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PNAS Science Sessions Profile

PNAS Science Sessions

English, Sciences, 1 season, 369 episodes, 1 day, 21 hours, 35 minutes
About
Welcome to Science Sessions, the PNAS podcast program. Listen to brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in PNAS, plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us.
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How a small fish makes big sounds

How a small fish makes big sounds Science Sessions are brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, National Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us. In this episode, Verity Cook from Charité – Berlin University of Medicine explains how a fish 12 millimeters in length produces sounds exceeding 140 decibels. In this episode, we cover: •[00:00] Introduction •[01:37] Can you tell us more about the fish you studied? •[02:26] What are some of the methods you used to characterize the fish’s sound production mechanism? •[03:49] Can you walk us through the process of how these fish produce sound? •[05:02] What are the broader implications of your findings? •[05:53] Conclusion. About Our Guest: Verity Cook PhD Student Charité – Berlin University of Medicine View related content here: https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2314017121 Follow us on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts for more captivating discussions on scientific breakthroughs! Visit Science Sessions on PNAS.org: https://www.pnas.org/about/science-sessions-podcast  Follow PNAS: Twitter/X: https://twitter.com/PNASNews Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PNASNews/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/pnas-news/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/pnas-news Sign up the Highlights newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/nas/podcast-highlights
4/8/20246 minutes, 17 seconds
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History of flight in dinosaurs

Dinosaur feathers hint at flight history Science Sessions are brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, National Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us. In this episode, Jingmai O’Connor and Yosef Kiat share insights gleaned from modern birds’ feathers that help understand the evolutionary history of flight in dinosaurs. In this episode, we cover: •[00:00] Introduction •[01:02] Jingmai O’Connor, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Field Museum of Natural History, describes the characteristics of feathers associated with flight. •[02:11] O’Connor gives context and background for previous knowledge of the evolution of flight feathers in dinosaurs. •[03:25] O’Connor describes the sources of fossil specimens for analysis of feather evolution. •[04:29] Yosef Kiat, an ornithologist at the Field Museum of Natural History, tells what he learned about the consistent number of primary feathers in modern birds. He also tells how that number applies to dinosaurs.  •[05:54] O’Connor explains what the symmetry of feathers reveals about a species’ flight ability and history. •[06:29] Kiat applies feather symmetry to explain the flight evolutionary history of Caudipteryx. •[07:05] Kiat summarizes the findings of the study, using feather number and shape to assess the flight abilities of four genera of dinosaurs. •[07:47] Kiat and O’Connor describe the type of potential fossil evidence that could fill in holes in the history of flight evolution in dinosaurs. •[08:42] Kiat and O’Connor explain the study’s caveats and limitations. •[09:44] Conclusion. About Our Guests: Jingmai O’Connor Associate Curator of Fossil Reptiles  Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL Yosef Kiat Postdoctoral Research Fellow Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL View related content here: https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2306639121 Follow us on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts for more captivating discussions on scientific breakthroughs! Visit Science Sessions on PNAS.org: https://www.pnas.org/about/science-sessions-podcast  Follow PNAS: Twitter/X: https://twitter.com/PNASNews Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PNASNews/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/pnas-news/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/pnas-news Sign up the Highlights newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/nas/podcast-highlights
3/25/202410 minutes, 2 seconds
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Bee communication in a changing world

Science Sessions are brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, National Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us. In this episode, researchers describe the potential impact of anthropogenic disturbances on bee communication. In this episode, we cover: [00:00] Introduction [00:45] Description of the waggle dance of honeybees. [01:59] Maggie Couvillon, an entomologist at Virginia Tech, explains what information researchers can glean from the waggle dance. [03:24] Christoph Grüter, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Bristol, describes what impact climatic changes may have on bee communication. [05:13] Michael Hrncir, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Sao Paulo, recorded the impact of rising air temperatures on foraging in stingless bees. [06:48] Grüter explains how landscape changes and habitat fragmentation might affect bee communication. [08:23] Elli Leadbeater, an ecologist at Royal Holloway University of London, found that dancing honeybees found the foraging environment of central London superior to agricultural land. [09:49] Kris Braman, an entomologist at the University of Georgia, studied how the distribution of land cover at different scales influences bee diversity in Georgia. [11:24] Grüter explains how insecticides may alter bee communication strategies. [12:41] Denise Alves, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Sao Paulo, describes how a fungal pesticide can affect nestmate recognition in stingless bees. [14:23] Adam Dolezal, an entomologist at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, describes how a bee pathogen affects nestmate recognition in honeybees. [15:17] Final thoughts and conclusion. About Our Guests: Maggie CouvillonAssistant ProfessorVirginia Tech Christoph GrüterSenior LecturerUniversity of Bristol Michael HrncirProfessorUniversity of Sao Paulo Elli LeadbeaterProfessorRoyal Holloway University of London Kris BramanDepartment Head and ProfessorUniversity of Georgia Denise AlvesPost-doctoral ResearcherUniversity of Sao Paulo Adam DolezalAssistant ProfessorUniversity of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View related content here: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsbl.2022.0155 https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2219031120 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022191020300512 https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.14011 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10841-022-00402-6 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045653521026199 https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2002268117 Follow us on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts for more captivating discussions on scientific breakthroughs! Visit Science Sessions on PNAS.org: https://www.pnas.org/about/science-sessions-podcast Follow PNAS: Twitter/X: https://twitter.com/PNASNews Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PNASNews/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/pnas-news/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/pnas-news Sign up the Highlights newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/nas/podcast-highlights
3/4/202416 minutes, 31 seconds
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Adult talk and children’s speech

Alex Cristia and Elika Bergelson explain the factors influencing speech in children.
2/12/202410 minutes, 18 seconds
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Modeling illuminates pitcher plant evolution

Chris Thorogood and Derek Moulton explain how mathematical modeling of carnivorous pitcher plants can lend insights into their evolution.
1/29/202410 minutes, 6 seconds
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How children perceive gendered division of household work

Allegra Midgette and Nadia Chernyak describe when young children begin to perceive and accept unequal and gendered division of household labor. 
1/15/20248 minutes, 36 seconds
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Reversing hearing loss in mice

Karen Steel explains a proof of concept for restoring hearing loss in mice. 
1/2/202410 minutes, 31 seconds
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50 years of DNA cloning

Stanley Cohen reflects on the 50-year legacy of a classic PNAS paper on recombinant DNA.
12/18/202312 minutes, 7 seconds
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Carbon emission benefits of remote work

Longqi Yang and Fengqi You discuss the potential reductions in carbon emissions of switching from in person to remote work.
12/5/20237 minutes, 52 seconds
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Skeletal records and gender bias

Jeremy Siow, Taylor Damann, and Margit Tavits discuss both historical and modern gender inequality in Europe.
11/20/20239 minutes, 23 seconds
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Genetic shield against neurodegeneration

Emmanuel Mignot explains how a variant of an immune system gene might protect some people against neurodegenerative disease.
11/6/202310 minutes, 28 seconds
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Penalties tied to motherhood

Cecilia Machado and Douglas Almond discuss the impact of a first child on the career trajectory of mothers.
10/9/202310 minutes, 4 seconds
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Motherese in bottlenose dolphins

Laela Sayigh asks whether dolphins use "motherese" when communicating with their calves.
9/25/202310 minutes, 22 seconds
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Racial disparities and climate policy

Pascal Polonik and Kate Ricke explain why reducing greenhouse gas emissions does not always improve environmental equity.
9/11/202310 minutes, 18 seconds
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What illusions tell us about silence

Ian Phillips, Rui Zhe Goh, and Chaz Firestone use auditory illusions to explore how people perceive silence.
8/28/202310 minutes, 41 seconds
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Growth mindset and educational outcomes

Cameron Hecht discusses an intervention targeting high school teachers to improve student retention and diversity in STEM fields.
8/14/202310 minutes, 43 seconds
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How dehorning affects rhino behavior

Vanessa Duthé explains how dehorning affects the behavior of black rhinoceroses.
7/31/202310 minutes, 24 seconds
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Why legalese persists

Eric Martínez explains why legal documents are written in hard-to-read language.
7/17/20238 minutes, 54 seconds
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Gender gap among migrant scientists

Researchers explore trends in the gender gap among internationally mobile scholars.
7/3/20237 minutes, 39 seconds
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Communal nesting in bird-like dinosaur

Mattia Tagliavento talks about the evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds using isotopes in Troodon eggshells.
6/19/20239 minutes, 38 seconds
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Racial disparities in air pollution exposure

Pengfei Liu shares findings on racial disparities in exposure to the air pollutant nitrogen dioxide.
6/5/202310 minutes, 7 seconds
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How vertebrates acquired a gene for vision

Chinmay Kalluraya and Matthew Daugherty explain how vertebrates acquired a gene critical for vision from bacteria.
5/22/202310 minutes, 1 second
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Genomic insights for sea turtle conservation

Blair P. Bentley, Lisa Komoroske, and Camila Mazzoni discuss the role genomic elements play in the evolution of sea turtles.
4/24/20239 minutes, 26 seconds
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Jump, bend, and roll: The rise of bioinspired robots

A special edition of Science Sessions delves into the capabilities of robots inspired by plants and animals.
4/4/20239 minutes, 10 seconds
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Math learning through videos

Stanislas Dehaene and Marie Amalric investigate whether short online videos are sufficient to teach mathematics concepts.
3/20/202310 minutes, 6 seconds
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Impressionism and air pollution

Anna Lea Albright and Peter Huybers describe how optical effects consistent with air pollution appear in the paintings of Claude Monet and J.M.W. Turner.
3/6/20239 minutes, 51 seconds
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How lizards adapt to urban living

Kristin Winchell explains the genetic basis of anole adaptation to urban environments.
2/14/20239 minutes, 55 seconds
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Revisiting the history of animal extinctions

Researchers document animal extinctions in the Ediacaran Period that may have preceded the earliest known mass extinction.
1/30/20237 minutes, 36 seconds
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The music of Mesozoic bush crickets

Bo Wang and Chunpeng Xu describe how fossilized katydids provide insight into the role of insect sounds in the Mesozoic.
1/16/202310 minutes, 8 seconds
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How a neural network taught itself chess

Tom McGrath describes how the neural network AlphaZero taught itself how to play chess without observing a human game.
1/3/20237 minutes, 13 seconds
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Honeybees: Nature’s puzzle solvers

Orit Peleg, Golnar Fard and Francisco López Jiménez explain how honeybees overcome geometric constraints to construct honeycombs.
12/19/20227 minutes, 23 seconds
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Cultural identity in sperm whales

Taylor Hersh explores how patterns of clicks produced by sperm whales suggest the exchange of cultural information between the whales.
12/5/202210 minutes, 16 seconds
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Tuning into nature’s music

Researchers discuss what animal soundscapes can tell us about the health of ecosystems.
11/14/202219 minutes, 16 seconds
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Point sources of methane emission

Daniel Cusworth discusses combining aircraft-based and satellite-based measurement to identify methane emission point sources.
10/31/202210 minutes, 2 seconds
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How climate warming releases ocean methane

Syee Weldeab describes what researchers can learn from ancient global warming about the risks posed by ocean floor methane hydrates.
10/17/202210 minutes, 31 seconds
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U-turn in occupational gender segregation

Ling Zhu and David B. Grusky explore intergenerational factors influencing occupational gender segregation in the United States.
10/3/202210 minutes, 9 seconds
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Activated patients reduce implicit bias

Izzy Gainsburg and Veronica Derricks discuss how patient activation can disrupt implicit bias in physician-patient interactions.
9/19/202210 minutes, 10 seconds
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How bumblebees respond to noxious stimuli

Matilda Gibbons, Lars Chittka and Jonathan Birch discuss the possibility that bumblebees may feel pain.
9/6/20229 minutes, 56 seconds
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Science of Misinformation

Researchers explore how misinformation spreads and what can be done to stop it.
8/15/202220 minutes, 57 seconds
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Bias and the placebo effect

Lauren Howe and Alia Crum explore the interactions of societal biases with the placebo effect.
8/1/20229 minutes, 22 seconds
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Epigenetic clocks for humans and dogs

Steve Horvath and Elaine Ostrander explain the usefulness of epigenetic clocks in humans and dogs.
7/18/202213 minutes, 16 seconds
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Peopling of the Americas

Researchers explore how and when humans first arrived in the Americas.
6/27/202219 minutes, 58 seconds
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How the saw sings

L. Mahadevan, Petur Bryde, and Suraj Shankar explain the otherworldly sounds of the musical saw.
6/13/202210 minutes, 38 seconds
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Underrepresentation of women in economics

Guido Friebel discusses the lack of gender parity in academic positions in economics.
5/31/202213 minutes, 14 seconds
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How bias impedes women’s ascent to political leadership

Christianne Corbett and Robb Willer explore perceptions of electability of female political candidates.
5/16/202210 minutes, 17 seconds
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Treating cystic fibrosis

A feature episode explores recent developments and future research directions in treating cystic fibrosis.
4/25/202225 minutes, 5 seconds
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Rising temperatures and European bird traits

Martijn van de Pol reports that approximately half of the changes in the traits of 60 European bird species can be attributed to rising mean temperatures. 
4/11/20229 minutes, 8 seconds
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Origin of the Great Unconformity

Brenhin Keller and Kalin McDannell explore the origins of a worldwide gap in the geologic record spanning hundreds of millions to billions of years.
3/28/20227 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ethnoracial identity of MENA Americans

Neda Maghbouleh, Ariela Schachter, and René Flores explore the US Census classification of people with Middle Eastern and North African ancestry.
3/14/202210 minutes, 42 seconds
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Disparities in scholarly output

Thema Monroe-White and Cassidy Sugimoto discuss how disparities at the intersection of race and gender affect the expansion of scientific knowledge. 
2/28/20228 minutes, 56 seconds
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Frontiers in coral conservation – Part 2

Researchers explore cutting-edge approaches to coral reef conservation. Image credit: Cody Engelsma (Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, FL).
2/14/202211 minutes, 44 seconds
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Frontiers in coral conservation – Part 1

Researchers explore cutting-edge approaches to coral reef conservation. Image credit: Cody Engelsma (Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, FL).
1/31/202212 minutes, 50 seconds
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Racial disparities in communication

Ray Block Jr. and John Holbein report that Americans are more likely to respond to an emailed survey request from a sender with a putatively White name than a sender with a putatively Black name. Image credit: iStock/Prostock-Studio.
1/18/202212 minutes, 48 seconds
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Tropical forests in the Anthropocene – Part 2

A collection of research articles explores how tropical ecosystems have borne the brunt of the human impact on the environment. Image credit: Pixabay/Pexels.
12/27/202114 minutes, 55 seconds
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Tropical forests in the Anthropocene – Part 1

A collection of research articles explores how tropical ecosystems have borne the brunt of the human impact on the environment. Image credit: Pixabay/Pexels.
12/13/202115 minutes, 13 seconds
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CRISPR use in agriculture: Part 2

A special episode explores the state of CRISPR use in agriculture. Image credit: Can Stock Photo/molekuul.
11/29/202117 minutes, 49 seconds
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CRISPR use in agriculture: Part 1

A special episode explores the state of CRISPR use in agriculture. Image credit: Can Stock Photo/molekuul.
11/15/202116 minutes, 31 seconds
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Language loss and medicinal plant knowledge

Rodrigo Cámara-Leret explains the impact of indigenous language extinction on medicinal plant knowledge. Image credit: Pixabay/DEZALB.
11/2/202116 minutes, 34 seconds
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How Zen stones form

Nicolas Taberlet and Nicolas Plihon explore the physical explanation for a fascinating natural phenomenon: the formation of Zen stones on frozen lakes. Image credit: N. Taberlet, N. Plihon. Lab Physique ENS de Lyon and CNRS.
10/18/202110 minutes, 31 seconds
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Greenhouse gas emissions tied to concrete

Hessam Azarijafari, Randy Kirchain, and Jeremy Gregory explore how innovations in the concrete industry can reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Image credit: Pexels/Life Of Pix.
10/4/202110 minutes, 55 seconds
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Racial and ethnic disparities in pollutant exposure

Sarah Chambliss discusses racial and ethnic disparities in exposure to air pollutants. Image credit: Pixabay/sueegeneris.
9/20/202112 minutes, 31 seconds
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Soil microbes and hybrid vigor

Maggie Wagner and Manuel Kleiner report that the interaction between maize and soil microbes influences hybrid vigor. Image credit: Kayla M. Clouse.
9/7/202110 minutes, 39 seconds
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Racial disparities in air pollution

Gaige Kerr discusses racial disparities in atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide in the United States.
8/23/202110 minutes, 40 seconds
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Genome sequencing of extinct giant lemur

Stephanie Marciniak, Logan Kistler, and Ed Louis describe an extinct giant lemur.
8/9/20219 minutes, 43 seconds
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Upslope advance of forest fires

Mohammad Reza Alizadeh, John T. Abatzoglou, and Mojtaba Sadegh report that forest fires have been advancing upslope across the western United States in recent decades.
7/26/202110 minutes, 42 seconds
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How bats know the speed of sound

Eran Amichai investigates how bats know the speed of sound.
7/12/202116 minutes, 50 seconds
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Animal behavior and ecosystem effects

Mike Gil discusses how changes in animal behavior can affect ecosystems.
6/28/202112 minutes, 53 seconds
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Patient–physician racial concordance

Brad Greenwood explains how patient–physician racial concordance decreases Black infant mortality.
6/14/202111 minutes, 6 seconds
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How HIV infects human cells

Vinay Pathak describes when and where HIV sheds its capsid coating while infecting human cells.
6/1/202112 minutes, 44 seconds
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Self-cleaving ribozymes

Jeannie Lee describes the discovery of self-cleaving ribozymes.
5/17/202112 minutes, 7 seconds
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Designing synthetic organisms

Josh Bongard describes AI-designed, reconfigurable biological organisms made from frog cells.
5/3/20219 minutes, 6 seconds
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Exploring electron bifurcation

Jonathon Yuly, David Beratan, and Peng Zhang investigate how electron bifurcation reactions work.
4/19/202111 minutes, 42 seconds
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Exploring the length of human conversations

Adam Mastroianni and Daniel Gilbert explore why conversations almost never end when people want them to.
4/5/20219 minutes, 36 seconds
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Climate history of Mars

Joe Levy shows how glaciers on Mars can reveal its climate history.
3/22/202111 minutes, 55 seconds
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How click beetles jump

Marianne Alleyne, Aimy Wissa, and Ophelia Bolmin explain how the click beetle amplifies power to pull off its signature jump.
3/8/202113 minutes, 15 seconds
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Eruption of Steamboat Geyser

Mara Reed and Michael Manga explore why Yellowstone's Steamboat Geyser resumed erupting in 2018.
2/22/202116 minutes, 44 seconds
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Geological history of Mars

Martin Bizzarro tells what zircon crystals reveal about the geological history of Mars.
2/8/202112 minutes, 35 seconds
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Learning the language of facial expressions

Aleix Martinez explains why facial expressions often are not accurate indicators of emotion.
1/25/202115 minutes, 11 seconds
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Hazards of ozone polution to birds

Amanda Rodewald, Ivan Rudik, and Catherine Kling talk about the hazards of ozone pollution to birds.
1/4/202116 minutes, 39 seconds
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Preserving muscle and bone mass in space

Se-Jin Lee and Emily Germain-Lee explain a way to preserve bone and muscle mass during spaceflight.
12/14/202018 minutes, 1 second
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Predicting the Asian giant hornet’s spread

David Crowder and Gengping Zhu explain how to predict the spread of the Asian giant hornet.
11/23/202012 minutes, 4 seconds
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Supernova and mass extinction

Brian Fields explores a hypothesis that a supernova may be responsible for a mass extinction.
11/9/202021 minutes, 44 seconds
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Future of artificial intelligence

Eric Horvitz discusses AI’s promises and perils.
10/26/202023 minutes, 59 seconds
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Origin and diversification of penguins

Juliana Vianna and Rauri Bowie explain the origin and diversification of penguins.
10/12/202017 minutes, 15 seconds
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Economics of Greenland ice sheet melting

William Nordhaus explains the economic consequences of Greenland ice sheet melt.
9/28/202017 minutes, 18 seconds
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Military conscription and public sector employment

NAS member Dalton Conley explains how the Vietnam War draft lotteries are a natural experiment for studying how military service affects life outcomes.
9/14/202016 minutes, 30 seconds
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Transitions tied to early farming

Clark Larsen describes the costs of urban life a Neolithic city.
8/31/202017 minutes, 17 seconds
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Soil bacterium that lives on air

Mette Svenning and Alexander Tveit describe a bacterium that can live on gases in the air.
8/17/202014 minutes, 34 seconds
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Exploring bivalve shell design

Derek Moulton explains the mathematics behind bivalve shell design.
8/3/202015 minutes, 21 seconds
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Origins of the kinetochore

Eelco Tromer and Jolien van Hooff explain the origins of the kinetochore in eukaryotic cells.
7/20/202017 minutes, 13 seconds
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Breaking the STEM ceiling

Fabiola Gianotti, Marcia McNutt, and Donna Shalala discuss the past, present, and future of women in STEM.
7/6/202016 minutes, 12 seconds
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Size limits of ice

Francesco Paesani, Thomas Zeuch, and Valeria Molinero discuss the size limits of ice crystals.
6/22/202014 minutes, 9 seconds
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How marine reptiles moved from land to sea

Julia Schwab and Steve Brusatte describe how marine reptiles made the evolutionary move from land to sea.
6/8/202011 minutes, 35 seconds
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Nutrient dilution and grasshopper decline

Ellen Welti explains how grasshoppers in a Kansas prairie could be in decline even with abundant grass.
5/26/20206 minutes, 42 seconds
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Protein design and its applications

NAS member David Baker describes how to design proteins from scratch and the products of his lab's own protein design efforts
5/11/202018 minutes, 25 seconds
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Active learning in STEM

Elli Theobald and Scott Freeman describe the benefits of active learning for underrepresented minority students.
5/4/20205 minutes, 46 seconds
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Designing street networks

Adam Millard-Ball and Chris Barrington-Leigh explain trends in urban street network design.
4/20/20206 minutes, 53 seconds
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Engineering T cells to fight disease

NAS member and Nobel laureate David Baltimore describes efforts to enhance T cells' ability to fight cancer and HIV.
4/6/20207 minutes, 19 seconds
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Dynamics of RNA frameshifting

Christine Dunham discusses RNA frameshifting and its potential applications in biotechnology.
3/23/20205 minutes, 47 seconds
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Albatross patrol

Henri Weimerskirch describes how albatrosses can help detect illegal fishing boats.
3/9/20206 minutes, 24 seconds
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Stardust predating the Solar System

Philipp Heck tells the story of interstellar stardust grains that predate the Solar System.
2/24/20206 minutes, 32 seconds
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The Science of Science Communication

Baruch Fischhoff, a decision scientist at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the ingredients necessary for effective science communication.
2/10/20206 minutes, 42 seconds
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Impact crater in southern Laos

Kerry Sieh recounts the hunt for a meteorite impact crater in Southeast Asia.
1/21/20206 minutes, 13 seconds
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Human–clam cohistory

Dana Lepofsky describes ancient sustainable clam gardening practices.
12/30/20196 minutes, 58 seconds
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Artificial intelligence in the laboratory

Theoretical physicists Hans Briegel and Hendrik Poulsen Nautrup describe an artificial intelligence that can design quantum experiments.
12/16/20197 minutes, 25 seconds
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Rhetoric of the French Revolution

Simon DeDeo and Alexander Barron discuss the rhetoric that shaped the French Revolution.
12/2/20198 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ocean eddies and shark foraging

Cam Braun explains how ocean eddies allow sharks to dive and forage in deep water.
10/28/20197 minutes, 22 seconds
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Signs of admixture in fossil record

Shara Bailey explains the significance of a three-rooted lower molar in an archaic jaw.
10/15/20196 minutes, 28 seconds
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Nucleic acid liquid crystals

Noel Clark and Tommaso Bellini describe how nucleic acids form double-helical liquid crystals, with implications for the origins of life.
9/30/20197 minutes, 28 seconds
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Eye movement and visual perception

Benjamin de Haas explains individual differences in eye movement patterns.
9/16/20196 minutes, 14 seconds
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Serotonin, platelets, and immunity

Eric Boilard explains the role of serotonin and platelets in immune responses.
9/4/20197 minutes, 18 seconds
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Interfaces and Mixing

A collection of research articles explores developments in interfacial transport and mixing, with wide-ranging practical applications.
8/19/201913 minutes, 39 seconds
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Origin of sunflower family

Jennifer Mandel outlines the evolutionary history of the sunflower family.
8/5/20196 minutes, 28 seconds
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Nutrients and Chesapeake Bay recovery

Jonathan Lefcheck and Robert Orth discuss nutrient pollution and recovery in the Chesapeake Bay.
7/22/20198 minutes, 11 seconds
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Physics of chocolate-making

Daniel Hodgson explains the physics of chocolate-making.
7/8/20196 minutes, 27 seconds
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Adapting to climate change

Chris Field discusses misconceptions about climate change and how humans can adapt to a warming planet.
6/24/20196 minutes, 16 seconds
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Climate change and global economic inequality

Noah Diffenbaugh and Marshall Burke discuss how global warming impacts economies and income inequality.  
6/11/20195 minutes, 46 seconds
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Bacterial symbiosis with bobtail squid

Margaret McFall-Ngai describes how a symbiont bacterium affects a host cephalopod.
6/11/20196 minutes, 55 seconds
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Aftermath of Chicxulub asteroid

A paleontological site preserves the immediate aftermath of the asteroid impact that may have caused a global mass extinction.
6/11/201913 minutes, 51 seconds
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Immigration and economic mobility

Thor Berger and Per Engzell explore connections between European immigration and present-day economic mobility in the US.
6/11/20196 minutes, 19 seconds
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Parenting and STEM careers

Erin Cech discusses parenting and gender disparities among STEM professionals.
6/11/20199 minutes, 2 seconds
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Tracing the origin of Europe’s megaliths

Bettina Schulz Paulsson explains the origin and spread of Europe's megaliths, including Stonehenge.
6/11/20196 minutes, 30 seconds
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Pollution across borders

Daven Henze discusses how air pollution spreads across the globe and what policymakers are doing in response.
6/11/20195 minutes, 44 seconds
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Unraveling hagfish evolution

Tetsuto Miyashita describes how the hagfish helps define the vertebrate tree of life.
6/11/20197 minutes, 23 seconds
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Climate change and forest diversity

Daniel Wieczynski and Van Savage show how climate affects the diversity of forests.
6/11/20196 minutes, 4 seconds
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Network theory and climate change

Jingfang Fan explains what network theory can reveal about climate systems.
6/11/20195 minutes, 39 seconds
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Quantum computing

Christopher Monroe discusses recent developments in quantum computing.
6/11/20196 minutes, 11 seconds
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Fur grooming in cats

Alexis Noel and David Hu describe the unusual properties of a cat's tongue.
6/11/20195 minutes, 39 seconds
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Biodiversity loss in Haiti

Blair Hedges discusses the state of Haiti's remaining forests and the consequences to biodiversity.
6/11/20195 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mapping the galactic plane in X-rays

Chryssa Kouveliotou describes her efforts to compile a detailed X-ray map of the galactic plane.
6/11/20197 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ancient Maya salt industry

Heather McKillop explores the Maya salt industry.
6/11/20196 minutes, 9 seconds
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Social mobility across generations

Mike Hout explores the persistence of occupational and socioeconomic standing from parent to child in America.
6/11/20196 minutes, 6 seconds
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Paintbrush for butterfly wings

Robert Reed explains genetic controls on butterfly wing colors.
6/11/20197 minutes, 46 seconds
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Nondestructive sampling of cell contents

Nick Melosh describes a method for sampling RNA and proteins from cells using nanostraws.
6/11/20196 minutes, 14 seconds
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Deep subseafloor microbial life

Victoria Orphan and Elizabeth Trembath-Reichert discuss microbial life in the deep subseafloor.
6/11/20196 minutes, 30 seconds
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Origins of bread

Amaia Arranz-Otaegui describes the discovery of bread that far pre-dates agriculture.
6/11/20195 minutes, 24 seconds
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Natural selection in sea stars

Lauren Schiebelhut describes natural selection following sea star wasting disease.
6/11/20195 minutes, 41 seconds
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Respectfulness in police-community relations

Rob Voigt and Nicholas Camp examine respectfulness in police officers' interactions with community members.
6/11/20197 minutes, 28 seconds
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Biodiversity hypothesis

Jenni Lehtimäki and Stefan Reber explore links between animal exposure in upbringing and immune system function.
6/11/20197 minutes, 49 seconds
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RNA origin in warm little ponds

Ralph Pudritz and Ben Pearce describe a model of how RNA-based life could have originated on the early Earth.
6/11/20196 minutes, 18 seconds
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Manipulation of ant behavior by parasites

David Hughes discusses how a parasitic fungus manipulates ant behavior for reproduction.
6/11/20195 minutes, 38 seconds
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Gut microbiota and human health

Rob Knight discusses the role of the human gut microbiota in health and disease.
6/11/20195 minutes, 16 seconds
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Wearable health monitors

John Rogers describes soft, wearable electronic devices for health monitoring.
6/11/20197 minutes, 13 seconds
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Gene therapy for retinal disease

Karina Guziewicz and Artur Cideciyan explain a potential gene therapy approach for macular degeneration.
6/11/20197 minutes, 24 seconds
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Global hydrologic models and water storage

Bridget Scanlon discusses the use of global hydrologic models for studying changes in water storage worldwide.
6/11/20195 minutes, 34 seconds
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Project MindScope

Christof Koch describes a large-scale effort to understand how the cerebral cortex functions.
6/11/20195 minutes, 57 seconds
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Science and Philanthropy

Robert Tjian discusses the role of philanthropy in funding scientific research.
6/11/20196 minutes, 59 seconds
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Gene editing in mosquitoes

Omar Akbari and Kevin Esvelt discuss a gene editing approach for harmful mosquitoes.
6/11/20196 minutes, 21 seconds
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Big data

Atul Butte explains how researchers can use existing data to answer biomedical questions.
6/11/20197 minutes, 24 seconds
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Molecular contraception

Polina Lishko discusses the development of unisex contraceptives.
6/11/20195 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Chan Zuckerberg Biohub

Joseph DeRisi describes the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a new privately-funded medical research center in the Bay Area.
6/11/20195 minutes, 57 seconds
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Early evidence of winemaking

Patrick McGovern describes evidence of winemaking in Georgia during the Neolithic period.
6/11/20196 minutes, 1 second
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Bird feathers reveal past air pollution

Carl Fuldner and Shane DuBay describe how bird feathers preserve records of air pollution.
6/11/20196 minutes, 28 seconds
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Interview with 2016 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Vadim Backman

Vadim Backman describes a technique for high resolution imaging of biological molecules without labels.
6/11/20196 minutes, 30 seconds
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Interview with 2016 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Jonathan Sears

Jonathan Sears describes potential treatment strategies for retinopathy of prematurity.
6/11/20195 minutes, 39 seconds
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Zebrafish avatars for cancer treatment

Rita Fior describes how zebrafish can make cancer treatment more efficient.
6/11/20195 minutes, 37 seconds
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Interview with 2016 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Sandu Popescu and Jeff Tollaksen

Sandu Popescu and Jeff Tollaksen explain how a fundamental principle of nature does not hold in quantum mechanics.
6/11/20196 minutes, 54 seconds
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Interview with 2016 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Yayoi Obata

Yayoi Obata describes the formation of mammalian egg cells in vitro.
6/11/20194 minutes, 56 seconds
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The Deep Hot Biosphere after 25 years

John Spear discusses the legacy of Thomas Gold's "Deep Hot Biosphere" hypothesis.
6/11/20195 minutes, 19 seconds
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Interview with 2016 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Russell Graham

Russell Graham describes the extinction of woolly mammoths from St. Paul island.
6/11/20196 minutes, 14 seconds
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How Sherpas adapt to high altitudes

Andrew Murray describes metabolic adaptations of Himalayan Sherpas to low-pressure, low-oxygen conditions at high altitudes.
6/11/20196 minutes, 7 seconds
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Interview with 2016 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Fernando Colchero, Roland Rau, and Susan Alberts

Fernando Colchero, Roland Rau, and Susan Alberts describe the relationship between lifespan equality and average lifespan.
6/11/20196 minutes, 26 seconds
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Oyster Harvest

Rowan Lockwood discusses the sustainability of Native American oyster harvesting in the Chesapeake Bay.
6/11/20196 minutes, 13 seconds
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Improving endoscopy for disease diagnosis

Pelham Keahey describes how differential structured illumination microendoscopy can improve cancer diagnosis.
6/11/20196 minutes, 32 seconds
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Fungicides and honey bee health

Entomologist May Berenbaum discusses the effects of agricultural fungicides on honey bee health.
6/11/20195 minutes, 4 seconds
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Vision and transition to land

Malcolm MacIver describes how our aquatic ancestors may have become interested in land.
6/11/20196 minutes, 7 seconds
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Self-driving cars

Jeff Schneider explains how self-driving cars use machine learning to learn the rules of the road.
6/11/20196 minutes, 47 seconds
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Science for the general public

Steven Weinberg describes his experiences writing about science for a general audience.
6/11/20196 minutes, 58 seconds
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Interview with 2017 Breakthrough Prize winner Steve Elledge

Steve Elledge discusses how cells sense and respond to damage to their DNA.
6/11/20197 minutes, 7 seconds
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DNA folding by loop extrusion

Erez Lieberman Aiden discusses a model of how DNA folds to fit inside a cell nucleus.
6/11/20196 minutes, 45 seconds
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Maize domestication in Mexico

Researchers Jean-Philippe Vielle-Calzada and Miguel Vallebueno discuss 5,000-year-old partially domesticated maize.
6/11/20194 minutes, 31 seconds
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Future of infectious disease research

Charles Rice and Robert Landford discuss the future of hepatitis C research without chimpanzees.
6/11/20196 minutes, 48 seconds
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Honeybees and biofuel crops

Clint Otto discusses the impact of land-use changes on beekeepers in the Dakotas.
6/11/20196 minutes, 34 seconds
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Recoding an organism

George Church, Matthieu Landon, and Michael Napolitano discuss the genetic replacement of arginine codons in E. coli.
6/11/20196 minutes, 9 seconds
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Interview with 2016 Kavli Prize Winners Kip Thorne and Rai Weiss

Kip Thorne and Rai Weiss describe the detection of gravitational waves with LIGO.
6/11/20196 minutes, 39 seconds
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20th-century excess male mortality

Eileen Crimmins discusses the mortality difference between the sexes and its possible causes.
6/11/20196 minutes, 33 seconds
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Remodelling brain function

Kavli Prize winner Eve Marder discusses flexibility and stability in neural circuits.
6/11/20196 minutes, 43 seconds
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Climate change and irrigation water

Joshua Elliott discusses potential impacts of climate change on water availability for irrigation.
6/11/20195 minutes, 41 seconds
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Modeling disease spread

Andrea Rinaldo explains how cell phone data can be used to model disease spread.
6/11/20195 minutes, 24 seconds
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Interview with 2015 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Amanda Woerman

Amanda Woerman discusses the role of the alpha-synuclein prion in the neurodegenerative disorder multiple system atrophy.
6/11/20195 minutes, 43 seconds
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Interview with 2015 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Anne Case and Angus Deaton

Anne Case and Angus Deaton describe recent changes in mortality trends for white non-Hispanic Americans.
6/11/20196 minutes, 7 seconds
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Interview with 2015 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Glaucio Paulino and Evgueni Filipov

Glaucio Paulino and Evgueni Filipov describe an origami-inspired approach to designing deployable structures and metamaterials.
6/11/20196 minutes, 5 seconds
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Interview with 2015 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Mark Jacobson

Mark Jacobson explains the feasability of a 100% wind, water, and solar power grid in the continental United States.
6/11/20195 minutes, 29 seconds
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Interview with 2015 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Will Castleman and Cuneyt Berkdemir

Will Castleman and Cuneyt Berkdemir describe how to mimic rare earth elements using superatom clusters.
6/11/20195 minutes, 52 seconds
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Interview with 2015 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Yatrik Shah

Yatrik Shah describes the connection between maternal iron absorption during lactation and neonatal anemia.
6/11/20195 minutes, 16 seconds
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Nanoparticles for disease detection

Sangeeta Bhatia describes the development of nanoparticles that can aid in detecting cancer and other diseases.
6/11/20196 minutes, 2 seconds
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Origins of mathematical ability

Stanislas Dehaene investigates how certain areas of the brain might be related to mathematical ability.
6/11/20193 minutes, 35 seconds
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Building the James Webb Space Telescope

John Mather of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center explains why and how the James Webb Space Telescope is being built.
6/11/20195 minutes, 36 seconds
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Tracking endemic tuberculosis

Robyn Lee and Marcel Behr investigate the genomics of endemic tuberculosis in Northern Canada.
6/11/20196 minutes
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Brain clarity

Karl Deisseroth explains a method to explore the wiring and structure of the brain.
6/11/20196 minutes, 33 seconds
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Gene drive for malaria mosquito control

Anthony James describes how gene drives can be used to spread malaria parasite resistance in mosquitoes.
6/11/20197 minutes, 11 seconds
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Interview with 2014 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Anthony Vecchiarelli

Anthony Vecchiarelli explains a system of genetic cargo movement within cells that has roots in the work of Alan Turing.
6/11/20196 minutes, 20 seconds
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Interview with 2014 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Jintai Lin

Jintai Lin explains the impact of a global economy on air pollution in China and in the US.
6/11/20194 minutes, 34 seconds
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Interview with 2014 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Frank Bates

Frank Bates describes how a project related to chewing gum led to materials science discoveries.
6/11/20196 minutes, 41 seconds
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Interview with 2014 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Abigail Marsh

Abigail Marsh describes mechanisms of altruistic kidney donors' responsiveness to others' emotions.
6/11/20195 minutes, 37 seconds
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Search rankings and voter manipulation

Robert Epstein of the American Institute for Behavioral Research describes how search engine rankings can influence voter preferences.
6/11/20196 minutes, 32 seconds
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Timeline of the end-Permian extinction

Seth Burgess describes a timeline of events surrounding the end-Permian mass extinction.
6/11/20196 minutes, 11 seconds
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Interview with 2014 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Yaara Oren and Tal Pupko

Yaara Oren and Tal Pupko describe how bacteria can evolve via transfer of gene regulatory regions.
6/11/20195 minutes, 31 seconds
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Uniqueness of olfactory perception

Noam Sobel explains how a human olfactory fingerprint helps uncover the uniqueness of individuals’ sense of smell.
6/11/20195 minutes, 39 seconds
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Candidate vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus

Rino Rappuoli of GlaxoSmithKline discusses preclinical studies of a vaccine candidate against Staphylococcus aureus.
6/11/20194 minutes, 55 seconds
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Improving global scientific engagement

As AAAS president for 2015, Geraldine Richmond focuses on global scientific engagement.
6/11/20195 minutes, 35 seconds
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Blaming those who harm intentionally

Susan Fiske describes how intentional acts of harm motivate people to assign blame.
6/11/20194 minutes, 41 seconds
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Biocontainment safeguards

Jef Boeke explains how to safeguard against unauthorized growth of engineered microorganisms.
6/11/20195 minutes, 33 seconds
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Exploring tropical glaciers

Lonnie Thompson discusses clues to Earth's ancient climate history that are stored in tropical glacial ice.
6/11/20195 minutes, 40 seconds
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Gatekeeping in scientific publishing

Kyle Siler discusses the role of editors as gatekeepers at scientific journals.
6/11/20195 minutes, 53 seconds
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Designing theoretical molecules

Alán Aspuru-Guzik discusses how he uses supercomputing as a "molecular spaceship" to explore chemical space and discover potentially useful new molecules.
6/11/20195 minutes, 44 seconds
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Genome editing

Keith Joung and Feng Zhang explain methods for editing sequences of DNA in living cells.
6/11/20196 minutes, 16 seconds
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An overdependence on p-values

Veronica Vieland discusses a common disconnect between scientists and statisticians in evaluating scientific evidence.
6/11/20194 minutes, 30 seconds
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Retina cell transplantation

Robin Ali describes efforts to transplant healthy rod and cone cells into afflicted retinas.
6/11/20196 minutes, 9 seconds
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Heart regeneration

Hesham Sadek explains the regenerative capability of newborn mouse hearts.
6/11/20194 minutes, 40 seconds
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Global collaboration against HIV

Ambassador Deborah Birx discusses international efforts in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
6/11/20196 minutes
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Molecular profiling of cancer

Elaine Mardis discusses how next generation sequencing technology is helping the Pan-Cancer Initiative gain a molecular understanding of cancer.
6/11/20196 minutes, 21 seconds
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Growing stem cells in 3D

David Schaffer describes how to culture human stem cells in a fully-defined, scalable 3D medium.
6/10/20196 minutes
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Astrocytes and ALS

Brian Kaspar discusses the role of astrocyte cells in the motor neuron disease ALS.
6/10/20196 minutes, 1 second
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Taming an unwieldy cancer target

Frank McCormick discusses a National Cancer Institute-led effort to turn a well-known cancer-causing protein into a viable drug target.
6/10/20194 minutes, 28 seconds
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Genetic switchboards

James Collins explains how researchers can rewire bacterial cells and control multiple genes simultaneously within a single cell.
6/10/20194 minutes, 3 seconds
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Interview with 2013 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Francesco Pennacchio

Francesco Pennacchio explains how neonicotinoid insecticides can influence the immune response of honey bees.
6/10/20196 minutes, 10 seconds
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Interview with 2013 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Caroline Roullier

Caroline Roullier and colleagues won the 2013 Cozzarelli Prize in Behavioral and Social Sciences for their work on the distribution of sweet potatoes in Oceania.
6/10/20196 minutes, 15 seconds
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Interview with 2013 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Yoel Sadovsky and Carolyn Coyne

Yoel Sadovsky and Carolyn Coyne describe the placenta's role in protecting the fetus from infection by viruses.
6/10/20196 minutes, 22 seconds
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Interview with 2013 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Tad Patzek

Tad Patzek explains how natural gas production declines over time in hydrofractured wells.
6/10/20196 minutes, 20 seconds
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Interview with 2013 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Mimi Kao and Allison Doupe

Mimi Kao and Allison Doupe explore song learning in the male zebra finch.
6/10/20194 minutes, 34 seconds
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Interview with 2013 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Erik Petigura and Geoffrey Marcy

Erik Petigura and Geoffrey Marcy discuss the number of Earth-like planets that may exist in our galaxy.
6/10/20196 minutes, 20 seconds
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Modeling human cognition

James "Jay" McClelland describes a parallel distributed processing approach to understanding human cognition.
6/10/20195 minutes, 37 seconds
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Exchanging kidneys

Alvin Roth discusses how principles of economics can benefit people who need kidney transplants.
6/10/20196 minutes, 10 seconds
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Nicotine addiction and relapse

Inés Ibañez-Tallon discusses how nicotine and neurons conspire to hamper efforts to quit smoking.
6/10/20195 minutes, 48 seconds
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Where breast cancer meets brain size

Inder Verma and colleagues describe how a breast cancer-associated gene might be implicated in brain size control in mammals.
6/10/20196 minutes, 26 seconds
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Supernova chemistry

Paul Dunk discusses the chemistry of carbon in space following a supernova.
6/10/20195 minutes, 33 seconds
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The postdoctoral problem

NAS member Gregory Petsko discusses efforts to assess the US postdoctoral workforce.
6/10/20196 minutes, 21 seconds
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Understanding citrus greening

Ariena van Bruggen and J. Glenn Morris, Jr. discuss their work on citrus greening, a disease that is threatening the global citrus industry.
6/10/20195 minutes, 57 seconds
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Genetic screening for adults

C. Thomas Caskey and Amy McGuire discuss whole-genome genetic screening for adult-onset diseases.
6/10/20195 minutes, 31 seconds
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Synthesizing fuels and chemicals from CO2

James Liao talks about engineering microorganisms to synthesize fuels and chemicals from CO2.
6/10/20195 minutes, 40 seconds
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Speech perception and language acquisition in infants

Janet Werker describes how exposure to speech and environmental factors can affect language acquisition by infants.
6/10/20194 minutes, 29 seconds
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Menopause, mitochondria, and memory

Neuroscientists John Morrison and Yuko Hara talk about the links between estrogen, mitochondria, and age-related cognitive decline.
6/10/20195 minutes, 37 seconds
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A microbial map for wine

David Mills discusses regional differences in microbes found in grape must.
6/10/20195 minutes, 35 seconds
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Building better batteries

Yi Cui discusses how nanometerials are improving the energy storage capacity of batteries.
6/10/20194 minutes, 34 seconds
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History of alcohol in human diet

Steven Benner discusses the interaction between early humans and alcohol.
6/10/20195 minutes, 6 seconds
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Tracing development in color

Scott Fraser discusses tools to glean a multicolored view of embryonic development.
6/10/20195 minutes, 44 seconds
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Changing the way we think about antibiotics

Deborah Hung talks about identifying new approaches for treating and diagnosing infectious diseases.
6/10/20194 minutes, 31 seconds
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How humans may have evolved intelligence

Steven Pinker explains the idea of a cognitive niche, which may have facilitated the evolution of human intelligence.
6/10/20195 minutes, 59 seconds
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Incentivizing positive behaviors

David Laibson describes how behavioral economics can help incentivize positive behaviors.
6/10/20195 minutes, 27 seconds
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Making commercial tomatoes taste better

Harry Klee explains how he is trying to make commercial tomatoes more flavorful.
6/10/20195 minutes, 3 seconds
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Health risks from eating Fukushima-contaminated seafood

Nicholas Fisher discusses his recent study investigating the health risks associated with eating seafood contaminated with Fukushima-derived radioactivity.
6/10/20194 minutes, 38 seconds
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Curbing dishonest form-filling

Nina Mazar discusses her recent study showing that where people sign a form affects how honestly they complete it.
6/10/20195 minutes, 34 seconds
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Mapping the mouse connectome

Jeff Lichtman explains the promise and challenges tied to building a mouse connectome.
6/10/20195 minutes, 58 seconds
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The diets of ancient hominins

Matt Sponheimer discusses what our ancient evolutionary ancestors may have eaten.
6/10/20195 minutes, 16 seconds
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Interview with 2012 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Andrew Zammit-Mangion, Michael Dewar,Visakan Kadirkamanathan, and Guido Sanguinetti

Andrew Zammit-Mangion, Michael Dewar,Visakan Kadirkamanathan, and Guido Sanguinetti describe their statistical model of conflict dynamics and how they tested it using the WikiLeaks Afghan War Diary.
6/10/20195 minutes, 17 seconds
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Interview with 2012 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Janet Braam and E. Wassim Chehab

Janet Braam and E. Wassim Chehab discuss how plants anticipate and defend against insect attacks.
6/10/20195 minutes, 12 seconds
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Interview with 2012 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Paloma Gonzalez-Bellido, Hanchuan Peng, and Apostolos Georgopoulos

Paloma Gonzalez-Bellido, Hanchuan Peng, and Apostolos Georgopoulos describe their research on how dragonflies catch their prey.
6/10/20195 minutes, 3 seconds
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Interview with 2012 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Sean Palecek and Xiaojun Lian

Sean Palecek and Xiaojun Lian describe their efficient method for converting stem cells into heart muscle cells.
6/10/20195 minutes, 9 seconds
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Interview with 2012 Cozzarelli Prize Winners Clayton R. Magill and Katherine H. Freeman

Clayton R. Magill and Katherine H. Freeman discuss how water availability and ecosystem changes influenced early human habitats.
6/10/20195 minutes
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Interview with 2012 Cozzarelli Prize Winner Bob MacCallum

Bob MacCallum explores how music can evolve from noise based on listeners' preferences.
6/10/20194 minutes, 39 seconds
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The life beneath our feet

Diana Wall discusses how life in the soil may change in a warming world.
6/10/20195 minutes, 22 seconds
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Engineering bacteria to curb malaria transmission

Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena describes how he engineered a symbiotic bacterium found in mosquito guts to block the transmission of the malaria parasite.
6/10/20195 minutes, 21 seconds
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The science of microbes

Julie Segre and Liliana Losada discuss human-microbe interactions in a recording of a PNAS Science Cafe event held in Washington, DC on February 27, 2013.
6/10/20195 minutes, 44 seconds
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Taking science to the streets

John Durant talks about the role of science festivals in science literacy.
6/10/20195 minutes, 40 seconds
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Microbial cell factories

Bernhard Palsson explains how bacteria can be used as factories to produce sustainable products.
6/10/20194 minutes, 54 seconds
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Fly social networks

Joel Levine discusses his research on social interaction networks in fruit flies.
6/10/20195 minutes, 23 seconds
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What makes us human

Chet Sherwood explores the unique aspects of the human brain's anatomy and function
6/10/20195 minutes, 14 seconds
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Why music moves us

Thalia Wheatley and Beau Sievers discuss the structural similarities between music and movement.
6/10/20193 seconds
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Social bacteria

E. Peter Greenberg explains how antisense RNA help regulate bacterial social interactions.
6/10/20195 minutes, 31 seconds
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How mosquitos survive raindrops

David Hu describes his research on how mosquitos survive collisions with raindrops, which could help design better flying robots.
6/10/20195 minutes, 20 seconds
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The evolution of music from noise

Bob MacCallum explores how music can evolve from noise based on listeners' preferences.
6/10/20194 minutes, 31 seconds
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The science of biodiversity - Part 2

Merlin Hanauer and Chase Mendenhall discuss the science of biodiversity, in the second of two recordings of a PNAS Science Cafe event held in Washington, DC on October 17, 2012.
6/10/20195 minutes, 20 seconds
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The science of biodiversity - Part 1

Merlin Hanauer and Chase Mendenhall discuss the science of biodiversity, in the first of two recordings of a PNAS Science Cafe event held in Washington, DC on October 17, 2012.
6/10/20195 minutes, 26 seconds
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Reshuffling in the human genome

Fred Alt discusses methods to map human chromosomal reshuffling.
6/10/20194 minutes, 54 seconds
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Widespread lead poisoning in condors

Myra Finkelstein discusses her research showing that California condors are significantly threatened by lead from lead-based ammunition.
6/10/20194 minutes, 33 seconds
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Cancer nanomedicines

Chemical engineer Mark Davis discusses his research on nano-sized cancer therapeutics.
6/10/20195 minutes, 7 seconds
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How caffeine can help prevent cancer

Chemical biologist Allan Conney discusses his research on caffeine's anticancer properties.
6/10/20194 minutes, 27 seconds
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Understanding the brain's architecture

Neuroscientist Charles F. Stevens discusses his research on finding the brain's underlying design principles.
6/10/20195 minutes, 8 seconds
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A systems approach to drug development

Marc Kirschner discusses the goals of systems pharmacology.
6/10/20194 minutes, 34 seconds
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Building new biological objects

Frances Arnold explains how she harnesses the power of evolution to create proteins and organisms with applications in medicine and in alternative energy.
6/10/20195 minutes, 27 seconds
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Virus-fighting bacteria

Akiko Iwasaki explains how gut bacteria boost immunity to influenza virus.
6/10/20194 minutes, 59 seconds
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Bugging the immune system

Sarkis Mazmanian talks about how gut bacteria interact with the immune system to influence health and disease.
6/10/20195 minutes, 19 seconds
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Bacterial invisible ink

David Walt discusses his research on using fluorescent bacteria to send secret messages.
6/10/20195 minutes, 2 seconds
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Gatekeepers of our immune system

2011 Nobel Prize winner Bruce Beutler talks about his discovery of the first mammalian innate immune receptors, our first line of defense against the threat of microorganisms.
6/10/20195 minutes, 22 seconds
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Thwarting dengue transmission

Medical entomologist Scott O'Neill explains how an intracellular bacterium could help curb the spread of dengue virus.
6/10/20195 minutes, 14 seconds
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Cancer immunotherapy comes of age

Cell biologist Ira Mellman discusses cancer immunotherapy at Genentech.
6/10/20194 minutes, 47 seconds
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Revolutionizing microscopy

Changhuei Yang and Guoan Zheng talk about their inexpensive, lens-free biomedical imaging device, which could change the way we do microscopy.
6/10/20194 minutes, 32 seconds
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Making physics palatable

Spanish chef Ferran Adrià and physicist David Weitz discuss the science of cooking.
6/10/20195 minutes, 29 seconds
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The benefits of gut bacteria

Lora Hooper talks about the complex bacterial ecosystem in our gut and its important role in metabolism and immunity.
6/10/20194 minutes, 50 seconds
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Sackler Colloquium on the science of science communication

Baruch Fischhoff and Dietram Scheufele discuss the need for a scientific approach to the communication of science.
6/10/20195 minutes, 35 seconds
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Making improved antibodies against HIV

Structural biologist Pamela Björkman explains how engineering improved versions of naturally occurring antibodies against HIV might make them promising therapeutic agents.
6/10/20194 minutes, 49 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize winner Roland Kanaar

Roland Kanaar explains how elevated temperature augments cancer treatment.
6/10/20195 minutes, 13 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize winner Merlin Hanauer

Merlin Hanauer discusses the benefits of protected areas.
6/10/20194 minutes, 44 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize winner Jacob Waldbauer

Cozzarelli Prize winner Jacob Waldbauer reconstructs the history of oxygen on Earth.
6/10/20195 minutes, 9 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize winners Robert Saye and James Sethian

Cozzarelli Prize winners Robert Saye and James Sethian introduce a numerical method to track complex motions.
6/10/20195 minutes, 1 second
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize winner James Smith

Economist James Smith discusses the effect of childhood mental problems on adult life.
6/10/20195 minutes, 6 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize winners Erica Machlin Cox and Selena Sagan

Erica Machlin Cox and Selena Sagan discuss an unusual interaction that protects the hepatitis C virus from our body's defenses.
6/10/20195 minutes, 2 seconds
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Life's building blocks

George Church discusses the potential of synthetic biology.
6/10/20196 minutes, 9 seconds
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The science of sleep

Erin Hanlon and Jeanne Duffy introduce their research on sleep, in a recording of the PNAS "Science of Sleep" event held in Washington, DC on March 14, 2012.
6/10/20195 minutes, 1 second
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Rebooting damaged vocal cords

Robert Langer and Steven Zeitels describe a polymer gel that could help patients regain lost voice.
6/10/20195 minutes, 28 seconds
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Drivers of embryonic development

Developmental biologist Cliff Tabin explains how genes shape the formation of organs.
6/10/20195 minutes, 23 seconds
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Stem cells and diabetes

Can stem cells help cure Type 1 diabetes? Douglas Melton hopes to find out.
6/10/20195 minutes, 16 seconds
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Sex-specific scientific reporting

Nancy Adler discusses the need for sex-specific scientific reporting and the role it has played in women's health over the last 20 years.
6/10/20194 minutes, 12 seconds
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The science of fear - Part 2

Psychology experts Daniel Pine and Mark Wiederhold answer fear-related questions from the audience, in second of two recordings from PNAS's "The Science of Fear!" event held in Washington, DC on October 12, 2011.
6/10/20194 minutes, 52 seconds
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The science of fear - Part 1

Psychology experts Daniel Pine and Mark Wiederhold introduce their research on fear, in the first of two recordings from PNAS' "The Science of Fear!" event held in Washington, DC on October 12, 2011.
6/10/20195 minutes, 14 seconds
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Catalysts for energy storage

Daniel Nocera discusses how efficient catalysts can help us store solar energy in the same way plants do.
6/10/20195 minutes, 18 seconds
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Scent of a predator

Molecular biologist Stephen Liberles discusses how prey learn to recognize the scent of a predator.
6/10/20195 minutes, 40 seconds
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Human lung on a chip

Donald Ingber discusses the "microfabrication" of human biological systems as a means to replace animal testing during drug development.
6/10/20195 minutes, 53 seconds
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New Editor-in-Chief of PNAS

Inder Verma discusses his new role at PNAS and his future plans for the journal.
6/7/20193 minutes, 39 seconds
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Social computing, mobile phones, and the developing world

Wendy Kellogg discusses her research into social computing and her boots-on-the-ground observations of how mobile phones can impact the developing world.
6/7/20196 minutes, 9 seconds
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Applications of rapid genome sequencing

Stephen Quake discusses rapid DNA sequencing and treating medical patients based on their genomes.
6/7/20195 minutes, 18 seconds
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Imaging, information technology, and autism spectrum disorder

Gregory Abowd discusses the clinical applications of capturing and recording the every day experiences of children with autism spectrum disorder.
6/7/20195 minutes, 49 seconds
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Paper devices for medical diagnoses

George Whitesides discusses an inexpensive and easy-to-use medical diagnostic device that can be used in the developing world.
6/7/20194 minutes, 49 seconds
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Social networking and predicting personality

Jennifer Golbeck discusses the intersection of computer science, sociology, and social networking.
6/7/20194 minutes, 54 seconds
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The science of chocolate

Physicist David Weitz discusses the material properties that make chocolate to-die-for.
6/7/20195 minutes, 1 second
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Ubiquitous computing and smart environments

Bo Begole discusses ubiquitous computing, behavioral modeling, and smart environments that can anticipate people's information needs.
6/7/20194 minutes, 31 seconds
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Changing public perception of the Smithsonian

Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Wayne Clough discusses his goal to educate the public about the Smithsonian's groundbreaking scientific research projects.
6/7/20195 minutes, 30 seconds
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Genetically modified crops and agricultural productivity

Roger Beachy discusses the role of genetically modified crops in feeding the world's growing population.
6/7/20195 minutes, 49 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Zvonimir Dogic

Zvonimir Dogic discusses how viruses can be coaxed into forming self-assembling, polymer membranes.
6/7/20194 minutes, 52 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winners Won-Yong Song and Jiyoung Park

Won-Yong Song and Jiyoung Park discuss the urgent problem of arsenic-tainted rice in Southeast Asia, and genetically engineered rice plants that would be safe to consume and could help remediate arsenic-contaminated groundwater.
6/7/20195 minutes, 24 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Liza Moscovice

Liza Moscovice discusses what her study on baboon behavior reveals about the evolution of cooperation in humans.
6/7/20196 minutes, 1 second
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winners Robina Shaheen and Mark Thiemens

Robina Shaheen and Mark Thiemens discuss an oxygen isotope signature that reveals how carbonates on Mars form in the absence of life.
6/7/20196 minutes, 57 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Cheryl Lyn Walker

Cheryl Lyn Walker discusses the role of a cellular protein, called ATM, in offsetting oxidative damage.
6/7/20195 minutes, 53 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Benjamin tenOever

Benjamin tenOever discusses his team's prize winning discovery that could be the key to developing a universal influenza A vaccine.
6/7/20196 minutes, 7 seconds
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The personalized medicine revolution

NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins discusses "personalized medicine," a novel approach in which doctors diagnose and treat patients using detailed information about each individual.
6/7/20195 minutes, 17 seconds
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Aircraft and Iceland's volcanic ash cloud

Susan Stipp discusses her PNAS research article that reveals whether the ash cloud from the 2010 eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano posed a threat to aircraft, and if the widespread airport closures in Europe were warranted.
6/7/20192 minutes, 2 seconds
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Keeping Congress up-to-date on the latest scientific research

Jim Jensen, Executive Director of the Office of Congressional and Government Affairs, a branch of the National Research Council, discusses how scientific research shapes public policy.
6/7/20195 minutes, 12 seconds
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Clean energy funding in the 2012 research budget

Kei Koizumi, Assistant Director for Federal Research and Development at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, discusses some aspects of the President's 2012 research budget.
6/7/20195 minutes, 4 seconds
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Electronic artificial noses

Nate Lewis dicusses the design principles and applications of electronic artificial noses.
6/7/20195 minutes, 11 seconds
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Visual prosthetic devices for the blind

Peter Schiller discusses a device that could one day restore sight to the blind by directly stimulating the visual cortex.
6/7/20195 minutes, 47 seconds
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Call for papers: PNAS Plus

PNAS Editor-in-Chief Randy Schekman discusses the journal's new option to publish online-only research articles.
6/7/20191 minute, 34 seconds
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Nano-healing and the future of surgery

Rutledge Ellis-Behnke discusses his research in nano-healing, a technology that halts bleeding and helps the brain and body to recover from injury and disease.
6/7/20194 minutes, 48 seconds
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Identifying the source of HIV infections in criminal cases

David Hillis explains how phylogenetics can be used to solve criminal cases involving the intentional transmission of HIV via unprotected sex.
6/7/20194 minutes, 33 seconds
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Microexpressions and the science behind "Lie to Me"

Paul Ekman, the scientist whose research inspired the Fox television drama "Lie to Me," explains that almost everyone can learn to read the facial microexpressions that reveal concealed emotions, but that the technique is no "Pinocchio's nose."
6/7/20195 minutes, 38 seconds
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The "missing link" between fish and land animals

Neil Shubin researches the evolutionary origin of anatomical features. Dr. Shubin's most recent discovery, Tiktaalik roseae, has been dubbed the "missing link" between fish and land animals. Dr. Shubin discusses Tiktaalik and the evolutionary shift from life in water to life on land.
6/7/20194 minutes, 58 seconds
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Tracking the spread of flu-like diseases in schools

Marcel Salathé researches disease transmission and prevention, at the Penn State University Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics. To investigate how flu-like diseases spread through schools, Dr. Salathé used wireless sensors to measure the number of close-proximity, person-to-person interactions during a typical day at a local high school.
6/7/20191 minute, 49 seconds
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Pollution in indoor environments

Charles J. Weschler studies the chemistry of indoor pollutants, including airborne particles, volatile organic compounds, and inorganic gases such as ozone. Listen as Dr. Weschler discusses the consequences of indoor pollution at home and in the workplace.
6/7/20196 minutes, 2 seconds
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Dark matter, dark energy, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist, author, host of "NOVA ScienceNOW," and the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium. Listen as Dr. Tyson discusses the extraordinary capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the nature of dark matter and dark energy.
6/7/20194 minutes, 28 seconds
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Scientific credibility, public exposure, and irate third-graders

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist, author, host of "NOVA ScienceNOW," and the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium. Listen as Dr. Tyson discusses the balance between scientific credibility and public exposure, and the pitfalls of challenging Pluto's status as a planet.
6/7/20194 minutes, 57 seconds
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Public science literacy, and race and gender bias in science education

Dr. Mae Jemison is a physician and scientist, who on September 12, 1992 aboard the space shuttle Endeavour, became the world's first woman of color to travel into space. Listen as Dr. Jemison discusses race and gender bias in science education, and the importance of public science literacy.
6/7/20195 minutes, 11 seconds
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The origin of malignant malaria

Dr. Nathan Wolfe is the Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor in Human Biology at Stanford University and Director of the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative. Listen as Dr. Wolfe discusses malaria and the parasites that cause it, and his research that determined the origin of malignant malaria in humans.
6/7/20194 minutes, 37 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Lennart Balk

Dr. Lennart Balk discusses the thiamine deficiency syndrome killing European wild birds.
6/7/20195 minutes, 16 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Mary Immordino-Yang

Dr. Mary Immordino-Yang discusses her fMRI study of admiration and compassion.
6/7/20196 minutes, 26 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Vera Gorbunova

Dr. Vera Gorbunova discusses the innate cancer immunity of the naked mole rat.
6/7/20195 minutes, 43 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Daniel Rugar

Listen as Dr. Daniel Rugar discusses his 100 million-fold improvement in resolution to conventional magnetic resonance imaging.
6/7/20194 minutes, 40 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winners Michael Köttgen and Owen Woodward

Michael Köttgen and Owen Woodward discuss identifying a key gene associated with gout, and the possible therapeutic implications.
6/7/20194 minutes, 38 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner John Dore

John Dore discusses the connection between rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and the increasing acidity of Earth's oceans.
6/7/20195 minutes, 31 seconds
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Adaptation and Evolution: The Life of an RNA Virus

Edward C. Holmes is a professor of biology and a Distinguished Senior Scholar in the Eberly College of Science at the Pennsylvania State University. Listen as Dr. Holmes discusses his research on using comparative genomics to study the genetic evolution of RNA viruses.
6/7/20194 minutes, 38 seconds
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Privacy and Social Security numbers

Alessandro Acquisti is an Associate Professor of Information Technology and Public Policy at the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. Listen as Dr. Acquisti discusses his research in the economics of privacy and his 2009 PNAS research article on predicting Social Security numbers.
6/7/20195 minutes, 28 seconds
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Fundamentals of environmental economics

Maureen Cropper is an economics professor at the University of Maryland and a former lead economist at the World Bank. Listen as Dr. Cropper discusses her research in environmental economics and her 2008 election into the National Academy of Sciences.
6/7/20194 minutes, 53 seconds
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The future and stem cells

James Thomson is best known for his pioneering work that isolated and cultured non-human primate and human embryonic stem cells. Listen as Dr. Thomson discusses his research and the future of stem cells in medical uses ranging from drug discovery, transplantation, and as a basic research tool.
6/7/20195 minutes, 4 seconds
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Simulating material behavior

Emily Carter's work merges quantum mechanics, applied mathematics, and solid state physics to create simulations of various molecules and materials. Listen as Dr. Carter discusses her research and her 2008 election to the National Academy of Sciences.
6/7/20195 minutes, 34 seconds
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Human expansion out of Africa

Richard Klein served as editor for the PNAS Special Feature titled "Out of Africa". This collection of articles explores the historical expansion of Homo sapiens from Africa to Eurasia. The Special Feature, along with an editorial by Dr. Klein, will publish in the September 22 issue of PNAS.
6/7/20195 minutes, 19 seconds
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Seeing inside cells

Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz's laboratory at the National Institutes of Health works to characterize the fundamental principles governing protein geography and movement within cells. Dr. Lippincott-Schwartz talks about her work and her recent election to the National Academy of Sciences.
6/7/20195 minutes
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Yoshiro Nagao

"Decreases in dengue transmission may act to increase the incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever"
6/7/20195 minutes, 1 second
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Karen McComb

"Cross-modal individual recognition in domestic horses (Equus caballus)."
6/7/20195 minutes, 2 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Marius Wernig

"Neurons derived from reprogrammed fibroblasts functionally integrate into the fetal brain and improve symptoms of rats with Parkinson's disease"
6/7/20195 minutes, 6 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Albert-Laszlo Barabási

"The implications of human metabolic network topology for disease comorbidity"
6/7/20194 minutes, 43 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner John Rossi

"MicroRNA-directed transcriptional gene silencing in mammalian cells"
6/7/20195 minutes, 6 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Raymond Jeanloz

"Fluid helium at conditions of giant planetary interiors"
6/7/20194 minutes, 55 seconds
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Interview with Randy Schekman

Randy Schekman, the PNAS Editor-in-Chief, discusses the selection process and history of the Cozzarelli Prize. The Cozzarelli Prize is given annually to six outstanding PNAS articles, each representing one of the major disciplines of the National Academy of Sciences.
6/7/20194 minutes, 48 seconds
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Stem cells in neuromedicine

Fred Gage is a professor in the Laboratory of Genetics at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, CA. In this podcast, Dr. Gage talks about the subtleties involved as researchers explore how to use stem cells to treat conditions such as Parkinson's disease.
6/7/20197 minutes, 13 seconds
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Malaria and vector research

Thomas Wellems is the head of the Malaria and Vector Research Unit at the National Institutes of Health. In this episode, he discusses the advances made in the fight against malaria and the problems that still remain.
6/7/20194 minutes, 50 seconds
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Inside Science

Bruce Alberts is the former President of the National Academy of Sciences and the current editor-in-chief of Science. In this podcast, Dr. Alberts talks about how he generates ideas for editorials, how Science approaches issues of scientific misconduct, and his opinion on the proliferation of journals worldwide.
6/7/20195 minutes, 17 seconds
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Examining Proceedings

PNAS is one of the world's most-cited multidisciplinary scientific journals and has been published by the National Academies since 1915. This podcast, part of the Sounds of Science produced by the National Academies, looks at the history and future of this publication with Ken Fulton, publisher of PNAS.
6/7/201910 minutes, 32 seconds
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Interview with Pamela J. Fraker

Pamela J. Fraker was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007. She is known for her investigations of the impact of nutritional deficiencies, particularly of zinc, on immune defense. Her work provided evidence that deficiency in protein--calories causes a decline in antibody and cell mediated responses, which leads to higher rates of infection, poor wound healing, and other adverse impacts in the malnourished and those with chronic disease.
6/7/20194 minutes, 50 seconds
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Interview with Ran Nathan

Ran Nathan organized the Movement Ecology Special Feature for PNAS. He is an associate professor and the chair of the department of Evolution, Systematics, and Ecology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in Jerusalem, Israel.
6/7/20194 minutes, 44 seconds
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Interview with Nina Fedoroff

Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1990 for her work in the field of Plant Biology, Nina Fedoroff is a pioneer in the molecular aspects of plant transposable elements. Building upon the work of Barbara McClintock, she elucidated the sequence of some of these elements, demonstrated their utility for gene cloning and was instrumental in converting the study of plant transposable elements into one accessible by molecular techniques.
6/7/20195 minutes, 38 seconds
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Interview with Richard T. Durrett

Richard T. Durrett was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007 for his work in applied mathematical sciences. Durrett's research in probability theory concerns problems that arise from ecology and genetics. He has developed mathematical models to study the evolution of microsatellites, impacts of selective sweeps on genetic variation, genome rearrangement, gene duplication, and gene regulation.
6/6/20193 minutes, 17 seconds
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Interview with C. Owen Lovejoy

C. Owen Lovejoy was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007 for his work in the field of anthropology. Lovejoy overturned traditional models of human origins by integrating biomechanics into biological anthropology, demonstrating that the earliest hominids walked on two legs. He developed novel methods for quantifying sexual dimorphism and revealing the demographics of prehistoric humans.
6/6/20195 minutes, 3 seconds
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Interview with Albert Libchaber

Albert Libchaber was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007 for his work in physics. Libchaber has made lasting and fundamental contributions to experimental chaos dynamics and its application to biological physics, from elucidating the forces at work when a fish swims through water to defining the minimal conditions necessary for artificial life.
6/6/20194 minutes, 36 seconds
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Interview with John G. Hildebrand

John G. Hildebrand was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007. His work on the functional organization, physiology, and development of the central olfactory system of insects has made him a pioneer in analyzing neural mechanisms underlying chemosensory control of mating behavior and insect--plant interactions. This work has application in disruption of insect mating behavior and herbivory, with practical benefit to human health and welfare.
6/6/20195 minutes
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Kenneth A. Dawson

Understanding the nanoparticle-protein corona using methods to quantify exchange rates and affinities of proteins for nanoparticles.
6/6/20194 minutes, 57 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Brian Spencer

Targeted delivery of proteins across the blood--brain barrier.
6/6/20194 minutes, 51 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Andreas Reichenbach

Müller cells are living optical fibers in the vertebrate retina.
6/6/20195 minutes, 9 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner R. Adriana Hernandez-Aguilar

Savanna chimpanzees use tools to harvest the underground storage organs of plants.
6/6/20195 minutes, 2 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Monica Olvera de la Cruz

Faceting ionic shells into icosahedra via electrostatics.
6/6/20194 minutes, 55 seconds
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Interview with Cozzarelli Prize Winner Sandra Díaz

Incorporating plant functional diversity effects in ecosystem service assessments
6/6/20194 minutes, 57 seconds