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PRI: Arts and Entertainment Profile

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

English, Arts, 1 season, 165 episodes
About
This podcast features pieces on music, books, film, television, and other arts from some of PRI's most popular programs. It will take you to all corners of the world, and to the undiscovered corners of your own community, highlighting all of the arts along the way.
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Out of Eden Walk: Cyprus

National Geographic Explorer Paul Salopek tells host Carolyn Beeler about his first stop after having walked through the Middle East. On Cyprus, he found beaches with baking European tourists, a busy port city and a checkerboard of olive groves and yellow hay fields. But he also found the vestigial border line that divides the island's Greek and Turkish communities, and walked through an abandoned tourist city, a relic of a border war that has never been fully resolved.
4/4/20240
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Sudan Tapes Archive preserves music across decades and continents

Sudanese American Haneen Sidahmed is digitizing cassettes tapes of classic Sudanese songs dating back to the 1960s. In the process, she's created a music archive called Sudan Tapes Archive. Reporter Hana Baba, of station KALW and the podcast, "The Stoop," talked to Sidahmed about how her work has taken on new urgency amid war in Sudan.
4/3/20240
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What rhymes with isosceles triangle? This French math teacher has the answer.

Antoine Carrier, a middle school teacher in Bordeaux, southwest France, stays up late many nights, pen in hand, crafting math rhymes. Online, tens of thousands of kids know him as A’Rieka, the rapping math teacher. 
4/2/20240
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Brazil remembers the 1964 coup and victims of the dictatorship 

Brazil is remembering the 1964 coup that began on March 31 that year. The event 60 years ago sunk Brazil into a brutal 21-yearlong dictatorship that would last until 1985. Today, the country is still grappling with the meaning and memory of what happened. 
4/1/20240
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‘Our joy is limited’: A subdued Purim in Israel during wartime 

Jews around the world just celebrated the holiday of Purim, which is said to mark the survival of Jews in ancient Persia. In Israel, it is known for being a raucous holiday with parties, costumes, sweets and drinking. But for many Israelis, the war meant this year’s holiday felt different.
3/26/20240
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‘Imaginary Amazon’ exhibition counters negative stereotypes through contemporary art

University Art Gallery at San Diego State University has just unveiled an exhibit, "The Imaginary Amazon," featuring works by contemporary artists, many of them Indigenous inhabitants of the forest. The artists' intent is to address some of the stereotypical Western perspectives of the Amazon. The post ‘Imaginary Amazon’ exhibition counters negative stereotypes through contemporary art appeared first on The World from PRX.
3/22/20240
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'Imaginary Amazon' exhibition counters negative stereotypes through contemporary art

University Art Gallery at San Diego State University has just unveiled an exhibit, "The Imaginary Amazon," featuring works by contemporary artists, many of them Indigenous inhabitants of the forest. The artists' intent is to address some of the stereotypical Western perspectives of the Amazon.
3/22/20240
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‘What crime have we committed?’ Ghana’s LGBTQ community braces as anti-LGBTQ bill may turn into law

Lawmakers in Ghana recently passed a bill that could lead to a severe crackdown on LGBTQ activities that have many people worried. Ghana's president is under pressure domestically to sign the bill into law, but could face economic consequences if he does. 
3/19/20240
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10 years ago, the Sunflower Movement pushed Taiwan away from China

March 18 marks the 10-year anniversary of a movement that changed Taiwanese politics for a generation. The Sunflower Movement saw hundreds of students occupy Taiwan’s Legislature — demanding that lawmakers reconsider a trade deal they were about to ratify with China.
3/18/20240
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Can endangered languages be saved? This new book may have the answer.

New York City is home to over 700 languages, but some will soon cease to exist. Is there still time to save them? The World’s Carolyn Beeler talks to linguist and author Ross Perlin about his new book, “Language City: The Fight to Preserve Endangered Mother Tongues in New York."
3/12/20240
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‘Oppenheimer’ film ‘fails’ to show devastation of atom bombs in postwar Japan, critics say

‘Oppenheimer’ is expected to win big at the 2024 Academy Awards. But one point of controversy is that the director did not depict any images of the devastating aftermath of the dropping of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Getting those images out to the public was a longtime quest for Herbert Sussan, then a 24-year-old filmmaker who filmed in Japan at the time.
3/8/20240
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Out of Eden Walk: Paul Salopek traverses the Arabian Peninsula via Saudi Arabia

The World's host Carolyn Beeler talked with National Geographic Explorer Paul Salopek about his experiences walking through different parts of Saudi Arabia as a part of his "Out of Eden Walk" project.
3/8/20240
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Jewish American delis: A story of culture, community and survival

Food is, of course, an important part of culture. A new exhibit at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Illinois, is exploring the role delis have played in Jewish culture and history. In America, many delis were founded by Holocaust survivors.
2/29/20240
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Women's camel racing team takes an ancient sport back to the future

Camel racing is an ancient sport. There are records of races on the Arabian Peninsula that date back to the 7th century. These days, it's still hugely popular, with robot jockeys and cash prizes. But a new team is taking camel racing back to its roots — with a twist.
2/27/20240
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Renowned conductor Seiji Ozawa is remembered as ‘graceful,’ ‘supernaturally’ gifted

Seiji Ozawa, who led the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) for nearly three decades, died this week in his home country of Japan. The World speaks to Brian McCreath, who broadcasts the Boston Symphony Orchestra on WCRB in Boston, about Ozawa's life and legacy. The post Renowned conductor Seiji Ozawa is remembered as ‘graceful,’ ‘supernaturally’ gifted appeared first on The World from PRX.
2/9/20240
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Renowned conductor Seiji Ozawa is remembered as 'graceful,' 'supernaturally' gifted

Seiji Ozawa, who led the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) for nearly three decades, died this week in his home country of Japan. The World speaks to Brian McCreath, who broadcasts the Boston Symphony Orchestra on WCRB in Boston, about Ozawa's life and legacy.
2/9/20240
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New book explores the life of psychiatrist and writer Frantz Fanon

Since the latter half of the 20th century, the influence of Frantz Fanon has been felt in fields as distinct as psychiatry and postcolonial studies. A new book explores the "revolutionary lives" of the psychiatrist, writer and anti-colonial rebel, whose understanding of identity evolved through his travel and experiences, including confronting colonial hierarchies as a person of color in postwar France, and eventually joining the Algerian War of Independence. Host Marco Werman learned more from Adam Shatz, author of "The Rebel's Clinic: The Revolutionary Lives of Frantz Fanon."
2/9/20240
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Miami’s Little Haiti: What is lost when a community is displaced?

The Haitian population of Miami has remained unchanged since the beginning of the century, with about 30,000 people. But little remains of the neighborhood that Maria and Viter Juste founded in the 1970s that came to be known as Little Haiti. The post Miami’s Little Haiti: What is lost when a community is displaced? appeared first on The World from PRX.
2/2/20240
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Miami’s Little Haiti: What is lost when a community is displaced?

The Haitian population of Miami has remained unchanged since the beginning of the century, with about 30,000 people. But little remains of the neighborhood that Maria and Viter Juste founded in the 1970s that came to be known as Little Haiti.
2/2/20240
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International Guitar Night shows off diverse styles and sounds from across the globe

The World’s host Marco Werman previews two of the artists who are featured as part of the 24th annual edition of International Guitar Night touring North America. The post International Guitar Night shows off diverse styles and sounds from across the globe appeared first on The World from PRX.
1/29/20240
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International Guitar Night shows off diverse styles and sounds from across the globe

The World’s host Marco Werman previews two of the artists who are featured as part of the 24th annual edition of International Guitar Night touring North America.
1/29/20240
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‘It’s an act of resistance’: Haiti’s jazz festival opens in Port-au-Prince despite security challenges

This week, jazz fans in Haiti will once again gather for the 17th annual PapJazz Festival. The event draws enthusiasts from across the island, as well as international jazz aficionados. Festival organizer Milena Sandler says the gathering in Port-au-Prince is "an act of resistance" amid security and economic challenges in Haiti. The post ‘It’s an act of resistance’: Haiti’s jazz festival opens in Port-au-Prince despite security challenges appeared first on The World from PRX.
1/25/20240
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'It's an act of resistance': Haiti's jazz festival opens in Port-au-Prince despite security challenges

This week, jazz fans in Haiti will once again gather for the 17th annual PapJazz Festival. The event draws enthusiasts from across the island, as well as international jazz aficionados. Festival organizer Milena Sandler says the gathering in Port-au-Prince is "an act of resistance" amid security and economic challenges in Haiti.
1/25/20240
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‘I’m here to fight for democracy’: Tens of thousands protest against the far-right in Germany

The AfD, or Alternative for Germany, has been around for over a decade and has significant public support. But there's been widespread protests against them since news broke that AfD members had met with neo-Nazis to discuss mass deportations from Germany.
1/23/20240
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'Religious triumphalism': A grand Hindu temple opens on a controversial site in India 

On Jan. 22, a temple of Lord Ram will open its doors in Ayodhya, in northern India. The temple stands where the Babri mosque once existed, before it was torn down by a Hindu mob. The occasion marks a victory for Hindus and a sorrowful reminder for Muslims of the ongoing tensions between the two groups in a Hindu-majority country.
1/19/20240
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In Istanbul, the classic ‘Turkish breakfast’ comes under fire for food waste

Turkey is famous for its elaborate breakfasts, featuring a huge spread of a wide variety of foods that can take hours to eat. Critics say the traditional breakfast is indulgent and leads to food waste. Others say it’s part of the culture and here to stay.
1/19/20240
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‘Birds are everywhere!’ Women bird guides in Uganda set a global example

Birdwatching is a rapidly growing and lucrative part of the tourism sector worldwide, but women make up a very small minority of professional guides. Uganda Women Birders, a bird guide club, is revolutionizing the industry by encouraging and supporting women who want to get into the business. Anita Elash reports from the town of Entebbe, Uganda.
1/18/20240
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All-women Estonian quartet brings ancient folk music to the forefront

The small Baltic nation of Estonia is experiencing a folk music renaissance, with young musicians bringing traditional songs and instruments to the forefront in an attempt to reassert a unique Estonian identity and keep the country’s ancient heritage alive.
1/17/20240
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Surrogacy advocates fear pope’s position will create stigma

Commercial surrogacy is banned in many European countries. In the US, the laws vary from state to state. The pope wants to see the practice outlawed worldwide.
1/16/20240
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All-women Estonian quartet brings ancient folk music to the forefront

The small Baltic nation of Estonia is experiencing a folk music renaissance, with young musicians bringing traditional songs and instruments to the forefront in an attempt to reassert a unique Estonian identity and keep the country’s ancient heritage alive. The post All-women Estonian quartet brings ancient folk music to the forefront appeared first on The World from PRX.
1/12/20240
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The humble origins of the ubiquitous ‘climate stripes’

When Ellie Highwood was crocheting a blanket as a baby gift in 2017, she wanted to make something that would mean something to the baby's climate-scientist parents. She ended up making a "global warming blanket." And she never could have guessed the impact that the blanket would have. The post The humble origins of the ubiquitous ‘climate stripes’ appeared first on The World from PRX.
1/11/20240
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The humble origins of the ubiquitous ‘climate stripes’

When Ellie Highwood was crocheting a blanket as a baby gift in 2017, she wanted to make something that would mean something to the baby's climate-scientist parents. She ended up making a "global warming blanket." And she never could have guessed the impact that the blanket would have.
1/11/20240
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‘Dining with the Sultan’: A unique exhibit explores the fine art of feasting in historic Islamic lands

A new exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art takes visitors on a journey to explore food and art through the Middle East and beyond. It includes recipes by an Iranian American chef dating back to 10th-century Baghdad and artwork influenced by different cultures.
1/11/20240
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‘Dining with the Sultan’: A unique exhibit explores the fine art of feasting in historic Islamic lands

A new exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art takes visitors on a journey to explore food and art through the Middle East and beyond. It includes recipes by an Iranian American chef dating back to 10th-century Baghdad and artwork influenced by different cultures. The post ‘Dining with the Sultan’: A unique exhibit explores the fine art of feasting in historic Islamic lands appeared first on The World from PRX.
1/11/20240
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Healing old wounds: The revival of Greenlandic Inuit tattoos in Denmark

Greenland’s Indigenous peoples once wore bold face tattoos that carried deep spiritual and cultural significance. But during the centuries of Denmark's colonial rule, the Inuit tradition of getting face and hand tattoos disappeared. One Inuk tattoo artist is now reviving a piece of Inuit heritage for community members living in Denmark. The post Healing old wounds: The revival of Greenlandic Inuit tattoos in Denmark appeared first on The World from PRX.
1/9/20240
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How the oud brought this Palestinian American musician closer to their culture, family and history

For Palestinians in the diaspora, staying connected to their ancestral home and making sense of the politics in the region has long been a challenge. Meklit Hadero, host of “Movement,” a series on music and migration, spoke with Clarissa Bitar, a Palestinian American who found that a musical instrument could bridge history and great distance. The post How the oud brought this Palestinian American musician closer to their culture, family and history appeared first on The World from PRX.
1/3/20240
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How the oud brought this Palestinian American musician closer to their culture, family and history

For Palestinians in the diaspora, staying connected to their ancestral home and making sense of the politics in the region has long been a challenge. Meklit Hadero, host of “Movement,” a series on music and migration, spoke with Clarissa Bitar, a Palestinian American who found that a musical instrument could bridge history and great distance.
1/3/20240
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A newly launched news channel in Iraq tries to preserve the ancient Syriac language

Al-Iraqiya news recently started a Syriac-language broadcast in an attempt to preserve the ancient language, which derives from Aramaic, the original language of the Bible and Jesus. They are based in Baghdad. People at the network and in the Iraqi Christian community talk about what this means for them.
12/29/20230
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The writer who published a satirical magazine while hiding in a Dutch home during WWII

From 1943 to 1945, Curt Bloch, a German Jew, published the magazine “Het Onderwater Cabaret” from a crawl space in the Dutch home he was hiding in. His work is being featured next year in an exhibit at the Jewish Museum Berlin.
12/26/20230
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German circus meets the Big Apple

New York’s Big Apple Circus is collaborating with a famed German circus this year, giving the annual show a distinctly European flair. Jeff Lunden reports on the mind-boggling juggling, the clowns and the poetry.
12/18/20230
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Film festival makes its way through Ecuador's Amazon by boat

For the past few weeks, a floating film festival has been plying the waters of Ecuador's Amazon region. The films are transported aboard a solar-powered boat. It stops in Indigenous communities along the rivers, sets up a projector, and shows films by and about Indigenous people around the globe.
12/11/20230
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'A link with my ancestors': Britons reconnect with Jewish roots for EU passports

Since the Brexit vote of 2016, hundreds of thousands of Britons have applied for citizenship of European countries, allowing them to continue to work and travel freely while holding onto their British passport. Thousands have been able to acquire passports of other European nations through sometimes distant Jewish roots.
11/27/20230
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The first Cuban tres players at Berklee

The national instrument of Cuba, the tres is gaining some attention in the US. For the very first time, Berklee College of Music in Boston admitted two students of Cuban tres this year.
11/22/20230
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New book taps into the cultural history of eyeliner

For centuries, eyeliner has been seen as a staple, and often the only beauty item some women and men wear. In culture journalist Zahra Hankir's latest book, "Eyeliner: A Cultural History," readers learn how eyeliner isn't just some superficial beauty hack and that in many cultures around the world, it has been revolutionized and popularized by people of color for medicinal purposes, authority and its cultural ties.
11/21/20230
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'Existing and resisting': Black quilombo communities fight for land, rights in Brazil

Monday is Black Consciousness Day in Brazil. It falls on day of death of Zumbi dos Palmares, the leader of Palmares Quilombo, a community of runaway slaves and their descendants, in 1695. There are still thousands of quilombos across Brazil, and many continue to fight for their land and their rights.
11/20/20230
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A food writer celebrates the tastes of her hometown: Lagos, Nigeria

New York Times food writer Yewande Komolafe grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. When she moved to the US in her late teens, she recreated her favorite dishes by memory. Now she celebrates her home town's cuisine in her new book: "My Everyday Lagos: Nigerian Cooking at Home and in the Diaspora." Host Marco Werman speaks to Komolafe about what inspired her book.
11/16/20230
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College football hype can be lost in translation for international students

If you're not from the US, football and its traditions can be bewildering. To help their international students, many universities now offer a crash course in the rules, scoring and, of course, fight songs. Shannon Young reports from football-crazed Boulder, Colorado, that the classes aren't just to help international students understand football but American culture.
11/15/20230
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In Argentina, ‘Swifties Don’t Vote For Milei’

Just days before the presidential elections in Argentina, Taylor Swift fans wanted to make sure their voices were heard. Pink posters with the caption: "Swifties Don't Vote for Milei” were spotted all around the country’s biggest stadium, where the pop star recently performed three sold-out concerts. Javier Milei is a far-right libertarian candidate who has proposed radical changes if elected.
11/15/20230
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American World War II doctor in Italy captures scenes of wartime beyond the front lines 

Lt. Col. Manuel E. Lichtenstein was a doctor in southern Italy during World War II. He met with top generals and won prestigious awards. Stories about his three harrowing years there were passed down in his family. But an old box of photos he took — of simple moments with everyday people — reveal a different view of life during wartime, away from the front lines.
11/10/20230
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Saving Ukraine’s cultural heritage with a click

Since the beginning of Russia's large-scale invasion of Ukraine, Moscow has been bombing uniquely Ukrainian cultural sites. Preservationists are using "photogrammetry" — the act of deriving precise measurements from taking overlapping photos and rendering them in three dimensions. Dina Temple-Raston, the host of "Click Here," was recently in Ukraine and met those working to preserve the country's heritage — on their phones.
11/9/20230
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Roman Catholic Church remains inconclusive about reforms for women, LGBTQ after monthlong meeting wraps

More than 450 church leaders from around the world came to the Vatican in early October to debate this and other questions during the latest synod, a monthlong meeting to discuss the church’s future. Their conclusion: more research is needed.
11/2/20230
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Spanish musician María José Llergo turns roots into wings with ‘Ultrabelleza’

​​​​​​​The Spanish artist María José Llergo has just released her first full-length album, called “Ultrabelleza.” Her voice carries the legacy of flamenco, the traditional music of her homeland, but on this new record, her roots have turned into wings, allowing her to explore other genres.
10/27/20230
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Zimbabwe's stone sculptors struggle to keep carving

International art collectors purchased many of Zimbabwe's massive stone carvings. But buyers stopped coming in 2000 after conflict over land reform policies led to violence. Some sculptors are still trying to keep their art alive.
10/26/20230
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How this Cambodian American singer found her voice

Chhom Nimol is the lead singer of the band Dengue Fever, based in Los Angeles, California. In this installment of “Movement,” a series on music and migration, we hear from Nimol about how she found her singing voice.
10/26/20230
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This Spanish hip-hop star is stepping into global music

Ever heard of Celtic Trap? It’s not exactly a thing yet, but it might be soon thanks to C. Tangana in the mix.
10/25/20230
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‘Happiness is in your hands’: Young Jain women continue to renounce the world

The Jain religious community in India makes up less than than 1% of the population. A steady number of them — even children — are renouncing the material world to join Jain monasteries.
10/24/20230
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For ‘dinosaur music,’ prehistoric instruments set the tone

Musicians Anže Rozman and Kara Talve invented prehistoric instruments to help transport viewers back in time for the BBC series, “Prehistoric Planet.”
10/19/20230
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'The cosmovision of our ancestors': Panama witnesses first solar eclipse in 25 years

Saturday’s solar eclipse cut across the western United States, dipping down into parts of Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and Brazil. It was Panama’s first eclipse in 25 years and it came at an auspicious time when scientists are promoting an interest in astronomy. 
10/16/20230
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Australians ready for a historic referendum recognizing First Nations people

On Oct. 14, Australians will vote on a referendum that would officially recognize First Nations people for the first time and establish an advisory body called Voice to Parliament.
10/13/20230
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‘Walking soccer’ trend in Spain keeps people of all ages in the game

Soccer is a sport with lots of contact – and injuries. But imagine the game played much slower. In Barcelona, “walking soccer” allows soccer lovers of all ages to continue playing the game.
10/13/20230
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Costa Rica is Catholic by law, but the president is courting evangelicals

​​​​​​​Costa Rica is the only country in the Western Hemisphere with a state religion. The religion is Catholicism. But what happens when a president is elected promising to lift evangelical voices to the fore?
10/11/20230
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We want you: Russia, Ukraine and US run ads targeting Russians

In recent months, Russia, Ukraine and the US have been running online ad campaigns all targeting Russian citizens. Russia wants more men to join its military. Ukraine wants them to lay down their arms. And the US is looking to recruit spies.
10/11/20230
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Artist Daniel Jobim honors the musical legacy of his grandfather, a bossa nova pioneer

Daniel Jobim is now on the road playing his grandad's music on tour with Seu Jorge, another Brazilian superstar. 
10/6/20230
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‘Finding my home’: Mural features student poem about move to Miami

What does it mean to find home in a new country and a new language? That’s the inspiration behind a massive new mural in Miami Beach – created by a Spanish art collective known for its vibrant designs and unconventional canvases.
10/5/20230
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Rural communities in the Amazon face a complex world of carbon credits

Brazil has embraced carbon credits as a way to protect the Amazon and mitigate climate change. But many community activists in the Amazon say carbon offset projects can be problematic.
10/3/20230
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A modern take on an ancient Chinese folk tale

The new opera, “Monkey: A Kung Fu Puppet Parable,” had its world premiere in Boston over the weekend. The story is based on an ancient Chinese folk tale and uses modern and diverse cultural elements to create a unique rendition of the popular fable.
9/28/20230
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‘It’s all mixed’: Sasami makes music inspired by her multicultural heritage 

Sasami’s latest album, “Squeeze,” is a musical concoction of different genres and influences — including her family’s multicultural heritage as zainichi Koreans. Meklit Hadero, host of “Movement,” our series on music and migration, speaks with Sasami about her family history and upbringing. 
9/28/20230
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Mexican American teen star sings on after heated controversy with Mexican audiences

Yahritza Martinez, 16, went from apple picking in rural Washington, to becoming a TikTok sensation and chart-topping musician. But her career nearly came to a halt after her comments about Mexico went viral. Despite the controversy, Martinez played at a major Mexican Independence Day concert in Mexico City — but some fans were not yet ready to embrace her.
9/26/20230
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Spain all-boys choir finds a new tune and admits girls

After more than 700 uninterrupted years of boys-only belting, Spain’s La Escolania de Montserrat Choir is finally mixing things up. Beginning this September, a select group of girls will be allowed to join the boys at the altar, singing the liturgy at Saturday afternoon and Sunday masses. Choir organizers are calling it a revolution.
9/26/20230
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A new book explores Taiwan's culinary identity

The culinary contributions of Taiwan are often overshadowed by other cuisine from the region, especially China. Now, a new cookbook highlights some of the ingredients and flavors that make Taiwanese cooking unique.
9/25/20230
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Tibetan monks on tour in US as China continues to restrict religion in Tibet

A group of Tibetan Buddhist monks, living in exile in India, are doing a “sacred arts tour” this month in the US. They’re demonstrating an ancient artistic and spiritual practice, creating big, colorful sand mandalas. They say Buddhist traditions like this are under threat because of Chinese government policies in their historic homeland of Tibet.
9/19/20230
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'She is the evolution of reggaeton': The rise of trans Puerto Rican artist Villano Antillano

Puerto Rican rapper Villano Antillano is a leading voice in a new generation of LGBTQ artists subverting traditional gender norms in reggaeton and reclaiming the political roots of the genre.
9/8/20230
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‘This is not a peaceful country’: Violence and poverty soar in Costa Rica

Costa Rica sells its image as a “green paradise,” with ample nature reserves and no standing military. But many say this reputation is more myth than reality as violence, poverty and unemployment is on the rise.
9/8/20230
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Motherhood and motherland: One woman’s pregnancy experience in Russia

Amie Ferris-Rotman, a global news editor for New Lines Magazine, wrote a personal essay about her experience being pregnant in Russia, where many citizens believe it is a woman’s patriotic duty to give birth and become a mother. She talked about it with The World's Marco Werman.
9/7/20230
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'Planet Hip Hop': The music will always be the voice of the people, Samy Alim says

As we wrap up “Planet Hip Hop,” our summer series celebrating 50 years of hip-hop music around the world, H. Samy Alim returns to talk with host Marco Werman about the next 50 years. Alim is an anthropology professor and the director of the Hip Hop Initiative at UCLA. 
9/6/20230
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Student loans can be ‘simple’ and ‘automatic.’ Other countries offer lessons to the US.

In the US, interest on student loans started accruing again on Sept. 1. Soon, more than 40 million borrowers will have to resume their payments. The US is an outlier when it comes to high tuition and the debts that students take on.
9/5/20230
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London's foxes: Pesky pests or celebrated survivors?

Foxes have played a role London's landscape for a century. But they're being increasingly seen as pests, who raid trash cans and cause fear and annoyance. Reporter Rebecca Rosman talks to a photographer and a historian who want to celebrate the foxes of London.
8/31/20230
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Barcelona gets bombarded by selfie-taking tourists

Spain’s on the rebound with tourism after huge losses during the pandemic. Those in the tourism business are relieved. But visitors are back with a vengeance and they’re not always well-behaved, irking locals who miss the quieter days.
8/29/20230
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This Crimean Tatar singer gives voice to her homeland with a new album

Jamala, an Indigenous Crimean Tatar, often talks about how her heritage shapes her music. Her new album, “Qirim,” or “Crimea,” is a sort of ode to her country, with 14 epic Crimean Tatar folk songs.
8/28/20230
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Ecuadorian group creates political hip-hop with bunnies and clowns

Mugre Sur is known for their deeply political songs — and also their sense of humor. They’re tackling Ecuador’s political turmoil in their upcoming album,  “Sudamericamente.”
8/22/20230
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Demise of ‘Crooked House’ pub is cautionary tale about loss of British heritage

The mysterious demolition of a lopsided 18th-century pub in England has infuriated the local community and raised questions about the loss of British heritage and the demise of the country’s famous pub culture.
8/21/20230
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World’s faith leaders convene to ‘fight against authoritarianism’

​​​​​​​People of faith gathered in Chicago this week to talk about something that doesn’t sound very religious. And that’s authoritarianism. It wasn’t a traditional political rally for a specific candidate. They’re taking part in the Parliament of the World’s Religions, an interfaith convening that first took place in the late 1800s. People from many different religious traditions took part. 
8/18/20230
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Colombian activists try to shame city government into fixing broken sidewalks — by painting them pink

In Colombia's capital city Bogotá, pedestrians need to watch out for loose slabs of pavement they can trip over, or wobbly tiles that get their feet wet or splash dirty water on their pants. But some activists have started trying to shame the city into making repairs more quickly by covering the broken spots with pink paint and black Xs. 
8/17/20230
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Korean revenge film 'Oldboy' returns to theaters for its 20th anniversary

In 2020, the Korean film "Parasite" made history at the Oscars when it became the first non-English language film to win best picture. But before "Parasite," there was a different Korean film occupying the international cinematic landscape: a 2003 movie called "Oldboy." It's being rereleased in theaters on Wednesday for its 20th anniversary.
8/16/20230
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Indian women do less paid work. It’s bad news for the economy.

Across the world, higher economic growth has seen a rise in women’s employment, according to the United Nations. But India is bucking that trend, where educated women are working less in paid positions.
8/15/20230
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Women rap artists a driving force as hip-hop turns 50

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of hip-hop, The World's Marco Werman looks at women who are rocking the mic across the globe. He dives in with Msia Kibona Clark from the department of African Studies at Howard University and host of the "Hip Hop African" podcast.
8/11/20230
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‘Sing every single song like it’s your last’: How conflict in Sarajevo changed this musician’s life

Thirty years ago, war raged in the city of Sarajevo in the former Yugoslavia, where Gino Yevdjevich was once a pop artist. In our latest segment of “Movement,” our series on music and migration, we hear how this conflict changed Gino’s life and led him to create the Seattle-based punk band Kultur Shock.
8/9/20230
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​​Los Lobos celebrates 50th anniversary

The iconic East Los Angeles band Los Lobos is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Their blend of rock ’n’ roll and traditional Mexican music has stayed consistent over generations. Members of the band, which formed when they were in high school, reflect with The World's host Marco Werman on their staying power.
8/8/20230
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‘Planet Hip Hop:’ The evolution of Korean rap

As part of our summer series, "Planet Hip Hop," we take you to South Korea, where hip-hop found its footing in the 1990s. Haekyung Um has written extensively about Korean pop culture and also teaches global popular music and Asian music industries at the University of Liverpool. She joined The World’s host Marco Werman to talk about the evolution of hip-hop and rap in South Korea. 
8/3/20230
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The changing landscape for Sweden’s successful music industry

​​​​​​​The Nordic nation is the third-largest exporter of pop music in the world, after the US and the UK. But musicians in Sweden are worried that the country's changing political climate could endanger this great Swedish success story. 
8/3/20230
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1,000-year-old Gion Matsuri festival resumes in Kyoto, Japan

After four years of pandemic shutdowns, the grand Gion Matsuri festival resumed in all its glory this July, with bells, gongs and flutes chiming atop massive floats decked out in lavish tapestries and treasures.
7/31/20230
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‘Planet Hip Hop': Senegalese rappers push for social and political change

This summer, we are taking you on a global journey to celebrate the 50th anniversary of hip-hop. In Senegal, hip-hop has evolved from something of a fad, to an influential force for social change.
7/27/20230
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‘It’s not about you, it’s about the conversation’: This Belgian music duo gets you dancing — and talking

In our latest installment of “Movement,” our series on music and migration, Meklit Hadero speaks with Belgian artists Charlotte Adigéry and Bolis Pupul, who are trying to start difficult conversations through music.
7/26/20230
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Finnish Moomins book series finds new audiences in the US

​​​​​​​The Moomins are troll-like characters from a Finnish children's book series that became popular around the world starting in the 1950s. But they never really took off in the United States. The author Tove Jansson rejected Walt Disney's offer to buy the brand. Now, a bookstore chain in the US is trying to popularize the Moomins here.
7/25/20230
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This Israeli rapper brings people together through multilingual lyrics

Noam Tsuriely is a 28-year-old Jewish Israeli hip-hop artist from Jerusalem He says he likes to rap in both Hebrew and Arabic to get Israelis and Palestinians to learn both languages, so they can understand each other better. Tsuriely's story is the latest in The World's summer "Planet Hip Hop" series.
7/21/20230
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"We are dead inside:’ Women in Afghanistan protest Taliban ban of beauty salons

The ban will come into effect in five days, leaving roughly 60,000 women out of work.
7/20/20230
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Pokémon fever once again grips fans around the world

The 27-year-old Japanese trading card franchise has exploded in popularity in recent years, leading to frenzied fans, collectors and Pokémon card players fighting for the best cards.
7/19/20230
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More Armenians in California are moving back to their parents' native land

California is home to the largest Armenian diaspora. Since the end of the recent conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan, there’s been a reverse migration of children of Armenian migrants in the US back to Armenia. They’re starting businesses, getting jobs and moving back with their families to set up homes.
7/19/20230
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A traditional Iranian sport has been closed off to women. One activist wants to change that.

Varzeshe Pahlavani is a mix of martial arts, wrestling and calisthenics. It has deep roots in Persian tradition going back centuries. The sport is officially closed off to women, but one female Iranian activist is trying to change that.
7/18/20230
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A ‘green road’ leads displaced Ukrainians to shelter in ecovillages

The Green Road project has helped over 3,000 displaced Ukrainians find safe housing in ecovillages throughout Ukraine and across Europe — including the idyllic, rural community of Hallingelille, just outside of Ringsted, in Denmark. The project is a testament to the power of international friendships and networks in times of crisis. 
7/18/20230
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Mahraganat artists in Egypt are defining hip-hop culture, despite government crackdowns

Hip-hop has taken root in Egypt. Authorities are trying to suppress it. But the raw power of the music may be unstoppable. Yasmine el Rashidi, author of "Laughter in the Dark: Egypt to the Tune of Change," tells host Marco Werman how young Egyptians are pushing hip-hop to the limit.
7/14/20230
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Venezuelan artist uses recycled bottle caps to create large eco-murals

Oscar Olivares plans to take his ecological art global in hopes of promoting sustainable practices and educating communities on how to recycle.
7/10/20230
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Contemporary African animators make their mark on the international scene

The current writer's strike in the United States jeopardizing content creation for streaming services might, in fact, help international film and television productions fill the gap and reach global audiences.
7/5/20230
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A silent movie cinema thrives in Brussels

For most of the world, silent films died out in the 1930s. But in Brussels, the only remaining cinema in the world with a regular schedule of silent films, with live piano accompaniment, is thriving. 
7/5/20230
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Planet Hip Hop: How French rappers continue to raise their voices for justice and identity

The World’s “Planet Hip Hop” series takes us to France, where hip-hop is second only to the US in terms of popularity and influence. Samuel Lamontagne, co-leader of the UCLA Hip Hop Initiative, explains the power of hip-hop and its evolution in France.
6/29/20230
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'It's time that we face the issue': #MeToo movement gains momentum in Taiwan

Although the movement began within political parties, it’s since spread to many other sectors of society such as entertainment and academia. And in some cases, there’s even been a backlash.  
6/28/20230
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‘It’s the new soccer, where stars are born’: Trap music boom inspires Argentine youth

The latest installment of The World's "Planet Hip Hop" series takes us to Argentina, where trap music has a huge following. From their bedrooms, aspiring artists remix their favorite trap songs and record music of their own.
6/28/20230
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Why are some sounds funny?

To English speakers, the word, “peanut” isn’t especially funny. But “peanut” in Serbian, “kikiriki” is widely considered by Serbs to be the funniest word in their language. This raises the question of why people laugh at some words (“poop”) but not at others (“treadmill”). Does it come down to their meanings? Or are people responding to their sounds? Psycholinguist Chris Westbury set out to discover the answer.
6/27/20230
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Young Russian game designers find a new home in Serbia

About a dozen Russian game developers have wound up in the quiet city of Subotica, on the border of Serbia and Hungary, to start over after fleeing Russia. Some left after facing arrest for aiding Ukraine, while others wanted to avoid getting drafted.
6/20/20230
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Georgia's famous Borjomi water company takes a hit during Russia-Ukraine war

Georgia’s beloved Borjomi mineral water can be found anywhere from Kyiv to Kazakhstan. But Russia's war in Ukraine has hurt the company’s bottom line.
6/16/20230
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Hip-hop artists in India call out caste discrimination 

In India, artists are using hip-hop to stand up to one of the world's oldest forms of discrimination: caste. In recent years, a new wave of Dalit artists is wielding some of the same musical elements that Black artists began channeling decades ago to call out prejudice and injustice.
6/15/20230
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How the Bologna Process expanded opportunities for students across Europe

Exchange programs allow students to move freely between universities across the European Union, while paying local tuition fees — which, in some cases, can be free. The Bologna Process has united university degrees across the continent under a common set of quality assurance controls and recognition standards.
6/15/20230
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Crossing borders: Living in one country, going to school in another

Thousands of students attending US colleges and universities actually reside in Mexico. The World's Marco Werman speaks to teacher Joanna Esser and Tijuana student Carlos Tenorio from Southwestern College in Chula Vista, California, about what it's like to cross borders daily for education.
6/14/20230
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Catalan separatists want university classes taught in the local language. Spanish academics resist the change. 

​​​​​​​Language has always been at the heart of the Catalan people’s campaign for independence. And the regional government is once again demanding that university professors teach their courses in Catalan. But does the Catalan-language law further the nationalist cause, or leave the region more isolated? Professors are already rebelling. 
6/14/20230
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Beirut museum damaged by blast reopens

In 2020, a deadly blast at Beirut port destroyed the much-beloved Sursock Museum. Parts of the 20th-century building’s architecture, reflecting both Venetian and Ottoman stylistic elements, were damaged, along with 57 works of art. Now, almost three years later, the museum has reopened.
6/13/20230
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Barcelona’s Primavera Sound festival grows even larger

Music festivals are ever-expanding enterprises, adding new locations and dates, even if they're repeating the same line-up.
6/12/20230
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Taiwan's political parties beset by sexual harassment allegations

Taiwan is having a #MeToo reckoning about sexual harassment in politics, several years after other parts of the world. Despite the relatively high number of women in public office, many instances of sexual harassment in the political scene have been ignored or covered up.
6/9/20230
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Planet Hip Hop: The World celebrates 50 years of hip-hop around the globe

Hip-hop turns 50 this summer, and its influence has been felt in all corners of the globe. From the streets of the Bronx to a revolution in Beirut, from anti-apartheid messages in Cape Town to graffiti in Cairo. Throughout the summer, we will be exploring Planet Hip Hop.
6/8/20230
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This blues musician fled Russia for Serbia. But he sounds like he came straight from the Mississippi Delta.

It only took one listen for musician Sergei Grin (a.k.a. “Gringo”) to hear the blues and know that's what he was meant to play. Grin, who is originally from St. Petersburg, Russia, now travels around Serbia with his guitar, singing American country music and blues. 
6/5/20230
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Ukrainians embrace tattoos as a form of patriotism

In many ways, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has become a war of identity and self-expression. Many Ukranians are turning to tattoos to show their patriotism.
5/31/20230
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This Jerusalem tattoo studio is part of a centuries-old Christian tradition 

The Razzouk family in the Old City of Jerusalem has been doing Christian-themed tattoos going back to the 1300s. Today, tattoo artist Wassim Razzouk and his sons carry on a Coptic Christian tradition of tattoo artistry, attracting people who come from all over the world to the family shop to get inked.
5/26/20230
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Ukrainian rock band Vopli Vidopliassova and fans rediscover an old hit 

​​​​​​​In 1989, the Ukrainian punk rock band Vopli Vidopliassova released an album called “Tantsi” or “Dances.” In 2019, the original session tape was rediscovered, and in 2023, Tantsi was finally officially released.
5/25/20230
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Tokyo’s trash-collecting samurai takes a fun, zany approach to cleanup

They call themselves the Gomi Hiroi Samurai — or the “Samurai Who Pick Up Litter.” These sword-wielding eco-warriors have turned garbage collecting into a choreographed performance. 
5/19/20230
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This fashion brand modernizes Ukraine’s traditional vyshyvanka shirt and dress to reflect wartime

​​​​​​​Despite the ongoing attacks, Ukrainians around the world are celebrating Vyshyvanka Day on Thursday. The vyshyvanka is an elaborately embroidered shirt or dress traditionally worn in Ukraine.
5/18/20230
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Romania's traditional blouse industry under threat by mass production of fake replicas

​​​​​​​The Romanian blouse, IA, is one of the best-known symbols of Romania’s culture. But cheap replicas manufactured in China and India threaten the future of the homegrown industry.
5/15/20230
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Russian artists in exile create new identity and work 

At the start of the war in Ukraine, much of Russia's cultural elite fled the country, including playwrights, filmmakers, artist and curators. A year on, they have established themselves in new cities across the world, a century after a previous exodus of Russian writers and artists reshaped global culture.
5/11/20230
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Migration across Darién Gap changes Colombian village’s economy

In the small village of Capurgana, at the entrance to the Darién jungle and near Colombia’s border with Panama, hundreds of villagers now work as guides and porters leading migrants across the rainforest.
5/11/20230
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Japanese restaurants use AI to combat sushi terrorism

​​​​​​​The latest disturbing TikTok trend in Japan features young pranksters who are contaminating sushi that is served on conveyor belts in restaurants. They share videos of themselves licking sushi rolls or otherwise contaminating plates and condiments. Some restaurants are using AI to fight back.
5/10/20230
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El Fuego volcano erupts in Guatemala

​​​​​​​The El Fuego volcano in Guatemala spewed lava and ash over part of the country last week. Thousands evacuated the area, and many more were exposed to dangerous ash. 
5/9/20230
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This 80-year-old pudding maker in Tokyo goes viral for his flan-flinging flair

For more than five decades now, Shizuo Mori, now 80, has been waking up at 4 a.m. to prepare the famous flan-style puddings he serves at Hecklen, his cozy corner café in Tokyo’s Toranomon neighborhood.  
5/9/20230
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Liverpool steps in to host Eurovision Song Contest

Last year's winners from Ukraine are unable to host in-country this year due to ongoing conflict with Russia, so Liverpool is stepping in. To learn more about it, The World's Carol Hills spoke to Dr. Eurovision, himself, Paul Jordan.
5/8/20230
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How a group of Cuban female musicians claimed a drum — and a tradition

The legendary group Obiní Batá is celebrating 30 years of music and women’s empowerment in Cuba. But the road to acceptance and success was not easy. 
5/5/20230
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Young people in Spain use punk rock to vent their frustrations

In Spain, there have been an increasing number of punk concerts taking place each month, with the genre seeing a rise in popularity.
5/4/20230
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New Kings and Queens soccer leagues enlist internet stars to revamp sport

The game is loosely based on soccer, but immersed in video game culture and reality TV antics. In Barcelona, Spain, the second season of the Kings League kicks off the first weekend of May alongside the first season of the Queens League. This summer, the Prince Cup will launch for kids ages 9 to 11.
5/2/20230
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'Winnie and Nelson': A new book explores a fraught political partnership

Author Jonny Steinberg’s new book, "Winnie and Nelson: Portrait of a Marriage," explores the complex relationship between Nelson Mandela and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, two of the world’s best-known freedom fighters. Steinberg joined The World’s host Marco Werman to discuss the fraught political partnership of these iconic revolutionaries.
5/1/20230
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Portugal’s president says country should apologize, 'assume responsibility' for slave trade

This week, President Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa said Portugal should formally apologize for its role in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The Portuguese were responsible for selling nearly 6 million people into slavery — mostly in Brazil. Some activists and scholars say an apology is just a start and there's still a long way to go.
4/28/20230
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‘Out of reach’: Over 40 academic editors leave global publishing company they say overcharged to publish their work

​​​​​​University professors and researchers depend on getting published. So it was considered a bold move when the editors of two prestigious brain journals resigned en masse this month after the publisher refused to lower the fees it charges academics to publish their work.
4/28/20230
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Indian govt removes parts of Muslim history from federal textbooks

The Indian government’s new school textbooks have significant deletions in them related to Muslims in Indian history. Some historians accuse the ruling BJP government of rewriting the country's history to suit its Hindu nationalist ideology.
4/28/20230
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In Russia, a novel about a summer romance between two men sparks outrage

Novels about queer topics have been pulled from bookstores in Russia under a recent law that bans all mention of LGBTQ life in popular culture. It's part of a regional crackdown against novelists and poets.
4/26/20230
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You can ring this 'fish doorbell' to help marine life in the Netherlands

The World's Carol Hills spoke to Anne Nejs, an urban ecologist for the city of Utrecht, who worked on creating the doorbell back in 2021. She says mid-April is the best time of the season to go fish-doorbelling.
4/21/20230
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Archaeologists uncover ancient Moorish waterways to irrigate Granada 

The Moors, who ruled in Spain, had a network of canals 800 years ago that moved water from the Sierra Nevada down into cities and farms. Archaeologists today are trying to uncover those canals, and put the ancient wisdom about irrigation to use today.
4/20/20230
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Sudanese American rapper Oddisee on overcoming cultural taboos and confronting self-doubt

"Movement" host Meklit Hadero speaks with Sudanese American MC Oddisee about his new album, "To What End," which grew out of a period of intense self-doubt.
4/19/20230
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South Africa’s Pilani Bubu has ‘jumped off the shoulder of giants’ to create music filled with tradition

The singer-songwriter has always straddled between the worlds of globalization and the traditions of her homeland.
4/17/20230
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'The Stolen Daughters of Chibok': the impact of the abduction of Nigerian schoolgirls 9 years on

Author and human rights activist Aisha Muhammed-Oyebode documented the heartbreaking stories of the Chibok families nine years after the Boko Haram abductions that gripped the world’s attention.
4/13/20230
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Uganda's LGBTQ crackdown could have a ripple effect in Ghana and other African countries

Uganda recently passed a law that criminalizes homosexuality, punishable by death. LGBTQ people and human rights advocates fear that the Ugandan law may empower anti-LGBTQ movements elsewhere on the continent.
4/11/20230
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Spain's small-town bars get a boost with proposed subsidies

The beating heart of village life in Spain is the local bar, and many of these establishments need urgent life support. Spanish politicians have voted to offer the watering holes public subsidies. Their reasoning: bars serve much more than beer.
4/10/20230
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'Can we reject these labels?': A new book questions how patriarchy became the norm.

How did patriarchy become common around the world, and can we change the dominance of men in societies? Science journalist Angela Saini explores these questions in her new book, "The Patriarchs; The Origins of Inequality."
4/7/20230
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Polish cheesemakers bask in newfound fame

The food website Taste Atlas recently rated the light and creamy bundz, made from sheep's milk, as one of the top cheeses in the world. The cheese doesn't come from France or Italy — it comes from the southern mountains of Poland.
4/7/20230
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Many Jews this year will celebrate Passover with a traditional reading in Ukrainian for the first time 

The night of April 5 marks the beginning of Passover. Traditionally, Jewish families gather around the dinner table for the holiday with a festive meal where they eat matzah and read aloud from the Haggadah. The text tells the Passover story, guiding readers through a tale of redemption. On Wednesday night, many Ukrainians will be reading the Haggadah in their own language for the first time.
4/5/20230
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Daughter of South Sudanese freedom fighters reflects on family and country

Concerned that her mother's legacy would be forgotten, filmmaker Akuol de Mabior set out to create a new documentary called “No Simple Way Home.” It tells the story of Rebecca Nyandeng de Mabior's contributions to the liberation of South Sudan.
4/3/20230
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Vatican rejects Doctrine of Discovery after years of pressure from Indigenous activists

The 15th-century Doctrine of Discovery provided the legal basis for the colonial-era seizure of Native lands. Sociology professor Cora Voyageur, who is also a member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, joined The World's host Carol Hills to discuss the significance of the Vatican's repudiation of the doctrine.
3/30/20230
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Montreal Canadiens superfans brace for historic record to be smashed

The Boston Bruins are on the verge of making history — eclipsing the Montreal Canadiens' coveted record of most points scored in a regular season, set back in 1977.
3/30/20230
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Divisions among Orthodox church communities widen amid war in Ukraine

This month, the Ukrainian government issued an eviction notice to clergy at Pecherska Lavra, where some Orthodox Christians may still have close ties with Russia.
3/29/20230
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Looted relics returned to Cambodia receive monks’ blessings

Cambodian artifacts were often looted out of the country beginning in the 1970s, under control of the Khmer Rouge. At least 13 antiquities have been returned this month amid a push in the art world from artists and scholars to return looted works to their countries of origin. 
3/28/20230
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Vietnam draft dodgers who settled in Canada have influenced some of its small towns for generations

Tens of thousands of young American men went to Canada to avoid being conscripted to fight in Vietnam. Some Canadians welcomed them, while others wanted nothing to do with these "hippies." But many of those who stayed — and half of them did — would go on to be leaders in their communities as politicians, environmental activists and teachers and have a lasting impact on Canada's small towns.
3/28/20230
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Erol Josué’s new album Pèlerinaj highlights Haiti’s Vodou tradition and the artist’s own pilgrimage

The 18 tracks on "Pèlerinaj," or “pilgrimage” in Haitian Creole, are a mix of sacred Vodou chants and traditional Haitian rhythms with funk, jazz, rock and electronic music.
3/24/20230
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India's tramway turned 150. But it’s on its last legs.

​​​​​​​Kolkata's 150-year-old tram system is limping along. It's down to just two lines and there is little political will, or room in the city's crowded streets, to bring the streetcars back to their former glory days. The tram does have a small but loyal band of supporters who want to keep it alive.
3/21/20230
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Faith and family sustain this Kyiv family in wartime Ukraine

Sasha Shulyahina was 38-weeks pregnant when Russian forces invaded Ukraine in late February 2022. Motherhood and her faith continue to sustain her through a year of war.
3/17/20230
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Art historians debate identity of iconic Mariupol painter

Arkhyp Kuindzhi is a revered artist who was born in the Russian empire. He was from Mariupol, which is now part of the modern Ukrainian state, sparking a debate among art historians: Should he be considered a Ukrainian or a Russian artist?
3/17/20230
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Prominent Afghan news organization reports on life under Taliban rule from Maryland 

The investigative newspaper Etilaatroz opened a new newsroom in an office building in Silver Spring, Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC.
3/16/20230
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Gloria Estefan is set to be the first Hispanic woman to be inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame

She's already won numerous awards and has been a pioneer of Latin music.
3/16/20230
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'We have to keep on living’: The search for love in wartime Ukraine

The stress of war is a litmus test for relationships.
3/14/20230
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This 16th-century epic poem sparks political controversy in India

In recent months, a 16th-century epic religious poem has ignited a political storm in India, after several officials said it was offensive to women and those at the bottom of India’s religious caste hierarchy. As the country heads toward general elections next year, some say that different parties are using the poem to appeal to various voters.
3/10/20230
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Athletes in Ukraine strive for Olympic gold 

As Ukrainian athletes train for the Summer Olympics next year in Paris, it is unclear whether or not Russian athletes will be allowed to compete in the Games.
3/9/20230
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Artist Yun-Fei Ji grew up during China's Cultural Revolution. He ponders art as 'global citizenship.'

Ji produces paintings using traditional Chinese methods, such as calligraphy and ink painting, to address serious contemporary topics such as migration, the environment and social issues. 
3/9/20230