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Podcast Inglês Online

Portuguese, Education, 1 season, 200 episodes, 13 hours, 40 minutes
About
Aprenda os idioms e phrasal verbs mais comuns do inglês toda semana em menos de cinco minutos, com as explicações super fáceis de entender da Ana Luiza do site Inglês Online. Tudo que você ouvir nos episódios é usado no inglês de todo dia. Nível de compreensão recomendado: intermediário e acima.
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Podcast: You got this

How have you been? Hoje o episódio é sobre duas expressões fáceis, fáceis. Veja só como são fáceis: You got it! e You got this. Né? Mas minha pergunta a você é sempre essa: Você já usa estes idioms sem pensar? Se a resposta for não, você precisa ouvi-los mais vezes... Simples. Enjoy! Transcrição Hello. How are you? What's going on? How have you been? Well... Today we have a new episode of the Inglês Onlines podcast, obviously. This is Ana, as you know. Unless this is your first time listening to the podcast, but here we go. Today, I have two really quick and really nice expressions. Both of them with the verb 'get', but in the past - 'got'. These are really, really informal. If you watch any shows at all... If you have the habit of watching TV or movies, American sitcoms... You have definitely heard these before, both of them. But my goal is always enough input that these expressions actually get in your head - because the more input you have, the more you will become acquainted, or... used to these expressions. And as you know, there's a tipping point. After that tipping point, that expression just starts coming to your mind whenever you want to express that idea. Here you go. First one is you got it. This simply means someone is telling you that you will get what you want. Let's say you have a friend who owns a company, and your friend really likes you and trusts you. And let's say it's a guy. This guy has been asking you forever to join his company and to work with him, let's say as a salesperson. And you're finally willing to work with him. You're finally at a place where you're saying: Ok, yes, I'll join your company, I'll work for you. However, you say to your friend: Ok, I'll take the job if I get a company car. And what does your friend say? Your friend really wants you. He says: You got it! You got it. You got the car. Ok, you got it, it's yours. You want the car, you got it. Next example. Let's say your neighbor asks you to move his furniture. Let's say it's a girl. she's asking you to help: "Oh, can you please help me move my furniture? It's a lot of stuff. It's kind of heavy. Please help". And you know that she has a bike, and you don't... And you want to ride somewhere on the weekend and you need a bike. So you tell your neighbor: Ok, I'll help you move the furniture if you loan me your bike for the weekend. And she says: You got it! You got it. The bike is yours for the weekend... You got it. Third example: Let's say your friend Jack got two tickets to a theater play and for some reason he's not going anymore. You and your girlfriend really want to see that play. You say to Jack: Hey, if you're not going to use those tickets - can I have them? And Jack is a really generous guy. He says: You got them! You got them. Notice that I'm using "them" right? I'm talking about two tickets. He just says: You got them. Okay, guys. Now, the second expression is actually one of my favorites because it's an expression of encouragement. It's really nice when someone says that to you. Let's say you're talking to a colleague, and you're talking about this presentation that you have tomorrow... And you've been preparing, you've been working really hard because you're going to... present, let's say, to a client. And your colleague has been listening to you talk about the presentation and he says: You know what? You got this. You got this. That means your colleague believes you're completely capable of doing this. You will have no problem being a success. He believes you will be a success. "You got this". Notice the emphasis on the word 'got'. Let's say you're on a phone call with your boss, and you're just about to step into a sales meeting with a big client. And your boss, who trusts you, says: "Hey, good luck. You got this. You got this." Or you're about to take an exam and you've been studying for this exam for months now. You're about to hop on the bus, or drive to the exam place, and your roommate says "Hey,
2/6/20205 minutes, 12 seconds
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Podcast: What’s been going on with the Royals?

How’s it going? No episódio desta semana do podcast, eu comento as últimas da família real britânica. Se você é uma pessoa que não tem muito interesse nesse assunto, não se preocupe: eu também não. Mas o bafafá foi tanto por aqui no último mês que eu tinha que falar alguma coisa! Ouça o meu resumo, pois ele tem tudo que você precisa saber. Enjoy, e passe pelo iTunes (ou a plataforma que você usa) e deixe uma review para o podcast - muita gente entra em contado comigo para dizer obrigado/a pelo pod, e essa é uma das melhores maneiras de agradecer :-) Adorei ler as mais recentes. Nota: a imagem deste post é uma foto tirada por mim da capa da revista satírica Private Eye deste mês. Transcrição Hi! This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. How are you doing? How have you been? Today I thought I would talk about something that is kind of old news by now, and that is -- everything that's been going on with the royal family here in the UK. And let me tell you, I was never someone who was interested in royal news. I knew the very basic... You have the queen, Queen Elizabeth and then you have Charles and Andrew. Prince Andrew was involved in a scandal recently -- he was friends with a pedophile and he gave this car crash of an interview that turned out to be worse than if he hadn't done the interview. I don't know if you guys heard about it in Brazil, but then, more recently... Prince Harry and his wife Meghan decided to distance themselves from the royal family. And I mean... I've been living in the UK for six years now and I have the habit of... having a look at the newspapers -- at least at the headlines sometimes -- usually once a week. It was impossible to avoid. I ended up reading several articles about what was going on. I don't know exactly what the Brazilian newspapers told you guys but here's a summary of what I read. Prince Harry is the son of the late Princess Diana, and Prince Charles. He's the younger brother of William, who's married to Kate. And Prince Harry, a couple years ago, I think... Got married to an American actress, Meghan Markle. She used to have a role in Suits, but she doesn't anymore... She started dating Prince Harry and I think in less than a year they decided to get married. And they got married and it was a huge royal wedding... And then after a few months she got pregnant, she had a baby, and finally, a few weeks ago... They decided to tell the press that they were stepping back from the royal family and from the royal duties. Being a royal in the UK is like having a full-time job. You represent the country in all kinds of official and governmental situations and events... And obviously you receive funding to do that, which comes from taxpayer money. But the thing that sparked a lot of controversy here in the UK is that... Number one: they released their announcement to the press before they had ironed out all the details with the queen, and... Most British people were not happy about that because actually they care a lot about respecting the queen, and people get really angry here if they think that their queen has been disrespected. That was the first thing. And then the second thing that people didn't seem to like very much was that their announcement to the press was kind of unclear. They said that they were stepping back from royal duties, but they kind of implied that they were going to keep some benefits like the really expensive mansion where they used to live -- which obviously is also funded by taxpayer money... That was a bit strange, and apparently the queen was very upset that their announcement went to the press first, before she and Harry, or she and Harry and Meghan had enough time to talk through all the details and agree on what kind of arrangement they were going to have. Anyway, those were the two major points of discontent, I would say, for the British public... But now, apparently, they're already in Canada... They're living a new life.
1/27/20204 minutes, 11 seconds
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Podcast: Grab the bull by the horns

Hello!! How’s it going? Hoje eu falo sobre uma Uber ride que fiz recentemente no podcast, e aproveito essa historinha para ilustrar o idiom grab the bull by the horns... Uma expressão bem bacana e comum. Obrigada a quem deixou as novas reviews no iTunes - é sempre muito gratificante saber que o podcast ajuda no aprendizado de novas expressões em particular, e do inglês no geral. :-) Transcrição Hello, how are you doing? This is Ana and I'm back with another episode of the Inglês Online podcast - our second episode of 2020! Have you listened to the first one? If you haven't, go back and listen. Better yet, go back and look at our archive of episodes and download them all... I mean, these are five-minute long English bites that you can have throughout the day... A little bit every day. Why not? By now, we have a huge archive with hundreds and hundreds of episodes and the great thing is... I try not to repeat any idioms - I always try to center the episode around an idiom, or a couple of idioms, that I haven't really examined before... or I haven't really explained before to you guys. It's always a different theme. All right. Now back to today's episode: today I'm going to tell you about a recent Uber trip that I had - because the Uber driver told me... He talked about something that's really interesting to me, which is, how he learned English. And that story is going to be a good illustration of this idiom, grab the bull by the horns or take the bull by the horns. Picture a bull. Now picture its horns. Now imagine yourself grabbing that bull by the horns. I think you can get an idea of what the idiom means. You have a challenging situation in front of you, or a difficult situation, and you face it head-on... And you solve a problem, or you go through that difficult situation and come out (on) the other side, but... In any case, whatever the challenging situation is, you are facing it, you're not running away. You're grabbing the bull by the horns. This Uber driver... He was very chatty so I started asking him How long have you been working with Uber? Do you always work in this area? What's the traffic like today? You know. And I noticed that he spoke really good English but he had a slight accent. I could tell that he had learned British English, but he had a slight accent and then I asked him Where are you from? And how did you learn English? And he said: Well, I'm from Iran and I've been here in the UK for 10 years, and... When I moved to the UK I spoke exactly zero English. And this is a guy - he's probably close to 40 years old - it's not like he moved here when he was a child. When he said to me I learned it on my own. And I could hear his English - very good English... Obviously I was curious, as I always am, so I asked him What did you do to learn English? And he said Well, I spent some time studying grammar, studying vocabulary... but most of all, I used to just watch TV and pay attention to what people were saying and just try to repeat it. And, you guys, you probably know that his native language... I think it's called farsi. It's one of those languages that has nothing to do with English. This guy was really learning a completely different thing, a completely different language from scratch. It was, for him... It was a language that didn't make any sense - he couldn't make any connections with his native language. He said he just persisted by watching TV and just listening to the sounds that people were saying and he was probably, as he watched... I imagine that he was making that connection: these are the sounds these people are saying, and this is what they're doing. That sound must have something to do with what they just did right now... Let's say they're at a restaurant and this woman is talking to the waitress. OK, so that means she's ordering something... something like that. But I just found it amazing and I'm not telling this story because I'm going to advise you to do the same, necessarily.
1/22/20205 minutes, 39 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Justo você dizendo isso!

Hi, there! How have you been? Veja/ouça no episódio de hoje um idiom super especial: of all people! No Brasil, expressamos essa ideia dizendo Justo você vem me dizer que não posso fazer tal coisa - e também pode valer para Olha quem fala! Ouça o episódio para entender o que eu quero dizer - se é que você já não conhece essa expressãozinha.... Quem é que não tem um exemplo de situação onde poderia ter dito algo assim? Pois é, é comum em qualquer língua. Enjoy. Transcrição Hello, how are you? Did you have a good end of 2019? How's it going so far? Have you rested? Did you go traveling? Anyway, the Inglês Online podcast is back and this is our first episode of 2020. I'm very happy to be back and for our first episode this year, I have chosen a really great expression. Really nice idiom, and if you read the title of this episode you know which idiom I'm talking about - and you know that in Portuguese that expression will change, depending on who we're talking about. I know that some people don't like it when I speak Portuguese in these episodes, but sometimes I just think that it's helpful and this is one of those times. For example, in Portuguese we say: justo você or justo ela, justo a Maria. In English, the corresponding expression is always the same - it doesn't change. In English we can say: of all people, of all people. Let me give you an example: let's say you go shopping with a friend... Let's say your friend's name is Tom. You and Tom go shopping and... Let's say you're a girl. You're shopping for clothes. Let's say you have to buy a dress and you go to the shopping mall... and Tom is really patient. You go to shop after shop after shop and you try on a load of dresses. Every single time, you go into a shop and you have a look at their selection of dresses, and you pick out the ones that you like and then, obviously, you talk to the shop clerk, or the shop attendant, and you ask that person Can I have these dresses in my size? And when you get the dresses, you go into the fitting room and you try them on. You have your shoulder bag with you, you have your wallet in your shoulder bag... obviously! Because when you finally settle on a dress you will have to pay for it - when you buy it. You and Tom have been looking at dresses for a couple of hours now and you finally find a dress that you love. You have just tried it on... It looks great on you... You asked Tom's opinion and he complimented you - he said: Oh, you look great. Good! You're happy. When you go pay for the dress, however, you look in your bag and you can't find the wallet. You realize that you must have left your wallet in one of the fitting rooms. Now you have to go back. You and Tom go back to all the shops to look for your wallet and Tom... is kind of giving you an earful. He's saying How can you let this happen? You have to be mindful of your wallet. Your wallet has all your documents - it has all your credit cards! You always have to know where your wallet is, you have to keep checking your bag for your wallet. You have to make sure that your wallet is always in your bag!! And you look at Tom and you say, Tom... Really? Of all people, you're giving me a hard time, because I lost my wallet, really? I mean, you've been friends with Tom for a while, you know that he keeps misplacing his keys - and sometimes he loses his keys! In the past year alone you've heard Tom say  he misplaced his keys at least five times. He eventually found the keys but before he found them, he would always give you a call and say: Oh... you don't know what happened, I misplaced my keys - I can't find them! I hope I haven't lost them. I mean, of all people... Of all people Tom is now giving you a hard time because you can't find your wallet and you probably left it at one of the shops. You cannot believe it. You look at him and... Tom, seriously, of all people - of all people you are giving me a hard time. Basically, that's it! I mean,
1/6/20205 minutes, 9 seconds
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2019: A year in review!

Hi. What's up? No episódio de hoje, falo um pouco sobre como foi o ano de 2019 aqui no Inglês Online, assim como o que vem por aí. Enjoy! Transcrição Hello, listener. How are you? This is the new episode of our podcast. Thank you to everyone who has left a review! If you're a listener - if you are especially a regular listener of the Inglês Online podcast and if you can spare a minute or two, please head over to the Podcasts app on your iPhone or Android phone and leave a review. I really appreciate it. Thank you! So this is the last episode for 2019. The podcast is coming back in January - the plan is first week of January but before we wrap 2019, I just wanted to say that this has been a special year. First of all, because I relaunched our Curso Básico, and you guys... It's better than ever. I've had a great group -people are making a lot of progress in their English and we will have the pre-intermediate coming up... And obviously new groups for the Curso Básico, which is the first module, right? It's really the elementary level. And before I launched the course earlier this year, I made a series of three video classes teaching you a bit of English. Do you remember the classes? Did you watch them? I talked a lot about the 'possessive pronouns' hers, theirs and mine. And anyone who watched those classes got a lot of exposure to those. These little words are some of my absolute favourite things to teach because I know that people go through years and years of English so-called 'learning', and they come out of it not knowing these words, let alone speaking them naturally. I love teaching all those little words that sort of appear here and there in English lessons when you are going to English school and doing a course. But they're never... you never hear them enough if you're doing only the English classes. If all your exposure to English comes from going to English classes twice a week, you never get enough exposure to really absorb these little words. That's why I really enjoy focusing on them, because I know that people listening to these classes and watching these classes are going to get a lot out of it. Anyway, I hope you had the chance to catch those video classes while they were still up on the website and I hope you've continued to listen to English. I guess you have - if you're listening to this podcast right now. And by the way, our podcast has come back full force this year, after a break. I'm doing it in a different way now: before, I used to write the podcast and prepare, and revise before I recorded it... Whereas now, I'm doing it in much more of a... impromptu way, that is - just sort of winging it. It's not true that I wing it a hundred percent of the time. Sometimes I scribble down some thoughts before I record the episode but overall it's a lot more spontaneous than it used to be. As a result, I think the speed has been going up and down. Sometimes I talk a bit more slowly but there have been times where I talked a lot faster. You let me know what you think - you let me know if you think I'm talking too fast or if the speed is okay for you. One other really cool thing this year is.. our collection of basic English tips has expanded like crazy . Actually it has been expanding for the past few years thanks to the amazing work of professor Marcelo, who's part of the Inglês Online team. I know this is the podcast, I know that you're probably not a basic English learner anymore, but hey - if you'd like to have a review about basic vocabulary just head over to the Inglês Básico section of the website and you'll see some pretty cool tips. And most of them have audio as well. This is it you guys. Just wanted to do a little recap and let you guys know that the podcast is coming back early January... And thank you all for listening and for sharing, and for letting me know what you think, and for leaving reviews. (I) Wish you a great end of the year, a very Merry Christmas and see you soon. Bye!
12/24/20194 minutes, 22 seconds
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Podcast: Online Delivery Services

How have you been? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje, falo sobre os serviços de entrega online, os chamados delivery services - nome que também usamos no Brasil. Enjoy... Transcrição Hello, everyone, what is up? How have you been? I'd like to start by thanking everyone who has left a new review for the podcast in the past couple of weeks. Thank you very much! It's much appreciated. And I'd like to ask you - if you've been a listener for a while and you enjoy the podcast, please leave a review either on Apple Podcasts or iTunes or if you're a Google Podcasts listener, that's great too. Thanks. Today I was looking at this website that we have here in the UK, called 'Deliveroo', deliveroo.co.uk... because that's how the URLs go here in the UK. In American websites you have .com - and in the UK you have .co.uk. This is the most famous service, I guess, or delivery service aggregator, I would say, in the UK. And this is a website where you register, or you sign up, and depending on where you live you have a choice of lots and lots of different restaurants. It's very easy, obviously, it makes it very practical, because you look at the list of restaurants and they are categorized by cuisine or type of food. And you can look at their menu and choose whatever you want, and then you pay on the spot using your credit card. And then, because you have already signed up, the website has your address. All you have to do is click 'go' or 'pay' and when you finish your payment, you just wait until the delivery person gets to your place with your order. It's super, super simple and I know that in Brazil there are a few services that do that as well. But here in the UK... I've been living here for six years and Deliveroo... I think Deliveroo is relatively new because I don't remember seeing this or hearing about it four years ago. Now there's Deliveroo and there's 'Uber eats' as well, which is connected to Uber somehow. I've never used it, I don't think, but Deliveroo... I use it all the time and it's really good. And the thing that I love about it is that not only you don't have to deal with cash, which is the same as Uber... With Deliveroo you just use your credit card and once you place your order, it's done. And the second thing that I love about it is that they tell you exactly where the restaurant is at, in terms of progress in preparing your order. You can see if the restaurant is still cooking your food or when they're done... And then this little app on the website tells you "Now the delivery person has just picked up your order", "They just left the restaurant, they're heading over to your place" And then they show you a map. And it's this dynamic map that actually shows the delivery person moving on the streets. It's pretty cool - you know exactly how far or how close they are... it's pretty cool It's very, very convenient and it makes it really easy. Tell me what it's like in Brazil, because I know that there are similar services in Brazil. I think there's a website called - ifood.com.br - I don't know if that's just for São Paulo or if it's present in other cities as well. I don't know. I'm looking here at a page from Deliveroo which is for this restaurant called - Gourmet Burger Kitchen - which has pretty nice hamburgers... and I've ordered from them in the past, They always have meal deals - I mean, if you go to McDonald's you know what a meal deal is, probably... It's when you buy three things: you buy a burger, you buy a side order of potato chips - which is what we call them in the UK; in the US you would say french fries - and then you order a beverage and you get a discount. That's a meal deal. And then they show me my recent orders, they show the specials of the day and then beef, chicken, veggie and vegan... They have a section with veggie and vegan burgers, which is cool, obviously, if you're a vegan person. I mean, good for you! Then they have the kids section with smaller burgers, fries and sides, sauces,
12/11/20195 minutes, 2 seconds
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Podcast: The benefit of the doubt

How's it going? Hoje falo sobre aquela famosa expressão - tanto em inglês quanto em português... o benefício da dúvida. Alguém já falou isso para você? Ouça o episódio de hoje para se familiarizar com este idiom. Transcrição Hi, guys, how's it going? This is Ana with the Inglês Online podcast. I wanted to thank everyone who left a review for the podcast recently, thank you so much... and wanted to ask you guys: if you've been listener for a while, if you enjoy the podcast please head over to iTunes or the Apple store or the Podcasts app on your iPhone and leave a review for the podcast. And if you use Google podcasts please do the same. It really helps the podcast become... you know, better known and more people will get to listen to it, because they'll see the reviews and be interested. If you leave a nice review, that is! Let's just get to it and start the new episode. Today I wanted to talk about this expression or idiom, or whatever you want to call it, which is the benefit of the doubt. We use the same expression in Portuguese with the same words and here at Inglês Online we published an article, an English tip featuring this expression a while ago... But I thought this expression is popular enough... It's common enough that it deserves a podcast episode, so here it is. The benefit of the doubt. When do you give someone the benefit of the doubt? It's usually... it's usually when you don't know them very well, I would say. Because if you know someone very well... you know if they're telling the truth or not. Generally you know if someone is telling the truth or not when you know them very well. So if you don't know someone very well, if your relationship with this person is not very close - it's not a very close relationship, then something happens and you give them the benefit of the doubt. So, what kind of thing? Let's say you're talking to your friend... your good friend, your good friend Jack. You guys have been friends for a while and Jack's mate, whom you don't know very well... Paul. Paul is there as well, Paul is listening to the conversation and you don't know Paul very well. So you and Jack get to talking and you end up sharing with Jack that you're planning a birthday party for your cousin, let's say. The next day, your cousin Kelly gives you a ring and says: "Hey, I heard you're planning my birthday party. That's so cool". And you know, there goes the surprise... There's no surprise anymore. She heard the news that you're planning her surprise party. And you ask her "Who told you?", and she says: "Ah... I'm not going to tell you, because I don't want you to be mad at the person who told me. It's okay, don't worry". But you know what, you are a bit mad, because when you were talking the only person you told about this was Jack and inadvertently you also told Paul, because you forgot that Paul was right there, you were talking to your friend Jack and you told Jack that you were planning Kelly's surprise party. But you know that Paul heard you. So now you're thinking... it has to be Paul! Because, I mean, Jack is my buddy, Jack has been my friend for years, he would never do that, he knows to keep a secret, he knows it's my secret, he would never go and tell Kelly. It has to have been Paul. You talk to Jack, and Jack says: "Hey, no, it can't be Paul, he's such a good keeper of secrets, he would never do that and also he doesn't know your cousin". And you say: "Ok, well... I'll give him the benefit of the doubt". Meaning you're not sure that it wasn't him, but you're also not sure that it was him. Since you don't know this person very well, OK... "I'll give him the benefit of the doubt". You're still going to talk to Paul, maybe you'll become friends... You know, you're not sure one way or another. You're giving him the benefit of the doubt. Now, this is an expression that if you say to a friend of yours or someone that is close to you... "I'm giving you the benefit of the doubt" - it sounds slightly agg...
12/6/20195 minutes, 9 seconds
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Podcast: Booking a flight online

What’s up? No podcast de hoje, falo sobre reservar um voo. Enjoy :-) Transcrição Hi, everyone, how's it going? Is it boiling in Brazil yet? Here in my neck of the woods it's getting colder and wetter every day. Sorry, I didn't mean to brag... Anyway, I thought that having a look at one of these booking websites where you can search and find your flight would be a good idea. There's some interesting vocabulary involved - let's dive right into it. The website I'm looking at has kind of a funny name: Momondo. I'm looking at it right now and... What does it look like? At the top you have sort of search form where you enter the airport you're departing from. And then you enter the other airport where your flight is supposed to arrive. You enter first the three-letter code for the departure airport - let's say you're departing from... if it's an international flight, maybe you're departing from Guarulhos, which is GRU. Or if you want to go somewhere, I don't know, in Brazil and you're departing from São Paulo, you're going to enter CGH which is the three-letter code for Congonhas, then you enter the dates. The date (when) you're going to depart, and then if it's a round trip you're going to enter your return date as well... Or maybe you're just looking at a one-way ticket and then you only enter one date, which is the departure date. Then you hit Search and when you look at the results you, obviously see a list of flights. Several options from several different airlines, and you'll be able to see the dates - usually it will be the dates that you entered. You'll be able to see, for each flight, how many stops, how long each stop takes... The time of the flight, and then you have some options: either you'll see a few direct flights, which are usually more expensive, and you will see some flights with one, or two, or sometimes even three stops. There are some flights that - with all the stops - take, sometimes, over 24 hours. If you want to save some money maybe that's the flight you choose. And then, when I scroll down on the search results, I see multiple different airlines. I see some traditional ones like TAP, which is a Portuguese one, KLM, which is a Dutch one, British Airways... And then on the left side of the search results there's the sidebar with additional options. Right on the top you have... almost at the top, you have the option of, I guess, narrowing down your search by number of cabin bags, or checked bags that you want to take, and also the payment method. What is a cabin bag? That's... that's also known as a carry-on bag. That's sort of, that smaller bag - when you board the plane you take it with you, and you sort of put it in the overhead compartment above your seat. Or, if that is full, you kind of tuck it away under the seat in front of you. Usually the flight attendants will help you with that. That's the cabin bag or carry-on bag. And then you also usually have a checked bag, depending on... if it's a budget flight, sometimes you have to pay quite a bit of money to be able to take a checked bag with you, and for other flights, longer flights... It's included in the price. You can take a checked bag with you, which is actually that larger bag. It's that large suitcase where you put all your clothes. If you're traveling for a month, you'll probably need a large suitcase. You stuff all your clothes in there, and your toiletries, and your shoes and whatever else you want to take with you. That's the larger bag and obviously you can't board the plane with that bag. You have to get to the airport with some time in advance and check that bag. And then scrolling down a bit further, I find that there are some options for "flight quality": you can choose "show Wi-Fi flights only", "show flights with multiple tickets for booking", "show red-eyes". This is an interesting expression. A red-eye flight is any flight departing late at night and arriving early the next morning.
11/26/20194 minutes, 55 seconds
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Podcast: Pizza delivery

How's it going? No podcast de hoje, falo sobre entrega de pizza (ou qualquer outra comida). Enjoy :-) Transcrição Hello! Hi, how are you? How have you been? What's up? This is Ana Luiza with another episode of the Inglês Online Podcast. Very happy to announce that we have finally straightened out the situation with the podcast feed on the Podcasts app for iOS. You can now subscribe to this podcast on your iPhone or on your iPad using the Podcasts app... Very happy about that -  everything working... And by the way, I'd like to ask you: if you've been a listener to this podcast for a while (or maybe even a recent listener), please head over to the Podcasts app and leave a review for this podcast - an honest review obviously... But I would really appreciate that. And if you listen on your Android phone or on Spotify, or Stitcher, wherever, please leave a review as well. I would really appreciate that - thank you guys. This week I'm talking about delivery, food delivery. And this is because a podcast listener sent me an email a couple of weeks ago and asked me "Ana, can you do a podcast about food delivery? What's the vocabulary involved?" So... cool! How do we start? Let's say you're home, and you're hungry and obviously you don't want to go out. You feel a bit lazy or maybe... I don't know, it's Sunday night and you're kind of winding down, getting ready for Monday. Let's order in, let's say you say to your... whatever... your husband or wife or your friend, your roommate, let's order in. "How about we order in instead of going out to eat? Let's order in, let's order some pizza". You go online, maybe you have their... their printed menus, the menus from the pizza place. Or maybe you don't. You go online, you find them online, you go to their website and you see their delivery menu... or their takeout menu. You have a look - let's say this is you and your roommate. Let's say you're in college and you share a flat with your roommate. You guys have a look at the online menu... "What are we ordering?" Let's say, pineapple and turkey or just mozzarella with a bit of tomato sauce. You've decided on what you want, you grab your phone, you dial the number and you call the pizza place. The person at the pizza place... answers your call and you say: Hi, hi, I'd like to place an order, please. It can be as simple as that: you want to place an order for delivery... Or you could say: I'd like to order a pizza. And then that person will usually ask you: Is this delivery or takeout? Because usually places that do delivery... food places that deliver - they also do takeout. What is takeout? That's when you go over to the food place - to the restaurant! And you order the food that you want but, instead of sitting down at one of the tables and enjoying your meal there, you take it out. They make your food, they wrap it up, you pay for it and then you take it home with you. The person taking your order will probably ask you: Is this delivery or takeout? And then you say: well... it's for delivery. And then they will say: Do we have your address? Or, "What is your address, please?" Or "Can I have your address, please?" And you tell them your address and then that person will ask: What would you like? And then you tell them: I'd like the mozzarella with tomato sauce or turkey and pineapple. Half and half, let's say. And then the person taking the call will make a note and they will tell you what your total is, or you can ask them: How much is it? What's the total? And they will tell you: Your total is... let's say eight dollars fifty, $8,50. And you can ask them: How long will that be? Meaning: how long will it take for you to make my pizza and bring it over to me, and they can say: "Well... that'll be 15 to 20 minutes". And then you could ask them: "Do you take cash? Can I pay the delivery person? Or should I use my credit card and pay now over the phone?" And they will tell you: "Oh... we don't take cash,
11/18/20195 minutes, 26 seconds
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Edição extraordinária: Problema para assinar?

Neste episódio eu peço a você que me escreva ou deixe um comentário abaixo se estiver com problema para assinar o feed do Podcast Inglês Online. Pra que a gente entenda o que está acontecendo, é sempre útil saber qual app e sistema você está usando (exemplo: app "Podcasts" no iPhone). E é claro que eu dou essa mensagem em inglês no formato de episódio do pod - afinal, listening nunca é demais e qualquer coisa é desculpa para mais um episódio :-) Enjoy! Transcrição Hi, everyone, how's it going? This is an extraordinary edition, or episode, of the podcast Inglês Online, just because I wanted to talk to you guys about something that's going on with the podcast. I have been getting a few messages from listeners that... They're having a hard time subscribing to the podcast, but I didn't get a lot of detail yet. A couple of people just left a couple of reviews on my podcast saying that they're not able to subscribe and that's fine... But I would like to ask you -- if you're a listener and you're trying to subscribe to the podcast, and you're getting an error message saying that the feed cannot be found or something isn't working... Please send me an email at analuiza @ inglesonline.com.br and let me know exactly what's going on, including which app you're using okay and if it's Android or iOS. For example: "I'm trying to use the app "Podcasts" on my iPhone or on my iPad and it's not working" or "I'm using Android, I'm using the app XYZ and I'm getting this error message". If you can send me a screenshot of the error message you're getting -- that's even better. That's going to be super useful for me to troubleshoot. I have been aware that there's been... that there's a bit of a problem with the feed of the podcast for a little while. I've gotten in touch with a couple of people but unfortunately I haven't been successful in finding someone who can help me fix this issue yet. I think this week I should be able to find someone to work on this and finally fix the feed. I would ask you -- just a little bit more patience and if you can do what I said that would be excellent: if you're having trouble subscribing to the podcast, just let me know which app you're using, which system... If it's Android or iOS, or if you're doing it directly on iTunes. Although I don't think you're going to have a problem with iTunes --  because I just tested it and it's working fine. And then if you can send me a screenshot -- that's really helpful as well. This is our podcast for today. I thought I'd record this message so it's just one more thing for you guys to listen to. We don't have the transcript for this one yet... Professor Marcelo is going to take care of that tomorrow... But there you go. You guys -- I hope you're enjoying your Sunday and let me know if you're having any issues with the podcast. Speak to you soon. Bye.
11/3/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Comfort food

How are you? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre comida e dietas low-carb. Qual é a sua comfort food? Pense nisso ouvindo o podcast. Enjoy :-) Transcrição Hi, you guys, how are you doing? How's everything going? This is Ana with another episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Today I want to talk a little bit about food or, more specifically, about diets. Not as in dieting necessarily to lose weight, but diet as in... What you eat every day or what you normally eat for breakfast, for lunch, for dinner. I'm going to tell you something that I think not many of you know about me. I was a vegetarian for the longest time... Years and years and years. I would sometimes eat a piece of fish, but no meat, no chicken, no nothing for years. I am going to be honest with you: I loved it, I really enjoyed it, I really didn't miss meat and, to be honest with you, I had a great time being a vegetarian. But here's what happened. I just thought that I was missing the protein. One day I just kind of thought about it and realized that I was beginning to feel a bit weak, and I thought it was about the protein. It's a bit hard when you're a vegetarian to get enough protein if you want to get outside of dairy... Because, yeah, I was a vegetarian so I used to eat dairy, like eggs and cheese and milk... But there's only so much cheese that I can eat and there's only so many eggs that I can eat and so much milk that I can drink. And so at one point, I kind of got tired of having dairy as my main source of protein and I didn't really know what to do. Like I said, I really enjoyed being a vegetarian, but I slowly kind of got back to eating a bit of meat here and there, and right now I'm eating a bit of chicken and even a bit of beef. What I'm doing right now is I'm trying the low-carb style of eating: a low-carb diet. And I'm finding it kind of interesting, because the food... I like the food involved and I'm wondering if you know anything about the low-carb diet, or if you follow a specific diet, or a strict diet. I don't know, or what are the foods that you eat? Or, if you you're one of those people who just eats anything and everything -- whatever you feel like eating! What is it? And here's the expression I wanted to sort of talk about today which is comfort food, and that's what made me think about all of this because when I was a vegetarian it was kind of easy to find comfort foods. Really easy to find a lot of good food that doesn't have meat in it, but now that I'm beginning again on low-carb, because I already did it in the past... But I'm kind of beginning it again. What are the comfort foods for a low-carb diet? First of all, I think you understand what comfort food is, right? It's basically food that gives you comfort. Traditionally a tub of ice cream would be comfort food. A bag of cookies would be comfort food, chicken soup - if you're feeling a bit sick, if you're a bit under the weather, if you're  sneezing... You would like to stay home at night and, you know, watch a good movie and have a bowl of chicken soup and that would make you feel better. That's comfort food as well - not necessarily the most nutritious kind of food usually, but it is food that makes you feel good when you are a bit down or maybe when you're a bit sick. Now I'm thinking about the low-carb diet, and I'm thinking -  what kind of comfort food can we have with low-carb? Maybe... what? Nuts? Walnuts and peanuts, and hazelnuts, I don't know... maybe that's it. Maybe nuts, maybe olives.... I mean, bread is out, cookies are out. Any kind of product that comes from wheat or that uses any kind of wheat flour as an ingredient... That's out. Maybe it's still possible to make chicken soup in a low-carb diet. I don't know. What do you think? Give me your tips, and for those of you who don't know... I'm just assuming that everyone knows what low-carb is. But, actually, if you don't know what a low-carb diet is: it's this diet where you really limit the inta...
10/31/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Passwords

Hi, there. Hoje eu falo sobre…. senhas! Como você escolhe as suas? Eu conto como escolho as minhas. Enjoy :) Transcrição Hi, everyone, how's it going? How are you doing? Welcome to another episode of the Inglês Online podcast. You know what I was thinking about, today and yesterday… a little bit yesterday? Passwords. I'm just moving browsers, I'm just kind of switching from Chrome over to Firefox, which I used ages ago. I was a very loyal user of Firefox until… it just became a bit clunky and it wasn't working so well. I kind of abandoned it and switched over to Chrome… but now it's the opposite. Chrome doesn't suit me anymore, it's just… I just don't like the fact that I use so many Google products. I don't fully trust Google to take care of my personal information. Basically I think I'm giving Google too much personal information. I'm kind of trying to disentangle myself from Google a little bit and Chrome happens to not be working so well. Chrome sometimes is way slower than other browsers. I've tested the same URL on different browsers and Chrome usually comes last, and it just takes up a lot of memory, I found. I'm kind of ditching it for now and it looks like Firefox was completely overhauled, which is great, and I hear it's awesome. I'm moving everything over to Firefox now. I started dealing with my passwords and I realized that most of my passwords are something that I can kind of remember, or that I think I can remember, you know what I mean? My passwords are usually a combination of words that mean something to me, like places that mean something to me or people, dates… It's usually what I use for passwords, which I've heard is a bit risky. Obviously, I try to mix things up and I try to use characters, because… I mean, this is 2019 and obviously we have to be careful, but what I realized was… You know when you go to a website and you're signing up and you have to come up with a password? And sometimes your browser will offer up a password that is really complicated - it's this combination of 20 different letters and symbols and numbers… There's no way you can memorize that and I realized that I never, I never accept that. I always end up going with my own little combination. Like I said: letters and numbers that mean something to me, and as a result I have sort of a handful of combinations that I use in a lot of places, let's put it this way. And even with such a small number of passwords, and passwords that are not that complicated, I need sort of a notepad. I have a page on one of the Google services - I think it's Google Contacts. I created a page where I write down all my passwords for every website and I frequently have to go to this Google Contacts page and look for my password because I can't remember… I'm wondering, what do you guys do? How do you guys manage your passwords? Is there an easier way? And by the way, I found this page yesterday that lists the 50,000 most common passwords. Can you guess what the top one is? The most common password that people use? That's right! It's the word 'password'. Yes, there are still people that use the word password, oh my God… I'm not that creative with my passwords, but I wouldn't go that far and use the word password (or in Brazil 'senha'). Just a few curious ones here: Number 8 is 'superman'. Number 11 is the name 'jennifer'. Number 13 is 'Iloveyou' and number 14 is 'starwars'. And I searched the word 'senha' on this list and it actually shows up twice. One is 'minhasenha' and the other one is 'senha123'. If you're using one of these two: 'minhasenha' or 'senha123', I think it's time to change your passwords. Tell me what you think, tell me how you handle your passwords, tell me if… let me know if you're just like me - if you end up using words and numbers that have personal meaning to you, or if you usually accept those complicated suggestions from your browser in order to be safer. Talk to you guys soon. Bye!
10/25/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Mary’s and Jack’s cars

How's it going? Hoje eu falo sobre uma coisinha que todo mundo vê na aula de inglês básico: o possessive case ('s). Mas é comum a gente aprender Mary's car, John's apple e por aí vai... Os casos em que mais de uma pessoa é "dona" não aparecem com tanta frequência no livro de inglês - e mesmo que apareçam, muita gente acaba não "pegando" por falta de input. Esse é o tema do nosso episódio de hoje - enjoy! Transcrição Hey, everyone! This is Ana with another episode of the Inglês Online podcast. How are you doing today? So, listen to this: Mary's and Jack's cars are outside. Let me say that again: Mary's and Jack's cars are outside. What does that mean? That means that Mary owns a car, Jack owns a different car and both their cars are outside. So I'm focusing on the possessive case: it's that way of expressing possession where we use an apostrophe and the letter S. Mary's and Jack's cars are outside - each one of them has a car so I'm using one possessive for each: Mary's and Jack's cars are outside. What would happen if... Let's say a couple of people... Let's say a husband and a wife - if they shared a car. If they had one car for both of them. Let's say... Edward and Christine, ok? So, they have one car. Edward and Christine's car is outside. I'm talking about one car and it belongs to both of them. Edward and Christine's car is outside - and the order doesn't matter, so I could say Christine and Edward's car is outside. same thing. Let me give you a few more examples of two people who have two different things. Let's say I'm talking about two friends - Ted and Tina. One guy and one woman. They are friends - Ted and Tina. Ted's and Tina's dogs are friends. Ted and Tina are friends, Ted's and Tina's dogs are friends too. So, Ted has a dog, Tina has a different dog and their dogs are friends. Ted's and Tina's dogs are friends. Ted's and Tina's bicycles are inside. Ted and Tina rode their bikes somewhere... Let's say to the ice cream shop and they brought their bikes inside. So Ted's and Tina's bikes are inside. Karen's and Christie's dolls are very pretty. Karen is a little girl, Christie is another little girl, Karen and Christie are friends and each one of them has a very pretty doll. So I'm talking about both of their dolls... Karen's and Christie's dolls are very pretty. Now, let's talk about a couple of brothers that share lots of things. Let's say they're called Timmy and Johnny. Timmy and Johnny are brothers, they're both eight years old and they share a bike. Timmy and Johnny's bike is blue - they have only one bike. Timmy and Johnny's bike is blue. Notice that the apostrophe and the letter S go after the second name, right? The last name. Timmy and Johnny's bike is blue: it's only one bike. Timmy and Johnny's bedroom is very large. They share a bedroom and it's a large bedroom. Timmy and Johnny's bedroom is large, and finally... Timmy and Johnny's mother is German - she came from Germany. So Timmy and Johnny's mother is German. Alright! These are my examples for today. I just wanted to go over these two ways of using the possessive case, because... In this way we're covering a few examples that are not really necessarily present in books or they're not very frequent, I think. And again, this is something I don't hear a lot of students using correctly. I thought this would be a good opportunity to go over a few examples. Give it a listen. Get familiar with these ways of using the possessive case. I hope you've enjoyed it and see you next time. Bye! Key expressions Mary's and Jack's cars Possessive case Vocabulary Mary owns a car = Mary possui/tem um carro rode = Passado do verbo ride e no texto significa pedalar/andar de bicicleta bedroom = quarto de dormir get familiar with = se familiarizar com algo
10/17/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: I’ll bring you up to speed

What's up? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre a expressão 'bring someone up to speed'. Mais uma que é super comum no dia a dia dos nativos de inglês. Transcrição Hey, everyone, how's it going? Here's our podcast for this week. Yes! I'm recording it just now. How have you guys been? It's been crazy over here at Inglês Online as, I guess, many of you know... This week we've opened up enrollment for module one of our Curso Básico. In the past few weeks I... the past couple of weeks I recorded a series of three free classes where I talked about possessive pronouns and it's been awesome. I got great feedback, people told me that it's been really useful to finally understand those pronouns and you know what? It's been a lot of fun. You know what I just noticed? Everything I said up to now... I'm using the present perfect a lot, so there you go. Here's a little bit of practice on the present perfect at the beginning of this episode for you. Alright! We're right now in the middle of the enrollment period for the Curso Básico and, again, I know that you're probably not part of the target audience for the Curso Básico. I know that there are many former students of my first version of the Curso Básico here, right now, listening to this podcast and... They tell me that right after they completed the Curso Básico they were able to start listening to the podcast, which is awesome - because this podcast is not exactly just basic English, you know. I just... I just used the present perfect, I use present perfect continuous, I use conditionals, I use complex verb tenses, vocabulary and prepositions, and pronouns, and all kinds of things and expressions. So kudos to you if all you did was complete my Curso Básico and now you have a habit of listening to this podcast. This is amazing and I want you to know that. I want you to be aware of that, okay? This is really... a really great result. Congratulations. Okay, I was looking at a few posts here, that I did... And I saw this expression - this idiom bring someone up to speed. And let me give you an example from an office situation - because that's going to be really easy to understand. So, let's say that you work as part of a team in your company. So you have your colleagues, and you have your manager... And one of your colleagues went on holiday for two weeks, and while your colleague was on holiday your manager asked the team to start working on a new project. So obviously your colleague who was on holiday wasn't aware of the new project... but when your colleague came back you had to tell him - let's say it's a guy, Mark. You had to tell Mark what the new project is about; what it entails; what you have to do; what the results expected are; what kind of work each of you in the team is going to be doing... In other words you have to bring Mark up to speed. So, that's an expression for when there's something going on... Some kind of project, some kind of activity, some kind of event... And then someone new, for some reason, gets involved in that situation. But because they're new, they're not aware - right? They're not aware of what's going on, so someone has to bring them up to speed. Bring someone up to speed is just - to inform them of what's going on. I mean this happens a lot in work situations, right? I'm pretty sure you can remember the last time at work - or maybe in your personal life - when you had to bring someone up to speed, because they just arrived in this situation which is ongoing. So everyone who's involved in the situation obviously knows what's going on, but that new person doesn't - so you have to bring them up to speed. That's it for today. I'll just... before I close, I'll ask you to please forward the emails where I'm talking about the new Curso Básico to your friends and neighbours and family... If you know people who really want to learn English or are really interested in improving their English, and learning how to speak...
10/3/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Sorry to rain on your parade

What's up? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre a expressão 'rain on someone's parade', super comum no dia a dia do falante de inglês. Não perca... Transcrição Hi, everyone. How is it going? What's up? How have you been? Today is the day for another episode of the Inglês Online podcast. I'm Ana Luiza and it's been busy... it's been a busy week. We're working on the relaunch of the 'Curso Básico'- the new edition of our Curso Básico. I've also been releasing free video classes, which, if you haven't watched yet... You should head over to the homepage of inglesonline.com.br, insert your email and watch these lessons because they're pretty cool. So, let's focus on the podcast. Today I just wanted to talk a little bit about this really cool expression, I mean... The meaning, you know... it's not that cheerful, but it's a very nice... It's a nice expression, very common and people use it a lot. Again, if you're someone... Like I said in previous episodes, if you are someone who watches a lot of movies and sitcoms you have definitely heard it. The idiom of today is rain on someone's parade. So, this is pretty easy to visualise. Imagine a parade, let's see... in Brazil we have September 7th which is Independence Day. So we have a parade. So now imagine that all of a sudden it starts to rain on the parade. And now imagine that you're using that as a metaphor and - you are the rain on someone's parade. I think you can get the meaning. You can get what it means pretty easily, so you're basically... when you're raining on someone's parade, metaphorically speaking, you're basically killing their joy or you're basically telling them that whatever they were expecting... Whatever they were very excited about isn't going to happen for some reason. So, let me give you an example. This is actually based on a true story. Let's say you're planning a really nice day out for the weekend. You've looked at the weather forecast. It's going to be a sunny day - great! You talk to a few friends and you start organising this little day trip to the mountains... It doesn't matter... somewhere! One of the big attractions in this place that you want to go to with your friends is that they have this shopping mall with some kind of specialty store. Let's say they sell computer parts and these computer parts are really hard to find, so obviously I'm assuming you and your friends are really into computers. And you and your friends are really excited about it. So you're going to this place in the mountains on Sunday and you're really looking forward to going to the shops. And you are spending a bit of money to buy these computer parts that are otherwise very hard to find. You spend the week chatting with your friends and planning out your journey. And then Sunday morning comes around and you're all about to get in the car and your other friend - who didn't get invited by the way... He calls you on your cell phone and you answer the phone, and you tell him: Hey, well, you know... We happen to be going to that place, that shop to have a look at the computer parts. And your friend says: Hey, I'm sorry to rain on your parade, but those shops are closed. It's Sunday. I mean, can you relate? I know I can. I mean, that has definitely happened with me before. You leave one little detail out... I mean, it's an essential detail - let's be honest - but at the time it seemed like a small detail, right? One little thing you didn't think about and BAM... your trip is ruined. You know, whatever. You decide to go anyway and have fun with your friends or you just cancel the day and stay home. But that's it, that guy said... I mean, it wasn't his fault, right? The guy in the phone - but that's why he said: I hate to rain on your parade. I hate to kill the excitement and the joy that you guys are feeling because you're finally going to that shop, but here's the deal: the shops are closed. So, that's it, I mean....
9/24/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Bear with me

What's up? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre a expressão 'bear with me', super comum entre os falantes nativos. Ouça já! Transcrição Hi, everyone... how are you? How are you doing? This is Ana Luiza, with another episode of the Inglês Online Podcast. And this is very impromptu... I was just thinking now of this expression. This idiom from the English language, bear with me. And I thought it would make for a nice episode of the podcast. I'm going to give you mainly two examples or, rather, two kinds of situation where this idiom fits like a glove. It's perfect for a couple of situations and I'm going to explain them to you right now. One of them would be... let's say you're explaining something to someone or... you're sort of having a chat with someone and you're telling them a story. And your story has a point, right? You're going to get to the really interesting part in a few seconds or maybe in a minute, but first you have to kind of set up the whole story. You have to give the other person some background information, right? You have to tell them how... how you're going to get to that point. You have to tell them the events that led up to that interesting point, to the point that you want to make... To the part of the story that's really interesting, so it's going to take maybe a minute or two. You have to tell this person about a few events; you have to give them some information. You have to set up the story but the other person doesn't know... The other person is waiting; they're expecting to hear that interesting part, so you tell this person... Just bear with me. Bear with me. "So, the other day I went to this place or that place and I met with this person and that person and this happened or that happened..." You're telling your friend - you're telling them a bunch of stuff that they don't really understand right now. What does that have to do with the really interesting thing that you said you were going to tell them? but you know it's important; you know that this is important information for the other person to understand the really interesting part that is coming in the next minute or two. So you tell this person "Just bear with me while I tell you the story". Basically, bear with me means "Just have a little patience", okay? Stay with me, don't go away, have a little patience while I give you all this important information and we're going to get to the really interesting point very soon. And the other example, you guys, I'll give you a real... A very real example in my life when something happens to my website. My website is full of basic English exercises. There's a whole section of "Inglês Básico" at Inglês Online which is just about interactive English exercises and it's really cool, it's very popular, people love it... Let's say, for some reason, there's a problem and all of a sudden none of the exercise pages are available. So I go to Inglês Online and I write a post, and I say: "Guys, unfortunately we have a problem with the exercises. We have a problem with the plugin that we're using to provide the exercise for you. We're working on it as fast as we can... Please bear with us and we're going to get it fixed as soon as we can." I'm asking you guys to bear with us - just have patience and bear with us. Have patience because we're working on it as fast as we can, okay? So bear with me - that's how you're going to hear it most of the time. Very, very common expression... So listen to this episode a couple of times, get used to it and I'm sure you will start noticing this expression, ok? Talk to you next time. Bye! Key expressions Bear with me Vocabulary impromptu = de improviso fits like a glove = cai como uma luva, perfeito para tal situação set up the whole story = preparar, criar toda a história led up to  = passado de 'lead up to' (conduzir a, levar a). Nota: falantes nativos de inglês frequentemente escrevem a forma passada como "lead up to", o que é incorreto.
9/16/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Does she, though?

Hi, there. Hoje eu falo sobre uma maneira super comum de usar a palavra 'though' - os falantes nativos usam o tempo todo, mas você raramente vai encontrá-lo nas suas aulas ou no livro de inglês. Ouça bem o episódio e se familiarize! Quanto mais você ouvir, mais você internaliza as expressões e estruturas do idioma. Enjoy! :-) Transcrição Hi everyone, this is Ana Luiza with another episode of the Inglês Online podcast. How are you doing? How's it going? Today I want to talk to you about another one of those words that you will see, sort of briefly, in English schools and in your English books... If you go to school, if you go to... If you have English classes I'm sure you will have learned it, you will have done exercises about it. But again: this is another word that I don't hear a lot of Brazilians speak or, at least, speak naturally and today our episode is going to center around a particular use of this word which is really... It's really interesting and it's really common, of course. It's very useful. The title of this episode gives it away, obviously. I can tell you that I hear this all the time and if you master this, I'm telling you... You're going to be that much closer to speaking English like a true native. Okay? Let's go to the examples. So, the word of today is though: T-H-O-U-G-H, though! Notice that there's a bit of a difference in the pronunciation, for example, of dough. Dough is what you use to make bread... to make cake, you mix flour, water, sugar and eggs together and you make dough. And the word of today is: though. It's a bit different. So, just listen: Let's say you're talking to your friend. And you have a mutual friend called Mary. Your friend - the one who's in front of you, talking to you - says: "Mary likes fish". You know, Mary likes fish. And you say: Does she, though? Does she, though? What does that mean? That means you're questioning the veracity of what your friend just said! I mean, does Mary really like fish? You don't think she likes fish... You have been with Mary to restaurants before and you ordered fish. You asked her: do you want to try my fish? And she said: Ugh... no! Thanks! Ugh! I don't like fish. So, you're not really... you can't really believe your friend, when your friend says: Mary likes fish. You are questioning it, you're saying: does she, though? And why am I using "does"? Your friend said: Mary likes fish. That's the present simple and the auxiliary word for 'likes' is 'does', so instead of asking the full question "Does she like fish, though?"... You don't need that. You only use does: Does she, though? So, here's another example. The same friend says: "Simon told John the truth". And you hear that and you think, well... I was there when Simon was talking to John and I heard what Simon said to John. I don't think he spoke the truth. So when your friend says, 'Simon told John the truth'... You answer with: Did he, though? Did Simon really tell John the truth? Did he, though? Let's go through a few more examples: Your friend says "She has moved on from the breakup with her boyfriend". And you say... Has she, though? You're doubting everything, you're doubting everything your friend is saying today. And then your friend says: "Laura and Mark are going to the beach this weekend". And you say: Are they, though? I spoke to Laura and she said she doesn't even like the beach. She doesn't want to go to the beach... ever again. So, when your friend says "Laura and Mark are going to the beach this weekend".... You say: Are they, though? Then your friend says: Well... he wants to buy a new computer. And you say: Does he, though? Didn't he just buy a new computer last month? Now, your friend is saying: Well... Karen studied a lot for the exam. And you say: Did she, though? I saw her the day before the exam. She was out and about having an ice cream. And finally, your friend says: That store slashed all their prices. And you say: Did it,
9/9/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Either one or the other

How's it going? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre algumas formas comuns de usar a palavra 'Either'. Transcrição Hello, everyone, how are you doing? This is Ana Luiza with another episode of our Inglês Online Podcast. And today we have a quick episode. I want to get right into it. It's something that is really, really useful and very common in the language and the reason I want to focus on it... Ok, so let me tell you what I am talking about: I'm talking about the word "either". Either, which is also pronounced 'AITHER' and sometimes E-I-T-H-E-R. Ok, and the reason I want to focus on the word either is that it is really common in the language. People use it all the time; it's a really good word. It's not difficult and if you've done English classes before, if you've gone to English school and if you've gone as far as... I don't know, maybe pre-intermediate or definitely intermediate, either is there. It's there in your books, but that doesn't mean that students come out of English school being fluent on how to use either, ok?... I'll be honest with you... This is a word that even Brazilians who have gone a bit far, you know, in English schools with classes... They are not using this word naturally, and I think everyone should. So, that's why I'm focusing today on a couple of different ways that we use either... Really, really common ways. So, I'm not going through all the possibilities with the word either, but just on a couple of really common ways that we use either every day in the English language, ok? Listen up! First one: your friend says... I like dogs. And you say: I like dogs too. You know, we both like dogs, you like dogs, I like dogs too... And then your other friend says: I don't like cats. And you know what? You don't like cats either, so you say: I don't like cats either. So, what's the difference there? I like dogs, I like dogs too. I don't like cats, I don't like cats either. When you are being positive, when you are saying that you do something or that you are something or that you like something, and you are going to agree with that person, you use 'too'. Now, when the person is saying that they are not something or they are not doing something or they didn't do something or they didn't like something and you are going to agree with them, you use 'either'. And obviously, again, you can say 'AITHER'. It's just that 'EITHER'... It's the way that I say it. Let's have a look at this. I don't like cucumbers. Oh... my friend Mary doesn't like cucumbers either. You know, my cousin Tony, he can't sing. Oh... I can't sing either. My friend Tina... She doesn't like cooking in the afternoon. I don't know why, but she doesn't like cooking in the afternoon... she only cooks in the morning and at night. Yeah, she doesn't like cooking in the afternoon. She watches TV all afternoon. Oh... that's a coincidence, I don't like cooking in the afternoon either, ok? You know my neighbour Candace? She doesn't like the colour green. Oh... What do you know? I don't like the color green either. Well... you know, my dad. He doesn't like to work sitting down. He only works standing up. He doesn't like to work sitting down. Huh... Wow, what a coincidence, I don't like to work sitting down either, cool? So, someone doesn't like cucumbers, I don't like cucumbers either. Another person can't sing, oh... I can't sing either. Someone else doesn't like cooking in the afternoon. Wow, I don't like cooking in the afternoon either. That person doesn't like the colour green. I don't like the colour green either. So and so doesn't like to work sitting down. I don't like to work sitting down either. Are we cool? Cool! Moving on. Ok, here's the other way, you guys. This is so common. So let's say you only have a choice of two things, ok? You only have two alternatives for whatever, ok? Whatever. Let's say you are going to a costume party and your friend fixed you up with a costume for the costume party,
9/2/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Safe place for your mail

How's it going? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre vocabulário relacionado a entrega de correio (especialmente encomendas) aqui na Inglaterra. Transcrição Hi, guys, how are you doing? This is Ana with another episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Last week I talked about 'dad jokes' and bugs, and stuff. So, this week we are talking about a more interesting topic: mail delivery. So, here's what I got for you. I placed an order online for some food and this stuff is coming from far away... a bit far from where I live. The company posted the parcel and gave me a tracking number. And you know when you have the tracking number and you go online, and you go to the website of the delivery company. And you type in the tracking code and then you can follow the journey of the parcel and have a... Actually, sometimes, a pretty good idea... They give you a one-hour window of when you are going to get the delivery. Sometimes they tell you, "you are going to get it today between 3 and 4PM". So it depends - it depends on the company, but when they do that, it's pretty cool. I had actually forgotten that I put this order for this food product, because... I actually ordered it, like, three or four weeks ago and they still haven't delivered it. I'm looking now at their web page that is supposed to have that tracking information and this is what is says. The status is - 'We have collected your parcel' and under "Estimated delivery day" it says: Unavailable at this time. So it's not looking good, you guys, it's not looking good. They collected the parcel like, over a week ago and they don't have any information. I'm not very cheerful about this right now. But ok, let's talk about other vocabulary related to mail delivery, I mean... why not? So, one thing that's pretty cool when you place an order online and I think it's more and more common... At least here in the UK when I place an order on Amazon... is that you can sort of give them information about 'safe places' for the delivery person to leave your parcel in case you are not home. So for example, on Amazon... I think Amazon it's probably the website I order from the most. They just have so much stuff and their price is usually OK. So, I'm looking here at my account page on Amazon and I was actually going to update the information on the safe place for my next delivery... And they have this little pop-up that asks me: Where is it safe to leave packages when you are not available? So, let me give you a few options that I'm seeing here. One of them is the 'front porch'. so what is a porch? If you have watched lots of American movies, I'm sure you have seen houses with porches before... And we have them in Brazil as well, obviously. So a porch is this little area, usually at the front of the house. It's attached to the house and it's covered, but it's usually open. You could call it a 'veranda' as well.  So usually people put nice, comfy chairs in the porch and when it's sunny they just go and sit in the chairs and, you know... They read a book or they have a chat. So, that's the porch. The front porch is one of the places that you can usually choose as a safe place for the delivery man, or woman, the delivery person... to leave your parcel in case you are not home. So here's another option: the 'rear porch'. Same thing but instead of being in the front it's at the back of the house. Another option is 'garage', and then you have "behind the wheelie bin'. So, a wheelie bin is a huge trash can, but here in the UK people don't really say trash can, not even garbage bin or garbage can. They say 'bin' and they call garbage 'rubbish', so usually you say rubbish bin. A wheelie bin [see image] is this big bin for rubbish, but it has wheels underneath. So that's why it's called a wheelie bin... Why does it have wheels? Because every week, or every two weeks, you put the bin outside so that the bin men can collect your rubbish. So it has wheels.
8/19/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Dad joke

How are you? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre a expressão “dad jokes”, entre outras. Já ouviu falar? Ouça mesmo assim :) Listening é sempre bom, especialmente se você mora no Brasil! Transcrição Hi, everyone! This is Ana, today we have another episode of our impromptu podcast. Just to give you an update on the weather, like a couple of weeks ago I said that it was unbearably hot... and the temperature fortunately has dropped a few degrees. So today we didn't even have a sunny day, I mean, it was reasonably warm but not unbearable, y'know... So it was good, I mean, it was a bit cloudy, but that's fine, it was not too hot. So, how are you doing? What have you been up to? What's the weather like? Is it still cold in Brazil? What part of Brazil are you in, and what's the weather like where you are? I mean, if you are in Rio you don't even need to answer because I know it's super hot, but if you are in other parts of the country, what's the weather like right now? Probably not too hot, but getting warmer, right? Ok, so, I'm looking up right now and I'm looking at this abandoned spider web and I have to say something. In Brazil I think everyone can relate... in Brazil where I grew up, anyway, we had cockroaches. In terms of insects and bugs it was like, cockroaches and ants. Every house I lived in, every place I lived in... Every once in a while we would see like a cockroach, ant...like on the kitchen-top if you left anything sugary, like a jar with sugar or any kind of sweet, a candy bar, anything! I mean, in ten minutes that thing would be covered in ants. So, here in the UK, it's kind of weird, I just haven't gotten used to it. It's not that I miss the cockroaches and the ants, I don't! But I have been in the UK for six years now and I have never seen a cockroach. Honestly, there are no cockroaches here and to be very honest with you I never see ants either. Maybe if I look for them outside I will be able to find some ants, but let me tell you what I see here all the time- it's spiders! Now, let me know how you feel about spiders. If I had to pick between cockroaches and spiders, I would pick spiders all the way. However, with that said- here in the UK in every place I've lived in I have seen the biggest spiders I have ever seen in my life. When I lived in Brazil I never saw spiders this big. We don't have cockroaches, but we have spiders and if I leave my window open, let's say it's hot and I want to feel the breeze from the street and so I open my window. Let's say I leave it open for a couple of hours, I mean, you can bet the next few days I'm going to see spiders crawling on the floor, I'm going to start seeing spiderwebs, it's just...ugh... I can't kill anything, so I what do is I trap the spider inside a glass jar and I release it outside, y'know, that's what I do. But anyway, that's what we have here, no cockroaches which I'm very happy about but spiders- and gigantic ones. Ok, so, the other day I just heard this expression so check this out. I don't think we have this expression in Brazil which is 'dad jokes', not "dead" as in the opposite of "alive", no. Dad as in D-A-D, the word for father. So, we have this expression here in... not just here actually, not just in the UK. This is an expression that people say, people use in the US as well, 'dad jokes'. So, what is a dad joke? Well... have you ever been at a family... like any kind of event where you have family? Like your uncles, your aunts, your father, your mother, your brothers, your sisters, your cousins, whoever in your family. And then either your father or your grandfather or your uncle make that joke, you had the dessert right? Someone like your aunt or your mother usually made the dessert and it was "pavê de chocolate" and someone said: "ok, é pavê ou pra comer"? That is the quintessential dad joke. If you ever had an uncle or a father or a grandfather tell that joke, then you know what a dad joke is.
8/6/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Keep a straight face

How are you? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre os idioms “put on a brave face” e “keep a straight face”. Já conhece? Ouça mesmo assim. Listening nunca é demais, especialmente se você mora no Brasil! Transcrição Hi, everyone, this is Ana of Inglês Online, yeah, that's me with another... I guess another episode of our podcast. How are you guys doing? Here where I live, it is so hot right now, like it's Brazilian heat honestly, it's... I think today we've reached 35º or 36º, it is really, really hot, and I've been eating a lot of ice cream and just kind of waiting for some rain, to be honest... to bring down the temperature a bit, like... What's the temperature like in Brazil right now? Is it... is it still winter, it is a bit lower, right? Well... lucky you! Here it's just insufferably hot. Ok, so, you guys, I was thinking today about a few expressions with the word face. So, one of them is put on a brave face, ok... It's very, very common, I mean, if you are someone who watches, y'know, American movies or sitcoms more likely than not you've come across it... someone has said it. So, what does that mean? Put on a brave face. Let's say you are going through something and then there's an outcome that you really dislike, y'know, someone says something that you don't like or all of a sudden someone gives you some news, y'know, that makes you sad or you remember something or your car breaks... I don't know, or you have to get on with something under not so ideal conditions and instead of showing that you are sad, instead of showing that you are anything... Like desperate or sad or down, you just put on a brave face and you get going, and you do whatever it is that you had to do, or that people are expecting you to do, and you go ahead and you do it, y'know. You put on a brave face and you don't really show how are you feeling inside. I've heard from some colleagues at work before that sometimes they can tell that I'm putting on a brave face because, when things don't really go my way and I'm unhappy: "Oh... Ana you just put on a brave face and you go ahead". I don't know, I don't know that I always do that, sometimes I think my emotions really show on my face - sometimes I cannot keep a straight face, I cannot keep a straight face. So a straight face is a face that doesn't really let on the emotions that the person is feeling in that moment, so they keep a straight face. You can't really tell. Picture someone when you give them some... I don't know, bad news, y'know like they hear bad news and you think that you are sure that this person doesn't like the news, but they don't show it, y'know, there's no emotion on their face, you know what I mean. Some people are like that, they are able to do that, it's like they keep everything inside and so, when you see someone like that you can say, well... y'know, they kept a straight face all the way through. The most common way though to use the expression keep a straight face is when you are trying not to laugh at people and that is hard, that is something I have an extremely difficult time with. People who know me well know that, it's really, really difficult for me to suppress like a smile, at least, when someone is telling me a story that I find really funny. It's really hard y'now, it's really hard because sometimes you just... I don't now, for whatever reason - like you are really not trying to be disrespectful to that person but for whatever reason what they are saying reminds you of something that you think it's funny. And I'm the kind of person that gets distracted very easily and this is something I have been trying to improve - like, listening better and concentrating better on the person that is in front of me talking to me. But sometimes when you get distracted very easily, y'know, naturally - it's kind of your personality or something, you kind of remember something, or something else that someone said that makes you smile and sometimes it comes across as dis...
7/25/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Moving forward

Depois de um break, o podcast volta. Welcome back ;-) Ana How are you? Hoje eu falo sobre a expressão “moving forward” que eu ouço com frequência no meu ambiente de trabalho. Não perca! Transcrição Hi, everyone, this is kind of an episode of the podcast. As you guys know, if you've been listening to the podcasts or following the website for a while, you know there has been a break... We've taken a break with the podcasts and there are a few reasons for that. Things have gotten very, very busy with the site, and myself and Marcelo, who works for Inglês Online, who's part of the team... both of us have been working really hard to make the website better, and doing a lot of work behind the scenes and writing lots of new articles - especially Marcelo for the basic English section of the website. So, there has been a lot going on and in the coming weeks, there's gonna be more, more news. I just wanted to say "hi" and say that in the future... in the near future we will probably be having more impromptu podcasts or podcast episodes like this one. And what made me want to record one today was... I was thinking about this little expression that I've been hearing a lot lately, actually in the past- the past couple of years, I'd say... Cause here in London I do a kind of freelance work for this company- as you guys know I live in London, so the people I work with... They live all over Europe so we talk on Skype all the time. I end up hearing, y'know just a lot of business language... whatever people are saying. So, I've been hearing this expression a lot moving forward which means basically in the future or from now on or from here on out. So, moving forward, you maybe thinking, well, moving forward these are two, y'know, normal, regular words of the English language, yeah that's true, moving and forward, but I can tell you that, like a few years ago, if I had to say in the future I would say, in the future or from now on, I wouldn't say moving forward, but now, I've heard this expression so many times that if I want to say, If I want to talk about something that, for example, we are gonna be doing differently from now on I would use moving forward. So for example, let's say me and my team... we did some work and y'know we completed a report and one of the sections of the report... let's say we used the color green on a chart and let's say our manager looks at it and says: Oh, ok, you know what, our client doesn't like the color green, so we actually we can't use the color green cause that's in the contract, y'know we can't use the color green, so moving forward we are gonna use yellow or blue or red or orange not green. So that's how it's gonna be, moving forward. So, I just wanted to pass that on to you guys cause it's a very simple... I mean, it's a combination of two very common words in the English language, but it's just something that people started using a little while ago, so I just wanted to share this with you guys. Please leave your comments, let me know what are the expressions you have been hearing lately in case you have been doing your listening or in case you are fortunate enough to work with people who speak English on a daily basis. Leave me a comment, or just say hi and speak to you soon. Bye! Key expressions moving forward Vocabulary there has been a break = houve uma pausa behind the scenes = sem ninguém ver, sem ninguém ficar sabendo, por trás dos bastidores impromptu podcasts = podcasts de improviso I end up hearing = eu acabo ouvindo you know what? = quer saber? in the future = no futuro, futuramente from now on / from here on out = de agora em diante, daqui para frente that's in the contract = está no contrato pass something on = passar, retransmitir, repassar uma informação in case you are fortunate enough = no caso de você ter a sorte/ser sortudo o bastante on a daily basis = diariamente, todos os dias
7/17/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Self-stirring mug

How are you? Hoje eu falo sobre a estrutura “self-stirring” em inglês. Não perca! Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Alright, so let me show you something - and if you're just hearing my voice and not looking at the episode page at Inglês Online, you can head over there and check out this photo I'm going to talk about. This is a photo of a self-stirring mug. So, I found this product in a shop here in London and this shop is just full of novelty products. It's got all kinds of funny, interesting and unique products and sometimes they come up with some pretty useful stuff. Yes, I'm talking about this self-stirring mug. What is that? It's a mug that stirs itself. So, let's break this down: say it's 3PM and you feel you need that boost of energy only instant coffee can give you. You head over to the kitchen, grab a mug, put in a spoonful of Nescafe or whatever brand of coffee you prefer, pour some boiling water and sugar in the mug and then you use a spoon to stir the water and everything in it. So, there you go: with a self-stirring mug, you don't have to worry after adding in all your ingredients - it will give your beverage the perfect stir and all you have to do is enjoy it. Ok, so what is a self-stirring mug? It's a mug that stirs itself. Probably at the press of a button, this little mug will stir itself. It's a self-stirring mug. Notice that this is a perfect example of a sentence structure that can't be literally translated word by word into Portuguese. Have you heard of self-cleaning ovens? What are they? A self-cleaning oven is an oven that cleans itself. I'd love to have self-washing clothes and a self-cleaning home but apparently we're not there yet. So, let's hear the structure again: self-washing clothes would be clothes that wash themselves. A self-cleaning home would be a home that cleans itself. You wouldn't need to, you know, dust the furniture, sweep the floor, do the dishes - I mean, can you imagine? A self-cleaning home would clean itself. I mean, imagine how much free time you would have to do other stuff. Now here's one that is pretty common everywhere: self-locking doors. If you got one of those at home, especially if it's the main entrance to your place, chances are you've locked yourself out at least once. How would that happen? Well, a self-locking door will lock itself behind you, right? As soon as it shuts behind you - that's it. It's locked. The locking system doesn't require you to insert a key and turn the key and so on. Nope, it will lock itself upon shutting. So, you if you forgot to take the keys with you and the door locked itself, that means you're locked out and you'll need to call a locksmith to get that door open. Have you ever locked yourself out because you forgot to get the keys, and the door locked itself? Let me know in the comments! See you soon. Key expressions self-stirring self-locking self-cleaning Vocabulary head over there = vai/ir até lá novelty = algo novo ou interessante, novidade come up with = inventar, criar brand = marca beverage = bebida chances are = é provável que locksmith = chaveiro
2/11/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Lobo em pele de cordeiro

Hi, there. Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms muito diferentes, mas que significam a mesma coisa... e que são usados quando as aparências enganam. Não perca! Transcrição Hi, there. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, today I was reminded of this really interesting expression, devil in disguise. If you can understand the words I just said then you know what the expression means. We use this expression to talk about something - it can be a situation, or an object, or a car, a house, whatever - or someone, who appears at first to be helpful or well-meaning but turns out to be the opposite. So, let's say you just moved into a new neighbourhood, ok. The reason you just moved is, you've been saving money for years and you decided to invest in your own flat. So, you bought this property and you're really happy because now you're a homeowner. Your next-door neighbour comes around very quickly and introduces himself, and gives you lots of helpful tips on the neighbourhood. "So nice!", you think, right. You invite him in for some coffee, a chat, etc. It's always great to be friendly with neighbours. The next morning, the doorbell rings and it's a police officer. Yeah, a police officer came by for an official inspection. You JUST moved in, you thought everything was in order, and you have no idea why the police would show up at your door all of a sudden wanting to do an inspection! Weird. Well, it's not like you can turn him down so you let him in. He then explains to you that someone called the Police anonymously about you! What? You just moved in, but it doesn't matter. Someone called the police and said you were in possession of illegal substances. As in, drugs. You're freaked out when you hear that but there isn't much to do other than let the policeman have a look around. What if the previous residents left drugs stashed away in the flat and the officer finds them and thinks they belong to you? Damn, you're weak in the knees now thinking about the possibility when the police officer comes back and tells you he's finished looking and didn't see anything, and he leaves. And then you realise that only a couple of people have your new address, and these are people you really trust. You have known them all your life. Who else could have given your address to the police? Your real state agent? No, they'll be profiting from you for a few months - they would not want to get you in any kind of trouble! You can only think of one person: you neighbour! Could he be a devil in disguise? Could he be a person that comes across as really nice and helpful, but in time reveals himself to be a wolf in sheep's clothing? I'm going to leave the ending to this little story up in the air 'cause this is beginning to sound like the plot of a mystery novel or something. I think many of you will have had this experience - having your first impression of something or someone change drastically when you realise that person or situation is actually causing you some kind of harm. So, that's when people will say "This thing is a devil in disguise" or "That teacher was a wolf in sheep's clothing", for example. These are not nice expressions, of course. I mean, it's totally OK to say them in any situation but we only use them when talking about something unpleasant. So, can you think of any unfortunate experiences you've had that you can describe using one of these expressions? Let me know, and talk to you soon. Key expressions devil in disguise wolf in sheep's clothing Vocabulary well-meaning = bem intencionado, com boas intenções homeowner = proprietário, dono da casa you just moved in = você acabou de se mudar show up = aparecer, chegar you're freaked out = você está assustado/apavorado stashed away = escondido
2/4/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Nasceu em berço de ouro

How's it going? Hoje eu falo sobre alguns idioms com a palavra BORN - aquela mesma palavra que aparece em I was born... Não deixe de ouvir! Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Ok, let's get started. If you've read the title of this episode, well... that's the first term we're tackling today. Now, check this out: interestingly, in Brazil we say that someone who was born into a wealthy family was born in a cradle made of gold, right. So, we use the cradle, and gold, for a metaphor that expresses wealthy beginnings. In the English language, however, we use a spoon and not gold, but silver, to talk about people who were born rich. A silver spoon. And there's more: the silver spoon was in your mouth. And just like in Brazil, native English speakers don't say that someone's born with a silver spoon in their mouth to make a compliment. They'll say that more in an insulting way, to express that that person always had it easy in life and so on. Nowadays it's not unusual to see people justifying themselves to others on social media, making sure everyone knows that they may be rich now but they weren't born rich - they weren't born with a silver spoon in their mouth. Listen to what this guy tweeted out: To those who say I was born with a silver spoon in my mouth, I ask you, please look at this photo and point out the “silver spoon” because I must have accidentally dropped it on my way to school. https://twitter.com/SRobertsKRON4/status/1024316716342435840 You can see an image of the place where he grew up on the blog. So, there you go: he's telling everyone "Hey, I wasn't born rich. Just look at this place and you'll see that I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth." Before we move on, let me ask you: in your opinion, what's the best image to represent wealth - a silver spoon, or a cradle made of gold? Let me know. And here's our second one for this episode - and this is a very easy one. It's exactly the same as we say in Portuguese... However, it's always useful to hear stuff - and you know why! The more you hear it, the more it'll get in your head and add to your English fluency. So, here you go: I wasn't born yesterday. And this one's pretty much used in negative sentences a hundred percent of the time. People will say it to communicate that they're not naive, or gullible. If someone is gullible, that means they'll believe anything you tell them. Actually, wait: another very frequent way to use this one is by asking "Do you think I was born yesterday?" meaning, obviously, "Do you think I'm naive or stupid?" So, the question I just said and the negative form are basically how you're going to hear this idiom. Let me give you another great example coming from Twitter - check this out: Just had a customer complain and ask for her meal free after eating it all plus boxing some up to take home???? Sorry darling but I wasn’t born yesterday So, the customer ate the food, saved some of it to take home and then asked this lady for their money back, apparently. Her answer here is "Sorry darling, I wasn't born yesterday." I'm no fool, you're not going to take advantage of me or get a free meal like that. I'm not that gullible - I can see you ate the food and you're even taking leftovers with you! Some people have no shame... Can you think of a situation in your life where you thought "Haha. I wasn't born yesterday and I can see you're not telling the truth"? I think for me it was the last time I talked to a real estate agent - she said a certain flat I was interested in was in a really good area but I knew she was lying because I had done some research prior to talking to her. So, what about you? I'm sure you've got your own examples. Let me know, and see you soon!   Key expressions
1/28/20194 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Se tem alguém que sabe fazer isso, é o Zé

Hi! No podcast Inglês Online de hoje, falamos sobre mais um idiom daqueles que você não encontra no seu livro de inglês. Ouça bem o episódio e se familiarize...  Daqui a pouco, o idiom começa a sair da sua boca. True story! Não perca. Transcrição Hi! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, we start today with a term that will make total sense to you - I'm sure of it. Check this out: “If anybody knows how to make a great cappuccino, it's Bruno”. See? Even the name is Italian. So, obviously you say that when you want to highlight that Bruno is very skilled at making cappuccinos. He's better than all the other people you can think of. So, when your coworker Elizabeth says “Hey, I'm throwing a party this weekend and the theme is Italian-Japanese fusion. I'm going to have sumo wrestlers and lasagna.” Yeah, and also, Elizabeth wants to serve great cappuccino to her guests. That's the only missing piece for her - she's got the sumo wrestlers sorted, she's making the lasagna herself because she's really good at it, but she doesn't know anyone who can make great cappuccino. So, you say to Elizabeth “You have to meet my friend Bruno. If anybody knows how to make great cappuccino, it's Bruno.” So, your friend Bruno makes the most delicious cappuccino you have ever had. I mean, even Starbucks (the coffee shop chain) has been trying to hire him, but Bruno likes to work independently. Even Starbucks knows that if anybody can make a good cappuccino, it's Bruno. So, let me give you some other examples: if anybody knows how to make delicious lasagna, it's your friend Elizabeth. If anybody knows how to solve hard Math problems, it's Tommy. In the past: when you were still in school... if anybody knew how to have a good time it was your friend Chris. If anybody knew how to hold students’ attention, it was teacher Marcos with his History lessons. So, listen to this example from Twitter, from Los Angeles Valiant: ‏ If anyone knows how to party, it's #VALLA fan, @TPAIN. Get tickets now 🎟️ https://t.co/tZEqWSpk7Q pic.twitter.com/KKzlbLnbUM — Los Angeles Valiant (@LAValiant) July 20, 2018 Do you have that friend, or that relative, who could be a professional party person - if such an occupation existed? They feel at home when they're in a party. They always look happy, they show everyone a good time, they're first on the dance floor, they seemingly know every single person on the guest list - you know the type. Are you one of these? Can we say “If anybody knows how to party, it's you”? Well, if it's not you it's probably somebody you know. And by the way, how could someone describe YOU using today's expression? “If anybody knows how to remove stains from a used shirt, it's X”. Or, “If anybody knows how to hit the high notes in “I will always love you”, it's Z”. So, how would the people who know you describe you? Let me know! I'm curious. See you soon!   Key expressions If anybody knows how to (do something), it's (someone)   Vocabulary feel at home = se sente em casa, se sente a vontade she's got the wrestlers sorted = ela já “organizou”, já tem os lutadores
12/31/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Mais adiante, isso fará diferença

Hello! No podcast Inglês Online de hoje, você me ouve falar sobre dois idioms relacionados ao que vai acontecer mais adiante... Ouça já! Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, let's say you're walking sort of aimlessly on the streets of some American city - just picture that, in your imagination. Then, all of a sudden, you feel like having ice-cream. You don't know if there's an ice-cream parlour or a supermarket in the neighbourhood, so you ask a local: “Excuse me, sir? Do you know where to go for an ice-cream?” The man replies “Oh yes, there's a bakery just down the road - it's a two-minute long walk. They have great ice-cream.” OK, problem solved. There's a bakery that sells ice-cream just down the road. So, you keep going straight on, after a minute or so you'll find it. So, that is, of course, the most physical or literal meaning of the expression down the road. And there is, of course, a figurative meaning for down the road (I mean, why wouldn't we have that?) and it means in the future, after something progresses a little bit, or after some time goes by. Example: let's say we're hiring a new employee to work in our shop and, if we don't check their references now (before hiring) we may have problems down the road. I mean, that person could be someone who steals. They could be a fugitive - someone on the “most wanted” list. Better check who they are now, because you never know - if we don't we could be in for a surprise down the road. So, if you're someone who's pretty used to listening to podcasts in English (and I'm winking at you if Inglês Online is one of those podcasts!) you've probably had no difficulty at all to understand what down the road means. That's great. However, you're the person I want to talk to right now. Is the term “down the road” on the tip of your tongue? Does it come to your mind when you want to express that exact idea? If it does, again - that is great. I'm guessing, though, that for most people this idiom is not on the tip of their tongue. It can and it will be - if you listen to it enough times. And that's why I'm going to read you another example, from a tweet by the Hoop Central https://twitter.com/TheHoopCentral/status/1024042495980662785 So, Lebron James, American star basketball player, said that he wouldn't close the door on (meaning, he would not refuse) a possible return to Cleveland down the road. In the future... Not now, but maybe down the road. In... some time. Who knows when? Just down the road. Here's another very relatable example: if you never brush your teeth growing up... oh boy. You'll most certainly have teeth problems down the road. So, you know this sentence I just said - you'll most certainly have teeth problems down the road? Here's another way of saying it: You're bound to have teeth problems down the road. It is bound to happen. That means, it will happen for sure. It's a natural consequence of what's going on right now. If you're single and you sign up to an online dating site, you're bound to meet some people. It's bound to happen. I don't know if you're going to end up with one of them, but you're bound to meet a few different people. If you study a lot for your exams, you're bound to do well. If you prepare poorly, you're bound to fail. If you never, ever leave home carrying an umbrella, you're bound to be caught in the rain eventually. Unless you live in a place where it never rains... of course. If you listen to a lot of comprehensible English regularly, you are bound to improve your fluency. It's a law of the Universe. I'm serious! It is. So, let me know what you think is going to happen with you down the road. See you soon!   Key expressions down the road be bound to  
12/24/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Time to step up your game

How are you doing? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre mais duas expressões super comuns do inglês do dia-a-dia. Não perca! Transcrição How are you doing? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, imagine you're working with your boss on a sales proposal for a new client. The two of you have worked on it for a couple of days, and you both agree that it looks alright. So, now you're both presenting the proposal in the client's meeting room, and the client people don't look like they're buying it. They look kind of suspicious... or just a bit unconvinced. So, by the end of the presentation, the head of Strategy for the client is saying “You know, we were expecting better terms, and a better offer in general. We have cheaper offers from other companies that do exactly the same thing you offer, but we were hoping you would be able to take it a step further and give us the kind of top-notch service we expect for this price.” Yikes! Your boss tells the client that you will take that into consideration and evaluate how you can revise the order, and get back to them. He says to you “We need to step up our game”. When you step up your game, you improve something. You make it better quality, or you improve the quality, or you develop a skill, or something. So, that's more or less what your boss is saying: we're going to have to improve our proposal and come back with something that is higher-caliber if we want to get this client. So, how would that apply in your life? Let's say you love volleyball but you're not that great a player at the moment. So, you go ahead and join a group of people who play every Thursday. You realise they're pretty strong, and you'd better step up your game so you won't be too disruptive of the good game they play. So, what do you do? You start practicing a bit on your own, and the reason is... You want to step up your game and come up to their level - or at least a bit closer. So, here's another example of how it might apply to your life: you like cooking, but your lasagna is just average. However, a rumour was spread that you cook a mean lasagna... You, on the other hand, know that the person who spread the rumour is someone who only ever had frozen lasagnas before and that is possibly the reason why they loved yours so much. So, you decide that it would be a good idea to step up your game - you start practicing with some excellent recipes you found online. You make lasagna following like five different recipes, and by the end of the week you've had so much lasagna you can't even look at it - but you've certainly improved your lasagna-making skills. You have definitely stepped up your game. You're confident now that when your friends come over they will leave satisfied and content. So, I remember years ago when I was teaching English the traditional way and it was working out very poorly. I decided to step up my game and I did that whole research on how to actually improve fluency, and then I wrote my How-to-speak-English tips. I really stepped up my teaching game and it was a game-changer for me and lots of people - Inglês Online readers and others. So, let's wrap things up for now - and I will leave you with the question: When did you have to step up your game? Let us know and see you soon.   Key expressions step up (one's) game   Vocabulary head of Strategy = o “manda-chuva” de Estratégia top-notch = de primeira, de altíssima qualidade a mean lasagna = (informal) mean, aqui, é uma gíria usada para dizer “excelente”
12/17/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Vai quebrar paradigmas

What's up? Hoje, no podcast Inglês Online, dois idioms do inglês relacionados a originalidade e inovação (veja também este episódio sobre inovação!). Um deles é uma das maneiras de dizer “vai quebrar/quebrou paradigmas” em português. Não perca este pod. Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, I'll kick off this episode with a question: what is a cookie-cutter approach? What is a cookie-cutter way of doing things? First of all think of what a cookie-cutter is. It is a sort of mold with a round shape, or maybe shaped like a square, or a heart... It's usually made of some kind of metal and nowadays we have lots of silicone molds as well. So, one day you decide to bake some cookies. So, you go to the kitchen, you make cookie dough and you roll it out using a roller pin. Now it's time to cut your cookies using your favourite mold. Let's say it's a star-shaped cookie-cutter mold. So you go ahead and you cut all your star-shaped cookies, and then you bake them. You have now exactly twelve cookies shaped like stars, and they all look exactly the same. So, that's the cookie-cutter's job: to make all cookies look exactly the same. So, let's say you decide to open a clothes store and you're going to use a cookie-cutter approach. That means you're going to do exactly the same things that every other clothes store does: you're going to have shelves, and lots of racks with clothes hanging from them. You're going to have a staff of sales attendants, and every time a potential customer walks in, one of the sales people will walk up to them and ask “Can I help?” So, that's what every other clothes shop you've ever been to does. And you think, “Well, there must be a reason why all those other shops do this. It must work!” So, that would be a cookie-cutter approach - it's exactly the same as other shops - and I'm not saying it is necessarily a bad approach or a good approach, but it's a cookie-cutter approach. Now, let's say you think about it for a couple of days and you have now actually changed your mind about opening a cookie-cutter shop! At this point, you're thinking about opening a shop where all the clothes will be lying around on couches. You know, sofas. It will be like a messy bedroom and you think most people will feel at home - because most people you know are messy, anyway. So, clothes will be lying around and there will be beautiful shopping baskets, and people will collect the pieces they're interested in and then walk over to the fitting rooms, where they'll be able to try the clothes on. Also, there'll be no tills. Customer will have two options: they can pay using their cell phone, or they can use the self-scan stations inside the store. And instead of shop attendants, there will be fashion consultants to guide customers on what looks best on them. So, if someone thinks this sounds like a supermarket - nope! No way. It's messy and self-serviced, but you're thinking if you bring in some street performers and an oyster bar, customers will have a blast. In fact, you think this will be such a huge success... it will be a game-changer. Other shops will start copying what you did. You will win awards; your success story will turn into a business case and will be discussed in classrooms all over the world. It will be a game-changer. Of course, you don't need to achieve worldwide fame to do something that is a game-changer. You could ask the canteen at your school to make their potato mash using fresh potatoes instead of the powder mix they've always used, and, I mean... That would be a game-changer, at least for me if that's where I eat lunch. So, can you think of an example? What happened in your life recently, or a while ago, that was a real game-changer?
12/10/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Fica de olho

How are you? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre mais duas expressões super comuns do inglês do dia-a-dia. Não perca! Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, check this out: if you're receiving my message in your inbox (thanks for being a subscriber, by the way) then you probably keep an eye on your inbox for my messages, right? Otherwise, why would you be on the list...? So, when you keep an eye on something, that means you're focusing a little bit of your attention on it. It's like... you're aware that something's about to happen; you're aware that this cool newsletter you've subscribed to will be popping in your inbox shortly and for that reason you're keeping an eye on your inbox. Every time you fire up that browser window there's something in the back of your mind that tells you "There may be new mail from Ana" - or anyone, really, that you've subscribed to. So, here's the thing: I know you understand what I mean when I use the idiom "keep an eye on". I know you got it; I'm sure you understood the little example I just gave you. Is this idiom coming out of your mouth as you speak English, though? That's what this podcast is for: give you a lot of audio input. Listen to something you understand long enough, and before you know it you'll be saying it like a pro. Or, in our case, like a native speaker. I've seen it happen countless times. Let me get on, then, with more examples - this one, for a slightly different way to use "keep an eye on". Same as we do in Brazil, in English we can use 'keep an eye on' someone or something with the purpose of watching that person or thing. As many of you know, I like going to cafés or coffee shops with my computer and getting some work done over a cup of coffee. Sometimes when I want to go to the loo, I ask the person sitting next to me to keep an eye on my bag and my computer. I'm asking that person to watch my stuff for me - by the way, once, in Brazil, I asked a girl to do that for me and she said, point blank, "If someone tries to steal your stuff there's nothing I can do". Anyway, I've had some strange stuff happen here in London as well, regarding other people's reactions to leaving stuff unattended in a café. But back to our idiom: you get the point. You ask someone to keep an eye on your bags, on your groceries, on your wallet, on your new employee, on your kids, whatever or whomever you think needs a bit of vigilance! You can also say keep an eye out for something, "keep an eye out for something." That has a bit more of a specific meaning - let's say I tell you, Inglês Online subscriber, "Keep an eye out for my English course!" Here, I'm telling you exactly what to expect - my new course. I'm not asking you to watch or take care of my course - I'm telling you there is this new thing coming up - my course, and telling you to pay attention: keep an eye out for it, because it's coming soon! "Keep an eye out" is also useful to warn people that something or someone is going to show up soon. You can tell your colleagues at work "Guys, keep an eye out for the Health inspector visit - we got a letter from the Health Department today saying they're inspecting every office in the neighbourhood this week". Or maybe you're at the bus stop with a group of people and you're all chatting and having a laugh and your friend says "Everyone, keep an eye out for the bus or we'll be stuck here for another thirty minutes." So, what is it that you're keeping an eye out for at this moment? Let me know! See you soon.   Key expressions keep an eye on keep an eye out for   Vocabulary before you know it = antes que você se dê conta, quando você menos esperar get work done over a cup of coffee = fazer o trabalho enquanto be...
12/3/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Forward-thinking innovation

How have you been? No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre inovação, e um idiom relacionado a pensar pra frente! Não perca. Transcrição How have you been? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, I'm sure you will understand the word 'innovation'. When a person is prone to innovating or favours innovation in some way, that usually means this person is pretty open to new ideas. They're interested in learning new things and testing new ways of doing old tasks 'cause... That's one of the things innovation is about, I think. It's not just coming up with a new electronic device no one's ever seen before but it's also finding new and better ways of doing stuff you already do. I have to say, I love that concept. I'm all for finding new and better ways of doing things. And just to clarify, "new and better" to me means "easier and less time-consuming". Don't get me wrong, I'm pretty demanding, usually, as far as quality is concerned, but if you can find an easier and faster way of accomplishing something without compromising the level of quality that I consider necessary... hey, count me in and sign me up. I mean, think of the company you work for (in case you have a job.) If you don't have a job yet... Just wait. Your time will come :-) So, I think anyone who works for a company will be able to relate to this... There are things you do, that you have to do again, periodically... And sometimes you can just tell that there would be an easier way to get it done but - for whatever reason, that "easier way" never gets implemented and every time you have to do that task, you have that feeling of "What a time-waster" or maybe you just go through it mechanically, 'cause you've sort of tuned out... You know what I mean? Maybe you haven't said anything because any changes would depend on the approval of many other people; maybe it's because you don't think the people involved are particularly receptive to new ideas; maybe you just don't have any spare time for making suggestions, or it may be that you know, you're not a person who's particularly inclined to speak up and offer your thoughts. Let's go with the opposite idea, though. Let's say that, after doing this task for a couple of months, it's pretty clear to you that there's an easier, faster way of accomplishing it and let's say you're pretty fortunate to have a boss who is a very open person and is interested in hearing your suggestions. So, you walk up to your boss one day, when... Let's say it's a guy and his name is Gary. So, Gary is hanging by the water cooler and you just walk up to him and explain your idea of how to make this little process simpler and faster, without any compromise to the final result. Gary says "What a great idea. I'm very pleased to work with someone who's so forward-thinking. We have been doing things this way for years! Your idea introduces technological innovation to this process, and will make things easier for everyone when we launch our new range of products next year!". Sounds like a dream boss, right? So, Gary said you're forward-thinking. That means thinking ahead but not just in terms of simply planning ahead... It's more than that. It's also about anticipating trends, you know... being able to predict that something is going to be useful or successful before that thing exists. In other words, being a bit of a visionary! I think it's safe to say that people like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg - whatever your other opinions about them are - were or are pretty visionary. Let's wrap things up with this tweet: https://twitter.com/JHGreenwoodCo/status/1025035260835315712 Who would you call "a forward-thinking person"? Do you have anyone in your family who is forward-thinking?
11/26/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Marry into money

How's it going? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms com a palavra money - os dois super comuns do inglês de todo dia. Não perca... Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Ok, so we have two idioms today that are pretty relatable... Meaning, everyone has heard them, at least in Portuguese. Both of them use the word money, which is pretty much one of the first words people learn in English. The first idiom is marry into money, which we use when we're talking about someone - let's say it's John... So, John married someone who's wealthy or whose family is wealthy. So, in the future it may happen that one of John's acquaintances will be talking about him and they will refer to the fact that John married someone who belongs to a wealthy family. And this is what John's acquaintance might say: You know, John Smith? He just lost his job, poor thing. That's alright, though. His wife comes from a very wealthy family. Yes, it's true, didn't you know? Oh yes, John Smith married into money. Of course, this kind of thing is never said in a super flattering way - but people will say it. John married into money, your cousin married into money and so on. You know Meghan Markle? You can say “Meghan Markle married into royalty.” There you go... Same structure. Let's move along and focus on our second idiom of today: made of money. I'm sure you get the meaning... Everyone's been there. At least once in your life you must have asked someone - usually a parent - to buy you something, and that person said “It's too expensive. I'm not made of money!” And, there are actually quite a few sayings in English that are very similar to what we say in Brazil, both in format and meaning. Like “money isn't everything”, for example, and “money can't buy happiness”. Here's one that we wouldn't literally say in Portuguese: on the money. When someone's on the money, that means they are exactly right about something. Example: you and your friend Gary decided to watch a soccer game and made a bet. You bet team A would win 2-nil, and Gary bet the other team was going to win, 3-nil. You thought “This is the easiest money I've ever won. There's no way the other team is winning. They're on a losing streak - lost the last three games to mediocre opponents.” Well, as it turns out, the other team scored three times and team A didn't score at all. Gary was on the money. He won the bet. How he did it, you do not know. But he was on the money. Have you ever met anyone who's good at guessing who the murderer is on murder stories? I've never been able to - I've read quite a few murder stories in the past and I usually tried to guess who it was before the final chapter, but I was rarely on the money. Are you someone who's always on the money with your guesses? Let me know and see you soon!   Key expressions marry into money made of money on the money   Vocabulary on a losing streak = com vários episódios seguidos de “perder” algo acquaintances = conhecidos
11/19/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Jump ship

Hello! No podcast Inglês Online de hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms que você vai ouvir o tempo todo em sitcoms e filmes americanos (e ouvir de falantes nativos também). Os dois tem a ver com abandonar algo que você estava fazendo. Ouça já! Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! We're beginning with a great expression today: jump ship. That's it, jump ship. It's basically like an intransitive verb, just to go back to grammar a little bit. An intransitive verb is a verb that needs no complement. For example, "give" is not intransitive. When someone tells you "John gave." you feel like asking... John gave what? Like, what did John give? And to whom? So, jump ship is not like that - when you say someone jumped ship, you're saying this person abandoned something they were a part of. I think the most frequent kind of example for this expression has to do with, let's say, a group project of any kind that has a number of people involved in it. It might be a company with dozens of employees and one day the vice-president of marketing and sales decides to jump ship. Why? Because he and the CEO significantly disagree about the direction the company should go in. After several meetings, the VP of marketing thought to himself "I can't go on in this company if this is where we are headed. Continuing to ignore our competitors will lead to disaster." And he quits. This is a high profile company so his decision makes the headlines on some industry magazines: John Doe, VP of Marketing and Sales at the Green Train, jumps ship over disagreements. And the top of the article reads "I couldn't go on like that anymore, Mr. Doe said. I can't watch the company self-destruct because it refuses to pay attention to the competition." So, ok, whatever the reason, many people sooner or later jump ship from something. Listen to what Fast Company magazine tweeted out a few days ago - and I will read the first line of the article as well. https://twitter.com/FastCompany/status/1033613684193546242 So, in this case, Tesla employees are jumping ship - they're abandoning their positions at Tesla - for better pay at Apple. Tesla is a tech company as well, but they develop electric vehicles, solar panels, and other stuff. So there you go. People may choose to jump ship from a project, a company, an enterprise... for many different reasons. Now, when someone jumps ship from a situation - listen to this: that doesn't necessarily mean that this person is a quitter. If someone calls you a quitter, let's just say... that's not a compliment, ok. "Quitter" obviously comes from the word "quit" and a quitter is someone who gives up easily. You know, people who will start something up and at the first sign of a hard time they'll give up? And then they do that repeatedly? That person would be seen very often as a quitter. So, listen to what this guy, Kurt, tweeted out: https://twitter.com/KurtInMilwaukee/status/1032671403072528384 "Hang in there" means be strong, endure this tough situation you're in a little bit longer - don't be a quitter! Now, I would argue that there is a time to quit and that's when you look at what you've been doing and you realise that you were mistaken about lots of things and your enterprise just isn't progressing the way you expected, and then you quit. So, that wouldn't be an example of a quitter. A quitter would be someone who repeatedly quits something without giving it a proper go. Can you give me an example from your own life? See you soon.   Key expressions jump ship be a quitter   Vocabulary it makes (the) headlines = vira manchete (de jornal ou revista) John Doe = nome genérico, mais ou menos equivalente a dizer "fulano de tal"
11/12/20184 minutes, 35 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: É uma faca de dois gumes

How's it going? No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online eu falo sobre como dizer “Meu, se controla!” e faca de dois gumes em inglês. Sempre bom saber! Ouça e se familiarize... Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online Podcast app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, let's get started today with a great expression: get a grip! I've talked about a similar idiom before in a previous episode. In fact, there are many different ways of saying the same thing, so today we're going with Get a grip! You could say that telling someone to get a grip is an expression of tough love. You're telling someone to calm down. So, that person is obviously in a bad state in that particular moment and you're telling them to, you know... Get a grip! Take control of their emotions, and lower their voice if they're angry or shouting... Or if they're just, like, freaking out about something, speaking really fast and they look like they're about to hyperventilate, you can also say “Get a grip! You have to calm down.” And like I said before, there are many ways of telling someone to get a grip. Another one would be “get a hold of yourself”. So, let's look at a real-life example: something that was tweeted out by a guy named John. He's advising exam-takers to get a grip on themselves and take control of their nerves. Listen: Board exam takers, a piece of advice:Your mind is your greatest enemy. Your ego wields emotion and fear like a double edged blade, either way, you lose. So get a grip on yourself and calm down. Because your mind is a powerful tool, one mindset can change everything.— (@abarkezz) July 17, 2018 So, apart from some funny comma use, John's saying that you should use your mind wisely when you're taking an exam. He basically says that your ego is a double-edged blade, which is also a very interesting term for our podcast, so let's focus on it a little bit. I'm not going to lie - I hear double-edged sword way more often than double-edged blade so I'm using sword for the examples. When you say something is a double-edged sword, you're saying it can help you but it can also cause you trouble. Depending on how you use that thing; depending on the decisions you make; sometimes depending on the circumstances - that thing can be extremely positive or it could be a hindrance. Example: winning the lottery overnight - double-edged sword. That'd be awesome... we all love money, right? Talk to past lottery winners though, and ask them if there were any downsides. I'm betting at least some of them will be able to tell you a few downsides. Obviously, our minds are a double-edged sword. We can use our minds to do amazing stuff, think up the greatest ideas, get ourselves out of trouble and so on... But before we know it, we'll find ourselves in a state of panic before an exam or an interview, for example. If you've ever found yourself in this exact situation you know what I'm talking about. You may end up drawing a blank halfway through the exam. You may stutter uncontrollably when trying to answer the interview questions. Not fun. So, that's what John is talking about, although in my opinion he slightly misused the expression “double-edged blade”. He's saying that your ego will wield emotion and fear, and “either way you lose”. That means that there's no positive coming out of your ego. A double-edged blade, on the other hand, can be both: positive or negative, depending on circumstances. Anyway, John ends up telling exam-takers to get a grip on themselves and calm down. We all know it's better to be calm when you're taking an exam, right? I guess what people don't know sometimes is how to get to that calm state. So, what's your recipe to getting calm? Let us know and see you soon!   Key expressions
11/5/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Tirar o amassado da camisa

Hello! Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre uma expressão do inglês que eu não ouço muito nas bocas dos brasileiros - e que, no entanto, é super comuns entre os falantes nativos... além de vocabulário prático sobre passar roupa, como “tirar o amassado da camiseta”. Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Today I'm talking about a little idiom that you'll hear a lot when listening to native English speakers talk - be it the news, TV shows, movies, it doesn't matter. And I'm so happy that today I'm talking about it, because I don't hear it enough when Brazilians are speaking English. So today is the day: you're going to receive massive input on iron out. Iron out. Let's start with a brief pronunciation tip: even when we “get” the ways of the English sounds in our heads, sometimes we will still be surprised. I've done podcasts about unusually pronounced words before... So you can look in the archives for that but the point here is, IRON is one of those words. Considering how we say things in Portuguese, if you haven't listened to this word enough times, you're still going to mentally consult your frame of reference for pronunciation, which is... Brazilian Portuguese. And then you're going to go ahead and maybe say something like “iron”. So, there you go: people don't really pronounce it “ai-ron” or “ai-ran”. It's more like “ai-arn”. So, of course, when you're saying things fast it all gets jumbled together and before you can discern anything the speaker is already on a different topic. So let me tell you this: don't be too hard on yourself, OK? Just pay attention to what I said, listen to this podcast (which you already are), have a look at the transcript so you can read my suggested pronunciation, and after you're done go over to Forvo.com and look up iron. You'll be able to hear a few more people say it. So, let me start with the literal use of this idiom... For example, your t-shirt just came out of the dryer and it's all wrinkled. So you grab your clothes iron and you use it on your t-shirt to iron out all those wrinkles. So you press that t-shirt with the steam iron, or whatever the kind of iron it is that you use, and you make it all flat and wrinkle-free. You have just ironed out all the wrinkles from your t-shirt. How about pants with a crease? Do you know what a crease is? It's that sort of line or mark that runs vertically down the front of some pants - usually pants that are meant to be worn in more, like formal or social occasions. You won't see a crease in most denim pants or in tracksuit bottoms. So back to the crease: when you buy a pair of pants with a crease, it's actually not recommended that you iron out the crease in them. The crease is there for a reason, right - to give your pants a more sophisticated look. So, obviously, “iron out” is the perfect expression to be applied metaphorically when you're talking about little things or issues that need to be resolved in any situation in life. For example: my coworker and I have been working on this project together. I'm taking care of the purchasing and he is handling marketing. We're having a meeting today to iron out a few details, such as the fact that some expenses he has planned for marketing will exceed my purchasing budget, and also the fact that I'm using an old version of the company logo and he wants to redo it but we don't know when it will be ready. So just a few details we need to iron out; a couple of things we need to discuss and clarify. When you're working on a project with a team, you may need to get together periodically to iron out a few details. You can even say “I got together with my team yesterday to iron out a few wrinkles on this project we're working on”. It's bound to happen.
10/29/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: This is off-putting

How are you? Hoje o podcast tem, só para variar, dois idioms do inglês pra lá de comuns - e é a vez da palavrinha off. Listen and enjoy :-) Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! OK. So, I love our first idiom of today. I love that I'm talking about it on this podcast because, you'll see, it's not a difficult expression to understand and it's not hard to say or pronounce at all! However, it's not really an idiom that lots of students learn - I don't see it really being taught even to intermediate students... Maybe even advanced students! So, let's get started. Our first idiom is off-putting. When you say that something is off-putting, what you're communicating is something like "This thing here makes me dislike that thing; it makes me want to go away or not get involved with it." An easy example: your friend offers you a beautiful sandwich, and you're so hungry. The sandwich's got everything you like: two slices of crunchy bread, a bit of lettuce and tomato, some mayo, melted cheese and let's say, salami... It looks so yummy to you. Gorgeous! Then, your friend says: “You know what the best thing about this sandwich is? There's a layer of mussels between the salami and the cheese. Yum!” Now, I don't know if you know what mussels are - they're a kind of seafood. And granted, lots of people love oysters and mussels, and all kinds of seafood and that's all fine; other people however can't stand the idea of it. And for the sake of this little story, you are now one of them. (By the way: to see a picture of what mussels look like, have a look at the episode over at the Inglês Online website.) OK, on with the story: so you hate mussels. And you were really looking forward to eating that sandwich. Now your friend has told you that there are mussels mixed in with the cheese and... that is just so off-putting to you! Knowing that there's a bunch of mussels in the middle of that yummy-looking sandwich is seriously off-putting. Quite simply, you don't want to eat that sandwich anymore. You're looking at it differently now. It's not the same sandwich. That beautiful image of the sandwich that was making you salivate has now been shattered, just like a glass window being hit by a million rocks. OK, I think you get the idea. If this has been hard for you to imagine because you're someone who loves mussels, just picture a food that you really dislike and imagine that someone stuffed that thing in the middle of your favourite sandwich or something. Let's pick a different food... Say, tomatoes. Some people can't stand tomatoes - I've met a few of them in my life. So, listen to this: tomatoes put you off. They're off-putting to you and another way of saying it is, tomatoes put you off. Basically, “off-putting” is the adjective, so you say that something is off-putting to you or to your cousin, to your friend and so on. And then, you can talk about that thing that is off-putting to you by saying that... it puts you off. Sometimes a dish doesn't look very good. It may taste delicious, but its appearance is off-putting and it makes you not want to eat it. The appearance puts you off eating that food. I heard someone on TV say once that one of her friends had a complicated relationship with her boyfriend, and their relationship put this person off having a relationship. It's like, she looked at their relationship and thought “Oh, their relationship is off-putting. It puts me off wanting to have a relationship.” Smell is something that can frequently put people off doing something. So here's my question for you: what is the one ingredient that puts you off eating a dish, if that ingredient is present? Tell me! See you soon.   Key expressions off-putting
10/22/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Tirar satisfação com alguém

How have you been? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms super comuns do inglês - e um deles é para dizer “tirou um peso dos meus ombros". Não perca... Transcrição How have you been? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, let me start with an idiom that we use when we want to say that, you know... this person or that person doesn't particularly enjoy doing this or that, so they avoid it. They shy away from it. Here's a very common example: there are many, many people in the world who shy away from confrontation. You know, confrontation? That's when you confront someone on something they said or did, for example. Look at the title of this episode: that is one way we, Brazilians, say that same thing in Portuguese. Now, “tirar satisfação” usually involves some hostility, and that expression is more informal, I feel. To be fair, when an English speaker says they're going “to confront someone”, there is going to be some sort of conflict as well, but the difference here is that “confront” is a word you can use in any situation - either formal or informal, it doesn't matter. So, let's say you hear that one of your “friends” is slagging you off behind your back. Say your friend's name is Joanna. So you hear Joanna has been saying some unkind things about you. And you go “Wow! Why is Joanna saying these things? What is up with that? I thought we were good friends!” And then the next thing you do is - you go talk to Joanna. You are going to confront Joanna about what she's been saying. So you go to this place where you know she hangs out at, on weekends, and there she is. And you confront her! You say “Joanna, I heard you've been saying this and that about me. What's up with that?” So, doing that once in a while doesn't mean you're a very confrontational person. A confrontational person is someone who usually won't let anything slide... Whenever they hear something that someone did and they don't like it, they will speak to that person and tell them they didn't like it and they want to know why that person did that... And then they will tell that person that he or she should not have done that, and so on. That would be a very confrontational person. So, are you a confrontational person? Do you confront people like, every week... or just once in a while? So, let's go back to our first term of today: there are many people, on the other hand, who will shy away from any kind of confrontation. They hate conflict so much that they'd rather not say anything ever than risk displeasing someone by confronting them on something. So, there you go:  you can imagine, like, two extremes. On one extreme you've got someone who shies away from confrontation completely and I think what can happen is that this kind of person usually hangs around with people who are kind of bossy. I mean, if you're a bossy person there's nothing better than being surrounded by people who will never confront you, right? You can't be too bossy if there's no one to boss around. So, at the other extreme you have someone who shies away from all confrontation and at the opposite extreme, you have a very confrontational person who just feels like they have to speak up every time they hear something they don't like. So, ok, let's just hope that we're all somewhere in the middle. How about that? That's it for today - let me know where you fall on the non-confrontational, confrontational scale and see you soon!   Key expressions shy away from confront someone be confrontational   Vocabulary slag someone off = falar mal de alguém Say your friend's name is... = Vamos dizer que o nome de sua amiga/o é... hangs out at = frequentar um lugar and there she is = e lá está ela
10/15/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Tenta! Quem sabe você gosta?

How's it going? Hoje eu foco em um idiom que eu já usei muito nos podcasts do Inglês Online quando explicava outros idioms. Mas no episódio de hoje, ele é o centro das atenções. Não perca! Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, if your friend Jim comes up to you and says “You know, I've been thinking about learning how to cook. Just thinking! I haven't cooked anything yet. Not even close. Still eating frozen lasagna every day. But I'm thinking it would be good to learn and make some food”. So, you just say  “Give it a go! Just go and do it, see how it turns out. It'll probably be better than frozen pasta”. Give it a go! Just give it a go. If you've been listening to the Inglês Online podcast for a while, you have definitely heard me use this idiom dozens of times, like dozens of times. If this is the case for you, today I want to make sure you'll hear it many more times and that you will be soon on your way to saying it spontaneously to the next person that tells you “Hey, I feel like trying this or that.” You'll just open your mouth and say “Give it a go! Why not?”. Well, unless you have a good reason to tell them not to, of course. So, check out what this (apparently famous) person tweeted out: https://twitter.com/AnnaSaccone/status/1023283650945839104 So, she's going through the last few days of her pregnancy and she's thinking that watching a fun reality show will help her get through it. And her question is, should she give “Southern Charm” a go? I've no idea, I've never watched it but you get the gist. Your friend says “I like that girl. Should I ask her out?” You say “Yeah, ask her out. Give it a go. You'll never know if you don't”. Your father's trying to show you how to drive a tractor. You're sitting by his side watching him drive, and he says “Hey, it's your turn now. Let's swap seats so you can give it a go”. Your friend Anna says “My friends want to go scuba-diving. I'm not crazy about scuba-diving... and I'm not going” So, you know Anna has never tried it so you say “Hey, give it a go! You never know - you might like it!”. And sometimes you give something a go, and it turns out you don't like it, or it doesn't work for you, it's not what you expected, whatever. In these cases, you can say “Hey, I gave it a go, and it didn't work. I didn't like it. It wasn't what I expected”. I was once watching an interview with a girl who said she liked a boy and she told him that she liked him a few times, and tried to sort of get him to go out with her, and he still wasn't interested. The girl said “I gave it a good go but it didn't work”. I gave it a good go. I really tried. I put a good amount of effort into it and it still didn't work. So, please tell me - when did you last give something a good go, and it turned out that it didn't really work? See you soon!   Key expressions Give (something) a go   Vocabulary to turn out = resultar, revelar-se, acabar em be on the/your way to something = estar prestes ou próximo de conseguir fazer ou alcançar algo you get the gist = você entendeu (o que eu quis dizer) to ask someone out = convidar alguém para sair
10/8/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ele tá pegando no meu pé

What's up? Hoje o podcast Inglês Online tem dois idioms super interessantes e, claro, muito usados por falantes nativos no dia a dia. Ouça já! Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, listen to this: Mary's parents have been getting on her case because she hasn't been doing well in school. If you're familiar with this expression, you understand what I just said, of course. But even if you're not familiar with it, you may get it: Mary's parents have been getting on her case about her grades! She hasn't really been studying too hard and her grades are slipping. That means Mary's parents have been telling her “Mary, you need to study harder. Let us help you with Maths and Geography.” “Mary, have you done your homework?” They've been getting on her case ever since her grades started to slip. Teachers can sometimes get on your case. Have you ever had that experience? Parents will get on their kid's case, and also some friends, boyfriends, wives, etc will also get on their friends’, girlfriends’ and husbands’ cases. And bosses! How could I forget? Sometimes it's your boss who's been telling you to do something this way or that way, or maybe he or she has given you a deadline to get a task done, and... they're worried you may have forgotten, or they're anxious. Who knows? In any case, they start getting on your case because they haven't seen the results yet. “Have you done it? Why haven't you done it? When are you going to do it? It's time you did it.” They're getting on your case a bit. To be fair, if your boss is asking you all the questions I just said, it's more a case of them breathing down your neck. That is a bit stronger than just “getting on your case”. When you say someone's breathing down your neck, that means they're watching you more closely. That person is sort of monitoring you and probably being overbearing. I'll give you an example: my friend used to rent a room in a house that belonged to a woman who also lived in the house. One day my friend left the house and forgot to turn off the light in her room. The woman saw the light was on - and, small detail, in order to have seen it she would have had to get in my friend's bedroom while she wasn't there. The woman called my friend and told her off for leaving the light on. A week later my friend forgot again, and the woman called her again. She was monitoring my friend's bedroom, getting in there while my friend was out. My friend wasn't happy about it, of course, and felt like the woman was breathing down her neck. So, check out what this person tweeted out: https://twitter.com/rideout___/status/1025039709083521024 So, she's pretty happy that she can wear sweats to her job - to be honest, unless I was a personal trainer, I'd rather not. What do you think? Have you ever had the feeling that someone was breathing down your neck about something? Was it a parent, your boss, a friend? What happened? Let me know and see you soon.   Key expressions get on someone's case breathe down someone's neck   Vocabulary be overbearing = tentar controlar, dominar tell someone off = repreender ou dar bronca em alguém sweats = blusa e calça de abrigo
10/1/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: The nail in the coffin

Hi, there. No podcast de hoje você me ouve falar um idiom super, super comum com a palavra nail. Ouça e confira! Transcrição Hi, there. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Our first expression of today uses the word ‘coffin’. Yep, coffin, that sort of box that we use to bury people who have passed away... dead people. The idiom is nail in the coffin. I think it'll be easier to get it if I give you an example, so let me read to you what this guy, Scott Mendelson, tweeted out: https://twitter.com/ScottMendelson/status/1024703974308438016 So, let's break this down a little bit: the first part of his question is “Will the new Terminator cement Paramount's comeback”. He is, of course, talking about the Terminator franchise, the series of movies starred by Arnold Schwarzenegger... at least the past ones were. I don't know if Arnold is in the new one, but, you know, moving on... So, that guy is asking if this new Terminator movie will cement, or solidify, Paramount's comeback. A comeback is a return after recovering from a state where things were not so good. So, again, I don't know a lot about the state of this huge movie studio, Paramount, but I assume things have not been going so well for them. Otherwise, why would they need to have a comeback? So, if this new installment of the Terminator does well at the box office, it may be just what Paramount studios need to come back from whatever troubles they were having. Let's get to the second part of Scott Mendelson's tweet now! Here's the full question he asked: Will the new Terminator cement Paramount's comeback, or be a final nail in the coffin? What does he mean by “nail in the coffin”? This is what he means: Paramount is already in bad shape - again, everyone, I haven't checked to see if this is true, but I assume it is. So, Paramount is struggling; it's facing a difficult time. In a case like this, the nail in the coffin is the event or circumstance that finally brings the situation to a complete failure. It terminates the suffering. See what I did there? Pun intended. It's more or less what we say in Brazil as “golpe de misericórdia”... I think it's slightly different but close enough. So, I think now Scott's tweet is clear: will the Terminator save Paramount, or be the nail in the coffin that makes it go bankrupt, perhaps? We'll have to wait and see. So, imagine that this guy Peter starts a new business, but right away he's running into all sorts of trouble. He hasn't been able to find a competent assistant and his suppliers have just told him they ran out of pencils, which is what Peter sells. So, his business is struggling and Peter has had to work extremely long hours for several weeks now in order to try and turn things around. The thing is, a few days ago he found out his business partner Steve ran away and took all his money with him. Like, everything. That was the nail in the coffin - Peter has declared bankruptcy. So, do you have any examples for nail in the coffin? Let me know, and see you soon!   Key expressions nail in the coffin   Vocabulary let's break this down = vamos por partes installment = capítulo if it does well at the box office = se ele for sucesso de bilheteria to be in bad shape = estar em maus lençóis, em condições ruins ou críticas. Também usado para dizer que alguém está em 'má forma' go bankrupt = ir á/ou abrir falência pun intended = o trocadilho / jogo de palavras foi intencional
9/24/20183 minutes, 56 seconds
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Podcast: I should have seen it coming

Hello! No podcast de hoje você vai me ouvir falar sobre dois idioms pra lá de comuns (of course :-). Você também vai me ouvir usar a estrutura ‘should have done’ várias vezes - are you ready? Enjoy. Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, here's our first idiom of today - before revealing what it is, think about this: you know when something unpleasant happens and, after the fact, you look back at everything that led up to that thing happening... You think of, you know, the people involved, what they said, and then you have that feeling of, I should have predicted that this was going to be the outcome! Maybe you had a feeling. For a fraction of a second, a thought crossed your mind that was something like "This is a bit off". This doesn't sound right. Can I be sure about this situation, can I be sure about this person? But then you brushed it off, you quickly dismissed it. And now, looking back at this unpleasant outcome, you think “I should have seen it coming”. So, when you say ‘I should have seen it coming’, you're saying that you should have predicted it, basically. You should have known! Can you relate to what I'm saying? I'm sure you can. I mean, I can think, off the top of my head, of a handful of situations I've been through where I had that feeling that something was off, you know, before something happened... that I didn't want to happen. In all of them, after the fact, I thought “I should have seen it coming.” How did I not see it coming? I don't know. When you want something to happen, or when you're short on time, or when you don't want to confront something, you kinda brush these feelings off very quickly, don't you? So, here's something else you can say when you realise you could have sort of predicted what was going to happen: in hindsight, I should have spoken to this person first, done this or done that instead, or I should have eaten a hot dog instead of chili beans before that roller coaster ride! Anyway, that's what ‘in hindsight’ means. So, of course, it's much easier to realise your mistakes after the fact. It's much easier to look back, knowing what you know now, and analyse what went wrong, isn't it? Let me give you a few more examples to help get ‘in hindsight’ into your head! In hindsight, I should have done a little bit more research before buying a new car. I followed my neighbour's advice blindly and now I have a car that won't start. In hindsight, I should have picked the other candidate to work with us. He didn't have as much experience, but his attitude was a whole lot better than our current colleague's attitude. I should have known this person was going to be a handful. In hindsight, I should have studied a bit harder for this exam. I had a feeling I had not prepared enough. What is your example? What happened to you recently that made you think “I should have seen it coming” or “In hindsight, I should have done this or that”? See you soon! Mais sobre I should have seen it coming   Key expressions should have seen it coming in hindsight   Vocabulary after the fact = depois do acontecido you brushed it off = você não deu importância àquilo off the top of my head = assim de imediato (geralmente usado em conjunto com expressões do tipo “think of something”, “give an example”, etc) something was off = tinha alguma coisa estranha, que não combinava to be short on time = estar com pouco ou sem tempo roller coaster = montanha russa be a handful = ser alguém difícil de lidar, alguém que dá trabalho
9/17/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Fazer as coisas sem pensar

How are you doing? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre um idiom ótimo de pronunciar (fun!)  e uma expressão super comum do inglês do dia a dia. Não perca!! Transcrição How are you doing? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for “inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let's dive right in with our first expression of today - and this is an informal one that I've heard quite a few times. So, think about this: when you do something without a lot of forethought, without, you know, reflecting a little bit first, without any planning or even without a clear reason for doing it... That's when we could say you're doing something willy-nilly. I love this idiom because it sounds kind of funny and it's fun to say. So, let's say your friend Sam is an impulsive kind of guy. He's pretty young and a bit inconsequential - you know what I mean, he doesn't give things a lot of thought before doing them. So the other day Sam decided to enrol in an expensive arts course 'cause he thought it would be cool to become an artist. Here's the thing, though. Sam isn't financially independent, and in order to attend the course he'll have to spend quite a bit of money in arts supplies. His parents will have to spend that money, that is. Not Sam. His parents would be more than happy to encourage Sam to become an artist, if they didn't know him better. They know Sam usually enrols in expensive courses willy-nilly only to give up a month later. He's a starter, but not a finisher. They remember when Sam decided to learn a language a few months ago and spent his allowance willy-nilly on an Indonesian course that he abandoned two weeks later. What that means is, Sam didn't really give it a lot of thought. He didn't think through all that would be involved in seriously learning Indonesian, and he didn't really consider whether this was just a passing interest or something he was willing to commit to. So he just went for it willy-nilly and, as it turns out, he's not a student of Indonesian anymore, and he's a little bit poorer than he was a month ago. So, check out what this guy tweeted out: Wowww I’m really about to make a whole year of being single.. i used to jump in to relationships all Willy Nilly and honestly, finding that self love and self worth is way better than putting up with peoples bullshit and lowering yourself So, that was a nice thing he learned. Cool. Next up we have win someone over, and this is a pretty common one. You win someone over basically when you convince them of something; when you bring them over to your side, metaphorically speaking. That's all there is to it, really. Let's say you're giving a presentation this week to the big boss in your company and you want to convince him or her that more money should be invested in your department. Your boss has been skeptical of your ideas - she just doesn't see the need for any improvements right now. She's an open-minded lady though: she encouraged you to present your ideas to the big boss and, if you're able to win him over, it's a done deal. So, that's pretty much it: winning people over means bringing them to your side, getting them to be favourable to whatever it is you think or want to do. A good example would be, let's say, a guy who wants to date some girl but the girl isn't that interested. The guy then cultivates a friendly relationship with the girl and ends up winning her over, and they become girlfriend and boyfriend. What are your examples? Let me know and see you soon!   Key expressions willy-nilly win (someone) over   Vocabulary forethought = pensar muito bem antes de fazer alguma coisa, prudência, premeditação arts supplies = materiais de artes (para as aulas) allowance = mesada as it turns out = no fim das contas
9/10/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Fez por merecer

How are you? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre o que quer dizer “be in the doghouse” com alguém... Não é algo muito bom, mas acontece - e a expressão é ótima! Não perca. Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for "inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, let's dive right into it: when you're in the doghouse with someone, that means this person is upset or angry about something you've done, ok. So, let's say Paul is married and he has been working late all week. His wife Linda is mad at him because she expected him to be home around 7 in the evening - so they could go porcelain-shopping. So, Paul has had a lot of work to do lately, though. He feels bad, and... you know, maybe in the back of his mind he wasn't too crazy about going porcelain-shopping, let's face it. Anyway, Linda is a bit mad now and that means Paul is in the doghouse for now. So, he's going to have a chat with her tonight and take her out and stuff like that, and see if they can make up. So, ‘be in the doghouse’ is slang - it's a slang term, and therefore really informal. You wouldn't normally use this idiom for something really serious - for example, my friend betrayed me and stole all my money so she's in the doghouse now. No, hopefully your friend would be in jail, rather than the doghouse. Now, you know when you see someone that you know that person is misbehaving... And they think no one's noticing. That happens all the time, especially because some people manage to fool others for a while, right? Eventually, though, people catch on to it and the misbehaving person gets found out or exposed. Then, some form of consequence or punishment usually happens - and here's what you could say: Well, this person had it coming. They had it coming! This person had it coming. When you say that, it means that you think that person basically deserves whatever hardship, trouble or consequence they're facing right now. They've done things that led up to this point. Check out this tweet: Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes that reason is that you're a terrible person and had it coming 😶. — Luu Venda™ (@Lut3ndo) July 26, 2018 So yeah, that's what this guy said - sometimes you're a terrible person and that's why something bad happened to you. You had it coming. I think you'll be able to relate to this idiom - everyone knows someone who lied for a while about something and they were getting away with it. You knew they were lying, but for some reason you were not in a position to out that person. And one day, it happened: someone figured out that person was lying and the whole lie was exposed. They lost their job. They had it coming, obviously. Can you think of an example of your own? Who is it, in your professional or personal life, that got exposed and you thought “They had it coming”? Let me know, and see you soon!   Key expressions be in the doghouse (someone) had it coming   Vocabulary go porcelain-shopping = ir comprar (alguma coisa de) porcelana isn't too crazy about = não está morrendo de vontade de if they can make up = se dá pra eles fazerem as pazes people catch on to it = as pessoas “se tocam”, percebem aquilo led up to this point = levaram a, fizeram as coisas chegar a este ponto to out someone = desmascarar alguém
9/3/20183 minutes, 29 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Me deu um nó na garganta

Hello! Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms do inglês pra lá de comuns com a palavra throat (garganta). Não perca! Transcrição Hello. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for “inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let's get started, and I'm sure you will know what I'm talking about. Let's say you're watching a nice film and the heroine is going through a lot of pain right now. She has struggled so hard to overcome her difficulties and just when she thought she was going to meet her grandma... She finds out that her little old grandma just passed away. Our heroine is crying now because she's devastated, and you can't help but feel a lump in your throat. We have all been there, right? You can physically feel that thing in your throat especially when you're witnessing or thinking about something sad or very moving in some way. So, check out what this girl, “anna brink”, tweeted out: https://twitter.com/agrce27/status/1024809095881285632 That's a bit of a tough situation. What do you do when you're talking to someone and all of a sudden you have a lump in your throat? And how about our second idiom of today: shove something down someone's throat. That sounds a bit aggressive, but that's the point. Example: let's say you go meet your girlfriend's parents for the first time, and they can't stop talking about politics. The problem is, their positions are opposite to yours. And, they're not really that open to discussion, though. They keep talking about their politics, how good it is, and - they totally expect you to be on the same page. Then, they start slagging off people who disagree with them. YOU don't agree with them, obviously, but if you say something now things are going to be awkward. However, you can't help but feel that your girlfriend's parents are shoving their politics down your throat. When someone shoves something down your throat, it's like they're trying to make you accept or agree with them on something. It feels a bit forceful, like there's no space for different opinions. That person has the last word, and that's it. In my example, your girlfriend's parents are shoving their politics down your throat and leaving you no room to disagree. I mean - you could disagree, of course, but from the looks of it things would get awkward. "Shove something down someone's throat" can also mean literally trying to force someone to swallow food, for example, or pills if you're at the doctor's. Some people have had that experience when they were little - one of their parents shoving some medicine down their throat. Have you ever had that experience? Has anyone ever done that to you, or do you have kids? Have you ever tried to shove something down their throat? Have you tried to force them to eat something, or to swallow some medicine maybe? Let me know in the comments and see you soon.   Key expressions lump in (one's) throat shove something down (one's) throat   Vocabulary passed away = faleceu you can't help but feel = não tem como você não sentir we have all been there = todos nós já passamos por isso lol = abreviação de "laughing out loud" que significa rindo muito alto ou rolando de rir to be on the same page = estar de acordo, na mesma sintonia, na mesma linha de pensamento to slag someone off = criticar ou falar mal de alguém  
8/27/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: A situação saiu do controle

How's it going? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms ultra-comuns para expressar que algo fugiu do controle! Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for “inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let me tell you about this little expression that is so, so common in the English language - and I'm only getting around to talking about it now! Amazing. And it's also pretty easy to get - you won't have any trouble :-) However, that doesn't mean you'll immediately start using it all the time - you might do so, but it usually takes a bit of listening for new language to get in our heads so that it'll come out easily when we open our mouths and want to express those things. So, here we go: you know when a situation gets out of control? That's pretty much it, you guys. If something gets out of hand, that means it's getting out of control. However, it doesn't necessarily mean someone was controlling it and lost control. Very often it just means something became excessive; it became too much - to the point where it was no longer acceptable, or it started to get in the way of other people's well-being, for example. A party can get out of hand. In fact, I have some experience with that. When I still lived in Brazil, one of the residents in a neighbouring building used to have really loud parties till the wee hours of the morning. Sometimes there were people screaming out the window - I'd say that's when it really got out of hand since no one seemed to be able to make them stop. Good times! Anything that has the potential to escalate into a really bad state could get out of hand. An argument between two people, for example. Have you ever witnessed it happen? If you've ever watched reality shows, you probably have indeed witnessed it. It starts as a disagreement, then it escalates into an argument, then a shouting match where they're practically at each other's throats. That's when you know things have gotten out of hand, and someone will usually interfere and break the two people apart. On to our second one: spin out of control.  Picture someone driving a car really fast on a slippery surface, and then they lose control of the car and it starts spinning... out of control. That's a very concrete way to use this idiom. The car spun out of control (yup, spun is the past tense of spin). So spinning out of control is something we can say about some machine that stopped responding to our attempts to control it and is just doing its thing and looking pretty crazed in the meantime! However, for this episode we're focusing on the meaning that is similar to 'get out of hand'. Whenever we see something getting progressively worse and it looks like no one's able or willing to get it back on track, we can say it's spinning out of control. For example, some people feel like they obsess about things and think about it way too much, but they can't seem to control their thoughts. These people often say "My thoughts are spinning out of control". "Things are spinning out of control" is also a very common one and you'll have heard it before if you're used to watching American TV. What do you think? Any examples? Let me know and see you soon!   Key expressions get out of hand spin out of control   Vocabulary I'm only getting around to talking about it now = só fui falar dela agora, só consegui falar dela agora wee hours of the morning = altas horas da manhã, madrugada good times = expressão usada em geral ironicamente, com o significado oposto do literal doing its thing = fazendo o que ela quer
8/20/20180
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Como falo em inglês: Ele se virou do avesso para ajudar

What’s up? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms pra lá de comuns, e um deles é usado para descrever aquela pessoa que fez de tudo e mais um pouco para ajudar alguém. Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for “inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let's get started today with a nice expression: leave no stone unturned. I like this idiom because it's very easy to imagine what it means in your mind - isn't it? Let's say you were actually looking for something in your backyard... maybe you were holding your bank card when all of a sudden you just had an urge to pop out to the yard and sit near your begonias. And while you're there enjoying a bit of fresh air you get lost in thought, and then you hear the phone ring. It's time to get back inside. You're too late for the phone (it stopped ringing when you came in), but you realise nonetheless that you're not holding your bank card anymore. Darn! You must have dropped it somewhere in the backyard. So you go back and you start searching thoroughly. You look under every leaf and under every stone. You're even turning over the stones in your little garden - you got to find this card. You end up finding it, of course... You dropped it under a begonia. You literally left no stone unturned, though. You covered them all in your search. People say they “left no stone unturned” when they've made every possible effort to find or get something. Let's say your sister is an accountant and, when she woke up today, she said she dreamed that she owned a business in Romania. Yeah. So now she feels that dream has to become reality. She turns to you and says “Hey, I need to find out everything about how accounting works in Romania. Their laws and regulations, the particularities of the market, costs involved... everything? Will you help me?” You're always there for your sister, so you tell her “We're in this together. I'll help you become the number 1 accountant in Romania. We'll find everything you need. We'll leave no stone unturned!” Which leads me to our second idiom of today: bend over backwards. It fits our example just great, because that is what you do for your sister. She needs help to break the accounting market in Romania and you'll help her get there. In order to help her, you start researching online every day for about an hour. You go to the local library and check their information. You seek out the Romanian community in your town to get some information from them. In other words, you're bending over backwards for your sister. You're putting in a whole lot of effort and doing everything you can. People can bend over backwards to get any kind of result they really want, though - it doesn't need to be a situation where they're helping someone. You could be preparing for an exam, for example, and bending over backwards to be well prepared. You've hired a private tutor, you're studying long hours, you've downloaded computer programs that will help you get there and so on. It's fair to say you're bending over backwards to achieve a good score. I think these two expressions are very relatable - anyone can think of real-life examples for “leave no stone unturned” and “bend over backwards”. So, when did someone do that for you? Or, when did you do that for someone? Let me know and see you soon.   Key expressions leave no stone unturned bend over backwards   Vocabulary have an urge (to do something) = ter uma vontade repentina (de fazer algo) pop out = sair de forma rapida para algum lugar, dar uma escapadinha nonetheless = mesmo assim darn! = Expressão usada para demonstrar desapontamento ou irritação, semelhante ao nosso 'caramba/droga' break the accounting market = entrar no mercado de contabilidade
8/13/20180
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Podcast: Drop the ball

How are you? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms pra lá de comuns... Só pra variar :-) Um deles, em particular, é muito comum no inglês americano - eu mesma ouvi outro dia de um American. Não perca! Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for “inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, you guys, let me start with this very, very popular way of saying you or someone else failed to do something you were supposed to do, or you sort of made a mistake when you were trying to complete a task. I heard it just the other day, from an American person, for the millionth time. He said “Look, I was supposed to take care of this and get it done, and I didn't. I dropped the ball.” He said he dropped the ball - it's a sports metaphor, as you can probably tell, and I'm not sure which sport that comes from but we can guess it's a sport where we're not supposed to drop the ball. So this guy dropped the ball, not literally, but metaphorically in this case. It was his job to complete a task and he didn't. He dropped the ball. When someone does a poor job of something, or makes a mistake when doing a task of some kind, you can also say that they dropped the ball. So, the reason I mentioned an American person used that expression with me is, you're not going to hear too many British people saying that - it's really more common in the States. So can you think of an example of you dropping the ball... or maybe someone you know? I'm sure you can. So let's move swiftly on to our second expression of today. Picture an airplane going down in flames. Done? Cool. So we use the idiom go down in flames to say that something is being, or was completely destroyed, or just was a spectacular failure. That's a common combination, by the way... To fail spectacularly. Anyway, it's pretty easy to find examples of this expression being used particularly when people are talking about something they didn't approve of to begin with. Then they see that thing fail, and they talk about the failure saying “It went down in flames.” I mean, it's a pretty powerful image! So, do you remember Harvey Weinstein, the big American producer who was accused a while ago of all kinds of sexual offenses? I bet his business went down in flames in the aftermath of those events. Sometimes, advertising campaigns that cost a fortune and were planned for months go down in flames. It happens! The ad campaign is a disastrous failure. I'm sure anyone who's worked in advertising would have a story to tell about a campaign that went down in flames. So, this idiom, as you can probably see, applies very well to projects that demanded big efforts, big money and other resources. Then for some reason it all goes wrong. And it also applies very well to things that used to work very nicely, so to speak, and then all of a sudden that thing ceases to exist or goes out of business. Like the Weinstein company. His name certainly went down in flames after all the revelations. So, what's your example? Does anything come to mind? Let me know and see you soon.   Key expressions drop the ball go down in flames   Vocabulary you can tell = dá pra você ver swiftly = rapidamente in the aftermath = o que acontece após um determinado evento cease to exist = deixa, para de existir to go out of business = encerrar atividades, fechar as portas, falir
8/6/20183 minutes, 59 seconds
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Podcast: Curiosity killed the cat

What's up? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre mais duas expressões super comuns do inglês do dia-a-dia. Não perca! Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download the Inglês Online app at the Google Play Store or the Apple Store - search for “inglês online Ana". Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Ok, so here's our first idiomatic expression of today, and it's an interesting one. I don't really know if we have the equivalent in Brazil... it's likely that we do, but I can't think of anything right now. So picture this: you know that your friend Beth is not a huge fan of horror movies, ok. It's not her thing. However, there's a new horror movie out and everyone's talking about it. It's supposed to be a blockbuster and it's being promoted on every TV show. Alright, so Beth for some reason goes and watches the movie on a Saturday night with her friends. And the next day you bump into Beth while standing in line at the baker's, let's say. So of course you say “Hey Beth, how's it going? How did you like the new movie?” And Beth proceeds to tell you that she hated it. She absolutely disliked it and she's giving you a list of reasons: the story is bad, the actors not talented enough, the editing was bad and the list goes on. Now, if you didn't know Beth well enough you'd have skipped the movie altogether based on her review. You've known her for a while, though. You know Beth can be very opinionated and you're also aware that she's not an admirer of the horror genre. Because of that, you know better than to rely solely on her opinion. You know you should take her opinion with a grain of salt. That means you're listening to her but you're also keeping in mind that she may not be able to make a fair assessment of the film because well, she's biased! She doesn't like the genre. You don't even understand why she went and saw the movie. So you take what she said with a grain of salt: you keep in mind that she may not be seeing this objectively but you still take in consideration what she said. I guess taking opinions with a grain of salt is something we all do sometimes - that's pretty common. So here's our second term of today: it's more of a saying, really. Curiosity killed the cat - that's it! The word killed is a bit strong, obviously... Basically you can say that to someone when they ask you a question you don't want to answer. You're implying they're being a bit nosy, even. Let's say you're telling your friend about a new guy you've met and you've been out with this person a couple of times... Your friend is asking all kinds of details though, such as “Do you see yourself with this person in five years?” It's like an interview. So you just say “Curiosity killed the cat... I'll let you know more as I make a decision”. “Curiosity killed the cat” is a pretty good-natured, playful way to tell someone you're not going to answer their question. Obviously they're not going to be killed for being curious - it doesn't even mean that something bad is going to happen to them for being curious, so the saying is not always used with the original meaning. But it's a playful way to avoid a question. It's nicer than “Mind your own business” or “You're so nosy”. Have you ever said something to that effect to a very curious friend or family member? I know I have. Let me know and see you soon.   Key expressions take something with a grain of salt curiosity killed the cat   Vocabulary rely solely on something = levar em conta ou se apoiar somente em algo to skip = pular, passar, dispensar ou ignorar algo biased = tendencioso/a, parcial em favor de alguém ou algo saying = ditado popular playful = brincalhão / brincalhona Mind your own business = Cuide da sua vida, isso não é da sua conta nosy = abelhudo/a
7/30/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Longe de mim criticar

How's it going? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms comuníssimos (é claro) com a palavra far. Com um deles, você vai poder dizer "longe de mim criticar, mas..." Enjoy! Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Download our apps on the Google Play store and the iTunes store for a very easy and organised listening experience of our podcasts. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So you know when someone is about to criticise another person but they preface their criticism with something like "Look, I don't mean to criticise but..." or "No offense, but..." Well, our first expression today is sort of used in the same kind of situation. So, let me read what this lady, Lizzie Logan, tweeted out and then I'll explain it a little bit: https://twitter.com/lizzzzzielogan/status/984422467019182080 So first of all, TSA stands for Transportation Security Administration and I think that's what she's referring to when she says there was a TSA agent singing gospel songs at full volume while doing his job - which, by the way, was to monitor metal detection somewhere... So we can tell she doesn't want to come across as super critical since the language she's using is very mild actually. And, the first thing she says is far be it from me to limit someone else's artistic expression. "Far be it from me to do something" basically means "I'm doing something in a few seconds but that is not really what I mean to do". Sometimes we just want to criticise something; we just want to express a negative opinion or tell people what we think is wrong about a situation or a person and so on. So that's it - when people don't really want to come across as overly critical they may preface what they're saying with Far be it from me... Far be it from me to tell you how to do your job, but don’t you think you should have planned your actions more carefully? Far be it from me to rain on your parade but I don't think this girl is interested in you. Far be it from me to be stingy but I don't see the value in paying so much money for this hotel. Now, let's move on to our second idiom of today's episode, and this one contains the word FAR as well. So, let's go ahead and start off with an example - listen up: This restaurant is a far cry from what it used to be when I was a child. When I go there nowadays to have a meal, nothing tastes the same. It just doesn't taste good. They've changed the dishes, the recipes, I don't know where the original cook's gone. This food is a far cry from the great stuff they used to offer. So, when something is a far cry from another thing, it means it's very, very different and usually in a negative way. It leaves a lot to be desired! So someone will usually say that when they're not happy. What they see now is just not as good; it's actually much worse than it used to be. It's a far cry. So, I'm sure you can give a few examples from your own life. A place you've known since childhood which has changed for the worse. A food place where you used to have your favourite dish. And this is a common one: we, as consumers, can always notice, right, when the quality of a product goes down. This happens a lot with food items. Sometimes I can tell that those biscuits that I like just don't taste the same anymore and then one day they appear to be about half the original size. A far cry from what they used to be. What are your examples? Let me know, and see you soon!   Key expressions Far be it from me to do something A far cry from   Vocabulary to come across as = Parecer ser, no sentido de demonstrar ou transparecer sua característica ou qualidade rain on your parade = jogar um balde de água fria, ser estraga-prazeres it leaves a lot to be desired = Deixa muito a desejar
7/23/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Blessing in disguise

How have you been? Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms comuníssimos com a palavra blessing. Are you ready? :-) Transcrição How have you been? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. For a better listening experience, head over to the Google Play Store or Apple's App Store and download the Inglês Online app. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So our first expression of today is blessing in disguise. Yep - do you know what that means? Let's see. I'm going to read out a tweet for you, and you tell me whether you know what blessing in disguise means or not. So check out what this guy tweeted out - he's talking about two football teams who lost one of their players: https://twitter.com/OvieO/status/983833742799237121 So just an observation: notice that he said "Roma lost Salah" and "are", so "Roma are" and then in the second sentence "Liverpool lost Coutinho" and "are" - "Liverpool are". OK? So he uses 'are' with Liverpool and Roma, why? Because these are collective nouns. They communicate, like, a whole team. He's talking about a team and in British English it's very common to use "are" with nouns that represent more than one person; they represent a group. So this guys said "sometimes losing your best asset". He's referring to the star player each of the teams lost - "can be a blessing in disguise". What looked like a really bad thing in the end did not prevent a great outcome. Here's a dictionary definition for you: an unfortunate event or situation that results in an unforeseen positive outcome. I remember at the time of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the Twin Towers in New York - a couple of people were interviewed saying they were supposed to be on those airplanes and because they were late, or some some other reason, they missed their flights. To those people, missing the flight was a blessing in disguise. Bit of an extreme example... but there you go. I think the best way to really see this idiom, blessing in disguise, in your life is to think about something you lost, an opportunity you missed, that... at the time really bummed you out. Then, let's say about a month later, you couldn't even feel sad when you thought back of what happened because something much better came along. I know that, for me, this exact sequence of events has happened so many times. I miss a sale and some time later I'm happy I didn't spend that money on something I didn't need. Missing that sale was a blessing in disguise. I miss an opportunity to do something and then some time later I realise that thing wasn't really what I wanted to do! Missing that opportunity was a blessing in disguise. These are my examples - what are yours? Now, here's our second one with blessing: count your blessings. This is usually said to someone who's feeling a bit down on their luck... Maybe they just got some bad news, or the outcome they were expecting didn't really happen, or they're just going through a hard time right now. And then a friend - more likely a stranger, to be honest - will tell them "Hey, count your blessings. At least you still got..." Whatever. At least you still got your home. Or your family. Or a job. Some money. Basically, when someone tells you to count your blessings they're telling you that no matter how sad your predicament is, there are a few things you should be grateful for. Let's go to Twitter again - check out this one. https://twitter.com/idillionaire/status/983819346509053952 Look, I'm not saying it's easy to do what this chick suggested but that was a good example of how someone might use the term count your blessings.  How would we say that in Brazil? I actually can't think of anything right now that would be a good translation for count your blessings... I mean, something we Brazilians actually say. Do you have anything? Let me know and see you soon!   Key expressions blessing in disguise
7/16/20184 minutes, 59 seconds
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Podcast: What’s the point?

What's up? Hoje eu falo sobre expressões super comuns com a palavra point, como there's no point. Não perca! Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, let's get started: remember last week's episode, when I talked about the idiom 'cry over spilt milk'? Well... there's no point, really, in crying over spilt milk. There is no point. Point, in this expression here, means something like purpose or use. There's no use, there's no purpose in crying over spilt milk. So for example: you decide to plan a surprise party for your classmate Tony the next 13th of February. Then you find out Tony and his family are moving to another country on the eleventh. There is no point now in planning a party for Tony, right? What is the point of planning this party? Tony won't be around anyway, and the whole point of the party was... Tony. So I bet that if you regularly watch TV shows and movies you've heard these expressions with "point" before. They're uber common - every native speaker uses them a lot. The question is, are you using them? So that's the point of this episode. Yep! To give you more exposure and make you more familiar with these terms. What's the point of taking your family to a nice restaurant right after they had lunch? There's no point in doing that. It's pointless. What's the point? Taking them for a meal when they just ate? Pointless. Investing in new software for your company to improve your financial records when you have not made one sale yet... What's the point? I would say that's pointless. No useful result will come of that. What are you going to do with new software? You haven't even sold a unit yet! It's a pointless investment. There's no point in making this investment and buying new software. So, check out what this person, Lauren, tweeted out: https://twitter.com/Laur_MacAskill/status/980494301443641346 So Lauren has a pretty low opinion of the world right now. For those of you who don't know or don't remember, April Fools' is the first day of April, and you know what that means in Brazil. In the US and in the United Kingdom as well, people love to pull pranks on April Fools'. Lauren thinks this is pointless since, in her opinion, the world is enough of a joke as it is. If it's sunny outside and the forecast says "sunny" for the whole week, it's pointless to take an umbrella with you when you go out. Telling a kid who's crying to stop crying is usually pointless. What's the point of doing that? The kid will not listen and they won't stop crying. Expecting a cat to bark is pointless. Buying stuff on sale that you're not going to wear is... pointless. I've done it! But now I look at it and I think "What was the point of buying this stuff?" Tell me: what exactly is it, in your life right now, that would make you ask yourself "What's the point of this? Why am I doing this?" Let me know, and see you soon. Key expressions There's no point What's the point? Pointless Vocabulary uber = super, very (informal) pull a prank (on someone) = pregar uma peça em alguém, fazer uma pegadinha
7/9/20183 minutes, 53 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: São águas passadas

How's it going? Hoje eu falo sobre idioms que as pessoas usam para dizer coisas como "deixe o que já passou no passado". Curioso/a? Então ouça já! Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So imagine you had a row with a friend last month, ok? You and your friend argued over where your group of friends was going to spend their next holiday. That's it: you're both in the same group of friends and every year you guys organise a trip somewhere over a long holiday, and this year you and your friend... Mark ended up in a row over the location of your holiday. You wanted a beach, Mark wanted the mountains. You said everyone preferred the beach, whereas Mark insisted it was time for a change and other people in the group were on board with that idea. And it got a bit heated! Pretty soon you both were nearly shouting at each other and a couple of people had to intervene and ask you guys to cool off! Well, turns out that you did cool off eventually and so did Mark. You're both in the same group of friends and, more importantly, same soccer practice team so... let's be honest, it's just easier if you guys get along. So, in that spirit, the next time you saw Mark you said "Hey Mark, are we cool?" and Mark said "Yeah, we're cool. Things got a bit heated but it's water under the bridge now." And because your mutual friends are great people, they actually picked a vacation place that is neither a beach nor the mountains for your next trip. So when Mark said "It's water under the bridge now" - well, if you've seen the title of this podcast you know exactly what this means. Even if you haven't though, I'm sure you'll get it: we say something is water under the bridge if that thing caused some upset, or trouble in the past... But it's resolved now. You're over it, or you don't care anymore. It doesn't upset you anymore. It's water under the bridge. So, your little brother stole your favourite toy when you guys were toddlers and after thirty five years he decides to give you a heartfelt apology about it. You say "Hey bro, don't worry. It's water under the bridge. Really." Your neighbour backed into your car last week and because of that you were late to a meeting and so on. The neighbour paid for the repair but he still feels bad for causing so much trouble. What do you say? "It was an accident; it's water under the bridge." And here's a related idiom, although it means something slightly different - and just like water under the bridge, we say something very similar in Brazil: cry over spilt milk. For this one we say, I think we say literally the same thing in Portuguese: cry over spilt milk. Once you spill milk, it's there: it has been spilt. You can see it there on the floor, and even if you start crying the milk will still be there. You'll hear this expression very often like this: OK, let's not cry over spilt milk. Or, "Look, it's no use crying over spilt milk so let's see what we can do moving forward." If something can't be rectified; if it's done and there's no going back - that is when people will sometimes say "C'mon. It's no use crying over spilt milk. It'll blow over." Check out what this person tweeted out: It's no use crying over spilt milk. Don't express regret for something that has happened and cannot be remedied. Easier said than done, I guess, but there you go. What do you think? Do you cry over spilt milk? Let me know and see you soon.   Key expressions water under the bridge cry over spilt milk   Vocabulary row = briga, discussão to be on board with something = concordar com algo, com uma ideia to cool off = esfriar a cabeça, acalmar-se toddler = criança pequena it'll blow over = a situação vai se acalmar, vai passar o efeito ruim easier said than done = mais fácil falar do que fazer
7/2/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Isso não me cheira bem

How's it going? Hoje eu falo sobre mais idioms a respeito daquela intuição que a gente tem de vez em quando - algo aqui não está cheirando bem, ou simplesmente um palpite sobre o que vai acontecer. Não perca! Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So check this out: we say ‘I smell a rat’ when we think something's off. We have a feeling that someone is being deceitful. They're hiding something; they're not being completely truthful... Something is wrong, and you smell a rat. That means that you have this feeling; you can tell that something is wrong. You can tell maybe from the way people are speaking, maybe from the body language of that person - you can tell they're lying. I think this is something everyone can relate to, right? You've been through this before. Sometimes you can just tell that person is hiding something. Let's say your work colleague promised to help you with something, and you keep reminding them of it. Then after the second time you've brought it up, you notice that you're the only person talking about it - your colleague Nathan is being very noncommittal. He's not saying anything now although a couple of weeks ago the two of you agreed that he was going to train you on something. You bring it up and Nathan doesn't say no, but he doesn't say yes either. Nice. You smell a rat. You think Nathan doesn't want to do it anymore, but doesn't have the guts to tell you directly. You can just tell by his body language that he's acting all noncommittal. You smell a rat. So you confront him about it, and he says “Well, I probably won't have the time to train you since I've been asked to participate in a task group”. Whatever that is. Anyway, I'm thinking you'll be able to come up with an example pretty easily of a recent situation where you smelled a rat, and you were right! So tell me what your story is in the comments if you feel like it. What about having a hunch? Having a hunch is sort of similar to smelling a rat, though not really the same thing. Also, when you smell a rat - that is more specific to knowing that something is off. Something is wrong. A hunch, on the other hand, can be about anything, it can be quite positive! A hunch could be your intuition speaking to you. You've got a feeling, you've worked out something inside your head and it's coming to you in the form of a hunch. Your friend Layla tells you “I got a new job! It's my dream job, and you'll never guess what it is.” Well, you have a hunch since Layla has been talking nonstop about how all she wants to do in life is knit little dog jackets, so I don't know. That could be it. So you say “I have a hunch, Layla. You've been hired by a pet shop to knit dog jackets?” and Layla says “Yes!”. So there you go. Obviously, in this case it's not a real hunch since you already knew what Layla's dream job was. A real hunch is when you sort of guess something, seemingly out of nowhere. And your hunch may be wrong, of course. Let's say you're playing some kind of friendly game against your friend, and you're trying to anticipate their moves. You have a hunch they're gonna go this way. Now, you have a hunch they're going to go a different way. Sometimes you're spot on and sometimes you're wrong. What do you think - can you apply today's terms in your life? Let me know and see you soon. Key expressions smell a rat have a hunch Vocabulary Noncommittal = qualidade da pessoa que não quer se compromoter com algo; não dá uma resposta firme ou se comporta de maneira a não se comprometer to have the guts = ter coragem to come up with = sugerir, propor ou ter uma ideia something is off = tem algo errado, algo suspeito, estranho to knit = tricotar, fazer tricô. to be spot on = acertar na mosca, ser preciso, exato em algo
6/25/20184 minutes, 4 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Faça de uma vez!

Hi, what's up? Hoje eu falo sobre um idiom muito comum, mas a melhor parte é uma maneira de usar a palavra already que você não aprende em nenhum livro de inglês. Não perca! Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site. Transcrição Hi, what's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Let's dive right into our first term of today: cut to the chase. Cut to the chase is one of the many ways to tell someone to get to the point, to quit going around in circles maybe, to just get to the message, just say what they want to say. This is one expression that is usually said when the speaker is getting a bit impatient, so they will either tell YOU to cut to the chase, or say something like “Let me cut to the chase”. When someone asks you to cut to the chase, they're asking you to get to the core of your message. The thing that really matters. The thing that you want to say, but for some reason you're not saying yet. Maybe you're making small talk, you know? Maybe you'd like to explain something before getting to the point. Maybe you haven't found the right words to say it. But that person you're talking to is aware that you want to say something, or at least that you would like to say something, so they ask you to basically skip the small talk and get to the point. They're in a rush, or they're just plain impatient. “C’mon, cut to the chase already.” Notice the use of the word ALREADY in this case. This is a very interesting way to use it, and it's one that you will rarely ever be taught about in an English course. When someone asks you to do something already, that means they want you to do that immediately - they have waited long enough, they don't want to wait any more! In fact, they think you should have already done it. They can't believe you haven't already done this thing. That is what they're communicating when they say “Do it already!” You've been telling your sisters for weeks that you would like to start learning Polish. So this morning while you guys were having breakfast you brought up your desire to learn Polish again, and your sisters said, ok, “Find a Polish teacher already! Here. Have a look at learnpolish.com” Your friend Matt has been telling you for months now that he needs to get through all the books on his reading list. He's been adding books based on recommendations from friends and the list has grown now to almost twenty books that he's got to read. Matt has always been an avid reader but work has kept him so busy lately that he barely has time for his favourite hobby: reading. You can tell he misses his regular reading routine, so when he brings that up yet again you say “Matt, just read those books already. Make the time. Put it on your calendar. Get reading already!” Right now, think about a few things in your life or in the lives of the people you know - things about which you'd say “Do this already!” You know, the stuff people have been saying for a while that they'd like to do. What did you come up with? See you next time. Key expressions cut to the chase do it already! Vocabulary Small talk = conversinha que você tem pra quebrar o gelo, sobre o tempo etc. make the time = arruma tempo to come up with = sugerir, propor ou ter uma ideia
6/18/20183 minutes, 26 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Desabafar

Hello! No podcast de hoje você vai aprender como dizer 'desabafo' em inglês. Não perca... Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So today I'm talking about this little word, vent. It's so common in everyday speech that... you don't even know how common it is. If you read Internet forums in English, if you watch movies or sitcoms or anything especially from the United States, you've come across it. To vent means to talk about how you're feeling when you're upset, or stressed out, feeling pressured, exhausted... Anything really that has been making you feel basically not well and that you've been enduring for a while. Then one day you decide to vent. You decide to vent your feelings. Maybe you're out with a good friend, and you guys weren't even talking about anything difficult or unpleasant. You were just catching up, having a nice conversation and drinking beer... when all of a sudden it just comes to you. You're relaxed, you trust your friend, he's told you about what he's been up to, the latest ups and downs in his life, and all of a sudden you feel relaxed enough to open up. You start venting. You vent about this situation you've been having at work that... is not easy. You've been having some kind of problem, let's say with a coworker. That's it, a difficult coworker. This is someone you've had to work very closely with and it hasn't been easy. There's not much you can do about it - you guys are in a project together and it's your responsibility to make sure the project gets completed successfully. At the same time, you don't really get to pick who you work with. So you've been putting up with some bad attitude and lack of cooperation from this coworker, and it has been a hindrance to the execution of the project. It's been tough, and you're not the type to complain too easily, but today seems like a good opportunity to vent. Your good friend is all ears, so you vent about how tough it's been to make sure every phase of the project gets completed on time and how this has been actually making you lose some sleep! Yep, you've actually lost sleep over this - you're so stressed. So you vent to your friend for a good ten minutes. You get your feelings out... you get it off your chest. Those feelings you had been bottling up because you didn't want to complicate things even further? They're all out now. You get them off your chest by telling your friend all about your work woes. It's like when you have a pressure cooker that's been cooking for a while and then you spin that little thing on top to release some steam, right? Which explains the second term of today: blow off steam. When people have some pent-up anger or are very stressed or tense, anything like that... they may do something to blow off steam - like a pressure cooker that lets off some steam. Many people go to the gym and exercise a lot as a way to blow off steam. The tweet below is a very nice example for the term ‘blow off steam’: it reads A great way to blow off some steam! And the attached video shows a family happily stomping on this big puddle of water with their wellies. So, that doesn't mean everyone in the video was necessarily super angry before and they're doing this in order to release the anger! Like I said before, and you're probably aware of, idioms and expressions are used in a variety of situations and their meaning will sometimes be a softer version of the original meaning that you'd find in a dictionary. In this example, these kids are blowing off some steam by playing in the puddle. Maybe they're just releasing some built-up energy. Or they're just having some fun after a rainy day. https://twitter.com/Poca_ES/status/997248823838691328 What do you do in order to blow off some steam? Let me know! See you soon. Key expressions vent blow off steam Vocabulary to come across = se deparar ou encontrar alguém ou ...
6/11/20184 minutes, 35 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Parei de um dia pro outro

How have you been? Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms que tem tudo a ver com tentar abandonar um vício ou hábito fortemente enraizado... e as sensações desagradáveis que às vezes aparecem depois disso. Não perca! Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site. Transcrição How have you been? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Ok, everyone. Our two idioms of today can easily go together in a story. They don't always have to, but they make sense together and you'll see why very soon. Also, if you watch TV shows and movies regularly, you've heard these before... guaranteed. Ok, imagine that you know someone who's depressed. I mean, clinically depressed. Let's say it's your friend... Mary. She went to the doctor and was diagnosed with depression, and then she started taking anti-depressants. And she took anti-depressants for several months and then one day, for whatever reason, she decided to stop taking them. She thought “I'm going to stop and see what happens. I'm curious. Maybe I'll feel better - maybe I'll realise that I don't need anti-depressants any more and if I realise I still need them, I'll go back”. Ok, so, to recap, Mary had been taking anti-depressants every day for months, and one day she thought “I'll stop and see what happens.” The next day she stopped. Mary stopped taking anti-depressants cold turkey. She went cold turkey off anti-depressants. Going cold turkey off something means suddenly stop taking that drug that you depend on, or supposedly depend on. It means you've been taking it for a while, you're used to it, you think it helps you, it provides some kind of relief, it makes the annoying symptoms go away... and then for some reason you stop cold turkey. Overnight. That's what going cold turkey means. Look at what this person tweeted out: “Top tip: don’t go cold turkey off your anti-depressants". A “top tip” is a tip that is really valuable - and this is the top tip: don't go cold turkey off your meds. So I'm thinking that this is exactly what this person did, and they had first-hand experience of the withdrawal symptoms which must not have been pleasant. So, this is our second term of today: withdrawal symptoms. Have you heard it before? Even if you haven't, by now you know what it means. That's what people usually feel when they stop something they're, well, addicted to. Smokers who use will power to stop smoking, or anyone who stops consuming whatever they were addicted to cold turkey... these people will usually experience withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms are obviously not pleasant, right? When you're addicted to something and you stop cold turkey, you should probably expect some discomfort or even some pain. Even people who cut coffee off their lives sometimes report some withdrawal symptoms. In many cases, these symptoms will go away in some time. And, of course, the term ‘withdrawal symptoms’ can be used metaphorically as well - for example when you really like something or are used to it, and it suddenly goes away. You could sort of joke and say you got withdrawal symptoms, like this girl who tweeted “I honestly get withdrawal symptoms from my boyfriend when I don’t see him for a few days”. So there you go... as with many, many expressions, you can use withdrawal symptoms in a couple of different ways. I think most people will have a personal story involving quitting something cold turkey. And, maybe, experiencing withdrawal symptoms. I've gone cold turkey a few times in my life - sometimes I was able to keep it up, other times I wasn't. I usually find it harder, though, to gradually decrease the intake of whatever it is I'm trying to cut off. I find that it's just easier to stop once and for all to go cold turkey. What about you? What is your story? Let me know in the comments and see you soon. Key expressions
6/4/20184 minutes, 45 seconds
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Podcast: Get your head around something

What's up? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre mais duas expressões do dia a dia de falantes nativos do inglês. Uma delas é um idiom muito usado para expressar “Não consigo compreender!” Não perca. Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site. Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let me tell you about a very, very popular idiom in English. We use it in situations where you just can't understand something. It may even be mind-boggling to you. But... it may not; it may just be something that sort of stuns you temporarily, and you can't comprehend how that can happen, or how a certain person made the choice that they made... You can't get your head around it. That's our first expression of today. When you can't get your head around something, it means you find that thing challenging to comprehend. You have this situation in front of you, and it feels completely foreign to you - like something you would never consider, maybe you didn't know it was possible. And then, all of a sudden, someone you know tells you that they decided to abandon their 20-year-long successful career as a... doctor, let's say and start up a new career in street art. Let's say this is your friend Lucas. Lucas was a happy doctor, by the way. He never complained about being a doctor and the long hours. That is what is most mind-boggling about it. And you know Lucas well. He's an expressive guy. You believe that if he had been unhappy he would have let on that he was unhappy. In other words, you can't get your head around your friend's sudden change of heart about his long-running, successful career as a doctor. He wants to be a street artist now, and you just can't get your head around it. So the same way we say “get your head around it” you can say “wrap your head around it”, “wrap”. Same thing, so let's use that for the remainder of this episode. Sometimes people feel like they can't wrap their heads around how something works, for example. Let's say you bought a new kitchen gadget. It's supposed to be wonderful and make your life so much easier. The only problem is, you tried switching it on, and nothing. You then went ahead and read the manual, and tried to follow the “easy start guide” step by step. Nothing! That thing looks like it's... dead. You know it's in good condition, though, because it's brand new and the sales assistant tested it in front of you. You, however, can't make it work. You can't wrap your head around those instructions. You know you're missing something but you don't know what it is. You read through the instructions again and feel like they're about launching a spaceship rather than making a kitchen gadget work. You can't wrap your head around them. They don't make a lot of sense to you. Has this ever been you? Some things are mind-boggling - they boggle the mind, and you can't make sense of them. Sometimes we can't wrap our head around someone's decision; sometimes we can't wrap our heads around how something works; sometimes we can't wrap our heads around an event - how could it happen? It's mind-boggling. So here's what I'm asking you: try and remember the last time something happened in your life that really made you think “I can not wrap my head around this - I can't comprehend it!” Let me know what that was. Talk to you next time! Key expressions Get/wrap one's mind around something mind-boggling Vocabulary Stuns you = deixa você chocado, estupefato ou pasmado com alguma coisa Let (something) on = deixar transparecer Change of heart = mudança de ideia, opinião ou atitude Brand new = novo em folha
5/28/20183 minutes, 59 seconds
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Como digo em inglês: Ele foi mais rápido que eu

How are you doing? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre o idiom super comum no inglês "beat someone to the punch". Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site. Transcrição How are you doing? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So think about the last time you had a brilliant idea during a conversation, or an amazing suggestion that you were about to make... Then, before you could open your mouth, your friend or a coworker went ahead and said the exact same thing. Just a few seconds after you had that brilliant thought, and you were getting ready to say it. Somehow, your coworker... Todd had the same thought, and he was faster than you. Todd beat you to the punch. I think many of you listening today will be able to relate. The situation I just described is not uncommon; it happens fairly often. It's kinda funny how sometimes people have the same idea at the same time. I remember listening to an interview with a TV director once and he was telling the interviewer about this great idea he had for a TV show. It was something he had been thinking for a while, really original and interesting. And, what do you know? Just when he was about to start developing the idea he heard about this new show that another TV producer was working on. Guess what: it had the same premise. So his amazing idea wasn't new or original anymore... The other producer beat him to the punch. We also use this idiom in a figurative way, of course. Not everything is a competition, but if anyone, let’s say... achieved something faster than you, you can say “Hey, you beat me to the punch!” So let's say you and your friend Sam were chatting the other day about making ice cream yourselves. So today you bump into Sam and he tells you he's made ice cream. You haven't yet, so you say “You beat me to the punch! How was the ice cream?” Or let's say that you and your brother still live at home and depend on your dad for money and other stuff. You're getting ready to ask your dad for a relatively large sum of money to buy a bike, and then you learn your brother has done just that while you were thinking. Your brother beat you to the punch. If you're used to watching American TV shows, you've probably heard it before: “You beat me to it”. Someone was going to say something and then someone else said it first. It's interesting that there's another expression with beat that almost means the opposite: beat around the bush. When someone's beating around the bush, they're sort of like going around in circles and not getting to the point. They're either afraid of saying something or they're not sure how to express their ideas... sometimes you can tell, though, that the other speaker wants to say something but for some reason keeps hinting at it, rather than just communicating it clearly. They're beating around the bush. You can check out a previous episode with this idiom. I'm sure you can think of an example when someone beat you to the punch. Was it your brother or sister? Was it a coworker, when you were ready to give your boss an idea and he or she beat you to the punch? Let me know! Tell me your story, and see you next time. Key expressions Beat someone to the punch Beat (me/you/etc) to it Vocabulary to bump into someone = maneira informal de dizer: encontrar com alguém por acaso, esbarrar com algúem large sum of money = grande quantia de dinheiro to hint at = dar a entender, insinuar ou sugerir algo
5/21/20183 minutes, 39 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Não é a toa que você é conhecido como…

How have you been? Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms em inglês usados para dizer como alguém é conhecido. Não perca... Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site.  Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Let's get started with a really informal way to, sort of have good-natured fun with someone by telling them that they're famous for something. This term is so informal that it's not even an entry in dictionaries at this point. So let's say your friends Mary and Tom, who are boyfriend and girlfriend, had this big trip to... Paris! Yeah, they went to Paris and spent two weeks there. And, when they came back, you learned that Mary and Tom are engaged. Tom proposed to Mary by the Eiffel Tower. So Mary is now telling you all about it and how Paris is so beautiful and romantic, and it's the perfect place for a marriage proposal... And you say "Well, they don't call it City of Love for nothing!" So what are you saying? First, you're saying that Paris is called City of Love, and people don't call it that for nothing! There's a reason Paris is called City of Love, and the reason is that it is a beautiful and romantic city. So you tell your friend Mary "They don't call it City of Love for nothing." Another example: in your group of friends one of you has the nickname of "the Hulk". That's a pretty common one. I think when I was in school everyone knew a Hulk. So that's usually the tall, muscular, strong guy who can lift a heavy table or something. So you guys all call your friend Tony "the Hulk". One day you guys are all having a beer in some bar and two people walk in carrying what looks like a pretty heavy box. One of them trips on a broomstick and loses their balance, but before the heavy box lands on your friend Christine, who's sitting pretty close to the scene, the Hulk swoops in and grabs it. People cannot believe it. It's a really heavy box. Jaws are dropping. You say to the woman standing by your side "They don't call him the Hulk for nothing." Ok, and here's a simple idiom, sort of related to the one I just explained. It's a term I'm pretty sure many of you have heard before. My question is, though: are you using it? Does it come to you naturally? If you said no, listen on. This is the goal of this podcast: to provide you with comprehensible input to the point where you'll be so familiarised with idioms that you'll speak them naturally. So I'm talking about the idiom well-known for. I'm just going to go ahead and give you examples: Silvio Santos is well-known for being one of the most successful entertainers in Brazil. Robert de Niro is well-known for being a talented actor. Rio de Janeiro is well known for its beautiful scenery and beaches. Brazil is well-known for its tropical weather. Investment banking is well-known for being a very competitive career. What else? What else is well-known, and what is it well-known for? Let me know. See you soon! Key expressions they don't call (someone) (something) for nothing well-known for Vocabulary good-natured = agradável, bem-humorada lose your balance = desequilibrar-se, perder o equilíbrio marriage proposal = pedido de casamento broomstick = cabo de vassoura swoops in = "vai lá", entra em ação rapidamente jaws are dropping = pessoas estão ficando de boca aberta
5/14/20183 minutes, 31 seconds
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Podcast: Jump the gun

How are you? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre duas expressões pra lá de comuns com a palavra JUMP. Não perca! Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site.  Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Jump the gun. Jumping the gun is our first expression of today. I'll give you an example and it'll be easy to understand: one day my friend told me that his company was developing a new web application that was really cool. Everyone in the company was pretty excited about it, as they were sure their customers would love it. They were so excited that when the tech staff told them that the web app would be ready in a couple of weeks, he and his team (who are in Marketing) started planning a beta test. Now, a beta test - I've recently learned - is something you do to have your customers test your new product before the official release... But at that stage the product should be about ready to be released in the market. So you get the product about ready, nearly finalized, and that's the beta version. Then you go ahead and you ask your most enthusiastic customers to take it for a spin and give you their feedback. So what happened was that my friend's team started planning the beta test and even announced it to their customer base. Several customers reached out to say they wanted to participate in the test. Then, it happened. A few days later they heard from Tech and the news wasn't good: "We've found a number of bugs and the app isn't ready to be released." My friend's team had now to get in touch with all the customers and explain that the test was being delayed. My friend said "Clearly, we jumped the gun. Got excited and started planning the test but it was too soon." True story, everyone. They jumped the gun on the announcement of the beta test, and I think this happens a lot - it seems to happen frequently. Have a look at this tweet by someone named Samuel: https://twitter.com/SamECheung/status/984125868107882496 Ok, and here's our second idiom of today, one that I'm sure you guys will get very quickly: jump to conclusions. You know when someone doesn't have all the facts pertaining to a situation but they've already concluded this or that and are actually taking action based on their premature conclusions? That happens everywhere, and I think it happens a lot. To be honest, I've done it and it's usually not a good thing. Depending on what's being discussed, if you jump to conclusions before knowing all the facts you could get in a state of panic, or fear... very often unfounded, but you don't know that yet, right? Because you haven't heard all the details. So in looking for examples I found out that the Book of Proverbs from the Bible has this quote: Don't jump to conclusions, there may be a perfectly good explanation for what you just saw. That about sums it up. Here's another one: you see your friend's boyfriend talking to an attractive woman in a restaurant. You want to talk to your friend immediately and tell her what you just saw, but then you learn he was talking to his sister. You jumped to conclusions right there. Can you give me a true example from your life? Let me know! Talk to you soon. Key expressions jump the gun jump to conclusions Vocabulary take it for a spin = testar algo pela primeira vez (gíria, metáfora de quando alguém dá uma volta em um carro para testar) to reach out = iniciar contato com alguém, entrar em contato unfounded = sem fundamento That about sums it up = isso resume/diz tudo, basicamente é isso *  Observação: No tweet, Samuel escreveu 'haitus', mas a escrita correta da palavra é 'hiatus'.
5/7/20183 minutes, 55 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Não é uma brastemp

How are you? Hoje o podcast foi inspirado pela pergunta de uma leitora e aluna de longa data, a Patricia Infanti. Como dizer aquele termo que todos nós conhecemos, "Não é uma brastemp", em inglês? Não perca! Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site. Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! As I said in the little intro above, today's topic came from someone from the Inglês Online community! Patricia sent me an email wondering how to say "Não é uma brastemp" in English. The English idiom I would use to say that immediately came to mind - and I can tell you that the one I thought about is one possibility. There are other ways to convey the message of "Não é uma brastemp" but you're about to hear my choice. Ready? Here it goes: it's nothing to write home about. Nothing to write home about - it's a metaphor, right? Basically, it means you wouldn't take the time to sit down and write a letter to tell your family about it, because whatever it is, it is not that great. It's mediocre... Or just not as good as it could be, or not as good as you expected. You bought a new mobile phone because the last one you had was stolen, let's say. Everyone knows about your stolen phone so when your friends first see you call someone up on the new one, they ask you if you're happy with the new phone. And you look at it and think "Meh.." and then you say "It's nothing to write home about, but it does the job". True story, by the way. That happened with me. It's not the best phone you could have bought. It's a replacement phone, you're a bit short on cash and therefore you ended up buying a cheap, no-frills model that will allow you to make and receive calls but not much else. You knew that, though. That's what you were going for. It's not like you're disappointed, but you know your new phone is nothing to write home about. And you know how I used the word "meh". That's something people say when they want to convey this feeling - the feeling that whatever they're talking about is nothing special. Nothing to write home about. It's not great, it's not horrible either. It's just... meh. So you may ask someone if they liked this big, much-hyped blockbuster movie and they look at you and say just "Meh. After so much hype I was expecting a lot more." Now, back to the first idiom. I'm sure you can think of something in your recent past that you could describe as nothing to write home about. Maybe something you bought and it was satisfactory. Average. It would be boring to talk about about it, really since there's nothing interesting to mention..! What is it? In my case it would be some strawberries that I bought in the supermarket the other day. I was looking forward to eating them, I can tell you that. They looked bright red and juicy, but when I took the first bite, it was like I was eating strawberry-flavoured water, or something. They weren't bad, but the flavour was barely there. If someone had asked me "So how are the strawberries? ", I would have said "Hmm.. nothing to write home about". For a short answer, I would have said "Meh". Have you felt like saying "Meh" recently? What was it? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions it's nothing to write home about meh Vocabulary no-frills = básico, sem nada de especial much-hyped = algo sobre o qual foi feito barulho, estardalhaço no sentido de promoção the flavour was barely there = quase não tinha sabor
4/23/20183 minutes, 51 seconds
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Podcast: That was just bizarre!

What's up? No podcast de hoje, eu falo sobre uma situação que aconteceu comigo essa semana - e que eu achei bizarra! Ouça! Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site. Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So if you have been following Inglês Online for a while you may know two things about me: I live in London, and I like taking my laptop to coffee shops to work. Sometimes I work from home, and sometimes I go out to a coffee shop. So last Thursday I went to my usual coffee shop, not too far from where I live, and started doing some work. Everything was going swimmingly: I talked to a couple of people about work on Skype, completed some tasks, reviewed a couple of things... And then my phone rang, and it was a call I wanted to take. The coffee shop was pretty noisy, so I knew it was going to be slightly challenging to hear the other speaker clearly. So I looked around and trusted my intuition that it would be OK to leave all my stuff at the table and get out of the shop for two minutes to have this chat in a quieter place. Now, I know I'm speaking mainly to Brazilians here, who listen to this podcast. In Brazil - at least in big cities - it would be really risky to get out of a coffee shop and leave your stuff behind, even for a few minutes. In London.. it's risky too. Not as risky as Brazil, but still risky. Now, I've lived here for almost five years now, I've had my phone nicked in a coffee shop, so I'm pretty aware of what can happen. Still, I quickly assessed the situation when that call came in, and, fully aware of the risks, decided it would be OK to get out for a minute or so. So after I was done with the call I came back in and walked over to my table, and my stuff was GONE. Everything. I stood there in shock for quite a few seconds, and then I said "Oh my god" as I looked over to the two women sitting at the table next to me. They were there when I left, so I thought they must have seen the person who stole my things. Several seconds later, one of the women looked at me and said "Oh, we took all your stuff to the barista. You shouldn't leave your computer and your bag unattended." Well, there is something I didn't know! Now, my first impulse when this kind of thing happens is to try and acknowledge any good intentions behind it - so all I could say while they were talking was "Thank you" and "I know, you're right, but you scared me to death." One of the women said "You're lucky we're not thieves." It took me a few seconds to process that they were actually trying to teach me a lesson and by then I was ready to leave. Sure, great intentions, but making me stand there for several seconds unnecessarily thinking that all my stuff had been stolen? A bit much. So I said "Thank you for the lesson" and walked off. I didn't say it rudely, but I was being sarcastic. Sadly, I don't think they got the sarcasm. One of the women said "You're welcome!" So I went over to the counter, got my stuff from the barista and left. I'm sure I'm going to hear a few different kinds of opinions on this one, so TELL ME! Tell me what you think about this one and talk to you next time! Vocabulary swimmingly = very well, perfectly my phone was nicked = meu telefone foi roubado; nick = roubar (UK slang) barista = palavra usada para as pessoas que trabalham num café preparando as bebidas
4/15/20183 minutes, 38 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Nem se compara

How are you? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre mais uma expressão super comum do inglês, além de um produto usado para limpar o box (de vidro) do chuveiro... Não perca! Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o podcast no site. Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let's get right into today's expression, or idiom: imagine you've been consuming a certain product for years. Same brand, same product for, say... a couple of years. Not just you, by the way. Let's say you and your friend Jenny buy the same product. And, let's say we're talking about a... limescale remover. Yeah, I'll take the opportunity here to talk a little bit about what a limescale remover is, 'cause... I don't think you're going to learn this at your English course. Crédito Roemspzoo | Creative Commons First of all: limescale is that sort of white deposit that builds up over time especially on shower doors that are... made of glass. The last place I lived in Brazil had a glass door near the shower - so if you have the same I'm sure you know what I'm talking about. If you don't, trust me - limescale is one less problem for you to deal with. So in case you can't find limescale removers in your local supermarket, I'll just go ahead and share with you some useful information that I found... Lemon juice and vinegar will apparently do the trick if you'd like to remove limescale from the glass doors. Now, here where I live I can find a couple of different brands of limescale removers in the cleaning products section of my local supermarkets. So let's go back to my little story from the beginning of the episode, where you and your friend Jenny have been using the same limescale remover for a couple of years. Jenny recommended this product to you two years ago, and you started using it. And then, what happened yesterday was that you bumped into Jenny when you were both at the bank - she had just paid some bills, while you were just about to go in and get some cash. And.. somehow, you guys got to talking about house-cleaning and limescale just came up. Jenny said the following to you: "My friend, I would like to ask you to forget all about limescale remover ABC, which we have been using for a while, and give limescale remover XYZ a try. I found out about XYZ a couple of weeks ago... My glass door in the bathroom needed a good scrub so I thought, why not? Let me try XYZ out - it IS a little bit more expensive, but you will see it is worth every extra penny! Limescale remover ABC pales in comparison to XYZ. It just pales in comparison! Many times when people watch a movie, and then the sequel, they think the sequel pales in comparison to the first movie. Or when you read a book and then watch the movie adaptation, you think the movie pales in comparison to the book. Here's a dictionary definition: to pale in comparison is to be or seem less important, impressive, or otherwise deficient when compared to someone or something else. You know, it's like limescale remover ABC and limescale remover XYZ: ABC pales in comparison to XYZ. So, what is it that you used to do or consume that pales in comparison to the thing you do or consume now? In other words... it's like you had an upgrade. You used to do something or go somewhere and now you're doing something else or going to a different place. And the previous thing pales in comparison. Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions pales in comparison limescale remover Vocabulary say... = vamos dizer... do the trick = resolvem, funcionam, são o suficiente you got to talking = vocês começaram a conversar it is worth every extra penny = vale cada centavo a mais
3/26/20184 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Idioms com scratch

What's up? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms super comuns na língua inglesa com a palavra scratch... Não perca! Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So do you know what scratch means? If you feel an itch somewhere in your body, you're probably going to scratch it. And you know those cards that you get sometimes when you buy something, and there's this silver-coloured surface and underneath the silver layer there might be a prize for you? So you have to scratch those bits of silver off to see if you've won anything. To sum up, think of a dog scratching itself. Dogs do that a lot. I think you get the gist. So here's sort of a funny expression, if you think about it: do something from scratch. So here's an example: when you make lasagna from scratch, that means you make the pasta yourself. That's right: you don't go to the store and buy the lasagna sheets that have been pre-made and packaged for your convenience. No, you use flour and eggs, and whatever else is needed to make the sheets, and then you make the tomato sauce using the tomatoes you bought at the market and you grind the beef, and then you cook it, and you put it all together to form your beautiful lasagna. That is lasagna that you made from scratch. So when you make food from scratch, for example, that means you, yourself, make the parts that will be used to put together the whole thing. This expression is obviously very common when you're talking about creating, or building, or making something. Food dishes are a perfect example. Nowadays there's so much prepared food available, and some of it is really great quality food, that I end up not cooking a whole lot of food from scratch. Other people are more old-fashioned when it comes to food: they like cooking basically everything from scratch. Here's another example where you can apply this idiom: let's say you'd like to log your monthly expenses into a spreadsheet to have a better sense of where your money's going every month. You browse the internet for a few minutes looking for a template for your spreadsheet. Maybe there's something out there that someone built for that purpose and you could copy it or buy it. After a half hour you realise there's nothing you like, and you decide to build your spreadsheet from scratch. So you will decide how many columns you'll use, the formulas, the labels and everything else. You'll build the spreadsheet from scratch. And here's another great idiom that you'll hear a lot - let me start with an example. Let's say you just took a course on how to cook with chayote. If you don't know what chayote is, I'll tell you right now: chuchu. So you took this one-week course that taught you all the culinary secrets you need to create marvellous dishes with chayote. So you're in market now to buy... chayote, of course, and you bump into your friend Mary, who wants to know all about the chayote secrets. Well, you're kind of in a rush so you only have time to tell her secrets number one, two and three. Mary is blown away. She says "I never knew there was so much you can do with chayote!" You tell Mary that the two of you should get together so you can further discuss the culinary role of chayote, because secrets one, two and three that you just told her? That's just scratching the surface of all the possibilities. There's so much to learn! There are about fifty great tips that you learned that really turned you into a chayote expert. Mary is blown away by the first three secrets! That's nothing. You're just scratching the surface. It's just the beginning. There's a lot more beneath the surface. The first three tips are just a taste, just an introduction - they're just scratching the surface of the wealth of knowledge you acquired in your chayote marathon. So tell me: do you usually cook things from scratch? Talk to you next time. Key expressions
3/1/20184 minutes, 35 seconds
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Podcast: Keep your options open

How's it going? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms comuníssimos no inglês, que tem a ver com as opções que você tem na vida. Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o áudio no site. Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So you know when you're sort of looking at your options for... something, whatever. Let's say you'd like to throw a big birthday party for yourself! So you've been looking at the options. Where to do it? There's your place, obviously, but let's say you live in sort of a quiet building, in a quiet neighbourhood, and you're afraid the music might get a little out of control, and some of the neighbours might want to call the police... so you're still thinking. Your place is an option. There's also the bar where you're a regular. You go to this bar after work, every other day, to have a beer and relax with your office mates. It's small bar, no frills, nothing fancy about it but that's part of the appeal. You're thinking it would be nice to have your party there and enjoy their selection of nibbles with a beer. And then there's your friend Larry who just started renting out his garage for events. He's fixed it up a bit and it looks great, actually. You're not sure though... This would be the priciest option out of the three, and you're not sure it's worth it. Not because Larry's place isn't great, but because you think your place or the neighbourhood bar are excellent options. So what do you do? Nothing for now. Your birthday is two months away, so for now you're keeping your options open. That means you're not committing to anything at this moment. You're still shopping around, you're still thinking, musing over your choices, collecting some more information - you are keeping your options open. Who knows? You might wake up tomorrow with an answer. For now, you're keeping your options open - you don't need to decide right now. Now picture this: your friend Lola works as a shop assistant. She's only working part time, though. She made sure to find a job where she only has to work five hours a day. Why? Because she's also looking for a job as a Math teacher. Yeah, she happens to be good at Math and she thinks she can make some money teaching it. So she's been interviewing at different schools and thinking about part time jobs in teaching. But there's more: Lola also works as a part-time phone psychic. That's right. She's got some psychic abilities and she was hired last month by a famous phone psychic network to give consultations to clients. She's able to do that during her lunch hour, for about forty minutes, every day. So Lola is pretty busy... She's got two jobs and looking for a third one. She's doing that because she doesn't want to put all her eggs in one basket. She wants a safety net, so to speak. If something happens to the shop assistant job, she will have the other two jobs to fall back on. She could increase her psychic hours. If the psychic job goes belly up, she's got teaching and the shop job. Lola likes to be safe, so she's not putting all her eggs in one basket. She has given this a lot of thought and she likes spreading the risk. She doesn't want to have all her eggs in one basket. So that's her plan: have three jobs to go to and if something goes wrong with one of them, she has the other two. Tell me: do you have an example of your own for keeping your options open? I'm sure you do, so let me know in the comments! Talk to you next time. Key expressions keep your options open put all your eggs in one basket Vocabulary no frills = só tem o básico that's part of the appeal = é uma das coisas que te atrai (no bar) nibbles = comidas mais do tipo aperitivo he's fixed it up = ele reformou (melhorou) a garagem, nesse caso to fall back on = para se apoiar go belly up = dar errado
2/15/20184 minutes, 8 seconds
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Podcast: Guess where it happened

How are you? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo - em inglês, é claro :-) - sobre cinco situações em que eu perdi alguma coisa ou fui roubada. Veja se você consegue adivinhar onde foi que cada uma aconteceu: no Brasil ou em Londres, onde eu moro? Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o áudio no site. Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So today I'll give you five situations that I've been through in my life, all relating to losing a wallet or my cell phone... or having it stolen, and you try to guess whether each one of them happened when I still lived in Brazil, or more recently after I moved to London. Here we go: I went to a toilet in a University, and left my wallet somewhere in there. The same day, a student called me up and said she'd found it. So we met up and I got my wallet back. I was sitting in a cafe working on my computer, and my cell phone was right there by my computer, on the table. Two women walked in, sat at the table across from me and pretended they were asking me for help, or something. I don't know because I couldn't understand a word they said. Meanwhile, they opened a map on the table, which covered my phone and as I was distracted, they pulled the map and with it, the phone. I only realised it about a minute later and by then, they were gone. I lost my wallet on the way home from the supermarket. A couple of days later, a police officer called and said a woman had found it and taken it to the police station. So I went to the station, they asked me a few questions and I got my wallet back. I left my cell phone on a bus once, after traveling from one city to another. When I realised it, I called the bus company and asked if someone had returned it or if the driver had found it. They said no, no driver had said anything about a cell phone left on the bus, no one had contacted them. I went to a supermarket to do some shopping before I went home. However I was holding my laptop while paying for the groceries, and at some point I needed to reach for my wallet. I set my laptop down somewhere, grabbed my wallet, paid and left without the laptop. Two hours later I came back to the store asking if they had found it. They knew immediately what I was talking about  - my laptop was safely stored away in a room in the back of the store, so I got it back. There you go. These are five situations I've been through that involved either having something stolen, or leaving a personal belonging somewhere. Which ones do you think happened in Brazil and which ones in the UK? I'll tell you: #1, where I left my wallet in a toilet and it was returned to me, was in São Paulo when I was a college student. #2, where two women stole my phone at a café, was in London. #3, where I dropped my wallet on the way from the supermarket and someone found it and turned it in to the police happened in London. #4, where I left my phone on the bus and whoever found it kept it instead of returning it to the company, happened in São Paulo. And, finally, #5, where I left my laptop in a supermarket and they kept it safe for me was in London. Did you guess correctly? These are situations everyone has been through before at least once - I think. What was your experience when you forgot your wallet or your phone somewhere? What happened? Let us know and talk to you next time.
2/5/20184 minutes, 5 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: O gato comeu a sua língua?

How are you doing? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms relacionados a dizer alguma coisa e dar opinião. Não perca!! Se você está recebendo este episódio por email, clique aqui para ouvir o áudio no site. Transcrição How are you doing? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So here's our first idiom of today: has the cat got your tongue? Or just "cat got your tongue"? That is mostly similar to what we say in Brazil - see the title of today's episode to see what I mean. People say "Cat got your tongue?" a lot when they sort of want someone to react to something and that person is keeping quiet. For example, let's say your friend Mary is very opinionated about tomatoes. She thinks everyone should eat green tomatoes. Yes, it's very important to her that everyone around her knows that green tomatoes have some kind of nutrient that you can't find anymore when the tomato has ripened and turned red. Mary keeps yapping about it everywhere you go. Whenever you're around food she'll say "They should be serving green tomatoes. Green tomatoes are so important for your health." So it turns out you all go to a party one night and there's food at the party. You see a beautiful bowl of salad full of leaves and vegetables, including tomatoes. Red tomatoes. You know Mary is going to say something about it. So you're just waiting. You're helping yourself to the salad, of course - it looks delicious. However you fully expect Mary to say something. Well, she doesn't! This is so unexpected, it's almost unsettling. You look at her and she's helping herself to the salad, then she grabs a bit of pasta, all without saying a word about the lack of green tomatoes! All you can say is "Hey, Mary? Cat got your tongue? Where's your commentary about the importance of green tomatoes in a healthy diet?" And Mary says "Oh. Yes, for sure. They should have green tomatoes in this salad, absolutely. I just can't stop thinking about our exam tomorrow! I'm so worried that I didn't even pay attention to the colour of the tomato. You're right, though. I'm going to have a chat with the caterers and explain to them why they should include green tomatoes in all dishes." "Cat got your tongue?" You could say this every time you're in a meeting, or with a group of people and you expect someone to have an opinion about something that they've been waiting to voice, and then when the moment comes, they don't. Of course, it can be a bit of a pushy thing to say and it can sound rude depending on the context, so be careful! You wouldn't say that to someone you don't know, for example. Here's another related idiom: chime in. Let's say you're having a discussion at work. It's you and three colleagues, and you're talking about next steps regarding a plan of action to increase sales. You're presenting your ideas about the product, and they're listening. However, you know that one of them, Richard, knows the product a little bit better than you do. You would like Richard to correct you if necessary - just in case you say something that is not entirely accurate. So you begin: "Let me tell you my ideas for increasing sales for our product - Richard, feel free to chime in if necessary." You're asking Richard to contribute, to give his opinion, even correct you if he sees the need. "Feel free to chime in" is an invitation for someone to contribute and give their opinion or share their knowledge about the topic of discussion. We can also use this idiom any time someone gives their opinion in a discussion: "John and Nick were talking about the history of football, and Andy chimed in a few times. All three of them know quite a bit about football." Do you usually chime in in discussions? Let us know and talk to you next time. Key expressions (has the) Cat got your tongue? chime in Vocabulary helping yourself to the salad = (você está) se servindo de salada
1/25/20184 minutes, 18 seconds
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Podcast: The odds are in your favour

How are you? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre expressões com a palavra ODD. Não perca!! Transcrição How are you doing? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! How about we take a quick look at the word odd? O-D-D, odd. One of the most common meanings of odd is... strange. Unusual, peculiar, strange, all of that. Now, I hear the word odd with that meaning way more frequently in British English than American English, so. For example, you may hear "What an odd coincidence!" or someone you know may be a bit blunt all of a sudden and say "You look odd in that jacket". Or something very unexpected happens, that you think was really not supposed to happen, and you say... "That's odd. I left the bike inside the apartment. How come it's outside now?"... or "Look! A racoon! That's odd. I've lived here for twenty years and it's the first time I've seen a racoon." It this was the US, I would probably hear "strange" or "weird" rather than "odd". So I've talked about the word odds before, in the idiom "What are the odds?" Here's another term with the same word: the odds are in your favour. You can understand odds, O-D-D-S, as chances or probability. So when someone says "I think your plan will be successful. The odds are in your favour!", they're saying it is likely that things will go your way. Likewise, if someone says the odds are against you, they think you're going to face some challenges and the probability of your success doesn't look very high. So if you have to drive in the São Paulo traffic at rush hour for the first time, without a map or GPS, and you have one hour to get from a neighbourhood in the northern part of town to a neighbourhood in the southern part of town... The odds are against you. What if you have twenty minutes to buy five different kinds of fruit, and you're taken to a supermarket and left there? I'd say the odds are in your favour. And now, you have to complete a school assignment over the weekend and you're afraid that you're going to be so distracted by browsing the Internet that you're not going to get anything accomplished. Well, you're in luck because due to a technical glitch in the service provider, you'll have no Internet access over the weekend. The odds are in your favour now! And, finally, let's say you have to find a particular John Smith who lives in... Canada. And, you know, you have five days to find him. That's all the information you have: his name is John Smith and he lives in Canada. You don't even know where in Canada he lives. And you've got five days. I would say the odds are against you on that one. Of course, it's always nice when the odds are against you and you go ahead and accomplish whatever it is that you wanted to accomplish anyway. Has that ever happened to you? Please tell me your story in the comments! Talk to you next time. Key expressions odd the odds are in your favour the odds are against you Vocabulary likewise = da mesma maneira
1/15/20183 minutes, 35 seconds
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Podcast: Fight at the tube platform

Hello! Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre o pânico causado por uma briga no metrô em Londres. Não deixe de ouvir :-) Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and... enjoy! So, everyone... I'd like to tell you guys today about an incident in London, and the general reaction to it. So what happened in the afternoon of November 24th, at the Oxford Circus tube station platform? I'll read out a couple of tweets written by an eye witness. Here's the first one, by someone called Regan Warner: https://twitter.com/reganwarner/status/934124249056411648 So this is basically what happened: for whatever reason, some guy started a fight by bumping into another guy. They exchanged words - I would assume they were probably insulting each other or, at the very least, not being very kind - and then one of them punched the other in the gut - that means belly. And the whole thing developed into a full-out fight. Now, the second tweet: https://twitter.com/reganwarner/status/934124719355424774 As you can see, people were sort of panicking. Someone fainted, kids were crying, people running away... And I immediately thought of fights I've witnessed in the past, in Brazil, and how people would sort of just step away a bit and kind of watch the fight unfold, really. Well, I'm sure that's what many people would have done at a different time and different context here in the UK as well. However, these is 2017 and this is London. We've had horrible terror attacks fairly recently - the biggest ones being on Westminster bridge and in London Bridge (the neighbourhood), both in the city of London, and a horrific one in Manchester during an Ariana Grande concert. People are obviously on edge, as you would be, and when you're basically trapped on a tube platform and have to walk for a few minutes before you're even able to get out... A fight on a crowded platform will likely startle most people and send them into a panic. Listen how this local TV personality, Olly Murs, recounted what happened on Twitter: "Everyone get out of @Selfridges now gun shots!! I’m inside" "I was shopping and then all of sudden the whole place went mad, I mean crazy people running & screaming towards exits." "We found a small office to hide to which loads of staff and people were saying there was shots fired" What is interesting here is that he was inside Selfridges, a big department store on Oxford Street, and he thought he heard gun shots! And he reported the same kind of panic happening inside the store. The police, however, confirmed later that there had been NO gunfire and no casualties, apart from a woman who suffered minor injuries during the evacuation of the station. When we're in a state of panic, we may hear and even see stuff that actually never happened... Of course, we also see and hear stuff that definitely happened! Have you ever found yourself in that kind of situation, where something triggered a collective state of panic? Let me know and talk to you next time! Vocabulary full-out = complete, total as you would be = como é de se esperar watch the fight unfold = ver a briga acontecer (se desenvolver) people are on edge = as pessoas estão tensas, nervosas
1/8/20184 minutes, 19 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ele agiu de má fé

How are you doing? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms super comuns no dia a dia do inglês. Não perca! Transcrição How are you doing? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, there's a term in English that pretty much corresponds to what we say in Portuguese - "má fé", and the term is bad faith. Check this out: my neighbour hired a contractor to do some work in her kitchen. After months had gone by, this guy was still working on her kitchen - and it was not a big kitchen, trust me. Part of the work he was supposed to do was install a heating system under the tiles on the floor. After almost three months - I kid you not - he said he was basically done. He also said that he had installed the heating system but there was some problem with it. It was just not working. My neighbour spent a fortune on this system, so she was not happy. She got a hold of a woman who worked with this contractor before, and the woman told her the truth: this particular contractor wasn't skilled in electrical systems. That means that he should not have agreed to install the heating system, right? So my neighbour had another contractor come over and take a look at the system. This new contractor said there was nothing wrong with it - the problem was the installation. So there you go: the first contractor knew he didn't have the skills and agreed to do the job anyway. Then, he didn't do it right, and blamed the system instead of owning up to his lack of skills and returning the part of the payment that corresponded to that job (I think this is the least he could have done.) My neighbour spent her money on this guy, and then some more money on the second contractor for his professional opinion. The first contractor acted in bad faith. To act in bad faith means to conduct yourself with a dishonest intent. Basically you know you're doing something wrong, but you go ahead anyway with some kind of transaction - where the person at the receiving end will not get exactly what they are being led to believe they're getting. I'm pretty sure this is something everyone has been through - dealing with someone who acted in bad faith and deceived you, gave you their word on something while knowing they weren't going to hold up their end of the bargain. So here's another idiom, another term that is very appropriate as it helps explain what it means to act in bad faith: you enter a transaction with someone, you make a deal, you agree to collaborate in some way and you don't hold up your end of the bargain. The difference here is that when you act in bad faith, you know, really, that you're not going to be holding up your end of the bargain. You know it's coming. You're acting in bad faith. Other times, people start out with good intentions, or so they say, but they end up not fulfilling their obligations or keeping their word about something they agreed on - here, again, they're not holding up their end of the bargain. Whenever you don't fulfill an obligation or any kind of agreement, whether or not you're acting in bad faith, you're not holding up your end of the bargain. How about you tell me your examples? Let me know and talk to you next time! Key expressions act in bad faith hold up your end of the bargain Vocabulary I kid you not = sem brincadeira
12/27/20173 minutes, 37 seconds
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Como digo em inglês: Ela fez pouco do meu problema

Hello! Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms super comuns com as palavras light e lighten - não perca! Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So you know when you tell someone about a problem that you're having, and then... they go ahead and make a joke about it? Or they think it's not that bad - maybe you're exaggerating. Doesn't sound that important! You happen to know all the particulars of the problem though, and therefore you're aware that it's actually kinda serious. That other person is making light of your problem. To make light of something means to treat something as if it were nothing. It's unimportant. Ok, maybe it has some importance, but it's not that serious. This is how someone sees that thing, if they're making light of it. They treat it as something... trivial. Maybe the other person doesn't mean to be disrespectful, of course. Maybe they just don't know or they don't understand what you're saying. You could say "I wish you wouldn't make light of this issue. It's actually quite serious." And then they may ask you for further information and you can gauge whether or not to share additional details. Let's say you told your friend that you're quite upset because you can't find your pen anywhere. Yes, a pen. Your friend finds this funny and points out the fact that there's an office supplies shop just around the corner where you can get ten pens for a dollar. You say "Well, I wish I could make light of it... It's an heirloom pen that has been passed down in my family for generations." Obviously now your friend understands the importance of the pen. It would actually have been a good idea to lead with that bit of information. Now your friend knows, so he's not making light of your problem anymore. He actually thinks you should go to the police. Now, our next idiom is a bit different in meaning and in form: lighten up, or, as you'll hear often, lighten up a little. The word lighten derives from light, obviously, and "lighten up" can be used in the literal sense. An example: the walls in your bedroom are gray and it all looks a bit lifeless. If you hang a few colourful paintings on the wall, they might... brighten it up a little bit, and if you painted the walls white, that might lighten it up a bit. Do you hear a pattern? Brighten up, lighten up. Colourful paintings may brighten up your room and white walls will lighten it up. White walls may brighten it up as well, to be fair. And what about a person? When someone lightens up, it means they've become less serious, or demanding, or worried - in other words, they have relaxed a little bit. If someone says to you "Lighten up!" basically they're saying "Oh, chill" or "Relax!" Relax, however, can be totally friendly and even comforting, when you realise that someone's tense and you want to assure them that everything is going to be fine. You can tell them "Hey, relax..." When someone tells you to lighten up, on the other hand, it's like they're kind of, sort of giving you a little tap on the shoulder and going "Please calm down. You're overreacting a little bit. Lighten up!". So there you go! Let me know what you think of today's idioms and talk to you next time. Key expressions make light of something lighten up Vocabulary gauge = avaliar, medir to lead with that bit of information = iniciar a história com essa informação brighten (something) up = dar mais brilho, cores vivas, vivacidade a algo
12/19/20173 minutes, 49 seconds
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Podcast: Moving with a van

Hi, what's up? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre como foram minhas mudanças de casa aqui em Londres.. Não perca :-) Enjoy! Transcrição Hi, what's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, if you've been listening to this podcast for any length of time you may know that, about four and a half years ago, I moved to London in the United Kingdom. I have since moved house a couple of times and today I would like to tell you a little bit about my experiences and hopefully offer a bit of relevant vocabulary. So when I first arrived in this country I had only two suitcases with all my stuff in them. Yes, only two very large suitcases. I left some things behind in Brazil but I managed to bring mostly everything with me.. So that wasn't too complicated. Now... we start accumulating stuff after we've settled somewhere, don't we? I do, anyway. So. Fast-forward to two years later, when I moved house the first time. I had to hire a van. Now, mind you, it's not like I filled up the van. No, there was still plenty of space in the van after the driver loaded all my stuff into it, but I definitely needed help because in addition to my original pair of suitcases I now had a couple of bags and two or three boxes. Thank goodness such services are available! You can hire them off the internet - there are plenty of choices. So I picked a van service that seemed pretty reliable and was not disappointed. The driver was a Hungarian guy, very strong, obviously - 'cause his job is to carry boxes and furniture... I rode along with him in the van to my new place and while we chatted he told me that he had been in London for many years and there were many other Hungarians living in the UK, working and saving up money. OK, no surprises there. So a couple of years later I moved house again, and I hired the same van service to help with the move. This time around the dad of the owner of the company was the driver. Yep - he didn't say that right away, but as we chatted and he told me about how he was born in the north of England but then he moved to Birmingham, where he's lived for a while... Then he told me he worked as a builder, in construction, and he currently buys houses, fixes them up and then sells them.. it eventually came up that his son dropped out of college and started the van company on his own, and he's doing pretty well. So when his dad comes around to London to visit, he pitches in as a driver. So it was pretty nice chatting with him as I recognised a bit of a Northern accent (he then confirmed to me he was from the North of England) but then I told him it didn't sound like pure Northern (which was when he told me he'd been living in Birmingham for many years, which had changed his accent a bit). Birmingham is in the West Midlands of England. It's good to see I can sort of tell a few of the local accents apart, since back in 2013, when I first moved here, I could barely understand some of them! Why don't YOU tell me what it was like last time you moved house? Did you have to hire someone to help? Did your friends or family give you a hand? Talk to you next time. Vocabulary I have since done something = depois que a coisa que acabei de dizer aconteceu eu já (fiz alguma coisa) move house = se mudar de casa (ou apartamento) to settle somewhere = se estabelecer em algum lugar fast-forward to 2 years later = "pule" para dois anos depois ride along with someone = ir com a pessoa em algum veículo fix a house up = reformar, melhorar uma casa (frequentemente para revendê-la a um preço maior) to pitch in = colaborar, com ajuda, dinheiro, etc tell accents apart = diferenciar os sotaques
12/11/20173 minutes, 28 seconds
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Como digo em inglês: É um quebra-galho

Hi, everyone. Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre soluções quebra-galho em inglês. Ouça lá! Transcrição Hi, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So today I'm going to talk about a situation that, I'm sure, everyone is very familiar with. And that's the situation where we either don't know how to fix something properly, or we don't have the time to do that, or all the necessary parts, you name it. I think we come across this type of situation fairly often, especially those of us who use software on a daily basis. We need to get something done on a text document or spreadsheet, but then we realise we don't really know how to do it. We then try to look it up in the Help files or do a search online, but - I don't know, we find the information confusing, incomplete, or I don't know... just not helpful. What to do, though, if you're on a deadline? You have to get that table done, just the way your boss wants it! You've tried to find step-by-step instructions, but that didn't work. It's time to find a workaround now. A workaround is sort of a semi-solution, a way of fixing that problem this one time, maybe just for today. A workaround would likely not be considered a permanent solution for anything... because it's usually not the optimal solution. Using the example I just mentioned, let's say your boss asked you to put together this fairly complicated table on a text document. The table isn't very simple because some cells are supposed to contain pictures; whereas other cells are supposed to have different background colours. Yes: in total, we're talking about fifteen images and thirty five different background colours. Every table you've done so far has been black and white - so this looks fairly complex to you. Tables and text documents are not your specialty... You are, however, a whiz at graphic design. That's right. You can't build a table on a text document, but you can create amazing graphics using a photo editor. So you go ahead and you make a table exactly the way your boss wants, using the photo editor, and you save it as an image file. Then, you paste that image on the document. It looks great, but it's not ideal. It's just a workaround - it's not a permanent solution. It's not ideal because it is an image. Your boss can't edit that image, and she might want to. She'll have to ask you to modify the image file if she wants a different table. If you had built the table using the functionality of the text editor, then it would be easy for your boss to edit it. But you didn't have the time to learn all that today - your boss needs this table ready by 5PM. You used an image editor to build an image in twenty minutes, and it's done. So you used a workaround. Your boss will eventually ask you to learn how to build tables properly... She has already told you you'll be making lots of tables in the months to come. But for now, an image will do. You can also call your solution  a quick fix. It's a solution that saved you time. So you say "Boss, I haven't learned all about tables yet but I found a quick fix." You boss appreciates the quick fix, although she realises that you'll have to do it properly next time. Now tell me your stories of finding a workaround for real problems. Let me know and talk to you next time! Key expressions a workaround a quick fix Vocabulary you name it = "você escolhe", mas no sentido de "e por aí vai" an image will do = uma imagem serve
11/27/20173 minutes, 58 seconds
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Como digo em inglês: Ela aprende rápido

Hi, everyone. Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre algumas comuns com a palavra QUICK. Não perca: ouça já! Transcrição Hi, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let's get started! You know how some people, sometimes, seem to be always ready to do something... like, complain, for example. Or criticise. It's like that is the first thing on their mind. Whatever it is, whatever the situation, the first words out of their mouth always seem to be in the form of criticism. Or a complaint. So there's a very common way to describe that behaviour in English, and it's very simple too: you say someone is quick to criticise. Or quick to complain. For example, Janet is always quick to point out the flaws in restaurant service. Whenever you guys go together to a new place to eat, Janet will start with her observations: the waiter isn't dressed properly. Those tables are not being serviced. She forgot to bring the juice. Granted, Janet is a food critic, but still. She's very quick to criticise and point out flaws in general. Here's another way to use the word quick: when someone's a quick study. That's an easy one to understand as well, so let's hear it a few times so you get used to it and start saying it yourself. Basically, someone who's able to learn something easily or quickly is a quick study. And that doesn't apply just to school stuff like geography and math. You say someone is a quick study when they're able to understand how something works fairly quickly. When you're teaching someone a trick, for example, and they get it relatively quickly? You can tell them they're a quick study. Or if someone says "Hey, I'd like to teach you how to do this, but it's not that easy and we don't have a lot of time", you can tell them, "Go on, I'm a quick study." And here's an interesting... phrasal verb, I suppose, that is somewhat related to what we're talking about: study up on something. Study up. That means you're going to learn as much as you can about a certain topic. You're going to ask people for tips, then head over to the local library, loan a couple of books on the topic, do several online searches and get a hold of everything and anything that will help you learn new things about your chosen topics. You really want to exhaust your options. That's how you study up on something. A while ago - a few years ago, actually - when I decided to find out what was necessary to acquire fluency on a second language, that's what I did. I read up on language acquisition. See? I'm using READ instead of STUDY here. I read up on language acquisition. So I did a lot of online searching and read up on language acquisition. Of course, I concentrated on what made sense to me and on stuff that was backed up by positive evidence, but I did read up on the topic. Can you give me an example that relates to your life? Let me know, and talk to you next time! Key expressions someone is quick to (do something) quick study study up on / read up on Vocabulary granted = tudo bem que exhaust your options = conhecer/ usar todas as opções possíveis
11/20/20173 minutes, 25 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Uma coisa não tem a ver com a outra

Hi, everyone. Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms super comuns entre os falantes da língua inglesa. Ouça já! Transcrição Hi, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So picture this: someone's trying to convince you of something, or they're trying to make you understand the way they think. So they proceed to make a comparison - this way, it will be easier for you to grasp the message behind what they're saying. For example: your friend John is telling you that, in his opinion, parks in the city should offer free food to visitors. He says "They offer bathrooms, don't they? We can use the toilets for free. So I think they should give us food for free as well." You reply "John, you're comparing apples and oranges here." You're comparing apples and oranges, or you're mixing apples and oranges. Free toilet services and free food? That's apples and oranges. These are two different things that shouldn't necessarily be handled in the same way. So you tell John "The city is able to provide toilet services, which are relatively simple and affordable enough. But providing food is a much more complex operation - the cost is a lot higher, it involves several specific rules and regulations that have to be adhered to, not to mention that, you know, different people want and like different things! Why would you want to deprive people of all the different choices that they can have when buying food from a shop?" And you finish your argument by repeating  "John, you're comparing apples and oranges." Or your other friend, Molly, tells you that she's going to do a Math test tomorrow. The subject of the test is... two things: one, addition. Like, two plus two equals four. Two, subtraction. As in, eight minus three equals five. That's it. Molly is a professional accountant, by the way. I think she knows how to add and subtract. You, on the other hand, are a medical student  and tomorrow you have your final... neurosciences exam. Ok, I don't even know if neurosciences is an exam subject in medical school, but let's go with it. So you basically have to study a whole lot in the field of neurosciences, for tomorrow. Molly knows all that, obviously, but she still says "Wow, we both have to study hard today. I'm sure we'll have to put in the same amount of effort, me with addition and subtraction, and you with neurosciences!" And you know she means it - she is not being sarcastic or anything. So, obviously, your first thought is "Yeah, that's apples and oranges, Molly. Apples and oranges." Alright! Let's move on to another idiom: your days are numbered, or this or that thing's days are numbered. If you're in the habit of watching American films I'm sure you've heard this one before. That would be something that the hero of the movie would typically say to the villain: Your days are numbered. That means, you won't be able to keep doing what you're doing for too long. I'll catch you, I will stop you, you'll go to jail - your days are numbered. So basically that's it - if something's days are numbered, that thing will not exist for much longer. I think everyone can think of an example in their life. Sometimes... sometimes there's a shop in your neighbourhood that just can't seem to do well, no matter how much effort the owners put into it. Whenever you walk past, you can't help but notice that it's empty. No customers. That makes you think that this shop's days are numbered, right? Have you had an example like that in your neighbourhood? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions compare / mix apples and oranges days are numbered Vocabulary you can't help but notice = não dá pra (você) deixar de perceber
11/13/20174 minutes, 13 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Deu um chilique

Hello! Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre algumas maneiras de dizer que alguém 'teve um chilique'! Transcrição Hello! You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So I've talked in the past about people having a strop and not being able to hold their temper. Today we come back to the same theme with the following idiom: throw a temper tantrum. It is such a common expression that people will often just say "throw a tantrum". A tantrum is basically a display of bad temper  - someone throwing a tantrum will seem to be very angry or seriously unhappy about something, and they may refuse to behave in the way that is expected of them, or refuse to cooperate with something and so on. So, you guys, there are some words that are commonly associated with this topic of throwing a temper tantrum - first of all, you could also say throw a fit. A fit. In this case, we wouldn't say "throw a temper fit", ok? Just go with throw a fit, or throw a tantrum, and the message will be very clear. Here's a way to describe a temper tantrum... Jack threw a tantrum this morning because he wasn't happy with the breakfast served at the hotel he's staying in. He said he was frustrated with the service, since he had specifically asked the hotel staff for scrambled eggs the night before, and they made fried eggs instead for his breakfast this morning. Jack had a fit. He threw a tantrum and, while you understand that not getting your eggs the way you want can be very distressing (*), you also think that Jack's behaviour was very childish and immature. So when someone's childish, they're behaving in a way that a young child would behave - because that child hasn't learned yet that they can't have everything they want all the time and they will cry or throw their toys out of the pram when things don't go their way. You can also describe the behaviour of someone having a tantrum as extreme. It's not an everyday kind of behaviour, is it? We don't want to go around having a fit whenever we don't get what we want. Between having no reaction at all, and throwing a temper tantrum, most people are able to go somewhere in the middle and explain why they're not happy and maybe achieve some kind of resolution. So throwing a tantrum might be described as childish and extreme. Now the other extreme of that is people who remain cool, calm and collected when in a stressful situation. Or even if they feel frustrated, tired or even angry, they're able to keep their cool. Many people say that practicing meditation helps them remain cool and collected. Others say that praying helps them in remaining centred. When someone is able to remain centred, that means that they don't let negative emotions get to them under stress. They're able to navigate through a difficult situation, be rational and still make sensible decisions. Now, tell me: have you ever witnessed someone throw a tantrum in public? What did you see? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time. Key expressions throw a (temper) tantrum throw a fit cool, calm and collected remain centred (UK) or centered (US) (*)That was a bit of sarcasm :-)
11/6/20173 minutes, 41 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: No dia de São Nunca

How have you been? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms com a palavra HELL. Não perca! Transcrição How have you been? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So here we go: this week I'm going to talk about two idioms with the word hell. Yep, hell, the opposite, so to speak, of heaven. Let's get right into it: if someone gives you hell for something you've done or said, that means... they're not happy, to say the least. Giving you hell means telling you off, scolding you in a severe way. As per usual, however, sometimes people say "Oh, so and so will give me hell if I'm late" and they might be exaggerating a little bit. Maybe their friend will say something if they're late but not necessarily give them hell - but we sometimes do that, right? We use certain expressions to exaggerate something and to create a certain effect. So you might say "I didn't do the dishes yesterday and my mother gave me hell for it", meaning, she was upset. Or you could hear your work colleague say "My team screwed up the sales presentation to our biggest client and our director gave us hell for it" meaning, the director gave the team a severe scolding that will be hard to forget. So here's another one with hell: when hell freezes over. As everyone knows, hell is a place that is supposed to be really, really hot. So you can imagine what a person means when they say "when hell freezes over". That means never, ever; not a chance. "Are you going to sell your bike and buy a car and start driving everywhere?" "Ha, when hell freezes over! I love riding my bike. Even when I'm on vacation! I'll go everywhere on bike." So let me put together a little story for you: your boss, Joe, is the marketing manager and you've told him that your colleague Tina, over at Sales, said she needed a detailed report of all marketing expenses for the last five years - every single one of them. And, she needs it in two days. So when you're done talking, Joe just looks at you and says "Yes. We're going to prepare a complete report on every one of our expenses in the last five years for the day after tomorrow, when hell freezes over." That's it. You know that when your boss Joe says no, he means no. Tina is going to get that report when hell freezes over. Well, next thing you do is march over to Sales and give Tina the news. You're going to start working on the report as soon as hell freezes over. You obviously use different words to convey the message, right? You say "Tina, unfortunately this isn't something we can do at the moment. We don't have enough staff to be able to handle this kind of task." Tina's boss, Larry, who's just walking by, overhears you. He's very angry to learn he's not going to see this report anytime soon. In fact, he's giving you hell for it right about now. He's turned red and looks very agitated. Really upsetting what's going on; Larry is clearly not happy. You go back to your boss' office and tell him that Larry has given you hell for telling him about the report. So that kind of thing happens sometimes, doesn't it? What is your example? Let me know and talk to you next time! Key expressions give someone hell when hell freezes over   Vocabulary overhears you = ouve (a sua conversa, sem estar participando dela)
10/30/20173 minutes, 44 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: É OK, mas nada demais

How's it going? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms com a palavra NOTHING! Não perca. Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So in today's episode we'll focus on the word 'nothing' for a little bit. First of all, listen to it again: nothing. Did you notice I did not say "NÓ-thing"? I said it more like "nothing". Just something to notice - we speak Portuguese as our native language and because of the sounds of Portuguese, we would tend to read a word such as nothing this way: NÓ-thing. So pay attention from now on every time you come across this word, hopefully because you've heard it: nothing. And here's something people say a lot - it's our first expression of today: it's nothing personal. When someone says that to you, they're trying to tell you that whatever behaviour they've had or decision they've made was not meant to criticise or offend you. It doesn't mean you're not a good person or whatever quality may be related to that decision. It doesn't even mean that they don't like you. They may have made their decision purely based on objective factors. For example, let's take a job interview. You had a great time with the interviewer, you guys hit it off and chatted for twenty minutes, uninterruptedly. You thought "It's in the bag". But then you get a call from that same person two days later, saying that they had a look at your resumé and realised that they need a couple of skills for the position... and, unfortunately, at this time these are skills that you don't possess. "It's nothing personal", the interviewer says. "I liked you as a candidate but we really need those skills". Obviously sometimes people will say that in an insincere or sarcastic way. Of course! If you watch lots of American films or TV shows you've probably come across it before. Example: someone says "Hey, we don't need your services anymore. Nothing personal!" when it's obvious they have made that decision because maybe you brought carrot cake to work the day before and didn't ask your coworkers if they wanted a bite. You get the picture. By the way, that reminds me of a somewhat similar expression, no offense, which has been featured in a previous episode - have a listen. And here's another one that I've heard a lot in the past few years: it's nothing to write home about. When you say something is nothing to write home about, what you're saying is... this thing I'm talking about? It's nothing special. It's really unremarkable, or not that great. If I were to sit down and write a letter to my folks back home, I would certainly not include that bit of news in my letter - because it's nothing to write home about, really. Can you think about something in your life right now that would make you say - it's nothing to write home about? Maybe it's your cell phone. It may be your bicycle, or the food place you go to for lunch, or the performance of your coworker. Let me know what you come up with, and talk to you next time! Key expressions nothing personal nothing to write home about Vocabulary You guys hit it off = vocês se deram muito bem It's in the bag = está no papo You get the picture = (acho que) você entende
10/23/20173 minutes, 35 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Vou nessa

Hi. What's up? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre maneiras de dizer em inglês "vou nessa". Não perca! Transcrição Hi. What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So today let's review a few different ways to let other people know that you're leaving. Most of these are very informal, so they're not idioms that you would normally say in a business environment, unless you were sure it'd be ok to do so. And again, this is to let people know that you're leaving somewhere, that you are saying good-bye, that you're going somewhere else. And now that I think of it, in Brazil we have lots of ways to say that we're leaving, right? Everyone has a favourite one. Maybe all you do is get up and say "Bye" - I don't know. Or maybe you're one of those people who spend ten minutes saying good-bye? I mean, with all those people to hug and kiss, it can take a while. Whatever the case, I think each one of us have our own way of saying farewell. So our first expression of today is a simple one, and it's an idiom that I, myself, use a lot: "I'm taking off". Taking off is something airplanes do... but people can say that too. "I'm going to take off now". Where's Jenny? Oh, she took off ten minutes ago. Or, "Everyone, I gotta take off or I'll be late for class. Bye." And when I first moved to London I met someone who would frequently say "I'm going to shoot off now" or just "I got to shoot off" - same meaning as take off. And there's a way to tell people not only that you're leaving but let them know where you're headed - maybe you're familiar with this one: I'm off to the hairdresser's. We're off to the meeting now. "Bye, we're off to see the play." However, there's something an old landlady of mine used to ask me whenever she saw me heading toward the front door: "Ana, are you off out?" She wanted to know if was heading out, if was leaving the house to go somewhere. So I would reply "Yes, I'm off out" or "Yeah, I'm off to the supermarket" or something. So there you go: "off out" is something you can say to just let people know you're leaving the house and going out somewhere. Now here's another one I've heard people say here and there: "Ok, I'll love you and leave you now. Bye". It will have sounded a bit funny if that's the first time you've heard it, but that's exactly how the expression goes: I'll love you and leave you, or I must love you and leave you. And actually it is sort of a humorous expression, so, again, you wouldn't say that in a more formal environment. Other than that, feel free to say it to your friends... "Everyone, great catching up with you all but I got to love you and leave you." So which ones have you heard for the first time today? Did you know all these ways to basically say good-bye? Which one's your favourite? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions take off shoot off off out love you and leave you Vocabulary landlady = proprietária da casa onde eu morava (e pagava aluguel)
10/17/20173 minutes, 27 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: O ponteiro do relógio

How have you been? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre algumas expressões com a palavra CLOCK, todas - como sempre - muito comuns entre os falantes nativos. Transcrição How have you been? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So today let's talk a little bit about some vocabulary specific to clocks. Sure, 'clock' is a very basic word and one that English students learn in their first few lessons... I know. But there's other stuff that is clock-related, and not talked about that often. So here we go: first of all, every non-digital clock has two hands. Two hands. There's the hour hand, which is the little hand and it points to the hours. Then there's the minute hand, which is the big hand, and it points to the minutes. By now you now what we call the two hands of a clock in Portuguese. So, for example: if it's three o'clock, the minute hand of a clock will be pointing to the number twelve, and the hour hand of the clock will be pointing to three. If it's a quarter to eleven, the big hand, or minute hand, will be pointing to nine, and the little hand, or hour hand, will be pointing to the vicinity of number eleven - in fifteen minutes, it will be pointing exactly to eleven. So look to a wall clock near you: what time is it, and what numbers are the hands of the clock pointing to? Right now, for me, it's almost noon. Almost 12PM. Ten minutes to noon, to be more precise. So the minute hand is pointing at the number ten, and the hour hand is pointing at twelve. Alright - so, with that bit of business taken care of, let's take a look at the terms clockwise and counterclockwise. When something is done clockwise, or when something happens clockwise, that means it happens in the direction that the hands of a clock move. Let's say you're with a bunch of people in a room doing some kind of group activity and the leader of the activity says "OK, now let's all form a circle and start slowly moving clockwise round the room." So now you have all formed a circle, and you and everyone else then took a step to the left and started moving in the same direction the hands of a clock rotate. If you're having trouble picturing what I'm saying, just imagine a clock on the floor, and then imagine the group formed a circle around that clock. Now imagine the direction in which the minute hand of that clock would move as time passes - so when the group moves clockwise, they'll be going in the same direction of the movement of the minute hand. I'm sure it won't be hard for you to understand what counterclockwise means. Yep, that's the direction that is opposite to the rotating hands of a clock. So if you're with the same group in a room and the activity leader says "Ok, so let's now move counterclockwise round the room" you would all take a step to the right and start moving in the opposite direction to the rotation of the hands of a clock. So before we wrap up, here's one other idiom that is very, very common: round the clock, meaning non-stop, day and night, continuously. Sometimes people work on something round the clock - for example, when a deadline is approaching. Or when someone is being watched by the police - the police will have them watched round the clock. So look at a clock right now - what numbers are the hands pointing to? Let me know and talk to you next time! Key expressions big hand / hour hand little hand / minute hand clockwise, counterclockwise round the clock Vocabulary with that bit of business taken care of = com isso resolvido, com essa parte esclarecida (não precisa ser a respeito de "negócios" necessariamente)
10/13/20174 minutes, 9 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Cantadas

How's it going? Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre cantadas em inglês que eu achei engraçadas... Não perca. Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy. So how about today we have our podcast about a fun topic: funny pick-up lines! Yes, pick-up lines. Or, as we call them in Brazil, "cantadas". And when I say funny, obviously some people will think they're funny; others will think they're cheesy or just plain distasteful. Who knows? Keep listening and tell me what you think. All we really know is that the person saying the pick-up line is openly showing their interest in you. One more thing before we start: you can say pick-up lines or chat-up lines - same thing. Also, I've collected the examples I'm giving you in this episode from a few different sites so if you'd like to see more, just do an online search for "pick-up lines". You'll find a lot. Alright, so how about this one: Your hand looks heavy. Let me hold it for you. A bit cheeky if it's coming from a stranger, is what I think. So here's a list of my "favourite" ones, so to speak: Come live in my heart, and pay no rent. We're not socks, but I think we'd make a great pair. I hope there's a fire truck nearby, 'cause you're smoking! Well, here I am. What were your other two wishes? If I were a cat, I would spend all 7 lives with you. What do you think so far? Good? Seriously, if you're a girl - what would your reaction be if someone you barely know said those to you? Has anyone ever approached you with a cheesy or funny pick-up line? In my case, I only remember that happening in one instance, seriously: I was walking my dog, and a guy said something along the lines of "If I say woof-woof will you take me home?" Everyone, I swear he said that, and I found it kind of funny. I still do. From the list of pick-up lines I just read, I think my favourite one was "Well, here I am. What were your other two wishes". I mean, I would just burst out laughing if someone said that to me - it's too funny. So let me give you another short list of lines: You're so hot, I could bake cookies on you. You look cold. Want to use me as a blanket? Hey, my name is Microsoft. Can I crash at your place tonight?  Do you know what's on the menu? Me 'n' u. OK, I don't know about you, but if I heard any of those I'd laugh. I guess any guy saying these lines would be prepared for the girl to laugh. Now, I've only selected a few funny ones, but I would like to hear from guys and girls what your experience with this is in real life. Have you actually used a funny chat-up line on someone you barely knew? What was their reaction? I guess it's a lot more common for men to say that to girls, so what about you, ladies? What have guys said to you, and how did you react? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Vocabulary plain distasteful = simplesmente de mau gosto cheeky = um pouco insolente mas pode ser bem-humorado ao mesmo tempo smoking = atraente, linda
10/6/20173 minutes, 35 seconds
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Podcast: Cover your tracks

Hello, everyone. Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre um idiom muito comum com a palavra cover - não perca! Transcrição Hello, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So listen to this: when people do something wrong, sometimes they remember to cover their tracks. Many times they don't! In those cases, it's easy to figure out what that person did. For example: let's say your work colleague Richard one day decides to steal from your company. Steal... office supplies. Yeah, pencils and notepads. He opens the supplies cupboard and takes, like, fifty pencils and about twenty notepads. However, Richard does all that while he's eating cherry ice cream. Yes, cherry ice cream. That's bright red. So what happens? When Mary, the admin, opens the cupboard a few hours later she notices it's been raided. As she wonders who stole all those office supplies, she sees some cherry ice cream on the floor. She immediately remembers that Richard loves cherry ice cream. In fact, he's the only person in the entire office who likes that particular flavour of ice cream. She finds it very strange that Richard would have come to the office supplies cupboard to get stuff without speaking to her first. Why? Well, because Mary is in charge of office supplies. So when someone in the office needs a new pen, or an eraser, or a notepad, they usually tell her what they need, and then Mary herself goes to the cupboard and brings the supply to that person. That way she always knows what's in stock and what's not. So right now she's looking at the notepads and the pens, and she can see they're running low. She's suspicious. She looks at all that cherry ice cream on the floor - she's actually a bit mad 'cause she stepped on it - and she knows it was Richard! Richard stole office supplies but he didn't cover his tracks, he just didn't. Maybe he forgot. If Richard had remembered to cover his tracks, he could have looked around and searched for evidence that he'd been in the supplies cupboard. Maybe then he would have spotted the cherry ice cream on the floor, and cleaned it up. That way Mary wouldn't be able to immediately figure out that it was him who stole all the supplies. There's more, though. As you may remember, Richard stole fifty pencils and about twenty notepads. That's a lot of supplies, and he hid them all under his desk. Well, when Mary came back from the supplies closet she headed straight over to Richard's desk. He wasn't there, but Mary took a peek under his desk and she obviously saw the stolen pencils and notepads. I think it is clear that Richard definitely didn't cover his tracks! Not only did he leave cherry ice cream on the floor near the cupboard, but he also did a poor job of hiding what he stole. In order to cover your tracks, you would have to to hide or destroy anything that shows where you've been or what you've been doing - in other words, the incriminating evidence! So, yeah, Richard did a poor job of covering his tracks, and he got caught. His manager called him into his office for a little chat... and Richard got suspended for a month and had to go through some HR training. Can you think of a similar story where someone covered their tracks... or maybe they didn't, and got caught? Let me know and talk to you next time! Key expressions cover my/your/his tracks Vocabulary cupboard = armário admin = administrative assistant raided = atacado de surpresa (aqui, num sentido mais figurado - não é um ataque de verdade)
9/28/20174 minutes, 2 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ele está passando por uma fase

How's it going? Hoje eu falo sobre duas expressões super comuns com phase e faze. Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Our idiom today is really simple. We say something very similar in Brazil. "Ele tá passando por uma fase". He's going through a phase. Example: you bump into your friend Sally in the mall and she says "Have you seen Martin lately? I saw him last night at the pub and he looked like death. What is going on?" And you say "Oh, don't worry about Martin. He's just going through a phase of rethinking his whole life, apparently and he's let himself go a little bit. He was fired from his job but, like I said, don't worry - he's fine. He really didn't like his job anyway. So now he's thinking about what he's going to do. It's just a phase." So your friend Martin is just going through a phase, or so you hope! He'll probably be back on his feet in a couple of months or so. And if he isn't, you're ready to be there for him, be a good friend, listen to him, have a chat and even tell him he needs to get his act together if it comes to that. Some people go through a phase of being into gardening, or cooking, or listening to punk rock. I remember when my friend went through a phase of going jogging every day. It was just a phase, and it lasted about three months. Turns out she didn't really like jogging. What about you? Tell me about your phases. Now the other word we have for today sounds the same, but the spelling is completely different. When we say "go through a phase", phase is spelled p-h-a-s-e. The "faze" I'm talking about now, however, is spelled f-a-z-e. Faze. So let me give you an example of how to use faze with a Z. My friend Jane and I went to a bar last week and they asked us to show some ID at the entrance. Jane was upset, mad even, but it didn't faze me. I didn't care, it didn't bother me. It didn't faze me. Then the next day Jane and I went to this burger place where they make our favourite burger. We were really looking forward to it. Well, we get there and the guy behind the counter tells us they're "out of burgers tonight". Everything else on the menu - feel free to order. Not burgers, though. Not tonight. I was really disappointed. I was so disappointed I almost cried, seriously. Not Jane though. It didn't faze her, and she likes that burger even more than I do. But it really didn't faze her. This is a very good word because it's something that happens all the time, isn't it? Different people are subjected to the same situation and react very differently. You and your friend go through something; you have a strong reaction but your friend isn't fazed. Certain things really bother your brother or your sister but when the same thing happens to you, you're not fazed. I'm curious to know about the things that faze or don't faze you - let me know and talk to you next time! Key expressions go through a phase faze Vocabulary he looked like death = estava com uma cara péssima, acabado let yourself go = parar de cuidar de si mesmo, ficar com aparência ruim be there for someone = estar disponível para dar apoio a alguém
7/24/20173 minutes, 49 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Dá um jeito na sua vida!

What's up? Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms super comuns com a palavra clean. Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! We have a couple of idioms today with the word clean. Yep. I bet you all know what clean means - both the verb and the adjective. There's always more to learn when it comes to English though... and that's because the sheer number of idiomatic expressions in this language is just unbelievable. So our first idiom of today is come clean. People sometimes come clean with someone about something. That means they have admitted something to that person. Obviously we're talking here about something unpleasant or difficult, right? Let's say this guy called Peter came clean with his dad about how his car got damaged. It wasn't someone else's fault, like Peter originally claimed; it was Peter's fault and he came clean about it with his dad. Last week, Peter came clean with his friend Tina about his true intentions when they became friends: he actually has feelings for her, and Tina had no idea. So Peter admitted, or came clean, about his feelings for Tina. Ideally politicians would come clean about all their misdeeds, all at once, like right now - wouldn't that be perfect? Obviously many people never come clean about lots of things they've done, or how they feel, and so on. Some people do, however - can you remember the last time it happened to you? Or maybe you were the person who came clean about something. I'd like to hear your story - please leave a comment. Our second idiom with clean today is about getting your act together. It's about improving your behaviour in some way; it's about changing the way you do things and perhaps behaving in a way that is more acceptable, constructive, or nice - you get the idea. I'm talking about the idiom clean up your act. Let's say your friend Karen was fired for being a lazy and dishonest employee. You could tell her "Karen, you brought this on yourself. You know you should not have lied to your boss and you should have done your job. It's up to you now to clean up your act and start behaving like a mature, reliable person." Or let's say you stayed in a hotel for a few days and found that your room was a bit dirty, the flush valve in the bathroom didn't work, the service was sloppy and the food was bad. So now you're back in your home and you go to the Trip Advisor website to leave a review - you feel it's your duty to warn others before they make the same mistake and spend money on a horrible stay. You go ahead and write "Hotel ABC needs to clean up their act. Sloppy service, room hadn't been cleaned, couldn't flush for a whole day." You could say that someone who used to drink excessively, for example, and got into a bit of trouble every now and then because of their excessive drinking, has now cleaned up their act. That means this person doesn't drink excessively anymore. That's it for today! Tell me about how you cleaned up your act about something, and talk to you next time! Key expressions come clean about something with someone clean up your act Vocabulary sheer = palavra usada para dar ênfase, como em português às vezes se usa "puro" ou "simples" he has feelings for her = ele gosta dela (no sentido romântico) brought this on yourself = você foi a causa dessa coisa indesejável que aconteceu com você service was sloppy = serviço foi com má vontade, descuidado
7/17/20173 minutes, 39 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Já era hora!

How have you been? Hoje eu falo sobre um idiom comuníssimo e pouco usado por nós, brasileiros que aprendem inglês. Enjoy :-) Transcrição How have you been? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So imagine you have a favourite restaurant in your neighbourhood. You've been going to this restaurant for years. You like the food, you know the staff, it's reasonably priced, it's almost perfect. Not just for you, but all your neighbours go often as well. It's just a great place. There's only one downside: they don't take credit cards as a payment method. That's right. You have to pay in cash. Not that you spend a fortune every time you go, it's not that. It's just that it would be easier if you didn't have to worry about having enough cash in your wallet every time you go there. You know what I mean? It's always the same thing: you gotta check your wallet and, two times out of three, make a stop at the ATM machine before you head to the restaurant. So today is Sunday and you decide to stop by your favourite neighbourhood place and have a nice meal. The owner is happy to see you and proceeds to take you to your favourite table. He then says "Guess what? We now take credit cards!" Yep, that's right. You can hardly believe it. After so many years, finally! You say "Wow, that is awesome. It's about time you guys accepted credit cards!" It's about time. It's about time your restaurant accepted credit cards. Notice the verb tense: accepted. It's about time the restaurant accepted credit cards. Everyone else does! This is a great restaurant, customers love it, people come in often for a good meal and nowadays many of us rely on cards to pay safely and easily. People have been looking forward to the day they'd be able to simply whip out their card and make a payment. So it's about time you accepted cards. City workers put some speed bumps on the road near where I live, and my thought was "It's about time they did that!" There are kids crossing that road every day and speed bumps help make it safer, so it's about time the city put a few of those on that road." Notice that "put" is the past tense of put. You know when you're watching a movie and the villain seems to be able to get away with everything? It's like the good guys are the last ones to know. So when something happens that finally puts an end to the villain's misdoings, you think "It's about time. It's about time something bad happened to the villain of the story." Again, notice that I used "happened", past form of happen. Or maybe it's been hot and dry where you live for a couple of months and then, all of a sudden, one day it starts to rain. You think "It's about time we had some rain". How would you use "about time" in your own life? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time. Key expressions about time Vocabulary ATM machine = caixa eletrônico (ATM = automated teller machine) two times out of three = de cada três vezes, duas vezes whip out (something) = sacar (um cartão, uma caneta do bolso, etc - informal) speed bump = lombada misdoing = coisa errada, crime
7/10/20173 minutes, 14 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Isso está fora de questão

Hi, there. Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns com a palavra question. Enjoy! Transcrição Hi there. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let's say you're planning your holidays - you're looking forward to them. You've been browsing the Internet, looking for nice destinations but it turns out you're going to your favourite beach town as always. You can't wait! You're so excited about the holidays that you can't help but ask Sally, your boss, where she's headed for her holidays this year. Sally looks at you and says "Holidays? Holidays are out of the question for me this year. With one manager in hospital and the new manager I'm responsible for training, I can't even think of taking time off before January." Wow. You feel bad for Sally, obviously, but like she said - holidays are completely out of the question for her at this moment. So notice how we say this in English - out of the question. Slightly different from what we say in Portuguese, right? A few more examples: I don't like sushi. That's true, by the way. Having a sushi dinner for me would be out of the question. I'm not a fan of horror movies. In fact, I never watch them. So getting me to go with you to the cinema to watch a violent horror movie - it's out of the question! Don't even try. Don't waste your time. Alright - so let's move on to our second idiom of today: there's no question. There's no question for me that soda drinks do not quench my thirst. On a hot day I need water, no question about it. Notice that in Brazil we use the word "dúvida" for the same kind of expression, right? So there's no question you can't always translate Brazilian or Portuguese expressions literally into English, and vice-versa. Many times I see writers translating English expressions literally into Portuguese - which frankly just makes their text harder to comprehend. There's no question our mother-tongue is rich and varied enough that we can find whatever words we need to put our point across. So that one is really easy - there's no question. Now here's an interesting term with the word question before we wrap things up: a loaded question. A loaded question is a question that requires... a loaded answer. How so? Well, imagine you run into your friend Jane, who's just separated from her husband of fifteen years. You ask her if she's alright and then your second question is "Do you miss your ex-husband?" Jane immediately says "Oh, that's a loaded question." The reason she says that is, she still feels vulnerable, she's confused, she's a bit depressed but, on the other hand, relieved that she can now move on... It is a bit difficult for her to express how she feels because so many emotions are involved. That is why this is a loaded question. You can also say a question is loaded when it's not necessarily about personal emotions, but still about a difficult or complicated topic and demands a difficult or complicated answer. Maybe you just bumped into your friend Tom who owns a company, and he tells you the company has been in the red for the past six months. So you ask him "Are going to let some people go?" Tom says "That's a loaded question. I've been struggling about what to do and have not made a decision yet." So you can tell that is a difficult subject for Tom - as we would expect. He's probably been thinking a lot about it and, because it's not easy, hasn't decided what to do at this point. And that's why he said "That's a loaded question." So that's all for today. Let me know what things are out of the question as far as you're concerned, and talk to you next time! Key expressions out of the question there's no question a loaded question Vocabulary I didn't get the reference = não entendi a referência quench my thirst = mata(m) a minha sede in the red = no vermelho put a point across = comunicar uma ideia
7/3/20174 minutes, 28 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ela faz isso com o pé nas costas

Hey, everybody. Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms super comuns com a palavra fish... Incluindo como dizer a frase do título deste pod. Enjoy! Transcrição Hey, everybody. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So imagine that it's a stressful day at the office. A stressful Friday, to be specific. You've got a million things to do and your phone seems to be ringing off the hook. You're getting ready to enter an important meeting when your work colleague approaches you and says "Hey buddy, have you heard about the new curtains in the meeting room? They're thinking about a purple pattern for the curtains but I'd really rather have a floral design. Can you swing by later today and take a look at the catalogue, see which ones you like? I think you'll agree with me - floral is the way to go." So you look at your colleague and say "Sounds important. However I do have four different meetings to attend this afternoon before 5pm, so I think you'll understand when I tell you that, as much as I would like to help you choose the best colour for the new curtains, I've got bigger fish to fry." That's right. You have bigger fish to fry today. That's a different way of saying... I've got more important things to do than the one you're asking me to do. I can't take time to do this thing you've just spoken about - I've got bigger fish to fry. Four meetings before 5 PM. Then you pick up the phone in your office and it's your admin. She says "Tony from the warehouse is calling about your visit next week." You know who Tony is and, in a different situation, you'd take the call. Not today, though. You've got bigger fish to fry and that's what you tell your admin: "Listen, I've got other fish to fry now. Please take a message and tell Tony I'll speak to him soon." Sometimes you need to make a choice, right? When you don't have time or resources to do everything that comes your way, you've got to prioritise. Sometimes you just have to say "I have bigger fish to fry" and move along with something that is more important to you. OK - on to our second idiom of today. Imagine something that is ridiculously easy to accomplish. Maybe you're very skilled at cooking wonderful food. You've been doing it for years, to the point.. your friends ask you to cook for them when they have a special occasion. You're a wonderful cook. Some would say you're a proper chef. So when someone asks you if you're capable of making a nice lasagna, your friend Larry says "Lasagna? That's like shooting fish in a barrel for him (or her)". That's like shooting fish in a barrel. Obviously if you have fish trapped in a barrel... it would be easier to shoot them than if they were swimming freely in the sea or in a river. So, that's basically it. For you, making a great lasagna is like shooting fish in a barrel. So easy. Let's say you arrive in São Paulo and it's your first time in the city. Ever. You have to visit several different offices in different parts of the city. It's a bit daunting. You know São Paulo is a huge city and it's easy to get lost. However your friend Maria comes to the rescue and you immediately feel better. Maria has lived in São Paulo for decades and knows her way around the city like the back of her hand. She's volunteered to drive you wherever you need to go. She's even better at this than a cab driver. For Maria, getting to any address in São Paulo is like shooting fish in a barrel. She's basically a human GPS. So tell me - where could you apply that expression in your life? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time. Key expressions other/bigger fish to fry like shooting fish in a barrel Vocabulary ringing off the hook = (telefone) tocando sem parar admin = administrative assistant daunting = assustador (no sentido de intimidating) like the back of her hand = como a palma da mão (veja que não é uma tradução exata)
6/26/20174 minutes, 6 seconds
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Mais uma maneira de falar em inglês: Ele me enganou

Hi, everyone. Hoje eu falo sobre alguns idioms que raramente são usados em inglês - brincadeira! Como sempre, expressões super comuns e que estão na boca dos falantes nativos, hoje com a palavra trick. Transcrição Hi, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So today let me tell you about a term that we use when we want to say that someone used a bit of deception in order to make another person do something. Attention! Deception does not mean "decepção". Deception happens when you deceive someone; when you lie to them, or exaggerate, or omit information, so that they will act in a way that gives you the result you want. That's deception. So here's our first idiom: trick someone into doing something. It's basically what I just said, but here it goes again: when you trick someone into doing something, you're fooling or deceiving this person. Maybe you're telling them a lie. Maybe you're only implying something... that is not true. You might be holding some information back from this person, because you know that if you tell them, they're not going to do what you want. Or maybe... you're manipulating them in some way, leading them on to behave in a certain way. Whatever you're doing, when you trick someone into doing something you're not being a hundred percent honest with that person about what you know, or your motives. For example: let's say my [quote, unquote] "friend" John tells me one day "Hey, Ana, I'm selling raffle tickets to help with a really worthy cause. It's an amazing cause. Would you be interested in a ticket?" And I say "Oh yeah, sure. I'm feeling generous so give me five tickets!" Later that day my friend Mary gives me a ring and tells me how John doesn't actually represent any causes. He said he was going to help the poor with the proceeds from the tickets, but actually he's raising money for himself so he can buy a new car! So there you have it: John tricked me into buying raffle tickets, and now he's nowhere to be found. He ran away with the money. First, he tricked me  - and a few other people - into buying his tickets, and then he ran away. By the way, tricking someone into doing something is different from talking someone into doing something. Check out that episode to learn more. And here's one more idiom with the word trick. Very simple, very common, just use it whenever you find something that does exactly what you need. That does the trick. It does pretty much what is needed. This morning I needed to put some old clothes in boxes because someone was coming over later to collect the boxes and give them away to people in poor communities. I thought I'd need to go to the shop and get a couple of boxes, but then all of a sudden I stumbled upon the old box my stove came in, in the garage. That did the trick. Problem solved. The stove box did the trick. The last week someone told me about a new hair product and I went over to my local drugstore to buy it but they were out. Instead, I bought a similar product and then when I came back home I tested it on my hair. It did the trick! Yeah, it wasn't the product I had originally been recommended, but it did the trick anyway. It worked. It did what I needed it to do. Alright - so now please go ahead and tell me what it is that you've bought recently that did the trick - it did exactly what you needed. Talk to you next time! Key expressions trick someone into doing something do the trick Vocabulary quote, unquote = maneira como as aspas são lidas em inglês: "friend" lê-se 'quote, unquote friend'. raffle = sorteio a worthy cause = uma causa (de caridade) muito boa, de valor
6/20/20174 minutes, 5 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: fazer sinal para o ônibus parar

How's it going? Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms com a palavra flag, incluindo "fazer sinal para o táxi/ônibus parar". Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So I'm wondering how you get to work or school every day. Do you drive, or do you take public transport? In case you take the bus, you know very well that if you're the only person standing at the bus stop, when you see your bus you have to raise your arm as a kind of signal to the driver that you want him to stop. What you're doing is, you're hailing down a bus. To hail down something or someone means exactly that: to signal or wave at someone to let them know they should stop. We do the same thing for a taxi, right? If I'm out in the street and need a cab to go somewhere, when I see one approaching I'll just raise my arm, maybe wave, and if the taxi is free the driver will stop and pick me up. Have you ever missed a bus because, although you were standing at the bus stop, you forgot to hail it down? It's happened to me. Actually, I'm not sure whether I was distracted or forgot to wave, or I just thought someone else was going to hail it down. Nobody did, and the bus just went right on past all of us. But that's pretty rare - that actually happened out here in London. In São Paulo it was usually the opposite: I don't think I ever had to worry about hailing down a bus because there were always so many people at the bus stop who were waiting for the same bus I was... So lots of hands went up as the buses approached. Here's a tweet I read the other day: https://twitter.com/iamlaurenhutton/status/849545339552112643 The woman who tweeted this is a former cast member on a reality show that I used to watch. Also, I didn't get the "magneto" reference... I only watched the first X-man movie so, if you know what she's talking about please let me know! We can also say flag down - it's the same thing as hail down. Sometimes you're driving a car and the police will flag you down, won't they? A police officer will sort of wave at you and you know you should immediately pull over. So police officers sometimes flag down cars. And here's another idiom with flag that you will hear a lot: red flag. I hear that one all the time. A red flag is a sign to you, or to someone else, that something is not right. Maybe you're interviewing someone to be your new assistant - let's say it's a guy called Richard. So Richard says "I've had three jobs so far, and all my bosses were awful people. They were really horrible." OK. So you hear Richard say that the last three bosses he had were awful people - really? That raises a red flag. That's a huge red flag to you. You keep going with the interview, but by now you've already made up your mind: either this guy has a problem with authority figures or he doesn't think twice about badmouthing other people. Either way, it's a no-go. Richard saying that all his previous bosses were awful people was a big red flag to you. Or let's say you're a girl and you've been dating a guy for a few months now but he still doesn't want you anywhere near his place. He's fine with coming round to yours, but whenever you suggest going round to his, he'll give you an excuse. That's a red flag to you. Something smells fishy... Maybe he's married? You end up breaking up with him because you can't ignore a red flag like that. OK, that's it for today! Tell me about your red flags in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions flag or hail something/someone down red flag Vocabulary I didn't get the reference = não entendi a referência badmouth someone = falar mal de alguém either way = de qualquer uma das duas maneiras que você acabou de mencionar a no-go = uma situação que você não quer, que não vai acontecer, você não vai aprovar, etc
5/1/20174 minutes, 10 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Uma estimativa bem por cima

Hi, all. Hoje eu falo sobre estimativas (dois idioms super comuns! Não perca!) Transcrição Hi, all. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and enjoy! So let's talk a little bit about the word estimate. That's e-s-t-i-m-a-t-e. Take notice of the pronunciation: estimate. An estimate is an approximate calculation; you could say it's an educated guess most of the time. Most of the time, not all of the time... sometimes people make an estimate and it's just a wild guess. Everyone has had to make estimates in their lives. When you're about to go on a journey to your weekend destination, you make an estimate of how long the journey is going to take based on the weather, traffic reports, the distance to be traveled and so on. Here are two very common ways in which the word estimate is used: the first one is combined with the word rough. If someone tells you they have a rough estimate of something, they are forewarning you that this estimate is really just an approximation and a better estimate could be made using additional information. Usually you make a rough estimate when someone wants an answer or a number in that moment, and you don't have all the information needed for that calculation on hand. So you just use whatever you know and... or remember in that moment, and tell them "Well, my rough estimate is XYZ. That's a rough number, a rough estimate. Later today when I'm around my computer I'll be able to make a better guess." Here's another one: a ballpark estimate. A ballpark is a stadium where games are played that involve a ball. Ballpark estimate is a slang expression; it's another way of saying, you know, "it's an approximate number" or even "it's a rough estimate."     Here's an example: you take your car to the mechanic because it's been making a strange noise. The mechanic tells you he's going to look into it this afternoon. You ask him "How much is this going to be?" and he says "There's no way I can tell you right now" and you insist: "Please give me a ballpark estimate", and he says "In the 400, 500 range." That's a ballpark estimate. Another example: your best friend says she's throwing a party in the next few months and it is obviously very important that you be there, because it will be a party in your honour. But... you're planning your annual vacation, and you're about to start booking hotels for next month - so you absolutely need to have at least a ballpark estimate of the date to make sure that you're not going to be away on that date. You ask your friend and she says she doesn't know yet. That's her answer, "I don't know." So you go ahead and explain to her that you're looking into hotels for the next few weeks, and say "If you can't give me an exact date, give me a ballpark estimate." Give me a date that is in the ballpark. Give me something, so I at least have some idea! Now, listen to the verb we can use when we make an estimate - the verb is estimate. You make an estimate, and you estimate something. Can you estimate how many people work on the same floor with you? Can you estimate how many times you have brushed your teeth since the day you were born? Can you estimate how many hairs you have on your head? Just a ballpark estimate, c'mon :-) Let me know in the comments what you've come up with, and talk to you next time! Key expressions a rough estimate a ballpark estimate estimate (verb) Vocabulary educated guess = um palpite feito com base em algum conhecimento e dados (e que provavelmente está correto)
4/24/20174 minutes, 9 seconds
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Podcast: Nomes de lugares com pronúncia inesperada

... a não ser que você já os conheça, claro. What's up? Hoje eu falo sobre vários nomes de lugares aqui no Reino Unido, em especial na Inglaterra, cuja pronúncia eu só aprendi depois de ouvir a versão certa algumas vezes - estes nomes são muito counter-intuitive pra gente! Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So today I thought I'd give you a taste of some of the names I've encountered since I moved to London. Not people names, but places. Until I got to hear other people say them, I mispronounced quite a few of them. Some places in the UK have names that are not that intuitive to pronounce - well, not for us Brazilians, anyway. The US has got them as well, but I find that they're a lot more common out here. For this podcast in particular it would really be helpful if you followed the transcript as I say the name of each place. So let's start with some neighbourhoods in London. Take Balham and Clapham, for example; two areas below the river. I think what I find a bit unusual is the H after the letters L and P and how the H is completely silent. It's like it's not even there. Balham and Clapham. Now I was very surprised first time I heard someone say Southwark, Southwark which is the name of a huge area of London. I did not expect it and I hope you're reading these words as well so you can be surprised as well! Southwark. What about the W in there? It just... disappeared. How about this town in West London called Ruislip? That's right, Ruislip. I can tell you that that is not the first pronunciation that came to mind when I first saw that word. And here's one I learned very early on, because it's a famous market in London and it's in people's mouths a lot: Borough market. Not "borou", no, but Borough. Borough market. So when I learned that one and then I saw "borough" affixed to the names of other places, I thought "Oh, OK, I know how to say that!" Only, I was wrong. Check these ones out: Loughborough and Peterborough. There are many more like these but I'm just giving you a couple of examples. Loughborough Junction is a neighbourhood in south London and Peterborough is a town in eastern England. Now, this one - people who move to London get up to speed on this one pretty quickly, because it's the name of an extremely well known touristic spot in central London, Leicester Square. I've heard it mispronounced in all kinds of ways: leicéster, laicester. Hey, I even did it myself years ago. Nope, it's Leicester. Leicester is a city in the English Midlands, which is the central part of England. It's a major city in the county of Leicestershire. Yep, Leicestershire. And Worcestershire.. I had to throw that one in. Now, here's the name of a place many Brazilians are reasonably familiar with: Windsor, where the Windsor castle is. Not "windssor", but Windsor. We have a similar "z" sound in Swansea, a coastal town in Wales. Now look what happens to "mouth" when it's attached to the end of a name: Portsmouth. We also have Plymouth. Both are port cities in the south of England, which means they're by the sea. I'll finish today's episode with one of the best examples of non-intuitive pronunciation: Newquay. Make sure you check the spelling of all these places by reading the transcript, but especially this one: Newquay. That's another coastal town in the south of England. So I want to know: which one surprised you the most? I think for me, it was Newquay. Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Vocabulary get up to speed on (something) = se atualizar, ficar sabendo sobre (alguma coisa)
4/18/20174 minutes, 18 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ele tá me esnobando

How are you? Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms para usar quando alguém está dando aquela ignorada em outra pessoa. Observação: repare em como eu pronuncio o nome Anthony no podcast. Apesar de ele ter o TH, frequentemente é pronunciado no Reino Unido como faço aqui: com o som regular de T (como em Tony) e não TH (como em Kathy). Transcrição How are you? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So let's say you arrive at your friend Anthony's birthday party and you see some friends and you say hi to them, obviously, and then you see a few people you know - not very well, they're not close friends; they're acquaintances but you greet them as well, of course... So you decide to approach this little circle of people you know - it's two of your good friends, plus Sally who you've seen before and even exchanged a few words with but.. whom you don't know really well. She seems nice anyway, so, no worries there. So you go ahead and say hi to your friends, and Sally, ask them what they've been up to and stuff, and after a minute or so you notice that Sally is a bit frosty towards you. She didn't really say hi back when you greeted her and she's avoiding eye contact. She's being a bit frosty. Have you ever experienced that? And I'm not talking about shyness.. obviously some people aren't naturally warm because they may be shy or very reserved. Sometimes you just know that that's not the case, though. You've talked to this person before and you know they're nice, and they've been warm towards you, and you can't remember doing anything that might have upset them so you're now a bit puzzled by their treatment. You can tell that this person is being frosty. And then, let's say you're at the same party and you bump into two of your older friends, John and Alice. John greets you warmly; Alice, not so much. She says hi and quickly excuses herself without another word. Throughout the night, she always seems to be deep in conversation with someone else every time you approach her. You can tell Alice is giving you the cold shoulder. She's kind of snubbing you slightly; she's acting indifferent towards you. She's giving you the cold shoulder. You don't feel particularly popular at Anthony's birthday party tonight, obviously... First it's Sally acting a bit frosty, and now it's Alice giving you the cold shoulder. In Alice's case, though, you have a pretty good idea of why she's behaving like that. Alice is your ex-girlfriend, and you guys broke up over a year ago, and you thought she was fine. All this time you've gotten along great and you definitely thought she was over you. So, what happened? Well, you started dating again a couple of weeks ago. You're going out with a different girl now, and you know how it is within a group of friends... News travels fast. Alice must have caught wind of it and now she's avoiding you. I think everyone listening to this podcast can relate. Can you remember a time when someone acted a bit frosty towards you and gave you the could shoulder for a while? Why did they do that? Did the two of you end up getting back on good terms? Let me know in the comments about what happened and talk to you next time! Key expressions frosty cold shoulder Vocabulary you're puzzled = você está confuso/a she was over you = ela tinha te esquecido (romanticamente) catch wind of (something) = ficar sabendo de (alguma coisa) get back on good terms with someone = ficar de bem, fazer as pazes ou voltar a falar com alguém
4/11/20173 minutes, 35 seconds
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Podcast: Do you cook a lot?

Hi, everybody. Hoje eu falo sobre comida e talvez você ouça alguns ingredientes cuja tradução para o português você não conhece exatamente (ou talvez não!) Veja o vocabulário no fim do post para ter ajuda. Transcrição Hi, everybody. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So, how are you doing today? It's a sunny morning out here where I am, and I feel like talking about something that's a bit unusual for me. Maybe not for most other people but a bit unusual for me, which is food, and cooking a little bit. See, I don't usually cook much and the people I've met here in London are always a bit surprised when I tell them I don't cook much. And the reason I don't cook much isn't necessarily that I don't like cooking; it's just that I end up doing other things with my time and cooking doesn't make it as a priority. That is absolutely helped by two things: the fact that fortunately I'm able to find pre-packaged food in supermarkets that is of good quality and tastes nice, and the fact that I usually eat very simple things. For example, for the longest time I had a version of fish and chips for dinner. I say "a version" because the true fish and chips, the one you get at a pub, is a much bigger and heavier portion of food than the one I get at the supermarket. The one from the supermarket is a much smaller chunk of fish, coated in breadcrumbs, with potato wedges. Sort of like what we call "peixe à milanesa com batata frita", but potato wedges are chunkier than French fries. Click on the link I've included here to see what potato wedges look like. So that was all I had for dinner for the longest time, with a bit of lime juice and salt, and I loved it. Other times I cook a little bit: I make rice with sultanas and steamed broccoli with garlic, and this is one of my favourite things ever to eat. I think I could eat that most nights and be happy. By the way, sultanas are "white" raisins, although they're not really white... They're just a bit less dark then regular raisins I suppose. I also make salad regularly - green leaves, tomato and store-bought dressing, but that doesn't really count as cooking, does it? So lately I've gone back to eating avocado in the form of guacamole. Again, very simple food and simple to make. So a few weeks ago, for the first time in a long time, I smashed one half of a ripe avocado, added in a bit of chopped tomatoes and onion, a little salt, a squeeze of lime and... that was it. That's what I remembered of the recipe and let me tell you, it was quite bland. Pretty blah. Obviously, that was not how I remembered good guacamole to taste like. I searched online and found a recipe titled "The best guacamole ever". Perfect - that's exactly what I wanted. So obviously the ingredients I was already using were there - avocado, onion, tomato, lime juice and salt; but here's my mistake: I was completely overlooking all the different kinds of pepper that go into a guacamole... and garlic. So I got that sorted immediately - went to the shop and got some red chili, cayenne and black pepper. I didn't have any of those 'cause I rarely ever put pepper on my food. So the next time I made the guacamole I added in all that pepper, and also added some minced garlic. It turned out great - full of flavour and picante! I suggest you give it a try if you've never had guacamole before. It's basically avocado, tomatoes, onion, lime juice, garlic and a bunch of peppers. Very yummy... and healthy to boot. That's it for today - tell me what you've been cooking in the kitchen.. Rice, beans, chicken, vegetables? I want to know. Tell us in the comments, and talk to you next time! Vocabulary chunk = pedaço chunkier = mais grossa (espessura) breadcrumbs = migalhas de pão, usadas também para fazer 'milanesa' steamed = no vapor bland = sem gosto, sem graça blah = mais ou menos, sem graça, não muito bom (informal)
3/31/20174 minutes, 16 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: a intenção dele foi boa

 What's up, everyone? Hoje eu falo sobre as intenções de alguém em inglês. Como dizer a intenção dele foi boa, ou de boas intenções o inferno está cheio? Confira também duas expressões para dizer "falar bem de alguém" neste episódio. Transcrição What's up, everyone? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So you know when someone behaves in a way that ends up doing more harm than good, but you just know they had the best intentions when doing so? They were just trying to help; they really meant well. You know this person is well-meaning. When someone is well-meaning, that means they... mean well. However, you were there when they did what they did or said what they said and you know that the end result wasn't that great. Rather than being mad at them, though, you're just lamenting the sad outcome. You know that their heart was in the right place. So that's our first idiom of today: their heart was in the right place when they did that or said whatever. It may not have helped, it may even have made matters a bit worse, but... in the end, their heart is in the right place. You may just need to have a quick word with them to maybe make them aware of the effect of their actions. For example: Steve offered to put in a good word for you with his boss, knowing that you're coveting a new position in his department. He goes ahead and does just that: he tells his boss you're great to work with, and very competent too. However, he goes and says that you've been doing an awesome job in project XYZ, which is a top secret project that you're not supposed to be talking about to other people. So now Steve has basically made clear to his boss that you can't keep your mouth shut. Great. That kinda ruins the whole point of talking you up to the boss. You were sure Steve knew that project XYZ was confidential. Maybe he didn't. Anyway, you have known Steve for years now and you know he's a good guy. You know he would never do anything to harm your chances at getting that job. You just know that his heart is in the right place. He screwed up a little, but his heart is in the right place. ...Which leads me to the second one of today's episode - I guess we can call this one a proverb: the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Obviously, people often mean well but end up doing bad things or even wreaking havoc sometimes. We say something very similar in Brazil, don't we? However I could never work out whether that saying applies to someone who really meant well; someone whose heart is in the right place but ends up making things worse. Now that I'm thinking about it, I think that's exactly the case and that is how this saying came about: good intentions that end up causing trouble. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. And, as we do in Brazil, you can say that proverb in order to imply that someone knew full well what they were doing when they were "trying to help", so to speak. Basically you're accusing them of not being honest: "So Jane, now I know why you offered to bring me lunch. You were trying to give me food poisoning! This sandwich is the worst thing I've ever had." And you finish your rant by telling your colleagues "The road to hell is paved with good intentions. Beware of Jane and her lunch runs." So I guess we can all think of great examples of people who meant well but ended up making things worse. Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions someone's heart is in the right place the road to hell is paved with good intentions Vocabulary put in a good word for you with = falar bem de você para coveting = querendo, desejando talk someone up = falar bem de alguém mean well = ter/tem boas intenções wreak havoc = arruinar, causar muito problema work out = figure out lunch run = a ida até algum lugar de comida pra comprar o almoço pro grupo/pessoal do escritório
3/14/20174 minutes, 1 second
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Como falo em inglês: Carteiro tentou entregar e eu não estava em casa

What's up, everyone? Hoje eu falo sobre uma tentativa dos correios daqui de me entregar uma compra que fiz online outro dia. Eu não estava em casa, e então eu comento quais são as opções para pegar o pacote. Veja e ouça o vocabulário e collocations específicos para essa situação: Royal Mail, delivery attempt, "Something for you" card, arrange redelivery. Transcrição What's up, everyone? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! So as I'm here with my laptop open on... my lap, thinking about what my next podcast is going to be about, I decide to check the Royal Mail website and see where my new boots are. Let me explain: the Royal Mail in the United Kingdom is equivalent to our Correios, or the Post Office in the US. A few days ago I ordered a pair of boots off the Internet, and a postal worker should be delivering them any day now to my place. So I've literally just gone to the Royal Mail website right now and typed in the tracking number the shoe shop provided me... and there it is: a Royal Mail worker tried to find me fifty minutes ago at my place, and I wasn't there. I'm here, at a coffee shop. It's ten past one in the afternoon now, and for the last several weeks I have always been home at this time.. but today I decided to leave earlier than usual and grab a cup of coffee while writing the podcast. Obviously, that was enough to set Murphy's Law into motion and bam! That's when the delivery person showed up. Bummer. So this is what happens now: the delivery person has hopefully left me a "Something For You" card - that's a small card that lets me know a delivery was recently attempted. After twenty four hours - which in this case is tomorrow around 1PM - I could go to the nearest post office carrying the card and some ID, and pick up my boots. There's another option, though: instead of going myself to the post office, I can arrange a redelivery by either calling up Royal Mail or clicking on a button on their website. You can see what I'm talking about if you look at the screenshot I've included in this post. Rearranging delivery is a nifty little feature of Royal Mail that I have used before - this isn't the first time I've missed a delivery - and I'm probably going to use it again now. So I'm going to click that button and enter some details from the "Something For You" card, and then choose a date for redelivery. Only, this time I'll make sure I'm home 'cause I don't want to miss it again! So what happens in Brazil right now if you miss a delivery? I remember the postal worker used to make three attempts at delivery before returning the package to their warehouses. Do they still do that? And what happens if you miss delivery all those times? Should you go to a Correios office with the Brazilian version of the "Something For You" card and your RG to pick up your package? I don't think I ever had to do that when I lived in Brazil - let me know if you've done it... and talk to you next time. Key expressions Royal Mail delivery attempt "Something For You" card arrange redelivery Vocabulary on my lap = no meu colo bummer = gíria (mais comum nos EUA) de insatisfação, como "que chatice" nifty = particularly nice, good P.S. A expressão no título deste post pode ser dita simplesmente assim - "I missed a delivery [because I wasn't home obviously]"
3/3/20173 minutes, 4 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Pegou pesado demais com o coitado

How's it going? Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms comuníssimos no inglês quando queremos dizer que uma pessoa pegou pesado demais com alguém que já estava mal. Transcrição How's it going? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy! Today I'm going to talk about a type of situation that is particularly unpleasant... It's not nice to take part in it and it's not nice to watch it unfold either. Interestingly, there are several English idioms that can be applied in this context, so let's start with kick someone when they're down. Just imagine your work colleague John made a big mistake yesterday and, because of his mistake, the company has now lost a significant amount of money. John got reprimanded by his manager and his job is hanging by a thread. Your desk is right next to John's desk, so you're there to watch as Margot, a marketing assistant, walks up to John and gives him a scolding for losing the business deal. So, at this point, John feels awful for losing the deal, obviously, and he's already been told off by this boss. You could say he's in a pretty low place right now. So on top of that, Margot comes up to him and tells him off again. She's basically kicking John when he's already down. You feel compelled to pull Margot aside and have a word with her. You say "Margot, c'mon... John's obviously aware he screwed up. There's no need to kick him when he's down." There's no need to kick someone when they're down. They're already down, they're aware of how they acted, they know they have screwed up. It's a nice piece of advice: don't kick someone when they're down. So that leads me to the second idiom of today and it's closely related to "kick someone when they're down". Why? Well, when Margot scolded John she specifically mentioned that John should not have tried to conduct the negotiation in Spanish, as his Spanish is not that great... She's basically saying it was a stupid decision. When you heard Margot say that, you thought "This is a bit much - it's a bit much to comment on the details of how John screwed this up." So in addition to telling Margot she shouldn't kick John when he's down, you say "C'mon Margot, leave John alone. Now is not the time to point out that his poor Spanish skills were the reason he failed. That's kind of a cheap shot. He feels bad enough already... Let's just leave it." A cheap shot is, let's say, an attack directed at someone who can't defend themselves. It could be a mean remark - it could even be a mean comment disguised as concern. Imagine that someone's feeling particularly vulnerable after making a mistake or being told off, just like John is. Someone then goes over and makes them feel worse by bringing up something negative about that person's life that catches them off guard. This person feels weak right now,  so they can't even properly defend themselves. You know what I mean? So that would have been a cheap shot. If you regularly watch American TV shows and movies, you will have certainly come across someone saying "That was a cheap shot. That was uncalled for." So I'd like to hear from you: can you remember the last time you witnessed a case of "kicking someone when they're down"? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions kick someone when they're down cheap shot Vocabulary is hanging by a thread = está por um fio gives him a scolding = dá uma dura nele he's been told off = já levou uma dura (to tell someone off = dar uma dura em alguém) a pretty low place = bem por baixo (pretty aqui é intensificador) let's just leave it = vamos parar de falar / dar atenção a isso uncalled for = desnecessário (não precisava ter ido tão longe com a crítica / ataque) Veja mais: Como digo em inglês: Pega leve com ele
2/17/20173 minutes, 41 seconds
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Podcast: idioms com TOGETHER

Hello, everyone. Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns com a palavra together. Enjoy! Transcrição Hello, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm going to talk about a few idioms with the word together. They're very common and you'll hear them all the time in daily conversation, so listen on. Here's one of them: put our heads together, or put their heads together, or your heads. Let's say you were asked by your boss to find some kind of solution to a problem, and, after thinking about it for a while you realise that Joe, the head of the sales team, has some information that would likely be useful in solving this problem. So you go ahead and give Joe a ring, and you say "Hi Joe, my boss has asked me to find a solution to problem XYZ. I know you've been affected by it as well and you've got some experience on the topic, so I thought we'd get to the solution much faster if we put our heads together and try and figure this thing out." "Let's put our heads together" means let's get together and talk about this thing. Let's discuss it, let's hear each other's ideas and brainstorm together. This way, we will figure things out much faster. You'll hear this idiom a lot in offices where people are used to getting together and discussing problems, or in companies where teamwork is encouraged. Let's put our heads together and find a solution to this problem. Or, Karen and Steve weren't able to find a solution individually, but I'm sure if they put their heads together they'll get there. Here's a related proverb: two heads are better then one. Same idea underlying "let's put our heads together" - one head may not be able to come up with a plan to fix this issue, but with two heads we've got a better chance. Do we have our own idioms to say this kind of thing in Brazil? If you know, please leave a comment - I want to know. And here's the other "together" idiom of today: get your act together. If someone at work, for example, tells you to get your act together, they're, well... saying you should probably change your behaviour a little bit. You should become more organised and generally function a bit better. They probably think that your desk is a bit of a mess, or maybe you've been turning in your reports a bit late, or the last couple of times you participated in company meetings you were slightly unprepared and your performance left much to be desired. So that person - let's say it's your boss - tells you "You need to get your act together and start making your desk presentable. I also expect you to turn in your reports on time, and come to meetings better prepared. Get organised and be efficient about your work. Get your act together!" This idiom can be used in personal situations as well - let's say Tim's girlfriend broke up with him six months ago and Tim is still so depressed about it that he hasn't cleaned his place in months! There's dust and dirt everywhere and also, a strange smell coming from the kitchen. You are a good friend of Tim's and therefore it's your job to finally tell him "Tim, enough is enough, my friend. I know you're in pain but you have to get on with your life. Look around you! There's filth everywhere. You have got to get your act together starting now, clean up this mess and move on." What are your examples? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key idioms put (people's) heads together get (someone's) act together Vocabulary enough is enough = já chega, já deu filth = sujeira, imundície
2/4/20173 minutes, 59 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ele se comportou como criança mimada

Hi, all. Hoje eu falo sobre idioms muito comuns aqui no Reino Unido, e que ouvi recentemente por causa do que aconteceu numa saída em grupo. Não perca! Transcrição Hi, all. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm telling you what happened at a recent group outing. Thank you for listening and for telling everyone you know,  and enjoy the podcast! So you know when you get together with a friend and you catch each other up on what you've been up to... That's what my friend Yasmin and I did about a week ago. So Yasmin was telling me that back in November her friend Sofia organised an outing on a Friday night. And here's the first piece of vocabulary I'd like to highlight for our episode today: organise an event, organise an outing and so on. That's what a British person will say when he or she is the one planning the event. I'll give you an example: a few weeks ago I organised dinner for a few friends of mine. I texted everyone with potential dates, heard back from them and settled on the final date. Then I called the pizza place, made a reservation and texted everyone back with the details. So I organised dinner for us, and later that evening my friends said "Thank you for organising". This is more of a British way of saying it - I guess in the US you'd say something like "plan dinner" rather than organise. So anyway, Yasmin's friend Sofia organised an outing for herself, her boyfriend John, Sofia and two other people. So that was a total of 5 people. They went to a new pub in the neighbourhood, and once there they found a table and grabbed some drinks. Sofia, however, was disappointed that there was no dance floor. She really wanted to dance that night, and she was expecting to find a good dance floor and some nice music. My friend Yasmin told me that the rest of the group was actually pleased with the pub, Yasmin included. Sofia wouldn't let it go, though. She insisted on moving the party to a different pub with a dance floor, but by then it was already 10pm and no one really felt like leaving. Well, Sofia decided to go anyway - so she left and John, her boyfriend, went with her. About a half hour later Sofia texted Yasmin, asking her to come to the other pub. Yasmin texted back saying she didn't really feel like going as she was having a good time with the two other girls. Sofia insisted, saying that John was - listen to this - in a strop, and if Yasmin came over his mood might improve. To be in a strop means to be moody, to be in a bad mood. It's British slang - never heard that in the US. So basically Sofia wanted Yasmin to get to the second pub 'cause she thought John's mood would improve - that's because Yasmin and John have been friends for years. John was in a strop... And here's another idiom my friend used to describe the situation - she said "Sofia told me John was throwing his toys out of the pram". What does "pram" mean? A pram is a stroller - a four-wheeled sort of chair where you put a baby - and then you push it, of course! So the baby will often have toys in the pram, right? And when the baby has a strop and wants to throw a little tantrum, he or she will start throwing their toys out of the pram. So when Yasmin told me that John was throwing his toys out of the pram, what she meant was, John was being immature and behaving like a child - maybe throwing a little temper tantrum. I think we can all think of examples when someone we know behaved like an immature child and threw their toys out of the pram. Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions organise (an event, an outing) be in a strop throw toys out of the pram Vocabulary a group outing = uma saída em grupo catch someone up (on something) = atualizar alguém (sobre algo); contar as novidades a alguém (sobre algo)
1/13/20173 minutes, 56 seconds
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Podcast: Getting a refund at the store

Hey, you guys. Hoje eu conto a confusão que aconteceu numa loja aqui na hora de buscar os pedidos que fiz pela Internet. Enjoy... Transcrição Hey, you guys. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'll tell you about a mix-up at the store where I was supposed to collect my online orders. So this is obviously our last episode of 2016 (two thousand sixteen) and I wanted you to hear about something that happened to me in the past couple of weeks. It's nothing really out of the ordinary - not that it should happen all the time, hopefully it won't. But it can happen to anyone, though, and it's a bit of a departure from our usual content about shopping, which is usually, you know "How much is it?", "Here's your change" and so on. Here's what happened: there's a store chain here in the UK called Wilko. I guess in Brazil the closest thing to Wilko would be Lojas Americanas. So, it was the second week of December and I realised I needed some cleaning wipes for my cell phone. Simple as that, my cell phone was getting dirty and I needed to clean it, so I went to Wilko and looked for wipes. No luck: they were out of cleaning wipes. That same day I went online and ordered the wipes to be delivered at my local store. Total of the order: £1.50. The next day I decided to buy a nice box of chocolates I'd seen at Wilko a few weeks before. However, I already knew my local Wilko store was out of that because I checked last time I was there. So I went online again and placed a second order for the box of chocolates. That one cost me £8. Every online store in the UK accepts PayPal as a payment method, right? So I paid for both orders using my PayPal account. It's just easier than typing my card info every time. So right away my bank statement showed two charges by PayPal: one for £1.50 (one pound, fifty p) and another for £8. So a week or so went by and I got a call from Wilko saying my stuff had arrived. They didn't really say which order so I just assumed both of them were there. So I headed over to Wilko and then to the Customer Service counter, and gave them my name. The lady behind the counter went to the back of the store and only came back, like, ten minutes later, empty-handed. My stuff wasn't there! Neither the cleaning wipes nor the chocolate box. She asked me to wait a few more minutes so she could search for the products in the store. Then, she came back with the wipes, which were fortunately in stock now, but they were still out of the chocolates. So she just apologised for how long it was taking, and then I told her that I had actually changed my mind. Instead of waiting for the chocolate to arrive, I would cancel the order and take a refund. So right then and there, she asked me for my card and proceeded to credit my account with £8. It should all have been done and finished right then - but it wasn't. So just last week I got another call from Wilko saying my order had arrived! What? Anyway, I ended up forgetting about it until yesterday, when I looked at my bank statement and saw that Wilko had charged me for £8, again. Some kind of mix-up, for sure. So today I swung by my local Wilko shop again in the hopes I'd be able to sort this all out and get a second refund. This time a guy spoke to me and I explained what happened. He said my refund should have come from PayPal, since it was my chosen method of payment for the order. So he rang some PayPal person and asked them to process my refund. And PayPal has now sent me an email saying the refund is being processed. So I guess that lady was maybe a bit hasty in giving me a refund through the store system rather than having PayPal do it. So there you go everyone, rather than doing a whole episode reminiscing about our year together and talking about the highlights of 2017 - you got my refund story. This is useful stuff - I promise :) so enjoy. Happy holidays and talk to you next year! Vocabulary
12/30/20164 minutes, 25 seconds
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Podcast: Tea and remaining calm!

Hey, everybody. Hoje eu falo sobre um aspecto cultural super relevante dos ingleses! Não perca. Transcrição Hey, everybody. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm talking about a cultural trait of English people. Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! Today I'm going to tell you about something quite interesting - a cultural aspect of English people. So I dedicate this episode to all the listeners who are really curious about different cultures and, as for the rest of you... Keep listening 'cause there's some good English here and you can never listen to too much good English. So check this out: like most of you, I own a smartphone, right? And guess what - we get scam calls here in the United Kingdom as well. I know... Shocker. Scam calls are basically made by dishonest people who would like to steal your money, so they will tell you a lie hoping that you'll either give them money or disclose personal information that they will use to swindle you out of your hard-earned cash. So this week I received a message from my cell phone carrier warning about scam callers. After a brief introduction, they laid out the steps to beating the scammers, and that's where this gets really interesting. I'm going to read them out to you: First, hang up: Think calmly about what you are being told, ask yourself if it makes sense. Don’t give out any personal details. If it feels wrong, hang up. Then, call back: If the caller claimed to be from a company, call the official number (not the number you were called by) and ask whether they’ve called you. If they didn’t, they can help you report it. Good advice, right? I mean, hang up, then try to call the company to find out whether they have really tried to contact you or not... That's sensible advice and it could have been offered by a responsible company from any country, really. But... that wasn't all. I omitted step #2 on purpose, because that's something only the English would say. Yes, there's one more bit of advice between step #1, "Hang up and think calmly", and step #3, "call the official number of the company". Here's step #2: Make tea: Making a cup of tea is the perfect opportunity to get away from the phone, pause and reflect on what to do next. Only then, after you've made tea and calmly reflected, do they recommend that you try and contact the company. I've talked a little bit about tea and British people - if you've read my post you now know I wasn't exaggerating when I said tea is a very important matter in this country and is seriously woven into the fabric of British society. But there's a reason why the company brought up "tea" in their advice - they're telling their clients to reflect and think camly about what to do next. This is a very, very English way to behave. You guys, you have no idea how calm English people generally are at all times. Things that, communicated to the average Brazilian, would make them pull their hair out are met with a pensive look when relayed to an English person - that means they're taking it in and trying to think about it rationally. Being rational, reacting calmly and not letting your emotions overtake you are traits that are highly valued by people out here. That's why only in England would you see a step 2 like the one I got on this email - a step that combines tea and calm reflection in the face of a problem. That's it for today - hope you've enjoyed today's episode. Let me know either way and if you have your own ideas on how to react to scam callers - let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! the original message (excerpt) Vocabulary "I know... Shocker" = expressão sarcástica (como "que surpresa, não?") swindle you out of (money) = trapacear, enganar você e roubar (dinheiro) cell phone carrier = empresa de telefonia celular/móvel sensible = com bom senso
12/17/20164 minutes, 25 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Esclarecer as coisas e ficar numa boa

Hi, everyone. Hoje eu falo sobre três idioms da língua inglesa que eu ouço toda hora vendo TV aqui. Confira! Transcrição Hi, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm going to tell you about three terms, or idioms, that I hear all the time when I watch reality shows on British telly. Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So today I'm going to tell you about three idioms that I hear all the time watching shows with groups of friends... Especially some reality shows that involve, you know, groups of people that know each other, and they spend lots of time together, and... um, they're friends but there's a lot of drama, and people fight and make up... In other words, your run-of-the-mill reality show. So the first one is when someone says "It's not my place to say this or that to so-and-so". Well, first of all, "so-and-so" is a generic term for an unspecified person. It's like when we say "fulano" in Brazil. Back to our expression, it's not my place. Its meaning is probably pretty straightforward, but let me give you an example: imagine you have a group of friends and then, one day, two people in this group have a fight. Since you are particularly close to the two people involved in the disagreement, the other friends in the group ask you if you're going to have a word with them to try and get them to make up. And you say "No, I'm not. It's not my place to say anything. This is between the two of them." I think it's very common to say this when there's a fight between girlfriend and boyfriend, for example. Usually friends of the couple will say "It's not my place to tell Mary that I think Richard did nothing wrong" or "It's not my place to tell her what I heard about her boyfriend." And like I said, I hear this a lot on reality shows but make no mistake - people outside of the television world use this a lot. This is very common in everyday conversation. Our second idiom of today is an interesting one and it is really about people taking sides when there's a disagreement between two people they know. People have rows all the time in reality shows, and their mutual friends will tend to take the side of the person they're closest to. For example: John and Richard had a row, and Mary is taking Richard's side on this one. She says "My loyalty lies with Richard; I've known him the longest." That's usually how it goes on the shows I've watched - if you've been friends with Richard for 5 years and friends with John for only a year, then your loyalty lies with Richard because you've known him longer than you've known John. So sometimes the person who had a row with your friend will approach you and try to get your support, and you'll say "Look, my loyalty lies with so-and-so." What that means is, you're saying you have your friend's back. You're on your friend's side so you're not going to side with this person. And here's our third idiom, which is also related to rows and disagreements. After two people have a disagreement, one of them will approach the other in order to talk and clear the air. Clear the air means make peace, at least superficially, so that they can be civil to each other when they're in the same room. People don't always clear the air in real life after having disagreements, right? But in the reality shows I watch that seems to be part of the cycle every time. This is the cycle: things are said, word spreads, people tell other people what was said about them, people fight, then they bump into each other and clear the air... so that they can have a new row in the future - seriously, that's like 80% of what goes on in these shows. I'm curious about your opinion on the topic. Do you usually clear the air with someone when you've had a disagreement with them, for example? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions
12/6/20164 minutes, 22 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Eles vão morar juntos

Hello, everybody. Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns da língua inglesa com a palavra move. Não perca! Transcrição Hello, everybody. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today we talk about idioms with the word move. Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So let's start today with a simple idiom that we use to tell someone we will soon have a new place of residence. Meaning, the house or apartment we currently live in will no longer be our place of residence. In some time, we will have a new address, and a new place to call home. For example, let's say that next week I am moving house. I'm not, really, but that's the idiom, move house. So I remember when I asked my web developer some time ago to do some work for me and he replied back saying "I'll be able to do this on Monday. Tomorrow I'm moving house." As for me, since I came to London I've moved house a couple of times. Last time I actually moved into a flat - but that's how the idiom goes: move house. Last time I moved house was June, this year. By the way - while I was looking for examples around the web I found an article entitled "Is it rude to ask a friend to help you move house?" I guess if it's a close friend that would be OK. Would you do that - or rather, who would ask to help you move house? Now, check out our second idiom: move on. If you regularly watch TV shows and films, you have definitely heard this one in phrases like "It's time to move on". "He's moved on". "You have to move on." To move on means, essentially, to keep moving forward and it's usually said in a figurative sense, rather than literally. It's an expression that will likely come up when someone has just come out of a relationship. Example: John and his girlfriend ended things last month, and his friends have told him he's got to move on. What does that mean? That means his friends think John should be going out, meeting new people, maybe start going out with someone new. That's "moving on". You can also say move on when you're having a conversation and you're done with a certain topic or when you're at a meeting and - same thing, you're all done discussing something and it's time to move on to the next topic. Our third idiom of today is move in with someone. You've heard this one a lot if you watch American shows frequently. When you move in with someone you're going to share a house or an apartment with them. You'll probably share expenses as well, as well as every room in the house other than your bedroom - well, sometimes you share a bedroom. It's very common to hear people say "I'm moving in with my boyfriend" or "My girfriend and I are moving in together". So, obviously, we're talking about couples here who, at first, live in separate residences, and eventually decide to live together. It could be that the girl is moving into the guy's place, or the other way around - the guy is moving into his girlfriend's place. Or maybe they've found a new home and they're both moving out of their current places and moving in to the new place, together. Are you familiar with any of our idioms today? Move house, move on, move in? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions move house move on move in Vocabulary as for me = quanto a mim
11/25/20163 minutes, 54 seconds
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Podcast: a tradição britânica Guy Fawkes Night

Hi, you guys. Hoje a gente tem um episódio especial e com vídeo, além de áudio :-) Foi Guy Fawkes Night aqui na Inglaterra (e em todo o Reino Unido, que também inclui Irlanda do Norte, Escócia e País de Gales), e eu fui na comemoração em um pub aqui em Londres. Aproveitei para gravar um vídeo onde a minha amiga Shereena, que é de Londres, explica um pouco sobre qual a razão de ser e como é feita a comemoração. Só como introdução, você vai ver que Guy Fawkes fez parte de um plano para explodir o Parlamento britânico! Bom, ele foi pego e punido com a pena capital (que hoje não existe mais no UK). Tudo isso aconteceu em 5 de novembro de 1605, e em todo o país até hoje se comemora o fato de que Fawkes não foi bem sucedido em seu plano. É mais ou menos uma "malhação de Judas" não-religiosa e única do Reino Unido: em parques e no interior do país, um boneco (an effigy) representando Guy Fawkes é queimado numa fogueira, enquanto que em vários pubs e outros locais menores há queima de fogos (a fireworks display). Foi esse último que eu fui assistir em um pub no sul de Londres. Abaixo, você encontra a) o áudio da minha conversa com a Shereena, b) o vídeo da conversa, e c) a transcrição. Assista o vídeo: Transcrição (Ana) Hi, you guys. This is for a new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Tonight I'm here at a pub.. We're celebrating Guy Fawkes Night, which happens to be a very traditional celebration, or a very traditional day in the UK and I thought it would be nice to let you guys know what this is all about. So I'm here with my friend Shereena, who happens to be a Londoner and she can tell us everything about Guy Fawkes Night. So, I'm gonna ask her right now... This is Shereena! Hi, Shereena... (Shereena) Hi... (Ana) So tell us - what is Guy Fawkes Night all about? (Shereena) So, I don't know what year it was but, in Britain... I think Britain is the only place where we celebrate Guy Fawkes. And Guy Fawkes tried to blow up Parliament... I don't think it was just him, I think he's just the guy that got the bad name. So, there was like, a dozen people. And, um... So, yeah, even though he tried to blow up Parliament, for some reason we celebrate it every year! And... Because there's a gunpowder connection, we, we use fireworks and, yeah... It's an excuse to have a party, really. (Ana) Alright. So... So is this, is this a traditional way to celebrate Guy Fawkes, like, you come to a pub... We watched the fireworks, by the way. There's like, fireworks everywhere. Is it all across the UK?... for the fireworks display. (Shereena) Yeah. Yeah, so it'll be all across the UK. Traditionally it's gonna be at a park and they'll have a big bonfire, and they'll put an effigy of Guy Fawkes at the top and so obviously... kill him off for doing a bad thing. So that's kind of the tradition. I think the fireworks are... just the gunpowder connection. Yeah. (Ana) But they don't do that in London anymore, do they? [estou perguntando se eles não fazem mais a comemoração com a fogueira em Londres] (Shereena) They do, in the parks. Yeah, they do. It starts off with a bonfire countdown. A countdown just, like... the bonfire, and that's the kind of, main kind of thing. (Ana) Alright. (Shereena) But the fireworks are just the gunpowder connection. (Ana) OK. So thank you, Shereena. (Shereena) Thank you, Ana. (Ana) And... you can either do that, or you can do what we did. Come to a pub, you know, pay five quid and watch the fireworks display. OK, so that's it for today. I hope you guys enjoyed it and see you next time :-) Vocabulário which happens to be / who happens to be = que é; que por acaso é a dozen people = uma dúzia de pessoas gunpowder = pólvora five quid = cinco libras (contos, pilas, mangos - é gíria pra libra, e não tem S no plural)
11/8/20162 minutes, 9 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Agora é com você

Hi, all. Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns do inglês com a palavra ball. Não perca! Transcrição Hi, all. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today we look into idioms with the word ball. Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So let's get started today with an idiom that you will hear all the time. Seriously, I'm not even exaggerating. Both of our idioms today are actually quite common in the English language and if you're in the habit of watching American or even British TV shows, you've probably heard them many times already. Just this week I was watching an English reality show and heard our first idiom: the ball is in your court. That means, it's up to you now. It's your decision or it is up to you to take the next step. So let's say I invite my friend Mary to go on a trip to Buenos Aires with me. I tell her that I can book the accommodation and prepare our itinerary. All she has to do is let me know whether she wants to come along! So now the ball is in her court. It's her decision, it's up to her, and once she's made up her mind she will let me know whether she's coming or not. The ball is in her court. Here's one more example: Robert and Dana were boyfriend and girlfriend. They had been in a relationship for two years. One day, they had a fight because... Robert did something that Dana didn't like. As a result, they broke up. However, Robert later apologised to Dana and explained why he did what he did. She understood, but still wasn't sure if she wanted to get back together with him. Robert said "Well, you know how I feel. The ball is in your court now." That means, it's up to Dana. It's her decision. The ball's in her court. Now on to our second expression of today... Imagine that you have a favourite band that you love. You've got all their albums, you've been to their concerts... You're a huge fan. One day their new CD comes out and when you listen to their new songs you can't help but feel hugely disappointed. You hardly know what to think! The songs are just... awful! Is this really the band you know and love? More like the band you thought you knew... So your brother wants to know if you like the new CD and you tell him the truth: your favourite band really dropped the ball this time. They dropped the ball. They failed. They made a mistake - or a series of mistakes. They did not keep up the good work, that's for sure. Maybe they're suffering from depression. Maybe they're having a bad year. Maybe they're fighting amongst themselves and it's affecting their creativity. You don't know what the reason is... But you know this time they dropped the ball. Imagine you're working with a team at your company and you're preparing a sales proposal for a big client. Gary is the salesperson who is going to meet with the client and present the proposal. On the day of the meeting... Gary sleeps through his alarm and misses the appointment. That's right... When Gary finally gets out of bed, it's too late. Gary screwed up. He completely dropped the ball on this one. Your company would have closed the deal if Gary had not dropped the ball on the day of the meeting. Now, what is your example? What's your story about someone dropping the ball? Was it you who dropped the ball? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions the ball is in your court drop the ball
11/1/20163 minutes, 59 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ai, que dor!

Hello, everybody. Hoje eu falo sobre palavrinhas em inglês chamadas interjections - super comuns e bacanas. Não deixe de conferir! Transcrição Hello, everybody. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm talking about interjections. Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So, you know those little words or phrases that we use... generally at the beginning of a sentence, to express some kind of emotion? Like Wow, what a nice house! Or Ugh... That sucks. So wow and ugh are what we call interjections. We have them in Portuguese as well, obviously, and in every language, probably. Let's go through a few today. If someone throws something at you all of a sudden and it hurts, you'll say Ouch! You can also say the shorter version Ow! That's quite common. Not "Ai!" though... That's what we say in Brazil and it doesn't work in English. Here's one I say all the time - very respectfully: Jesus! That, to me, expresses surprise or astonishment. There's also a shorter, more popular version of that - Jeez! Another one of my favourites is Whoa. I say that a lot, when I'm totally caught by surprise by something or someone. For example, "Whoa. You don't like chocolate! Are you serious?" And here's one we say to agree with what somebody else just said: Amen! Your friend says "I'm so relieved the company's given us Monday off to watch the Big Brother final" and you say "Amen to that". Or, your brother says "Thank goodness we didn't go to the beach today. The weather was awful" and you agree: Amen! And how about this one - aww... That's when you think something or someone is cute, adorable, sweet and so on. That's a very frequent one, and... mostly used by the ladies. If you're used to watching American TV shows and films, no doubt you've heard that one a lot. Let's say your friend shows you a picture of her new puppy dog, who's obviously super cute. You go "Aww..." That's pretty much it. And here's one that expresses fear, or a bit of surprise, but with a negative connotation: Yikes! Let's say your coworker Danny is telling you how, on the way back from his holiday, he got a flat tire and he and his family had to spend the night in a hotel room with cockroaches crawling all over the floor. Yikes!... That is a very suitable reaction to this story. Yikes... There are so many others that we hear all the time. Goodness! Oh my gosh. Bingo!... when someone gets something right or is spot on. Alright! Anyways... All these little words - can you remember a few? Let me know your examples in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions Interjections Vocabulary is spot on = está precisamente correto (no que disse)
10/25/20163 minutes, 29 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Não fure a fila

Hi, all. Hoje eu falo sobre vocabulário relacionado a algo muito importante na Inglaterra: fila. Transcrição Hi, all. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm talking about the importance of queueing in the United Kingdom, where I live. Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So... anyone who comes to England for the first time will notice a lot of queueing around them. A queue is the same as a line. We say line in the US, and queue in the UK. Queue, by the way, is how you pronounce the letter... Q. English people are very organised when it comes to queueing. If there are lots of people waiting to get served and they're supposed to stand in a queue, then they will patiently stand in a queue - it'll be a long queue but it doesn't matter. You will not see the English elbowing one another in a disorganised mass of people trying to get the attention of the person behind the counter. Well, unless you're in a pub, that is. Other than that, though, I can tell you that the system works and everyone here is used to it and they expect newcomers to know their place - that is, at the back of the queue. A couple of times, someone has cut in front of me while I was queueing. Yes, I just conjugated a verb - that's how important queues are out here. I was queueing and someone cut in front of me. Now, both times, it was someone from some other country where queueing isn't that... important, let's put it that way. English people wouldn't be caught dead jumping the queue. I have to say I quite like orderly queues. I think they make our lives easier!  Who's with me? If you jump the queue, or - another way of saying that is, 'cut in line' - so if you jump the queue here in the UK, someone might call you on it. I've seen it happen more than once - people will say "Um, excuse me, there's the back of the queue over there." It has actually sort of happened to me. One day I went to this street market and spotted a stall selling bread. I was really in the mood for bread so I immediately headed over to the stall and I just went ahead and told the person there which bread I wanted. So the guy very politely explained to me that there was a queue of people waiting to be served and they might get a bit angry if I got served first. I turned my head and saw a line of about five or six people, all silent. Oh, oh... I didn't really notice there was a queue. I was kind of embarrassed so I apologised and told the guy I would come back later. So that was my story. Has anything similar happened to you? What do you do when someone cuts in front of you?  Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions jump the queue cut in line the back of the queue queueing Vocabulary wouldn't be caught dead jumping the queue = não furariam fila nem mortos Who's with me? = Quem concorda comigo? call you on it = chamar sua atenção por ter feito isso
10/19/20163 minutes, 7 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ele tem pavio curto

Hey, everyone! Hoje eu falo sobre alguns idioms em inglês com a palavra temper, incluindo uma expressão para "pavio curto". Transcrição Hey, everyone. You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today we look into idioms with the word temper. Mark Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So let's get started today with the term short temper. If someone's got a short temper, that means they have a tendency to become angry very easily and very quickly. Most people know someone like that, right? Let's say Mark is someone who has a short temper. By the way, we can say short fuse as well. Same thing. So Mark has a short fuse and can be easily provoked into having fights and arguments with people. He frequently gets into trouble for not being able to control his temper. His friends have advised him to learn to hold his temper in order to avoid getting in trouble. But here's a... like, here's a valid question: how can people with a short fuse hold their temper, though? Do you know anyone who used to have a short fuse in the past and has now learned how to hold their temper? Like, they have actually changed their behaviour and are now able to keep their cool in situations where before they would definitely have lost their temper. Do you know anyone like that? It's certainly possible to change - some people do anger management treatments, others seek a hypnotherapist to get their temper under control. Let's go back to Mark, the guy who frequently loses his temper. Mark has a short temper, or a short fuse. One day he was having lunch in the company cafeteria and his colleague accidentally spilled some tomato sauce on his shirt. Mark was fuming! He totally lost his temper over the spilt sauce on his shirt. He screamed at his colleague, punched the table and said his shirt had been ruined. He made a big scene while his colleague tried to apologise. And that wasn't the first time Mark had lost his temper. One day he was in a meeting where he and his peers were discussing their strategy for the coming semester. Someone disagreed with Mark and, unfortunately, again, his short fuse got the better of him. Mark wasn't able to hold his temper and he and his colleague got into a heated argument that lasted almost twenty minutes! So I guess you can get the meaning of "hold his temper", right? When somebody can hold their temper, that means they can keep calm, they can keep their cool even in face of disagreement or any unwanted situation, really. What really made Mark lose his temper was the fact that the other guy criticized a decision Mark had made about a month before. His decision did not produce the good results he was expecting, and apparently he's touchy about it... So when his colleague brought that up, Mark just lost it. His short temper definitely got the better of him and things got very heated. So one day Mark's boss finally had a serious conversation with him about his conduct and gave him an ultimatum. He said "Mark, we expect you to get a hold of yourself and Tina from Human Resources will advise you on some anger management programs that you're welcome to join. You need to learn to hold your temper and control your short fuse." Tell me - do you know anyone who has a really short fuse? Are you able to hold your temper in most situations? Let us know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions a short temper / a short fuse / a quick temper hold one's temper lose one's temper Vocabulary fuming = morrendo de raiva to make a scene = "dar um show" no sentido de ter uma reação desagradável que chama atenção em público got the better of him = passou a controlar seu comportamento about a month = mais ou menos um mês to lose it = perder a calma completamente, explodir get a hold of yourself = se controlar emocionalmente
10/7/20163 minutes, 50 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Se Deus quiser

Hi, what's up?  Hoje eu falo sobre alguns idioms em inglês com a palavra God. Transcrição Hi, what's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today we're looking into idioms with the word God. Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! "Thank God it's Friday" Photo by bark / Creative Commons I guess one of the most commonly heard expressions with God is Thank God! We say basically the same thing in Brazil - thank God is what we say when we're relieved that something happened or didn't happen, and so on. "Thank God you got here on time! No one can get in after the gates have been closed." Reminds me of Vestibular in Brazil every year... "Thank God they have my size in blue." Thank God we were able to find a place to eat. Thank God it didn't rain last weekend. Thank God we have the Internet. Thank God it's still sunny outside... and so on and so forth. Oh, this one: TGIF - thank God it's Friday. Most of you listening to this episode are probably pretty familiar with Thank God. So please leave an example in the comments - how would you use this idiom today? Now check this out - "My friend is ill and I am going to see her in three weeks, God willing." God willing literally means if God wants it to happen. Of course, nowadays even people who are not religious and do not believe in God use that idiom. It just means something like "hopefully." Here's one I found on Twitter: "God willing, one day I'll write a book about my career." My next vacation I'm going to a beach, God willing. Someone else said "God willing eight months from now I hope to be living in my new house." And how about this one - for God's sake! Also, for God's sakes. This one's considered a bit rude over here - why? Because you say that when you're annoyed and, everyone, I can tell you that people in this country - the UK - are very discreet about showing annoyance. Basically, they don't. You can hardly ever tell when an English person is annoyed or angry. So when someone blurts out "For God's sakes!", you know they're mad. And here's another way to vouch for your sincerity - say honest to God. "Honest to God, I didn't see that car coming and before I knew it, it was too late." What you're doing here is saying that this is really true. Here are a few nice quotes from Twitter: I honest to God don't know what's going on with my hair today. I am truly and honest to God shaken at the Brad and Angelina divorce news. I am not fibbing when I say I get at least four mosquito bites every day. Like honest to God, every day. And one more: Honest to God I almost threw up now from laughing so hard. OK. So these are all expressions that we also use in Brazil, in Portuguese obviously. We say these things every single day so please leave your own examples in the comments, and talk to you next time. Key expressions thank God God willing for God's sakes honest to God Vocabulary blurts out = fala sem pensar fibbing = inventando, contando uma mentira.
9/25/20163 minutes, 25 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Que chique!

How are you doing?  Hoje eu falo sobre as palavras fancy e posh. "Fancy" é comum tanto nos EUA quando no Reino Unido, mas com um significado diferente em cada país. Já "posh" é bem mais comum no Reino Unido. Confira! Transcrição a posh / a fancy restaurant How are you doing? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm talking about two little words that I hear a lot here in the UK - posh and fancy. Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! Today I'm talking about a topic that always seems to attract a lot of interest from English learners: differences between American and British English. My focus is on the words posh and fancy. So let me start out by saying that before I moved to the United Kingdom, I hadn't heard the word "posh" that many times. And why is that? Well, that's because I was used to listening to, almost exclusively, American English - really, like, almost 100% of the time. In fact, I knew of the word "posh" only because I knew that British girlband Spice Girls, and one of the members was nicknamed Posh Spice. In all my years hearing American English I don't think I've heard the word 'posh' once, except to refer to that artist. Now, the United Kingdom is a different story (for those of you who don't know, by the way, the United Kingdom is a country comprised of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). The word posh is used here all the time - for example, if someone has a posh accent, that means they speak the way rich people or upper class people speak. That's what "posh" means, in general: anything related to the upper classes, or anything luxurious, sophisticated - whatever it is, it's about something that upper class people, or at least wealthy people would do, have or be. Now, that's not what people say in the United States. Americans use the word "fancy" instead. If you tell an American that you're going on a five-star cruise to the Greek islands, they might say "Oooh, fancy!". That's pretty much the same as our "Que chique!" in Brazil. So in the US you will often hear people refer to a fancy restaurant, a fancy hotel and a fancy car; whereas in the UK you'll hear people talk about posh people, posh places, posh accents and so on. As I said before, though, you don't hear the word "posh" that often in American English. That's not the case for the word "fancy" in the UK, however. You do hear it a whole lot, but with a different meaning. To fancy, in the United Kingdom, means to like, to have a desire for something... or someone. As soon as I moved to the UK I started hearing things like "Fancy a beer?" or "Let's get something to eat. What do you fancy?" In these questions, fancy is used with the same meaning as "feel like" as in "Do you feel like having a beer?" and "What do you feel like having for dinner?" I still say "feel like" or "want" instead of fancy, but I'll admit I quite like this word - it sounds kinda nice :-) Also, the simplest way to say that you're attracted to someone or that you like them in a romantic way here in the United Kingdom is to say "I fancy him" or "I fancy her". It's rare to hear "I have a crush" but if you say you fancy someone, everyone will know you're romantically interested in that person. So, tell me: who do you fancy at the moment? That's it for today. Let me know if the words posh and fancy are new to you and talk to you next time! Key expressions posh fancy Vocabulary I knew of the word posh = eu tinha conhecimento da palavra posh
9/2/20164 minutes, 4 seconds
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Podcast: Highly unusual

What's up?  Hoje eu falo sobre combinações perfeitas entre advérbios e adjetivos, usadas pelos nativos todos os dias. Confira! Transcrição What's up? You're listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I'm talking about adverbs that go really well with adjectives, also known as adverb-adjective collocations. Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So today I'm talking about adverb-adjective collocations... ugh. Kidding, it's not boring, really, 'cause it's not a grammar lesson. I only mentioned "adverb-adjective" so you have a reference for what the general topic is for this episode. Let's get right into it with the first example: instead of saying someone was aware of something, you can say that person was fully aware of what was going on. Let's say we're talking about a guy named Jack here. So Jack wasn't just aware. Jack was fully aware of, let's say, the sales meeting that happened this morning. It's not like he just heard something about the meeting in passing. No, he had all the details. He got an in invitation to the meeting, and RSVP'ed yes. Jack was fully aware of the sales meeting this morning. Fully aware is used instead of just "aware" when, obviously, you want to emphasise that someone knew full well that something was going to happen and so on. It's a handy expression when people are trying to avoid taking responsibility for something or when they want to pretend they had no idea something was going on. In those cases you say "Nope, you were fully aware this was going on." And that's why "fully aware" is a collocation. That's how people speak. That's the combination of words native speakers use. They don't say, for example, "You are wholly aware" or "entirely aware". Are these wrong? Nope. People will get it, they just don't use them - at least not often. Here's another one: if you think Inglês Online is going anywhere, you are sadly mistaken. That means, you are completely mistaken. You think English is impossible to learn? You're sadly mistaken. It's just that you haven't been trying to learn it the right way. If you think we don't have sunny days in London you're sadly mistaken. We have plenty of sunny days out here. And how about when someone's really shy? We can say he or she is painfully shy. Tony can't speak to a room full of people. He gets very uncomfortable at a party - he's painfully shy. I found this example on Twitter - a girl wrote "I hate how sometimes I am incredibly outgoing then sometimes I am painfully shy". Can you relate? Let me talk about the word 'unusual' now. I like this word. Instead of saying that something is strange, you can just say it's unusual. That means it's something that doesn't happen very often, it's unexpected and so on. You can emphasise that, saying something is highly unusual. You hear this often in movies and TV shows when someone's sort of apologising or trying to explain why something didn't go as planned. They might say "Everything seemed to be under control and then, all of a sudden, the engine exploded. That is highly unusual." You know what else is highly unusual? How hot it is today here in London. The windows are open and I'm sweating, people. So here's the last one to wrap up this episode: a nice way to say that something costs an arm and a leg. Here's my example: sometimes I go to the supermarket to buy food and when I look at the price tag I immediately change my mind. Frozen food can be ridiculously expensive. It's just cheaper to make it yourself. I bet you guys can find several examples of stuff that's ridiculously expensive where you live. Cars, imported products, seafood in some areas and the list goes on. When you say that something is ridiculously expensive, that usually means you have no intention of paying for it. I wanna hear your examples - let me know, and talk to you next time! Key expressions highly unusual
8/25/20164 minutes, 36 seconds
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Podcast: Idioms com GOLD

Hey, everyone.  Hoje eu falo sobre alguns idioms do inglês com a palavra gold. Confira! Transcrição Hey, everyone. This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode's page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free. Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So today we have a few idioms with the word gold. I remember that, a number of years ago, someone referred me to a web developer and said, "He's gold." That's quite a compliment. My friend said that the web developer was gold. That means he thinks the guy is great, has lots of qualities - he is gold. So that one's very easy. Here's another idiom that you'll hear a lot when you watch American movies and TV shows: gold digger. Gold digger. It's usually applied to women, but it could be said of anyone, really, who gets in a relationship with someone wealthy, so that they'll benefit from all that wealth. We see that a lot in movies, don't we? And sometimes in real life as well. A girl starts dating a very rich man that she wouldn't otherwise date. The guy's rich, showers her with presents, takes her to expensive restaurants and boat cruises, gives her a lot of jewellery and so on. A lot of people would call that lady a gold digger because, for them, it's obvious that she would not be with that man if it weren't for his wealth. So that's a gold digger. Let's change the tune a little bit - our next idiom is strike gold. When someone strikes gold, that means something great has happened to that person. Their life has become better in some way. Maybe they hired a new employee for their company and struck gold. Why? Because that new employee turned out to be amazing and your business is doing much better now that you have them on board. You struck gold with this new employee. Or maybe your friend Jennie bought a second hand car last year and everyone knows by now that she struck gold. She stopped having car troubles when she bought that car. It's super efficient, reliable, safe, requires little maintenance, easy to park and manoeuvre... Jennie really struck gold with that car. And let's wrap up the episode with one more "gold" idiom: a heart of gold. We say that in Brazil, don't we? It means the same in English. We all know people who have a heart of gold. They're just good people: generous, caring, giving. Someone with a heart of gold is usually someone who will do good things for others without expecting things in return. They just do stuff out of the goodness of their hearts. When you hear this idiom - heart of gold - is there someone who immediately comes to your mind? Is there someone close to you, or maybe someone you've worked with at the same office, who has a heart of gold? And here's something else I wanna know - when have you struck gold in your life? Maybe you met someone special a while ago - for a romantic relationship, or simply a friendship - and when you think of that person you feel you've struck gold. I certainly feel that way about some people in my life! I wanna hear your stories - let me know, and talk to you next time! Key expressions gold (adjective) gold digger strike gold heart of gold Vocabulary she wouldn't otherwise date = ela não sairia (com o homem) se a situação fosse diferente (se ele não fosse rico) now that you have them on board = agora que você tem ele/ela (them é usado aqui para comunicar ele ou ela) na sua equipe Click the link to buy one iTalki class for your specific learning needs and get another one free
8/13/20163 minutes, 45 seconds
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Podcast: Cool as a cucumber

Hi, everybody.  Hoje eu falo sobre os idioms do inglês cool as a cucumber, free as a bird, hot as fire e mais. Transcrição Hi, everybody. This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode's page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free. Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! Today let's take a look at a number of expressions that use an object or an animal to emphasise a quality. For example, cool as a cucumber. "Cool" here means cool-headed, or someone who can keep their cool even when they're under a bit of pressure, or stress. I like this idiom; I find it funny - I mean, it says that someone is cool as a... cucumber. And of course, I get it, cucumbers feel pretty fresh and cool, but it still sounds funny. So, for example, you might say that, to your surprise, your friend Annie was cool as a cucumber before her job interview. Are you usually cool as a cucumber? And here's one I hear a lot: free as a bird. Are you busy Friday night? Nope, free as a bird. There's a Supertramp song titled 'Free as a bird'; go ahead and take a listen. It's a great song. Anyway, if your English-speaking friend says "I've got two tickets to see Rihanna. What are you doing tonight?" you can say "I'm free as a bird." And here's another one that's pretty straightforward: hot as fire. As you may or may not know, the word hot is used to describe someone who's very attractive, so you'll see and hear hot as fire being used to describe people very often. Or you can say it about the weather: "It's hot as fire outside... thirty three degrees." Or you could use hot as fire for really spicy food, like a mustard sauce that tastes a bit sweet, but is hot as fire. And how about this one - blind as a bat? Well, I did a little bit of research and it turns out that bats are not really blind; like the rest of us they can't see in complete darkness so they have a special trick for finding their way in the dark. That's how the expression goes, though - blind as a bat. One woman tweeted "I just realised that I can no longer sit in the back row of a college lecture hall... I'm blind as a bat." Obviously she's exaggerating - she's not completely blind. Another one said "My grandma used to tell me to eat my carrots because they were good for my eyes but here I am years later, blind as a bat." I got the same piece of advice when I was a kid - you should eat carrots 'cause they're good for your eye sight. Hmm... Not sure that's true. There are many more idioms like these in the English language. Brave as a lion, busy as a bee, sly as a fox. Which one is your favourite?  Are you blind as a bat when you're not wearing your glasses? Are you in a relationship now, or are you free as a bird to go out and date? Are you cool as a cucumber when you're under pressure? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions cool as a cucumber free as a bird hot as fire blind as a bat Vocabulary straightforward = fácil de entender mustard sauce = molho de mostarda sly = ardiloso Click the link to buy one iTalki class for your specific learning needs and get another one free
8/5/20163 minutes, 40 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Vou fazer o que você quer, mas com uma condição

What's up, everyone?  Hoje eu falo sobre como dizer as expressões "passar no farol vermelho" e "com uma condição" em inglês. Transcrição What's up, everyone? This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode's page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free. Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast! So let me present you this week with a couple of idioms that are, as always, very common and... I heard both of them this week, I don't remember where. Probably on some TV show or a podcast. And the reason they stuck with me is, we say the exact same thing in Brazil, but with slightly different words. So if we haven't heard or read these expressions enough and internalised them, guess what... It's our instinct to kind of translate the words we use in Brazil directly into English, which will basically sound a little off. So first up we have an expression related to driving, traffic, cars or motorcycles, or other vehicles. It's a traffic infraction: run a red light. Listen again: someone ran a red light. You know what we're supposed to do as drivers when we come across a red light: we're supposed to stop. So when you run a red light, obviously you could cause an accident. And you could get a traffic ticket. I have run a red light a couple of times in my life, I guess, but I haven't had a car in a while now so if I were to start driving regularly again I would probably be very careful to not run any red lights. Now, are you a driver? Do you drive every day? Be honest with me: when's the last time you ran a red light? Did anyone see it? Did you get caught? Did you get a ticket? Now listen to this: you ask your brother to borrow his car for the afternoon. Your brother says "You can have my car for the afternoon on one condition: return it to me with a full tank of gas." Did you catch the phrase 'on one condition'? Notice that in Brazil we say something like "with one condition"... So, forget that and listen again: You can have my car for the afternoon on one condition: return it to me with a full tank of gas. If you have a daughter, for example, and she asks if she can go to a slumber party at her friend's house, you could say "You can go on one condition: do your homework first." And here's another example: your friend Joe has just done you a big favor. It doesn't matter what it was; let's just say he basically made your life a whole lot easier. Joe then gives you a call and invites you to lunch. You say "I'll go on one condition: this one is my treat." Listen again: I will go on one condition: it's my treat. What are your examples? Talk to you next time! Key expressions on one condition run a red light   Vocabulary (something) sounds a little off = (algo) soa meio estranho if I were to do something = se eu fosse fazer algo Did you get a ticket? = Você foi multado/a? a slumber party = quando várias amigas dormem na casa de uma delas Click the link to buy one iTalki class for your specific learning needs and get another one free
7/30/20163 minutes, 26 seconds
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Podcast: An unexpected turn of events

How's it going, everyone?  Hoje eu falo sobre algo que aconteceu comigo ontem - e que terminou bem de maneira inesperada. Transcrição How's it going, everyone? This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode's page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free. It was a huge box Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thank you for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's begin with the phrase turn of events - what does that mean? This phrase is commonly used to express some kind of change in a situation. So we can say, for example, that there was an unexpected turn of events - that's quite common. Or, an unfortunate turn of events - a situation took a turn for the worse. That's not the case for the story I'm gonna tell you, though. It happened just yesterday, and it was certainly an unexpected turn of events, but it was a fortunate one. So what happened was - I just moved into a new place and had to buy a desk and an office chair for my new place. They were supposed to deliver the chair yesterday during work hours, but I didn't want to stay in all day waiting for the delivery - so I provided instructions to the delivery company: "Please leave the package in the parking lot at the back of the building." So I left home in the morning, as I usually do, sat down at a coffee shop and started some work. A couple of hours later I got a text message from the delivery company saying they had made the delivery - and someone at my building had received it and signed for it. The name of the person didn't really ring a bell - it looked like it had been abbreviated. I thought "Great. I told them to just leave the package at the parking lot, and now someone's signed for it." I got immediately suspicious - I don't know why, but I did. I just could not understand why they needed someone's signature. I was now fearing that my chair had been stolen and I was gonna have to call up the company and make a complain and all that. So I decided I'd head over to my place right then since I was a bit worried anyway. When I got there, I thought I'd check the parking lot right away. I'll admit I feared I'd find no packages whatsoever awaiting. Well, that was my first pleasant surprise: there was a big package right where I had instructed them to leave it. I tried to lift it off the floor but it was too heavy, so I just dragged it along the pavement around my building until I reached the front door. Now, I live in a building with no elevators - on the first floor, but still... It wasn't going to be too easy to carry that package over to my place. And that's when the second unexpected turn of events happened: this nice lady who lives in my building, who I'd never seen before, was just coming out the front door and offered to help me with the package. It took us about thirty seconds to get to my door. She introduced herself and said that if I needed anything, to just give her a call. So, yeah... what started out as a bit of a worrisome situation for me turned out pretty nicely. That was a nice and unexpected turn of events... At least the events I had running in my head! Please tell us in the comments about the last time you had an unexpected turn of events in your life, and talk to you next time! Key expressions a turn of events Vocabulary a situation took a turn for the worse = uma situação piorou, de repente algo ruim aconteceu pavement = calçada (Reino Unido) but still = mas ainda assim
7/15/20163 minutes, 56 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Levar na brincadeira

Hi, all!  Hoje eu falo sobre idioms com as palavras joke e laugh. Transcrição Hey, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Are you able to take a joke? When your friends are having a good laugh at your expense, are you able to join them and have a good laugh yourself? Let's be frank here: some people are and some people aren't. Some people are great at taking a joke. They're able to laugh it off and go on with their business, and not hold a grudge. There are people, however, that don't do so well. Maybe because they're more sensitive, or because of the environment they grew up in, they're not so great at taking a joke. Some people feel hurt, and it's best not to make them the butt of any more jokes. OK - so I've just used lots of idioms and collocations related to joking. Let's break this down and take a closer look at a few of them. My initial question was "Are you able to take a joke?" I'm actually curious and I would like to hear from you guys if you're usually able to take jokes. That means, in general, that when you're the butt of a joke, you don't really care that much.  That's the expression: butt of the joke. As you may or may not know, 'butt' is a body part. It is our posterior, our derrière (that's a French word), or, as people say in the UK, our bottom. When someone is the butt of a joke, that means that they're the object of ridicule with that joke. Whoever told that joke is making fun of that person; that person is the butt of the joke. So if that person can, in general, take a joke, he or she will be able to laugh it off. Of course, there are jokes and jokes. Some jokes can go too far and sometimes they are truly insults disguised as jokes. However, let's say we're talking about a good-natured joke. Let's say your friend John is the butt of the joke. And let's say that John is the kind of guy who can take a joke. He's pretty chilled and has a great sense of humour. So when your other friends make a joke at John's expense, he doesn't care. In fact, he joins in and even laughs with them. John doesn't mind being the butt of the joke. He can take a bit of ridicule from his friends. The truth is, John knows his friends can take a joke as well. So when one of you makes a joke at John's expense, or in other words - when John is the butt of the joke, he just laughs it off. When you laugh something off, that means you're sort of treating a problem, or an unpleasant situation, as something unimportant... and you're showing that it's not that important by laughing at it. Now, tell me the truth: can you take a joke? Do you get hurt every time you're the butt of the joke? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions take a joke butt of the joke laugh it off Vocabulary at someone's expense = às custas de alguém hold a grudge = guardar rancor
7/6/20163 minutes, 34 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Estou só apagando incêndio

Hey, everybody.  Hoje eu falo sobre idioms do inglês com a palavra fire. Transcrição Hey, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today we start with the English saying "where there's smoke, there's fire." We say the exact same thing in Brazil. Where there's smoke, there's fire. That's what we think when it looks like something's wrong, or when we hear a rumour about something and we're not able to tell a hundred percent whether it's true or not... but we do tend to believe that there's something there. Most people do become suspicious when they hear a rumour, I guess. They say 'where there's smoke, there's fire'. That's why a well-known strategy by some politicians is to create rumours about opponents and spread them, because even though they're false people will usually think that there's at least a grain of truth in them. Where there's smoke, there's fire. Let's move on to another idiom with the word fire - again, we say basically the exact same thing in Brazil. Very, very common to hear people who work in offices and are very busy with their daily attributions, and when you ask them "How's it going?" they'll answer "Oh, you know. Putting out fires all they long." Listen again: I'm putting out fires. If you've ever worked in an office in Brazil, I'm sure you've heard people say the Portuguese version of that. When you have to deal with emergencies or things that are urgent, rather than your daily tasks, you're putting out fires. This could be you! I mean, what did you do in the office yesterday? Did you have to handle last minute, urgent requests from your boss? Did you spend considerable time trying to fix some kind of unexpected issue with a client, a supplier, your computer? Did you spend so much time putting out fires that you didn't even have a chance to read your e-mails? I think everyone can relate. I mean, I'm self-employed - I work for myself, and some days I spend hours putting out fires. I remember one day, a couple of years ago. I was getting ready to write a few blog posts when I started to get messages from readers telling me my website was down. So this wasn't just any small fire I had to put out, it was a big one. I remember it took me a few days to get the situation under control - in the end I had to find a different hosting service for Inglês Online and until I got that sorted I simply could not get ahead with any writing. Getting the website back up and working properly was way more urgent than getting a new blog post out - so that meant I spent those few days putting out a big fire rather than doing what I do every week, which is write new content. I'm curious: what's the last time you had to put out a fire at the office? Or maybe you do that regularly at home (hopefully not literally)? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions where there's smoke, there's fire put out fires
6/29/20163 minutes, 32 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Tal pai, tal filho

Hi, all.  Hoje eu falo sobre provérbios e idioms  do inglês com a palavra apple. Transcrição Hi, all. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So, you know how 'health' has been a hot topic for years, right? On TV shows, magazines, books, websites, everywhere you look there's a new study or piece of advice regarding how to keep healthy. Over the years I've heard the following saying quite a few times: One apple a day keeps the doctor away. Some people say that because, apparently, apples are so nutritious that if you eat an apple every day, you will never need to go to a doctor. I mean, obviously that is not completely true. Sure, apples are nutritious, as are all kinds of fruit, I guess. I wish it was that easy, though, right? I don't know about your apple consumption, but apples are actually not my favourite fruit and I rarely eat one. I do, however, have a bit of apple juice almost every day and that's because I love a good smoothie. I use apple juice as the base and then I add a banana, some frozen berries, a bit of spinach and flaxseed, and then I blend it all up. Does that count? I haven't been sick in a while so I'm gonna say yes. Where do you stand on this piece of advice - one apple a day keeps the doctor away? I sure wish it was mango instead of apple. Back when I lived in Brazil I used to eat mango every single day. Some days I would have as many as three mangoes, I kid you not. Anyway... I don't think we have a similar saying in Brazil, so there you go - one apple a day keeps the doctor away. Let me know if you think it's true or not. And here's another saying with 'apple': the apple does not fall far from the tree. Have you heard this one? We've got a similar one in Brazil but I'm not gonna say it because the words we use are different. So we say that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree when someone behaves the same way as their relatives, especially their father or mother. So let's say your father is a very well-organised man. He makes lists, he knows where everything is and when you need an old document, you can count on him to still have a copy of that old document in one of his desk drawers. And your brother happens to be the exact same. Very organised. His desk is never messy. Keeps copies of old bills. The documents in his folders are alphabetically sorted. What can you say? The apple doesn't fall far from the tree. Your mom loves make-up and has a huge collection of make-up items. Your sister is the same - loves putting on make-up and watching YouTube videos to learn new techniques. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree. So tell me: can you apply this saying to... maybe one of your parents and you? Are you just like your mom when it comes to hobbies, or studying, or something? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions One apple a day keeps the doctor away The apple doesn't fall far from the tree Vocabulary I kid you not = fora de brincadeira
6/23/20163 minutes, 49 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: fiz meu imposto de renda

Hello, you guys.  Hoje eu falo sobre vocabulário de imposto de renda em inglês. Transcrição Hello, you guys. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So did you file a tax return earlier this year? I did, on the 29th of April - the final deadline for online tax returns in Brazil. Listen again: file a tax return. A tax return is a form - and it can be a paper form, or an online form - where you, the taxpayer, state your income and other information about your life, every year. That's the way people talk about this - in other words, that's the collocation: file a tax return. Then, after you've filled out that form with your information, you submit it to the tax authorities and then, you either have to pay taxes, or you get a tax refund in case you've already paid in excess. If you're an employee at a company, you probably have part of your salary deducted every month, and that goes to the government, right? That's called withholding tax. So when you finally file your tax return, you may actually realise that the amount of withholding tax you've already paid is higher than the amount you actually owe the government. So that is one example of a situation where you would get a tax refund. This year, in the United States, the tax deadline fell on April 18th. That was the deadline to file tax returns with the IRS, or Internal Revenue Service. The IRS would be equivalent to Receita Federal in Brazil. In the United Kingdom, depending on how you choose to submit your tax return,  the deadline for submitting it will be different. Paper tax returns need to be filed by October 31st, whereas the deadline for filing online is three months later - January 31st. In Brazil we have the exact same options, right? We can file our tax returns online or in paper form. I don't remember ever filing paper tax returns. I've always submitted online returns, usually on or one day before the deadline... What about you? Have you been filing paper tax returns for years and refuse to do it online? I remember when I was a regular employee at a company and every year, after doing my taxes, I would get a refund. That was because of all the withholding tax that had been deducted from my monthly paychecks. Now that I work for myself, it's a different story. I'm always paying taxes - no refund. So what's it like for you? Are you an employee who gets a refund every year? Are you self-employed and you end up paying taxes every month, or every year? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions file a tax return taxpayer tax refund withholding tax
6/15/20163 minutes, 22 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: acima da lei

Hey, everyone.  Hoje eu falo sobre collocations comuns com a palavra law. Transcrição Hey, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So here's a very common way to use the word 'law': when someone breaks the law. Obviously, if you fail to obey a law; if you do something against the law, then you're breaking the law. For example, shoplifting is against the law. What is shoplifting? That's taking merchandise from a shop without paying for it. That is against the law and if you've done it, you've broken the law. So I did a search on Twitter and the first thing that popped up was the question "Did the Obama administration knowingly break the law?" Knowingly is an adverb and it would mean that if the Obama administration broke the law, they did so aware that they were breaking the law. I didn't follow the link to the article so I don't know exactly what the Obama administration might have done that was against the law, but there you go. It's true, though, isn't it, that some people break the law because they think they're above the law. Some people think they're immune to the law. In theory, however, no one is above the law, or no one should be. I know people who think they're above the law, or at least above the rules. It's kinda sad, 'cause I don't wanna be near those people. Now, I've been talking about the law and breaking it, and being against it, and being above it, and that reminded me of another great idiom: take matters into your own hands. When you take matters into your own hands you're going ahead and dealing with something that needs to be dealt with. And that usually happens because the people who should have dealt with it... didn't, or they didn't do it in a way that was satisfactory to you. So you decide to do something yourself. You decide to take matters into your own hands. We see that a whole lot on TV shows, right? People who are not happy about the way the police have been dealing with a crime, for example. They think the police have been too slow or haven't been doing enough... And they decide to take matters into their own hands and conduct their own investigation, and find information and uncover evidence themselves, and sometimes even deal with the criminal themselves! They really take matters into their own hands instead of just waiting for the police to do something. If you watch TV shows regularly, can you give me an example of a recent episode where a character took matters into their own hands? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions break the law above the law against the law take matters into your own hands
6/8/20163 minutes, 23 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: podre de rico

Hi, everyone!  Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms muito comuns com a palavra rich. Transcrição Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's focus on the word rich for a bit. Here's our first idiom: get-rich-quick. It's actually a phrase, right? Get rich quick. And it is very commonly used as an adjective - for example, a get-rich-quick scheme. Notice that when a phrase becomes an adjective, it gets hyphenated - check out the transcript and you'll see it. So I'm sure you can imagine what a get-rich-quick scheme is. I used to get emails all the time - I mean, nowadays they all go straight to the junk folder... Mostly I still see these ads, depending on the website I'm looking at, that say... John makes a thousand dollars a week without leaving his home. Click here and you'll learn what to do in order to make the same amount of money from home. That's a typical get-rich-quick scheme, where you basically don't have to do any work and you still make a ton of money. And the thing is, if there are people still placing ads like these that means they still get results - in other words, there are people clicking because they wanna know how to... get rich quick. Look what I found on Twitter: one guy said "I've met so many kids over the past three months who think this whole music and art thing is a get-rich-quick scheme." So this guy has met young people who think that getting into music is a way to become rich and famous without putting a lot of effort into it. I think that a lot of young people actually believe that to be true. They don't know about all the hours artists put in working, exercising and rehearsing; how early in the morning they have to be up and so on. I don't think making money with music is a get-rich-quick scheme at all. What do you think? And here's another idiom, or rather, more of a collocation in English. A collocation is the way native speakers combine words together to express an idea. For example, in Brazil we say someone is "podre de rico" when they're very, very rich. Why do we use the word "podre"? I don't know, but that's what we use. In English, on the other hand, one of the words we use in a similar expression is filthy. We say someone is filthy rich, which means they're very, very wealthy. By the way, the word filthy alone means disgustingly dirty, like very dirty. So there you go - there are things that only the filthy rich can afford, such as buying a Ferrari, or owning ten different mansions around the world. Interestingly enough, the expression for someone who's very, very poor is dirt poor. Dirt is that thing that gets on your clothes when you've been working outside on your garden all day. It's like dust or mud. Some artists started out in life dirt poor and worked really hard to become filthy rich. Like I said, I don't think music is a get-rich-quick scheme... So what do you think of our expressions today? Do you know people who were born dirt poor and then became filthy rich? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Key expressions get-rich-quick filthy rich dirt poor
6/1/20164 minutes, 3 seconds
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Podcast: ‘First Dates’

Hello, you guys.  Hoje eu falo sobre um programa de TV que tem feito um certo sucesso aqui no Reino Unido: o reality 'First Dates". Transcrição Hello, you guys. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I'm going to tell you about this reality show that I've been watching called "First Dates". By the way, if you're new to the Inglês Online podcast and you know nothing about me, here it goes: I moved to London three years ago so every once in a while I talk about life here or some cultural aspect... And I've begun to introduce more and more idioms that are typically British to the podcast. Makes sense, right? Since now I hear them a lot and I'm actually learning them. Back when I used to live in Brazil, the English I consumed was literally a hundred percent American. I've talked a little bit before about differences between American and British English; I mentioned that understanding different accents was a bit of a struggle in the beginning... For starters, I really had no idea there were so many different accents in the United Kingdom. In London alone, at least three or four. Fortunately overtime I've gotten better at comprehending what people say in different accents - watching lots of British shows has helped a lot, as well as just simply getting into a more relaxed frame of mind about this. So anyway - back to 'First Dates'. This is sort of a reality show on Channel Four here in the UK. I've included the link to their YouTube channel at the end of this post so maybe you can check out a few scenes if you like. So it's a bit random for me to watch a dating show, so to speak. By the way - if you need a refresher on dating vocabulary, check out this episode of our podcast. Anyway - I'm usually not very interested in dating shows, but my housemate had mentioned this show a couple of times saying that it was kind of sweet. Then a couple of weeks later a friend of mine said the same thing and I thought "Ok, that's it. I have to watch it." The premise of the show is simple: if you're a single person and are interested in dating... And you don't mind being on a blind date that is being televised, then you get in touch with them and if you're selected they'll ask you about your preferences and hopefully match you up with someone. Then the both of you will meet up at a restaurant in central London and your whole encounter will be broadcast on TV! Standard. So I went ahead and watched a whole season and I have to say, it really was entertaining and kinda nice to see two strangers hitting it off and having a good time. And it's all ages, backgrounds, physical types, nationalities, everything. Would you believe me if I told you that some people who first met on the show have decided to get married or live together? Well, it's true. Now, would you be able to go on a blind date on TV? I wouldn't. No way! What do you think of the premise of the show - and is there anything similar in Brazil at the moment? What's it called? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time! Vocabulário in London alone = só em Londres premise of the show = o conceito (premissa) do programa standard = típico (nesse caso, usado para sarcasmo) hit it off (with someone) = se dar super bem de primeira (geralmente duas pessoas que acabaram de se conhecer) First Dates YouTube channel
5/19/20163 minutes, 40 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: De uma certa maneira…

Hi, everybody.  Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns do inglês com a palavra way. Transcrição Hi, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So, you know when you ask for someone's help and you can tell that person went beyond the basics and actually put in some effort in order to help you? We say that this person went out of his or her way to help you. Let's say you talk to Shelly, who works in your office. You need her help to find a document, but deep down you don't really believe she'll be able to find it. A couple of days later Shelly gets back to you and says she's found it. She made a few phone calls, tracked down someone who had kept an old copy with them, and when she finally got her hands on it, she scanned it and emailed it to you. This is way beyond Shelly's job description. She didn't really need to go through all that trouble. Shelly went out of her way to get that document for you. She went out of her way. You had initially asked her whether she had a copy and she said no... And you thought that was the end of it. But she spent time making phone calls and tracking people down in order to get it for you. I think most people who work for a company know someone like that. There's always that person who will go out of their way to help others. Imagine that you're driving one day and, all of a sudden, your car just stops and simply won't start again. You call your good friend Mark, who lives in that neighbourhood, and he comes to pick you up. He calls a tow truck for you. He then takes you home and you have dinner with his family. He offers to drive you back home after dinner. The next day he texts you, just to check on you and ask if you need anything. Mark is going out of his way to be helpful and to be there for you as a friend. Now here's another popular expression with way. It's very simple, and very common. Let's say you're telling someone about how you and your brothers were raised by your aunt Maria after your parents passed away when you were kids. So you say "In a way, aunt Maria was a mother to us." She is not literally your mother, but she filled the role of mother for many years. She did most of the things a mother would do, so, in a way, she's like a mother to you and your brothers. Your friend John is now telling you about this manager at the company he works for. The manager is a very authoritarian person who likes to boss people around and he'll even throw a tantrum if someone challenges him. John says "In a way, he's like a dictator who thinks our company is his country to run." Yesterday I was late to catch a train and ended up missing it. As I waited for the next train, I had time to make a phone call and catch the person just when they were about to leave. So, in a way, it was a good thing I missed the train. Now, I'm sure you know someone who goes out of their way to help others. Who is it? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms in a way go out of one's way Vocabulário deep down = lá no fundo track someone/something down = conseguir encontrar ou fazer contato com alguém/algo a tow truck = um caminhão-guincho be there for someone = dar apoio a alguém boss someone around = mandar e desmandar em alguém throw a tantrum = dar chilique to challenge someone = desafiar alguém
5/9/20163 minutes, 37 seconds
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Podcast: Straight from the horse’s mouth

Hello, all.  Hoje falamos sobre dois idioms muito comuns no inglês com a palavra horse. Transcrição Hello, all. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So here's an idiom I've been hearing quite a bit lately: I don't have a horse in this race. What does that mean? Basically it means that you're talking about something whose outcome doesn't affect you. People usually say that to mean, you know, that they can be impartial or unbiased regarding the topic they're talking about, as in "I don't have a horse in this race - whatever the outcome, it doesn't matter to me but here's my opinion..." For example, let's say your friend is telling you about a new Italian restaurant that opened in his neighbourhood, and how it is much better than the old Italian restaurant near his flat. Your friend says that the new place is part of a chain and, no matter what you order, they'll get the food to your table in less than fifteen minutes. Your friend is raving about it and saying he will never go back to the old restaurant. And then you say "Look, I don't even like Italian food so I don't have a horse in this race. I have to say, though, anything you order ready in under fifteen minutes... That doesn't sound very appetising to me. If I were you I wouldn't ditch the old place just yet." Or let's say your friend is doing some course homework. You glance at one of the answers and you can tell he misused a word, which changes the meaning of the answer. You let him know but he insists you're wrong. You say "Look, I don't have a horse in this race; I'm just trying to help." It doesn't really affect you whether your friend misuses the word or not: you have no horse in this race. So let's move on to our second idiom of today: straight from the horse's mouth. This is a very, very common one and if you regularly watch TV shows you've probably heard it before. Let's say your friend Jennifer has just told you she's moving to Poland. So later today you bump into your other friend Leslie, who's also friends with Jennifer, and you give her the news: Jennifer is moving to Poland. Leslie is very surprised, and says "Where did you hear that?" and you say "Straight from the horse's mouth." The horse in this case is Jennifer, figuratively speaking, of course. Jennifer gave you the news herself. You heard it straight from the horse's mouth. Your friend Kimmy missed class yesterday, so you phone her up to let her know you're all taking a test tomorrow. Kimmy says "Who told you that?" and you say "I was in class! Heard it straight from the horse's mouth." The horse, in this case, would be the teacher. That's a very common situation, isn't it? You're telling someone a secret, a bit of gossip, news, and they say "Are you sure? Who told you that? Where did you hear that?" Well, now you know: every time you get your information from the source - the person who's moving to another country, who's been in an accident, or the decision-maker in the situation... You can say "I heard it straight from the horse's mouth." Can you think of anything going on in your own life right now where you would say that? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms I don't have a horse in this race straight from the horse's mouth Vocabulário ditch the old place = abandonar o lugar antigo
5/2/20163 minutes, 50 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Isso é novidade pra mim

Hi, everyone.  Hoje falamos sobre idioms e provérbios em inglês com a palavrinha news. Transcrição Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Let's get started today with the phrase That's news to me. Yep: that is news to me. I love talking about the word news, because the way it agrees with the verb is counterintuitive to us Portuguese speakers, so the more we hear it used the correct way, the more familiar with it we'll get. In other words, news ends with an S and we Brazilians have this almost uncontrollable impulse to say "the news are...". Oh- that's a mistake. We say 'the news is', 'the news was', 'What's the news?' and so on. News is singular. So our first term of today is "That's news to me". Very common to say that when someone tells you something and you're at least mildly surprised. Or maybe the other person thought you already knew and they expected you to have done something about it. For example, you're at the office and your assistant says "The new sales manager just called and said you were supposed to meet with him a half hour ago." You say "That's news to me. Who scheduled this meeting? " So the sales manager thinks the two of you were supposed to meet..? That's news to you. The office party has been canceled? That's news to me. Matt has a broken arm? That's news to me. Show da Xuxa is no longer on TV? That's news to me. And here's a very common proverb with the word news - notice the verb: Bad news travels fast. Travels; bad news travels. Isn't that true, though? I guess it's the same everywhere. When something bad happens, it spreads like wildfire. Yeah, bad news usually spreads like wildfire anywhere. So when you see someone who's been fired, for example, and you say "Sorry to hear you've been fired" and they express surprise and say "Wow, you've heard!", you can say "Yeah, bad news travels fast." Or when someone comes to you with bad news that you've already heard, you can say "Yeah, I know. Bad news travels fast." What is your personal opinion about this one? Would you agree that bad news travels fast, especially when compared to good news? So here's a saying with good news to wrap up the episode. No news is good news. Again, pay attention to the verb: is. No news is good news. That means that if you haven't had any news about something or someone, everything is fine. No news is good news. Obviously, this isn't always true. I think you'll agree with me. However, I think most of the time it is true that no news is good news. If people you know go away on holiday and you don't hear from them, that's probably because they're busy having a good time. If your brother moves to another city to go to college and you don't hear from him for a while, he's probably getting on with his new life. So give me your example. Tell me your most recent story where someone told you something and your reaction was "That's news to me". Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms That's news to me Bad news travels fast No news is good news Vocabulário spreads like wildfire = espalha que nem fogo em palha
4/25/20164 minutes, 1 second
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Como falo em inglês: Estou com uma sensação estranha

Hi, everyone.  Hoje falamos sobre idioms super comuns no inglês com as palavras funny e comedy. Transcrição Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's just say you're on your way to see a play at the theatre with your friends Jay and Trey, and then Jay says "I've got a funny feeling about tonight." Now, what does Jay mean by "a funny feeling"? Let's hear it: Jay goes on to say that he thinks something's gonna go wrong tonight. There may be an accident with one of the actors; you may never get to the theatre because you'll get lost; maybe someone very tall will sit right in front of you and you won't be able to see a thing; maybe the snack bar will be out of your favourite snack and it just will not be the same without it. Whatever it is, Jay can't say. He's just got a funny feeling about tonight. So a funny feeling is kind of an intuition. It's not a feeling about something being really funny in a comedic sense; it's more of a premonition. You have known Jay for years and you know that he's a little psychic, and... he's usually spot on. It turns out Jay was right once again. The theatre had to be evacuated halfway through the play due to a bomb threat! So that's what it means when somebody says they've got a funny feeling about something. They don't mean funny ha-ha, they mean a weird feeling. An intuition. A comedy is funny... Right? What kind of funny? Funny ha-ha (hopefully). A circus clown is usually funny ha-ha. When your friend Jay says he's got a funny feeling, though, he doesn't mean funny ha-ha, he means the other kind of funny: funny peculiar; a weird feeling. Here's something you will often hear from characters in movies or TV shows: "This feels funny." When a character says that, they usually don't mean that it feels funny, as in funny ha-ha. They mean that it feels funny as in, funny peculiar. In other words, whatever situation they're in, it feels a bit weird. And here's another one before we wrap up: cut the comedy. You say this to someone when you want them to stop acting silly, horsing around and so on. Let's say you're having a meeting with your teammates. You're thirty minutes into the meeting and everyone is still babbling about the weekend, laughing and teasing each other. You, on the other hand, have to be somewhere after the meeting so you finally say "Ok everyone, let's cut the comedy and get to work, shall we?" I wanna hear your example. Can you remember the last time you had a funny feeling about something? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms a funny feeling funny ha-ha cut the comedy Vocabulário you have known Jay for years = você conhece o Jay há anos to be spot on = acertar na mosca to horse around = ficar brincando, falando bobeira you're (x) minutes into the meeting = já faz (x) minutos que começou a sua reunião Shall we? = Vamos? (pode ser usada também ao final de uma sugestão, instrução, etc)
4/18/20163 minutes, 19 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Fazer uma cópia da chave

How's it going?  Hoje falamos sobre fazer cópias da chave e se trancar pra fora de casa em inglês! Transcrição a locksmith How's it going? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's say you just moved into a new house and you would like a couple of people in your life to have the keys to your house. Yeah, they'll be able to come and go as they wish. Let's say it's your brother and your best pal John. He's like a brother to you, so basically you want your brothers - your bros - to have a copy of your house keys. So what do you do? You go to a locksmith to have extra keys made for your bros. Well, not just for them. You know it's prudent to leave an extra key to the front door with your next-door neighbour, so you're going to the key shop to have three sets of keys made: one for your brother, one for John, and the third set for the neighbour. So that's the first term I wanted to talk about today - have keys made. Or, if you're in the UK, the more common "have keys cut". For example - I've lost my house key so I'll pop by the locksmith's tomorrow and have a new one cut. I just read somewhere on Twitter that someone just had a key cut at their local shop here in the UK, and they paid £2.69 for a key to be cut. He was outraged. By the way, "p" is short for pence. If you went to your local locksmith or key-cutting shop, how much would you pay to have a key cut? I remember once when I lived in São Paulo I got home and found out I had been locked out of my house. That means I didn't have my keys on me. When I left home earlier that day, my cleaning lady was there, and I thought she would still be there by the time I returned and she'd open the door for me. So I didn't take my keys with me when I left... So when I came back she'd already left and I found myself locked out. It was around 6PM so I had to call a locksmith after regular business hours.. It took him a while to get to my place but eventually he got there and then he told me how much it was going to cost. It was ridiculously expensive. He took one look at the lock and said "Oh, this is going to be a lot of work - this lock can be particularly fiddly to open without a key." I thought "Good, at least you're gonna have to work hard to earn the fortune I'm about to pay you." To my disappointment, it took him less than ten seconds to open the door. I think he was trying to justify his ridiculous price when he said that. Anyway... lesson learned. Never again did I leave my house without my keys. Now, I'm sure many of you have stories about being locked out of the house. Have you ever locked yourself out because you left the house keys, I don't know, on your nightstand and then you left the house through the front door, the door locked behind you, and you had no way to get back in? What's your emergency plan for when you lose your keys or get locked out - does your neighbour have a copy of your keys? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms locksmith a key made / a key cut locked out; lock yourself out   Vocabulário didn't have my keys on me = minhas chaves não estavam comigo fiddly = complicado, chato de mexer, etc
4/11/20163 minutes, 48 seconds
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Podcast: Idioms com rule

Hey, all.  Hoje falamos sobre dois idioms super comuns do inglês com a palavra rule. Transcrição Hey, all. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Let's get started with our first term of today: rule something out. To rule something out means to stop considering something as a possibility. Example: when I was looking for a place to live, I visited several houses. One of them was too far away from the city centre. It was a nice house, but it would take me one hour and a half to get to the city centre if I started living there, so I ruled it out immediately. I didn't even consider that house a possibility after I visited it. I quickly ruled it out and kept searching. I'm ruling HER out! Imagine you're the boss at work and you're looking for a new assistant, so you start interviewing people from different areas since you'd like to hire someone who already works for the company. You need someone who's very patient - your assistant will need to deal with clients all day long and they need to be able to remain calm under pressure. So you've just finished interviewing someone. She left your office a couple of minutes ago. You decide to get some coffee and as you open the door you see your last interviewee screaming into the phone. She's angrily reprimanding someone for forgetting to take a message for her. The moment you see that, you think "Well, that just rules her out". This woman is not an option anymore. You just simply cannot hire anyone for this position who would not remain calm when things go wrong. You're ruling her out. Now, moving on to the next idiom... Have you ever heard the idiom ground rules? Ground rules are basic guidelines, basic procedures for... a project, a meeting, or any kind of endeavour or situation where people are gonna work together, or play a game and so on. Let's say you're a celebrity and you're such a high-profile celebrity that you feel OK establishing a few ground rules at a press conference. In other words, there are some topics about your personal life that you'd rather not talk about and that's what your agent tells the reporters: "Here are the ground rules: no questions about the divorce, her plastic surgery and her dog Bernie." These are the ground rules for this press conference. Ok, now imagine that you're at the beach with a group of people. It's a rainy day so everyone's staying in. Your friend Melissa suggests playing hide-and-seek so you guys can kill some time. Melissa then says "So these are the ground rules: everyone has ten seconds to hide and we all have to hide inside the house." So these are the rules everyone has to play by - the ground rules. What's your example? When was the last time you were informed of the ground rules of a situation? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms rule something / someone out ground rules Vocabulário press conference = coletiva de imprensa hide and seek = esconde-esconde everyone is staying in = todo mundo vai ficar em casa
4/4/20163 minutes, 34 seconds
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Podcast: Not see the forest for the trees

Hi, everybody.  Hoje falamos sobre o idiom not see the forest for the trees e o que ele significa em inglês. Transcrição Hi, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Today we'll tackle an idiom whose meaning wasn't obvious to me for a while until I looked for some clarification and then I finally got it. So picture this: you're in school and somehow you and your friend Ken have been chosen to organise the graduation party. So Ken thinks the party should be at Grand Party Salon. Yeah, that's what it's called: Grand Party Salon, and your friend Ken has his heart set on the Salon. He thinks it's the perfect place: it's spacious, centrally located, nicely decorated and affordable. So the two of you go ahead and try to book the Grand Party Salon for graduation night. Things start to get a bit complicated when the staff person says that there are a few restrictions for graduation parties, such as no one individual can have more than four drinks and also, there has to be an equal number of men and women sitting at every table. Ken cannot believe it. He and you both know it would be impossible to control everyone's individual alcohol consumption or guarantee an equal number of men and women at every table. You start saying "Well, guess we'll just have to look for another place..." but Ken wants to fight for the Salon. He won't even consider other options; it's the Salon or nothing. But the Salon people will just not budge; you feel Ken's wasting precious time as the graduation date approaches and you still have not locked down a location for the party. So one day you tell Ken it's time to drop the Salon and move on. You tell him that the Salon would be a great option but they're making unreasonable demands and there are other very nice options out there. You tell Ken "You have to let the Grand Party Salon go. You've become so attached to the idea of having the party there, that you can't see the forest for the trees anymore. We're not gonna have a party if we don't secure a venue fast! It's less than two months away and all our planning depends on where the party is going to be!" And then, somehow, Ken gets it. He says "Thank you, buddy! Thanks for opening my eyes. You're right - I lost sight of the forest." Ken got so involved with trying to negotiate the Salon that getting it became his major concern, and he totally lost sight of the fact that location, while important, is just one element of planning a party. There's a whole lot more involved and it was all being put on hold because he was so dead set on the Grand Salon. So that's what "not being able to see the forest for the trees" means: you're so focused on details that you fail to understand, or lose sight of the larger situation. I can remember doing this in my own life a couple of times - for example, when I was starting out with Inglês Online and spent way too much time thinking about the appearance of my website, when, instead, and all things considered, I should have focused on writing more useful content for my audience. For a while, I couldn't see the forest for the trees and misplaced my efforts - but thankfully, in the end, everything turned out fine. So give me your example of not seeing the forest for the trees. Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms not see the forest for the trees   Vocabulário have your heart set on = querer muito (algo, fazer algo) lock down a location = arrumar, arranjar um local garantido
3/28/20164 minutes, 1 second
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Podcast: Award-winning, mouth-watering

Hello, all.  Hoje falamos sobre um tipo muito comum de compound adjectives, ou adjetivos compostos em inglês - o tipo que termina com -ing. Transcrição Hello, all. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today let me give you some examples of one type of compound adjectives. Don't mind the name compound adjective, it's not that important. Hear this: I live in an English-speaking country. The adjective here is "English-speaking". A country that speaks English, or a country whose people speak English, is an English-speaking country. Now this one: I live in a block that is full of gym-going people. What does "gym-going people" mean? It means "people that go to the gym". They frequent the gym; they are gym-going people. Now, my favourite actor gives award-winning performances. Award-winning performances. That means that his performances will win this actor some awards. His talent will win him a few awards. He gives award-winning performances. Look at the image on this post: there are several examples of the type of adjective I'm talking about here. Jaw-dropping, barn-storming, heart-breaking, show-stopping and award-winning - they're all used to describe an actress' performance in a musical. So let's take a closer look at a few of them. Sometimes you see something that makes your jaw drop in amazement, or in shock. Something that makes your jaw drop is jaw-dropping. That actress' performance is jaw-dropping. A jaw-dropping performance. If you're watching a movie and it moves you deeply to the point of tears, you could say the story is heartbreaking. It's a heartbreaking movie. Or it's a movie that tells a heartbreaking story. It just breaks your heart when you watch it. It's a heartbreaking story. So that actress' performance is also heartbreaking, according to the poster. Here are other common examples: I saw some mouth-watering strawberries at the market this morning. They looked so ripe and tasty, they made my mouth water. Those strawberries were mouth-watering. In my personal opinion, there is a lot of mouth-watering food everywhere you look. Whenever I go to the market, my mouth waters. Seriously. Bread, cheese, some fruit, pizza and so on. All mouth-watering food. Now think of a couple that has been in a long-lasting relationship. Their relationship has lasted for a long time. This is an extremely common adjective to describe not only relationships, but also partnerships or any other kind of agreement that started years ago and is still going. Are you in a long-lasting relationship? So give me your example. What's the last film you watched that made your jaw drop? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms compound adjetives: jaw-dropping, long-lasting, heartbreaking, etc Vocabulário don't mind the name = não ligue para o nome something that makes your jaw drop = algo que faz seu queixo cair it moves you deeply = ele te emociona profundamente breaks your heart = te emociona muito, te faz até chorar (geralmente de tristeza, etc) made my mouth water = me fizeram saliva
3/22/20163 minutes, 38 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: o carro foi capotando

Hey, everyone.  Hoje eu falo sobre vocabulário relacionado a um acidente de carro que aconteceu nos Estados Unidos um tempo atrás. Vamos ouvir maneiras de se dizer "o carro foi capotando montanha abaixo" e "a porta ficou balançando." Transcrição Hey, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So all of you listening to this podcast have probably got an intermediate or advanced level of English - have you ever had the experience of trying to describe an everyday situation in English and struggling to find the right words to do it? Well, I was listening to a podcast the other day from the Adam Carolla show, and as I heard a bit where he described a car accident, I thought it contained some pretty interesting vocabulary for our episode. Adam speculates, about how a car accident went down. And this is an accident that happened to someone else, not Adam - a man was driving a car and lost control of the vehicle. So let's go ahead and listen to Adam as he makes his comments: a barrel I will speculate that he was not wearing a seat belt; I will speculate that the car started to barrel roll and as it rolled, perfectly, the door, from centrifugal force, flew open. And as it was going, as the door was flinging, as it was spinning, he was launched. And if he'd had a seat belt on he wouldn't have been launched from the car that barrel rolled as the door flung open as it went... So Adam starts off by saying he thinks the man wasn't wearing a seat belt. So far, so good. His next guess is that the car started to barrel roll - so what does that mean? Well, picture a barrel and imagine the barrel rolling down a mountain. That's what Carolla thinks happened with the car: it barrel rolled, or rolled like a barrel down a hill or a mountain. So I hope you remember this from school - when there's something rolling like that, or spinning on it axis, centrifugal force is generated. You know that machine that dries clothes that have just been washed - a clothes or tumble drier? It's able to dry clothes because of centrifugal force. So Adam says that, because of centrifugal force generated as the car barrel rolled, the door flew open - a bit later on he uses the expression flung open, which basically means the same thing. Flung is the past tense of fling. So centrifugal force pushed the door open, or flung that door open; the door flew open or flung open because there was something forcing it to open. So with the car barrel rolling down a hill, I guess, and the door flinging - or moving from one side to the other - the driver was launched from the car. The driver was launched, or ejected from the car. Then Adam finishes by saying that if the driver had had a seat belt on, he wouldn't have been launched from the car that barrel rolled as the door flung open. Listen to his commentary once again: I will speculate that he was not wearing a seat belt; I will speculate that the car started to barrel roll and as it rolled, perfectly, the door, from centrifugal force, flew open. And as it was going, as the door was flinging, as it was spinning, he was launched. And if he'd had a seat belt on he wouldn't have been launched from the car that barrel rolled as the door flung open as it went... So there you go - good vocabulary to describe a very specific situation. Awful accident, by the way! Have you ever been on a car that came barrel rolling down a hill? Let us know in the comments, and talk to you next time.   Key terms car accident vocabulary Vocabulário
3/17/20164 minutes, 13 seconds
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Podcast: Don’t rock the boat

Hey, everyone.  Neste episódio do podcast eu falo sobre duas expressões super comuns do inglês com a palavra boat. Transcrição Hey, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's get started with a great idiom: rock the boat. Here's how you'll usually hear people say it: I don't wanna rock the boat. Be careful when you give your opinion; you don't wanna rock the boat. Don't cause any trouble, don't mess with a good situation or even an OK situation, let's not ruffle any feathers, don't rock the boat. So what exactly does rock mean here? Rock is a verb and it means moving something back and forth. Think of a rocking chair: you sit in it and you start rocking it back and forth. Sort of the same with a boat: you can get on it and start rocking it from side to side. So that is a metaphor that English people use, usually to express that they don't want to change things. They're not going to complain, they're not going to criticise anyone, they're just going to keep their heads down and do their job. They don't wanna rock the boat. Someone told me recently that the company they work for does not have a culture of learning and exploring new ideas. They don't really appreciate suggestions or criticism coming from staff. As a result, employees have learned to, you know, bite their lip and keep their thoughts to themselves. They're actually afraid of losing their job if they say something that displeases management. The employees at this company just don't wanna rock the boat. Another example: my friend went on a trip with a group of people and she noticed some strange behaviour by one of her travel companions. She decided not to say anything, especially given that she didn't know the person very well. Since this was a trip situation and she was going to be with this group twenty four hours a day for some time, she thought it would be better not to rock the boat. Now here's another popular idiom, one that the students of my basic English course know well: we're in the same boat. If someone tells me they're in some kind of trouble, I will tell them "We're in the same boat" if I happen to be going through the same kind of situation. I know what you're going through, I feel you, I hear you... We're in the same boat, I know exactly what you're going through. Now, the reason my students know this idiom isn't because they're having a hard time with the course - the reason is, I teach this idiom in the course, and by the end of it they know how to use it. Let's say your classmate Mary rings you up and tells you she's having a hard time with the Physics assignment. She's looking at question number one and she has no idea where to start. She feels lost and needs your help. You tell her "Bad luck... Can't help you. I'm just as lost as you are. We're in the same boat, Mary..." Now, have you ever been in a situation where you didn't want to rock the boat? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms rock the boat be in the same boat Vocabulário ruffle (someone's) feathers = provocar uma pessoa bite your lip = fique quieto ao invés de reagir e dizer algo ou rir given that = considerando que
3/1/20163 minutes, 43 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: 20 polichinelos e 30 abdominais

Hey, all.  Hoje falo sobre os mais conhecidos tipos de exercícios físicos - abdominais, polichinelos e flexões de braço e perna, em inglês. Transcrição Hey, all. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So back when I lived in Brazil, I didn't go to the gym at all. Sure, I signed up three or four times over the years but I never lasted longer than two months. I just didn't like going to the gym. I'm not really sure what changed, but a couple of years ago, when I was already living in London, I thought it would be nice to start exercising regularly and maybe get a little stronger. a lunge So that's how I became a gym-goer, and today I'm gonna talk about some very common kinds of exercises - I'm sure you will recognise all of them. In order to better understand which exercise I'm talking about, look at the corresponding picture as you listen. First, there's the lunge. In order to do a lunge, you step forward, say with your left leg, and then you bend both your knees at the same time. Then you bring your leg back to the initial position and repeat the sequence with the right leg forward, and so on. Keep in mind that this is just a general description of the exercise, OK? If you've never done it, seek additional instruction before you try it ;-) So that's the lunge for you. By the way, I can't remember what we call a lunge in Brazil - please let me know in case you do. a press-up Now here's a very popular one: the press-up. Do you do press-ups? That's when you get down on the ground, with your face down, and then you raise yourself, as though you were trying to push the floor away from you. There are a few different types of press-ups - and by the way, they're also known as push-ups. a jumping jack And here's one that... it's probably the first exercise I ever learned: the jumping jack. To do a jumping jack, you start off standing up with your feet together and arms alongside your body and then, as you jump, you move your feet out and raise your arms at the same time. Then you bring your arms down and your feet back together, and repeat the sequence. Can you remember doing jumping jacks as a child, maybe in your P.E. classes? doing a sit-up And then we also have lots of exercises to work our abs - the abdominal muscles. People working out often do sit-ups - that's when you're lying on your back with your knees bent, and then you tighten your abs and raise your body up towards your knees. Tell me - do you go to the gym and if so, do you ever do lunges, press-ups, jumping jacks and sit-ups? Which one do you find the hardest? For me, personally, lunges are the hardest - especially when the teacher asks us to do jumping lunges. Sit-ups are usually the least difficult ones for me. What about you? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms lunges press-ups jumping jacks sit-ups Vocabulário say, with your left leg... = digamos, com a sua perna esquerda P.E. = physical education knees bent = joelhos flexionado
2/21/20163 minutes, 29 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Ela tá em cima do muro

How's it going?  Hoje falamos sobre as expressões usadas para dizer que alguém está em cima do muro a respeito de alguma coisa, ou... simplesmente não decidiu ainda. Transcrição How's it going? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I'm gonna tell you about a very common idiom in the English language that is used to say that someone is neutral about something; or hesitant to choose a side in a discussion or competition. We say that person is sitting on the fence, or simply on the fence. Let's say a new film is out and all your friends want to go see it. You, however, have read the synopsis and can tell that there's a lot of heavy drama in this film. You happen to not be a big fan of overly dramatic stories. What's more, this film has been rated R for violence. Yep, lots of blood and gore. You can't stand watching violent scenes. OK, I'm talking about myself - it's true. I basically don't go to the movies anymore except when it's a comedy. So much drama and violence! Back to the example: so all your friends are excited and can't wait for Saturday to arrive. That's when they're going to the theatre. The film does sound amazing; the actors are outstanding and critics are raving about it. Also, hanging out with your friends is always fun. So there are pros and cons to this. If you go, you get to spend time with your buddies and watch what is supposed to be a wonderful film; however you'll have to endure some drama and cover your eyes when graphic scenes come up. So when your good friend Sally rings you up wanting to know if you're joining the gang on Saturday, you tell her that you're still on the fence about watching this film. You're undecided, you're still hesitant to make a decision. "I'm still on the fence with this movie, Sally... Not sure it'll be worth watching all the blood." You're on the fence about watching this movie. Last week you were on the fence about buying a new computer since your old computer was still functional. You decided to go ahead and buy a new one. Last month your father was on the fence about going on vacation. He ended up deciding to postpone the vacation until next year. Here's another example:  you've been offered a new position in the company you work for. You've talked to your boss about it and he has been very understanding. You really like your current job; however, this new position pays better and is a bit more challenging. You're still on the fence, though. The offer was extended to you a week ago and you haven't decided yet. You're still on the fence. Your boss then says "You've got to make up your mind. You can't be sitting on the fence forever." Now, notice that the meaning of "sit on the fence" isn't always exactly the same as ficar em cima do muro such as we use it in Brazil. When we say that in Portuguese, it usually communicates that someone doesn't want to make a decision because they lack the courage to do so; because they don't want to get in trouble and so on. So in English, 'sitting on the fence' does not necessarily have such a negative connotation, as you can tell by the examples I've used. It can, however. You could say "So and so is a fence-sitter" which means that person never takes sides - probably because they don't want to disappoint anyone. So a fence-sitter is someone who doesn't choose sides. What are you on the fence about at the moment? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms (sitting) on the fence fence-sitter Vocabulário
2/9/20164 minutes, 4 seconds
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Podcast: Meet a London black cab driver

How's it going? Hoje eu falo pra vocês sobre uma pessoa que conheci no fim de semana: a black cab driver. Transcrição How's it going? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. a black cab in London Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Today I'm gonna tell you about an acquaintance I made over the weekend. I went for a guided walk in central London, with a group, and as we waited for other people to arrive at the meeting point I struck up a conversation with this guy David. He was born and raised in London, and now lives near Heathrow airport. He told me that he will soon be moving to a nice area further up north. I then asked him about what his commute was going to be like after he moved house, and he said that it doesn't really matter since he drives a black cab. So that's his occupation: he drives a black cab. He told me that he had to pass a test in order to be qualified as a black cab driver. He studied for three years - yes, that's three years - to prepare for the exam. Just to give you an idea, David had to memorise over three hundred routes in London. Basically, you've got to know the map of London by heart, as well as all the important landmarks and buildings. Twenty-five thousand streets... How about that? In London you have the choice of black cabs and mini-cabs. Black cabs are the more expensive option and now I understand why. The driver of a black cab is highly qualified and chances are better that, you know, you're not going to be ripped off or run into any sort of trouble. With that said, there are good reputable minicab firms as well - but it's a lot easier to become a minicab driver than it is to be licensed and qualified to be a black cab driver, so... It's just less risky to hop into a black cab than a minicab. While we were walking, I told David where I live in London - it's an area called West Norwood which most people haven't heard of, but he obviously knew immediately where it was. Not only that, but he knew there was a somewhat famous cemetery in West Norwood, and he ended up giving me a few tips on local attractions that I could visit. David then told me about his trip to the United States a while ago. I think he visited seven or eight cities, and his favourite one was New York, and the least favourite one was San Francisco. So there you go: now you know a little bit about the life of a black cab driver in London. What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!   Vocabulário a guided walk = uma caminhada com um(a) guia, que vai comentando os pontos de interesse durante o passeio struck up a conversation = comecei a conversar after he moved house = depois que ele mudasse de casa commute = "viagem" ou trajeto, geralmente para o trabalho (e do trabalho para casa) be ripped off = ser explorado   Further reading about The Knowledge, London's legendary taxi-driver test Como taxistas adquirem The Knowledge (exame de qualificação) Photo credit: James Barrett under Creative Common
1/27/20163 minutes, 4 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Já vi melhores…

Hi, everybody.  Hoje falamos sobre I've had worse e I've seen better, expressões muito comuns no inglês Transcrição Hi, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Today you're going to listen to several examples of a very common structure in English. Imagine that you're out with a friend and it's 8 PM and neither of you have properly eaten all day. Yeah, that's right, you've spent the day chatting and snacking on potato crisps and peanuts. You guys are starving and decide to look for a decent place to eat. However, there's some kind of restaurant and bar strike going on and the only place where you can get food right now is a greasy joint that sells hamburgers. It does not look good but hey, you guys are hungry and out of options  so you decide to give it a try. So you go in the joint and order a couple of burgers and, as you're eating yours you're surprised to realise that, while it's not the best burger you've ever had... It is actually far from being horrible. So you say "OK, this is actually not so bad. I've had worse." So notice the use of the present perfect here: I've had worse. I have had worse. I have had worse burgers in my life. When did you have worse burgers? I don't know, it doesn't matter... I don't remember when, but I know that there was a time in my life when I had a worse burger than the one I'm having now. I've had worse. So this is a very common term, or structure, which can be used with a few different verbs. Just to keep with the food theme a bit longer, can you remember a time in your life when you were even a bit surprised that a certain food didn't taste so bad? Nobody was expecting it to be good and then you took a bite, and said "Eh... I've had worse." We have all been there. C'mon, what's your recent example? Maybe you've been to a football match and you thought the food at the stadium would be crap and then... Upon your first bite on that hotdog you thought "Eh, I've had worse." Or you went to the office party expecting, again, the food to be kinda awful... And in the end you thought, "I've had worse." Now, you can also say something like "I've had better", and that's the opposite situation, of course. That's a complaint - you say "I've had better" when you don't want to outright say that you don't like the food, or that it sucks. It's an euphemism, for sure, and it's very popular in English language conversations. Let's say everyone's been talking about this new movie and when you go see it, you're a bit disappointed. Your friend asks what you thought of the movie and you say "I've seen better." Or someone shows you some work of art, and... This is your opinion: "I've seen better." You hear about a restaurant that has been getting rave reviews everywhere and when you finally get to try their signature dish, you think to yourself... I've had better. What is your experience? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms I've had / seen worse I've had / seen better Vocabulário potato crisps = batata frita de saquinho, no Reino Unido (nos EUA, chamadas de potato chips) greasy joint = um "sujinho", restaurante parecido com boteco, que faz hamburger, etc. to outright say something = dizer algo diretamente rave reviews = grandes elogios (feitos por críticos) signature dish = o prato pelo qual eles são conhecido
1/13/20163 minutes, 41 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Já escolhi a roupa da festa

Hey, everyone.  Hoje falamos sobre dois idioms com a palavra PICK. Transcrição Hey, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So this is our first episode of 2016 and we kick off with a very simple expression: take your pick. It's very simple, really: it means choose which one you want. Of all the options available to you, which one do you want? Take your pick. You don't wanna go to the theatre on your own this Saturday. You've got a spare ticket and you'd like to take someone with you. Mike said he can go, Annie is also available and Jack also volunteered. Take your pick. Have you ever been in a restaurant where there's a dessert cart? The waiter will bring it around at the end of the meal, you look at the cart and there's some kind of pudding, there's black forest cake, there's apple pie, brownies and cookies. You're free to choose whatever you want. Take your pick. Or your friend, who you're spending Saturday with, says "I've nothing planned for today but we could go see a movie, chill at the pub, or stay in and play videogames. Take your pick." Now hear this: let's say you're a girl and you have a party this weekend... And you already have your outfit picked out for the party. You have your outfit picked out. To pick something out is to select something... or someone - pick out can be used with slightly different meanings but today we're focusing on this one. You have a closet with a few different outfits but you've already made up your mind about which one you're going to wear. You've already picked out the dress you're going to wear. Many people who do not have children but plan on doing so have their kids' names picked out already. They've already thought about it, they've made their choice and they know what they're going to name their kids in the event they have any. They've already picked out their kids' names. Let's say your mum sent you to the supermarket on a mission: bring back home some delicious biscuits to offer to your three aunts who are coming to visit this afternoon. You get to the market and head over to the biscuits aisle. There are so many options: plain biscuits, with almonds, vanilla cream, chocolate chips, crackers and the list goes on. In the end, you pick out the chocolate cookies with chocolate chips, which are usually a hit with everyone you know... Now check this out: yesterday I spent thirty minutes picking out the expressions for this podcast. It's true. My friend spent two hours at the eye doctor today picking out new glasses. Now I want to hear from you. Let me know what it is that you picked out last week, or yesterday. Talk to you next time!   Key terms take your pick pick out Vocabulário a hit = um sucesso
1/6/20163 minutes, 23 seconds
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Podcast: Feriados na Inglaterra

Hi!  Hoje falamos sobre algumas expressões comuns relacionadas a feriados aqui na Inglaterra (e no Reino Unido em geral!) Transcrição Hi! This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. This is the last Inglês Online episode of 2015 (twenty fifteen) and I wanted to take the opportunity to tell you guys about a couple of expressions used by the Brits to refer to holidays. Let's start with public holidays - what is a public holiday? It's a day where most businesses and services are closed. Christmas and New Year's Day are two examples. So here in the UK people actually refer to public holidays simply as bank holidays - as you can guess, banks are closed on bank holidays. So we just had a bank holiday - Christmas, the 25th of December. Tomorrow, January 1st, we have another bank holiday - New Year's Day. So apparently there are about eight bank holidays a year in England - and I'm talking about just England now. Only three of those are public holidays in Brazil as well: the two I mentioned before, Christmas and New Year's Day, and Good Friday, which is the Friday before Easter Sunday. The other five bank holidays in England are the second day of January; St. Patrick's Day on March 17th (seventeenth); Easter Monday, which is the Monday after Easter Sunday; May Day, which is the first Monday in May; the last Monday in May; the last Monday in August; and finally Boxing Day on the 26th (twenty-sixth) of December. So Boxing Day is the bank holiday I'd like to talk about - it's basically the day after Christmas, except when it falls on a Sunday. So if Christmas falls on a Saturday, the next day - 26th of December - will be a Sunday. In that case only, Boxing Day will be on the 27th. So what IS Boxing Day? Historically speaking, the most well-accepted version is that in the nineteenth century... the day after Christmas was the day servants and manual workers received gifts, known as "Christmas boxes", from their employers and customers. In modern times, though, Boxing Day is best known as a big shopping holiday - a lot like Black Friday in the US. Another holiday here is St. Patrick's Day, which is a religious bank holiday on March 17th. It celebrates Patrick, a missionary who, according to tradition, converted the pagan Irish to Christianity. Nowadays, when celebrating St Patrick's Day, it's tradition to wear green clothing to the parades and festivities all over the UK. So I've told you about a few bank holidays here in my neck of the woods - which Brazilian public holidays can you remember? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next year!   Key terms public holidays, bank holidays Boxing Day St. Patrick's Day Vocabulário Brits = British people (britânicos, informal)
12/30/20153 minutes, 23 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Tô com um trampo bacana

Hello!  Hoje falamos sobre a palavra GIG e como ela praticamente virou sinônimo de trabalho ou emprego de qualquer tipo. Um P.S.: gig também é abreviação de gigabyte, que não é assunto deste episódio. Transcrição a musical gig Hello! This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So an Inglês Online reader asked me about the word gig yesterday. He was reading a business book and came across the expression full time gig. He was surprised to see that, since he thought 'a gig' meant a temporary job, or maybe not even temporary - but sort of a side job that you take, in addition to your full time job, to make some extra cash. As it turns out, though, the word gig has been used in a much broader sense for a while now, to mean a job, or work. It's a slang word, for sure, so it's always informal. Before I give you more examples, let's just go over the original meaning of gig: in the beginning, gig was used by musicians when they were hired to perform somewhere. The word gig is still very much in use with that meaning - for example, I sometimes go to bars to see live music gigs here in London. They usually have lineups of four or more gigs on the same night. Some gigs are better than others and, in general, they leave the best gigs for last - so if the first performance starts at eight, for example, you'll probably see the fourth or fifth gig around ten or ten-thirty and these will probably be the most popular ones. Like I said, though, we can say gig for basically any kind of work in informal language. It doesn't matter if it's temporary or full time; if it's music-related or not. All you have to do is qualify it: a full time gig; a temp gig; a side gig, a great gig, and so on. You may be telling your friend that you're starting your new job as an analyst for a big consulting company. You tell her about the hours, the pay, the job description... And your friend thinks it's an awesome job. She says "Wow... Sweet gig!" And you agree. It is a sweet gig. It's going to be your full time gig from now on. You have another friend who's a carpenter and he's telling you someone wants to hire him to build custom furniture for a house in the countryside. It's a bit far from where he lives, so you ask him "Are taking the job?" and he says "Hey, a gig is a gig". It's work! Work is work; a gig is a gig. And yet another friend of yours says "I like my job but I wanted to make some extra cash so I'm driving for Uber now." So your friend now has a side gig, in addition to his full time job. He's an Uber driver. And here's my story: when I lost my full time corporate job years ago, I started teaching English. It was supposed to be just a temporary gig. It turned out to be more than that as it lasted for a few years, and eventually the Inglês Online website turned out to be my full time gig. So what's your gig? Do you work full time and also have a side gig? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms gig Vocabulário a side job = um segundo emprego, no geral 'part time', para complementar a renda lineup = programação das bandas para aquele período sweet gig = sweet aqui é gíria para ótimo, bacana
12/16/20153 minutes, 41 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: falar é fácil

What's up?  Você só fala... Fazer que é bom, nada. Como dizer isso em inglês? Hoje vemos três idioms do inglês muito comuns para comunicar exatamente isso! Transcrição What's up? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's get right into it: you're all talk and no action. Whoa... I'm not accusing anyone. Just letting you know what our first idiom of today's episode is. And while I'm sure some of you have heard this term before - it is, after all, very, very common in English - unless you're saying it confidently whenever you wanna tell someone they're only talking a lot about something but never actually doing it... Well, you could use some more listening to get even more familiar with it, and that's exactly what we're doing now. So when your father asks you "Did your brother ever get around to fixing the computer?" You know that John, your brother, hasn't fixed the computer yet. He's been telling everyone he's gonna do it for weeks, though. So you say "John's all talk and no action. He's at his girlfriend's now and the computer's still broken." John is all talk and no action. Notice that you can shorten this idiom to "He's all talk". She's all talk. John is all talk. They talk a lot about the stuff they're going to do, but they never actually do it! Your friend Melissa wants to move to an English-speaking country, let's say Canada. You know she's really going to do it - she has family in Canada, she's a nurse, she's applying for a visa and all that stuff. However, she's been saying she'll be able to speak good English come time to move, and you know that's not gonna happen... She can barely understand "What's your name?" and her plane leaves in a couple of months! Every time you see Melissa and ask her about her studies, she reaffirms her intention to learn English. Finally you just look at her and say "Melissa, you're all talk! You've been saying this for months now and you haven't even started lesson 1!" She's all talk and no action. She's all talk... What about someone who talks the talk but doesn't walk the walk? Picture someone who is very vocal about respecting other people, for example. They can actually speak beautifully about that topic, and you even feel inspired by their speech. However, one day the two of you disagree on something. And, well... Your friend, let's say his name is Rick, the one who just the other day made a Facebook post about the importance of respect, got mad at you because you didn't share the same opinion, and started calling you offensive names. Whoa... Rick talks the talk... but does he walk the walk? Hmm, I don't think so. Calling you names because you disagree with him... Not very respectful. Rick talks the talk, but he doesn't walk the walk. Someone, on the other hand, who actually acts or behaves according to what they talk is someone who talks the talk and walks the walk. So think about the expression: talking about something is relatively easy, isn't it? Now, aligning your actions with your talk... That may not be so easy. You know, talk is cheap! That's a great one as well - when you see someone boasting about climbing Mount Everest next year and how they're ready to do it, you could say "Talk is cheap! You should wait til you get back to say anything." You know those politicians who make a hundred promises because they wanna get elected? Talk is cheap. Saying what people want to hear is easy. Look at their track record if you really wanna know whether you can trust them. Talk is cheap!
12/10/20154 minutes, 30 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: canela e batata da perna

How's it going? No episódio de hoje, você ouve mais sobre duas partes do corpo (na perna) sobre as quais a gente não fala muito, e fica familiarizado com estas palavras. Transcrição How's it going? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I'd like to talk about some body parts that I know are not that well known by English students. What inspired me to talk about them was the term keep your chin up. The chin - c-h-i-n - is the part of the body that is right below our lower lip. So 'keep your chin up' is an expression of encouragement, right? It means, remain confident and maybe cheerful in whatever tough circumstance you're going through. Keep your chin up. Chin, then, made me think of shin, which is a body part that is in the leg. Look at the picture and you will see where the shin is. OK, so notice that I just spoke about an idiom with "chin", which is below the mouth. Chin. Now I'm talking about the shin, which is right below the knee. Shin... S-h-i-n. And notice that I am not saying "sheen", as in "Charlie Sheen". I'm saying 'shin'  - check out my pronunciation tip to learn more. So apparently shin splints are a very common form of leg injury. I looked for the expression in Portuguese and found "canelite" - I've never heard this word before so if you have, please let me know if that is what we really say for shin splints. Basically, almost any kind of pain you feel in your shin as a result of exercising will fall under this category - shin splints. And I found out that most shin splints occur when there is more stress on the tibia than it can handle, so - there you go. I'm thinking here about football players - or soccer players, if you like - do they wear any protection for the shin, like shin pads? If you know the answer, please educate me :-) So the shin is in the frontal part of the lower leg, right? On the other side we have the calf. Calf - c-a-l-f. The calf is the back part of the leg. Notice the way we pronounce calf - it's the same as half. Also, the plural form is calves, just like the plural of half is halves. One calf, two calves; one half, two halves. Calves are very fleshy and muscular, and of course, calves can be injured as well. You can strain your calf, for example. Apparently that happens a lot to tennis players. I don't think I've ever strained my calf, but it sounds painful. So let's talk about calves a little bit more. Here's a popular way to make your calves more muscular: are there any stairs where you live? If so, stand on the edge of a stair step. Be careful - don't lose your balance! Then, stand straight and lift your heels until you're standing on your toes. Stay there for two seconds, lower your heels and repeat the movement. That's it - simple. Tell me - do you know anything about shin or calf injuries? Do you exercise your calves regularly? Let us know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms keep your chin up shin calf / calves Vocabulário strain your calf = distender a batata da perna don't lose your balance = não perca o equilíbrio
11/26/20153 minutes, 51 seconds
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Podcast: What to do in a Paris-style terror attack

What's up? Sei que o título de hoje pode chocar um pouco :-( mas o assunto é atual e importante! Todos ouviram falar dos ataques terroristas em Paris, e o governo britânico já está orientando a população sobre como proceder em caso de ataques similares por aqui. Eu aproveito para falar sobre o vocabulário! Transcrição What's up? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. OK, so I know today's topic is a bummer: I'm gonna talk about the aftermath of the Paris terror attacks, specifically here in England, where I live. Keep listening though - the vocabulary involved is pretty interesting and not something you hear every day. So last Friday, the thirteenth of November 2015, a number of coordinated terrorist attacks occurred in Paris, France. There were mass shootings, suicide bombings, and many people were held hostage. As expected, ISIS, the islamic state terrorist group claimed responsibility for the attacks, and as it turns out other European capitals are at risk. So now the British government has released some advice on how people can prepare for similar attacks here in the UK. The main piece of advice, or at least the piece this newspaper article chose to highlight is, victims should run and hide rather than play dead. What that means is, rather than falling on the floor and pretending you're dead, you should try and run away from the shooting and hide away somewhere. But the UK Security Chiefs actually provided a lot of detailed advice, which is pretty interesting to go through - well, for me, I'd say it's kind of important to go through all of it... as you may know, I live in London - but for you and all other English learners it's a nice opportunity to get some more exposure to this sort of vocabulary, which you might have already heard on TV shows. So I've selected some of the advice, which they summed up in the following instruction: RUN, HIDE, TELL. So here we go: RUN: Escape if you can; consider the safest options; is there a safe route? Run, if not, hide. Can you get there without exposing yourself to greater danger? Insist others leave with you; leave belongings behind. So the first part is all about escaping and running away. Alright, makes sense. Here's the next part: HIDE: If you can’t run, hide; find cover from gunfire - if you can see the attacker, they may be able to see you; cover from view does not mean you are safe, bullets go through glass, brick, wood and metal; find cover from gunfire e.g. substantial brickwork or heavy reinforced walls; be aware of your exits; try not to get trapped; be quiet, silence your phone; move away from the door. So there are some interesting bits here - for example "cover from view does not mean that you're safe", meaning, if there's a wall between you and the attacker and they shoot, the bullets might still get through the wall and hurt you, so what they recommend is that you hide behind substantial brickwork (like a very thick wall). And the much needed instruction in our time of mobile phones - silence your phone if you're trying to hide from attackers. Finally, the third part of the advice is TELL: call 999 - What do the police need to know? Location - Where are the suspects? Direction - Where did you last see the suspects? Descriptions – Describe the attacker, numbers, features, clothing, weapons etc. Further information – Casualties, type of injury, building information, entrances, exits, hostages etc., and stop other people entering the building if it is safe to do so.
11/20/20154 minutes, 52 seconds
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Podcast: No pain, no gain

What's up? No episódio de hoje, falo sobre dois provérbios pra lá de comuns na língua inglesa. Não perca! Transcrição What's up? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's focus today on a couple of proverbs in English. Proverbs are sayings that have stood the test of time. In other words, they supposedly reflect some kind of truth and therefore people continue to say them because... truth never changes. I've talked about proverbs before in our podcasts and I've probably already asked the same question I'm gonna ask now: are proverbs always the truth? Well, I happen to disagree with some proverbs, to be honest. So, in my opinion, no, they're not always the truth. Wanna hear an example? No pain, no gain. Ok, that's probably not a proverb per se, but boy is that a popular saying. I think almost every gym in the UK has that saying glued to a wall. OK, when it comes to exercising and training that might be true - no pain, no gain. If you want to be in great physical shape or become a good athlete, then you've got to train, exercise, work out, lift weights, all of that stuff. There's a bit of pain involved, that's true. So in order to have some gain - in other words, in order to achieve your goal - you do have to experience some pain. True. If you want to become really good at something - let's say, speaking English, you do have to put in time and effort. Unless you're a baby learning to speak, of course. So - if putting in time and effort equals pain, then there you go: no pain, no gain. Now, the reason I slightly disagree with this saying is that pain is sometimes relative. Some people really enjoy training and working out and honestly don't mind doing it. Other people do not mind studying at all - I know people who love to study! So in their case - no pain and a lot of gain. Also - how about winning the lottery? That's like zero pain and a big gain. What do you think? Alright - so let's move on to our second proverb: Great minds think alike. First of all, 'think alike' means 'think in the same way'. You know when you and your friend say almost the same thing at the same time? That means you guys were thinking the same thing. The two of you think alike. One of you might say "Great minds think alike". Of course, it's always a bit of a joke when someone says that... It's like, they're congratulating you for being as smart as they are. After all, you said the same thing they said. One other example for this is, you could be chatting with someone on Facebook and you and your friend post the same thing simultaneously. So you type in next "Great minds think alike". Do you have a close friend or a relative, with whom that happens a lot? Please let me know in the comments... And talk to you next time!   Key terms No pain, no gain Great minds think alike Vocabulário have stood the test of time = já duram muito tempo per se = por si só, em si mesmo boy is that a popular saying = puxa, como esse ditado é comum
11/10/20153 minutes, 43 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: ele fez que não viu o que aconteceu

How are you? No episódio de hoje, falo sobre idioms muito comuns no inglês com a palavrinha eye, como o famoso "fulano fez que não viu o que aconteceu". Transcrição How are you? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. OK, so you know when there's something going on and people ignore it and pretend they didn't see it? I'm talking about something that should not be happening. For example, your entire class is doing an exam today and the teacher, Mr. Stevens, is there, standing by his desk, watching all of you as you do the test. So of course everyone knows that they're not supposed to cheat. They're not supposed to open their books while doing the test. They're not supposed to talk to each other nor help each other. Everyone knows that, especially the teacher! However, let's say that your classmate Johnny is sitting by your side and you can see that he's cheating. You can see it! He's looking at his notes while writing on the test. You lift your eyes to Mr. Stevens, who is looking directly at Johnny. You can tell he knows Johnny is cheating. You hold your breath for a few seconds, waiting for the teacher to call Johnny out. Instead, silence. You lift your eyes again, and, to your surprise, you see Mr. Stevens pulling up his chair and sitting down. He's now looking out the window! What? You can hardly believe it, but it's true: Mr. Stevens has turned a blind eye to Johnny's cheating. He chose to ignore Johnny's behaviour. He pretended not to see it. Mr. Stevens caught Johnny cheating, and chose to ignore it. He turned a blind eye to Johnny's cheating. Have you ever done that? Have you ever seen someone do something wrong in a situation where you were supposed to take some kind of action, meaning... You were not supposed to let that person get away with it, but instead you turned a blind eye? In other words, maybe you were the teacher and you caught a student cheating on an exam, and you did nothing. Or maybe you were reffing a soccer game and you saw one of the players commit a fault, and you said nothing. You turned a blind eye. Here's what an Egyptian journalist said, speaking about media censorship in Egypt: "My three friends got a life sentence, strictly for doing their job, for reporting - they're journalists and the world is silent. The world is turning a blind eye to what is happening in Egypt." His friends were imprisoned for reporting facts that didn't make the government look good - and this man says the world is turning a blind eye. OK - on a lighter note... When you're punched in the face, your eye turns black.  I know that in Brazil we use the color purple to describe an eye that was hit by a punch, but in English we call it black. If you're punched in the face you'll most likely get a black eye. Have you ever had a black eye, by the way? How did that happen? I'd like to hear that story. So please let me know in the comments... And talk to you next time!   Key terms turn a blind eye a black eye Vocabulário reffing = de refereeing, servir como juiz (referee) de jogo esportivo got a life sentence = foram condenados a prisão perpétua on a lighter note = falando de algo mais leve
11/5/20153 minutes, 42 seconds
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Como pronuncio em inglês: PROgress ou proGRESS?

What's up? No episódio de hoje, falo sobre aquelas palavrinhas do inglês que podem ser pronunciadas de duas maneiras: com ênfase na primeira sílaba, ou com ênfase na segunda. Tudo depende do uso. Ouça já! Transcrição What's up? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So here's what I want to talk about today: the pronunciation changes in words that can be nouns or verbs. Here's an example: the word i-m-p-a-c-t. IMpact, or imPACT. Have you noticed that there's a difference? Words like IMpact, or imPACT. INcrease, or inCREASE. OBject or obJECT. One is a noun, the other is a verb. With the noun, the stress is placed on the first syllable: OBject. With the verb, the stress is placed on the second syllable: obJECT. So which one is IMpact? It's a noun, like in this sentence: The behavior of parents has such a big IMpact on a child. Now let's use the verb imPACT - here's an example: Your donation will impact our organisation's results. Your donation will impact the results. As a noun again: your donation will have an impact. So in order to help you get used to this, let me give you a string of short examples with both IMpact and imPACT. Ready? Here they go: low-impact exercises are easier on the body. Our CEO's speech had no impact on employees. Recession has had a huge impact in our economy and lots of shops are now closed. Now, technology will continue to impact our lives in the future. Loss of vision will usually impact someone's independence. Plot twists generally impact the way a story unfolds. So, in case the difference in pronunciation doesn't come naturally to you - how are you gonna know? How are you going to learn this? Well, I suggest you do what I've done and get a move on with your listening. You could sit down and do focused activities to try and memorise, or internalise, the different ways to pronounce impact - but listening to comprehensible English as much as you can is, hands down, bar none, without a shadow of a doubt, the most efficient, fastest way for these things to become natural to you. Let's take another one: progress. I said PROgress, which is the noun. By the way, it's PROgress in the UK. Technology has brought a lot of PROgress to our lives. We've made a lot of PROgress on our reports. PROgress is a good thing. Now, listen to this: as they got to know each other better, their relationship proGRESsed. Mary didn't speak any French last year but she has since proGRESsed to an intermediate level. This disease usually proGRESses through various stages. Here are a few others: there was an INcrease in sales last year. The purpose of our courses is to inCREAse knowledge in our staff. Don't inSULT me! Sorry, what I said wasn't meant as an INsult. You need a PERmit to park your car in this area. We can't perMIT this behavior in our school. I'm studying a few different SUBjects now. We can't subJECT our employees to poor working conditions. So, tell me: have you noticed the different pronunciations of these words before? Do you say them right most of the time? Is this new to you? Can you give me a few examples of how you'd use them? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms pronunciations of progress, increase, object, etc. Vocabulário get a move on with = comece logo a fazer hands down = definitivamente bar none = de longe (neste caso)
10/29/20154 minutes, 21 seconds
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Podcast: Inglês Online updates

How's it going? No episódio de hoje eu faço diferente e te dou alguns updates relacionados ao Inglês Online. Transcrição How's it going? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I'm not going to talk about any specific idioms and expressions. Today I'm going to do more of an update on blog-related news. So I wanted to start by saying that our recent feed problem is over. If you're listening to this episode on your mobile you probably know that already... If you have no idea what I'm talking about, well... The feed for this podcast used to be at Feedburner, which is an independent service that is supposed to really help podcast producers by preparing their feed for iTunes. However Feedburner has been less than reliable for quite a while and last month it was my turn to experience that. My feed simply stopped updating, which meant that feed subscribers didn't get podcast updates for some time. It took me a while to find someone to help me ditch Feedburner and fix my podcast feed so that it would work again - but it's done now, so all's well. The other news I have is that I've been expanding the basic English section of Inglês Online. Just go to the site and hover your mouse over "Inglês Básico" on the top green menu and you'll see the options. I mean, if you're listening to this podcast you're probably way beyond the basics, but if you know of anyone who's in need of some basic learning, send them our way! For now, all I'm doing in the Inglês Básico section is written articles and activities. I have been updating the basic English tips regularly and also creating new activities and I intend to keep doing that for a while. So check it out and pass it on to your friends. Now, I hope you've been enjoying the podcasts and if this is your first time listening, welcome! I recommend you read "Como Falar Inglês", which is a series of tips I wrote in 2009 explaining the importance of Listening and the exact steps you should follow in order to get the most out of your listening activities. And the last thing I would like to address here is... probably the question I get the most from anyone that gets in touch with me, readers, students, everyone: are you going to release an intermediate course? Will there be a sequel to your basic course? And while I can't give you any details right now, all I'm gonna say is, yes. There is going to be a sequel, I am going to teach intermediate English and it's not going to take that long - so sit tight, stick around, keep following me on the blog, on Facebook, on Twitter and you'll be the first to know about it when it's time. Everyone, that's it for today and next week we're back with our regular programming of idioms, expressions and general English teaching. See you there!   Vocabulário ditch Feedburner = abandonar o Feedburner send (them) our way = manda (eles) pra gente stick around = fica por aqui
10/22/20153 minutes, 19 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: dei uma topada no dedo do pé

How are you? No episódio de hoje, você aprende como falar de "pequenos" acidentes que acontecem corriqueiramente com nossos pés, como "torcer / distender o tornozelo" e "dar uma topada no dedo do pé". Transcrição How are you? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So a couple of weeks ago I twisted my ankle while doing a gym class. It wasn't just any gym class. It's called Combat and it's sort of a combination of aerobics and punching and kicking. There's a whole lot of moving around, running and jumping, and... yeah, I ended up twisting my right ankle. Actually, there's an even better word to describe what  happened: I sprained my ankle. Have you ever sprained an ankle? It's happened to me so many times I've lost count. When you sprain your ankle, that means you have injured a ligament around a joint in your ankle. A ligament connects one bone to another at the joint. So when you twist your foot, or your ankle beyond its limit, that might hurt your ligament and give you a so-called sprained ankle. Like I said, that's happened to me a number of times while I was walking, exercising, running and so on. They made me fill out an 'incident report' at the gym. I had to leave the class 'cause my foot and my ankle hurt. When I got home I didn't even put ice on it. I just had this feeling that this wasn't too serious and I would just wait it out. So for the rest of the week I skipped the gym, and that was it. In a week or so I was back and there was no pain left. Now, here's another common accident involving our feet: stubbing a toe. You stub your toe when you strike it against something - let's say, a table leg or a wall - accidentally. I don't know which one is worse - stubbing a toe or spraining an ankle. I guess the pain from a stubbed toe is sharper, but it kinda goes away sooner. I have to say - I haven't stubbed a toe in a while  - knock on wood! If you walk around barefoot regularly, you'll probably stub a toe sooner or later. Now, before we wrap up our episode, here's one that I have yet to see happen: slip on a banana peel. Anyone! I haven't seen this happen to anyone and it's never happened to me either. I grew up hearing this phrase, in Brazil, but I've never seen anyone actually slip on a banana peel. Have you? I mean, I've seen it happen in cartoons and that's it. So now I'm thinking this is something cartoonists made up and it doesn't really happen in real life. Now, tell me - which of the accidents I just described have happened to you? How did you recover? Have you sprained your ankles a million times, like I have? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms twist (one's) ankle sprain (one's) ankle stub (one's) toe slip on a banana peel Vocabulário joint = articulação so-called = assim chamada wait it out = esperar isso passar, acabar knock on wood = frase dita enquanto a pessoa bate na madeira, para ter sorte e evitar o que ela falou
10/7/20153 minutes, 19 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Oi, sumido

How's it going? No episódio de hoje, eu falo sobre como dizer em inglês duas expressõezinhas nossas do dia a dia: "Oi, sumido" e "Vê se aparece". Transcrição Hi, what's up? This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I'm gonna talk about a couple of expressions with the word stranger. What does stranger mean? Hi, stranger! Well, a stranger is basically someone you've never met. This person's not a friend nor an acquaintance. So when someone says to you "Hi, stranger!" - are they calling you a stranger? Not really. "Hi, stranger" is a facetious way of saying "Hi, I haven't seen you in a while". "We've met before, I know you, but you've been out of touch (maybe)." Here's an example: let's say you have this friend who works at a computer shop. You haven't seen her in a couple of months. And then one day, out of the blue, your computer crashes. You try to revive it but nothing works. So you decide to take your computer to the shop - I mean, it's not like you have a choice. You don't know how to fix your computer and you've got a lot of work to do, so. Anyway, you get to the shop and there's your friend - the one you haven't seen or spoken to in a couple of months. As soon as she sees you, she says "Oh hello, stranger! How are you doing?" Every time you see a friend or anyone you're close to after a period of absence you can say "Hello, stranger." That's it! And our second idiom of today also has the word stranger in it and it's something people say when you're saying your goodbyes: Don't be a stranger. That means, don't disappear. Keep in touch. Make contact. Give me a call or come by for a visit some time. That's pretty much what we mean in Brazil when we say "Vê se aparece" or "Não some". By the way, that reminds me of the last couple of times someone said "Não some" to me. It's funny how people who say that are frequently the ones that are kinda lousy at keeping in touch - have you noticed? I used to be a bit lousy at keeping in touch, so I understand!... It's kinda funny, though, how sometimes we try to keep in touch with someone and they're always too busy to meet up... And when it finally happens, they're the ones who say "Don't be a stranger!" Anyway, let's wrap up with one more term - listen to this: John is no stranger to blind dates. What does that mean? John is no stranger to blind dates. That means John is familiar with blind dates. He's been on a few blind dates. He has gone on dates with women he had never met before. He's done it. He is no stranger to blind dates. One more example: my friend Mary decided to organise her wedding entirely on her own. She is going to plan every single detail of her wedding. I'm not worried for her - Mary is no stranger to party planning. She has a lot of experience planning all kinds of parties, actually. She worked at an event planning business for ten years! She's no stranger to party planning. So, you - the one who's listening to me right now: do you say things like "Hey, stranger" or "Don't be a stranger"? Are you good at keeping in touch with friends? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms Don't be a stranger Hey, stranger be no stranger to Vocabulário acquaintance = conhecido facetious = de brincadeira revive it (the computer) = reavivar (aqui, usado de maneira figurada) lousy at keeping in touch = não mantém contato (são ruins nisso)
9/28/20154 minutes, 6 seconds
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Podcast: Samba in London

Hi, what's up? Sabia que em Londres também tem escola de samba? :-) Pois no episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo um pouco sobre uma inglesa que desfila numa escola de samba brasileira aqui na Inglaterra. Transcrição Hi, what's up? This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So have you heard that there are "samba schools" outside of Brazil? Here in London they call it a "school of samba", actually. It is called Paraíso. How do I know? I'll tell you all about it. So around October last year I started looking for a place to live in London. That's because I had to leave my old place, obviously. I put an ad on a well-known website saying I was looking for accommodation and talked to a few people, and checked out a few places. And then an English lady answered my ad and said she had a spare room she would like to show me. She emailed me a few pictures, I liked them... And then we set up a meeting. A big yellow carnival headpiece hanging on a wall So when I first met Teresa - that's her name - face to face, she told me she loved samba and Brazilian carnival and she was actually a member of a Brazilian school of samba in London: Paraíso. I was a bit surprised to hear that. I mean, I know many foreigners who are into samba and Brazilian music, but this lady actually went to samba dance classes every week and participated in an actual "escola de samba"! Just to give you a better idea of just how much Teresa is into Carnival, when she was giving me a tour of the house we got to the dining room and I saw a big yellow Carnival headpiece hanging on a wall. That's actually a headpiece that Teresa wore in a carnival parade with her school of samba, Paraíso, a few years ago. Yes, Teresa dressed up in costume and paraded alongside dozens of 'passistas'. The carnival I'm talking about is an annual event in Notting Hill, London. Every year many different groups parade in the streets of Notting Hill, and Paraíso is one of them. They claim to incorporate all the main elements of a Rio carnival parade, although their group is a bit smaller. A 'passista' chatting with the London police Apparently in Rio samba schools in the Grupo Especial parade with up to four thousand people, whereas Paraíso puts two hundred and fifty people in the street. So this year I actually went to Notting Hill to see the carnival parade... I didn't get to see Paraíso though. It was raining, we got there around 2PM and my two friends wanted to grab a bite. So when we finally got to the actual area of the parades, Paraíso had already passed. I got to see a few other groups, though, and listen to their carnival music. I have to say - I'm one of those Brazilians who couldn't care less about Carnival, to be honest! I don't even like to travel in Brazil during Carnival, 'cause there's so much traffic coming and going to the beach (where else?), so... It's pretty funny that I ended up sharing a house with an English woman who's crazy about samba and Carnival. So where do you stand regarding Carnaval? Are you with me, or are you a typical Carnaval-loving Brazilian? Do you know anything about Carnaval in other countries? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Vocabulário wore = passado de wear - usar (no sentido de "vestir" ou usar algo no corpo) grab a bite = comer alguma cois
9/21/20153 minutes, 41 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Você tem que persistir

How's it going? No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, falo sobre maneiras de usar o verbo STICK. Transcrição How's it going? This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let me tell you a story: years ago, I was in a public speaking class. Basically, we all had to write a speech about whatever we wanted and then... Every one of us gave the speech in front of the class and listened to everyone's feedback. Our job then was to incorporate whatever useful feedback we got and work on the speech to make it better. After a couple of weeks, we then presented again what was, hopefully, an improved version of our initial speech. So when I gave my speech for the first time, this is the feedback I got: "I don't understand what you mean". I had spoken about one of my favourite books when I was a teenager, but the other students couldn't really understand where I was going with it. Actually, it wasn't even apparent to them what the story of the book was about. It was THAT bad. Well, in that moment I though the topic I had picked was the problem. The speech revolved around this book that meant a lot to me, but it wasn't really straightforward to those unfamiliar with the story. Some people gave me a puzzled look while I spoke... They were definitely not getting it. So, obviously, I got some private feedback from my teacher and he discussed several points with me. I just told him I was going to pick a different topic. In that moment I thought it would be impossible for me to write an interesting speech about that book. I'd taken a stab at it and it had not gone well, and I was feeling a bit discouraged... My teacher thought differently, though. He thought I should stick with it, and that is the expression I want to focus on today: stick with it, or stick with something. When you stick with something, that means you don't give up on it even when things get a bit tough. My teacher wanted me to stick with my topic. He wanted me to talk about that book. He didn't want me to give up on it just because my first attempt wasn't successful. He wanted me to stick with it, and that's what I ended up doing: I stuck with it. Yep, that's the past of the verb to stick: stuck. I stuck with it. The teacher gave me a few guidelines, and then I set off to rework my speech. And what do you know... The second time I gave that speech, it was like I was telling a completely different story. It went great and after I was done some of my classmates came to me and congratulated me on the speech. And then my teacher said, "Aren't you glad you stuck with it?" Aren't you glad you didn't give up on this topic? Now, think about some activity in your life that turned out to be harder than you initially thought, but you stuck with it and you're glad you did. So tell me about it in the comments! And one more thing: notice that I'm saying things like "I will stick with it", or "I stuck with it". Stick and stuck are the main verbs in those sentences. It's a different thing to say "I am stuck with it". In this case, stuck is the past participle of stick. Example: I am stuck with this crappy car. I spent all my money on it, and it is crap. Now I can't buy a new car, and I can't sell 'cause nobody wants to buy it. I am stuck with it. It has become a burden; something undesirable that I can't get rid of. Another example: I got some takeaway food on my way home, but when I opened the bag I had the wrong order! Worst of all, it was food I didn't like.
9/15/20154 minutes, 32 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Assim, de cabeça…

Hello, there. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, falo sobre duas expressões com a palavra head, e uma delas é parecida com o que a gente fala no Brasil: assim, de cabeça, eu só lembro desse ou daquele. Transcrição Hello, there. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So let's get started with the term a big head. I'm going to talk about the figurative meaning here. If someone says that you have a big head, that means this person thinks you're conceited or too full of yourself. Maybe you think you're more important than everyone else; or that you're better than everyone else! Maybe you think you deserve special treatment because because of something you've done, or because of a personal trait, or for something you have and so on. That's what being full of yourself means: basically, you think you're more important or better or deserve some kind of special treatment. And that's also how you get a big head. A woman said on Twitter today "I have so many new followers. I hope I don't get a big head." She was kinda joking, of course, but what was she saying? She was saying that she hopes she doesn't become conceited. She hopes she won't become full of herself with all these new followers. The adjective big-headed is also common. Instead of saying that someone has a big head, you will say that this person is big-headed. For example, someone tweeted out today that "all girls deserve someone that will treat them well, but girl -  don't let it get you big-headed". Off the top of my head... Ten people are coming. Don't become someone with a big head. That guy doesn't want you to become big-headed. Now let's move on to our second idiom of today: off the top of my head. This is a great one - it's so common! One possible translation for this term is in the title of this episode - when you say "Off the top of my head", it usually means that you're going to answer a question without a lot of thought or research to back it up. "Off the top of my head" means you're about to say what you remember first, whatever pops up in your mind at the time you're speaking. So when would you use it? Well, if someone asks you how much you're spending on your birthday party. You don't know the exact figure but you have an idea, so you say "Off the top of my head... Around a hundred reais." Or you could say "I can remember at least five different recipes for orange cake off the top of my head". That means that, for some reason, you're really familiar with orange cake recipes. I mean, you can remember five of them off the top of your head! Let's say your mother asks who's coming to your birthday party and you tell her the names of ten different people who said they were coming. Then, you say "I can't remember anyone else off the top of my head." OK, now: how about you give me an example for "a big-head", and another one for "off the top of my head? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions a big head big-headed off the top of my head Vocabulário to back it up = para apoiar (a sua resposta)
9/8/20153 minutes, 26 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: eu não pude deixar de ouvir

Hi, there. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo sobre aquela situação em que você ouve a conversa de outras pessoas sem querer. E também a situação em que você ouve de propósito! Transcrição Hi, there. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today we talk about eavesdropping. Yep, eavesdropping on someone else's conversation. Have you heard that term before? Here's a popular definition for the word: eavesdropping means secretly listening to the private conversation of others without their consent. Basically, every time you pay attention to and try to listen to what other people are saying (and you're not part of the conversation) you're eavesdropping. Well, of course, sometimes you can't avoid it. I mean, how many times have you been in an elevator and then someone stepped in while chatting on their cell phone and they happily carried on the conversation as though they were alone? You can't help but overhear what they're saying in that case, and that is the second term of today's episode: overhear. So the difference between eavesdropping on a conversation and overhearing a conversation is, one is on purpose and you're kinda not supposed to do it, while the other one happens unintentionally. Like I said though, if you're surrounded by people who are loud talkers, you would pretty much have to cover your ears to avoid overhearing, no? Now, when you know there are two people in the other room and they're having a private conversation... And you quietly put your ear to the door - well, then you are clearly eavesdropping. No two ways about it: you are eavesdropping. OK, now I'm going to ask you to admit to it and let us know about the last time you eavesdropped on a conversation. Who were you eavesdropping on, and did they ever realise you were there? What was the conversation about? C'mon... tell us! Here's what someone tweeted out: I'm glad our ears don't perk up like dogs when we're eavesdropping on a conversation. So, yeah! You know how a dog's ears will perk up when they're paying attention to something. If that happened to us human beings, well... I bet we would start thinking twice before eavesdropping. Now, overhearing what other people say is so common. When we're standing in line at the supermarket or just walking down the street, we can't help but overhear all kinds of things. I mean, there are entire websites devoted to strange or funny things people overhear while out and about. I've overheard many funny things in my life, and I have also gotten a few looks from strangers who've overheard me talking to other people. I wanna hear your stories: tell me about something funny you overheard someone say. Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions eavesdropping overhear Vocabulário as though they were alone = como se ele/ela estivesse sozinho/a no two ways about it = não há dúvidas when a dog's ears perk up = quando as orelhas de um cão ficam em pé we can't help but = não conseguimos evitar out and about = por aí (quando alguém está na rua, ocupado com atividades indeterminadas)
9/2/20153 minutes, 28 seconds
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Podcast: Are you quick to adapt?

Hey, everybody. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo sobre circunstâncias que forçam mudanças temporárias na sua rotina. Como você reage? Segue em frente como se nada tivesse acontecido ou demora um pouco pra se acostumar? Aproveite para reparar bem também no meu uso do Present Perfect, já que estou falando de uma situação que começou há alguns dias e continua até agora. Transcrição Hey, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening! So how do you react when your normal circumstances are disturbed? Here's what I mean... I'll give you an example of something going on in my life. I work at home. I used to go out to cafés a lot and bring my laptop with me, but lately I've been staying in more often. I've been doing that for a few reasons. One is, it saves me time, which means I've more time available to work on Inglês Online. Another reason is.. the silence. Cafés are busy, whereas my home is pretty quiet. Or so it was! So on to my example: my normal circumstances have been disturbed. Temporarily, that is. My housemate, who's also the landlady, is redoing her kitchen, and for that she hired two contractors who have torn the old kitchen down and are now in the process of putting a new kitchen in place. Obviously, tearing down the kitchen involved making noise. A lot of noise. Coincidentally, I had a job to do this week that involved recording my voice for a couple of hours. Ideally, I should do that without a lot of external background noise - not the case this week. So yesterday I waited until 6 o'clock in the afternoon - the two men working in the kitchen had left by then, and I was able to do my recording in relative silence. Well, having the kitchen redone also means I can't use the oven - actually, we can't use anything that used to be in the kitchen, except the fridge. So the fridge is working, and there's a new microwave oven, but that's it. All my stuff - kitchen supplies and groceries - is piled up on a table and covered in a dust sheet. I've been eating sandwiches and drinking coffee beverages out of a can (which isn't bad, I have to say - just a bit more expensive than making my own coffee). And, the house has been kinda messy. Obviously, this is all temporary and necessary for the kitchen work to be done. All should be back to normal in less than a month. And I had plenty of notice from my landlady, so... When the contractors started their work, I was ready. Still, it got me thinking about temporary disturbances and how we deal with them. My question for you today is, what would you do if you were me? Would you take your work somewhere else just to get out of the house? Would you do the same as I've done, and pick up a sandwich and some crisps in a shop every day for dinner? Would you be really annoyed if you decided to stay in every day, or would you be able to focus on your work and stay just as productive? Are you pretty flexible regarding your surroundings, or do you feel that you need the right kind of environment to get something accomplished? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Vocabulário to stay in = ficar em casa they have torn the old kitchen down = eles botaram abaixo a cozinha antiga they had left by 6pm = às 6 da tarde eles já tinham ido embora a dust sheet = um lenço, geralmente de plástico, para proteger objetos de poeira coffee beverages out of a can = bebidas em lata feitas com café I had plenty of notice from someone = a pessoa me avisou com bastante antecedênc...
8/24/20153 minutes, 33 seconds
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Podcast: dating vocabulary

Hi, all. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo sobre blind dates ("encontros às cegas") e aquelas ocasiões onde sua amiga quer te apresentar a alguém que ela acha que seria perfeito pra você. Transcrição Hi, all. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I'm gonna talk a little bit about dating. Dating is the activity of going on a date, or many dates. A date is when two people meet up - let's say, for dinner and a movie, potentially to get romantically involved. People go on dates to get to know each other better, and dating does not necessarily mean being in a relationship. I don't think we have an expression in Brazil that is the exact translation of "a date". We could say "um encontro", I guess, but we don't really say that, do we? So if two people start dating, or going on dates and if they do that regularly for a while, then they might end up having a talk about their situation and agree to be in a relationship. So that would be the moment when they start referring to each other as boyfriend and girlfriend. OK, so there are two terms related to dating that I would like to present today. You may be familiar with them, which is good. The first one is a blind date. First, let me clarify the meaning of the word blind: a blind person would be someone that doesn't have the ability to see. And a blind date is a date with someone you've never met before. I'm not talking about meeting someone in person for the first time - someone you've been chatting with online, from a dating site. Rather, I'm talking about going on a date with someone you've never met nor spoken with before. How can someone go on a date with a stranger, you ask? That is where the second expression of our episode comes in. Let's say you're single and your friend Silvia thinks she knows someone who would be perfect for you: Mark. So she wants to fix you up with Mark. So if both you and Mark agree with it, she will, let's say, give Mark your phone number, and maybe Mark will text you or give you a call and the two of you will agree to meet up for coffee. So now you're going on a blind date with a guy named Mark. Your friend Silvia is fixing you up with Mark. Have you ever tried to fix friends up? Did it work? Are you a talented matchmaker? I don't think blind dates are very common in Brazil. Again, a blind date is when you meet up with someone you've never seen or spoken with before so you can get to know each other a little and see if the two of you click. Have you ever been on a blind date? How did it go? Now, fixing people up, or at least trying to... That's a bit more common in Brazil I think. Do you know anyone who's been fixed up with another person by a mutual friend, and then they ended up having a relationship? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key expressions dating blind date fix someone up with Vocabulário meet up = se encontrar matchmaker = alguém que promove/sugere encontros entre pessoas estranhas (entre si) com o objetivo de formar um casal see if the two of you click = ver se vocês dois se dão bem, se tem algum futuro
8/10/20153 minutes, 34 seconds
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Podcast: Como usar whatever e whichever em inglês

Hello, everyone. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo sobre uma diferença básica entre as palavras whatever e whichever em inglês e dou exemplos de como usá-las. Transcrição Hello, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I will talk about the basic difference between whatever and whichever and give you examples of how to use both. I'm not gonna cover all the ways you can use one or the other; rather I'll focus, like I said, on the most basic way to use them. Whatever language you choose, it's important to listen to it. Do you remember the difference between WHICH and WHAT? Let's recap: which is the better option when you're referring to a limited set of options that is known to the people having a conversation. If you ask someone "What's your favourite movie?", you're asking that person to choose from an almost infinite number of possibilities - like, every movie known to man. Now, if you show three DVDs to that person, you could say "What's your favourite?" but "Which one is your favourite? " is better here. Why? Because you're asking them to choose from the three options you presented before you asked the question. So the examples I'm going to show you using whatever and whichever follow the same rule, so to speak. So if someone tells you "Whatever language you decide to learn, it is important to listen to it." Out of all the languages of the world, whatever language you choose, it's important to listen to it. If someone says "You can buy whatever you like in the supermarket. It's on me" they're giving you complete freedom - they will pay for any products you choose to buy without restriction. If your teacher tells you "whatever degree you'd like to pursue, I can help you" that means that you could choose any degree in the world and they will be able to help you. Now, if the same teacher says "In order to have my guidance you have to pick Geography, History or Social Sciences. So whichever one you choose, I will be able to assist you"... That teacher laid out three options for you - here, you have limited choice. If you go with one of these three options, they will be able to help you - whichever one you choose. If that other person said, "You will find five kinds of yoghurt at that supermarket. Whichever one you buy is fine" - again, you will find only five options. And finally, you might be telling that first person that you're thinking about learning an Asian language - like Japanese or Korean. So that person might tell you "Whichever one you choose (out of the limited set of Asian languages) will be a great addition to your education." I would like to see your examples for whatever and whichever. Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key expressions whatever whichever Vocabulário so to speak = por assim dizer it's on me = é comigo (eu estou pagando) laid out = apresentou, expôs
8/3/20153 minutes, 30 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Não entendi. Que você disse?

Hi, everyone. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo sobre algumas maneiras diferentes de pedir pra pessoa repetir o que disse (pois você não entendeu de primeira). Transcrição Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today's episode is about common ways to ask someone to repeat what they just said to you. You didn't hear it the first time, so you say, for example, "Come again?" There's obviously a literal meaning to that phrase, which is "Come again" or come back again some time, but if you say it more like a question, you're asking the speaker to repeat what they said. Now, it could be that you couldn't hear them, and it could also be that you're sort of questioning what they said. So "Come again?" can also be said when, let's say... You cannot believe what you just heard. It's very simple to use. Let's say someone offers you chocolate. "Would you like some chocolate?" And you say "Come again?" "Chocolate. Would you like some chocolate?" That's it. Here's a very similar term: Say what?  Same thing. Say what? It's like you were asking "What did you say?" or asking that person to repeat what they said. So you simply say "Say what?" We could use the same example: Would you like some chocolate? "Say what?" Chocolate. Would you like some chocolate? Now here's another one, and this one's a bit longer. "I didn't catch that" and you can also say I didn't get that. That just means, again, I didn't hear you. Please repeat. So there you have it: come again, say what and I didn't catch that, I didn't get that. If you watch lots of American movies and shows, you've no doubt come across the line "I didn't catch your name". That's very common and that just means that person's asking what your name is. Now, remember, it may be that you're talking to a native speaker on the phone and they're speaking a bit fast (as we often do when speaking our mother tongue) and you can't understand them very well - not just a couple of words, but overall. In that case, you may want to ask that person to slow down, rather than saying "Come again? " or "Say what?" all the time. For most situations, just say "Could you speak slower, please?" That's the informal version, which uses the adjective "slower". The more formal version, which correctly uses the adverb, is "Could you speak more slowly, please?" Sometimes it is necessary to explicitly ask someone to slow down, since some people will just keep repeating what they said without realising that the problem is that they're speaking too fast to be understood by someone whose native language isn't English. Have you ever had to ask someone to slow down? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key expressions come again? say what? I didn't catch that I didn't catch your name Could you speak slower? Could you speak more slowly?   Vocabulário slow down = desacelerar
7/27/20153 minutes, 34 seconds
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Podcast: Does punctuation matter? Yes, it does!

Hello, everyone. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo sobre a importância de se pontuar frases corretamente, com exemplos de mensagens em inglês que podem ter significados completamente diferentes dependendo de como são lidas. Transcrição Hello, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I came across something that sparked my interest and I thought it would make good subject matter for this episode. I'm sure many of you have come across one of those images on Facebook with a phrase that can be read several different ways according to how you punctuate it. Obviously, the meaning will change depending on how you read it, and that's the whole point. I guess one of the most well-known ones is the "let's eat grandma" meme. This one has been widely circulated around social media and usually comes with an image of an old lady... Probably for impact. And the words are exactly the ones I said before, only there are two versions. The first one is Let's eat, grandma - which has a comma after "eat", and means that someone is asking their grandma to join them and start eating. The second version has no comma: let's eat grandma. So that would be some pretty savage grandkid suggesting they should have grandma as a meal. The image closes with "punctuation saves lives!" Have you seen it on your social media timelines? That's not the one I saw today, though. The one that piqued my interest reads "Chickens keep dogs on leads". It was seen on a road sign by someone and this person photographed it. I can't post the picture here since I don't have the rights for it but I've put together an image that sort of gives you an idea. So this is a nice one since there are multiple ways to interpret this sentence. Before I get into this, let me ask you: take a look at the image I posted for this episode and read the words. What's the first interpretation that came to your mind after you read it? I'm curious. When I first read it, my thought was  - whoever put up this sign is calling me a chicken and asking me to keep my dog on a lead. Now, chicken is a word that can be used in the United Kingdom to refer to a woman and it's usually not an insult. So this person would be asking all women that are passing by to keep their dogs on a lead. If you're a guy, you're off the hook apparently. So that's one way to read it. The second way to understand it can be - this person is telling actual chickens to keep their dogs on leads. By the way, a lead in this case is a long piece of plastic or leather that is attached to the dog's collar, so the dog owner can direct and control the dog. And finally, the way I think whoever put up this sign intended for it to be understood. "Chickens. Keep dogs on leads" meaning, there are chickens running around in this area, so please keep your dog on a lead to prevent it from chasing after a chicken and potentially hurting it and so on. And that made me think about punctuation in general and how it can, when misused, really get in the way of understanding what the other person is trying to say. I know I've run into this problem before - someone sent me a message and I had a hard time figuring out what they wanted to say. Have you ever had a similar problem? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Vocabulário it would make good subject matter = daria um bom assunto for impact = para causar impacto you're off the hook = você não tem obrigação misused = mal usada get in the way (of something) = dificultar a realiz...
7/20/20154 minutes, 3 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Eu te defendi quando você brigou com ela

Hi, all. No episódio de hoje do podcast Inglês Online, eu falo sobre o reality show  que eu assisto para me acostumar com o inglês britânico, e também sobre um idiom super comum, que aparece toda hora nesse reality e em todo lugar onde se fale inglês. Transcrição Hi, all. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So I wanted to tell you about something I've been doing since I moved to England. If you know anything about me, you know that I grew up on American English so when I moved here, I wanted to make sure I got used to the local accent as fast as I could. Obviously I talk to people and they talk to me, but in London you will find people from all over the world, really, and that means a multitude of accents which are usually easier to understand than some of the native British accents. So as part of my plan to get myself acquainted with British English I went to the websites for the main UK TV channels and started following some TV shows online. Here in the UK you can basically watch most TV shows online, so that's pretty cool. One of the first shows I stumbled upon was "Made in Chelsea", so let me tell you about it. Well, I'll tell you a little bit about it - it's easy to summarise. Made in Chelsea is a reality show about very wealthy kids that live in Chelsea, which is a neighbourhood in London. When I say kids, I mean young adults in their early twenties. So this show is a hit in the UK- it's been going for eight or nine seasons - and by the way, in the UK they don't say "season"; rather, they call it a series: series 1, series 2 and so on. So although Made in Chelsea has had eight or nine series so far, things don't change much from one series to another. Here's what changes: some regulars leave, and new people join the show. That's it. This is what happens in every season: new couples are formed, then there's a lot of gossip about the new couples, then they fight and end up breaking up; or else one of them cheats and they end up breaking up. Then, if A and B used to be a couple and C and D used to be another couple, in the next season A and C get together, and then B and D get together as well, and the cycle of intrigue and misbehaviour begins again. I swear to you, that's 99% of what goes on. Anyway... Here's what I really wanted to tell you: one of the terms I hear most often when watching Made in Chelsea is "to have someone's back". The people on this show are all friends and some of them have been friends for several years, so they expect their friends to have their back. And what does that mean? To have someone's back means to defend them when someone is saying things about them that are unkind, for example. Or you can show your friend that you have their back by taking their side in a fight. Let's say your friend John is arguing with a guy named Michael about a girl. Michael likes this girl and he thinks John hit on the girl, even though John knew Michael liked her. So now Michael is confronting John about it, and John is saying that he and the girl were just having a chat as friends. So you tell Michael that John is telling the truth: he was not hitting on the girl; they were just having a chat. You have John's back on this one. John's your mate, your buddy and you always have his back. Plus, you know that John wasn't really hitting on the girl. I hear the term "have someone's back" on every episode of this TV show. They equate it with 'being loyal', really. One of the guys in the show is called Spencer, and his best friend is Jamie.
7/13/20155 minutes, 7 seconds
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Podcast: Groom destroys bride’s bouquet at wedding

Hey you! Hoje temos o episódio do podcast Inglês Online é sobre a história do noivo que chutou o buquê da noiva antes que qualquer uma das amigas dela conseguisse pegar as flores. Ouça o episódio para saber mais sobre o incidente, e qual foi a reação das convidadas. Transcrição Hey, you! This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I stumbled upon this funny piece of news about a bride who, on her wedding, you know - threw the bouquet to the female guests... As you do, when you're a woman getting married. It's tradition! So, anyway, the woman threw the bouquet, and here's what happened: "A groom left his female wedding guests disappointed after destroying his bride's bouquet of flowers - before any of the unmarried women could get their hands on them." That's right. The groom destroyed the bouquet. Here's the link to the story if you'd like to check it out, and there's a video too, so go watch it. So here's what I find weird about this story: this guy just got married. It's not like he's against marriage..! And as far as I know, he got married of his own free will. I mean, I would understand if a confirmed bachelor did that - although, honestly, that would be in poor taste - but at least it would be in line with his convictions. However we're not talking about a confirmed bachelor here, we're talking about the groom, now husband! What's going on with this guy? And here's what he did after kicking the bouquet, according to the news piece: "The groom then runs over to his friend and gives him a high-five, saying: "Sorry, I had to." So he high-fived his friend and said that he had to do it. Ok, I don't know about you but I'd be wary about marrying a guy that feels he has to save his mates from having the same fate as him... Now, it seems like the female guests didn't take it very seriously, which, I have to say, is nice. I found this comment on a different news site, supposedly by a guest that attended the wedding: "I was at that wedding stood amongst those girls. We all thought it was hilarious and were not left "disappointed". We all saw the funny side to what Joe did, including the bride! For everyone saying the marriage won't last, you don't know these people! They are ridiculously happy and currently on their honeymoon in Mexico! Some people just take things far too seriously and just need to lighten up!!" That's cool: everyone thought it was hilarious and the groom is a big goofball from the sounds of it. Better this way. If the bride thought it was funny, then I think it's funny. Now, I'd like to hear from female listeners - are you a stickler for tradition? If you're married, did you throw the bouquet... And maybe one of your friends caught it? Did she get married? Or maybe you were at a friend's wedding and you caught the bouquet. So - did you get married after that? I'm not the best person in the world to talk about traditions because I'm not really big on traditions. I'm fine with following them if I think they're OK, but I don't mind not following them either. How do you feel about traditions? If you're married, which traditional things did you do? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time. Vocabulary as you do = como é comum fazer I'd be wary about = eu ficaria meio cabreira a respeito de a confirmed bachelor = solteiro convicto goofball = palhação lighten up = relaxar a stickler for = faz questão de
7/6/20153 minutes, 46 seconds
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Podcast: For what it’s worth

Hey, everyone. Hoje temos um podcast com duas expressões super comuns no inglês com a palavra WORTH. Transcrição Hey, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. For what it's worth... I think your hair looks great So today we kick off our episode with this very, very popular idiom: for what it's worth. Actually... every term or idiom I talk about on this podcast is pretty popular - that's how they make the cut. So that's the case with today's idioms as well, and "for what it's worth" is one you've certainly heard if you routinely watch American movies or TV shows. First of all, if you're not clear on the meaning and usage of WORTH, I recommend you take a look at my previous post about it. OK, so imagine that you're having a chat with a friend who's just inconsolable about not winning a contest. Yeah, it was a drawing contest. Your friend is a talented artist, and he prepared, he studied, he took specialized classes, he put a lot of effort into this... And he didn't win. OK, so now he's standing in front of you and you can tell he's sad and all that... You don't really know what to say, I mean you know he's good - at least, you think he's good. So you tell him "Look, for what it's worth, I think you're an amazing artist." For what it's worth, I think you're an amazing artist. I don't know if my comment will help, but I think you're an amazing artist. I don't know if my comment is worth much, I don't know if it matters or not, if it's important or not, so just take my comment for what it is worth, and it may not be worth much. So, for what it's worth - I think you're an amazing artist. You don't just use "for what it's worth" when you're trying to console someone, though. For example, it can be a very unassuming way to introduce your opinion. Unassuming means modest, unpretentious. No one has asked what your opinion is, no one's invited you to speak, but you'd like to offer your opinion anyway, for what it's worth. You're not saying your opinion is the right one and everyone should listen, so, for what it's worth, here's my opinion. Now, if you're in a business meeting and all the other participants are there to listen to what you have to say, you should not start your speech with "For what it's worth, this is what I think." You're in that meeting as an expert, as someone who's supposed to know their business - so obviously you should state your opinion with confidence. We use "for what it's worth" when we want to come across humble, unassuming... You know, I'm just putting my opinion out there, for what it's worth. And here's another term with WORTH that I really like: money's worth. Let's say you're going to visit a place that is very touristic and has lots of interesting attractions, so you pay for a ticket that gives you entrance to all the attractions in the same day. You want to get your money's worth, so you go to every single attraction. That's right, there are thirty different things to see in that place and you manage to go to every single one of them. That's because you want to get your money's worth. You wanna get good value for your ticket. You paid a certain amount of money which gives you the right to visit thirty different attractions, so you want to get your money's worth. You're gonna visit all thirty of them. Here's another example: Mary went to Madonna's concert last week and said Madonna really gave fans their money's worth. That means that Mary thinks fans got exceptional value from the concert.
6/29/20155 minutes
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Como falo em inglês: Acho que a gente já se conhece

Hi, everybody. Hoje o episódio conta com quatro frases em inglês comuníssimas em eventos ou qualquer outra situação 'social', quando pessoas estão sendo apresentadas umas às outras. Transcrição Hi, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So today I will review with you guys four set phrases that are used every day, all the time, when people are introducing or re-introducing themselves or other people to someone. A 'set phrase' is the same as a fixed phrase. Fixed phrases are phrases whose words are fixed in a certain order - and that order is how people say them. Even if you could say the same thing in a different way, using different words... People just don't. Native speakers use set phrases just because... they do, the same way we, in Brazil, use our own set phrases, such as "Tudo bem?" instead of "Tudo está bem?" The second phrase is perfectly correct; it makes sense and everyone can understand what's being asked. We just don't speak like that, though. Same thing in English :) So I love our four set phrases of today because they all use the Present Perfect, which is something every Brazilian learner of English could become more familiar with. So here's the first one, which we say when we're introducing someone to someone else: Have you met...this person? For example, Have you met Ted? This is going to sound familiar to "How I met your mother" viewers. So that's a great line for introducing two people to each other. "Hey, Sara, come here. Have you met Ann?" Have you met my sister? Have you met John? It's a question, obviously, but we don't really expect to get an answer. You don't really need to say "No, I haven't", although you can. You could just say "Glad to meet you, John." And here's our second set phrase: If you've actually been introduced to that person already, you can say "Yes, I believe we've met." Someone's introducing you to James, for instance, but you and James were introduced about a month ago. The two of you have already met. So when your mutual friend Louise says to you, "Have you met James?", you say "Yes, I believe we've met." So last weekend someone introduced me to a man named Michael. My friend said "Ana, have you met Michael?" and I said "Hi, nice to meet you." Then later that night I was introduced to Debbie, who's someone I've actually met before. My friend said "Have you met Debbie?" and I said "Yeah, I believe we've met. How are you?" Now here are a couple of phrases for when you haven't met someone yet, and you'd like to introduce yourself. You see someone you'd like to talk to but there's no one there to introduce you to each other. You can just say "Hi, I'm John, or I'm Mary. I don't think we've met". Maybe this person is standing near you and, why not? You think it's a good idea to introduce yourself and greet them, maybe have a little chat... So "Hello, my name's Ana. I don't think we've met." And, instead of saying "I don't think we've met", you can say "I don't believe I've had the pleasure." Now, that's something I hear men say more often. "I don't believe I've had the pleasure" is a bit more formal than just "I don't think we've met." So there you go. Listen to this episode a few more times and get a bit more familiar with these phrases, especially if you're going to be at social events with native English speakers. Talk to you next time. Key terms Have you met ...? I believe we've met I don't think we've met I don't believe I've had the pleasure
6/22/20154 minutes, 12 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Infelizmente, não (e não é do jeito que você pensa!)

Hey, everyone. Hoje eu falo sobre jeitos diferentes de se dizer "infelizmente" ou "infelizmente, não" em inglês. Transcrição Hey, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So if you're listening to this podcast you probably know the word 'afraid' and the term "to be afraid" or "to be afraid of". To be afraid means to be fearful, to be scared of something. What are you afraid of? Ghosts? Bugs? Are you afraid of the dark? By the way, since I mentioned being afraid of ghosts, let me tell you about something that happened to me the night before Christmas, the 24th of December, 2013. I was already living in London in a house that I shared with four other people. Everyone had gone away for the holidays. I was going to fly to Brazil the next day, which was Christmas day. Anyway, all I remember is that I was pretty tired that night and I could tell that a storm was starting to build. The wind was blowing hard outside. It was around eight in the evening and I was in the kitchen fixing myself something to eat. Now, this was a three-story house with lots of doors and windows and, I swear to you, that night I understood why ghost stories are so popular in the United Kingdom. I could swear there was someone on the third floor slamming the doors - I mean, I'm sure it was just the wind but it really did sound like it was a person and if memory serves, I thought I heard a few steps. I was lucky though - I was knackered that night and couldn't be bothered to even be afraid of a ghost roaming around. OK, so after this little story let's move on to the expression "I'm afraid so". When someone asks you "Is it going to rain today?" and you answer "I'm afraid so", you are basically saying "Yes", but you're also communicating that you regret having to inform them that it is going to rain. If you answer "I'm afraid so", or simply "Afraid so", rather than just "Yeah", that adds a touch of "sorry to say that, I know you were expecting otherwise." That person was expecting clear, dry weather for today. Maybe they would like to go to the beach, maybe they were planning on taking their dog out for a long walk. So you're giving them the not-so-good news that it's going to rain. Did I flunk the exam? I'm afraid so. Are we lost? Afraid so. Are they out of ice cream? Afraid so. Does my hair look awful? I'm afraid so. Naturally, we can also say I'm afraid not with the opposite meaning. Is it gonna be sunny tomorrow? Afraid not. By the way, I remember hearing this on those little afternoon movies from "Sessão da Tarde" - I think they used to translate "I'm afraid not" as "Temo que não." I don't think anyone actually says that in Brazil, at least not informally. I guess what we do is use "Infelizmente." Also, I wanted to stress that "I'm afraid so" and "I 'm afraid not" are used all the time, whether it's a formal or informal conversation. "Did I get the job?" I'm afraid not. Has Mary called? Afraid not. Are the seats at the theatre any good? Afraid not. Do you have good news? I'm afraid not. So, did Brazil win the World Cup after all? I'm afraid not. So, come on - tell me where in your life you could use these little expressions. Are you about to deliver unpleasant news to someone? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time! Key terms (I'm) afraid so (I'm) afraid not   Glossário if memory serves = se eu me lembro corretamente knackered = exausta, acabada (gíria no Reino Unido) couldn't be bothered = nem me dei ao trabalho de
6/15/20154 minutes, 20 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Tenho um pressentimento

Hello, all. Hoje eu falo e dou vários exemplos sobre alguns idioms comuníssimos do inglês que usam a palavra GUT. Transcrição Hello, all. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Have you ever heard the word GUT? If you're in the habit of watching American TV shows and movies, I'm pretty sure you have. Gut means belly, or even 'intestines'. Look at the picture: that's a guy with a big gut. By the way, people call that a beer gut, or a beer belly. A beer gut is usually the result of habitual beer drinking. I searched Twitter for people using this idiom and found this: "I'm either pregnant or I have a beer gut." Well, I hope she has figured that one out by now. Then, this guy complained that... "Every day at the gym so far someone I know has commented about my beer gut." Geez. Anyway, beer isn't the only cause of a beer gut, that much I know... So let's move on to a very interesting idiom: gut feeling. That does not mean having a sick stomach, or having a bad feeling associated with your stomach. A gut feeling is an intuitive feeling. It's something you know, and sometimes you can't explain why you know it or where it came from. Some people call it intuition, some call it instinct, and other people call it divine guidance. Whatever you call it, when you have a gut feeling about something... I, personally, would recommend that you listen to it. I don't know about you, but when I have a gut feeling about something, it's usually right. And, honestly, sometimes I regret not listening to it. I think there have been times when... I felt pressured to take a particular course of action that was the opposite of what my gut was telling me. I can tell you that I always regret going against my gut, or not listening to my gut. OK, so, as you can see, we can just use the word "gut" - listen to your gut, listen to what your gut says, go with your gut. When people say something like that - go with your gut, they're saying "If you've got a gut feeling about this, trust it." What's your gut feeling about this, or that? Deep down, in your gut, what do you think will happen? So I totally agree when someone says "when in doubt, go with your gut". Do what feels right. This is a very common phrase: go with your gut. If someone tells you they were faced with a difficult situation and didn't really know what to do but then decided to go with their gut... Perhaps they ended up making a decision that was not what everyone expected, but it felt right because they went with their gut. They had a gut feeling about it and they listened to it. Now, can you guess what a gut reaction is? This is another great term with the word gut. Your gut reaction is your immediate, instinctive reaction to something. Before you have time to think, before you're influenced by other people's reactions... A gut reaction is your true, genuine reaction. If someone says "What is your gut reaction to this? Please give me your gut reaction", that means they wanna know your immediate thoughts on something, before you have time to choose your words. Just give me your gut reaction. No sugarcoating. Don't mince your words. I want your gut reaction. So I am sure everyone has plenty of experience with following or not following their gut. I wanna hear your stories. Did you follow your gut in this particular occasion? Did you not follow your gut? How did it turn out? Talk to you next time! Key terms beer gut / beer belly gut, gut feeling go with your gut, listen to your gut gut reaction   Glossário
6/8/20154 minutes, 32 seconds
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Como usar MAY e MIGHT, parte 2: a diferença

Hey, everybody. Depois da parte 1 dessa série de 2 partes, em que falei sobre as similaridades entre may e might no contexto de possibilidades presentes e futuras no inglês, hoje continuo com exemplos desses dois modal verbs em tempos verbais um pouco mais complexos. Transcrição Hey, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. it might have worked out So today I give you the second part of a 2-part series on may and might. In the first part, I talked about a few simple ways to use may and might interchangeably. In today's episode, I'll take it a step further  and give you examples of may and might being used with multi-word verb expressions. Here's what I'm talking about: we might have gone to the show if it had not rained. He may have read the letter by now. So today's examples are a bit more complex and you will hear lots of "have been, have made, have gone" and so on. There are two main kinds of situation I'm going to focus on: in the first one, there's a possibility that something may have occurred, or might have occurred - we don't know. This is the one where may and might are still basically interchangeable in general. In the second situation, I am going to talk about something that might have happened in a certain way, but didn't - it happened differently, and I know that for a fact. In this one, we usually go with MIGHT. So on to the first one. Let me present you with a few hypothetical situations... Let's say your friend Mike said something today that, he thinks, might have offended... his friend Lisa. Mike doesn't know for sure. Lisa may or may not be offended. Lisa might be offended - no one knows. So Mike thinks that his comment might have offended Lisa. Here we could also say, Mike thinks his comment may have offended Lisa. So here's another one - you gave your students homework yesterday, and today you find out that half of your students were not able to do the homework. It may have been too difficult for them. You don't know yet, but you're about to ask. So this is what you're thinking: it might have been too difficult for them, or it may have been too difficult. Your friend Mary said she was going to call you up yesterday, but didn't. Why? What is the reason she didn't call? You don't know for sure. She may have been really busy, or she may have forgotten. You're not sure, but she might have forgotten, or she might have been busy. Now, think of a few things that could have happened in a certain way, but did not. They happened in a different way. And you know how they turned out; it's a fact. Example: my friend John might have enjoyed his new job (it looked very promising) but it turned out that he hated it. We know for a fact that John didn't like his job, and in this case it is more common to use MIGHT. He might have enjoyed his job, but he didn't. I bought a lottery ticket when I was eighteen so I might have become a millionaire at 18, only... it wasn't the winning ticket so I didn't become a millionaire. Things between you and your boyfriend might have worked out great!... but they didn't, unfortunately, and you guys broke up after a few months. Now, think of something from your own life. Something that happened in a certain way. Before that outcome came about, though, that thing might have happened in a different way. What is your example? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!   Key terms may have been might have done   Glossário on to the first one = vamos à primeira,
6/1/20154 minutes, 34 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Não estou conseguindo acompanhar

Hey, all. Hoje eu falo pra você sobre o chamado phrasal verb "keep up". Você certamente já ouviu essa expressão se tem costume de assistir filmes e seriados legendados, e hoje se familiariza um pouco mais com ela no podcast. Transcrição Hey, all. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Today we take a look at the phrasal verb keep up. Keep up can have a few different meanings, and in today's episode we're gonna focus on two very popular, very common ways to use it. Imagine you started a new job two months ago. So today your boss calls you for a little meeting... She says "I want to congratulate you on your work. You've been doing a great job. Keep it up!" Your boss told you to keep it up. That's the same as "keep up the good work." "Keep up" is an extremely common phrasal verb and if you're a movie buff or into TV shows, you have certainly heard it before. When your boss tells you to keep it up, what is she talking about? She wants you to maintain the same level of performance at work. She wants you to keep doing a good job. Don't drop the ball! She congratulated you on your good work, and then told you to keep it up. Keep on doing a great job. Your friend Laurie has been learning to play the piano. She plays a beautiful piece on the piano. You say "Keep it up!" Your cousin Tony has been training to run a marathon and he's doing great. You tell him "Great job. Keep it up!" Your friend John has been trying his hand at cooking. You eat one of the cookies he made, and it's delicious. You say "Yum! Please keep it up. What are you planning to cook for next week?" I can't keep up Now imagine a different kind of situation. Let's say you've been going to an aerobics class at the gym for about a year. You do great at that class. You even look like you could teach that class - you're that amazing. You're moving to a different neighbourhood though, so you leave your old gym and sign up for another gym that's just next door to where you live now. You start going to the aerobics class, only to realize that you can barely get through 50% of the class! You're in shock, but it's really happening: you can't follow all the moves, they're too complex. You're falling behind in the sequences - the pace is too intense. In short, you can't keep up with the class! You can't keep up with this aerobics class. It's a bit too hard for you; too complex, too fast, it's too much for you right now. You see the other people in the class and they're doing just fine. Now, you... You can't keep up. You can't keep up with the teacher, you can't even keep up with the other people in the class! That means that right now you're not able to match their ability. You can't do things on the same level they do. Here's a different example. You and your friend Mark are both preparing for the same exam. So you guys agree to meet every other day to study together. However, Mark doesn't have a job and therefore he's been studying all day long, every day. You, on the other hand, have a full time job and can only study at night. So every time you guys meet to study, you can tell Mark is way ahead of you. You just can't keep up with Mark. He's got all that free time to study, and you don't. He's always going to be ahead of you. Now, come on. Tell me about a situation where you couldn't keep up. Maybe it was a gym class. Maybe it was a night class - you were not able to keep up because you worked all day and you were too tired to learn anything at night. Maybe you can't keep up with a relative or a friend -...
5/25/20154 minutes, 39 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Pra que?

Hi, everybody. Hoje eu falo pra você sobre mais duas expressões idiomáticas do inglês que estão na boca de todo americano: How come? e What for? A segunda é o nosso famoso "Pra que..?" Quanto à primeira, ouça e descubra, caso não conheça, ou acostume-se mais com ela. Nunca é demais! E mais uma observação para hoje: como eu geralmente faço nos episódios, they, them e their são usados para falar de alguém com gênero indefinido - já reparou nisso? Preste atenção no exemplo onde eu falo sobre a/o spouse. Transcrição Hi, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast, and it's a bit longer than usual. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Have you ever heard this phrase: How come? How come I have to do this? How come the sky is blue? How come it's raining when the weather forecast said it was going to be sunny? Well, even if you haven't heard "How come?" before, it's a very common phrase and once you get familiar with it, you'll start noticing it all the time in movies and TV shows. In short, the most common explanation to "How come?" is that it means Why? I'm talking about the meaning of "how come" here - it's similar to why. However, we say Why do I have to go to bed now?, and we say How come I have to go to bed now? We never say "How come do I have to go to bed now? "- no! Again, we say "How come I have to go to bed now?" What is the reason I have to go to bed now? How come I have to go to bed now? And before I give you more examples of How come?, let me clarify one thing: "how come?" is informal, which means you should use it when speaking to friends, family and other people you're close to. We don't use it in writing for a general audience, or in speaking to someone you don't know, for example... Or when you're addressing an important person, like the President or a judge. If you used informal speech such as "How come? " with someone like that, it could be considered impolite or even arrogant. OK. Now that that's taken care of, here's another example: How come you're not attending the conference? You signed up for the conference. You were supposed to come. You told me you were coming. And now my assistant tells me you're not going any more. How come? You're not attending the conference? How come? How come no one told me we were having the meeting at a different building? I'd like to know the reason for that. How come no one told me? You changed your mind about buying a new car? How come? Well, I decided to put the money in a savings account instead. How come you missed our final exam? Well, I felt so sick that day that I couldn't get out of bed. How come you didn't see us? We were sitting right behind you! Can you remember a good example with "How come?" Maybe something you heard in a movie, or read somewhere. Let me know in the comments! Now here's the second expression for today's episode: What for? It's very simple: when we ask "What for?", we're asking "for what purpose". Let's say you move to a new neighborhood with your family, and your spouse, who has never had a car in their life, says "I need a car." You look at your spouse and say "What for? Your office is just around the corner, our kids' school is three blocks away and we have everything we need within walking distance. What do you need a car for? You think you need a car... What for? What would be the purpose of a car? What do you need a car for? And your spouse might answer, "Well, I just signed up for yoga classes in our old neighborhood, so I definitely will need a car to get to my yoga classes.
5/18/20156 minutes, 22 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Todo mundo conhece o Faustão

Hey, everybody. Hoje eu falo sobre celebridades, os nomes que todos conhecem e os fãs que não conseguem tirar os olhos de seus ídolos, tudo em inglês. Transcrição Hey, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So how do we say "todo mundo conhece o Faustão" in English? We can say "everybody knows Faustão"... of course. And that structure is not the focus of our podcast. This one is: Faustão is a household name in Brazil. Listen again: Faustão is a household name in Brazil. First of all, what is a household? A household is a domestic unit where a group of people live - usually a family but sometimes it's just a group of people who are not even related to each other. A household can be an apartment, it can be a house, a hut, a trailer - whatever serves as a home to a group of people. When you ask that person for their address, they will tell you the address of the household. So when we say that someone is a household name, that would mean that this person is known in every household - in other words, almost everyone knows who they are. In Brazil we have, like everywhere else, a huge number of people who are household names. Roberto Carlos, Xuxa, Ronaldo, Faustão, just to name a few. Some people dream of becoming a household name, right? They want to become a celebrity, or a famous scientist maybe, or a politician. And obviously there are people who are household names locally, in their hometown. If you grew up in a town that isn't the capital of your state, you know what I'm talking about. Some people become local celebrities, widely known to the population, so they're a household name in that town. I was reading a blog post the other day about an artist called Marian Hill. The blogger asked the following question in the post: "How is Marian Hill not a household name yet?" She thought this artist, Marian Hill, was so great, so talented, that she could not believe the artist had not yet become really famous and well-known... In other words, a household name. If I asked you to name a few household names in Brazil, who would you say? The first name that pops up in my head is Pelé. The second one, I have to say, is Xuxa (although I never watched her show - it's true.) Let me know in the comments who pops to mind first. So we're talking about celebrities and I wonder who's gonna tell me about their celebrity encounter. Yep, I'd like to hear about it (actually, read - please post a comment). Have you ever had a run-in with a celebrity? Who was it? Are they a household name? Share the deets! Where were you, and when? Or maybe it was a celebrity sighting and you saw them from afar. Whatever the case, I'm curious: are you a starstruck kind of person? If you are, that means you have sort of an ongoing fascination with celebrities - at the very least you're interested in them and you would probably be in awe if you spotted a celebrity at the supermarket, for example. You wouldn't be able to take your eyes off them, your heart rate would go up a bit, and you would probably want to follow that person around for a bit until you worked up the courage to approach them and ask for an autograph. So.. come on, tell us: when you had that run-in with your celebrity, were you starstruck? What was your reaction? What did you do? Talk to you next time!   Key terms a household household name starstruck   Glossário pops to mind = vem à cabeça a run in = um "encontro" que não estava marcado deets = gíria para 'details'
5/11/20154 minutes, 17 seconds
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Como usar MAY e MIGHT, parte 1 (podcast)

Hi, everyone. Hoje eu falo sobre as diferenças (ou seria 'similaridades'?) entre may e might. Esse episódio é a parte 1 do assunto, que continua com mais um episódio em algumas semanas. :) Transcrição Possibilities Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. This episode is part 1 of a two-part series about MAY and MIGHT. Trust me, it's not a complicated topic - you'll see. However I try to keep every episode under five minutes, so I'm guessing I'll have two episodes to cover all the examples of may and might I wanna give you. So this is part 1, and part 2 is coming up in a few weeks. OK - let's talk about the basic differences between MAY and MIGHT. Actually I should say... Let's talk about all the similarities between MAY and MIGHT, since, as it turns out, these are more frequent than the differences. My hope for this episode is that it helps dispel the myth that there are rigid rules about the usage of one or the other - most of the time, there aren't. So just relax and give this episode a good listen. Fist off, both may and might are very common when we talk about possibility. If you come to London I will tell you that you might have a hard time getting on the tube after midnight. That's because most tube stations close around thirty minutes after midnight. You might have a hard time, but it is possible to get on the tube after midnight. And I could also have told you "You may have a hard time getting on the tube after midnight." And what would be the difference in that case? Well, you will find that some people think that it's better to use might when something is less likely, and may when something is a bit more likely... I'll admit that that's how I do it, and that's the general feeling I get from listening to English. If you have a different experience in your contact with native English, please let me know in the comments. So I, in particular, would say "You may have a hard time..." if I thought that would be more likely to happen. Now, here's what I really want you to pay attention to: is that a rule? Would one or the other significantly change the meaning of what I'm saying? The answer is "No." Some grammar books state that may means a stronger possibility than might; and by the same token, other people, including teachers, think that this is a very flexible "rule." So here are other things I could say using may and might interchangeably: I may go to the party - I'm not sure yet. We might swing by after dinner. Jane may call you about the report... She seems to be unclear on a few numbers. My friends might enjoy this restaurant. I may go to the gym on Sunday but I'm not sure yet. So just for the sake of being very clear, here are the same examples with the other word: I might go to the party - I'm not sure yet. We may swing by after dinner. Jane might call you about the report... She seems to be unclear on a few numbers. My friends may enjoy this restaurant. I might go to the gym on Sunday but I'm not sure yet. When talking about present and future possibilities in life - such as illustrated in the examples, use may or might fearlessly. In part 2 I'll explore slightly different situations and we'll see what works best with each one of them. Now go ahead and type a couple of your own examples in the comment area. Talk to you next time!   Key terms may might   Glossário dispel the myth = acabar com, quebrar o mito de have a hard time (doing something) = vai ser difícil (fazer algo) by the same token = da mesma maneira
5/4/20154 minutes, 11 seconds
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Como falo em inglês: Nem imagino porque…

Hey, all. Sabe quando alguém te conta uma história, e no fim a pessoa não consegue entender porque a amiga ficou brava com ela... E você pensa "Hmm, nem imagino porque...", pois está óbvio pra todo mundo, menos para ela? Pois é. Nosso idiom de hoje serve exatamente para isso. Transcrição Hey, all. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. So almost every time I see the word WONDER being taught to English students, the expression "I wonder if" is there. That would be equivalent to our "Será que..." I wonder if it's going to rain. I wonder if Brazil will ever win the World Cup again, and so on. The term "I wonder", however, is not our focus for this episode. Let's take a look at another very common way to use wonder. Let's say your friend Chris tells you that his brother bought a used car at Mike's Used Cars shop. You look at Chris and you say "I wonder why your brother did that... Mike's shop is the most expensive  place in the area to get a car." And then Chris goes on to explain to you that although Mike's cars are indeed expensive, their service is unbeatable. So when Chris tells you that, you say "Oh, ok. Now I get it." Now you understand why Chris' brother bought the car with Mike, even though Mike's cars are super expensive. Before Chris explained it to you, though... It was a mystery. "I wonder why Chris' brother would buy a car with Mike. They're so expensive!". Hmm, he bought a car from Mike... I wonder why...? You can basically use that for anything. Whenever you don't get why someone did something, or the reason why something is the way it is.  I wonder why they've changed their logo; I liked the old one. I wonder why "tanto faz" means "it doesn't matter." So now listen to this one: imagine you're throwing a party and you decide to hire a florist to decorate. Only, your friend Sally was planning on hiring the same florist for her wedding. In fact, she was the person who told you about the florist. She was very excited about having this person decorate the church, the reception ceremony... So she's very surprised when you tell her you hired this person to decorate your party, which is a week before her wedding. You can't see why that would be a problem, so when you realize Sally hasn't come to your party you're really surprised! The two of you are such good friends. You try to call her, and she doesn't pick up. You tell a mutual friend about what's going on, saying at the end "Not only has Sally missed my party but now she won't pick up the phone!" Your friend says "I wonder why...!" You look at her, puzzled, and she says "C'mon! You stole her florist one week before her wedding!" Oh. It all makes sense now. Sally's mad because you hired the same florist she wanted to hire. So when your friend says "I wonder why...!" she is being sarcastic, of course. Here's another example: your brother has an exam next week, but instead of spending most of his time preparing for the exam, he's really more interested in watching TV and playing videogames. Every time you walk past his bedroom, you notice he's... not studying. Later that week he tells you he failed the exam.  Your reaction is... "I wonder why." Obviously, you're being sarcastic. You know very well why he failed the exam. Tell me: how would you use "I wonder why" in your life? Please let me know in the comments when that happened and what it was about. Talk to you next time!   Key terms I wonder why Glossário indeed = de fato unbeatable = imbatíveis
4/27/20154 minutes, 36 seconds
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Podcast: 2 idioms com SLACK que todo americano usa

Hi, everyone. Neste episódio, eu falo sobre dois idioms do inglês que você não vai querer perder: um equivale ao nosso "dá um desconto" (quando alguém é iniciante, por exemplo); e o outro é para quando alguém está folgando... Sabe como é? Transcrição Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglesonline podcast. Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven't yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglesonline podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes. Thanks for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening. Alright. So how about when you get to the office on Monday and as soon as you step in, your boss calls you to introduce you to your new colleague, Johnny? It's Johnny's first day in the office. So on Thursday you overhear another colleague, Mike, telling your boss that Johnny has messed up a couple of spreadsheets. Your boss says "I'll talk to Johnny and train him to use the spreadsheets, don't worry. Now cut him some slack, the guy has been with us for less than a week." Your boss asks Mike to cut him some slack. Cut Johnny some slack. Johnny is the new guy, and he hasn't been fully trained in his new job yet. He hasn't learned all the ins and outs of the job. So cut him some slack. Cut Johnny some slack. Give him some time to get used to the office, get used to the job, get used to the spreadsheets... Don't be too hard on Johnny - cut him some slack. So when you cut someone some slack, you're treating them in a way that is less severe than usual, or being less demanding with that person. Why? Well, there's more than one reason why you may want to do that. Let's say you have just lost your job and your friend Mary came over to your place to keep you company and make sure you're alright. She's being a good friend. So, right now she's setting the table for lunch. Your sister looks at what she's doing and says "Hey, your friend Mary can't set a table... She's doing it all wrong!" And you say "OK, I'll fix it later. Please cut her some slack... She's just trying to help." So here's your sister criticizing your friend Mary, because Mary just isn't very good at setting a table. You know Mary's just being sweet and trying to help, though. So you tell your sister "Cut her some slack, she's just trying to help." I found an interesting examplo someone posted on Twitter: "When you make a mistake, fix it, but also be sure to forgive yourself. Cut yourself some slack... Nobody's perfect." So this one is for when you mess up and then start beating yourself up for it. Cut yourself some slack. Everyone makes mistakes. So, here's a plan: learn from your mistake and next time hopefully you'll do better. OK, so... You know when a person all of a sudden, for some reason, starts working less hard than usual? Their work, or effort, used to be OK. Now, it's like they're not working as hard. They're not putting in the same amou