man-Yee Lee, director of communications for the Greater Chicago Food Depository, and Carmen Moorer, youth services manager for the Chicago Heights Public Library. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/23/202411 minutes, 50 seconds
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Cook County Suburbs Are Losing Population. Far Southwest Suburbs Are Gaining.

It’s not just the city of Chicago that’s losing population, it’s also neighboring suburbs in Cook County, according to new Census data. Meanwhile, some suburbs farther out from Chicago are gaining big time. Reset learns more about this trend, who is going where, and some of the factors at play. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/22/202420 minutes, 10 seconds
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What To Watch For During Today’s Chicago City Council Meeting

Within the packed agenda before it, Chicago City Council is set to introduce ordinances that call upon Mayor Brandon Johnson to fire CTA President Dorval Carter, amidst calls for “new leadership” in the transit agency. Reset hears a preview of this week’s Chicago City Council meeting from WBEZ city government and politics reporters Mariah Woelfel and Tessa Weinberg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/22/202412 minutes, 6 seconds
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As Our Cicada Overlords Arrive, The Caterpillars Are The Real Winners

What does a bird think when it sees billions of cicadas flying around? Lunchtime. More than just a nuisance, periodical cicadas are an important player in the forest ecosystem. A 2023 study published in the journal Science, found that 80 species of birds started eating cicadas instead of caterpillars during the Brood X emergence, which had an effect on trees where the caterpillars live. Reset learns how the current eruption of cicadas affects the forest ecosystem, and the ripple effects we could be seeing for years to come. We talk to ecologist Zoe Getman-Pickering and Karen Weigert, director of Loyola University Chicago’s Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/21/202414 minutes, 13 seconds
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Meet The Chicago Photographer Documenting Demolition In The City

Chicago tears down a lot of buildings — the city issued nearly a thousand demolition permits in 2023 alone. But it’s not always clear why or what exactly is being torn down in the city. One Chicago photographer has made it his mission to document these doomed buildings before they get razed. Reset sits down with Soren Spicknall to talk about his photo series “Leave the Seat Empty.” For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/21/202412 minutes, 34 seconds
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Illinois’ Role In The LGBTQ+ Rights Movement

Here in Chicago and Illinois, we have a rich history of LGBTQ+ activism. Now, we can visit a traveling exhibit about the last 50 years of fighting for LGBTQ+ rights. The exhibit, called “Queer Justice,” is being featured at Chicago’s Center on Halsted. Reset checks in with Camilla Taylor, the deputy legal director for litigation at Lambda Legal, a national legal organization that focuses on LGBTQ+ rights and for those living with HIV. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/20/202410 minutes, 27 seconds
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DEI Is Under Attack. Here’s What’s At Stake.

Criticism of diversity, equity and inclusion programs across the country is on the rise in state legislatures, schools, and at some private companies. While DEI is intended to correct inequities within an organization, opponents of DEI programs argue it instead promotes division. Reset sits down with Alida Miranda-Wolff, Chicago DEI expert and author of The First-Time Manager: DEI to hear how to foster a safe, inclusive and productive workplace. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/20/202448 seconds
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Frontman of AJJ Says it’s “an Honor” to Fight the Status Quo

Co-founders of the folk-punk group AJJ join Reset to discuss their latest album Disposable Everything. The band has eight studio albums and twenty years of performing under their belts. Sean Bonnett and Ben Gallaty talk about the therapy of song-writing, collaborations, and advice for the newcomers. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/18/202414 minutes, 7 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: May 17, 2024

We look back on Brandon Johnson’s first year in office. Plus, money news! The IRS audit of Trump Chicago Tower could cost the former president $100 million, former West Side hospital executive charged with embezzlement, and lawmakers debate the state budget in Springfield as busloads of CPS teachers arrive at the Capitol to lobby legislators. Reset breaks down these stories and much more with David Greising, president of the Better Government Association, Nick Blumberg, a correspondent for WTTW News and Tessa Weinberg, city government and politics reporter for WBEZ. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/17/202446 minutes, 35 seconds
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Happy 20th Birthday Millenium Park!

The greenspace is a point of pride for many Chicagoans, and hosts many popular events throughout the year. But people were conflicted about it early on, especially about the unique art it holds. Reset digs into the archives, and hears from Loyola professor Timothy Gilfoyle to learn more about the history of the city’s famous park. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/17/202413 minutes, 57 seconds
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Chicago Theater You Should See In May

WBEZ’s May highlights of productions feature a mix of works at storefront and big-name theaters.The mix of local and national talent on stage is a testament to Chicago’s place in the theater ecosystem. Reset gets the scoop from WBEZ’s theater reporter, Mike Davis. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/16/202415 minutes, 8 seconds
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Number of Cyclists In Chicago Doubles, But Riders Still Worry About Safety

More and more Chicagoans are opting for bikes to get around the city. According to a new analysis, the number of cyclists have doubled in the last five years in Chicago. But with more folks biking, what needs to be done to keep them safe? Reset checks in with Active Transportation Alliance’s executive director Amy Rynell, and Lacey Cordero, volunteer, with Chicago Family Biking on current efforts to address biking safety in the city and what more needs to be done. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/16/202416 minutes, 47 seconds
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Civic Federation Raises Red Flag On Future Solvency of State Transit Agencies

The watchdog group is out with a 62 page analysis of the state’s proposed FY20205 budget. It notes that Governor Pritzker’s $800 million in tax changes will help close the state’s budget deficit, but that any more could overwhelm taxpayers. If left unchecked, the report says the CTA, PACE and Metra face an over $700 million deficit as soon as 2026. Reset learns more about the impact this could have on Chicago area transit riders from Joe Ferguson, president of the Civic Federation. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/15/202410 minutes, 32 seconds
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Why Are Asian Americans Less Likely To Seek Mental Health Care?

Asian Americans are often perceived to be more adjusted, successful and thriving compared to other minority groups in the U.S. – largely due to stereotypes rooted in the model minority myth. But research suggests that Asian Americans experience higher rates of mental illness and fare worse with their mental health compared to non-Asian people. Reset digs into why with University of Chicago’s Yoonsun Choi, and Chicago writer Ada Cheng. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/14/202418 minutes, 59 seconds
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Bad Record Keeping Leaving People Behind Bars For Longer Than Sentenced

Some people incarcerated in Illinois prisons could be eligible for immediate release. That’s due to a new state law that would take time off prisoner’s sentences for taking part in work, educational, reentry or substance abuse programs. But the law isn’t being consistently applied to eligible prisoners. Reset learns more about why and how that can change from Open Campus’s Charlotte West, and the Illinois Prison Project’s Candace Chambliss. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/14/202415 minutes, 18 seconds
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What’s That Building: The Former La Luce Building Near Ogden

A charming four-story Queen Anne-style structure from 1892 near Ogden has seen better days. The city’s landmark commission announced its new status back in 2021 to save it from certain demolition but three years later, is its dilapidated state all there is to it now? Reset learns more about this city landmark from architecture sleuth, and Crain’s Chicago Business residential real estate reporter, Dennis Rodkin. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/13/202413 minutes, 42 seconds
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Using Taste, Smell, Memory To Recreate Lost Recipes

You likely have a favorite food. Maybe it reminds you of someone, or some time in your life. But if you don’t have the recipe, or you make it and it doesn’t taste quite like what you remember, what do you do? Reset checks in with UChicago Neuroscience Professor Leslie Kay and Great American Baking Show winner Martin Sorge for tips on recreating dishes from memory. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/13/202413 minutes, 4 seconds
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Red Scarves’ Latest Album Explores Failure And Doing Your Best

Local indie band Red Scarves is out with their new album ‘Nice Try.’ It features nine tracks that navigate themes of failure, freedom and just doing your best. The four best friends came together during lockdown in the summer of 2020 to write the music for this latest project. Reset sits down with two of the four members of the group, Ayethaw Tun and Ryan Donlin, to learn more about how the band came together, their collaborative process of making music and the journey of releasing ‘Nice Try.’ For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/11/202412 minutes, 46 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: May 10, 2024

What a week in news! University of Chicago launched a pre-dawn raid on a pro-Palestinian encampment. President Biden comes to town. And 95 adults file a lawsuit alleging physical and sexual abuse at Illinois juvenile detention centers. Reset breaks down these stories and much more with Block Club Chicago’s Mick Dumke, Washington Post’s Kim Bellware, and Fox 32’s Paris Schutz. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/10/202444 minutes, 35 seconds
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Chicago Sits On One-Fifth Of The World’s Freshwater Supply. Here’s How Local Players Are Protecting That.

Water scarcity and what the UN calls “water-related hazards” – like flooding and drought – are increasing around the globe. As water supplies dry up, eyes turn to water havens, like the Great Lakes region. So how does a city like Chicago meet the need and protect the water resources from those who would only profit from it? Multiple players are coming together to do this under the banner of the blue economy in Chicago. Reset learns more about these efforts from Reset sustainability contributor Karen Weigert, Tikal Industries Christian Guerrero, and Current’s Alaina Harkness. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/10/202415 minutes, 19 seconds
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Hater Extraordinaire And ‘Most Ethical Guy In Music’: Remembering Chicagoan Steve Albini

In the world of music recording, Chicagoan Steve Albini was an international legend, even a pioneer. Albini passed away from a heart attack this week at 61. But his impact on fellow engineers and the industry will not be soon forgotten. WBEZ engineer Dave Miska shares how and why Albini spoke to a generation of punk Gen X-ers. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/9/20246 minutes, 45 seconds
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Inside Chicago’s ‘Fossil Lab’

The Fossil Lab is run by UChicago paleontologist Paul Sereno. It recently moved from the university campus to a space in Washington Park where visitors can see 3D renderings of dinosaurs and a wide variety of fossils. Reset sits down with Sereno to learn more about the community learning opportunities he’s planning for the lab. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/9/202415 minutes, 20 seconds
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Meet The Chicagoan Telling Deaf And Immigrant Stories Through Animation

Schantelle Alonzo is the daughter of Filipino immigrants and grew up in Chicago’s Albany Park. She was born deaf in her left ear and felt she didn’t see her story represented in animations she grew up seeing. Today, she creates short films to share stories of underrepresented communities like the deaf, Asian Americans and immigrants. Reset sits down with the animator to learn more about the impact she hopes to leave on people viewing her work. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/8/202413 minutes, 29 seconds
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Chicago Faces Another Lawsuit Over DNC Protest Permits

Bodies Outside of Unjust Laws, a coalition for reproductive justice and LGBTQ+ liberation, filed a federal lawsuit against the city last Thursday. That suit alleges the city violated their first and fourteenth amendment rights by denying their request to protest by the Water Tower on Michigan Ave, where many Democratic National Convention delegates will be staying. Plus, Mayor Johnson scraps his plan to relocate a downtown migrant shelter to the 11th ward. Reset hears the latest in city politics from WBEZ’s Tessa Weinberg and Mariah Woelfel. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/8/202412 minutes, 11 seconds
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Your Gas Bill Could Soar In Illinois

A new report finds Illinois residents could see a rate increase in their gas bills of 50% over the next 10 years. That report, from the Building Decarbonization Coalition and Groundworks Data, shows the state’s continued investment in natural gas infrastructure. Reset talks through meaningful intervention options with WBEZ’s Juanpablo Ramirez-Franco. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/7/20246 minutes, 53 seconds
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Ready To Ditch Your Smartphone For A ‘Dumb Phone’?

Nine out of ten people in the U.S. own a smartphone, according to the Pew Research Center. As our society becomes built around this technology, some people are nostalgic for a different time – when cell phones didn’t dominate and distract us. Reset discusses the topic with CPS principal Seth Lavin, who got rid of his smartphone, and TJ Driver, co-founder of Brick, a device that disables apps on your smartphone temporarily. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/7/202413 minutes, 53 seconds
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Latest On Pro-Palestinian Protests On Chicago Campuses

Student organizers from Northwestern, University of Chicago, DePaul and the School of the Art Institute have all set up pro-Palestinan encampments in recent weeks. Reset gets the latest on the protests from WBEZ’s Lisa Kurian Philip, The Depaulia’s Lilly Keller and The Daily Northwestern’s Jacob Wendler. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/6/202418 minutes, 22 seconds
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What’s That Building? Quinn Chapel AME Church

Quinn Chapel is an icon in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood that the community is in the process of restoring. The building sits on the corner of 24th and Wabash. It has a long history of Black activism and was once a station on the Underground Railroad, helping Black people escape enslavement. Reset learns more about this building and renovation project from architecture sleuth Dennis Rodkin. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/6/202412 minutes, 36 seconds
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Rosie Tucker Tells Hard Truths with Their New Record

UTOPIA NOW! is the latest from the queer indie super star Rosie Tucker. The album explores the failings of the music industry, the dangers of fame, and reflections on identity. Rosie joins Reset to talk about new music and the artists that inspired their sound. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/4/202417 minutes, 9 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: May 3, 2024

Protests continue on local university campuses. Lawmakers return to Springfield for spring session, where the Bears’ stadium plans are sidelined by the governor’s aides and other political leaders. Meanwhile, Mayor Johnson prepares to relaunch a guaranteed basic income program and the speed limit could be lowered in Chicago. Reset goes behind those headlines and more with Axios’ Monica Eng, Chicago Tribune’s Ray Long and WBEZ’s Mariah Woelfel. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/3/202444 minutes, 7 seconds
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Gardeners, Get Ready, Set, Plant!

May is the time to get garden beds ready, and harden off your seedlings so you can get your veggies in the ground now for bountiful summer months. Reset gets tips for getting veggie gardens started and spring veggie recipes from cultural historian and chef Jordan Wimby and the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Chester Jankowski. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/3/202413 minutes, 5 seconds
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Ready Or Not, Illinois Braces For The Sweet (Screaming) Song Of Cicadas

Producer: Jules Yaeger Editor: Meha AhmadIllinois’ biggest cicada season in over two centuries is beginning. Around a trillion cicadas will emerge from the ground all across the state—in urban, suburban, and rural areas alike. Reset checks in with Allen Lawrance with the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum and Stephanie Adams with the Morton Arboretum about the impact of this insect on people and plants this summer. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset. Mixer: Brenda Ruiz
5/2/202413 minutes, 8 seconds
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World Press Freedom Day

Last year, Calumet City cited a Daily Southtown reporter for seeking comment from public employees. That’s one out of at least 165 incidents that interfered with journalists seeking and conveying information to the public last year, according to the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker. But many violations of press freedom go unreported or under the radar. To mark World Press Freedom Day this week, Reset checked in with Seth Stern, director of advocacy at Freedom of the Press Foundation, to learn more. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/2/202418 minutes, 24 seconds
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Chicago Legal Group Wants Limited Solitary Confinement In Illinois Prisons

A report from the Chicago Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights, and other groups, says the state’s continued practice of solitary confinement violates international human rights. But change may be on the horizon. Illinois’ general assembly is considering legislation that would restrict solitary confinement, and hopefully create change in the system. Reset learns more from James Swansey with Restore Justice, and David Shapiro with the Chicago Lawyers’ Committee. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/1/202415 minutes, 38 seconds
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Use It Or Lose It: The Tale of Covid Relief Money Burning A Hole In Chicago’s Pocket

For this week’s update from City Hall, we learn about Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson’s plan to spend the remaining federal COVID-19 dollars before the funds expire at the end of the year. Plus, why the Mayor didn’t attend the funeral of a slain CPD officer, and how he’s defending support for the Chicago Bears $4.7 million stadium proposal. We get the latest from WBEZ’s Tessa Weinberg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
5/1/20249 minutes, 51 seconds
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Grammy-Award Winning Singer Laufey In Chicago

A jazz icon to some, a breakout pop star to others, the Icelandic-Chinese singer Laufey has skyrocketed into popularity. Her debut album dropped in 2020, and just three years later she won a Grammy for her 2023 album ‘Bewiched’. Reset sat down with the 25-year-old for more on stardom and how her lyrics resonate with fans of all ages. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/30/202426 minutes, 39 seconds
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CTA Continues To Struggle, Illinois Lawmakers Want to Consolidate Chicago Transit Agencies

From the recent death of an employee on the job raising concerns about driver safety, to a program meant to bolster employment that’s falling short of its goals, and a controversial appointment to the board, the Chicago Transit Authority continues to struggle. Reset talks through these issues, and some possible solutions, with Block Club Chicago’s Manny Ramos, Chicago Sun-Times’ Lauren FitzPatrick, and Commuters Take Action’s Morgan Madderom. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/30/202414 minutes, 6 seconds
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Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Regains Sovereignty Over Some Of Their Homelands

In 1849, the U.S. government illegally auctioned off land owned by the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation. Over the past two decades, the Tribal Nation has purchased some of their land back. This month, The U.S. Department of the Interior placed those 130 acres into a trust, formally recognizing the tribe’s ability to govern portions of their homelands. This is the first time this has happened in Illinois. Reset checks in with Joseph “Zeke” Rupnik, a chairman of the Prairie Band, on their efforts to regain sovereignty over the entire Shab-eh-ney Reservation. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/29/202412 minutes, 26 seconds
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Openlands Plants Its 10,000th Tree In Time For Arbor Day

The Chicago based non-profit, Openlands, brings trees to you! The organization’s program introduces the public to caring for the environment through teaching residents how to identify, care for, plant and advocate for trees. Reset talks with Openlands CEO, Michael Davidson and TreeKeeper #1905, Pablo Rodriguez. We also talk with Reset sustainability contributor Karen Weigert. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/29/202417 minutes, 7 seconds
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Jazz Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis Honors Duke Ellington In CSO Concert

Duke Ellington was born April 29, 1899. Today, 125 years after his birth, a concert series celebrates the pianist and composer's monumental impact on music. Reset talks with Wynton Marsalis, Grammy award-winning jazz master, about Ellington’s enduring impact on music and how he continues to honor Ellington’s legacy. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/27/202421 minutes, 26 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap, April 26, 2024

The Chicago Bears revealed plans for a new domed lakefront stadium – and successfully drafted their quarterback pick. The family of Dexter Reed filed a civil rights lawsuit over his killing by police. Chicago campuses see anti-war protests, and specialty grocers Dom's Kitchen & Market and Foxtrot face class action lawsuits from now-former employees. Reset breaks down these stories and much more with NBC-5 Chicago’s Christian Farr, Chicago Sun-Times’s Mitchell Armentrout, and Chicago Tribune’s Dan Petrella. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/26/202446 minutes, 32 seconds
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Netflix’s ‘Good Times’ Reboot Met With Backlash

Fifty years after the 1974 debut of the iconic “Good Times” sitcom, a new animated reboot of the show was launched on Netflix and fans of the original show are not having a good time. The sitcom depicted a Black family making ends meet in public housing in Chicago. Its co-creator, Chicagoan Eric Monte, quickly became known as the “Godfather of Sitcom,” as he was also the mastermind behind shows including “The Jeffersons” and “What’s Happening.” Reset checks in with Monte’s daughter Cynthia Crisp, WBEZ’s Natalie Moore, and journalism professor Arionne Nettles about the show’s legacy and remake. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/26/202418 minutes, 29 seconds
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How One Chicagoan Modernized Her Great-Great-Great Grandfather’s Pre-Prohibition Pale Ale

Laurin Mack loves Chicago and loves beer. So maybe it was inevitable that she would go on to tap into her great-great-great grandfather’s brewing legacy, and share his story of the beers that “built Chicago.” She re-opened the Conrad Seipp Brewing Company in 2020, and began the process of excavating the recipe for his pre-Prohibition pale ale. Several years, and two styles of beer later, you can now purchase Seipp beer at select Binny’s and Jewel locations. Reset sat down with Mack to learn more about “the beer that built Chicago” and the process of re-creating the past for the present moment. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/25/202412 minutes, 44 seconds
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Chicago Wants To Create One System For Migrant And Homeless Shelters

his attempt at unification comes as the number of migrants staying in shelters has decreased from a peak of nearly 15,000 people in January to about 8,600 as of Wednesday. The city and state has shut down 11 shelters set up specifically for migrants. But combining Chicago’s shelter systems is still a major change – and will require a lot of coordination. Reset learns more about what this consolidation could mean for Chicago from Nell Salzman with the Chicago Tribune, and Jenn Torres, a volunteer helping with migrants. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/25/202415 minutes, 24 seconds
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Foxtrot, Dom’s Kitchen & Market Workers And Customers Shocked At Sudden Closure

Outfox Hospitality, the parent company of Foxtrot and Dom’s Kitchen & Market, is filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, according to food-and-beverage newsletter Snaxshot. The move comes five months after the two Chicago-based companies merged. Reset learns more about what is going on from Eater Chicago’s Ashok Selvam and attorney Connie A. Lahn. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/24/202413 minutes, 37 seconds
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O’Hare Terminal Upgrade Halted Over City Budget Concerns

Passengers traveling through O’Hare’s Terminal 3 could soon see wider concourses, renovated restrooms, revamped baggage claim area and more. However, budget concerns have halted the construction of a global terminal and satellite concourses, leading Mayor Johnson to propose a major change in the order of construction. Reset hears the latest from WBEZ’s Tessa Weinberg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/24/202412 minutes, 31 seconds
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Why Did Most Cook County Suburbs Pass On A Piece Of A $20 Million Pie?

Migrants in Cook County suburbs still need housing and immigration support, but even with a pool of funds $20 million deep, few suburbs have applied for the assistance. The deadline closed this past Friday with only 4 out of about 100 suburbs sending in applications. Reset finds out more with WBEZ reporter Kristen Schorsch; Julie Solis, homeless prevention program manager from Respond Now, a non-profit in the south suburbs; and Alison Leipsiger, Evanston policy coordinator. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/23/202414 minutes, 32 seconds
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A 1950s Gold Coast NightClub Was Once The Hottest Spot In Chicago

Attracting performances by Richard Pryor, Barbra Streisand and Ella Fitzgerald, Mister Kelly’s on Rush Street was a destination for audiences of all races in the 1950s and ’60s. Reset talks about the Newberry Library’s latest exhibit on the importance of the venue with the library’s Vince Firpo, David Marienthal who donated some of the archival material, and freelance audio producer and journalist Andrew Meriwether. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/23/202415 minutes, 19 seconds
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Actor Harry Lennix On ‘Reading The Room’ In Chicago Theater

Legendy playwright August Wilson – considered one of the most important Black voices in theater – wrote the story of his life in the play How I Learned What I Learned. Today, that script is coming to life in a one-man show at the Broadway Playhouse in Water Tower Place. And Chicago-bred actor Harry Lennix (The Blacklist, Matrix Reloaded) is stepping into the role of August Wilson himself. How I Learned What I Learned is on a limited run until May 5, and Reset sits down with the actor for more on what audiences can expect. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/22/202413 minutes, 43 seconds
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Anyone Can Fall For Scams, Not Just Older Adults

Producer: Max Lubbers Editor: Meha AhmadWhile anyone can get scammed, older adults tend to face higher fraud losses. Victims over the age of 60 lose a collective $28.3 billion annually to scams or financial abuse, according to an AARP report. Still, people of any age can fall for these and other scams. Reset learns more about how to protect yourself and your loved ones with Chicago Sun-Times’s Stephanie Zimmerman, Wayne State University’s Peter Lichtenberg, and Chicago Fed’s Leslie McGranahan. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset. Mixer: Brenda Ruiz
4/22/202414 minutes, 18 seconds
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Rethinking Country Music Spaces

This week marks the 100 year anniversary of the first radio broadcast of National Barn Dance in Chicago. That's a variety show that predates the Grand Ole Opry and is credited with popularizing country music. And it's high time that the genre writ large acknowledges the history and role of Black musicians and fans in shaping the genre, says Francesca Royster, author of "Black Country Music: Listening For Revolutions." We sat down with her to learn more about the history, the opportunity of this moment and of course, to dig into Beyoncé's latest album, "Cowboy Carter."
4/20/202416 minutes, 9 seconds
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NYC Rapper MIKE Is Mastering The Pen

MIKE is on tour performing his latest album “Pinball,” produced in collaboration with Tony Seltzer. You can catch him at Metro next week. The 25-year-old artist tells Reset about keeping it real in his music, his friendship with the legendary Earl Sweatshirt and other friends out with new music. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/20/202414 minutes, 6 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: April 19, 2024

Tensions rise between Chicago’s top cop and oversight agency. City Council delays vote on Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson’s bond plan. Protesters block the road to O'Hare to raise awareness on war in Gaza. Reset goes behind the headlines of those stories and many more in our Weekly News Recap with Brandon Pope of CW26, Alex Nitkin of the Illinois Answers Project for the Better Government Association, and Sam Charles of the Chicago Tribune. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/19/202444 minutes, 48 seconds
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Tips On Reducing Your Food Waste

According to the USDA, about one third of food produced in the United States is never eaten and ends up in landfills, where it produces methane that contributes to climate change. Additionally, all of the fuel, water and resources that went into growing and transporting the food is wasted. Reset hears from local chef Devon Quinn and food writer Lisa Shames on their tips and tricks for creatively reusing ingredients rather than adding to a landfill. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/19/202416 minutes, 3 seconds
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America’s Top Librarian: ‘We’re Fighting For Our Lives’

Libraries are a haven of free access to books, movies, magazines, and even social supports. But those spaces have faced attacks and an unprecedented number of book bans – 4,349 instances of book bans across 23 states – in just the last half of 2023. Reset talks with Emily Drabinski, the head of the American Library Association, on why the county is divided between attacking and protecting libraries. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/18/202412 minutes, 12 seconds
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Chicago’s Role In Shaping The Country Music Genre

The first episode of the variety show Barn Dance aired on WLS on April 19, 1924. An event honoring this anniversary imagines what an episode of the show would sound like in 2024, with musicians, historical context and performances. It will be broadcast live on WFMT. Reset learns about the history of country music in Chicago, how the scene has evolved and what characterizes the sound today with Chicago historian Paul Durica, author Francesca Royster, Lawrence Peters of the Lawrence Peters Outfit, and musical director Jefferey Thomas. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/18/202420 minutes, 39 seconds
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Chicago Top Watchdog Wants To Know How City Could Improve Your Life

Chicago’s Office of Inspector General investigates misconduct on all levels of city government. And now it’s asking Chicago residents to weigh in on what’s important to them, and what governmental process or body they want to learn more about. It’s the office’s latest attempt to get public input on the inspector general’s priorities for the coming year. Reset sits down with Deborah Witzburg, the city’s inspector general, for more. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/17/202411 minutes, 45 seconds
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Addressing Inequities In Black Maternal Health

Hospitals and clinics that offer maternal healthcare have been closing on the South Side for years. And this puts mothers in those communities at risk. Reset sat down with UChicago Medicine’s inaugural Chief Obstetrical Transformation Officer, Dr. Sarosh Rana, and The South Side Healthy Community Organization’s chief operating officer, Sarah Janvier, to learn about what work needs to be done to create safer conditions for Black mothers. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/17/202416 minutes, 17 seconds
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How Black Chicago Has Swayed American Culture

Chicago is more than just the place where Arionne Nettles grew up, she writes, it’s in her DNA. In her debut book, We Are The Culture: Black Chicago’s Influence on Everything, Nettles takes readers through the history of how Black Chicagoans have led pop culture in America for decades, and gives insight into the ways culture shapes our lives and spreads across borders. Reset sits down with Nettles to discuss the city’s Southern roots, its cultural contributions and her own Chicago upbringing. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/16/202417 minutes, 53 seconds
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Chicago’s Newly Elected Local School Councils Face Unique Challenges

Since 1989, LSCs have won funding for their schools, removed corrupt faculty, renamed schools and even opened new campuses. Ideally, an LSC is typically made up of a school’s principal, a couple of teachers, parents, community members, and even students. But that’s not always the case. Reset learns more about Local School Councils in Chicago from two council members, Chinella Robinson and JP Paulus, and Chalkbeat Chicago’s Reema Amin. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/16/202414 minutes, 12 seconds
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Chicago’s Influence On Poetry

Chicago has given the world many wonders: architecture, ketchup-less hot dogs, house music. But did you know about the influence the city has had on poetry? Slam poetry got its start in Chicago in the 1980’s, spawning worldwide competitions, including the largest youth poetry festival in the world, right here in Chicago. Reset sits down with three local artists, Haiku Fest founder Regina Harris Baiocchi, Chicago’s first-ever Poet Laureate avery r. Young, and Illinois’ fifth Poet Laureate Angela Jackson, to learn what makes Chicago’s poetry scene unique. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/15/202415 minutes, 10 seconds
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What’s That Building? Schulze Bakery

The smell of bread used to waft out of a five-story building in Washington Park. After years of vacancy, the factory is back on the market. So what’s that building? Architecture sleuth Dennis Rodkin stops by Reset to dig into the past and future of the Schulze Bakery. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/15/20249 minutes, 35 seconds
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Chicago’s Alvin Cobb Trio Is Out With New Music

Alvin Cobb, Jr. is an Atlanta-native who found his way to Chicago to play jazz. He’s worked alongside several musicians both in and out of the jazz world, like Chance the Rapper, Nola Adé and Marcus Printup. Reset sat down with the musician to hear more about his journey and on making his first album featuring fellow jazz artists Katie Ernst and Julius Tucker. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/13/202412 minutes, 29 seconds
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WBEZ Weekly News Recap, April 12, 2024

Chicago’s Civilian Office of Police Accountability releases body cam footage from a deadly March traffic stop where officers fired nearly 100 shots in less than a minute. Plus, new legislation aims to close a race gap in teacher evaluations, and stargazers head downstate for a total solar eclipse. Reset goes behind the headlines of those stories and much more in our Weekly News Recap with Andy Grimm of the Chicago Sun-Times, Ravi Baichwal at ABC 7 News, and Leigh Giangreco with Crain’s Chicago Business. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/13/202443 minutes, 37 seconds
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Chicagoan Tackles Family Dysfunction In Her New Memoir

Life wasn’t always easy for poet Nikki Pitan, who grew up with domestic violence, and fatphobia affecting her self esteem in her far South Side home. She tells Reset about how her new memoir outlines her lifelong journey of healing and breaking those generational cycles. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/12/202417 minutes, 13 seconds
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Eating With The Seasons: ‘Polar Coaster’ Spring

Spring is coming and going in Chicago so fast you might think you’re on a bit of a roller coaster. Reset turns to cultural historian and chef, Jordan Wimby (aka Melanin Martha), for more on cool-season crops to plant now and in-season veggies for your dinners this week. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/11/202412 minutes, 9 seconds
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Evanston Township High School Is Third School In the Country To Pass Green New Deal

Congress has yet to pass a Green New Deal, a set of policies that aims to reduce emissions and provide a just transition to green jobs. So, high schoolers and the Sunrise Movement are taking matters into their own hands. Evanston Township High School is the third high school in the U.S. to pass a Green New Deal of their own. Reset learns more about the effort with student Milo Slevin and Reset Sustainability Contributor Karen Weigert. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/11/202415 minutes, 1 second
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This Chicago Doctor Worked In A Gaza Hospital. Here’s What She Saw.

Dr. Tammy Abughnaim normally works as an emergency physician in Chicago. But in March, she spent two weeks living and working in Al-Aqsa Hospital, as part of a team under the World Health Organization. When it came time to leave, Dr. Abughnaim says she begged to stay longer. Reset host Sasha-Ann Simons sat down with Dr. Abughnaim to hear about her experience in Gaza. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/10/202425 minutes, 43 seconds
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Could Illinois Be The Next ‘Right-To-Die’ State?

Illinois could soon join 10 states in the nation which allow what advocates call “medical aid in dying.” A bill in Springfield would give terminally ill people with six months or less to live the option to end their lives by self-administering a drug provided by a physician. Illinois lawmakers are considering the future of this legislation during the spring session, so Reset spoke with the bill’s co-sponsor Sen. Linda Holmes (D-Aurora) to learn more about it. Plus, hears from opponents like Access Living’s Amber Smock and supporters like ACLU of Illinois’ Khadine Bennett. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/10/202428 minutes, 38 seconds
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EXPO Chicago Art Fair Kicks Off

Thousands of artists and nearly 200 galleries from around the world are showcasing their work here in Chicago. We check in with WBEZ's Courtney Kueppers. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/9/20246 minutes, 49 seconds
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Chicago Fed Prez On The Economy, Health Of Our Financial System

The latest jobs report shows the U.S. economy is strong, but how consumers perceive and feel about it isn’t as positive. So, what’s really going on? Reset sits down with Austan Goolsbee, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, to find out how the economy is doing and to get a lesson on how the Fed works. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/9/202417 minutes, 38 seconds
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This Chicago Dentist Has The World’s Largest Collection Of Toothpicks

In his new book, Chicago-area dentist Steven Potashnick digs into the surprising significance of the toothpick in Western culture. It features photos of his extensive collection of 1,500 toothpicks, which is believed to be the largest in the world. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/8/202412 minutes, 32 seconds
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How Chicago’s Selective Enrollment Schools Came to Be

Chicago’s school board recently voted to prioritize neighborhood schools and de-emphasize selective enrollment schools, but board members are not ending school choice. Reset dives into the history of how selective schools came to be — from the space race to integration efforts. We talk with WBEZ education reporter Sarah Karp, who recently reported on this history for Curious City. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/8/202416 minutes, 26 seconds
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Valebol, The New Super Duo Changing The Sound Of Pop

The self-described “breeze-pop” duo is out with their debut album. VV Lightbody and Daniel Villareal have paired up to explore a genre that is out of their comfort zone. The self-titled album is wall-to-wall dancy, dreamy, and inspired. VV and Daniel join Reset to talk about the new release and a show at Thalia Hall in June. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/6/202418 minutes, 58 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: April 5, 2024

The Johnson administration has a new chief of staff, and Chicago has its first-ever chief homelessness officer. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra named its youngest-ever conductor and music director. Plus, swimming in the Chicago River? It’s happening. Reset dives into the top local news with Better Government Association president David Greising, Block Club Chicago reporter Quinn Myers and WTTW host and anchor Brandis Friedman. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/5/202445 minutes, 40 seconds
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How To Eat Deliciously On Vacation

For many of us, a big part of traveling is dining and trying local specialties. Reset reminisces about the best dishes we’ve had while traveling and gets tips from pros like Reset’s Andrea Guthman, WBEZ’s Cianna Greaves and Eater Chicago’s Ashok Selvam on planning meals while on vacation. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/5/202413 minutes, 57 seconds
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Thousands Sue In Chicago Over Black Hair Relaxers Linked To Cancer

Nine out of 10 Black women have used hair relaxing chemicals to straighten their thick curls. But lawsuits have been piling up in state and federal courts across the country for years claiming chemicals in hair relaxers are causing cancer. Reset hears from Traccye Love, one plaintiff in these cases, and learns more about an investigation by WBEZ’s Natalie Moore and the Chicago Sun-Times’ Andy Grimm. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/4/202415 minutes, 28 seconds
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Investigation Finds Illinois Hospitals Deny Care To Sexual Assault Survivors

Caring for yourself or a loved one after a sexual assault can be a harrowing experience, and an American Public Media investigation finds hospitals in Illinois have made it more challenging for victims. From delaying treatment, to throwing away rape kits and failing to notify child or adult protective services of the incident, Reset digs into how this can lead to a loss of evidence with American Public Media’s Kate Martin. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/4/202411 minutes, 11 seconds
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Phylicia Rashad’s ‘Purpose’ Peels Back The Layers Of Fictional Civil Rights Icon’s Family

The Jasper family in “Purpose” has been a pillar of Black American politics for decades as civil rights leaders, pastors and congressmen. But like all families, there are secrets and lies beneath the surface. Reset sits down with the Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s Glenn Davis, for more on the rehearsal process and inspiration for this show. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/4/202416 minutes, 57 seconds
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Who is Chicago’s First Chief Homelessness Officer?

Mayor Brandon Johnson appointed Sendy Soto to the position where she will be tasked with creating a five-year plan to address homelessness in Chicago. Reset learns more about this and other ongoing events in City Hall with WBEZ’s Tessa Weinberg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/3/202413 minutes, 15 seconds
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Are You Up To Date On Your MMR Vaccine?

Suburban Cook County confirmed its first measles case, bringing the total number of cases in the Chicago area to 53. City officials have vaccinated over 5,000 migrants since the first cases were reported at a migrant shelter in Pilsen. Reset checks in with RUSH University Medical Group’s Dr. David Ngyuen on best practices to protect yourself against these viruses. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/2/202413 minutes, 4 seconds
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Pregnant People In Illinois Jails Aren’t Getting The Care They Need

A new report from the ACLU of Illinois and the Women’s Justice Institute details the inadequate care pregnant women receive in jails across the state. Reset digs into those details with Women’s Justice Institute’s Alexis Mansfield, Alliyah Thomas who was pregnant while incarcerated, and the Marshall Project’s Shannon Heffernan. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/2/202417 minutes, 34 seconds
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Drive Down Memory Lane On The Historic Route 66

Once considered “the Main Street of America,” Route 66 stretches from the Midwest in Chicago to the West Coast in Los Angeles. Today, there’s a campaign to preserve the untold stories of the 2,440-mile highway. Reset learns more about that effort from the National Trust of Historic Preservation’s Amy Webb. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/1/20249 minutes, 7 seconds
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What’s That Building? More like What’s That Astronaut Statue?

Driving down Route 66, some 60 miles southwest of downtown Chicago, a massive astronaut statue, placed outside of a restaurant near Wilmington, Illinois used to be visible. But it’s no longer there. Reset learns more about the Gemini Giant, where it used to stand, and why it’s up for sale now. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
4/1/202412 minutes, 13 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap, March 28th: Flag burning at City Hall, residents lack heat, and more

Chicago alders want to censure Ald. Byron Sigcho-Lopez over his attendance at a rally where a veteran burned the American flag in front of City Hall. Plus, a WBEZ analysis finds more Chicagoans lacked heat in January than any month since 2019. Reset dives into these and other top local stories with City Cast Chicago’s Jacoby Cochran, WBEZ statehouse reporter Alex Degman, and WTTW Chicago politics reporter Heather Cherone. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/31/202438 minutes, 29 seconds
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Vocalist Lizz Wright on Grief, Gospel, and Lessons from her Grandmother

With a new album out next month, Lizz Wright joins Reset to discuss “defining loves” in her life, the artistry she finds in cooking, and growing up steeped in gospel music. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/30/202425 minutes, 41 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap, March 28th: Flag burning at City Hall, residents lack heat, and more

Chicago alders want to censure Ald. Byron Sigcho-Lopez over his attendance at a rally where a veteran burned the American flag in front of City Hall. Plus, a WBEZ analysis finds more Chicagoans lacked heat in January than any month since 2019. Reset dives into these and other top local stories with City Cast Chicago’s Jacoby Cochran, WBEZ statehouse reporter Alex Degman, and WTTW Chicago politics reporter Heather Cherone. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/29/202438 minutes, 29 seconds
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New Book ‘2020’ Covers The Year Everything Changed

A lot happened in 2020. Beyond a global pandemic, the year was also marked by a divisive presidential election, the spread of misinformation and mass protests, just to name a few. A new book by author and NYU sociologist Erik Klinenberg, titled 2020: One City, Seven People and the Year Everything Changed, charts the transformation of a nation. Reset learns more from the author himself on his process and on why it’s important to look back to learn. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/29/202421 minutes, 4 seconds
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Reimagining ‘Huckleberry Finn’ From The Black POV

James reimagines the Mark Twain classic Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – this time telling it from the perspective of the enslaved character Jim. Everett has written 30 books, including Erasure, the 2001 novel adapted into the Oscar-winning film American Fiction. Reset talks with the author about what his new work can teach us about agency and art of balancing satire and irony while conveying the horrors of slavery. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/28/202410 minutes, 35 seconds
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Chicagoans Reflect On Four Years Of COVID-19

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ended its five-day quarantine recommendation for people who test positive for COVID-19, announcing that people can return to activities after symptoms improve for at least 24 hours. It’s a big change from the required 10-day quarantine period from four years ago when the World Health Organization first declared COVID-19 a pandemic. Reset reflects on the impact of four years of COVID-19 with Steven Thrasher, author of The Viral Underclass: The Human Toll When Inequality and Disease Collide, and Megan E. Doherty, co-leader of Care Not COVID, an advocacy group pushing for safer healthcare settings. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/28/202416 minutes, 37 seconds
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Could Artificial Intelligence Save The Rainforest?

Rainforests are complex ecosystems that house over half of the world’s species, but they’re under threat from deforestation and climate change, and gathering data about the shifts in populations is difficult and unreliable. But AI could help. Reset hears from the Morton Arboretum’s Chuck Cannon, and Loyola University’s Karen Weigert on efforts to build accessible tools that can be used to monitor the species that call rainforests home. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/27/202413 minutes, 28 seconds
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‘The Exvangelicals’: Why Some Are Leaving The White Evangelical Church

For the most part, Sarah McCammon followed the rules set by her Evangelical family. She was taught to obey God, not to question her faith, and that her eternal salvation was secured in heaven. She later left the church, but soon saw the power of evangelical Christian beliefs on the political right after covering the Trump campaign in 2016 for NPR. Reset learns more about McCammon’s journey and the power she sees in that conservative religious community. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/27/202426 minutes, 11 seconds
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From Gen X To Gen Z: Swapping Notes On Sex Miseducation

When it comes to talking about sex, taboos and stigma can – and do – lead to myths and misinformation – particularly for women. From disproportionately impacted by long-term effects of STDs to infertility to even just being prepared for changes in their menstrual cycle, many women – across age groups – say the sex education they were offered in school and social circles left them woefully unprepared. Reset sat down with DePaul student Tyesha Thomas, Northwestern’s Dr. Traci Kurtzer, and co-host of WBEZ’s When Magic Happens podcast Cheryle Jackson to discuss sexual health and how the knowledge gap seems to persist across generations. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/26/202438 minutes, 22 seconds
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Chicago’s Kids Still Facing Lead Exposure. What Can Be Done?

Chicago still has more lead service lines than anywhere else in the country, and it’s impacting more than two-thirds of Chicago children under 6 years old. The CDC says there are no known safe levels of lead in a child’s body, and that constant exposure can damage the brain and nervous system, lead to slow growth and development, including learning and behavioral problems. Reset talks through solutions and resources with Chakena Perry of the Natural Defense Council, Brenda Santoyo with the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, and Michael Hawthorne with the Chicago Tribune. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/26/202421 minutes, 40 seconds
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Still A Close Race For Cook County State’s Attorney

Nearly a week after Illinois’ primary election, the race for Cook County State’s Attorney gets closer and closer as election officials tally up the remaining mail in and provisional ballots. Plus, the city announces plans to close temporary shelters housing migrants at 5 city parks, and transition the facilities back to their former use as a recreation destination for residents. Reset digs into this and more city politics happenings with WBEZ’s Tessa Weinberg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/25/202410 minutes, 46 seconds
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Y La Bamba Brings Its Indie Folk To Chicago

Front person Luz Elena Mendoza Ramos sits down with Reset to talk language and identity in song writing. You can catch their show Sunday, March 24, at Metro. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/23/202413 minutes, 31 seconds
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Chicagoland Palestinian Americans Reflect On Ramadan

Ramadan is a time for fasting, good deeds and charity for Muslims around the world and here in Chicago. But the holiday’s usual celebrations are more somber due to the war in Gaza. Reset sat down with a group of local Palestinian Americans to discuss how the holy month feels this year. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/22/202420 minutes, 44 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: March 22, 2024

Delays to election results leave some holding their breath. Chicago sues Glock over its ability to turn its weapons semi-automatic. And the Bring Chicago Home referendum flounders during the primary election this week that saw a record-low voter turnout. Reset delves into these and other top local stories with WGN’s Tahman Bradley, the Chicago Tribune’s Ray Long, and WTTW’s Amanda Vinicky. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/22/202441 minutes, 55 seconds
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Investing In Climate Change Solutions

Local heir to the Walmart fortune, Lukas Walton, founded Builders Vision to address environmental challenges. And recently, the group won a Parkinson Award from Loyola University Chicago’s Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility for its work. Reset sits down with Matt Knott, president and chief operating officer of Builders Vision, and Karen Weigert, Reset sustainability contributor, to learn more. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/22/202412 minutes, 40 seconds
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What You Don’t Know About The 1980 Chicago Classic ‘The Blues Brothers’

It’s hard to find a more iconic Chicago movie than “The Blues Brothers”, and the chance to learn something new about the 1980 film? Yes please! Reset sits down with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Daniel de Visé about the new stories he uncovered while researching the making of this cult favorite. Daniel’s book, “The Blues Brothers: An Epic Friendship, the Rise of Improv, and the Making of an American Film Classic” is available now wherever you buy books. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/21/202417 minutes, 31 seconds
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Chicago Dedicates TODAY As Rick Bayless Day

Mayor Brandon Johnson is recognizing the decades-long career of Rick Bayless and the impact he has had on the city’s restaurant scene and on making Chicago a food destination. The prolific chef owns several restaurants and brands, and he also supports small farmers and the arts in Chicagoland. Reset sits down with Bayless to reflect on his career and accomplishments. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/21/202417 minutes, 23 seconds
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2024 IL Primary: Biden, Trump Show Weaknesses

President Joe Biden and former president Donald Trump each won their primaries in Illinois on Tuesday. But a growing call for a protest vote among Dems and a never-Trump wing among Republicans could mean that both candidates have to shore up their support before the general election in November. Meanwhile, other items on the ballot remain too close to call, including the Bring Chicago Home ballot referendum. Reset digs into who won, who didn’t and which races are still too close to call with WBEZ state politics reporter Dave McKinney. For more on the latest results, go to WBEZ.org. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to Wbez.org/reset.
3/20/202410 minutes, 19 seconds
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How A 1990s Illinois Race Changed The Way We Count Votes Today

Long before there was Bush v. Gore and the “dimpled chad” fiasco in Florida, there were Penny Pullen and Rosemary Mulligan, two suburban Chicago Republicans vying for the same state house seat in a race so close, it was decided at points by a handful of votes, a coin toss and eventually the Illinois Supreme Court. Reset talk with author Patrick Wohl about his new book “Down Ballot: How A Local Campaign Became A National Referendum On Abortion” for more on the significance of that race and why every vote counts. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/20/202420 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Mind-Gut Connection

Microbes are everywhere, including in our stomachs, and they have a big influence on our overall health in a variety of ways. Reset explores the mind-gut connection with UChicago Medicine’s Alyse Bedell. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset
3/19/202416 minutes, 28 seconds
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What’s That Building? Strangers Home Missionary Baptist Church

The latest in our series What’s That Building? takes us to the former Cabrini-Green neighborhood to visit a boarded up church that community members and preservationists are working hard to save. Reset checks in with our architecture sleuth Dennis Rodkin for the story. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/19/202412 minutes, 33 seconds
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Chicago’s Rich History Of Migration

Officials call the 37,000 migrants who have arrived in Chicago since August 2022 an “unprecedented” situation. But a WBEZ analysis showed that earlier waves from Europe, the South and Mexico rivaled the current situation in size and scope. Reset explores the connections between current migration to Chicago and what happened in the past with WBEZ data reporter Amy Qin and UIC history professor Lilia Fernández. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/18/202420 minutes, 19 seconds
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Chicagohenge: A Misnomer (But Also A Golden Opportunity)

Tuesday, March 19, isn’t just Primary Day in Illinois — it’s also the best day to experience the phenomenon known as “Chicagohenge” when the sun aligns perfectly with Chicago’s grid. Reset checks in with Geza Gyuk, director of astronomy at the Adler Planetarium. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/18/20245 minutes, 40 seconds
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WBEZ’s Spring Arts And Culture Guide

Music, theater, dance, art, opera, whatever your artistic bucket list includes this spring, we have something you’ll love. Reset sits down with WBEZ arts and culture senior editor Cassie Walker Burke to get the lowdown on some shows and events you may want to check out. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/18/202412 minutes, 51 seconds
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LA Musician Neyva’s Tunes Are Out Of This World

Southeast LA is a second home for artist and musician Neyva. The first, they say, is Saturn. “That’s my home planet,” Neyva says. Reset checks in with Neyva to hear more of their eclectic, otherworldly music ahead of their March 17 show at the Empty Bottle. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/16/202415 minutes, 1 second
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: March 15, 2024

Migrants face an eviction deadline amid a measles outbreak. The State Capitol is placed in lockdown while lawmakers are in Springfield. The Illinois Supreme Court sides with the Johnson administration, denying an appeal to the “Bring Chicago Home” referendum. Meanwhile, the Chicago Bears say they’re committed to keep Chicago as their home, pledging billions for a new lakefront stadium. Reset goes deeper into those top local stories and more in the Weekly News Recap with Dan Petrella, Chicago Tribune state government reporter Dan Petrella, Chicago bureau chief of the New York Times Julie Bosman and WBEZ city politics reporter Mariah Woelfel. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/15/202444 minutes, 40 seconds
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Cook County Primary Ballots Include Judges. Do You Know Who You’ll Vote For?

Candidates for president, Congress and state senate might be familiar, but have you ever been at a loss when voting for judges? Reset sits down with Injustice Watch managing editor Jonah Newman to learn what you should know about judicial elections in Cook County before filling out your primary ballot. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/15/20249 minutes, 44 seconds
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Get Out Of Your ‘Pasta Sauce Rut’ With The Sporkful’s Dan Pashman

If cacio e pepe can get a makeover with chili crisp, what else is possible? Well, according to Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful Podcast, “Anything’s Pastable.” We check in with Pashman to learn more about his forthcoming cookbook out March 19. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/14/202415 minutes, 1 second
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Combatting Housing Insecurity In Chicago

The City of Chicago shut down construction on a temporary shelter by the Orange Tent Project. You might recognize the group’s bright orange tents across the city. Today on the podcast, we discuss why that shelter was shut down with Chicago Sun-Times reporter Sophie Sherry. We also dig into a WBEZ analysis detailing how nearly half of Chicagoans are paying over 30% of their income on rent and utilities with WBEZ sata projects editor Alden Loury. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/14/202413 minutes, 38 seconds
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An Oral History Of Americans’ Working Lives Today

A tattoo artist. Stay-at-home parents. A funeral director. A school custodian. Mark Larson talks to more than 100 people in a variety of professions for his new book “Working In The 21st Century: An Oral History of American Work in a Time of Social and Economic Transformation.” Reset checks in with the author. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/13/202419 minutes, 15 seconds
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Latest On Chicago Measles Cases, Bears Stadium

Chicago officials have confirmed five measles cases. Plus, the Chicago Bears say they want to stay in the city. Reset learns more about these and other stories from WBEZ city government and politics reporters Tessa Weinberg and Mariah Woelfel. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/13/202411 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Medical Limbo Of ‘Prior Authorization’

Your doctor says you need this treatment. But your insurance company says they don’t agree. Your pharmacist receives your prescription, but won’t fill it until your insurance provider greenlights it. This back-and-forth is called “prior authorization” and it’s how your health insurance company determines what medicines they will or will not cover. It also creates lengthy wait times for patients who need the medicine immediately – if they’re able to get it at all. Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker recently announced he’ll introduce a bill to stop what he called “predatory insurance practices.” Reset learns more about how this impacts patients and health care providers from UChicago Harris School of Public Policy assistant professor Zarek Brot-Goldberg and Reset listener Jackie Covarrubias, who says her father’s chemotherapy medication often gets denied by his insurance. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/12/202416 minutes, 7 seconds
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Chicago Will Enforce 60-Day Shelter Stays For Migrants. Where Will They Go?

City records show that nearly 12,000 people are currently staying in migrant shelters. That’s down from a peak of nearly 15,000 in January, but that number could drop precipitously now that Chicago officials are preparing to enforce a 60-day shelter stay limit. The first wave of migrants is set to be moved out on March 16. Reset learns more about what this means for migrants. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/12/202419 minutes, 40 seconds
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How WBEZ Started As A Remote Learning Tool

WBEZ got its start back in the 1940s. Reset kicks off a new bi-weekly series on Chicago history with a look inward with former WBEZ news director, program director and host Ken Davis. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/11/202414 minutes
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What’s That Building? Robert Franks Memorial

In the latest installment in our series What’s That Building, architecture sleuth Dennis Rodkin shares the story of the Robert Franks Memorial building in Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood. Robert “Bobby” Franks was 14 years old back in 1924 when fellow teens Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb killed him and left his body outside of Chicago. The premeditated murder became known as the “crime of the century.” Afterward, Franks’ father put money toward a boys’ club that he thought would have made his son proud. Amazingly, the building still serves boys today with a variety of enrichment programs. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/11/20249 minutes, 10 seconds
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Twin Peaks Frontman Lake J Out With New Solo Project ‘Dizzy’

Cadien Lake James, aka lake j, is the latest member of the Chicago indie band Twin Peaks to release a solo album. It’s called Dizzy. Reset checks in with him about his creative process and his new music. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/9/202414 minutes, 7 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: March 8, 2024

Illinois lawmakers return to Springfield. Former state Senator Terry Link is sentenced to probation for tax evasion. Plus, votes will count for the “Bring Chicago Home” referendum, and former president Donald Trump remains on the primary ballot. Reset goes behind those headlines and more with WTTW political correspondent Amanda Vinicky, WBEZ city government and politics reporter Tessa Weinberg and Crain’s Chicago Business government and politics reporter Leigh Giangreco. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/9/202444 minutes, 28 seconds
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How To Eat With The Seasons In The Midwest

Where can Midwesterners start if they want to eat seasonally? Getting a garden going can take a lot of planning, but each month on the podcast, we’ll drop a little inspiration to help you foster your green thumb and learn to eat with the seasons whether you’re gardening or just shopping for groceries. Reset check in with chef and cultural historian Jordan Wimby. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/8/202413 minutes, 22 seconds
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March Recs From WBEZ’s New Theater Reporter

What made Mike Davis fly all the way from Washington state to cover Chicago’s theater scene? Reset learns more about Davis and hears his recommendations for upcoming shows, including “Port of Entry” from the Albany Park Theater Project. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/7/20249 minutes, 36 seconds
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llinois Lawmakers Want To Protect State Wetlands

A 2023 Supreme Court ruling removed decades-old protections for wetlands. Now, Illinois lawmakers are fighting back. Illinois lawmakers are hoping to pass protections for the state’s wetlands this spring. Reset checks in with Juanpablo Ramirez-Franco, environment reporter for WBEZ and Grist. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/7/20244 minutes, 51 seconds
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Mark Your Calendars, Plan Your Skygazing Picnic: A Solar Eclipse is Coming

Four and a half minutes. That’s how long it will take for the moon to pass between the earth and the sun. Chicagoans won’t have to travel to catch a glimpse of the partial eclipse, but southern Illinois will experience “totality” for the second time in a decade. Reset learns more about how you can safely view this celestial phenomenon from: Geza Gyuk, director of astronomy at the Adler Planetarium; Ashley Walker, a third-year astronomy PhD student at Howard University and founder of Black in Astro; and Tom Auchter, a member Northwest Suburban Astronomers.
3/7/202414 minutes, 59 seconds
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One Of The Largest Feminist Bookstores In The Nation Thrives In Chicago

Chicago saw a wave of feminist bookstores opening in the 1970s, but how many are still open today? Women and Children First in Andersonville has stood the test of time for 45 years and find their work more relevant today than ever. Reset checks in with Linda Bubon, one of the store’s co-founders, and its current co-owners, Sarah Hollenbeck and Lynn Mooney, on the throughline to the bookstore’s success.
3/6/202417 minutes, 50 seconds
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‘Bring Chicago Home’ Appeal, Voter Turnout: The Latest On Your Local Ballot

The Chicago Board of Elections is appealing last week’s decision by a Cook County judge rendering the “Bring Chicago Home” measure invalid. Real estate industry groups against the measure say it violates state law by combining both a tax hike and a tax cut in the same question. Reset catches up on the latest with WBEZ city politics reporters Mariah Woelfel and Tessa Weinberg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/6/20248 minutes, 39 seconds
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One Chicago Family’s Fight Against An Ultra Rare Disease

When you hear about “rare” diseases, it can be easy to think we’re talking about a one-in-a-million case. But actually, the “rare” is far more common than you think. About 1 in 10 Americans suffer from a rare disease. But because there are so many different kinds, getting diagnosed or even treated can be a nightmare of doctor appointments, long wait times on phone calls, and jumping through hoops. That was the case for young Charlie Sims. At just four years old, his parents noticed their son was exhibiting behavioral changes that compelled them to consult a doctor. Now seven years old, Charlie is the first and only person to receive therapy for his rare disease. Reset sits down with his parents, Matt and Leigh Sims, and RUSH pediatric neurologist Dr. Elizabeth Berry-Kravis to find out more about his story, and the importance of advocating for yourself and your family when seeking medical care. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/5/202418 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Pros And Cons Of Digital IDs

Illinois is considering a bill that would allow residents to carry a digital version of their driver’s license or state ID, but privacy experts have some concerns. Reset learns more about the legislation from co-sponsor State Rep. Kam Buckner and Matthew Kugler, privacy expert and Northwestern University professor of law. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/5/202415 minutes, 15 seconds
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How Chicago Teens Are Fighting Gun Violence

Project Unloaded aims to shift the narrative around gun ownership and how the presence of a gun can change how a story ends. Reset checks in with the group’s founder Nina Vinik, program manager Olivia Brown and member of its Youth Council, Edgar Vilchez. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/4/202416 minutes, 26 seconds
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Chicago Now Home To Seven State-Designated Cultural Districts

Gov. JB Pritzker announced seven areas across Chicago as official cultural districts. This distinction will allow organizations located in those districts to apply for state funds to back efforts to preserve those communities. Reset hears from the leaders in two Chicago cultural districts and learns how state funding could support preservation efforts in Humboldt Park and Chinatown. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/4/202413 minutes, 51 seconds
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UK DJ Barry Can’t Swim Visits Chicago

Chicago has a vibrant electronic dance and house music scene. And one of the UK’s rising DJs, Barry Can’t Swim, made a stop in town during his When Will We Land? tour. Reset sat down with the artist ahead of his Chicago show to learn more about the album and his musical journey. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/2/202417 minutes, 30 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: March 1, 2024

Chicago sports teams are in a race for revenue for new stadium projects. CTA President Dorval Carter answers tough questions from alders and riders. Confusion remains over the Bring Chicago Home ballot referendum. Reset breaks down those stories and much more with a WTTW News correspondent Nick Blumberg, Chicago Sun-Times reporter Mitchell Armentrout and NBC-5 Chicago reporter Christian Farr. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/1/202441 minutes, 41 seconds
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The White Sox, Bears, Red Stars All Want New Stadiums. But Should You Foot The Bill?

Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf, who also owns the Chicago Bulls, recently traveled to Springfield to ask the state for public funding to back plans to move the team from 35th Street to the South Loop. Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker has expressed his reluctance to fund the move whereas Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson has been more open to the idea. But as taxpayers, how is this investment going to benefit us? Reset sits down with public finance expert Justin Marlow of UChicago’s Harris School of Public Policy to talk about why and how our tax money goes toward funding sports stadiums. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
3/1/202411 minutes, 3 seconds
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Trump Appeals Illinois Ruling To Kick Him Off The Ballot

Former president Donald Trump’s legal team on Thursday appealed an Illinois judge’s order to kick him off the state’s primary ballot. Cook County Judge Tracy Porter issued the ruling on Wednesday, though she put an immediate stay on her own order until Friday in anticipation of Trump’s appeal. The ruling comes as the nation’s highest court is set to rule on a similar effort to remove Trump from the ballot in Colorado. Reset digs into what to know — and what comes next — with WBEZ state politics reporter Dave McKinney. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/29/202411 minutes, 24 seconds
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Illinois Considers Ranked Choice Voting. Here’s How It Would Work.

An Illinois task force is studying whether the state should adopt ranked choice voting or another system for the 2028 presidential primary. The state’s current system, plurality voting (also known as winner-take-all) is common around the country, but some critics say its too limiting. Reset hears from WBEZ statehouse reporter Mawa Iqbal on what’s ahead for ranked choice voting in Illinois. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset
2/29/20245 minutes, 15 seconds
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What The Fight To Block A Giant Supermarket Merger Could Mean For Your Next Grocery Trip

The Federal Trade Commission – along with eight states, including Illinois, and the District of Columbia – are suing to block the biggest supermarket merger in history. The parent companies of Mariano’s and Jewel-Osco are looking to join forces but the FTC argues that the merger could eliminate competition and even mean higher prices for millions of customers. Additionally, there are concerns that the merger would affect worker’s ability to seek higher wages and better benefits. Reset hears from NPR business correspondent Alina Selyukh and Eater Chicago editor Ashok Selvam about how this lawsuit might affect the grocery shopping experience for Illinois shoppers. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/28/202416 minutes, 16 seconds
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Common Misconceptions About Disordered Eating

Eating disorders impact nearly one in 10 people in the U.S., and these behavioral conditions can have serious health consequences. Reset sits down with Jennifer Wildes, UChicago Med associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience, and Kate Merkle, registered dietitian and psychotherapist and founder of Nourishment Works, to learn more about recognizing signs and symptoms of eating disorders. Plus, we check in with Debbie Heywood, a Nourishment Works patient, to learn about her recovery experience. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/28/202432 minutes, 35 seconds
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How Worried To Be About 75 Degrees In February

Temperatures in the 70s in February? Late winter feels like late spring in Chicago this week. Reset talks with Max Grover, atmospheric data scientist at the Argonne National Laboratory, to learn more about this mild winter weather and climate change. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/27/20247 minutes, 55 seconds
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Black People In Evanston Reparations Program Tell Their Stories

In 2019, Evanston became the first U.S. city to create a reparations program to address historical inequalities between Black and white residents. Today on the podcast, we talk about a project where students are recording the stories of some of those recipients. Reset hears from Laurice Bell, executive director of Shorefront Legacy Center, Elizabeth Cox, Evanston resident and recipient of reparations, and Maasai Gentle, a senior at Evanston Township High School. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/27/202418 minutes, 12 seconds
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Judge Nixes Mayor Johnson’s ‘Bring Chicago Home’ Ballot Referendum

A Cook County judge ruled Friday that Mayor Brandon Johnson’s plan to alter the real estate transfer tax to raise up to $100 million a year to fight homelessness is invalid. Reset checks in with WBEZ city government and politics reporter Tessa Weinberg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/26/202411 minutes, 29 seconds
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Chicago Theaters Get A $670,000 Boost. What Impact Will It Have?

The Bayless Family Foundation is giving grants to Definition Theatre, TimeLine Theatre Company, the Chicago Children’s Theatre and the Remy Bumppo Theatre Company. The funding will go toward theater programming and operations. Reset sits down with TimeLine Theatre artistic director PJ Powers and Chicago Children’s Theatre co-founder and artistic director Jacqueline Russell. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/26/202414 minutes, 36 seconds
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Teen Punk Band Uniflora Plays One Of Chicago’s Top Rock Venues

Chicago’s punk scene is fresher — and younger — than ever. Case in point: The teen band Uniflora just played Metro’s iconic stage. The high school sophomores discuss their new single “Hellgirl,” the new age of Chicago DIY music and how their parents shaped their musical sensibilities. Reset checks in with drummer Ruby O’Brien, bassist Theo Williams and guitarist and vocalist Quinn Dugan. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/24/202416 minutes, 6 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Feb. 23, 2024

Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker delivers his budget address. Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson unveils a major economic development plan. Chicago closes four migrant shelters. Early voting resumes after a temporary pause. Reset goes behind the headlines of those stories and much more with WBEZ state politics reporter Dave McKinney, Crain’s Chicago Business government and politics reporter Justin Laurence and Brandis Friedman, co-anchor of WTTW’s “Chicago Tonight” and host of “Chicago Tonight: Black Voices.” For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/23/202445 minutes, 1 second
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Second City Is ‘Black By Popular Demand’ For A Second Year

The sketch comedy and improv show “Black By Popular Demand” examines the Black experience in America, and no topic is off limits. The seriously funny performance is playing at The Second City in Chicago Fridays and Saturdays through March 25. Reset checks in with the show’s director Rob Wilson. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset. To sign up for our daily newsletter, go to wbez.org/resetnews.
2/23/202415 minutes, 36 seconds
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Gov. Pritzker Zeroes In On Predatory Healthcare Practices

In his annual budget address Wednesday, Illinois Governor JB Pritzker announced sweeping medical reforms to root out predatory healthcare practices, erase $4 billion in medical debt and invest in Black maternal health by opening birth centers. Reset gets the scoop from WBEZ public health and politics reporter Kristen Schorsch. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset. To sign up for our daily newsletter, go to wbez.org/resetnews.
2/22/202413 minutes, 58 seconds
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How To Be A ‘Supercommunicator’ With Charles Duhigg

The author of ‘The Power of Habit’ is out with a new book on the neuroscience and psychology of how we communicate with one another. It’s called Supercommunicators: How To Unlock The Secret Language Of Connection. Reset checks in with award-winning journalist and writer Charles Duhigg. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to WBEZ.org/reset.
2/22/202433 minutes, 55 seconds
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Analysis: What Gov. Pritkzer’s Budget Address Tells Us About The Future In Illinois

Governor Pritzker delivered his annual budget address Wednesday. WBEZ state politics reporter Dave McKinney breaks down what you need to know about the state’s finances and future outlook. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to WBEZ.org/reset.
2/21/202412 minutes, 17 seconds
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Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker’s FULL Budget Address

Governor Pritzker delivered his annual budget address Wednesday. Reset is providing his full speech for listeners of the podcast. You can also find an episode in our feed where WBEZ’s Dave McKinney provides context and analysis about the governor’s assessment of the state of Illinois’ finances and what lies ahead for Illinoisans. For a full archive of Reset interviews, head over to WBEZ.org/reset.
2/21/202451 minutes, 43 seconds
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After 14 Terms In Congress, Could Someone Unseat Rep. Danny Davis?

Rep. Danny Davis, a Democrat, has been representing parts of downtown Chicago and the West Side since 1997, but he faces a number of challengers in the March 19 primary election. Meanwhile, in the 4th Congressional district, Democrat Jesus “Chuy” Garcia also has a notable challenger who wants to take his seat. So, what factors could contribute to who wins in those races? And what do the races tell us about the way the political winds are blowing in the Democratic Party? Reset checks in with WBEZ city government and politics reporters Mariah Woelfel and Tessa Weinberg. For another dose of Reset — beyond the podcast — sign up for our daily newsletter at wbez.org/resetnews.
2/21/202410 minutes, 50 seconds
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Actor Billy Dee Williams On Playing Lando Calrissian

Billy Dee Williams got his start as an actor on Broadway when he was seven years old and later made sci-fi history as ‘Star Wars’ con man turned good guy Lando Calrissian. Reset chats with Williams about his new memoir ‘What Have We Here: Portraits Of A Life’ ahead of a WBEZ event on Thursday, Feb. 22. For a full archive of Reset conversations, head over to wbez.org/reset.
2/20/202415 minutes, 49 seconds
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Chicago’s Buoyant Ventures Invests Millions Into Climate Tech Startups

Imagine making a mid-career pivot and going on to raise $76 million to support climate-technology startups. That’s what Amy Francetic did when she helped found the women-led Chicago venture fund Buoyant Ventures. Reset meets Francetic and learns about how Buoyant is working to fight climate change by investing in young companies with big ideas. We’re also joined by Karen Weigert, Reset Sustainability contributor and director of Loyola University Chicago’s Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility.
2/20/202419 minutes, 13 seconds
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Award-Winning Food Writer And His Father Out With ‘A Very Chinese Cookbook’

Chicagoan Kevin Pang is a James-Beard award winning food writer. He and his dad have a cooking channel called the Hunger Pangs, where they cook traditional Cantonese recipes and Chinese-American classics, which they adapted into the New York Times 2023 Best Cookbooks List. A Very Chinese Cookbook. Reset hears from Kevin on the significance of Lunar New Year foods and the power of cooking with family to preserve memory.
2/20/202418 minutes, 46 seconds
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Time To Hit The Polls Early! Here’s What You Need To Know.

Whether you’re a long time resident or new to the area, we have the latest on what you need to know to vote early in Illinois’ Primary election. Reset hears from Max Bever, Director of Public Information at the Chicago Board of Elections, on how to make the best out of your early voting experience.
2/19/202410 minutes, 37 seconds
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Chat With Chicago Folk Singer Naomi Ashley On Catching The ‘Love Bug’

Chicago folk singer Naomi Ashley’s new album Love Bug explores the different stages of love, from infatuation to obsession to heartbreak and beyond. Reset sits down with the artist for more on what it takes to turn heartbreak into a love song.
2/17/202418 minutes, 54 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: February 16, 2024

Residents on the South and West sides claim their 911 calls were ignored, as data shows the rapid response teams made traffic stops instead. Parts of Lurie Children’s Hospital’s system have been restored after a cyberattack forced it to shut down. And a Yelp list ranks a Chicago restaurant’s pizza as number one in the country. Reset hears more about those stories and more with Chicago Tribune state government reporter Dan Petrella, WBEZ criminal justice reporter Patrick Smith, and WBEZ city government and politics reporter Mariah Woelfel.
2/16/202444 minutes, 51 seconds
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Illinois Looking To Follow Chicago In Eliminating Subminimum Wage For Tipped Workers

Chicago became the largest U.S. city to outlaw a lower minimum wage for tipped workers last year. Now, Democratic lawmakers in Springfield have introduced legislation that would get rid of the lower minimum wage for the state’s tipped workers, something advocates for higher pay call the “subminimum wage.” Reset hears two perspectives on the proposed legislation: Audra Wilson, president and CEO of the Shriver Center on Poverty Law, and Mario Ponce, owner of Takito Brands restaurants.
2/16/202419 minutes, 44 seconds
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National Public Housing Museum Exhibit Humanizes Housing Crisis

More than half of U.S. tenants can’t afford their rent. Here in Chicago, thousands — tens of thousands by one measure — are experiencing homelessness. To complicate matters, the city continues to struggle to find shelter for the more than 35,000 migrants who have arrived in Chicago since August 2022. Reset goes behind the scenes of Evicted, a new exhibition at the National Public Housing Museum in Chicago with its Executive Director, Lisa Yun Lee, to shine a light on national housing policies and tenants’ rights.
2/15/202416 minutes, 29 seconds
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Mayor Brandon Johnson Ending Shot Spotter Contract In September

Chicago is severing ties with Shot Spotter – rebranded just last year as Sound Thinking – at the end of the summer. Supporters of the gunshot detection technology say this will slow response times to gunshot victims, but studies by the city and county officials find the tech system rarely produces documented evidence of a gun crime. Reset learns more from WBEZ criminal justice reporter Chip Mitchell.
2/15/202412 minutes, 49 seconds
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The Art of Asking Good Questions (That Could Lead To Love!)

There’s no perfect formula to love, but a set of good questions can get you far. Reset chats with dating coach and founder of Smart Dating Academy Bela Gandhi on her best advice for deepening relationships.
2/14/202420 minutes, 47 seconds
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Bring Chicago Home Is On The Ballot

Bring Chicago Home is an initiative to create a dedicated funding stream in the city budget to support the city’s unhoused population. Reset chats with WBEZ’s city government and politics reporter Mariah Woelfel about how that referendum could impact not just the unhoused, but also renters and the real estate market.
2/14/202412 minutes, 52 seconds
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Victor Migrated From Venezuela. He’s Grown To Love Chicago

Since August 2022, over 35,000 people have come to Chicago from the southern border, most sent here by plane or bus. Reset hears from a father of two about his journey to Chicago and when he hopes to be reunited with his family.
2/13/202412 minutes, 59 seconds
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It’s Never Too Late To Learn To Be A FireFighter!

Firefighters are an important part of keeping a community safe. Not only do they literally put out fires, they also help clean up hazardous materials and in some cases, make sure our buildings are up to code. And Skokie Citizens Fire Academy teaches interested residents about all that goes into the job, plus some firefighting skills. Reset learns more about the program from Inspector Timothy Taylor and hears from its oldest graduate, Mort Feldberg.
2/13/202413 minutes, 4 seconds
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One Migrant Traveled From Caracas, Venezuela To Chicago. This Is His Story.

Chicago officials have spent nearly 160 million dollars on the migrant crisis, from shelter and clothing, to food and funding for other services for the 13 thousand migrants in the city today. Reset hears from one migrant who may be subject to the city’s eviction notice for migrants staying in city run shelters on his journey of getting to Chicago and his hopes for the future.
2/12/202417 minutes
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Chicago Jazz Philharmonic’s Latest Show Honors Women Ahead Of Their Time

Lil Hardin Armstrong, Mary Lou Williams and Nina Simone are notable singers of their time, but trumpeter, composer and director of the Chicago Jazz Philharmonic, Orbert Davis, wanted to highlight their songwriting skills. In a new composition for the Philharmonic, Davis confronts the gender inequalities in jazz. Reset learns more about why Davis wanted to highlight each of the singer-songwriters with his new composition debuting this weekend.
2/12/202413 minutes, 5 seconds
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Local Improv Jazz Saxophonist Mai Sugimoto Celebrates Human Connection In New Album

During the pandemic, saxophonist Mai Sugimoto, bassist Joshua Abrams and drummer Isaiah Spencer came together to perform and honor the life and legacy of Chicago saxophonist Fred Anderson. From that moment on, Sugimoto recognized the magic and chemistry of the trio leading to the creation of her latest album “Sunlight Filtering Through Leaves". Reset sits down with the Japanese-born, Chicago-based improvised jazz artist to learn about her journey in music.
2/10/202420 minutes, 21 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap, Feb. 9, 2024: Lurie Cyberattack, IL Races To Watch And More

A judge rules that an Illinois challenge to former President Donald Trump appearing on the ballot won’t be delayed. Meanwhile, Springfield takes up the so-called “subminimum wage” for tipped workers and Chicago’s elected school board. Reset goes behind those headlines and more in the Weekly News Recap, this week with Simone Alicea, executive producer of City Cast Chicago, Alex Nitkin, reporter with the Illinois Answers Project for the Better Government Association, and Amanda Vinicky, WTTW political correspondent.
2/9/202444 minutes, 40 seconds
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Take A Deep Breath. Your Air Could Soon Be Cleaner.

The Environmental Protection Agency is strengthening air quality standards on industries like factories, power plants, and vehicles that emit soot. Those fine particulate particles have been found to collect in people's lungs, cause respiratory problems, and have even been linked to cancer. Reset learns more about this change from Chicago Tribune reporter Michael Hawthorne, and how the change could improve our health from Brian Urbaszewski, Director of Environmental Health Programs at the Respiratory Health Association.
2/9/202420 minutes, 30 seconds
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City Council Requires CPD To Explain Inconsistent 911 Response Times

Chicago Police have been found to have varied response times to emergency calls across the city, and now the City Council is requiring the department to conduct a workforce study to identify why. The city’s governing body also discussed a recent resolution calling for a ceasefire in Gaza, as well as solutions to the migrant crisis. Reset learns the latest from WBEZ’s city government and politics reporter Mariah Woelfel.
2/8/202410 minutes, 33 seconds
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How The Kennedy Expressway Cemented Segregation In Chicago

Chicago’s expressways can be traced back to the 1908 Plan of Chicago that envisioned a road system of roads that connected the city center to distant neighborhoods. But in the process of constructing them, thousands of residents were displaced – more than half of whom were Black, despite being only 23% of the city’s total population. And the result was the entrenchment of segregation in Chicago. For a walk through this history, Reset turns to two reporters: Richard Cahan, journalist, author Lost In America: Photographing the Last Days of our Architectural Treasures, and Susy Shultz, freelance editor and journalist, looking into this legacy.
2/8/202420 minutes, 54 seconds
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Increased Calls For Violence Prevention Work For Chicago Teens

It’s a tragic story that’s all too common in the city: gun violence ending young lives too soon. But a new public-private effort headed up by gun violence prevention nonprofit Chicago CRED aims to reduce shootings by 50% in the next five years. Reset speaks to Arne Duncan, former U.S. Secretary of Education and Founder of Chicago CRED, on how he plans to improve safety among Chicago teens.
2/7/202418 minutes, 25 seconds
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Chicago’s Household Income And Education Levels Are Rising

The Census Bureau's latest 5-year dataset was released in December, and WBEZ just crunched the numbers for Cook County tracts. But the gap between Cook County’s highest and lowest earning areas is among the highest in the nation. Reset learns more about what’s driving that change and which neighborhoods are being left behind from WBEZ’s Data Projects Editor Alden Loury.
2/7/202413 minutes, 51 seconds
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Here’s Why You Should Consider Running For Your Local School Council

As Chicago begins its transition to an elected school board in the fall, Local School Councils (LCSs) could become the place for candidates to prove themselves. LSCs are a unique and powerful feature of Chicago’s public school system, and the deadline to run for a seat is Feb. 8. Reset talks to Crystal Paul, a freelance journalist, and Karonda Locust and JP Paulus, LSC members, about the upcoming elections in spring.
2/6/202418 minutes, 37 seconds
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WBEZ’s Guide For Voting In The Illinois’ Primary

Illinois’ primary election is March 19th, but early voting starts as early as next week. Do you know where you’re voting? Or how to vote by mail? Whether you’re a long-time resident or new to the area, WBEZ’s primary guide’s got you covered. Reset learns more from WBEZ government and politics editor Tony Arnold.
2/5/202411 minutes, 52 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: February 2, 2024

City Council approves Gaza ceasefire resolution and Chicago becomes the largest city in the U.S. do so. Mayor Brandon Johnson gives migrants more time in shelters. And Chicago Tribune reporters go on strike for the first time in the paper's nearly 180-year history. Reset hears more about those stories and more with Chicago Tribune investigative reporter Ray Long, AXIOS Chicago reporter Monica Eng and WBEZ city government and politics reporter Mariah Woelfel.
2/2/202445 minutes, 22 seconds
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Can Chicago Handle Going Electric?

With recent pushes by Chicago’s city council to go electric and move away from natural gas in new buildings, it makes us wonder, “Could our power grid even handle that?” Reset discusses this question and more with Reset’s sustainability contributor and director of Loyola University Chicago’s Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility Karen Weigert.
2/2/202415 minutes, 10 seconds
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Chicago City Council Votes To Pass Ceasefire Resolution

Chicago becomes the largest city in the U.S. to call for a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas. With a narrow vote of 23 against and 23 in favor, Mayor Brandon Johnson cast a tie-breaking vote to pass the resolution. Reset checks in with WBEZ city government and politics reporter Mariah Woelfel to understand how the city’s ceasefire resolution fits into the larger picture.
2/1/202412 minutes, 15 seconds
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Funding For Expanded Pre-K Will Run Out

Thousands of parents rely on free preschool options which Chicago Public Schools has been able to expand thanks in part to COVID relief funding. But that money is set to run out in the next school year. So what will this mean for parents and the kids enrolled in these programs? Reset finds out from Reema Amin, reporter at Chalkbeat Chicago.
2/1/202413 minutes, 58 seconds
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Trump Will Stay On The Illinois March Primary Ballot

After a unanimous vote, the Illinois State Board of Elections decides to keep former president Donald Trump on the primary ballot. The Board decided the suit is out of their authority and jurisdiction. Reset checks in with WBEZ statehouse reporter Mawa Iqbal to get the latest update.
1/31/20249 minutes, 6 seconds
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Shelter Deadline Pushed Back Again, Saving 1,900 Migrants From February Eviction

The 1,900 migrants who were set to be evicted from shelters Thursday will now be able to stay until at least mid-March. Reset learns the latest on the 60-day shelter limit, City Council’s upcoming vote on a Gaza cease-fire resolution and how polling staff shortages will impact the Illinois primary election from Tessa Weinberg, WBEZ city government and politics reporter.
1/31/202412 minutes, 4 seconds
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‘Be A Revolution’: Author Ijeoma Oluo Inspires Everyday People To Take Action

As we continue to better understand systems of oppression in America, the question is: What can we do about them? That’s what writer Ijeoma Oluo tackles in Be A Revolution: How Everyday People Are Fighting Oppression and Changing the World — And How You Can, Too. Oluo documents her years spent shadowing movement workers across the country in areas including gender justice, disability justice, systemic racism and education. Reset sits down with Oluo to learn more about her call to action and how people can bring positive change to their own communities.
1/30/202444 minutes, 50 seconds
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Legendary Meteorologist Tom Skilling On Chasing Tornadoes, Predicting Weather And Retirement

Since he was just 14 years old, meteorologist Tom Skilling has predicted the weather, and helped Illinoisians understand the science behind it. He’s guided residents through rain and shine, floods and droughts, blizzards and heat waves. He’s chased tornadoes — and been chased by them. Reset talked to the longtime meteorologist about his legendary career ahead of his retirement.
1/30/202422 minutes, 53 seconds
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Common’s Top Advice? ‘Whatever You Feel Is Feeding You, Just Do That’

The Chicago rapper, activist and actor Common spills on the importance of staying grounded, setting boundaries and taking time for self. That’s advice from his new book “And Then We Rise: A Guide to Loving and Taking Care of Self.”
1/29/202427 minutes, 23 seconds
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Meet The New Leader Of Chicago’s National Museum Of Mexican Art

In 1987, Carlos Tortolero opened the National Museum of Mexican Art’s doors in Pilsen with the guiding principles that it should be free and accessible. Now, as the longtime leader takes a step back, the organization welcomes José Ochoa as its new leader. Reset learns more about José Ochoa’s plans for the museum.
1/29/202415 minutes, 30 seconds
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Pitchfork GQ? What The Merger Means For Music Criticism

Chicago shaped the early years of Pitchfork, a music review site that laid off half its staff last week. We caught up with the original Pitchfork crew: Ryan Schreiber, founder of Pitchfork, Chris Kaskie, co-founder of Pitchfork Music Festival and former co-owner of Pitchfork, and Amy Phillips, ex-executive editor of Pitchfork to hear the history of the pillar of music journalism. And talked about the future of music criticism with Alejandro Hernandez, freelance music journalist and Britt Julious, music critic for the Chicago Tribune.
1/27/202431 minutes, 57 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap, Jan 26, 2024

Mayor Johnson wants Chicago to say goodbye to gas. Pritzker joins Democratic governors in asking the federal government for help with addressing the needs of migrants. A Chicago police officer is sentenced for participating in the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol. Nearly a third of alders ask Mayor Johnson to scrap the 60-day shelter limit policy for migrants, while City Council debates cracking down on dollar stores. Reset goes behind the headlines of those stories and much more in our Weekly News Recap with Leigh Giangreco, government and politics reporter, Crain’s Chicago Business, Brandon Pope, reporter/anchor at CW 26 and Madison Savedra, Block Club Chicago reporter covering Pilsen, Little Village and Back of the Yards.
1/26/202444 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Future Of Rogers Park’s Roman Susan Up In The Air

Art space and gallery Roman Susan in Rogers Park has a new landlord. Loyola University purchased the building it occupies along with other businesses and residential tenants. As Roman Susan’s lease comes to an end next year, the future of the community art space is uncertain. To learn more about it and its impact in Rogers Park, Reset spoke with Roman Susan executive director Kristin Abhalter Smith and managing director Nathan Abhalter Smith. Check out the rest of our interviews and conversations at wbez.org/reset.
1/26/202418 minutes, 1 second
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More Seniors Saying No To Nursing Homes, Choosing ‘Aging In Place’

As the U.S. population ages, many Americans are thinking about what they want their golden years to look like. And more and more are saying “no” to nursing homes and “yes” to staying put. Aging in place is the practice of seniors staying in their homes with care from friends, family, and/or paid staff, rather than living in a retirement facility. It’s been gaining popularity as a way for seniors to maintain independence. Reset learns more about how to effectively, and safely, age in place with Mary Mitchell, columnist at the Chicago Sun-Times, and Margaret Laraviere, executive director of the Area Agency on Aging. Check out the rest of our interviews and conversations at wbez.org/reset.
1/25/202423 minutes, 11 seconds
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More Young and Middle-Aged Adults are Getting Diagnosed with Cancer

A new American Cancer Society report shows more adults under the age of 50 are being diagnosed with certain cancers. Some researchers point to changes in lifestyle, environment, ultra-processed foods, or something more unidentifiable. Reset learns more about this study and cancer outcomes from Dr. Adam DuVall, assistant professor of medicine at UChicago Medicine, and Dr. Christina Annunziata, senior vice president of extramural discovery science at the American Cancer Society.
1/25/202424 minutes, 4 seconds
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Illinois Eyes Ban On Red Dye No. 3, Other Harmful Additives

Illinois lawmakers are looking to ban five ingredients listed to be banned in a proposed bill in Springfield have been connected to cancer, behavioral problems in children, and overall to poor health outcomes. Reset hears more about the legislation under consideration in the state Senate from Stephanie Zimmermann, consumer investigations reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times. We also learn about the long term health impact of these additives in our foods from Rochelle Trotter, entrepreneur, health coach, and founder & CEO of R’Culinare.
1/24/202418 minutes
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What Chicago Can Learn From New York’s Migrant Response

As Chicago delayed its 60-day shelter-stay limit due to weather, New York has been enforcing its limit on single adults for months — and in January, started removing families. But advocates in New York City warn of chaos and inhumane conditions as the city has cast migrants on to the street. Reset compares the two city’s responses to the migrant crisis with Michael Loria, a reporter with the Chicago Sun-Times, and Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio with the New York-based outlet, Documented.
1/24/202418 minutes, 6 seconds
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Advocates Push For A Gas-Free Chicago

An ordinance to be introduced Wednesday in Chicago’s City Council would raise emissions standards and require new buildings to go electric. That means stoves, water heaters and furnaces that run on gas would no longer be part of the architecture of most new buildings in Chicago if a new proposal passes in City Council. Reset talks with advocates for the legislation, Sarah Moskowitz of the Citizens Utility Board and 49th Ward Alderwoman Maria Hadden about the benefits of such a move, as well as the concerns that groups like Peoples Gas and the American Gas Association have about the proposed changes.
1/23/202418 minutes, 7 seconds
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Amid Bus Driver Shortage, CPS Might Get Creative

Under a major bus driver shortage, Chicago Public Schools isn’t providing busing to general education students for the rest of the school year. The district is in early talks with a ride-share service that provides students transportation in other districts across the nation, like Denver Public Schools in Colorado. Reset talks with Jewél Jackson, investigative education reporter for the Illinois Answers Project, and Ismael El-Amin, a parent of two Chicago Public Schools students, on the best way to bridge the gap.
1/23/202420 minutes, 24 seconds
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One Pastor’s Perspective On Extension Of Migrant Shelter Deadline

Officials have touted the Unity Initiative, a donation-funded partnership between the city of Chicago and its faith community, as one reason the city is no longer relying on police stations as shelter. Reset checks back in with Jonathan de la O, pastor of Starting Point Community Church in Belmont Cragin, about participating in that program and what migrants need ahead of an impending stay limit being imposed at city-run shelters.
1/22/202414 minutes, 28 seconds
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Johnson Administrations’s ‘Do-Not-Hire’ List Under Scrutiny

Four former employees in the mayor’s office say they were improperly placed on City Hall’s do-not-hire list. Reset talks with Leigh Giangreco, government and politics reporter for Crain’s Chicago Business and David Greising, president, Better Government Association about those stories and how the city’s do-not-hire list is supposed to work.
1/22/202413 minutes, 31 seconds
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Reflecting on Arnold Randall’s Accomplishments Leading Cook County’s Forest Preserves

From overseeing the forest preserves’ centennial celebration to making a strategic conservation plan for the next century, Arnold Randall left an indelible mark during his 13 years as the general superintendent of Cook County’s forest preserves. Ahead of his departure from the district, Reset reflects with Randall on his legacy and conservation in Cook County over the past decade.
1/20/202416 minutes, 58 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Jan. 19, 2024

Continued freezing temperatures add another challenge to housing migrants. Car insurance rates are on the rise. And Illinois releases new assault weapons registration rules after only a fraction of eligible gun owners registered their weapons with the state. Reset breaks down these stories and more with Ravi Baichwal anchor at ABC 7 News, Stephanie Zimmermann, consumer investigations reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times and Paris Schutz, reporter and anchor, WTTW.
1/19/202444 minutes, 19 seconds
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After New Law, Field Museum Covers Some Native American Displays

Museums like the Field are now federally required to get “free, prior and informed consent” from tribes or descendants before allowing display of cultural items or ancestral remains. The Field already does not display those remains, but it does hold one of the largest collections in the nation. Reset hears from Debra Yepa-Pappan, artist and former community engagement coordinator for the Native American exhibition renovation at the Field Museum, about the museum’s repatriation procedures and the changes following these rules.
1/19/202414 minutes, 27 seconds
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Chicago-Area Company Launches ‘Jaws’-Themed Pinball Machine

Stern Pinball, based in suburban Elk Grove Village, created a new machine styled after Steven Spielberg’s classic summer blockbuster Jaws. Reset gets the scoop from Zach Sharpe of Stern Pinball and horror fan Moses Gibson of The Horror House Shop.
1/18/202415 minutes, 19 seconds
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Chicago Has A Plan To Improve CTA Buses, But Some Advocates Want More

The Chicago Transit Authority and Chicago Department of Transportation released a plan in November that aims to create a more reliable bus service in the city. Reset learns more on what the plan includes from Jennifer Henry, CTA’s director of strategic planning. We then heard from public transit advocates Kyle Lucas of Better Streets Chicago and Julia Gerasimenko of Active Transportation Alliance about what improvements they’d like to see to the CTA bus system.
1/18/202427 minutes, 51 seconds
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Expanding The Child Tax Credit Could Help Families. Here’s How.

A bipartisan deal reached in the U.S. Senate could expand the child tax credit for lower income families, many of whom do not currently earn enough to qualify. Lawmakers are trying to pass the bill before the current filing deadline of Jan. 29, but it’s unclear if it can pass in the House. Additionally, there’s a bill in the Illinois House to create a permanent child tax credit. Reset learns about the proposed expansions from Deirdre Walsh, NPR Congressional correspondent and how this could benefit lower income families in Illinois from Audra Wilson, president and CEO, Shriver Center on Poverty Law and Mykela Collins, parent ambassador, Ada S. McKinley Community Services.
1/17/202420 minutes, 28 seconds
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We Are Ditching Diet Culture In 2024

Around this time of the year, people are starting to work toward their New Year's resolutions. For many, their goals are to lose weight, work out more or eat healthier. But how can we embrace a more positive and less anxious relationship with our bodies, food and movement? Reset discusses with a panel of health and nutrition experts: Bethany Doerfler, a research specialist and clinical dietitian for Northwestern Medicine Digestive Health Center; Dana Buccheri, the owner and trainer of StrongWithDana; and Àngel Casas, a non-diet personal trainer.
1/17/202431 minutes, 59 seconds
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Chicago Migrants Get Brief Reprieve From Shelter Eviction

With frigid temperatures, Chicago officials postponed kicking newly-arrived migrants out of city shelters. But the new deadline is still looming. Reset spoke with a panel of people who are connecting migrants with resources: Veronica Saldaña, a volunteer lead for the police station response team, Annie Gomberg, another lead volunteer, and Andre Gordillo, director of New Vecinos – or “New Neighbors” in English – at New Life Centers, a nonprofit that is partnering with the state to provide services.
1/16/202417 minutes, 38 seconds
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Budget Eats To Try During Chicago Restaurant Week

Chicago Restaurant Week can be a fun opportunity to eat new dishes and set menus at a more affordable price — and this year 414 restaurants are participating. Reset hears from local foodies Monica Eng and Louisa Chu, co-hosts of the Chewing Podcast, on their picks and suggestions to make the most of the event.
1/16/202414 minutes, 8 seconds
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What Would Improve Chicago’s Union Station? You Have A Chance To Weigh In

Amtrak is getting $93 million in federal funds to renovate Union Station, which will include upgrades to the ventilation systems, expansion of platforms and changes to make the facility comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Amtrak is currently seeking public comment on proposed improvements to the station that the company says serves more than three million passengers annually. Reset finds out more about the renovation goals and how the public can weigh in with Mark Magliari, spokesperson for Amtrak Government Affairs; Sarah Freishtat, transportation reporter for the Chicago Tribune; and Mark Walbrun, a retired industry expert.
1/15/202431 minutes, 46 seconds
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‘King: A Life’ Biography Offers A Revealing Portrait of MLK

During his life and since his assassination, Martin Luther King Jr. was and has been the face of the Civil Rights movement, but how much do you know about the man behind the myth? King: A Life taps new material, including an unpublished memoir by King’s father and FBI surveillance tapes, to give a full, unflinching portrait of King. On MLK Day, Reset revisits a conversation with the Chicago-based author of the biography, Jonathan Eig.
1/15/202430 minutes, 30 seconds
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How To Spot A Snowy Owl And The Signs Of An ‘Irruption’

Snowy owls are a rare and coveted sight for bird watchers in the Midwest, but if you know what to look for you might have a better chance at spotting them. Reset learns more about snowy owl irruptions — the term for the mysterious and unpredictable migration cycle for the arctic bird — from Stephanie Beilke, senior manager in conservation science at Audubon Society Great Lakes and Edward Warden, president of the Chicago Ornithological Society.
1/13/202414 minutes, 23 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: January 12, 2024

A winter storm hammers Chicago, migrants housed on CTA buses, and, as the weather worsens, Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson delays a 60-day limit on how long migrants can stay in city shelters. Reset goes behind the headlines of those stories and much more in our Weekly News Recap with panelists Carrie Shepherd, reporter for Axios; Dave McKinney, WBEZ state politics reporter; and A.D. Quig, Cook County and Chicago government reporter for the Chicago Tribune.
1/12/202444 minutes, 28 seconds
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Chicago Braces For Frigid Temps And Almost A Foot Of Snow

Weather disasters are wreaking havoc across the country this week as Chicago prepares for a winter storm expected to hit today. Reset talks with atmospheric scientist Scott Collis with Argonne National Laboratory to learn more.
1/12/202413 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Best Time To Surf Lake Michigan In… Winter!

Ask any Midwestern surfer and they’ll tell you: the worse the weather, the better the waves. But beware of wading in those waters unless you know what you’re doing. As surfers navigate both environmental hazards and extreme weather, the difficulty and shared risk has built a tight-knit community on the Third Coast. Reset speaks with local surfers Mo McFadden and Rex Flodstrom and WBEZ freelance reporter Zachary Nauth to learn more about winter surfing on the Great Lakes.
1/11/202421 minutes, 21 seconds
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Meet Josh Long, New Chief For CPS Special Education

Josh Long, Chicago Public Schools’ new chief of the Office of Diverse Learner Supports and Services, was the principal of Southside Occupational Academy High School for 14 years. Reset learns more about how the department's new leader plans to support special education students throughout the district.
1/11/202411 minutes, 58 seconds
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Harvey Residents Say Their Homes Were Boarded Up While They Were Still Inside

Apartments at a building in south suburban Harvey got boarded up — while some residents say they were still inside. Videos of the situation went viral on TikTok. Reset gets the latest on the story and discusses tenants’ rights across Cook County with Daily Southtown reporter Hank Sanders and two organizers with the Metropolitan Tenants Organization: Philip DeVon and David Wilson.
1/10/202422 minutes, 54 seconds
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City Hall Update: A New Housing Commissioner And More Pushback To Bring Chicago Home

A group of real estate and business groups are pushing back against the city’s proposed real estate transfer tax that’s meant to combat homelessness, also known as the Bring Chicago Home ordinance. Plus, Brandon Johnson is trying to move away from Tax Increment Financing. Reset learns more from WBEZ city government and politics reporters Tessa Weinberg and Mariah Woelfel.
1/10/202413 minutes, 40 seconds
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Your Guide To Health Screenings And Checkups At Every Age

What’s considered a normal blood pressure? How often should I get a Pap test? What am I at risk for at my age? Reset checks in about checkups and screenings with Dr. Sam Wainwright, a pediatrician and health services researcher at University of Illinois Chicago, and Dr. Steven Rothschild, a family medicine physician with RUSH University Medical Group.
1/9/202433 minutes, 36 seconds
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Work Permits Are Hard To Get For Migrants

Only a small fraction of migrants have been approved for the documents they need to start working legally, according to a CBS Chicago review of internal city data. But not everyone is eligible for work permits under Temporary Protected Status. Reset discusses who is left out and checks in on the permit process for new arrivals with Eréndira Rendón, vice president of immigrant justice at The Resurrection Project and Sabrina Franza, general assignment reporter, CBS 2.
1/9/202413 minutes, 28 seconds
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Work Permits Are Hard To Get For Migrants

Only a small fraction of migrants have been approved for the documents they need to start working legally, according to a CBS Chicago review of internal city data. But not everyone is eligible for work permits under Temporary Protected Status. Reset discusses who is left out and checks in on the permit process for new arrivals with Eréndira Rendón, vice president of immigrant justice at The Resurrection Project and Sabrina Franza, general assignment reporter, CBS 2.
1/9/202413 minutes, 29 seconds
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One Chicago-Area Woman’s Fight To Get Her Family in Gaza To Safety

A Northwestern law student is suing the Biden administration over what she says is its failure to evacuate her U.S. citizen family members from Gaza. Palestinian American Yasmeen Elagha has spent the last three months talking, negotiating and pleading with different U.S. agencies — and even different governments — for help to get her family in Gaza to safety. Reset sits down with Elagha for more on her story.
1/8/202416 minutes, 22 seconds
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Food Friday: Bye Bye Hot Dog Bun. Hello Hot Dog Croissant

Move over hot dog bun, there’s a new carb in town. The pastry chef at Daisies, the Logan Square pasta emporium, joined forces with The Weiner Circle to bring a new twist to Chicago’s favorite dog and the Midwestern classic pigs in a blanket. Reset discusses the newest twist on a Windy City classic with WBEZ staffers Katie O'Connell, Cianna Greaves and Reset’s own Meha Ahmad.
1/8/202411 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Metropolitan Jazz Octet Takes On Bowie

Fans of David Bowie will know of his deep love of jazz. Though he never ventured into the genre in a literal sense, the inspiration is clear when you listen to his impressive body of work. The Metropolitan Jazz Octet, in partnership with Paul Marinaro, is reimagining some of Bowie’s classics with a new show titled “The Bowie Project.” Paul and MJO Co-founder Jim Gailloreto join Reset to discuss their love of the psychedelic space explorer, adapting Bowie's work in a new medium, and how the MJO came to be.
1/6/202419 minutes, 54 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Jan. 5, 2024

A group of Illinois residents have challenged Donald Trump’s candidacy. An undercount of people living in group quarters on the 2020 Census might mean Illinois isn’t losing population after all. Plus, there’s a slew of new laws you may have missed – like an e-cigarette ban in indoor public spaces. Reset breaks down those stories and more with Alex Nitkin, reporter with the Illinois Answers Project, Quinn Myers, Block Club Chicago reporter covering Wicker Park, West Town and Bucktown, and WBEZ education reporter Sarah Karp.
1/5/202446 minutes, 27 seconds
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What’s That Building? The History Of 5 Buildings Housing Migrants

Reset learns the history of two schools, hotels and a warehouse that are currently being used to house migrants for our What’s That Building series with architecture sleuth Dennis Rodkin.
1/5/202416 minutes, 34 seconds
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Hobbies And Activities To Warm Your Soul This Winter

Want to get out of your comfort zone and try something new this winter? Reset sat down with Jenny LeFlore, creator of Mama Fresh, Alison Cuddy, cultural producer and freelance journalist, and Breezy Fasano, co-founder of Chicago Craft Club to get tips on how to stay active and connected this winter.
1/4/202430 minutes, 12 seconds
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What Kids (And Families) Need To Thrive In The First Year

A new program for West Side families wants to help ease the burdens of parenthood during the first year of a baby’s life. Reset learns more about West Side Healthy Parents & Babies by speaking with Ayesha Jaco, executive director of West Side United, Katelyn Kanwischer, director of maternal and child health initiative at Lurie Children’s Hospital, and WBEZ public health and county government reporter Kristen Schorsch.
1/4/202418 minutes, 30 seconds
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Understanding Chicago’s Crime Prevention Strategy

This year the city of Chicago is rolling out a violence-prevention strategy to bring resources and investment to four of its most crime-impacted neighborhoods: West Garfield Park, Little Village, Englewood and Austin. This comes after a drop in homicides and gun violence both locally and nationally in 2023. But Chicago did experience an unusual spike in robberies last year. Reset learns more about crime in Chicago and the steps being taken to reduce it by speaking with Chicago’s deputy mayor of community safety Garien Gatewood and Kim Smith, the director of programs at the University of Chicago Crime Lab.
1/3/202418 minutes, 45 seconds
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Madigan, Migrants, DNC To Mark 2024 Chicago Politics

The year ahead will be a big one for local politics. Former Illinois House speaker Mike Madigan goes on trial, Alderman Ed Burke will be sentenced after being convicted on 13 charges in his federal corruption trial, the Illinois primary is coming up on March 19, and the Democratic National Convention comes to town this summer. WBEZ government and politics reporters Tessa Weinberg and Mariah Woelfel give a preview of the stories that will shape Chicago politics in 2024.
1/3/202414 minutes, 15 seconds
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How To Keep Your 2024 New Year’s Resolution

Is 2024 the year some of us finally keep a New Year’s resolution? It can be easier said than done, but experts say if you follow the best practices unearthed through research, it’s doable. Reset turns to Katy Milkman, professor at The University of Pennsylvania, host of the Choiceology podcast and author of How To Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be for tips and tricks on how to actually make desired changes.
1/2/202415 minutes, 35 seconds
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Chicago Dream-Pop Duo OK Cool

At a breezy 17 minutes, fawn – the 2023 EP from Chicago band OK Cool – explores big topics in a precise yet carefree way. Reset revisits a conversation with Haley Blomquist and Bridget Stiebris – creative partners behind OK Cool – about the duo’s stop-motion music videos, musical inspirations, and their collaborative writing process.
12/28/202318 minutes
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Laying Jazz To Rest: Angel Bat Dawid On Her Album ‘Requiem For Jazz’

Angel Bat Dawid’s latest album explores the potential “death” of jazz, providing an Afrofuturist requiem to lay it to rest. Increasingly layered, the Chicago artist’s 2023 release also draws parallels to Mozart’s last work. In this April 2023 conversation, Angel Bat Dawid joined Reset to talk about her early days learning the clarinet, her goals for teaching Black children and the 1959 documentary that inspired her latest work.
12/27/202323 minutes, 34 seconds
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Revisiting International House Music With ‘Global Currency’

As Reset wraps the year, we’re giving some of our favorite interviews with musical guests an encore presentation. Today, we take a look back at a conversation with DJ Mochi and DJ IGGY – the founders of Global Currency – and play some tunes from South America, Africa, and more.
12/26/202316 minutes, 13 seconds
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Food Friday: Movies That Are A Love Affair With Food

Your upcoming holidays may be full of movie nights and good food. So, why not combine the best of both worlds? From Big Night to Tampopo, Reset digs into the films that inspire us to eat and cook delicious food with Monica Eng, Axios Chicago reporter and co-host of Chewing Podcast, and Jesse Dukes, co-host of Upper Middlebrow.
12/23/202317 minutes, 32 seconds
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WBEZ Weekly News Recap: Dec. 22, 2023

Former alderman Ed Burke is found guilty of racketeering, bribery and attempted extortion. A months-long strike of adjunct professors at Columbia College ends. Meanwhile, Texas Governor Greg Abbott sent migrants to Chicago this week by plane. Reset goes behind those headlines and more with David Greising, president and CEO of the Better Government Association, Amanda Vinicky, WTTW political correspondent, and Jon Seidel, federal courts reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times, on the Weekly News Recap.
12/22/202346 minutes, 30 seconds
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What’s That Building: The Real-Life Locations From ‘A Christmas Story’

Set in the 1930s, A Christmas Story takes place in the fictitious town of Hohman. Reset learns more about the real-life places in Hammond, Indiana that inspired the iconic holiday film from WBEZ architecture sleuth Dennis Rodkin.
12/22/202311 minutes, 58 seconds
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Best Albums Of 2023 (Chicago’s Version)

Sorry Taylor Swift, but we’re doing our end of year albums the Reset way. We’re talking about the Best Albums of 2023 (Chicago’s Version) with the co-host of Sound Opinions, Greg Kot, music critic for the Chicago Tribune, Britt Julious, and host and producer at Vocalo, Nudia Hernandez.
12/21/202346 minutes, 7 seconds
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New Lifeguard Lawsuits Filed Against Chicago Park District

New lawsuits against the Chicago Park District allege lifeguarding for teens was no day at the beach. Dan Mihalopoulos, WBEZ investigative reporter on government and politics who broke the story of the toxic workplace culture and sexual abuse in the city’s lifeguard program, shares details from the latest lawsuits.
12/21/202315 minutes, 13 seconds
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Merry Mocktails For The Holiday Season

The holidays can add extra pressure to drink. But a cup of good cheer doesn’t have to include alcohol — and a growing movement toward mocktails is motivating the creation and distribution of more fun, non-alcoholic beverages. Reset talks with WBEZ’s Courtney Keuppers and Mary Moss, owner of Beverly Dry Goods, who searched for Chicago’s most creative mocktails and found recommendations for sober folks in 12 Chicago neighborhoods all in time for the festive season.
12/20/202314 minutes, 48 seconds
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Catholic Priests Can Now Bless Same-Sex Couples

According to new guidance released this week by the Vatican, “irregular” unions should not be denied the right to receive God’s blessing. Pope Francis’ guidance did not, however, amend church doctrine on marriage. Reset speaks with Steve Millies, associate professor of public theology and director of Bernardin Center at the Catholic Theological Union Mary Donnelley, board president at Dignity Chicago and Chris Pett, former national Dignity president to learn more.
12/20/202315 minutes, 11 seconds
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How NOT To Get COVID-19 This Holiday Season

Medical experts expect respiratory virus hospitalizations to continue to rise in Chicago. One reason? Only 11 percent of Chicagoans have gotten the most recent flu and COVID-19 vaccine. Reset chats with Dr. Mia Taormina, an infectious disease specialist with Duly Health and Care, about precautions to keep in mind this holiday season.
12/19/202314 minutes, 12 seconds
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Volunteer-Led Support Groups Bring Mental Health Care To Migrants

Producer: Landon Jones Editor: Brenda RuizIllinois has one of the greatest shortages of mental health care workers in the country, and new arrivals to Chicago face even greater barriers to access. This is because migrants may be disconnected from their families and support systems, lack a job or permanent address or have language or cultural barriers that keep them from seeing a therapist or social worker. Reset learns more about the need for mental health care in the city’s migrant shelters from Kristen Schorsch, WBEZ public health and county government reporter, Laura Pappa, director of behavioral health education at Northwestern Family Medicine, Veronica Armenta-Sanchez, licensed social worker and Aimee Hilado and Rebecca Ford-Paz from the Coalition for Immigrant Mental Health.
12/19/202327 minutes, 34 seconds
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Survivors Of Gun Violence Share Their Stories In Essays

The Trace, a non-profit newsroom covering gun violence, created a Survivor Storytelling Network, with the aim of helping survivors tell their stories in essay form. The goal is to reach a broad audience to add nuance to the conversation about causes of violence and the fluctuating ideas of redemption and justice. Each essay offers a peek into the ways violence rearranges a life. Reset hears the stories of Aja Johnson, Marlon English, and Jaree Noel, who are survivors of gun violence in Chicago, and Justin Agrelo, Chicago Community Engagement Reporter for the Trace who led the project.
12/18/202345 minutes, 34 seconds
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Chicago post-punk band La Rosa Noir makes waves with its debut ‘Arellano’

Fans of Johnny Cash, Television and the Beach Boys can sink their teeth into this new melting pot of classic genres. La Rosa Noir’s songs have changed over many years of performing, and listening to the polished and orchestrated studio album, Arellano, you can tell. Yeshi Regalado, frontwoman of La Rosa Noir, and Jannese Espino, her lead guitarist, join Reset to talk about their Chicano heritage, musical inspirations and the new album.
12/16/202324 minutes, 12 seconds
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As 2023 Comes To An End, How Has Chicago’s Plan For Housing Migrants Evolved?

This week Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson touted a near end to the use of police stations to shelter migrants. But, there are still a lot of unanswered questions about how the new city-run shelters will be managed. Reset spoke with the city’s deputy chief of staff Cristina Pacione-Zayas about the city’s strategy to house migrants.
12/16/202314 minutes, 34 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: December 15, 2023

Voters won’t get to weigh in on Chicago’s welcoming ordinance. Chicago workers will have to wait until July for the new mandatory ten days of paid leave. The fate of Alderman Ed Burke is now in the hands of a jury. Reset goes behind those headlines and more in our Weekly News Recap with WBEZ criminal justice reporter Patrick Smith, editor and reporter for Block Club Chicago Mick Dumke and reporter and anchor at CW 26 Brandon Pope.
12/15/202344 minutes, 32 seconds
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Kids Are Still Climbing Over Trains In Hammond, Indiana

Months ago, footage of kids crawling under and over stopped train cars at a railroad crossing put the spotlight on Hammond, Indiana. Reset checks in back with Joce Sterman, a national investigative reporter for Investigate TV, for an update on what has changed since – especially as a new video reveals a stopped train car beginning to move forward as a young girl tried to walk across the tracks.
12/15/202312 minutes, 55 seconds
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Wrapping Up 2023 With The Best And Newest Restaurants In Chicago

From Michelin stars to James Beard nominations, it’s been a year of culinary greatness for Chicago. Reset sits down with local food writers and foodies alike to highlight the city’s best new restaurants. If you enjoyed this conversation, check out our previous episode on the best movies of 2023.
12/14/202331 minutes, 9 seconds
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Guns From Indiana Shops Linked To Chicago Crimes

A recent ProPublica investigation finds gun sellers face few repercussions for failing to prevent illegal gun sales. The investigation also finds that tens of thousands of guns sold in cities outside Illinois have been linked to crimes in Chicago. Reset checks in with Vernal Coleman, reporter for ProPublica’s Midwest newsroom, to learn more.
12/14/202314 minutes, 15 seconds
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Former Chicago IG Joe Ferguson To Lead Civic Federation

The late Laurence Msall, who previously led the Civic Federation, was a wizard of public finance, someone who knew the ins and outs of city and state budgeting and had a keen eye for cost-effective approaches to government. Joe Ferguson brings a different background and perspective as a former federal prosecutor and good government advocate who spent 12 years as a tenacious city watchdog for Chicago. Reset talks to Ferguson about his plans for the group.
12/13/202318 minutes, 37 seconds
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How To Tip Properly This Holiday Season

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. But, let’s face it, gift giving can be stressful. So how should you pass along goodwill and cheer to service and tipped workers — and what’s the standard? Reset speaks with culture and etiquette coach Akilah Siti Easter about how to properly tip this season.
12/13/202316 minutes, 29 seconds
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No Migrant Tent Camp For Morgan Park And Other Chicago City Council News

Chicago lawmakers have scrapped plans to build a migrant camp in Morgan Park a week after the state stopped a potential camp in Brighton Park. Meanwhile, conservative Democrats on the council are asking for the resignation of seven officials from the Johnson Administration for greenlighting construction on toxic land in Brighton Park. Reset learns the latest about housing for migrants and other news from Chicago’s City Council from WBEZ city government and politics reporter Tessa Weinberg.
12/12/202314 minutes, 53 seconds
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Beware Of These Scams During The Holiday Season

Tis the season of giving. And the season of scams. There are a lot of different ways scammers are scheming to take your money and information. Reset sits down with Tom Johnson of the Better Business Bureau to learn about the top scams to look out for this holiday season. Get info on the latest happenings in Chicago and dig deeper into Reset conversations with our newsletter. Sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
12/12/20239 minutes, 30 seconds
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Learning A Language For The First Time At Six Years Old

Mahbuba, a refugee from Afghanistan, didn’t have a way to communicate for the first six years of her life. Expressing herself as a deaf child was difficult. With no access to education in rural Afghanistan as a deaf girl, she didn’t experience language education until coming to Chicago. Reset talks with author and freelance journalist Elly Fishman who covered Mahbuba’s story. If you want to hear more stories like this, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
12/11/202323 minutes, 32 seconds
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In Chicago, Robberies Spiked From July To Thanksgiving

Robberies in Chicago have increased more in the last five months than in any other consecutive five-month period since 2001. From July 1 to November 26, 2023, nearly 5,000 people filed reports of robbery with the Chicago Police Department. Reset speaks with the journalists behind the investigation, WBEZ data projects editor Alden Loury and Chicago Sun-Times staff reporter Sophie Sherry, to learn more.
12/11/202316 minutes, 57 seconds
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Food Friday: Chopped Episode Winner Chef Javauneeka Jacobs

Competing on a cooking show can be ruthless and cutthroat, but Chef Javauneeka Jacobs handles it with ease. Reset learns about the chef’s journey through the kitchen and into success — and her winning dish, Chef J’s Cassoulet Mexicano, which is being served at Rick Bayless’ Frontera Grill through December.
12/9/202311 minutes, 25 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Dec. 8, 2023

Governor Pritzker halts construction on a migrant tent camp in Brighton Park, while criticism grows over new protocols for seating the public at City Council meetings. Reset breaks down these stories and much more with executive producer of City Cast Chicago Simone Alicea, Block Club Chicago reporter Quinn Myers and WBEZ Politics & Government editor Angela Rozas O'Toole.
12/8/202334 minutes, 34 seconds
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Most CPS Grads Don’t Finish College In Four Years

Chicago Public Schools graduates take longer to complete college than students nationally, according to a study from the University of Chicago. Reset checked in with two co-authors of the study, as well as CPS’s director of College Pathways Brian Harris to hear about this issue – and discuss what efforts are needed to solve it. For more conversations like this one, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
12/8/202315 minutes, 23 seconds
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What’s That Building?: The Leaning Tower Of Niles

For those who often drive past the Leaning Tower of Niles, it might have lost its novelty. But for one Chicagoan the off kilter, domed, belltower structure was a new sight thanks to detours caused by construction on the Kennedy Expressway. So why is there a replica of the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Illinois? We speak with Reset’s architecture sleuth Dennis Rodkin to find out. If you liked this conversation, you can find more interviews with Dennis Rodkin in WBEZ’s “What’s That Building?” series at wbez.org/reset.
12/7/202310 minutes, 24 seconds
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Ald. Ramirez Discusses State Decision To Cancel Migrant Tent Shelter In Her Ward

City officials faced pushback on construction of a winterized migrant shelter in Brighton Park from the community and health advocates even before an environmental study showed unhealthy levels of mercury at the site. Illinois Governor JB Pritzker nailed the coffin shut on this project citing health concerns. Reset hears from Alderwoman Julia Ramirez, 12th Ward, on the move and on what comes next.
12/7/202312 minutes, 50 seconds
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Wrapping Up 2023 With The Best Movies Of The Year

We go to the movies for magic. To laugh, to cry, to care… at least that’s what Nicole Kidman says in the preview that runs before films start. We chat about our favorite flicks (and those that missed the mark!) with Brandon Pope, anchor at CW-26 and host of Season 4 of WBEZ’s Making Podcast, Michi Trota, Hugo Award winning editor and culture critic, and Cody Dericks, seasonal manager at the Music Box Theater and film critic for the website Next Best Picture.
12/6/202335 minutes, 50 seconds
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Eve Ewing On How Guaranteed Income Is Changing Lives In Cook County

For many, a little extra cash each month could go a long way. So one local scholar and sociologist set out to understand what a no-strings-attached monthly stipend could do for Chicago residents. Reset sits down with Eve L. Ewing about her limited podcast series “Guaranteed,” which examines what $500 monthly cash payments are making possible for some residents.
12/6/202334 minutes, 5 seconds
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Choosing A Medicare Plan In 2024

Generally, seniors 65 and older – who are retired and no longer use employer-provided insurance – will need to choose between Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage. This can be a daunting choice, with tradeoffs to each. Reset learns about the different parts to Medicare and gets advice for thinking through the options with Mary Mitchell, columnist and director of culture and community engagement for the Chicago Sun-Times, and Tricia Neuman, executive director of KFF’s Program on Medicare Policy.
12/5/202327 minutes, 16 seconds
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Investigation Reveals Flaws In How CPD Handles Cases Of Missing Black

The reporters on the seven-part series from City Bureau and the Invisible Institute found that Chicago detectives repeatedly brushed off family members' concerns, mishandled evidence and recorded inaccurate data that made finding missing people harder. Reset learns more from the duo behind the investigation, Trina Reynolds-Tyler, data director at the Invisible Institute, and Sarah Conway, senior reporter at City Bureau.
12/5/202318 minutes, 7 seconds
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‘Art Deco Nutcracker’ Brings More Diversity To Ballet

It’s challenging to become a classically trained professional ballerina, and people of color say they face more significant financial and accessibility challenges than their white counterparts when breaking into the field. Reset talks with Tatiana Chen, Shania Cook, and Rozhan Shabahang about being leads in A & A Ballet’s production of the Nutcracker and what it’s like to be part of the growing diversity in ballet.
12/4/202316 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Biggest Chicago Animal News Of 2023

From lions and a zebra born at the Lincoln Park Zoo, to spottings of snapping turtles, bats, and rats throughout Chicago, the reminder that wildlife is here, not just on TV, is all around. Reset revisits some of the biggest animal stories from this year with Seth Magle and Dave Bernier of the Lincoln Park Zoo.
12/4/202329 minutes, 26 seconds
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World AIDS Day 2023: Honoring Lives Lost And Forging A Future Free Of Stigma

Since the start of the AIDS epidemic, what’s changed? The medicine. What’s continued? The stigma. Reset brings together two people living with HIV in a conversation crossing generations and speaks with Dr. Sadia Haider of RUSH University Medical Center about efforts to educate heterosexual women about HIV transmission.
12/1/202331 minutes, 34 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Dec. 1, 2023

The Illinois primary is 109 days away. The Ed Burke trial is heating up. And the city of Chicago teams up with churches to house migrants. We’ll break down those stories and more in WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap with panelists Monica Eng, reporter for Axios Chicago, Michael Loria, reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times, and Dave McKinney, WBEZ state politics reporter.
12/1/202344 minutes, 18 seconds
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Aldermanic Prerogative Fuels Segregation In Chicago, HUD says

Federal investigators are taking aim at the role aldermanic prerogative has on the lack of affordable housing in Chicago. After a nearly five-year investigation, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development found that alderpersons’ ability to veto affordable housing proposals has been “instrumental in creating Chicago’s patterns of segregation.” Reset learns more from Roderick Wilson, executive director of Lugenia Burns Hope Center; and Monica Dillon, resident of the 41st ward and member of Neighbors for Affordable Housing. For more Reset news delivered straight to your inbox, visit wbez.org/resetnews.
12/1/202313 minutes, 4 seconds
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Meet A Pastor Housing Migrants In His Belmont Cragin Church

As winter sets in, a new partnership between the city and local churches called the Unity Initiative will house newcomers on a temporary basis in an effort to address the migrant crisis in Chicago. Reset checks in with Chicago Sun-Times reporter Michael Loria and Rev. Jonathan de la O of Starting Point Community Church. For more conversations like this, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/30/202316 minutes, 17 seconds
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Are You Smarter Than An 8th Grader?

All eighth graders in Illinois public schools need to take this test to graduate. Traditionally, it’s been a 15 true-false question quiz covering the U.S. and Illinois constitutions. Now, more school districts are moving away from that version and opting for short answer questions that require more critical thinking. Reset discusses how civic education these days is focusing less on dates and facts and stressing the important role students play in shaping democracy. Plus, we’ll see if a couple of our WBEZ colleagues can pass the test!
11/30/202316 minutes, 17 seconds
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Sun-Times Sports Columnist Rick Telander Is Now A Published Poet

Sports writer Rick Telander started writing poetry when he was hospitalized with a serious illness and thought about what kids who were in his situation might be going through. Reset talks with Telander about seeing his longtime side project come to fruition with the publication of Sweet Dreams: Poems and Paintings for the Child Abed. If you liked this conversation, check out our full catalog of interviews with Chicago artists and newsmakers at wbez.org/reset.
11/29/202317 minutes, 49 seconds
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Work On Migrant Tent Camp To Begin In Brighton Park

Nearly 26,000 migrants and asylum seekers have arrived in Chicago since August 2022. The post-Thanksgiving cold snap has highlighted just how important it is to find housing for the thousands currently sleeping in police stations, tents and the city’s airports. Reset gets the latest on the Johnson administration’s plans for a tent camp in Brighton Park and hears about other efforts to house migrants and asylum seekers from WBEZ city government and politics reporter Tessa Weinberg. To explore our full catalog of interviews, head on over to wbez.org/reset.
11/29/202315 minutes, 43 seconds
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What A Foxtrot And Dom’s Kitchen Merger Means For Chicago

Chicago-based Foxtrot Market and Dom’s Kitchen and Market — both upscale supermarkets with food service — will join forces. Reset talks with Virginia Lee, a market research expert and Food Institute writer, about what the merger means. To explore our full catalog of interviews, head on over to wbez.org/reset.
11/28/202312 minutes, 5 seconds
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Here’s How One Artist Is Creating Space For Indigenous Queer Writers

After having often felt like the only Native or queer person in a room, River Ian Kerstetter set out to make her own space with TIES Poetry, a series of open mics and readings celebrating Indigenous queer, trans and Two-Spirit writers. Reset talks with Kerstetter about the group and their own artistic journey. For more conversations like this, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/28/202315 minutes, 48 seconds
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COVID Hospitalizations Are Up In The Chicago Area

Hospitalizations are nowhere near past years, but the virus is still here. Plus, two new vaccinations to protect babies against RSV were approved this year, but rollout has been spotty. Reset gets insight into the increase in cases and the state of vaccine access for COVID and RSV from infectious disease specialist Dr. Mia Taormina. For more conversations like this, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/27/202313 minutes, 46 seconds
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Netflix’s ‘High on the Hog’ Features Chicago Food History

The latest season of the docuseries High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America continues tracing the development of American food and food culture by examining more (relatively) recent history: Reconstruction and the Great Migration. Reset learns more about the history of Black cooking in Chicago with James Beard award-winning chef Erick Williams and Dario Durham, co-host of the history and food podcast 77 Flavors of Chicago. For more conversations like this, head over to wbez.org/reset.
11/23/202317 minutes, 19 seconds
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New Book Highlights Untold Story Of Civil Rights Activist Mollie Moon

The new book Our Secret Society: Mollie Moon and the Glamour, Money and Power Behind the Civil Rights Movement introduces readers to a figure whose story has largely been overshadowed– until now. Reset learns more about how Moon shaped the Civil Rights Movement from author and historian Tanisha Ford. For more conversations like this, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/22/202332 minutes, 49 seconds
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What We Know About Train Safety After The CTA Yellow Line Crash

Federal investigators are so far saying a “design issue” caused the Yellow Line crash, but a full investigation still needs to be conducted. Reset dives into what we know about the crash — and what it means for train safety with Sophie Sherry of the Chicago Sun-Times and DePaul University’s Joseph Schwieterman. For more conversations like this, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/22/202313 minutes, 58 seconds
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Inside The Corruption Trial of Ed Burke

Chicago politics can be complicated, but jury members in former and longtime alderman Ed Burke’s corruption trial had to quickly get up to speed. Reset gets the latest on the trial from WBEZ city government reporter Mariah Woelfel. For more conversations like this one, browse our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/21/202315 minutes, 37 seconds
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On Transgender Day Of Remembrance, A Push To End Transphobic Violence

At least 26 trans or gender-nonconforming people have been killed in the U.S. this year, the majority of whom were Black trans women, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Transgender Day of Remembrance reminds us to pause and mourn these people’s lives — as well as celebrate the resilience of the trans community. Reset discusses the meaning of Transgender Day of Remembrance with Zahara Bassett, founder and CEO of Life Is Work, a West Side social service agency for trans and non-binary people. For more conversations like this, check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/21/202312 minutes, 42 seconds
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Volunteers Blindsided By 60-day Cap For Migrants In Chicago Shelters

The city unveiled the next phase of its migrant response and resettlement efforts, which imposes limits on how long people can stay in city-run shelters based on when they arrived. The city says this is meant to free up shelter space and fast track resettlement efforts. Reset hears from volunteers Erika Villegas and Debra Michaud about how they’re preparing to help people navigate these limits. For more conversations like this, check out our entire catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/20/202315 minutes, 41 seconds
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Reset Lost & Found: Where Can I Buy Green Coffee Beans?

One Evanston man searched high and low for green coffee beans since he moved to the city from Seattle. He wanted to find them because he likes to roast at home — a method preferred by some coffee lovers because it can be cheaper, tasty and provides more control over the brew. One of our producers lent a hand. Along the way, Reset learned about the joys of at-home roasting. Do you have a Chicago-area question Reset could help you find an answer to? Give us a call at 888-915-9945.
11/20/202311 minutes, 24 seconds
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Chicago Symphony Orchestra Up For More Than One Grammy In 2024

Jessie Montgomery, CSO’s Mead Composer-in-Residence, is nominated for “Best Contemporary Classical Composition.” CSO’s audio engineer Charlie Post has picked up a third nomination for “Best Engineered Album, Classical” with the CSO album Contemporary American Composers. Reset checks in with Montgomery and two CSO musicians to celebrate the honor and talk classical music in the modern day. To hear more conversations with Chicago’s 2024 Grammy nominees, head over to wbez.org/reset.
11/18/202321 minutes, 13 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Nov. 17, 2023

An earthquake rocks Illinois. Alders approve Mayor Brandon Johnson’s first city budget. More than 100 people are arrested for protesting outside the Israeli Consulate. Reset goes behind those headlines and more in our Weekly News Recap with Axios Chicago’s Carrie Shepherd, David Greising, president of the Better Government Association, and WBEZ investigative reporter Dan Mihalopoulos. For more on the week’s top stories, check out our catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/17/202344 minutes, 42 seconds
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Chicago Launches Reentry Program For People Released From Jail And Prison

Mayor Brandon Johnson lists reducing recidivism as part of his community safety plan. In that spirit, his office has launched a collaboration between the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services and community groups to fast track housing and jobs for people getting out of Cook County Jail and state prisons. Reset learns more about this collaboration and how it works. For more conversations about topics impacting Chicagoans, head over to wbez.org/reset.
11/17/202319 minutes, 21 seconds
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Grammy Nominee Dom Flemons On Where Music And Memory Merge

Dom Flemons is a Grammy-award winning singer-songwriter and folklorist up for Best Folk Album at the 66th Annual Grammy Awards. Flemons sat down with WBEZ’s Jason Marck to talk about some of the big ideas that run through his work, like preserving and pushing forward Black musical traditions. Check out more of our conversations with Grammy-nominated Chicago talent at wbez.org/reset.
11/16/202322 minutes, 38 seconds
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Chicago Police Could Be Banned From Joining Extremist Groups

The Community Commission for Public Safety and Accountability, or CCPSA, recently voted to pass a policy that could ban Chicago police from actively participating in hate and extremist groups. Reset discusses the ban with CCPSA commissioner Remel Terry to understand how it will work and what this change could mean for the department. To hear more Reset interviews like this, go to wbez.org/reset.
11/16/202311 minutes, 21 seconds
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Chicago Jazz Singer Kurt Elling Nominated For A New Grammy Jazz Category

Kurt Elling has been a jazz singer for nearly 30 years. He’s won two Grammys and been nominated for more than a dozen. And now he’s snagged another nomination in an all new category: Best Alternative Jazz Album. Reset chats with Kurt Elling about his latest album “SuperBlue: The Iridescent Spree” after working on it with fellow musicians Charlie Hunter, Corey Fonville and DJ Harrison during the COVID-19 lockdown. We spoke to Kurt as a part of our Chicago Grammy nomination week. To hear more of those interviews, go to wbez.org/reset.
11/15/202318 minutes, 44 seconds
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Educating More Teens, Young People About HIV Medication

According to AIDSVu, about 1 in 5 of all new HIV diagnoses in 2021 were among people ages 13 to 24, with Black youth disproportionately affected. And while HIV medication pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is safe for all ages, it’s mostly been geared towards adults. Reset learns about a new campaign to reach more teens and young adults in the 13 to 24 age group and explore how expanding information and health care options for teens can improve health outcomes with longtime AIDS advocate Jim Pickett, PrEP4Teens youth leader Ryder Kennedy, TaskForce’s Chris Balthazar and muralist and artist David Gauna. To hear more conversations like this, go to wbez.org/reset to check out our full catalog of interviews.
11/15/202332 minutes, 11 seconds
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Finding ‘The Light Inside’ With J. Ivy, Chicago Poet And Grammy Nominee

Chicago J. Ivy won the first Grammy Award in the Spoken Word category earlier this year, and now he’s up for another one. Reset catches up with J. Ivy to hear more about his recent project. Check out more of our conversations with Grammy-nominated Chicago talent, go to wbez.org/reset.
11/14/202333 minutes, 43 seconds
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The Barriers To Mental Health Care In Chicago

A recent study by the Collaborative for Community Wellness found several barriers that make it difficult to get mental health resources for Chicagoans, especially for folks who are uninsured or undocumented. Reset hears more about the study and what changes advocates want to make with WBEZ city government and politics reporter Mariah Woelfel. Listen to more Reset at wbez.org/reset.
11/14/202314 minutes, 24 seconds
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Chicago’s Third Coast Percussion On Their 2024 GRAMMY Nomination

The 2024 GRAMMY nominations are in and Chicago artists are getting some love. Reset talks with Chicago’s Third Coast Percussion about their latest nomination and learns more about the group with ensemble members David Skidmore and Robert Dillon. You can engage with Reset in so many ways! Along with our live show and podcast, you can also sign up for our newsletter at wbez.org/resetnews.
11/13/202314 minutes, 46 seconds
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The Push To Remove Chicago’s Lead Service Lines Gets A Boost

A $336 million loan will be used over five years to primarily fund the city’s program that replaces lead service lines when they break or leak. The Department of Water Management’s other programs to replace lead service lines at daycares and for low-income homeowners will continue. Reset learns about the scope of this effort and how this could help improve Chicagoans’ water from Reset sustainability contributor Karen Weigert and commissioner of the Department of Water Management Andrea Cheng. To check out our entire catalog of interviews, head over to wbez.org/reset.
11/13/202314 minutes, 50 seconds
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SAG-AFTRA Actors Win AI Protections, Streaming Bonus

The strike is over. The negotiating committee for the actors’ union SAG-AFTRA won increases in minimum rates, greater access to health care and baseline protections against AI technology for its members. The union also conceded streaming residuals by agreeing to split among union actors an estimated $120 million bonus paid out by studios for streamed content deemed “successful” during the 3-year contract. Ahead of the member vote to ratify, Reset checks in with Charles Andrew Gardner, president of SAG-AFTRA Chicago, to learn more. Want to stay up to date with all things Reset? Sign up for our newsletter at wbez.org/resetnews.
11/11/202315 minutes, 5 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Nov. 10, 2023

One of Brandon Johnson’s top City Council allies resigns his leadership post; state legislators wrap up fall veto session; President Biden visits UAW workers at Belvidere auto plant and is met with protesters. Reset goes behind those headlines and more in our Weekly News Recap with Leigh Giangreco, government and politics reporter for Crain’s Chicago Business; Ravi Baichwal, anchor at ABC7; and Jon Seidel, federal courts reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times. If you want to check out more Reset conversations, go to wbez.org/reset.
11/10/202345 minutes, 7 seconds
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New Program To Help Chicago’s Asylum Seekers In Chicago Apply For Work Authorization

A new federal program is launched Thursday in Chicago. Its goal is to help bring assistance to asylum seekers and new arrivals to apply for work permits. It’s a collaborative effort between the White House, Illinois, Chicago’s City Hall and Pilsen-based community organization The Resurrection Project. Reset gets more details about the program with Erendira Rendon, vice president of immigrant justice at The Resurrection Project, to learn how it will operate and how they plan on helping all new arrivals. To listen to more of our coverage on migrants and asylum seekers in Chicago, go to wbez.org/reset.
11/10/202313 minutes, 47 seconds
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Chicago-Area Family Mourns The Loss Of Over 30 Relatives Killed In Gaza

Each day Mohammed Abu Realh and his nephew, Mohammed AbuSafia, wait to hear from their remaining family in Gaza. In the last month, they’ve lost more than 30 relatives in airstrikes. Reset sits down with them to remember their family’s lives, and talk about the continued fear they’re facing. To hear more of Reset’s coverage on the local impact of the ensuing war, go to wbez.org/reset.
11/9/202333 minutes, 25 seconds
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What To Know About Chicago’s ‘Mansion Tax’ On The March Ballot

In March, Chicago voters will get to decide the future of the city’s Bring Chicago Home ordinance. The ordinance would raise the city’s tax rate on properties sold for over a million dollars and would lower tax rates on properties sold for less than that. According to Mayor Brandon Johnson’s camp, this referendum is a key part of his plans to address homelessness in Chicago. Reset hears from Bring Chicago Home organizers Kennedy Bartley of United Working Families and Electa Bey of Communities United. We also hear from Farzin Parang of the Building Owners and Managers Association to understand what those opposed are concerned about. If you want to listen to more Reset, you can check out our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
11/9/202318 minutes, 27 seconds
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Why More And More Kids Are Becoming Nearsighted

The number of kids being diagnosed with myopia, or nearsightedness, is increasing. And if our tech habits continue, eye doctors predict that half of the world’s population will have myopia by 2050. Scary. Reset talks to Dr. Lisa Thompson, an attending physician of Pediatric Ophthalmology at Cook County Medical Center, and Dr. Noreen Shaikh, an optometrist at Lurie Children’s Hospital, to understand the way screen time is affecting children’s eyes. Stay up to date with Reset by signing up for our daily newsletter at wbez.org/resetnews.
11/8/202315 minutes, 24 seconds
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Mayor Johnson Is Without A Floor Leader In Chicago’s City Council

On Monday, Ald. Carlos Ramirez-Rosa, 35th Ward, resigned from two key leadership positions at the urging of Mayor Brandon Johnson and the Chicago Aldermanic Black Caucus after an interaction Ramirez-Rosa had last week with Ald. Emma Mitts, 37th Ward. Reset learns more.
11/8/202316 minutes, 16 seconds
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What Parole Can Teach Us About Fixing Mass Incarceration

The U.S. leads the world in mass incarceration, with nearly two million people behind bars. But what paths are there to rehabilitation and freedom? Reset speaks with Chicago-based journalist Ben Austen about his new book “Correction: Parole, Prison and the Possibility of Change.” If you want to listen to more conversations like this, check out wbez.org/reset.
11/7/202330 minutes, 48 seconds
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How Rabbis Are Leading Chicagoland Congregations Through War, Rise In Antisemitism

On October 7, Hamas attacked Israel, killing 1,400 people and kidnapping more than 240. Reset hears how two area rabbis are confronting the attack, the war and growing antisemitism as they help congregants deal with the grief, sadness and other emotions they’re facing. For Reset’s full coverage of the Israel-Hamas war and how it’s affecting the Chicago area, head over to wbez.org/reset.
11/7/202317 minutes, 27 seconds
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Chicago-Area Arab Americans, Muslims Say Islamophobia Has Reached New Highs

In the last month, two Chicago-area Muslim schools have received violent threats, a six-year-old Palestinian American boy was fatally stabbed and a suburban man was charged with a hate crime for threatening to shoot two Muslim men. For some Arab and Muslim Chicagoans, these news stories take them back to their lives in the days and weeks after 9/11. Reset learns more about what the community is experiencing from Chicago Sun-Times reporter Nader Issa. For Reset’s full coverage of the Israel-Hamas war and how it’s affecting the Chicago area, head over to wbez.org/reset.
11/6/202314 minutes, 44 seconds
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Latest Chicago School Board Election Map To Be Discussed In Fall Veto Session

Next year, for the first time, Chicago voters can elect the members of the Chicago Board of Education. We check in with WBEZ education reporter Sarah Karp on one hurdle that’s standing in the way: the state legislature needs to agree on a voting map.
11/6/202313 minutes, 15 seconds
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Chicago Resavoir’s Latest Album Blends Bedroom Jazz, Hip-Hop, Soul And More

I don’t ONLY like to listen to one type of music,” says Resavoir frontman Will Miller. So, of course, his new work is a blend of genres. Resavoir started as a musician collective, but during the pandemic Miller embraced a more solitary style of making music. The hard work paid off, and the new album is out now. Reset talks with Will Miller, frontman of Resavoir and the man behind the project.
11/4/202321 minutes, 24 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Nov. 3, 2023

Chicago gets the season's first snowfall, fierce debate continues in City Council over where to house the more than 20,000 migrants, and Mayor Brandon Johnson heads to Washington D.C. with other mayors, looking for federal help. Reset goes behind those headlines and more with Paris Schutz, reporter and anchor with WTTW; Daniel Knowles, Midwest correspondent with The Economist; and Tina Sfondeles, chief political reporter of the Chicago Sun-Times.
11/3/202344 minutes, 51 seconds
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Understanding The Long Term Effects Of Gun Violence

For the second Halloween in a row, Chicago saw a mass shooting. Reset learns about the shooting that happened in North Lawndale over the weekend and what survivors need to heal from the physical and emotional trauma of gun violence. If you want to listen to more conversations exploring topics that impact Chicagoans, check out wbez.org/reset.
11/3/202332 minutes, 3 seconds
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Chicago’s Role In The War On Disco, And Beyond

Disco is at the root of many of our favorite music genres today, but there’s more to its history than Saturday Night Fever, and you don’t have to look far to find it. Reset learns more about The War on Disco and the genre’s influence on popular music from Ayana Contreras, music and content director at our sister station Vocalo 91.1 FM. If you want to check out our entire catalog of interviews, go to wbez.org/reset.
11/2/202318 minutes, 23 seconds
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Inside One Chicago School’s Support Group For Migrant Students

Chicago Public Schools doesn’t track immigration status, but this year nearly 8,000 students are enrolled in the district as English-language learners, compared to a yearly average of around 3,000. Reset speaks with Chalkbeat Chicago reporter Reema Amin to learn more about a program at Brighton Park Elementary to support the unique needs of migrant students.
11/2/202319 minutes, 30 seconds
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Why Is There A Housing Crisis In Chicago?

Chicago is juggling multiple housing crises at once. There’s a growing number of unhoused Chicagoans; more asylum seekers are arriving in the city; and there’s a lack of affordable housing overall. Reset discusses how Chicago’s housing system has evolved over the years and explores potential solutions.
11/1/202344 minutes, 59 seconds
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More Than 80% Of Cook County Property Owners Will Soon Pay Higher Tax Bills

Cook County property tax bills are due Dec. 1, and most homeowners will be paying more than last year. Reset explores why bills are rising with WBEZ Cook County and public health reporter Kristen Schorsch and Chicago Tribune county and city government reporter A.D. Quig.
11/1/202320 minutes, 2 seconds
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Sohla El-Waylly Teaches The Basics Of Home Cooking In Debut Book

Chef Sohla El-Waylly’s debut cookbook explains the hows and whys of cooking, introducing the fundamental skills any home cook needs to be confident in the kitchen. Reset speaks with the chef about her career and Start Here: Instructions for Becoming a Better Cook. If you want to check out our entire catalog of interviews, go to wbez.org/reset.
10/31/202316 minutes, 36 seconds
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Pianist Pat Leary Turning Music Into Meditation

Do you have a morning ritual? For Chicago pianist Pat Leary, each day starts behind the keys improvising beautifully calming tunes. He recorded this practice and turned it into an album. And Reset chats with the musician to learn more. If you want to check out our entire catalog of interviews, go to wbez.org/reset.
10/31/202318 minutes, 3 seconds
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The Scramble To Help Chicago’s Asylum Seekers, Unhoused As Temperatures Drop

Temperatures are dropping in the Chicago area and there are thousands of asylum seekers and unhoused without adequate shelter. The Johnson Administration recently announced sending warming buses to locations around the city, but what else is needed? Reset checks in with leaders and volunteers working directly to provide services to new arrivals and the existing homeless population in Chicago to talk about the current situation, how we should be talking about the needs of these two groups and future solutions. If you want to listen to previous conversations about this crisis in Chicago, check out wbez.org/reset.
10/30/202337 minutes, 51 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: October 27, 2023

Happy Friday! We’re back with our Weekly News Recap where we bring you the top stories this week and go behind the headlines with a panel of Chicago journalists. This week we were joined by CW 26 reporter and anchor Brandon Pope, Chicago Tribune state government reporter Dan Petrella and Block Club Chicago reporter Quinn Myers, covering Wicker Park, West Town and Bucktown. If you want to check out more Reset conversations like this, go to wbez.org/reset.
10/27/202346 minutes, 52 seconds
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More Therapists Are Practicing Climate Aware Therapy

More people are starting to bring their climate anxiety, also known as eco-distress, to their therapists. And as more are starting to become aware of climate change, therapists and other professionals are starting to practice climate therapy. Reset explores what climate therapy looks like in practice and how we can turn that distress into action with Marilee Feldman of the Life Counseling Institute practice and Karen Weigert of Loyola University Chicago’s Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility. Sign up to receive our daily newsletter at wbez.org/resetnews.
10/27/202320 minutes, 16 seconds
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Science Friday Host Ira Flatow Is Coming To Chicago

If you’re an avid public radio listener, you’re probably familiar with the weekly educational program Science Friday. And if you’re a fan, you have a chance to catch host Ira Flatow and the rest of the SciFri team on Sunday, Oct. 29 for a special live event! Reset chats with journalist and host Ira Flatow to get to know him more and learn more about the Don’t Be A Stranger event. Check out our entire catalog of Reset interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/26/202316 minutes, 1 second
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Food Insecurity In A First-World Country?

According to an annual report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 2022, 17 million households are food insecure. That’s up from 13.5 million households in 2021. This trend is reflected with what’s happening in Chicago where 1 in 5 American households are food insecure. Reset discusses what contributes to food insecurity and what could be done to address the problem with Sophie Milam of the Greater Chicago Food Depository. We host interviews like this every day and dive deeper into conversations in our daily newsletter. Sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
10/26/202318 minutes, 35 seconds
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Bats! Bats! Bats!

Halloween is just around the corner and do you know what winged animal might be waiting there, too? Bats! There are swarms of bats making their ways through Chicago as they migrate to warmer places to get away from the cold. Reset talks with Liza Lehrer, assistant director of the Urban Wildlife Institute at Lincoln Park Zoo, to learn about our bat friends. Visit wbez.org/reset to hear more of our interviews like this.
10/25/202313 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ald. Ramirez Weighs In On Migrant Tents In Brighton Park

The city of Chicago is eyeing a vacant lot in Brighton Park to serve as a winterized base camp to house migrants. Last week, Ald. Julia Ramirez of the 12th ward went to a protest outside of the site to hear residents’ concerns and it turned violent. Reset hears from Alderwoman Julia Ramirez about getting more feedback ahead of a community hearing tonight.
10/25/202313 minutes, 55 seconds
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Illinois Pot Growers Struggle To Raise Funding

Craft cannabis growers in Illinois face systemic obstacles to gaining a foothold in the industry, so Illinois is investing millions in an effort to solve the problem. Reset learns more from Alex Nitkin, reporter with the Illinois Answers Project of the Better Government Association.
10/24/202315 minutes, 58 seconds
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CPD Officers Linked To Extremist Anti-Government Group The Oath Keepers

There are nine officers who were on a leaked membership list for the anti-government group the Oath Keepers currently serving in the Chicago Police Department. Reset learns about the investigation into the way these officers interacted with the public and what’s being done to address the extremism and racism within CPD with WBEZ investigative reporter Dan Mihalopoulos and Chicago Sun-Times criminal justice reporter Tom Schuba. For more interviews like this one, go to wbez.org/reset.
10/24/202327 minutes, 26 seconds
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Graphic Novelist Daniel Clowes Out With New Book

The new graphic novel ‘Monica’ bends genre and reality to confront the themes of belonging, family and home. Reset talks with the author about the novel.
10/23/202319 minutes
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Millions In U.S. Hold Antisemitic Views, Condone Political Violence

Anti-hate group the Anti-Defamation League and the University of Chicago’s Chicago Project on Security and Threats surveyed 8,000 American adults to learn about the connections between antisemitic views, political violence and antidemocratic conspiracy theories. We talked through the results of the survey, how they connect to antisemitism we’ve seen since the start of the Israel-Hamas war and what the poll might tell us about the 2024 presidential election cycle in the U.S. Check out more conversations like this at wbez.org/reset.
10/23/202321 minutes, 51 seconds
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Preview Sen Morimoto’s New Album ‘Diagnosis’

Chicago DIY superstar Sen Morimoto says his forthcoming album “Diagnosis” is a commentary on capitalism, the music industry and more. Ahead of the November 3 album release, we had a listening party with Sen. Check out more conversations like this at wbez.org/reset.
10/21/202318 minutes, 30 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Oct. 20, 2023

The nation mourns the killing of six-year-old Wadea Al-Fayoume. Meanwhile, as the city attempts to set up housing for migrants ahead of winter, some residents are upset. We went behind these headlines and more with Block Club Chicago’s Melody Mercado, WTTW’s Heather Cherone and Axios Chicago reporter Monica Eng. Check out more conversations like this at wbez.org/reset.
10/20/202344 minutes, 38 seconds
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Chicago Jews Call For Ceasefire At U.S. Capitol

Jewish Voice For Peace and If Not Now planned protests in cities across the country and in Washington D.C. at the White House and U.S. Congress. They’re calling for a ceasefire in the war between Israel and Hamas. Reset hears from an organizer who went to D.C. and a local rabbi about why they support this movement.
10/20/202318 minutes, 31 seconds
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What’s Needed To Keep Hospitals Running In Gaza?

After hundreds died in an explosion at al-Ahli Hospital in Gaza City Tuesday night, international efforts to verify claims about who is responsible have been unsuccessful — and it’s overshadowed the loss of life and trauma inflicted on health care workers and civilians seeking safety. Reset speaks with a Dr. Zaher Sahloul, a local doctor who is president of MedGlobal — an NGO with doctors working in Gaza — to get an update on the needs of Gazans amid demands for an end to the blockade on international aid and war monitoring.
10/19/202316 minutes, 14 seconds
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Could Chicago Migrants Go To St. Louis?

Cities like Chicago and New York have more migrants than they can handle. St. Louis says it would like more migrants to come to town. We get the story from Esther Yoon-Ji Kang, WBEZ race, class, communities reporter.
10/18/20238 minutes, 41 seconds
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A ‘Human Library’? People Volunteer To Be ‘Open Books’

At Morton College in Cicero Thursday, you can visit a “human library.” No, we’re not kidding. It’s a library where you can “check out” a person — like you would a book — to listen to their life story. Each “reader” can ask questions that you might avoid in polite conversation. Reset spoke with Prairie Markussen, organizer of a “human library” event at Morton College, and Alejandro Joleanis, a human “book” participating in the library.
10/18/202331 minutes, 19 seconds
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Budget Season Is Underway In Chicago

Lawmakers in City Council have until the end of the calendar year to approve the budget. Reset talks with WBEZ’s Mariah Woelfel and Tessa Weinberg about the process as well as steps the administration is taking to house migrants ahead of the cold winter months to come.
10/18/202314 minutes, 55 seconds
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Evanston Mother And Daughter Still Among Hamas Hostages

Nearly 200 people from more than 30 nations have not been seen since Hamas attacked Israel on Oct. 7, 2023. Among them are an Evanston mother and daughter. Reset speaks with the family’s rabbi Meir Hecht of Chabad of Evanston about their kidnapping and how it’s impacting the Evanston community.
10/17/202316 minutes, 33 seconds
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Advocates Want To Stop Overdoses On The CTA. Here’s How.

Last year, 60 people died from opioid-related overdoses on the CTA, according to an analysis by the Chicago Reader. Reset talked with impacted Chicagoans and the reporter who broke down those numbers.
10/17/202323 minutes, 33 seconds
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Palestinian American Boy In Suburban Chicago Killed In Alleged Hate Crime

A Palestinian American boy and his mother were stabbed by their landlord, in their home on Saturday, October 14. The boy died and the mother is in critical condition. The accused killer yelled anti-Muslim epithets and stabbed the child 26 times. Reset hears how media and political rhetoric of the Israel-Hamas war may have played into this attack. Ahmed Rehab, executive director of the Chicago office of CAIR, the Council on American-Islamic Relations, also explains what he hopes U.S. politicians and Chicagoans will learn from the tragic story.
10/16/202319 minutes, 27 seconds
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Young Man in a Hurry Has a New Album

Actor Brought a Vice is a new record from Chicago band Young Man in a Hurry. Frontman Matthew Baron joins Reset to talk about the new release. Check out more interviews like this one at wbez.org/reset.
10/14/202321 minutes, 7 seconds
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Chicago Interfaith Group Reacts To War Between Israel And Hamas

Chicagoans on their way home from an interfaith trip in Jerusalem had to take shelter as rockets from Gaza struck Israel. Reset hears from three of them about their experiences, and the conversations they’re having with community members about radical empathy as the war in the Middle East continues. Check out more conversations like this at wbez.org/reset.
10/13/202331 minutes, 22 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap, October 13, 2023

Residents voice opposition to new migrant shelters. Chicago Marathon winner breaks world record. Northwestern’s new stadium plan faces resistance. Reset goes behind those headlines and more in our Weekly News Recap. If you want to check out past News Recaps or other conversations, you can see our entire catalog at wbez.org/reset.
10/13/202347 minutes, 5 seconds
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How Will Mayor Johnson Invest In Housing In Chicago?

Mayor Brandon Johnson called housing an “essential focus” of his administration’s focus. The question is, will he be able to put the money where his mouth is? Reset sits down with stakeholders to hear what they want to see from the administration and what housing investment could look like under the mayor’s proposed budget plan. To hear more conversations like this one, check out our full archive at wbez.org/reset.
10/13/202318 minutes, 6 seconds
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Father-Son Duo’s Epic Bike-Ride Film To Show At Festival

After three open heart surgeries, Donnie Seals Sr. knew he had to change his life, so he took up cycling. His son joined him in the pursuit, eventually proposing an epic bike ride from St. Louis to Chicago to celebrate his dad’s health — and they caught it all on film. Reset talks with the father-son duo about what this journey meant to them, and how it takes on health disparities in the Black community. Like the Reset podcast? Then you’re going to love our daily newsletter. Subscribe at wbez.org/resetnews.
10/12/202316 minutes, 44 seconds
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Mass Exodus From Illinois? New Report Debunks The Myth

The population of Illinois is becoming more educated, more foreign-born and higher paid, according to a report conducted by the Illinois Economic Policy Institute and the Project for Middle Class Renewal at the University of Illinois. Reset turns to a co-author of the report to learn more about the state’s shifting demographics and the fact that, contrary to popular belief, the state’s population is not on a steep decline. To hear more conversations like this one, check out our full archive at wbez.org/reset.
10/12/202313 minutes, 2 seconds
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Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson’s Full Budget Address

Johnson spoke Wednesday at City Council, laying out his plans for Chicago in the coming fiscal year. This is his full address.
10/11/202341 minutes, 4 seconds
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What’s In Mayor Johnson’s Chicago Budget Proposal?

Mayor Brandon Johnson presented City Council with his first city budget proposal Wednesday. From supporting migrants to a $538 million budget gap to investing into historically disinvested people in Chicago, there’s a lot to address. Reset breaks down some of the mayor’s plans with Mariah Woelfel, WBEZ city government and politics reporter, and Justin Marlowe, research professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. Like the Reset podcast? Then you’re going to love our daily newsletter. Subscribe at wbez.org/resetnews.
10/11/202316 minutes, 29 seconds
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Chicago Jews, Palestinians React To Israel-Hamas War

Many Chicagoans have connections to friends, family and loved ones in the Middle East. On Monday morning, Reset spoke with David Jacobson of Evanston whose son and daughter live in Israel as well as with Deanna Othman of Oak Lawn. She has family in Gaza. Stay up to date and listen to more from Reset at wbez.org/reset.
10/11/202317 minutes, 46 seconds
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President Joe Biden’s Full Address On Israel-Hamas War

President Biden spoke to the nation Tuesday afternoon after a call with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. This is his full address.
10/10/202310 minutes, 47 seconds
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Lawsuit Alleges AI Discriminates Against Renters Using Housing Vouchers

Evanston-based housing advocacy group Open Communities recently filed a federal lawsuit alleging companies using AI to discriminate against renters — specifically renters that would use housing vouchers. Reset spoke to WBEZ race, class, communities reporter Esther Yoon-Ji Kang about the story and learned how leasing companies use AI chatbots. You can listen to more of our interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/10/202310 minutes, 19 seconds
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New Fathers Can Also Experience Postpartum Depression

When you think of postpartum depression, often you’ll think of mothers. But did you know fathers can also suffer from the condition? Reset spoke with Dr. Sam Wainwright of UI Health’s Two-Generation Clinic and his patient Lushon Lee about this effort to understand postpartum depression among new fathers. You can check more of our conversations at wbez.org/reset.
10/10/202320 minutes, 43 seconds
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Keeping Indigenous Languages, Traditions Alive

For many Native Americans, their families have lost their language and history because of years of Indigenous people forced to go to boarding schools where they had to assimilate to white culture. Reset spoke with president of the American Indian Association of Illinois, Dorene Wiese about preserving languages and oral history. To hear more conversations like this one, you can find an archive of our work at wbez.org/reset.
10/9/202323 minutes, 24 seconds
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How The Healthcare System Is Still Failing Black Americans

Average life expectancy in the U.S. decreased by just under three years because of the COVID pandemic. But, if you break it down further by racial and ethnic group, life expectancy for Black and Hispanic people declined about four years. There are a number of reasons for this disparity. Dr. Brian H. Williams is a trauma surgeon and author of the new book The Bodies Keep Coming: Dispatches from a Black Trauma Surgeon on Racism, Violence, and How We Heal joins Reset. We check in with him about his experiences in healthcare as a Black man and seeing how ongoing inequities in the system are impacting his non-white patients. Check out the rest of our catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/9/202317 minutes, 23 seconds
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The History Of Filipinos In Chicago

Filipinos have been living in the Windy City since at least the early 1900s. From the first wave of men coming from the Philippines to the U.S. to forming a community in Chicago to the second wave of Filipino women arriving, there’s a rich history of Filipinos in the Windy City. Reset celebrates Filipino American History Month by talking about the history of Filipinos in the city and learning about an upcoming exhibit featuring the archived photos of the community from the mid 1900s with Ruben Salazar and Ashley Dequilla of the Filipino American Historical Society of Chicago. Check out more conversations like this at wbez.org/reset.
10/7/202314 minutes, 56 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Oct. 6, 2023

NASCAR is coming back to Chicago. Mayor Brandon Johnson is planning a visit to the southern border and has appointed the city’s first chief homelessness officer. Illinois Congressman Mike Quigley was the only Democrat to vote ‘no’ on a bill that helped avoid a government shutdown. Reset discusses these stories and more with a panel of Chicago journalists: Madison Savedra, Block Club Chicago reporter covering Pilsen, Little Village and Back of the Yards, Alex Nitkin, reporter with the Illinois Answers Project for the Better Government Association and Crain’s Chicago Business political columnist Greg Hinz. If you want to check out past News Recaps or other conversations, you can see our entire catalog at wbez.org/reset.
10/6/202343 minutes, 18 seconds
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Filipino American Culture Is About Much More Than Just Food

October is Filipino American History Month. It’s a time to reflect on the experiences of people that came before, connect with others in the community and build a stronger sense of identity being Filipino American. Starting October 6, an exhibition called “More Than Lumpia” will be held at the Catacombs Gallery at the Epiphany Center for the Arts until November 17. It aims to challenge stereotypes and narratives about Filipino Americans and shed light on the work of Filipino artists who are often underrepresented in the art space. We spoke with Cesar Conde, an artist and curator of the exhibition, to learn more about it and discussed with artists Abby Mendoza and Jimmy Bulosan about exploring their identity through art. For more conversations like this, check out our entire catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/6/202320 minutes, 29 seconds
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Former Northwestern Football Player Giving Back To Student Athletes

Ramon Diaz is a former Northwestern football player who played from 2005 to 2008. Now, he’s bringing a lawsuit against the school, alleging hazing and racist treatment. Reset gets the latest on the multiple allegations against Northwestern and what’s next. You can check out more of our conversations at wbez.org/reset.
10/5/202313 minutes, 44 seconds
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Chicago’s Arts And Culture Orgs Are In ‘Crisis’

Galleries, museums and theaters are still feeling the impact of the pandemic. According to a report on the health of arts and culture in the city, donations, memberships and attendance numbers are down and haven’t gotten back to pre-pandemic levels. Reset learns about what’s been happening and discusses potential solutions Leslé Honoré, poet and CEO of Urban Gateways, Kacie Smith of Arts Alliance Illinois and Kara Riopelle, managing director at the Chicago Shakespeare Theater. If you love Reset, then you’ll also love our daily newsletter! You can sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
10/5/202322 minutes, 51 seconds
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This Día De Muertos, Remember People With Alzheimer’s And Other Dementias

Reset learns more about why Hispanics and Latinos are more at risk for the diseases. We also talk about the altar honoring those lost to the diseases at the National Museum of Mexican Art’s Día de Muertos exhibit. Our guests are Cesareo Moreno, chief curator at the museum, and Amelia Garza, manager of diversity and inclusion at the Alzheimer’s Association. You can also find our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/4/202316 minutes, 29 seconds
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Long COVID Researchers Work To Identify Causes, Treatments

Not many people who suffer from long COVID end up fully recovering from complications. So-called long-haulers can experience a myriad of debilitating symptoms, including extreme fatigue, brain fog and difficulty sleeping. Reset learns more about the study with Nirav Shah, primary investigator of RECOVER studies and director of infectious disease research at NorthShore – Edward-Elmhurst Health. We also check in with Chimére L. Sweeney, a long COVID patient, writer and advocate to see how she’s been living with the condition. You can also find our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/4/202317 minutes, 58 seconds
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Illinois Residents Must Register Assault Weapons By Jan. 1

In August, the Illinois Supreme Court upheld the assault weapons ban, which took effect earlier this year. Residents who owned these weapons prior to the ban now must register them by January 1. Reset checks in with Chicago Sun-Times reporter Mary Norkol and Adam Winkler, author of the book Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. Did you know Reset also has a daily newsletter? Each edition features a breakdown of one big topic in news or culture, fun activities to try in the Chicago area and a chance to weigh in. Sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
10/3/202312 minutes, 40 seconds
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Chicago Authors Sound Off On Their Books Being Used To Power Artificial Intelligence

Meta, Bloomberg and others pirated more than 190,000 e-books to train generative AI, according to a dataset made searchable by The Atlantic. The news has sent shockwaves through the publishing industry. Reset speaks with Chicago authors Rebecca Makkai, Sonali Dev, and Ben Austen about their copyrighted material being used to train generative AI without their permission. You can also find our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset
10/3/202323 minutes, 46 seconds
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Student Loan Payments Restart, But Biden’s Got A Plan B

Borrowers suffering from financial hardship and other classes of people with outstanding federal student loans could benefit from President Biden’s latest efforts to wipe out student debt. The news came just as payments resumed after a suspension during the pandemic. Reset gets the latest on student loan forgiveness from WBEZ higher education reporter Lisa Philip. And don’t forget, we’re bringing you conversations like this every day. Find our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/2/20238 minutes, 3 seconds
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Public Opinion On Climate Change Is Changing

It’s officially fall. The season of pumpkins, leaves changing colors and 80 degree days, apparently. A recent poll shows that more adults in the U.S. are experiencing extreme weather and that more of them believe a warming planet is partially to blame. Reset discusses this shift in public opinion and fighting climate change with Lesley Showers of the Climate Action Museum and Reset sustainability contributor Karen Weigert. You can also find our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
10/2/202315 minutes, 28 seconds
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Talking Heads Make A Comeback On The Big Screen

The Talking Heads 1984 classic concert film Stop Making Sense is back in theaters, and this time it’s in 4K. Reset hears from Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune, Camryn Lewis of Music Box Theatre and WBEZ’s Lisa Labuz. For more stories like this, check out Reset’s daily newsletter. You can sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
9/30/202318 minutes, 22 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Sept. 29, 2023

The auto workers’ strike expands to Chicago. Hundreds more migrants arrive from the U.S.-Mexico border. The Chicago Park District quietly settles sexual misconduct cases. Plus, is a government shutdown inevitable? Reset breaks down the top stories of the week with David Greising of the Better Government Association, Rummana Hussain of the Chicago Sun-Times and WBEZ’s Dan Mihalopoulos. And don’t forget, we’re bringing you conversations like this every day. Find our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
9/29/202344 minutes, 35 seconds
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What’s That Building? Chicago Icons: The former John Hancock Center

In another installment of What’s that Building, Reset gets a glimpse into the history of an elegant 100-story high-rise on the Mag Mile. Reset talks to journalist Dennis Rodkin about 875 N. Michigan’s unique design, why the name changed from the John Hancock Center, and what happened to the Signature Room.
9/29/202313 minutes, 44 seconds
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‘This Puts Me In Panic Mode’: How A Government Shutdown Could Impact You

As a potential government shutdown looms, over 42,000 Illinois federal workers are at risk of losing their paychecks. Some might even need to go without pay until funding comes through. And many governmental programs that people rely on – like food stamps and child care assistance – also hang in the balance. Reset learns more about who will be impacted from WBEZ statehouse reporter Mawa Iqbal. We also hear more about what changes Chicagoans could see from Kellie O’Connell, CEO of Nourishing Hope, a Chicago food pantry, and Tamisha Holifield, a parent who uses Head Start and WIC programs. For more deep dives into local news, check out Reset’s daily newsletter. It arrives in your inbox Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. You can sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
9/28/202318 minutes, 20 seconds
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Illinois Traffic Stops Of Black Drivers Reach A 20-Year High

A decades-old Illinois law is supposed to prevent Black drivers from being pulled over disproportionately, but it’s not working. In fact, the numbers are going in the wrong direction. Reset checks in with Alden Loury and Matt Kiefer from WBEZ’s data team for more on their investigation. For more deep dives into local news, check out Reset’s daily newsletter. It arrives in your inbox Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. You can sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
9/28/202315 minutes, 31 seconds
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Meet Chicago School Board President Jianan Shi

Jianan Shi says he leads by “listening and collaborating” and that his experience as an immigrant shapes his views on how schools can lift up kids and their families. At 33, Shi is the district’s youngest leader in decades. And perhaps surprisingly for a board exec, he’s not a parent. Reset learns more about his vision for Chicago Public Schools. If you like this podcast, check out our conversation on why Chicago student math scores still lag behind pre-pandemic levels. You can also find our full catalog of interviews at wbez.org/reset.
9/27/202317 minutes, 4 seconds
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Mayor Johnson’s Latest Moves On Development, Migrants

The Johnson administration is ditching INVEST South/West, the Lightfoot-era program that aimed to bring economic development to underserved neighborhoods. It says it has its own approach. Meanwhile, the mayor and his allies are under fire for hiring a controversial security firm to monitor tent housing for migrants. Reset talks with WBEZ city government and politics reporters Tessa Weinberg and Mariah Woelfel. You can learn more about the Chicago region in Reset’s daily newsletter. It arrives in your inbox Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. Sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
9/27/202314 minutes, 19 seconds
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How Medical Debt Affects Your Credit Score

Did you know that unpaid doctor and hospital bills can lower your credit score? The Biden administration is taking steps to stop that from happening. Reset checks in with Edith Avila Olea from the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights and Carrie Chapman from the Legal Council for Health Justice. If you like this podcast, you may be interested in our interview on why more adults over 65 are giving cannabis a try. You can also check out our full catalog at wbez.org/reset.
9/26/202318 minutes, 41 seconds
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What Chicago Can Learn From Colorado On Safe, Healthy Housing

The Windy City’s current system calls for annual inspections for some highrise apartments, but other rental units are only inspected when they’re built or when there’s a complaint. Dozens of people have died over the past few years in building fires in Chicago in structures the city knew had fire safety issues. Reset learns more about what issues tenants face today and where city officials can find solutions with Alex Nitkin, investigative reporter for the Illinois Answers Project at the Better Government Association, and John Bartlett, executive director of the Metropolitan Tenants Organization. You can check out more of Reset’s work at wbez.org/reset.
9/26/202317 minutes, 16 seconds
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Little Amal Journeys To Chicago This Week

She’s a 12-foot wooden puppet of a Syrian girl who walks for the hundreds of thousands of displaced people worldwide, half of whom are children. Little Amal is making friends through art, food and education in a months-long tour across the United States — and this week she’ll be in Chicago. Reset speaks with local partners about where you can meet Little Amal and what you can learn from her while she’s in the city. Our guests include Lauren West, from the Syrian Community Network, Jacqueline Russell of the Chicago Children’s Theater and Paige Whitson-Martini of the Chicago Shakespeare Theater. Did you know Reset also has a daily newsletter? Each edition features a breakdown of one big topic in news or culture, fun activities to try in the Chicago area and a chance to weigh in. Sign up at wbez.org/resetnews.
9/25/202313 minutes, 27 seconds
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City Council Panel Votes To Raise Minimum Wage For Tipped Restaurant Workers

Mayor Brandon Johnson’s administration and the Illinois Restaurant Association struck a compromise Wednesday to raise tipped workers’ minimum wage over the next five years. The measure still needs approval from the full Council before it goes into effect. Reset checks in with WBEZ city government and politics reporter Tessa Weinberg and Saru Jayaraman, president of One Fair Wage.
9/25/202315 minutes, 1 second
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Fall Into Sweater Weather With These Outdoor Activities

Happy first day of fall! Don’t be left wondering what you’ll do on the weekend this fall. WBEZ has you covered. Reset checks in with WBEZ editor Cassie Walker Burke on the station’s Fall Bucket List to keep you in the loop.
9/23/202313 minutes, 20 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Sept. 22, 2023

Chicago sues chemical manufacturer Monsanto over polluted waterways. The defensive coordinator of the Chicago Bears resigns, and the team cuts its backup quarterback. Reset breaks down those stories and more with this week’s panel of journalists: Leigh Giangreco, government and politics reporter at Crain’s Chicago Business, Jacoby Cochran, host of City Cast Chicago, and Mick Dumke, investigative editor and reporter at Block Club Chicago.
9/22/202344 minutes, 40 seconds
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Chicago Public Schools Math Scores Lag Behind Pre-Pandemic Levels

Math scores remain low and low-income students are especially lagging, according to Chicago Public Schools data released this week. Reset talked with CPS director of math to hear about the district’s strategies to address the gap – and WBEZ’s Sarah Karp, who has covered this issue.
9/22/202321 minutes, 1 second
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How To Have A Great First (Or 100th) Date

Whether you’ve been with the same sweetie for decades or are trying to lock it down with someone new, dates play an important role in maintaining the spark in a relationship. Dating expert Bela Gandhi offers tips for planning romantic outings, and Reset producer Claire Hyman plans a date for a Chicago couple.
9/21/202330 minutes, 36 seconds
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This Ain’t Your Grandkids’ Pot Scene: More Senior Citizens Are Giving Cannabis A Try

Nearly a decade after medical marijuana became legal in Illinois, senior citizens are the fastest-growing age group of cannabis users. Reset speaks with Dr. Rahul Khare, founder and CEO of Innovative Care, Tom Gliszewski, owner of the Chicago Cannabis Company, and Jungle Cae, a social media cannabis educator, to learn more about safely using pot.
9/21/202330 minutes, 15 seconds
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More People Are Trying Voice Acting, But The Pros Say It’s Not So Easy

Chicago has long been an advertising industry hub, attracting all kinds of voice artists looking to make a buck. You may be more likely to succeed as a voice actor than for film or TV, but don’t expect that sending off a few voice recordings will be enough to bring the checks flying in. Reset learns more about the industry from Tal Rosenberg, freelance writer for Chicago Magazine. We’ll also meet two local voice actors: Harlan Hogan and Morgan Lavenstein.
9/20/202319 minutes, 32 seconds
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Chicago Actors On Strike Sound Off As WGA Set To Return To Negotiating Table

TV and film production has slowed to a near-halt after unions for actors and writers started striking earlier this summer. But this week, the Writers Guild of America is set to return to the negotiating table with major Hollywood studios. But what about SAG-AFTRA’s effort? Reset checks in with Charles Andrew Gardner and Courtney Rioux, two local union members, about the progress of their strike.
9/20/202318 minutes, 39 seconds
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Mayor Johnson Still Sees Pushback For Progressive Agenda Items

Mayor Brandon Johnson is receiving some pushback for his progressive campaign pledges in the City Council, from raising wages for restaurant workers to raising revenue for the unhoused. Reset checks in with WBEZ city government reporters Tessa Weinberg and Mariah Woelfel on the mayor’s achievements and shortfalls.
9/19/202315 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Link Between Zoos And Brain Health

Research shows spending stress-free time in nature regulates the nervous system and contributes to healthy brain function. In a new pilot program at the Lincoln Park Zoo, people with dementia and their loved ones and caregivers can do that and more. The Memory Enrichment program, which was developed in partnership with Sunrise Senior Living, is the first of its kind at a zoo or aquarium. Reset spoked to program creator Bill Green to learn more about why the program was developed and how it reduces the symptoms of dementia.
9/19/202314 minutes, 53 seconds
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The End Of Cash Bail In Illinois

Illinois became the first state in the U.S. to eliminate cash bail after years of debate and legal challenges. The change — which went into effect Monday, Sept. 18 — will dramatically impact the way people are detained in jail before trial. Reset discusses what this means for Illinois with WBEZ criminal justice editor Patrick Smith.
9/18/202313 minutes, 55 seconds
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Restorative Justice Leads To Fewer Suspensions At CPS

Chicago Public School data shows that the number of suspensions across the district dropped from 49,708 in 2014 to about 10,000 in 2022. The district also started moving away from a zero tolerance policy for misconduct and toward more restorative practices like peace circles that encourage students to reflect on their actions. Reset checks in with WBEZ Education reporter Sarah Karp for the details.
9/18/202312 minutes, 36 seconds
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An Innovative Girls Mental Health Program In Chicago

Teenage girls in the U.S. are reporting record levels of sadness and suicidal ideation. Reset speaks with the director of a school-based group counseling program and a health policy reporter to learn about how the Chicago-based program, Working on Womanhood, could become a national model to combat the crisis of mental health in girls.
9/16/202317 minutes, 39 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Sept. 15, 2023

Chicago opens its first casino. Libraries are evacuated over bomb threats. Mayor Johnson reveals a projected $538 million budget deficit for Chicago. Reset goes behind the headlines of those stories and much more with Carrie Shepherd, Chicago Axios reporter and Ray Long, investigative reporter at the Chicago Tribune.
9/15/202346 minutes, 39 seconds
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Chicago Sun-Times Columnist Mary Mitchell Launches Column On Aging

Mary Mitchell has been writing columns for the Sun-Times since the 1990s, but she’s taking her work in a new direction. Her new column ‘Starting Over’ will publish on Sundays, and focus on redefining what it means to be an older American. Reset gets to know the columnist and explores how ageism continues to be prevalent in our lives today.
9/15/202314 minutes, 2 seconds
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All Laughs With Comedian And Exhausted Chicago Gurl Maggie Winters

Comedian Maggie Winters is About to Blow Up! This week, we hear from the Chicago-native about how her experience growing up in the city has shaped her journey in comedy, including her recent one-woman comedy show.
9/14/202314 minutes, 25 seconds
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Fighting poverty in Chicago as U.S. poverty soars

Poverty rose 12.4% in 2022 according to census data released Tuesday. So, why the rise? Reset talks with an economist who studies household finances and the labor market and with two Chicago leaders working to end poverty.
9/14/202323 minutes, 21 seconds
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Chicago mobilizes to help Moroccans and Libyans

On September 8, 2023, a 6.8-magnitude earthquake devastated major cities in Western Morocco. The death toll is close to 3,000 and thousands more have been injured. Days later, heavy rainfall broke two dams in Libya leading to massive flooding killing over 2,000 people. Reset talks with an international relief organization about efforts to respond to these disasters.
9/13/202312 minutes, 40 seconds
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Mayor Brandon Johnson’s Plan To Move Migrants From Police Stations To Tents

Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson announced a plan to move roughly 1,600 migrants from Chicago police stations to tent camps around the city. These tents are being modeled after the ones built in New York City that can house up to 1,000 people. Reset turned to WBEZ city government and politics reporters Mariah Woelfel and Tessa Weinberg to get the latest on that plan and on the city’s financial forecast.
9/13/202315 minutes, 55 seconds
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Illinois Becomes New Home For Out-Of-State Trans Youth And Families

More than a dozen states have passed laws that restrict the full participation of transgender students in K-12 schools, according to a Chalkbeat analysis. And at least 18 states have passed laws restricting gender-affirming health care for minors. Reset speaks with an organizer and a parent on how Illinois has become a new home for people leaving states that have passed laws targeting trans youth and adults.
9/12/202321 minutes, 49 seconds
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What A Red Line Extension Could Mean For Chicago’s Far South Side

The $3.7-billion project — 50 years in the making — has reached what transit officials call “the final phase” of the federal funding process. When complete, the Red Line will include four new stops, including a new terminus at 130th Street near Altgeld Gardens. Reset checks in with community leaders from the far South Side: Cheryl Johnson with People for Community Recovery, Rev. Otis Moss III from Trinity United Church of Christ, and Andrea Reed with Greater Roseland Chamber of Commerce. And they sound off about the potential positive impacts of connecting their neighborhoods to the El system.
9/12/202323 minutes, 39 seconds
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What We’re Watching On TV This Fall And Our Favorites So Far

With writers and actors on strike, studios are banking on reality TV more than ever. From The Golden Bachelor to The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Primetimer editor-in-chief Danette Chavez, WBEZ Morning Edition anchor Mary Dixon, and CW26 anchor and reporter Brandon Pope tell us what they’re watching – and skipping – this fall.
9/11/202323 minutes, 37 seconds
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Groundwater Depletion Is A Big Problem For The Great Lakes Region

According to the EPA, approximately 90% of the nation’s water systems rely primarily on groundwater. Reset turns to water supply experts, like UIC’s Freshwater Lab director Rachel Havrelock, and Illinois Environmental Council Executive Director Jen Walling, to learn about sustainable ways to relieve Illinois’ stressed water systems. We also talk with Illinois’ 11th District State Representative Ann Williams.
9/11/202317 minutes, 52 seconds
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Live-Action Clue Extends Run In Downtown Chicago

Hasbro’s classic murder mystery board game comes to life in Clue: A Walking Mystery. In this immersive investigation, “detectives” will visit various locations across downtown Chicago to collect clues and solve puzzles in order to find out who did it, with what weapon and in what room. Reset speaks with director of operations and actor Sophie Grimm and game designer Juliana Moreno to learn more about the popular whodunnit experience.
9/9/202311 minutes, 31 seconds
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WBEZ’s Weekly News Recap: Sept. 8, 2023

The political career of the nation's longest serving state House Speaker comes to an end, while prosecutors prepare for the trial of Ed Burke. Plus the Taste of Chicago returns to Grant Park as the city’s first casino gets ready to open its doors. Reset breaks down these top local stories and more with Melody Mercado, Block Club Chicago reporter, Rick Pearson, chief political reporter at the Chicago Tribune, and Brandon Pope, reporter and anchor at CW26.
9/8/202336 minutes, 41 seconds
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You’ll Soon Be Able To Buy Narcan At Walgreens

Narcan, the nasal spray version of opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone, will become available this week at pharmacy chains like Walgreens, CVS and Walmart without a prescription. Reset talks with harm reduction experts, including Fanya Burford-Berry with the West Side Heroin/Opioid Task Force, John Wernings with the Chicago Recovery Alliance and Chelsea Laliberte Barnes with the Illinois Harm Reduction & Recovery Coalition.