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PBS NewsHour - World Cover
PBS NewsHour - World Profile

PBS NewsHour - World

English, News magazine, 1 season, 885 episodes, 3 days, 18 hours, 35 minutes
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Learn more about your world through in-depth analysis and on-the-ground reports. (Updated periodically)
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News Wrap: Israeli war cabinet member threatens to quit over Gaza strategy

In our news wrap Saturday, a member of Israel's war cabinet threatens to quit if the government does not adopt a new Gaza strategy, dangerous heat poses new risk, with widespread power outages in Houston flash flooding kills at least 68 people in Afghanistan, and the suspect in the Slovakian prime minister's assassination attempt is ordered to stay behind bars. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/18/20242 minutes, 42 seconds
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New book 'World on the Brink' argues U.S. failing to deter Chinese invasion of Taiwan

This week, China's Xi Jinping and Russia's Vladimir Putin inaugurated a "new era" of partnership, just before Taiwan inaugurates a new president on Monday. The new book, "World on the Brink: How America Can Beat China in the Race for the 21st Century," argues Taiwan is at the center of China's challenge to U.S. power and influence in Asia. Nick Schifrin discussed more with Dmitri Alperovitch. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/17/20247 minutes, 2 seconds
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News Wrap: U.S. military finishes work on floating pier to deliver aid to Gaza

In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. military finished work on a floating pier to deliver aid to Gaza, the House of Representatives passed a measure that seeks to force the transfer of bombs to Israel, authorities in Slovakia said the man charged with shooting Prime Minister Fico acted alone and the Supreme Court rejected a conservative attempt to weaken the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/16/20246 minutes, 30 seconds
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Outgoing UN humanitarian chief on handling one of the worst years for global crises

The U.N. warns the humanitarian crisis in Gaza is growing more acute. In southern Gaza, a quarter of the population faces catastrophic levels of food insecurity and in northern Gaza, nearly one in three children are severely malnourished. Nick Schifrin discussed more with Martin Griffiths, the U.N.'s top humanitarian official, about what he calls one of the worst years for humanitarian crises. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/16/20248 minutes, 25 seconds
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American families working to evacuate Gaza child facing rare medical disorder

Among the families caught in the war between Israel and Hamas is the Abu Zaiter family. Three-year-old Julia suffers from alternating hemiplegia, or AHC, an extremely rare neurological disorder that causes muscle stiffness, seizures and paralysis. Several families with children who have AHC have rallied to help Julia. Among them is Simon Frost, who discussed those efforts with Amna Nawaz. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/16/20246 minutes, 18 seconds
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News Wrap: Slovakia's prime minister shot in assassination attempt

In our news wrap Wednesday, Slovakia's prime minister was shot multiple times today in an assassination attempt, the Supreme Court ordered Louisiana to hold congressional elections this year using a House map with a second mostly-Black district, the number of drug overdose deaths in the U.S. fell last year and Congress has passed a broad aviation bill aimed at increasing air safety. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/15/20245 minutes, 45 seconds
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Israeli defense minister publicly criticizes Netanyahu's Gaza strategy

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pushed back against criticism of his Gaza strategy from within his own government. Israel's defense minister accused Netanyahu of "indecision" and leading Israel down a "dangerous course." The public infighting comes as the Biden administration said Israel did not have a political plan for what's next in Gaza. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/15/20245 minutes, 54 seconds
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Zelenskyy pleads for more support amid one of Russia's largest offensives of the war

Ukrainian troops fell back to defensive lines amid one of Russia's largest offensives since the beginning of the full-scale invasion more than two years ago. President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has postponed all foreign travel, and U.S. Secretary of State Blinken announced new weapons deliveries while visiting Ukraine. But as Nick Schifrin reports, in Kharkiv, the front is fragile. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/15/20244 minutes, 25 seconds
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Treasury Secretary Yellen on why Biden is targeting Chinese manufacturing with new tariffs

President Biden announced a series of major tariffs on several Chinese imports. The world's two largest economic superpowers are colliding over the future of electric vehicles and other industrial sectors. It comes as both President Biden and Donald Trump are battling to sell voters on their visions for the economy. Amna Nawaz discussed the developments with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/14/202410 minutes, 11 seconds
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Amid massive protests, Georgian parliament passes bill critics say will set back democracy

The parliament in the country of Georgia passed a bill that requires aid groups and media that receive foreign funding to register as "organizations serving the interests of a foreign power." Georgia is located between Russia and Turkey on the Black Sea. Critics call it the "Russia Law" and say it will increase Russian influence and block Georgia's integration into the West. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/14/20245 minutes, 54 seconds
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News Wrap: Defense minister replacement shows Putin's desperation, State Department says

In our news wrap Monday, the State Department says Vladimir Putin's appointment of a new defense minister shows his 'desperation' to sustain his invasion of Ukraine, smoke from wildfires in Canada prompted health warnings in parts of the Midwest and major U.S. airlines are suing the Department of Transportation over a rule requiring them to clearly disclose added fees. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/13/20245 minutes, 5 seconds
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Israel faces diplomatic pressure to avoid assault on Rafah

The United Nations says more than 360,000 Gazans who fled to Rafah have now been forced to flee again as Israeli troops attack sectors of the city in a bid to rout Hamas. Also in Rafah, the first foreign U.N. staff member was killed by Israeli troops. More than 100 Palestinian U.N. staff have been killed since Oct. 7. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/13/20244 minutes, 39 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel fights resurgence of Hamas militants in northern Gaza

In our news wrap Sunday, Israeli forces are again fighting Hamas in an area of northern Gaza that the military had previously cleared, Russia says a 10-story apartment building in the border city of Belgorod partially collapsed under Ukrainian shelling, the first person to receive a genetically modified pig kidney transplant has died, and filmmaker Roger Corman has died at age 98. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/12/20242 minutes, 49 seconds
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New film shows the toll Russia's invasion has taken on animals in Ukraine

The war in Ukraine has upended the lives of millions of people. It's also disrupted the lives of an untold number of animals, both pets and zoo animals. An upcoming episode of Nature on PBS, "Saving the Animals of Ukraine," documents how war-torn Ukrainians are reclaiming humanity by rescuing animals. John Yang speaks with director Anton Ptushkin about the film. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/12/20245 minutes, 52 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel expands Rafah evacuation orders ahead of potential military operation

In our news wrap Saturday, Israel issued more evacuation orders forcing tens of thousands of Palestinians to flee Rafah, Russian forces took control of five villages outside Kharkiv amid a renewed offensive in Ukraine's northeast, flash floods in Afghanistan, Brazil and Kenya have killed hundreds of people, and unusually strong solar storms are producing brilliant northern lights on Earth. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/11/20243 minutes, 37 seconds
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Israel likely violated international humanitarian law in Gaza war, U.S. report says

A highly anticipated report from the State Department concludes that the U.S. may continue to send weapons to Israel despite apparent Israeli violations of international humanitarian law. The long-awaited report comes just two days after the president said he would suspend a shipment of bombs to Israel as it surges forces around Rafah. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/10/20245 minutes, 10 seconds
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Sudan's paramilitary forces accused of ethnic cleansing, crimes against humanity in Darfur

More than a year of brutal war in Sudan between two factions of its army has killed tens of thousands and forced more than 8 million people to flee their homes. Some 5 million are now at risk of starvation there. As Nick Schifrin reports, the situation may be getting even worse. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/10/202410 minutes, 26 seconds
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Netanyahu vows Israel will continue Rafah operation after U.S. freezes bomb delivery

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu said his country would "stand alone if necessary," in response to President Biden's move to pause deliveries of some bombs to Israel. That decision has created a possible turning point in the U.S.-Israel relationship and the war in Gaza. Israel is poised to expand its operation in Rafah, a step the U.S. is warning Netanyahu not to take. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/9/20244 minutes, 19 seconds
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Middle East experts discuss if U.S. weapons pause will change Israel's tactics in Gaza

Will the Biden administration's holding up sending bombs to pressure Israel from launching a large-scale assault on Rafah have the desired effect? Nick Schifrin has views from Dennis Ross, who played leading roles in the Middle East peace process for more than 12 years, and Tom Malinowski, former Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy and Human Rights during the Obama administration. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/9/20248 minutes, 53 seconds
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Biden administration defends suspending weapons to Israel over Rafah assault concerns

Many Republicans and some Democrats are criticizing the Biden administration for suspending the delivery of thousands of bombs to Israel. At a Senate hearing, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin defended the move which comes as the White House also delayed a congressionally mandated report on Israeli military adherence to international humanitarian law. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/8/20244 minutes, 17 seconds
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Democratic, GOP lawmakers react to Biden pausing bomb shipment to Israel

As the Biden administration puts a hold on sending thousands of bombs to Israel, we have perspectives from two members of Congress. Geoff Bennett spoke with Sen. Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat from Maryland and a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and Amna Nawaz discussed the latest with Republican Rep. Mike Lawler of New York, who serves on the House Foreign Affairs Committee. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/8/202411 minutes, 20 seconds
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Ukrainian troops who lost limbs in war receive prosthetics and hope for the future

In addition to shortages of weapons and artillery in its war with Russia, Ukraine faces a critical manpower problem. Its troops are wounded and weary after more than two years of fighting and the military is struggling to replenish ranks. Amna Nawaz and producer Sam Lane report on both of those challenges. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/8/20247 minutes, 2 seconds
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Israel seizes Gaza border crossing as cease-fire and hostage deal hangs in the balance

Delegations from Israel and Hamas returned to Cairo to resume fraught negotiations over a potential cease-fire and hostage deal. Meantime, Israeli tanks and troops seized the Rafah border crossing with Egypt, delaying aid shipments as 1.2 million Palestinians shelter in the city. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/7/20244 minutes, 26 seconds
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How Israel's operation in Rafah affects aid for Palestinians and cease-fire talks

An Israeli delegation arrived in Cairo for crucial cease-fire talks a day after Hamas said it had accepted an Egyptian-Qatari proposal. To explore what could happen next, Amna Nawaz spoke with Hussein Ibish, senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/7/20245 minutes, 41 seconds
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Israel launches operation into Rafah, says cease-fire agreement not reached with Hamas

It is a delicate and momentous day in the Middle East. The Israeli military says it has launched a new operation into parts of Rafah in southern Gaza. At the same time, the Israeli government says it's continuing negotiations to reach a cease-fire with Hamas in exchange for the release of hostages. William Brangham discusses the latest with Nick Schifrin and Aaron David Miller. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/6/20245 minutes, 36 seconds
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News Wrap: Russia says it will hold drills to simulate nuclear weapon use

In our news wrap Monday, Russia publicly announced drills to simulate the use of battlefield nuclear weapons in its war with Ukraine, authorities in southern Brazil say at least 83 people have died in days of heavy rains and flooding with more than a hundred still missing and heavy rain across southeastern Texas began tapering off, but catastrophic flooding left widespread disruption. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/6/20244 minutes, 14 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel shuts down Kerem Shalom crossing into Gaza after Hamas attack

In our news wrap Sunday, Israel closed Gaza's main point of entry for aid after Hamas fired rockets at Israeli forces nearby, Al Jazeera went off the air in Israel after the Israeli cabinet voted to shut it down, Kenya said the country's death toll from flooding and landslides has risen to 228, Ukraine marked its third Orthodox Easter at war with Russia, and artist Frank Stella died at age 87. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/5/20242 minutes, 45 seconds
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What a rapidly changing civil war means for the future of Myanmar

Myanmar is on the brink of becoming a failed state. For three years, the southeast Asian nation has been embroiled in an escalating civil war between the military junta and pro-democracy forces. Now, resistance groups have gained control of a significant part of the country after a long line of junta defeats. John Yang speaks with Burmese-American journalist Aye Min Thant about the situation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/5/20247 minutes, 11 seconds
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News Wrap: Senior UN official warns famine in northern Gaza is moving south

In our news wrap Saturday, the head of the UN's World Food Program said there is "full-blown famine" in northern Gaza and it is spreading south, tensions remain high on college campuses across the U.S. amid anti-war protests, new drone footage reveals the damage Russia inflicted on a village in eastern Ukraine, and hundreds of people have been rescued from severe flooding in the Houston area. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/4/20243 minutes, 27 seconds
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Departure of U.S. troops from Chad and Niger raise regional security concerns

The African nations of Niger and Chad have both been key partners with the United States in combating terrorist groups in the region. But now that both countries are ruled by military regimes, that cooperation is in question. Ali Rogin speaks with J. Peter Pham, former U.S. ambassador and special envoy for the Sahel region, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/4/20247 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ukrainian family rebuilds life in Minnesota after fleeing Russian invasion

Since Russia invaded Ukraine more than two years ago, about 6.5 million Ukrainians have left the country. One of them is 10-year-old Artem Fedorenko, who lost part of his arm in a Russian bombing that killed his father and brother. Today, he and his mother Oksana are rebuilding their lives in suburban Minneapolis with help from the Minnesota-based Protez Foundation. MPR News brings us their story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/4/20245 minutes, 41 seconds
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Palestinian journalist describes fight to protect his family while covering war in Gaza

On World Press Freedom Day, the Committee to Protect Journalists says some two dozen journalists have been killed so far this year, the vast majority of them dying in Gaza. At least 97 journalists and media workers have been killed in Gaza, Israel and Lebanon since the start of the war. Nick Schifrin has a look at the life of our journalist in Gaza, cameraman and producer Shams Odeh. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/3/20245 minutes, 1 second
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Prisons holding ISIS members in Syria a breeding ground for radicalization, officials say

It's been five years since the Islamic State was defeated by a U.S.-led military campaign in Syria. But today some 10,000 ISIS fighters remain jailed inside Syrian detention centers. Human rights groups call conditions in the prisons abusive and local authorities warn they are a breeding ground for radicalization and an Islamic State revival. Special correspondent Leila Molana-Allen reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/3/20249 minutes, 14 seconds
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News Wrap: Rebuilding Baltimore bridge will take 4 years and cost $2 billion

In our news wrap Thursday, officials announced rebuilding the Key Bridge in Baltimore will take four years and cost nearly $2 billion, Hamas is sending a delegation back to Egypt for talks on a Gaza cease-fire with Israel, U.S. intelligence says Iran's allies have paused attacks on American troops for now and Donald Trump stepped up threats to reject November's election results if he does not win. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/2/20244 minutes, 51 seconds
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Niece of American held hostage in Gaza updates efforts to bring him home

Among the more than 100 hostages still held captive by Hamas in Gaza are five American captives believed to be alive and the bodies of three Americans confirmed dead. Israeli American Keith Siegel has been missing from his home in southern Israel since October. Amna Nawaz spoke with his niece, Hanna Siegel, about the status of hostage negotiations and the relentless work to bring them home. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/2/20246 minutes, 40 seconds
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News Wrap: Blinken says "time is now" for a Gaza cease-fire

In our news wrap Wednesday, Secretary of State Blinken is in Israel and insisting the "time is now" for a cease-fire, Prime Minister Netanyahu's office insisted Israel still means to assault the city of Rafah, the Federal Reserve left its key interest rate unchanged as inflation remains stubbornly high and a Florida ban on abortion after six weeks of pregnancy took effect. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/1/20246 minutes, 41 seconds
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Outgoing U.S. Indo-Pacific commander urges more action to counter China's military power

The Biden Administration calls the People's Republic of China the only country with the will, intent and military strength to change the world order. The U.S. military officer responsible for China and the vast area from Hawaii to India is stepping down this week after three years and a 40-year career. Nick Schifrin spoke with Adm. John Aquilino in Honolulu. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/1/20249 minutes, 43 seconds
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Agriculture school creates climate-aware approach to help small farmers feed Africa

Africa faces challenges as varied as its vast landmass. But one that's shared by all 54 countries is how to feed a population of 1.2 billion that's expected to double by 2050. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one attempt to build a foundation. It's part of his series, Agents for Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/1/20248 minutes, 14 seconds
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News Wrap: Netanyahu vows to invade Rafah whether there's a cease-fire deal or not

In our news wrap Tuesday, Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu vowed again to invade Rafah whether there's a cease-fire deal or not, former President Trump was found in contempt of court for violating a gag order in his hush money trial and House Speaker Johnson's job appears to be safe after Democrats announced they will oppose efforts to remove him. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/30/20247 minutes, 4 seconds
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How an African university is connecting doctors to patients in remote communities

Sub-Saharan Africa accounts for about 25 percent of all disease in the world, yet it has just three percent of the healthcare workforce. There are not enough medical and nursing schools and many of the continent's graduates are recruited to wealthier countries. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one effort to educate African providers who will stay and serve. It's part of his series, Agents for Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/30/20248 minutes, 40 seconds
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Israeli barrage on Gaza continues as cease-fire, hostage release negotiations resume

Fraught negotiations continue nearly seven months into the war in Gaza. A Hamas delegation left Cairo and is expected to return with a response to the latest cease-fire proposal. Secretary of State Blinken pressed not just for a cease-fire and hostage release, but for much more humanitarian aid into Gaza. Meantime, the Israeli bombardment continues with Rafah in its sights. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/29/20245 minutes, 5 seconds
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News Wrap: At least 45 killed by flooding in western Kenya

In our news wrap Monday, at least 45 people died in flash floods in western Kenya, Ukraine appealed for quick delivery of Western weapons as it gave more ground in the east, weekend tornadoes in Oklahomas killed four people and injured at least a hundred and the FDA will begin regulating new medical tests developed by labs to see if they work. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/29/20244 minutes, 10 seconds
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Indian government accused of trying to kill Sikh activists in U.S.

India has seen its stature grow on the world stage. Led by populist Hindu Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the world's biggest democracy has grown its economy and its geopolitical influence. But an investigation by The Washington Post adds new evidence to allegations that India is trying to murder some of its critics, even on American soil. William Brangham discussed the report with Greg Miller. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/29/20246 minutes, 27 seconds
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'New Cold Wars' examines America's struggles with China and Russia

In 1991, the Soviet Union ceased to exist, and with it the Cold War. At the same time, China was amid its rapid expansion. Now, Russia is again a principal adversary and China is a much stronger competitor. Nick Schifrin discussed the challenge presented by both nations with David Sanger, author of "New Cold Wars: China's Rise, Russia's Invasion, and America's Struggle to Defend the West." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/29/20248 minutes, 19 seconds
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Mexican consumer law helps man snag $28,000 earrings for $28 after Cartier pricing mishap

The words Cartier and deal are rarely said in the same breath. But the legendary French jeweler has been forced to extend an enormous discount to a Mexican man after he claimed an error allowed him to buy two pairs of earrings for $28 that were supposed to sell for nearly $28,000. Ellie Pitt of Independent Television News reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/29/20242 minutes, 12 seconds
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News Wrap: Hamas releases video of two hostages, including Israeli-American

In our news wrap Sunday, Hamas released video of two hostages as efforts around a cease-fire deal with Israel intensify, protestors rallied against the Israel-Hamas war outside the White House Correspondents' Dinner, tornadoes killed at least four people in Oklahoma, Iraq passed law imposing heavy prison sentences on LGBTQ+ people, and three-time WNBA champion Candace Parker says she is retiring. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/28/20243 minutes, 6 seconds
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Hard-hit cocoa harvests in West Africa cause chocolate prices to soar worldwide

If you've shopped for chocolate recently, you may have noticed your favorite items are either smaller or more expensive, or sometimes both. The price of cocoa -- the key ingredient in chocolate -- is the highest it's ever been after nearly doubling in the last four months. As Ali Rogin reports, this worldwide shortage has been years in the making. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/28/20246 minutes, 46 seconds
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How President Noboa's 'strong hand' policies against violence in Ecuador are playing out

Not long ago, Ecuador was a beacon of stability in a region known for political unrest and drug trafficking. But now, it's become one of Latin America's most violent countries amid a rise in organized crime. Many Ecuadorians are looking to President Daniel Noboa to turn things around. Carolina Jimenez Sandoval, president of the Washington Office on Latin America, joins Ali Rogin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/27/20247 minutes, 14 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel-Hamas war protests continue on campuses while some are shut down

In our news wrap Saturday, some universities moved to shut down protests over the Israel-Hamas war while students at others dug in, Israeli airstrikes killed at least 18 people in southern and central Gaza, Nebraska and Iowa residents sifted through the aftermath of a tornado outbreak, and Harvey Weinstein is in a New York City hospital after an appeals court overturned his 2020 rape conviction. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/27/20242 minutes, 51 seconds
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Israelis mark Passover amid conflict, loss and trauma

This week, Jews around the world are observing Passover, the festival of liberation that marks the historic exodus from ancient Egypt. But this year, joy is tempered with loss and trauma. More than 160,000 Israelis will mark the holiday while displaced from their homes. Still, others have empty chairs at the dinner table as their loved ones are still held captive by Hamas. Ali Rogin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/26/20246 minutes, 39 seconds
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North Koreans forced to process seafood that ends up in U.S., investigation reveals

In the interconnected, globalized economy, goods produced in one nation end up on shelves and in stores halfway around the world. Some American companies have recently come under scrutiny for alleged links to forced labor. William Brangham spoke with Ian Urbina, the journalist behind a new investigation documenting the forced labor behind Chinese seafood that ends up on American plates. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/26/20247 minutes, 35 seconds
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Kharkiv's children continue education below ground amid Russian airstrikes

In recent weeks, Russia has ramped up its airstrikes on Kharkiv. The eastern Ukrainian city has already faced nonstop bombings since Russia's full-scale invasion started more than two years ago. This latest campaign has left the 1.3 million residents of Ukraine's second-largest city worried about what comes next as the war reaches a critical juncture. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/25/20247 minutes, 29 seconds
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Ukrainian evangelical pastors show resilience while facing persecution from Russian forces

After Russia attacked Ukraine in 2022, some 20,000 Ukrainian children were forcefully transferred to Russia. As the city of Mariupol was being surrounded by Russian troops, the head of a Christian orphanage decided to take matters into his own hands to get 19 children to safety. With support from the Pulitzer Center, special correspondent Simon Ostrovsky reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/24/20249 minutes, 23 seconds
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News Wrap: Senate advances bill to send billions in aid to Ukraine

In our news wrap Tuesday, the Senate advanced a bill to send billions of dollars in aid to Ukraine, Israel ordered new evacuations of Northern Gaza as it carried out a wave of strikes throughout the strip, Norway called on international donors to resume payments to the U.N. agency for Palestinian refugees and a Moscow court rejected the latest appeal from American journalist Evan Gershkovich. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/23/20245 minutes, 37 seconds
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As ethnic violence rages on in Manipur, Indian government accused of looking the other way

Indian Prime Minister Modi hopes to secure a third term in elections now underway. He's promising voters a rising, united India. But in India's northeast, a state is at war with itself. Hundreds are dead, tens of thousands displaced and the government is accused of looking the other way. Zeba Warsi reports with support from the Unity Productions Foundation. A warning, some details are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/23/20247 minutes, 22 seconds
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More than 200 bodies found in mass grave at Nasser Hospital in Gaza

Many Palestinians have returned to Khan Younis to search for their dead after Israeli forces withdrew from the city. For more than a week now, they've unearthed graves where hundreds of bodies were buried. Ali Rogin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/22/20245 minutes, 1 second
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Chinese Olympic doping case swept 'under the carpet' by WADA, U.S. anti-doping chief says

A new doping scandal has erupted involving Olympic swimmers from China. Chinese authorities and the World Anti-Doping Agency found the drug trimetazidine but cleared the swimmers and did not flag problems to Olympic officials. Several who tested positive went on to win medals, including three gold medals. Jeffrey Brown discussed the latest with Travis Tygart of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/22/20247 minutes, 9 seconds
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News Wrap: Zelenskyy says new weapons from U.S. aid give Ukraine a 'chance for victory'

In our news wrap Sunday, Zelenskyy and other Western leaders praised Saturday's House vote approving $61 billion in aid to Ukraine, Palestinian health officials said Israeli airstrikes killed 22 people, including 18 children, in Rafah in southern Gaza, and Roman Gabriel, one of the leading pro quarterbacks of the 1960s and '70s, died at age 83. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/21/20242 minutes, 35 seconds
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NATO head Stoltenberg on whether delayed U.S. aid can still make a difference in Ukraine

Among the Western leaders welcoming Saturday's House approval of Ukraine aid was NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, who called it a move that "makes us all safer, in Europe and North America." Earlier, John Yang spoke with Stoltenberg from NATO headquarters in Brussels, and discussed how the aid will affect Ukraine's war against Russia. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/21/20247 minutes, 52 seconds
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News Wrap: Bipartisan House coalition passes $95 billion foreign aid package

In our news wrap Saturday, the House passed a long-delayed $95 billion aid package for Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, the Senate approved an extension of a controversial surveillance law, hospital officials say an Israeli airstrike on a house in southern Gaza killed at least nine people including six children, and former Arkansas governor and U.S. Sen. David Pryor died at the age of 89. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/20/20242 minutes, 41 seconds
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What's at stake for India and its allies as polls open in world's largest election

In India, voting in the world's largest election is underway for the next six weeks. Prime Minister Modi is heavily favored to win a third term, but his consolidation of power and crackdown on dissent have raised questions about his commitment to democratic values. Irfan Nooruddin, professor of Indian politics at Georgetown University, joins John Yang to discuss what issues are on voters' minds. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/20/20249 minutes, 11 seconds
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As journalist deaths climb in Israel-Hamas war, what can be done to protect them

The Israel-Hamas war is inflicting a devastating toll on civilians. The Committee to Protect Journalists says it's also the deadliest conflict for reporters, photographers and camera operators since the group began tracking casualties in 1992. Ali Rogin speaks with CPJ head Jodie Ginsberg about what's driving the mounting death toll and what can be done to better protect these journalists. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/20/20245 minutes, 46 seconds
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Why Israeli and Iranian officials downplayed apparent retaliatory strike in central Iran

There is an uneasy calm across the Middle East after both Israeli and Iranian officials had muted responses to Israel's apparent retaliatory strike in central Iran. The region had been on edge since an unprecedented Iranian attack and Israeli vows of revenge. Nick Schifrin discussed the latest with Suzanne Maloney of the Brookings Institution. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/19/20249 minutes, 25 seconds
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U.S. hits Iran with new sanctions while urging Israel against military response

On Thursday, President Biden and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu's top national security aides talked about Israel's potential response to the Iranian drone attack. U.S. officials think Israel shouldn't respond militarily and are trying to increase economic and diplomatic pressure on Iran to help make their case. Nick Schifrin discussed more with Dennis Ross and Khaled Elgindy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/18/20247 minutes, 6 seconds
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Conflict in Ethiopia eases, but millions there still face risk of starvation

As Ethiopia continues to face one of the worst droughts in recent history, millions of its people are suffering from acute hunger. The United States resumed shipments in December after suspending aid due to theft allegations. But starvation is still prevalent. Special correspondent Jack Hewson reports from the Tigray region in northern Ethiopia. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/18/20246 minutes, 26 seconds
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How Kharkiv is coping after 2 years of war and constant Russian strikes

Another deadly Russian strike in Ukraine killed at least 17 people, including three children, and injured many more. Officials say three Russian cruise missiles struck the center of the town of Chernihiv, located about 65 miles from the Russian border and less than a hundred miles from the capital city of Kyiv. Amna Nawaz reports from Ukraine. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/17/20244 minutes, 53 seconds
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How will Israel respond to Iran's drone attack? Middle East experts offer views

For decades, Israel and Iran have fought one another in the shadows and through proxies. That all changed this past weekend with Iran's direct attack on Israel. Israeli officials said they will retaliate but world leaders are urging restraint. Nick Schifrin has two views on the options for Israel and Iran and the risks with Eric Edelman and Vali Nasr. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/17/20248 minutes, 48 seconds
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Iraqi PM discusses regional turmoil and his country's partnership with the U.S.

Iraqi Prime Minister Mohammed Shia Al-Sudani is in Washington this week on the heels of tension in the Middle East. On the agenda was the future of U.S.-Iraq security cooperation, improving Iraqi economic and political integration with the region and the U.S. helping Iraq develop its oil resources. Geoff Bennett sat down with Al-Sudani to discuss those issues and more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/17/202414 minutes, 12 seconds
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News Wrap: First 7 jurors chosen to serve in Trump's criminal hush money trial

In our news wrap Tuesday, seven jurors have been chosen to serve in Donald Trump's criminal hush money trial in New York, Israel's war cabinet postponed a planned meeting to address any planned response to Iran's weekend attacks and federal regulators issued new protections for coal miners against black lung disease. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/16/20245 minutes, 28 seconds
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How recent Russian attacks on power plants have ravaged Ukraine's energy system

This year, Russia has launched a deliberate and devastating series of attacks on Ukraine's energy infrastructure. Taking advantage of gaps and shortages in Ukraine's air defenses, Russia has systematically targeted nearly every single power plant in the country. As Amna Nawaz reports, officials say the last few weeks have been unlike any they've seen before in this war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/16/20247 minutes, 6 seconds
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Sudan marks 1 year of brutal civil war as humanitarian crisis worsens

This week marks one year since the start of war in Sudan. What began as an internal power struggle has produced the world's largest displacement crisis. More than 8 million people have fled their homes, around 16 million are facing catastrophic levels of hunger and tens of thousands have been killed. Nick Schifrin reports in collaboration with North African media company, Ayen. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/16/202410 minutes, 13 seconds
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Allies urge restraint as Israel vows to respond to Iran's unprecedented drone attack

Tensions remain high in the Middle East as we wait to see if Israel responds to Iran's barrage of drones over the weekend. President Biden said while the U.S. commitment to Israel is unwavering, the administration would not support a retaliatory strike. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/15/20244 minutes, 26 seconds
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Exclusive: Zelenskyy says without U.S. aid 'we'll have no chance of winning'

Ukraine is facing challenges on multiple fronts, from critical shortages of munitions and manpower to Russia ramping up its attacks. It comes amid uncertainty around future aid from the U.S. Amna Nawaz sat down with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in Kyiv to discuss that and more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/15/202417 minutes, 44 seconds
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Israel weighs its response to Iran's attack as world leaders rush to contain conflict

World leaders are scrambling to keep conflict in the Middle East from spiraling out of control a day after Iran carried out its first-ever direct assault on Israel with drones and missiles. Nick Schifrin reports on the attack and John Yang speaks with Aaron David Miller, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about its ramifications. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/14/202411 minutes, 5 seconds
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News Wrap: Palestinians displaced by war move toward northern Gaza

In our news wrap Sunday, hostage release and cease-fire talks between Israel and Hamas have stalled, hundreds of displaced Palestinian families moved north along Gaza's coast, House Republicans renewed an effort to pass military aid for Israel, Sydney police gave an update on Saturday's deadly stabbing attack at a mall, and artist and author Faith Ringgold died at age 93. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/14/20241 minute, 56 seconds
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Ukraine faces dire shortage of munitions and manpower as Russia ramps up offensive

Ukraine has been at war with Russia for more than two years, and there are signs that this year could be pivotal. Ukrainian officials say they need more munitions and support as Russia appears to be gaining ground. Amna Nawaz reports from the ground in Kyiv. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/14/20244 minutes, 17 seconds
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Extreme drought plunges millions in southern Africa into hunger crisis

A devastating drought induced by El Nino has scorched crops and left millions hungry in southern Africa. As aid groups face budget cuts and broaden their operations to other conflicts, the region's crisis is expected to worsen. Ali Rogin speaks with Zimbabwe-based journalist Tendai Marima to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/14/20245 minutes, 46 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel on high alert, closes airspace as Iran launches drone attack

In our news wrap Saturday, Iran's much-anticipated attack on Israel is unfolding slowly, violent unrest continued in the West Bank as the body of a missing Israeli teen was found, an attacker stabbed six people to death at a mall in Australia, Russian troops escalated their assaults across southeastern Ukraine, and 174 people stranded mid-air in cable cars were rescued in Turkey. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/13/20243 minutes, 35 seconds
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Israel awaits possible retaliatory attack from Iran and proxy forces

Warning signs are flashing red throughout the Middle East and beyond as Israel and the U.S. await a possible Iranian response to the attack on its last week in Damascus, Syria. That Israeli airstrike killed one of Iran's senior military leaders. The Islamic Republic has vowed vengeance. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/12/20244 minutes, 44 seconds
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U.S. bolsters military ties with Japan and Philippines amid Chinese provocations

President Biden hosted the leaders of Japan and the Philippines on Thursday, sending a strong message of unity to Beijing. The administration says the network of alliances and partnerships in Asia is expanding in direct response to actions by China. Nick Schifirin discussed the developments with Zack Cooper, senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/11/20249 minutes
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Wind-assisted vessels could make commercial shipping climate-friendly

Is a revolution in commercial shipping to take place? Eighty percent of all international trade is carried by sea, producing substantial carbon emissions. Following the successful operation of two giant wind-assisted vessels, a British company predicts that by 2026, half of all new ships will have high-tech sails. Malcolm Brabant reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/11/20247 minutes, 21 seconds
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Ukrainian Christian groups face violent crackdown from Russian forces

Russia first occupied the Ukrainian city of Melitopol in March 2022. After the persecution of pro-Ukrainian activists, former government officials, human rights defenders and journalists, Russian secret services turned its attention to churches, their pastors and congregations. With the support of the Pulitzer Center, special correspondent Simon Ostrovsky and videographer Yegor Troyanovsky report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/10/202410 minutes, 25 seconds
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How Muslims in Jerusalem observed Ramadan and Eid amid 6 months of war in Gaza

The Muslim holy month of Ramadan has ended, and with it comes Eid al-Fitr, the holiday of breaking the fast. But in Jerusalem and the West Bank, the mood is subdued as fellow Palestinians struggle in Gaza with hunger, even starvation, as the war between Israel and Hamas grinds on. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/10/20245 minutes, 13 seconds
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Women who inspired 'Rosie the Riveter' honored for service during WWII

Some 80 years after their wartime efforts, real-life Rosie the Riveters are receiving the nation's highest civilian honor from Congress. John Yang has their story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/10/20243 minutes, 45 seconds
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Rwanda marks 30 years of reconciliation after genocide, but major challenges remain

Rwanda is holding observances to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the genocide in that East African nation that took one million lives. Rwanda has won praise for rebuilding efforts, but democratic backsliding and conflict just outside its borders have raised concern over the country's future stability. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. A warning, this story discusses and has imagery of genocide. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/9/20248 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ambassador Emanuel on building military cooperation with Japan to deter China

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida and the president of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos, will meet with President Biden on Wednesday for a trilateral summit. The Biden administration has been improving military cooperation with Asian countries as a means to counter China's increasingly assertive behavior. Geoff Bennett discussed more with U.S. Ambassador to Japan Rahm Emanuel. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/9/20248 minutes, 42 seconds
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King Charles presented with first banknotes bearing his portrait

British King Charles was presented with the new banknotes of his reign. The king, who is being treated for an undisclosed cancer, received the notes bearing his portrait at a brief ceremony at Buckingham Palace. Chris Ship of Independent Television News reports from London. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/9/20242 minutes, 1 second
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Israeli forces withdraw from southern Gaza as cease-fire talks resume

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday he set a date for the invasion of Rafah in southern Gaza, where 1.4 million people have sought shelter. This comes as hostage and ceasefire talks between Israel and Hamas again appear to be at an impasse and Palestinians return to a devastated Khan Yunis. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/8/20245 minutes, 15 seconds
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Millions of people witness rare total solar eclipse across North America

Millions of people on Monday watched a rare total eclipse cut across the U.S., Mexico and Canada, plunging some towns and cities into darkness for several minutes. In many other places it was a chance to view a partial eclipse. Miles O'Brien, who witnessed the spectacle from Dallas, has our report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/8/20248 minutes, 51 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel lowers military presence in southern Gaza as war hits 6-month mark

In our news wrap Sunday, Israel said it's pulling some of its troops out of southern Gaza, a top Iranian official's remarks stoked fears of wider regional conflict, Russia declared a national emergency after a dam broke during flooding, Rwanda marked 30 years since government-backed extremists killed an estimated 800,000 people, and a winning Powerball ticket worth $1.3 billion was sold in Oregon. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/7/20242 minutes, 45 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli military recovers body of Oct. 7 hostage from Gaza

In our news wrap Saturday, Israel says it recovered the body of a man taken hostage in the Oct. 7 Hamas attack, Russian drone and missile strikes killed eight people in the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv, Mexico suspended diplomatic ties with Ecuador after police raided the Mexican embassy in Quito, and the death toll in Taiwan's recent earthquake rose to 13. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/6/20242 minutes, 23 seconds
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Food waste is a global problem. Here are major drivers and what can be done about it

More than 2 billion people, about a third of the world's population, face food insecurity. At the same time, a recent UN report estimated that more than 1 billion metric tons of food went to waste in 2022, enough to give each person facing hunger around the world more than one meal a day. Ali Rogin speaks with Dana Gunders, executive director of ReFED, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/6/20245 minutes, 49 seconds
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Israel draws international outrage after airstrikes kills 7 aid workers

The Israeli military dismissed two officers and reprimanded three more senior officers it said were responsible for the killing of seven World Central Kitchen aid workers earlier this week. Nick Schifrin reports as Monday's attack puts even greater scrutiny on Israel's tactics in Gaza. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/5/20243 minutes, 47 seconds
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News Wrap: Rare East Coast earthquake rattles U.S.

In our news wrap Friday, a relatively rare East Coast earthquake rattled much of the northeastern U.S., the economy is still churning out jobs in spite of expert predictions and the commander of Iran's Revolutionary Guard vows retribution against Israel for an airstrike in Damascus. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/5/20244 minutes, 50 seconds
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Russia continues to link terrorist attack to Ukraine despite conflicting U.S. intelligence

The March 22 terrorist attack on Crocus City Hall killed 145 people and injured hundreds -- the deadliest attack in Russia in 20 years. Russia blamed the U.S. and Ukraine despite specific U.S. intelligence shared with Russia of an impending attack by ISIS-Khorasan. Nick Schifrin takes a look at Russia's unfolding accusations and the state of the U.S.-Russia relationship. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/5/20245 minutes, 44 seconds
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President Biden warns Israel of thinning patience amid humanitarian situation in Gaza

President Biden and other U.S. officials have warned Israel's government that they are nearly out of patience with how it's conducting the war in Gaza. Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, one of the president's closest allies in the senate, joins us to talk about this potential shift. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/5/20246 minutes, 25 seconds
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Israel's war in Gaza weighs on the holy month of Ramadan

Muslims around the world are marking the month of Ramadan. But this year, Israel's war in Gaza, with mass civilian casualties and widespread suffering among Gazans, has added a new layer to this holy month. We spoke with Muslims at a local mosque in suburban Maryland. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/5/20244 minutes, 1 second
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Biden warns Israel to protect civilians, aid workers in Gaza or risk losing U.S. support

President Biden is warning Israel that U.S. support for the war in Gaza depends on new efforts to protect civilians and aid workers. Biden spoke with Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu in a phone call Thursday following Monday's airstrike that killed seven humanitarian workers in Gaza. The White House said the president told Netanyahu an immediate ceasefire is essential. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/4/20244 minutes, 41 seconds
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Japanese prime minister on strengthening military cooperation with U.S. to counter China

The challenge presented by China is one of the main focuses of the Biden White House. The president will soon meet with the leader of Japan, one of America's strongest allies, in a bid to deepen the military partnership in East Asia. Geoff Bennett sat down with Prime Minister Fumio Kishida to discuss the stakes of the summit. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/4/202411 minutes, 49 seconds
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Documentary captures journalist's gender transition while embedded with Taliban

A new documentary now available on Amazon Prime and AppleTV offers an in-depth look at the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan. "Transition" follows Australian filmmaker Jordan Bryon as he undergoes a gender transition while embedded with a Taliban unit. Bryon and co-director Monica Villamizar spoke with Amna Nawaz about this turning point in Afghanistan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/4/20247 minutes, 7 seconds
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José Andrés accuses Israel of deliberately targeting World Central Kitchen members

The bodies of foreign aid workers killed in an Israeli strike early Tuesday morning have left Gaza and are flying home. On Wednesday, World Central Kitchen founder José Andrés accused Israel of targeting his employees deliberately, an accusation Israel denies. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/3/20242 minutes, 30 seconds
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Was Israeli strike on aid convoy negligence or accident? Retired military leaders weigh in

Following Israel's deadly strike on aid workers in Gaza and the international outrage it caused, Nick Schifrin has views from Wes Bryant, a retired U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controller who called in air strikes and led strike planning cells, and retired Israeli Lt. Col. Jonathan Conricus who commanded IDF forces in Lebanon and the Gaza Strip. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/3/20248 minutes, 40 seconds
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Israeli strike killing 7 World Central Kitchen members sparks international outrage

There have been few incidents in six months of war in Gaza that created the level of outrage that leaders across three continents expressed Tuesday. It comes after an Israeli strike killed seven members of Chef Jose Andres' World Central Kitchen aid organization, including one American-Canadian dual citizen. Israel called the killings unintended and vowed to investigate. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/2/20244 minutes, 16 seconds
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Head of Anera discusses pausing Gaza aid operation after Israeli strike kills WCK workers

American Near East Refugee Aid, or Anera, paused operations in Gaza after an Israeli strike killed seven members of the World Central Kitchen. For the last 6 months, Anera has been delivering medicine, water and food in Gaza, including some 150,000 meals a day. Sean Carroll, the group's president and CEO, joined Amna Nawaz to discuss his concerns. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/2/20246 minutes, 5 seconds
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Attack on Iran consulate in Syria escalates conflict in Middle East

There is an escalation of tension in the Middle East. On Monday, warplanes attacked a building inside Iran's consulate complex in Damascus, Syria. Some of the most senior members of Iran's Revolutionary Guard were killed. Iran blames Israel for the strikes. Now there are reports of new attacks on international ships in the Red Sea and a base in southern Israel. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/1/20243 minutes, 33 seconds
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'Havana syndrome' investigator on accusing Russia of targeting U.S. officials

For the last decade, American diplomatic, law enforcement and intelligence personnel have suffered grievous injuries in the line of duty. Many say they felt attacked by debilitating waves of sound and pressure known as "Havana syndrome." Sunday, 60 Minutes reported more on this story, and assigned blame to Russia. Geoff Bennett discussed that report with retired Army Lt. Col. Gregory Edgreen. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/1/20246 minutes, 5 seconds
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Brutal wave of gang violence leaves 1.4 million Haitians on brink of starvation

The UN says more than 1,500 Haitians have been killed so far this year in a situation it calls "cataclysmic." For nearly a month, the country has been engulfed in another wave of brutal gang violence. Nick Schifrin reports, and a warning, images in this story are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/29/20245 minutes, 11 seconds
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Sister of Evan Gershkovich discusses fight to free him from Russian detention

Thursday marks one year since Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich was detained by Russian police. He has remained in detention ever since on espionage charges, an accusation both the U.S. and Journal strongly deny. Nick Schifrin speaks with Gershkovich's family and examines efforts to release him. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/28/20249 minutes, 32 seconds
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Israeli holiday celebrations subdued by loss of loved ones and war in Gaza

This week for the first time in more than four decades, Jerusalem held a parade for the Israeli holiday of Purim. It's traditionally a party for kids and adults, but this year, the war has muted the festivities and even caused controversy over that parade. Nick Schifrin and producer Karl Bostic talked with Israelis about a subdued celebration in a time of war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/27/20246 minutes, 15 seconds
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Pentagon presents alternative to Israel's plan to assault Rafah

At the Pentagon Tuesday, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin presented an alternative vision to Israel's stated plan to assault Rafah, the city in southern Gaza where more than one million Gazans have fled. The discussion between Austin and Israeli Defense Minister Yoav Gallant came as negotiations over a cease-fire and hostage release hit an apparent impasse. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/26/20243 minutes, 53 seconds
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War reporter Rod Nordland on his memoir 'Waiting for the Monsoon' and facing death

After decades of covering war, traveling the world and being estranged from his family, journalist and author Rod Nordland was in New Delhi when he was struck by a grand mal seizure and given a diagnosis of incurable cancer. Nick Schifrin sat down with Nordland to talk about facing death and his discovery of a grace and love that he had never felt before. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/26/20248 minutes, 22 seconds
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Rift between U.S. and Israel widens over U.N. Gaza cease-fire resolution

There is a public break between the United States and Israel after the U.S. refused to veto a UN Security Council resolution that calls for a cease-fire in Gaza. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu accused the U.S. of changing its policy on the war in Gaza and canceled a planned visit of his top aides to Washington. Nick Schifrin reports on the latest developments. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/25/20244 minutes, 47 seconds
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News Wrap: Russia mourns victims of Moscow attack as some suspects charged with terrorism

In our news wrap Sunday, Russia held a national day of mourning for victims of the concert hall massacre in suburban Moscow, a barrage of Russian missiles hit targets in Kyiv and farther west as Putin blames Ukraine for the terror attack without evidence, and Nigeria's military says 137 of nearly 300 schoolchildren kidnapped more than two weeks ago have been released. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/24/20242 minutes, 20 seconds
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The devastating effect of the Israel-Hamas war on education in Gaza

The World Health Organization says the future of an entire generation in Gaza is at risk, with children dying of the effects of malnutrition and disease. Another casualty is Gaza's education system -- more than 800 schools are estimated to have been bombed or destroyed in five months of war between Israel and Hamas. David Skinner from Save the Children joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/24/20246 minutes, 3 seconds
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Intense fighting between rebels and Congolese army sparks fear of regional war

Violent conflict in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo is worsening the humanitarian crisis there, the World Health Organization warned this past week. As armed rebels close in on Goma, hospitals are overwhelmed and hundreds of thousands civilians have been displaced. Now, there are fears of a wider regional conflict. John Yang speaks with Jason Stearns to learn more about the situation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/24/20246 minutes, 13 seconds
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What we know about the terror attack in Russia and the ISIS group claiming responsibility

Russian President Putin has vowed to punish those responsible for the terror attack on a suburban Moscow concert hall that killed at least 133 people. In the capital, people are remembering the dead after one of the worst acts of terror in Russia in decades. Journalist Michael Weiss joins John Yang to discuss the Islamic State branch that claimed responsibility for the attack and Putin's response. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/23/20249 minutes, 5 seconds
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News Wrap: Government shutdown averted as Biden signs $1.2 trillion funding bill

In our news wrap Saturday, Biden signed a $1.2 trillion spending bill to fund more than half the government through the end of the current budget year, Egypt said about 7,000 aid trucks are being denied entry to Gaza as the UN warns of imminent famine, a Russian spacecraft blasted off from Kazakhstan to take a crew to the ISS, and author and illustrator Laurent de Brunhoff died at age 98. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/23/20241 minute, 55 seconds
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Princess Kate reveals she has cancer, undergoing treatment

Kate, the Princess of Wales, announced that she is undergoing treatment for cancer. The news came amid rampant and often irresponsible speculation about her in the British press and beyond. It also came after missteps by the royal family itself about her whereabouts and condition. Amna Nawaz discussed the announcement with Jennie Bond. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/22/20245 minutes, 10 seconds
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A Brief But Spectacular take on super communication

Charles Duhigg is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and best-selling author whose latest book seeks to unlock the secret language of communication. He shares his Brief But Spectacular take on super communication. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/22/20243 minutes, 23 seconds
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Study finds military suicide rates highest among tank brigades

The military has experienced suicide in its ranks for decades. In recent years, it was partly attributed to the stresses and strains members experienced in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But those conflicts are over and suicides remain at what the Pentagon calls an unacceptably high level. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/21/20248 minutes, 36 seconds
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WWII 'Ghost Army' soldiers receive Congressional Gold Medal

Some 1,100 World War II soldiers who served in the so-called "Ghost Army" received long overdue recognition at the U.S. Capitol. During the war, they belonged to units that specialized in trickery to outwit the Germans. Their methods included inflatable tanks, sound effects and phony radio transmissions. Thursday, three of the seven known surviving members accepted the Congressional Gold Medal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/21/20241 minute, 7 seconds
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China tightens grip on Hong Kong with passage of strict law punishing dissent

China criticized the West for questioning Hong Kong's new national security law. The once mostly autonomous city is now led by legislators entirely handpicked by Beijing and critics say Article 23 is a death blow to whatever independence the city still had. Nick Schifrin discussed the law and what it means for Hong Kong with Anna Kwok of the Hong Kong Democracy Council. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/20/20249 minutes, 55 seconds
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Experts warn of 'imminent' famine in Gaza with lack of aid reaching Palestinians

More than half of North Gaza's population is at risk of starvation and in southern Gaza, Rafah is projected to face famine by July. Israel says it places no restrictions on aid and blamed the humanitarian crisis on Hamas, but the UN has accused Israel of blocking assistance. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/19/20245 minutes, 1 second
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What's next for Israel and war in Gaza as rift between Netanyahu and Biden widens

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu reiterated his determination to send troops into Rafah, in southern Gaza, to rout remaining Hamas units. The drive has led to a rift with the Biden administration as it warns against an Israeli operation before more than 1.3 million Palestinians can move to safety. Amna Nawaz discussed the rising tensions with David Makovsky. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/19/20246 minutes, 53 seconds
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What Putin's continued rule in Russia means Ukraine and the world

Russian President Vladimir Putin declared his intention to advance deeper into Ukraine and voiced new threats against the West a day after he secured his fifth term in office. It was an election with no suspense and whose outcome was preordained. Nick Schifrin discussed what Putin's continued rule means for Russia, Ukraine, the United States and the world with Fiona Hill and Evgenia Kara-Murza. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/18/202415 minutes, 6 seconds
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News Wrap: Netanyahu says Schumer's call for new Israeli election is 'inappropriate'

In our news wrap Sunday, Netanyahu dismissed U.S. criticism of his leadership and handling of Israel's war with Hamas, polls closed in Russia's presidential election and early returns show Putin with 88 percent of the vote, a man has been charged with murder in Pennsylvania over Saturday's shooting deaths of three family members, and another volcanic eruption in Iceland prompted evacuations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/17/20243 minutes, 4 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel conducts airstrikes in central Gaza as aid airdrops continue

In our news wrap Saturday, more aid was airdropped across northern Gaza while Israel moves toward sending ground forces into Rafah in the south, a shooting suspect barricaded himself in a house in New Jersey, the FAA is investigating another incident involving a Boeing 737, Russia saw protests on day two of its presidential election, and the CDC says U.S. marriages are back to pre-pandemic levels. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/16/20243 minutes, 16 seconds
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U.S. skeptical that Israel can protect Gaza civilians as Rafah assault looms

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Friday announced he had approved plans to assault Rafah, where more than half of all Gazans have fled. At the same time, Netanyahu and international mediators also acknowledged that negotiations for a cease-fire have advanced. Nick Schifrin talks with Amna Nawaz to break it all down. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/15/20245 minutes, 33 seconds
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EU's top foreign policy official calls 30,000 killed in Gaza 'a massacre'

The Biden administration is struggling to find solutions to two major foreign policy challenges: creating a ceasefire in the war in Gaza and helping fund Ukraine's war against Russia. Nick Schifrin speaks with Josep Borrell, the European Union's foreign policy chief, to learn more about global efforts on these two fronts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/14/20247 minutes, 41 seconds
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Amid ordeal of the Israel-Hamas war, expectant mothers share the struggles of pregnancy

Of the many horrors endured by Palestinians and Israelis since the Hamas attacks of Oct. 7, perhaps none is more acute than those of expectant mothers. For the last several months, special correspondent Leila Molana-Allen has been charting the progress of their pain, their pregnancies, their sorrows and their joys. She brings us their stories now. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/14/20248 minutes, 35 seconds
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Mother of slain journalist James Foley discusses new book about her son

Friday marks 13 years since the start of the Syrian civil war. Jim Foley was an American journalist covering the conflict when he was kidnapped by Islamic State terrorists in 2012 and publicly beheaded two years later. A decade later, his mother Diane Foley tells his story and how she became an advocate for American hostages abroad in a new book, "American Mother." She joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/14/20247 minutes, 29 seconds
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Israel announces plan to evacuate Rafah ahead of southern offensive

Israel's top spokesperson suggested that Israel has a plan to evacuate many of the more than 1 million Gazans who have fled to Rafah in southern Gaza. The news comes as the U.S. continues to call on Israel to allow humanitarian aid into the strip while families struggle to observe Ramadan. Foreign affairs and defense correspondent Nick Schifrin speaks on how people in Gaza are celebrating. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/13/20248 minutes, 43 seconds
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Gazans struggle with starvation and displacement this Ramadan

There is fasting, and then there is starving. At Ramadan, many Gazans say they are now doing both. Nick Schifrin reports on how Palestinian families are struggling for sustenance during this holy month that has come amid a food crisis fueled by the Israel-Hamas war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/13/20245 minutes, 38 seconds
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Widespread gang violence in Haiti continues, bolstered by weapons trafficked from the U.S.

Months of raging gang violence came to a head today in Haiti. The prime minister, currently stranded in Puerto Rico, announced he would resign as soon as a transitional government is in place. Meanwhile, the widespread violence has recently been made worse by an influx of powerful weapons which special correspondent Marcia Biggs tells us are coming mostly from the U.S. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/12/202410 minutes, 18 seconds
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Gangs edge Haiti to brink of collapse as regional leaders seek solutions

In Haiti's capital, the gangs are in control and trying to overthrow an absent government. While the prime minister was abroad, gangs closed the airport, and he has been unable to return. Meanwhile, Secretary of State Blinken is talking to regional leaders about finding a different political solution. Nick Schifrin talks with Robert Fatton Jr. of the University of Virginia for more perspective. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/11/20248 minutes, 43 seconds
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As global migration surges, trafficking has become a multi-billion dollar business

Amid a global migration surge, the trafficking industry has become a multi-billion dollar business. Mexican officials estimate as many as 6,000 people cross into Mexico every day from diverse places like Russia and Venezuela. Amna Nawaz heads south to Chiapas, Mexico where many migrants stop before continuing their journey to the U.S. border. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/11/20247 minutes, 14 seconds
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News Wrap: U.S. Army ship en route to Mediterranean for construction of pier for Gaza

In our news wrap Sunday, cease-fire talks in the Israel-Hamas war remained stalled as efforts to increase aid to Gaza by sea continued, Alabama Sen. Katie Britt responded to criticism about a misleading story she told in her response to Biden's State of the Union address, and the U.S. military airlifted non-essential embassy personnel out of Haiti's capital amid escalating gang violence. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/10/20242 minutes, 56 seconds
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'The Achilles Trap' offers a new look at Saddam Hussein's relationship with the U.S.

The 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq was based on the allegation that the country's dictator, Saddam Hussein, had weapons of mass destruction. In his new book, author Steve Coll pored over hundreds of audio tapes and transcripts, many previously unreleased, of internal meetings to uncover Hussein's view on his tumultuous relationship with the United States. Nick Schifrin speaks with Coll to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/10/20247 minutes, 34 seconds
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News Wrap: Gazans scramble for food airdropped from U.S. and Jordan

In our news wrap Saturday, Gaza is on the brink of famine on the eve of Ramadan, Biden signed six spending bills that avert a partial government shutdown for two weeks, a helicopter crash killed three U.S. personnel on a border security mission in Texas, a Pentagon report found no signs of alien activity amid decades of UFO sightings, and Iowa's Caitlin Clark broke another NCAA Division I record. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/9/20243 minutes, 5 seconds
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Hungary's Orbán gives Trump an 'illiberal' roadmap for American conservatives

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán is meeting with former President Donald Trump on Friday, after a visit to Washington Thursday where he met no one from the Biden administration. Orbán has delayed both European aid to Ukraine and Sweden's bid to join NATO. Nick Schifrin reports on Orbán's relationship with global conservatives and why he has resisted some of Biden's top priorities in Europe. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/8/20245 minutes, 41 seconds
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UK proposal would crack down on extremism over war in Gaza

In Britain, the government is planning new legislation to punish extremists responsible for rising tensions because of the war in Gaza. As special correspondent Malcolm Brabant tells us, Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is concerned that both Jewish and Muslim communities are being targeted and that social cohesion is under threat. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/7/20246 minutes, 37 seconds
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'The Internationalists' explores Biden's foreign policy approach after Trump

During his State of the Union address, President Biden will portray himself as a steady steward of American interests around the world, drawing distinctions between his approach and that of former President Trump. Nick Schifrin spoke with Politico's Alexander Ward, author of "The Internationalists: The Fight to Restore American Foreign Policy After Trump," to learn more about Biden's strategies. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/7/20247 minutes, 13 seconds
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How Sudan's civil war has created a massive hunger crisis

The U.N. Security Council on Wednesday discussed the brutal conflict in Sudan that has killed 14,000 people and displaced 8 million others. This as the World Food Program says what began as a power struggle in Africa's third-largest country may become the world's biggest hunger crisis. We hear from Sudanese people impacted by the war and Nick Schifrin speaks with WFP's Cindy McCain to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/6/20249 minutes, 9 seconds
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Family members of hostages offer opposing perspectives on a resolution

Negotiators met in Cairo for a second day on Tuesday to try and secure a deal between Israel and Hamas that would see a pause in fighting in Gaza and the release of Israeli hostages. The U.S. had hoped to secure a deal before the start of Ramadan next week, but so far there's been no breakthrough. Nick Schifrin looks at the status of those talks and speaks with family members of two hostages. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/5/20249 minutes, 57 seconds
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The issues hindering Gaza cease-fire negotiations between Israel and Hamas

Israeli opposition leader and war cabinet member Benny Gantz visited Washington Monday to meet Vice President Harris. The trip came without the authorization of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and as Egypt, Qatar and Hamas held negotiations over a possible deal that would pause the war in Gaza and release Israeli hostages. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/4/20244 minutes, 7 seconds
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Israelis living near Gaza border return home for 1st time since Oct. 7 Hamas attack

In Israeli cities near the Gaza border, schools are reopening for the first time since the Oct. 7 attack. Hamas gunmen overran Sderot that day, killing at least 50 civilians and 20 police officers. Months later, the government is facilitating families to return, but many are still haunted by that day. Nick Schifrin reports. A warning, some of the images in this story are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/4/20246 minutes, 54 seconds
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News Wrap: Haley rebuffs RNC pledge to back Republican presidential nominee

In our news wrap Sunday, Haley said she does not feel bound to back the GOP's eventual presidential nominee, Congressional leaders reached a deal on six spending bills needed to avoid a partial government shutdown, Israel's military and Gaza health officials disagreed on the cause of more than 100 Palestinian deaths during an aid delivery, and Shehbaz Sharif became Pakistan's new prime minister. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/3/20243 minutes, 15 seconds
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Mexico City is running out of water. Here's why and how millions of residents are affected

Mexico City, one of the world's most populous cities, could be just months away from running out of water. It's a crisis brought on by geography, growth and leaky infrastructure, all compounded by the effects of climate change. Journalist Emily Green joins John Yang to discuss the situation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/3/20245 minutes, 24 seconds
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News Wrap: U.S. airdrops aid into Gaza as cease-fire proposal moves a step forward

In our news wrap Saturday, U.S. officials say Israel has essentially agreed to a proposed cease-fire in Gaza, the U.S. military aircraft dropped humanitarian aid into southwest Gaza, firefighters in Texas battle the largest wildfire in state history, Trump won Missouri's Republican caucuses and all 39 delegates awarded by Michigan's party convention, and fashion icon Iris Appel died at age 102. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/2/20242 minutes, 37 seconds
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Thousands gather in Moscow for Navalny's funeral, defying Kremlin and Russian police

Alexei Navalny, Russia's opposition leader, was buried Friday on the outskirts of Moscow, two weeks after his suspicious death in a Siberian prison camp. He was mourned by thousands in the streets amid threats by the Kremlin and a massive police presence. Navalny showed in death he could still conjure resistance to Putin's authoritarian rule. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/1/20243 minutes, 49 seconds
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Navalny's legacy and the future of Russian opposition

Thousands defied the Kremlin and fears of a police crackdown to gather for the funeral of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. Geoff Bennett discussed Navalny's legacy with Dan Storyev, English managing editor at OVD-Info, a human rights organization that aims to end political persecution in Russia. He also participated in Navalny protests. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/1/20245 minutes, 15 seconds
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Nobel Peace Prize winner defends reputation against corruption charges in Bangladesh

Nearly a half-century after its birth from a bloody civil war, Bangladesh has made significant strides in reducing poverty. One of the best-known architects of this progress is Muhammad Yunus, who popularized the concept of microfinance. However, Yunus has run afoul of his country's prime minister and now faces criminal charges. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports for the series, Agents for Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/1/20246 minutes, 39 seconds
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More than 100 killed in Gaza while trying to get food from aid convoy

The health ministry in Gaza says 30,000 people there have died in 146 days of war. That grim threshold was crossed after more than 100 died while trying to pull aid from trucks. The U.N. says more than half a million people are "one step away" from famine. Nick Schifrin reports. A warning, images in this story are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/29/20244 minutes, 35 seconds
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Refugees International head discusses difficulties getting humanitarian aid into Gaza

Almost the entire population of Gaza needs aid, but only a fraction of what's needed is entering the besieged strip. For more on the current humanitarian crisis there, Geoff Bennett spoke with Jeremy Konyndyk. He's the president of Refugees International, a global humanitarian organization, and previously served in the Biden and Obama administrations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/29/20245 minutes, 19 seconds
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Israeli soldier's video diaries offer unique perspective on war in Gaza

We have a rare glimpse into the Israel-Hamas war from an ordinary Israeli infantryman, Sam Sank, who in normal life works in information technology. His period of service has just ended and special correspondent Malcolm Brabant caught up with him during a brief visit to the Sank family home in London. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/27/20247 minutes, 26 seconds
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Israel plans for invasion of Rafah as cease-fire and hostage negotiations continue

Jordan's king warned against a proposed Israeli raid of Rafah in Southern Gaza after the IDF sent an operational plan to the War Cabinet outlining its proposed invasion. Rafah is now home to more than 1.3 million Palestinians who have fled fighting elsewhere in Gaza. At the same time, negotiations continue over a cease-fire and deal to exchange hostages for prisoners. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/26/20245 minutes, 52 seconds
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News Wrap: Trump moves closer to GOP nomination with win in South Carolina

In our news wrap Sunday, Trump scored a decisive victory in South Carolina's Republican primary while Haley told supporters she is not giving up despite losing in her home state, there are signs of slow progress toward a new cease-fire deal between Israel and Hamas, and a man set himself on fire outside the Israeli embassy in Washington, D.C. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/25/20242 minutes, 43 seconds
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News Wrap: Navalny's body returned to his mother, Western leaders meet with Zelenskyy

In our news wrap Saturday, South Carolina is holding its GOP presidential primary, Western leaders visited Kyiv as Ukraine's war with Russia entered its third year, a Navalny aide said the late Russian opposition leader's body has been handed over to his mother, a South Carolina man was convicted in the first federal gender identity-based hate crime trial, and farmers continued protests in France. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/24/20242 minutes, 44 seconds
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What lies ahead as Ukraine marks somber 2-year anniversary of Russia's invasion

Two years ago today, Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Every day since then, an average of 42 Ukrainian civilians have been killed and wounded. More than 14 million people are in need of humanitarian aid and about 4 million have been displaced within Ukraine, with more than 6 million living as refugees around the world. Nick Schifrin joins John Yang to discuss his reporting. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/24/20247 minutes, 4 seconds
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State Dept. official: If Putin wins Ukraine, tyrants 'will get hungry' with aspirations

The Biden administration unveiled a new set of sanctions against Russia to punish it further for the full-scale invasion of Ukraine that it started two years ago. The sanctions are also meant to target Russia for the death of anti-corruption activist and politician Alexei Navalny. Geoff Bennett spoke with U.S. Undersecretary for Political Affairs Victoria Nuland about the state of the war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/23/20247 minutes, 55 seconds
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Snowboard instructor to soldier: Ukrainian describes joining fight against Russia

Ukraine finds itself in a bloody stalemate on the frozen plains of the country's east and south, now two years into Russia's full scale invasion. With forces taking immense losses throughout the war, many are answering calls to protect their nation, and joining up. Nick Schifrin and filmmaker Amanda Bailly in Kyiv introduce us to one of them. A warning, the images in this story are graphic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/23/20245 minutes, 59 seconds
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Boyfriend of Russian-American woman arrested in Russia discusses effort to bring her home

A Russian-American dual citizen who's been living and working in Los Angeles has been detained in Russia accused of treason and fundraising for Ukraine. Ksenia Karelina was in Russia visiting her family when she was arrested. Her boyfriend, Chris Van Heerden, is pleading for help and joined Geoff Bennett to discuss the latest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/23/20245 minutes, 1 second
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Continued Israeli airstrikes flatten parts of Rafah amid slow progress for Gaza cease-fire

As the deadly bombing of Gaza continues, there is some progress towards a resumption of talks to release hostages held by Hamas and a cease-fire. Israel's Army Radio said the country's war cabinet approved sending emissaries to truce talks in Paris. But that slow progress toward a deal did nothing to stop the bombing and killing in Gaza. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/22/20244 minutes, 1 second
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Experts analyze state of Ukraine war 2 years into Russia's invasion

Saturday marks two years since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine. With the conflict at a frozen and brutal stalemate, Nick Schifrin discussed where the war is, where it could go and U.S. policy toward Ukraine with Michael Kofman, John Mearsheimer and Rebeccah Heinrichs. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/22/202411 minutes, 30 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli official reports progress on deal to free hostages and pause fighting

In our news wrap Wednesday, a top Israeli official offered new hope for a deal to free hostages in Gaza and pause fighting, Israeli lawmakers rejected international pressure for a declaration of a Palestinian state, Navalny's mother filed suit against prison officials who refused to release her son's remains and Russia's capture of a city in eastern Ukraine touched off an exodus in the region. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/21/20245 minutes, 16 seconds
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Experts discuss future of UNRWA in Gaza and allegations some employees helped Hamas

The U.N. acknowledged aid deliveries into Gaza have dropped dramatically, threatening a population where hunger is spreading. That aid is delivered by UNRWA, an agency that Israel recently accused of acting "under the authorization" of Hamas. Nick Schifrin discussed the allegations with reserve Israeli Col. Grisha Yakubovich and Matthias Schmale, a former UNRWA director of operations in Gaza. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/21/20249 minutes, 17 seconds
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Wikileaks founder Julian Assange makes last-ditch attempt to avoid U.S. extradition

A two-day hearing in a London court room began Tuesday over the fate of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. At stake is whether he'll be extradited to the U.S. on espionage charges. Carrie DeCell, a senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute, and Jamil Jaffer, a former senior counsel for the House Intelligence Committee, join William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/20/202412 minutes, 29 seconds
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Taiwan's top diplomat to the U.S.: 'We are already a sovereign and independent nation'

Tensions in the Taiwan Strait increased this week following incidents near an island involving the Chinese and Taiwanese coast guards. It's happening at a sensitive moment, in between Taiwan's recent election and the upcoming inauguration of its new president. Nick Schifrin speaks to Taiwan's new representative to the U.S., Alexander Tah-ray Yui, for his first broadcast interview. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/20/20248 minutes, 21 seconds
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Alexei Navalny's widow vows to continue his fight for a free Russia

Alexei Navalny's death Friday in a Russian Arctic prison continues reverberating around the globe. World leaders, including President Biden, spoke Monday of stepped-up sanctions against Russia as Navalny's widow picked up his fight against Vladimir Putin. Andrei Soldatov, an investigative journalist and Center for European Policy Analysis senior fellow, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/19/20249 minutes, 9 seconds
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Poland's foreign minister on concerns the U.S. will abandon Ukraine, Europe

Along the eastern flank of NATO nations sit several former Soviet satellite states, with long and bitter memories of Russian dominance. They are among the strongest supporters of Ukraine's fight against a Russia's invasion and warn that more must be done to defeat Putin's army. During the Munich Security Conference, Nick Schifrin sat down with Radek Sikorski, Poland's foreign minister, to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/19/20247 minutes, 51 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel continues bombarding Gaza, 3 first responders fatally shot in Minnesota

In our news wrap Sunday, the World Health Organization says southern Gaza's main hospital is "no longer functional" after an Israeli raid, two police officers and a paramedic died in a shooting in Minnesota, a senior Pakistan official admitted to helping rig election results in his city, and Golden State Warriors star Steph Curry narrowly won the first-ever NBA vs. WNBA three-point contest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/18/20243 minutes, 21 seconds
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News Wrap: Navalny's mother pushes for answers after his death in prison

In our news wrap Saturday, Alexei Navalny's mother is pressing for details of how the Russian opposition leader died in an Arctic penal colony, outnumbered Ukrainian forces have withdrawn from the devastated eastern city of Avdiivka, U.S. Secretary of State Blinken met with Israeli officials to discuss hostage negotiations, and the FDA approved a novel type of cancer treatment for melanoma. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/17/20243 minutes, 23 seconds
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Israeli attack on Rafah would have 'severe repercussions,' Egypt's foreign minister says

As Israel steps up its bombing across Gaza this week, talks aimed at negotiating the release of remaining hostages held by Hamas and a pause in fighting have stalemated. At the Munich Security Conference on Saturday, Nick Schifrin sat down with Egypt's foreign minister to discuss his country's role in mediating the cease-fire and the effect the war is having on the region. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/17/20247 minutes, 26 seconds
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'We have reached the end of our rope.' Why farmers around the world are protesting

From quiet fields to busy city streets, farmers around the world have launched protests in recent weeks, demanding relief from what they say is a crisis driven by climate change policies, red tape and crop prices. Ali Rogin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/17/20245 minutes, 29 seconds
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Reported death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny sparks global outcry

Russian opposition figure Alexei Navalny reportedly died on Friday at a remote Arctic prison where he was held. The anti-corruption campaigner and politician had long incurred the wrath of top Russian officials, including President Vladimir Putin, for exposing their hidden fortunes. Amna Nawaz reports on the global response to the news that Navalny has died. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/16/20245 minutes, 5 seconds
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Why Alexei Navalny's legacy after news of his death is 'one of tragedy' for Russians

Alexei Navalny was Vladimir Putin's most prominent political opponent in Russia. Amna Nawaz talks with Andrew Weiss of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace about Navalny's reported death and legacy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/16/20245 minutes, 22 seconds
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'Statements from United States are making us worried': Estonian leader reacts to Trump comments

World leaders gathered in Germany on Friday for the start of the annual Munich Security Conference. Nick Schifrin reports from the conference and sits down with one of the attendees, Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas, for an interview. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/16/20249 minutes, 11 seconds
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Civilians describe living in crossfire as Israel and Hezbollah battles escalate

As the war in Gaza rages, tensions are escalating on Israel's Northern border. Israel and Lebanese Hezbollah, which the U.S. labels a terrorist group, have traded fire since the Oct. 7 Hamas attack. Nick Schifrin spoke with Israelis who live near the border about the threat, their forced displacement and how their government has responded. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/15/20245 minutes, 18 seconds
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National security warning reportedly involves Russian space weapon

One of the handful of members of Congress with the most access to America's secrets warned of a "serious national security threat" on Wednesday. Leaders have since described it as "serious but not urgent." Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/14/20246 minutes, 10 seconds
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Former general linked to human rights abuses elected as Indonesia's next president

Prabowo Subianto appears to be the winner of Indonesia's presidential election. Prabowo currently serves as Defense Minister and was accused of major human rights abuses, including overseeing the abduction of democracy activists. Indonesia is the world's third-largest democracy and sits at a crucial pivot point between China and the U.S. Geoff Bennett discussed the results with Ben Bland. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/14/20245 minutes, 54 seconds
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Thousands of innocent people jailed in El Salvador's gang crackdown

El Salvador's President Nayib Bukele was re-elected for a second term in a landslide win. Bukele has overseen a vast and brutal crackdown on gangs, transforming the nation from one of the deadliest to one of the safest in Latin America. But that peace has come at a cost with thousands of innocent people jailed. Amna Nawaz and producer Teresa Cebrian Aranda visited the country for this report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/13/20249 minutes, 37 seconds
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Biden warns Israel to protect Palestinians after Gaza raid to rescue hostages kills dozens

It has been a day of joy in Israel, a day of dread in Gaza and a day of warnings in Washington. Israeli troops rescued two hostages from Hamas militants in Rafah in an operation that Palestinian authorities say killed more than 70. Israel is now threatening to assault Rafah, but President Biden warned that the displaced Palestinians there must be protected. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/12/20244 minutes, 43 seconds
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News Wrap: Trump's comments on NATO and Russia stir international backlash

In our news wrap Sunday, Trump's remarks about encouraging Russian aggression against NATO countries are drawing fire from allies around the world, Defense Secretary Austin has been hospitalized again, Ukraine says it shot down a mass barrage of Russian drone attacks, and Biden told Israel's Netanyahu that a ground assault on Rafah should not proceed without a "credible" plan to protect civilians. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/11/20243 minutes, 56 seconds
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News Wrap: Palestinians in Rafah brace for expected Israeli ground assault

In our news wrap Saturday, Israel continued bombarding Rafah in southern Gaza as Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu signaled an impending ground assault, a Russian drone attack killed seven people in the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv, and a surprising outcome to Pakistan's national elections has thrown the country into political chaos. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/10/20242 minutes, 10 seconds
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What to know about Germany's far-right politics and protests against its rise

For weeks, Germans have been flooding into streets, squares and parks, protesting the increasing influence of far-right parties. This comes as the leading far-right party in Germany suffered a narrow defeat in regional elections that were held in one of the party's strongholds. POLITICO editor James Angelos joins Ali Rogin to discuss the impact of this increasingly tense political atmosphere. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/10/20245 minutes, 11 seconds
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Netanyahu orders Israeli military to plan for evacuation of Rafah ahead of ground assault

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered the Israeli military to develop plans to evacuate Rafah, the southernmost city in Gaza. Its population before Oct. 7 was 100,000. Now, more than half of Gaza's 2.3 million people have fled to the city. At the same time, there is progress on talks that would pause the fighting. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/9/20245 minutes, 9 seconds
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Father of Palestinian American teen killed in West Bank discusses son's death

The New Orleans community is mourning the loss of a 17-year-old Palestinian American killed last month. Tawfic Abdel Jabbar is one of the 94 children, and 370 Palestinians total, killed in the West Bank since Oct. 7. In late January, over a hundred cars formed a motorcade in his memory along a New Orleans highway. Amna Nawaz spoke with Hafeth Abdel Jabbar about his son's death. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/9/20246 minutes, 28 seconds
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Russian destruction of Mariupol detailed in new report calling for Putin war crime charges

One of the most brutal Russian attacks against Ukraine took place in Mariupol two years ago. Human Rights Watch, in collaboration with two other organizations, released a report detailing what happened and who in Russia was responsible. Nick Schifrin reports. And a warning, some images in this report are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/8/20244 minutes, 36 seconds
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Experts discuss Gaza cease-fire negotiations as Netanyahu rejects Hamas' latest terms

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rejected a counterproposal from Hamas that would have paused the war in exchange for releasing Israeli hostages over the next few months. The U.S. has hoped a pause could spark broader regional diplomatic progress. Nick Schifrin examines the state of diplomacy with Marwan Muasher and Dennis Ross. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/7/202410 minutes, 46 seconds
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Militia hit by U.S. airstrikes in Iraq claims no connection to attacks on American troops

A U.S. airstrike in Baghdad Wednesday killed a leader of a group that has struck American forces for years. But another group bore most of the dead and casualties from last week's strikes and claims no connection to the attacks on the U.S. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn traveled to the site of those airstrikes in western Iraq and met members of the paramilitary group. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/7/20247 minutes, 43 seconds
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Survivors face slow recovery in northwestern Syria a year after devastating earthquake

One year ago, a devastating earthquake laid waste to large parts of southern Turkey and northwestern Syria. Tens of thousands were killed and recovery has been slow and agonizing, especially in Syria, where more than a decade of war had already made life unbearable. Leila Molana-Allen reports on how Syrians on both sides of the border are struggling to survive. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/6/20248 minutes, 30 seconds
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Blinken returns to Middle East in push for Gaza cease-fire, release of hostages

Secretary of State Blinken returned to the Middle East hoping to make progress on a deal to pause the war in Gaza and release Israeli hostages. The Biden administration hopes the deal could lead to larger diplomatic initiatives across the region. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/5/20243 minutes, 4 seconds
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Experts discuss obstacles to Palestinian statehood and Saudi-Israeli normalization

Saudi leaders say diplomatic normalization with Israel isn't possible without steps toward a Palestinian state. The U.S. hopes a pause in fighting could lead to progress on reforming the Palestinian Authority, normalization and two states. Nick Schifrin discussed more with Aaron David Miller of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Khaled Elgindy of the Middle East Institute. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/5/20249 minutes, 25 seconds
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News Wrap: U.S. vows 'sustained' military response to Iran-backed attacks

In our news wrap Sunday, U.S. officials say they are not done yet with their military response in the Middle East, another atmospheric river threatens California with flooding and mudslides, Moscow-appointed officials say Ukrainian shelling killed at least 28 people in Russian-occupied Ukraine, El Salvador holds its presidential election, and the president of Namibia has died. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/4/20243 minutes, 22 seconds
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How upcoming elections in South Asia will test democracy in the region

More than 1 billion people are going to the polls in South Asia this year. In a test of democratic values and human rights in the region, voters will choose leaders in five countries: Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, India and Pakistan. Michael Kugelman, director of the Wilson Center's South Asia Institute, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/4/20246 minutes, 58 seconds
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What the U.S. hopes to achieve with airstrikes against Iran-backed militias

The U.S. is responding to last weekend's drone strike in Jordan that killed three U.S. troops with airstrikes against Iran-backed militias in the Middle East. Pentagon officials say it took just 30 minutes for B-1 bombers and other U.S. aircraft to hit more than 85 targets in Iraq and Syria. Joe Buccino, a retired U.S. Army colonel, joins John Yang to discuss the strikes. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/3/20245 minutes, 27 seconds
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News Wrap: Democratic primary race begins in South Carolina

In our news wrap Saturday, South Carolina holds its Democratic presidential primary, Senate negotiators are closing in on a border deal, at least 19 people have died in forest fires in Chile, former Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan and his wife were sentenced to seven years in prison, and Irish nationalist Michelle O'Neill was named first minister of Northern Ireland's government. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/3/20242 minutes, 26 seconds
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U.S. strikes Iran-backed militias in retaliation for deadly attack on American troops

The U.S. launched a series of military strikes against Iranian forces and the militias they support in both Syria and Iraq. The bombings are in retaliation for an attack last weekend that killed three American soldiers and wounded dozens of others in Jordan. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/2/20246 minutes, 1 second
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El Salvador's vice president discusses controversial crackdown on gangs, upcoming election

El Salvador is holding its election and all eyes are on incumbent President Nayib Bukele. He came to power in 2019 and has overseen a brutal crackdown on gangs that terrorized the nation for decades. His popularity has soared, but his government has been accused of human rights abuses and dismantling democratic institutions. Amna Nawaz discussed Bukele's policies with Vice President Felix Ulloa. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/2/20249 minutes, 16 seconds
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Austin apologizes for failing to tell White House about his cancer and hospitalization

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin offered a full apology for failing to disclose his battle with prostate cancer. The military's second-in-command kept President Biden in the dark when he was initially diagnosed in December and during subsequent hospitalizations. That prompted new federal guidelines and triggered a political firestorm. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/1/20244 minutes, 16 seconds
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Russian politician denounces Ukraine war, wants to be 'free from Putin's shackles'

In Russia today, it is extremely rare to find someone willing to publicly criticize Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine which is now nearing its third year. But it's even rarer for that criticism to come from an elected official. Nick Schifrin spoke with a local parliamentarian who decided to take a stand. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/1/20245 minutes, 47 seconds
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U.S. blames Iran-backed militia for deadly attack, leaving Middle East on edge

The United States on Wednesday blamed an umbrella group of Iranian-backed proxies for the weekend attack that killed three U.S. soldiers in Jordan, further raising Middle East tensions. Vali Nasr, a former State Department adviser and professor at Johns Hopkins University, and Reuel Marc Gerecht, a senior fellow at The Foundation for Defense of Democracies, join Nick Schifrin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/31/202410 minutes, 18 seconds
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U.S. prepares response to Jordan attack as Qatar pushes for Israel-Hamas ceasefire

As the U.S. moves closer to retaliating for a drone attack that killed three American troops in Jordan, leaders from Egypt, Israel, Qatar and the U.S are negotiating for a ceasefire in Gaza and the release of Israeli hostages. Dr. Majid bin Mohammed Al Ansari, Qatari foreign ministry spokesperson, joins Nick Schifrin to discuss the latest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/30/202412 minutes, 2 seconds
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Michigan mayor snubs meeting with Biden over Israel-Hamas war

President Biden on Thursday is planning to stop in Dearborn, Michigan, a place with one of the largest Muslim and Arab American populations in the United States. Dearborn Mayor Abdullah Hammoud and several other Arab American leaders there have turned down an opportunity to meet with the president amid calls for a ceasefire in the Israel-Hamas war. Hammoud joins Laura Barrón-López to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/30/20246 minutes, 45 seconds
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Biden vows to respond to drone attack on U.S. base in Jordan

The White House says President Biden is considering options to strike back against the Iran-backed militia that killed three American soldiers on Sunday in Jordan. In Yemen, Iraq, Syria and now Jordan, American forces are engaging Iranian-supported groups. Nick Schifrin joins Geoff Bennett to discuss the escalations, the U.S. response and new developments in Gaza. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/29/20247 minutes, 24 seconds
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NATO chief discusses future of western support for Ukraine

Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine will soon enter its third year as U.S. support for Ukraine is coming into question because of Republican resistance on Capitol Hill. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, who is in Washington this week, joins Nick Schifrin from the Pentagon to discuss the war in Ukraine and western support for the beleaguered country. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/29/20249 minutes, 58 seconds
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News Wrap: 3 U.S. troops killed in drone attack on military base in Jordan

In our news wrap Sunday, three Americans were killed in Jordan by a drone strike that the U.S. blames on an Iran-backed militia, negotiators are discussing a new hostage release deal that would pause Israel's offensive in Gaza for two months, House Republicans released articles of impeachment against DHS Secretary Mayorkas, and three West African nations ruled by juntas are leaving ECOWAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/28/20242 minutes, 57 seconds
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LGBTQ+ Ugandans fight for survival, civil rights under country's anti-gay law

Uganda's constitutional court is expected to rule soon on a law that threatens fines, life imprisonment and even death for being gay. Ugandan civil rights groups challenged the Anti-Homosexuality Act in December amid international pressure to repeal the law. Ali Rogin speaks with two Ugandan LGBTQ+ activists for more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/28/20248 minutes, 37 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli airstrike reportedly kills mother and 2 children in Gaza

In our news wrap Saturday, Israeli airstrikes continued in Gaza less than a day after the UN's top court ordered Israel to do all it can to prevent civilian deaths, National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan wrapped up meetings with China's foreign minister, Boeing's 737 Max 9 jets are flying again after the FAA grounded nearly 200 for inspections, and the world's biggest cruise ship is setting sail. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/27/20243 minutes, 16 seconds
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U.N.'s top court orders Israel to prevent genocide in Gaza

The U.N.'s top court on Friday delivered major warnings to Israel about how it should conduct the war in Gaza. The International Court of Justice rejected South Africa's request for a ceasefire after it accused Israel of genocide but said those accusations should be further investigated. Harold Koh, professor of international law at Yale Law School, joins Nick Schifrin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/26/20249 minutes, 37 seconds
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American chemist causes stir in Britain by suggesting salt can improve cup of tea

Few things are more British than a cup of tea, but Britain was brought to a boil this week over a suggestion by an American chemist on how the classic cup might be improved. Malcolm Brabant has the story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/26/20243 minutes, 44 seconds
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Border standoff between Texas, feds intensifies as governor defies Supreme Court ruling

This week, the Supreme Court sided with federal agents to remove razor wire put in place by Texas along the Rio Grande. The state is using wire and state agents to block Border Patrol from accessing a section of the border in Eagle Pass. Homeland Security is demanding access to the area by Friday, but Gov. Greg Abbott is doubling down. Laura Barrón-López discussed the dispute with Stephen Vladeck. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/25/20245 minutes, 1 second
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Mexico's foreign secretary discusses what her country is doing to ease border crisis

Mexican Foreign Secretary Alicia Bárcena met with Secretary of State Antony Blinken in Washington to discuss the situation at the border. Since the holidays, there has been a drop in migrant encounters, which the Biden administration credits to aggressive enforcement by Mexico. Amna Nawaz spoke with Bárcena about the complex, political and human matter and asked what Mexico has done differently. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/25/20247 minutes, 45 seconds
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Video shows apparently unarmed Palestinian with hands up shot dead in Gaza

The war in Gaza has killed more than 25,000 Palestinians, according to the Gaza health ministry. Our colleagues at Independent Television News sent evidence of one more death, an apparently unarmed man walking with a group of men under a white flag with their hands up. Their crew in Gaza documented the killing and John Irvine reports from Israel. A warning, this story includes images of violence. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/24/20244 minutes, 6 seconds
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Experts weigh in on threat posed by Iran and line U.S. is walking to avoid regional war

A U.S. priority since the Oct. 7 Hamas attack has been preventing violence from expanding across the region. But overnight, the U.S. launched strikes at Iranian-backed groups in both Iraq and Yemen, following attacks by those groups. Nick Schifrin reports on the widening military campaign and the threat posed by Iran and gets two views on the exchange of fire from Michael Doran and Ali Vaez. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/24/202411 minutes, 45 seconds
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News Wrap: Houthi rebels vow to continue attacks on ships in Red Sea

In our news wrap Tuesday, Houthi rebels in Yemen expressed defiance after another round of Western air strikes and said they'll go on attacking ships in the Red Sea, Russian missiles killed 18 people in Ukraine, negotiators in the Senate are inching closer to a deal on new military aid for Ukraine and changes in U.S. border policy and journalist Charles Osgood died at his home in New Jersey. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/23/20244 minutes, 4 seconds
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Deaths of IDF soldiers in Gaza mark Israel's deadliest day since Oct. 7 Hamas attacks

Israel's military announced that nearly two dozen soldiers were killed Monday in Gaza, the deadliest day for Israel since the Oct. 7 Hamas attacks. Israel's government vowed to continue the war amid fierce fighting with tens of thousands of Palestinian civilians caught in the middle. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/23/20242 minutes, 56 seconds
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UN's top human rights official discusses humanitarian crisis in Gaza

The U.N. says 1.7 million of Gaza's 2.2 million residents are currently displaced. To discuss the humanitarian situation in Gaza and other humanitarian crises across the world, Nick Schifrin spoke with Martin Griffiths, the U.N.'s Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/23/20248 minutes, 34 seconds
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Israeli leaders increasingly divided over Hamas war and prospect of two-state solution

As the war in Gaza nears the four-month mark since the Hamas attacks in Israel, the shape of the debate inside that nation has become ever starker. Around 130 hostages are still held, the world is increasingly outraged at the Palestinian death toll inflicted by Israel and there are clear disagreements with Washington as the Israeli prime minister says he'll stay the course. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/22/20242 minutes, 58 seconds
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Retired Israeli generals share opposing views on how war in Gaza should end

There's a debate on whether Israel should stop the war, trade the Palestinian prisoners it holds for the hostages Hamas has and begin negotiations for a two-state solution. Nick Schifrin discussed both sides of the argument with retired Israeli Major General Gershon Hacohen and retired Israeli Brigadier General Jonathan Shimshoni. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/22/20247 minutes, 23 seconds
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News Wrap: Moscow blames Ukrainian forces for deadly Donetsk shelling

In our news wrap Sunday, Russia blamed Ukrainian shelling for at least 27 deaths near Russian-occupied Donetsk, Gaza health officials say more than 25,000 Palestinians have now died in the Israel-Hamas war, a U.S. airbase came under attack in Iraq, Indonesia's most active volcano erupted, and the motive behind the case of the stolen ruby slippers from "The Wizard of Oz" has been revealed. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/21/20243 minutes, 43 seconds
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News Wrap: Dangerously cold weather blamed for over 60 deaths nationwide

In our news wrap Saturday, Arctic weather settled in across much of the U.S. with wind chill advisories stretching from Montana to Florida, fallout from the Israel-Hamas war continues to raise tensions across the Middle East, and Stanford University's women's basketball coach Tara VanDerveer tied Mike Krzyzewski as the winningest coach in college basketball history. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/20/20242 minutes, 11 seconds
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Family fights for release of American held by the Taliban

For more than 500 days, an American citizen has been wrongfully detained in Afghanistan. Ryan Corbett lived in Afghanistan for 12 years, where he worked with local NGOs and advised small Afghan businesses. Amna Nawaz sat down with his wife, Anna Corbett, after she met this week with lawmakers in Washington, D.C. to push for her husband's release. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/19/20246 minutes, 27 seconds
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News Wrap: Netanyahu tells U.S. he opposes Palestinian statehood after Gaza war

In our news wrap Thursday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu dismissed talk of Palestinian statehood after the Gaza war ends, the Hamas-run health ministry reported the Palestinian death toll has passed 24,600, the U.S. military hit Houthi rebels in Yemen for the fifth time and severe drought forced authorities to cut shipping traffic through the Panama Canal by 36 percent. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/18/20244 minutes, 49 seconds
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American doctor who worked in Gaza describes dire humanitarian crisis civilians there face

More than 60,000 Palestinians have been wounded during the Israeli air and ground campaigns. Nick Schifrin reports on the state of medical care in the warzone and speaks with Dr. Seema Jilani, an American doctor who just returned from Gaza. A warning, some of the images and descriptions in this story are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/18/20249 minutes, 11 seconds
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Why women are drawn to solo travel and how the tourism industry is responding

A majority of people traveling abroad alone these days are women, and demand for women-led tour groups is rising. Stephanie Sy takes a closer look at the reasons why women are drawn to solo travel and how the hospitality industry is taking notice. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/18/20246 minutes, 31 seconds
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State Department official overseeing Yemen discusses U.S. response to Houthi attacks

The Biden administration relisted Yemen's Houthi rebels as a specially designated global terrorist group. The move follows more than 30 attacks by the Houthis on commercial shipping in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Nick Schifrin discussed the tensions with U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Tim Lenderking, the top State Department official overseeing Yemen policy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/17/20247 minutes, 35 seconds
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Former NATO chief on what's at stake as U.S. debates military aid for Ukraine

Critical U.S. aid to Ukraine is still being held up in ongoing negotiations between Congress and the White House over funding for border security. Amna Nawaz spoke with former NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen about what this means as Russia's war in Ukraine enters its third year. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/17/20246 minutes, 52 seconds
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World leaders concerned about Mideast war escalating after attacks in Lebanon and Iraq

The Biden administration will soon designate Houthi militants in Yemen as a specially designated global terrorist group, a White House official tells the NewsHour. It follows more than 30 Houthi attacks on commercial shipping in the Red Sea and it's a reversal from the first days of the administration when the U.S. delisted the Houthis as a foreign terrorist organization. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/16/20243 minutes, 45 seconds
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Israeli officials disagree in public over how war with Hamas should end

Israeli leaders are increasingly disagreeing in public over the best path forward with its war in Gaza. Nick Schifrin discussed the direction of the conflict and the splits within the Israeli war cabinet with David Makovsky, a distinguished fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/16/20246 minutes, 36 seconds
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News Wrap: Hamas releases video purportedly showing bodies of 2 Israeli hostages

In our news wrap Monday, Hamas released video purportedly showing the bodies of two Israeli hostages, U.N. agencies warned of widespread famine and disease in Gaza without more aid, Ukraine's military says it struck a blow against Russia by shooting down an early-warning radar plane and Bernardo Arévalo was sworn in as Guatemala's new president after opponents delayed his oath-taking by 10 hours. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/15/20245 minutes, 4 seconds
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Iranian-backed groups raise threat of drawing U.S. into a wider Middle East conflict

Since the Oct. 7 Hamas attack and Israel's military response in Gaza, Iranian-backed militias in the region have escalated attacks. Hezbollah and the IDF have traded barrages while the Houthis have lobbed missiles and attacked ships in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Amna Nawaz discussed Iran's objectives and influence with Karim Sadjadpour of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/15/20245 minutes, 20 seconds
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News Wrap: Temperatures plummet dangerously from Pacific Northwest to Rust Belt

In our news wrap Sunday, temperatures plunged to dangerous levels across the U.S., Israelis marked 100 days of war against Hamas with a rally demanding the release of hostages, officials say three people drowned trying to cross the Rio Grande, an Iowa principal has died after he was injured while protecting students in a school shooting, and two volcanoes are erupting in Iceland and Indonesia. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/14/20241 minute, 47 seconds
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Inside Afghanistan's worsening humanitarian disaster as aid funding falls short

Since the Taliban reclaimed control of Afghanistan in 2021, the country has plummeted further into political and economic instability. Frequent natural disasters and shortfalls in donor funding make the dire situation one of the worst humanitarian crises in the world. Dayne Curry, the Afghanistan country director for Mercy Corps, joins Ali Rogin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/14/20246 minutes, 37 seconds
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News Wrap: Extreme winter weather causes disruptions across the continental U.S.

In our news wrap Saturday, a massive winter storm spanning the country upends life for millions of Americans, Taiwanese voters rebuffed China by electing as president a candidate who rejects China's claim of sovereignty over Taiwan, and a second round of U.S. strikes against Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen and expected Houthi retaliation are raising concerns of a wider Middle East conflict. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/13/20242 minutes, 42 seconds
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What Taiwan's presidential pick means for the region and U.S.-China relations

The results of Saturday's Taiwanese presidential election has big implications for both Beijing and Washington. President-elect Lai Ching-te, who is also known as William Lai, rejects China's claim of sovereignty over Taiwan. Ali Rogin speaks with Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian, the China reporter for Axios based in Taiwan, about the election and what to expect next. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/13/20246 minutes, 49 seconds
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Houthis vow revenge after U.S. and U.K. airstrikes in response to Red Sea attacks

Houthi militants in Yemen promised retaliation after U.S. and U.K. airstrikes. U.S. officials said the strikes were not intended to widen the war in Gaza, despite Houthi claims that their missile and drone attacks in the Red Sea were designed to target Israeli-affiliated shipping. As Nick Schifrin reports, the U.S. said it could strike again if the Houthi campaign continues. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/12/20243 minutes, 18 seconds
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How the U.S.-led strikes on Houthis in Yemen could alter the conflict in the Middle East

The U.S. strikes against Houthis in Yemen mark a significant escalation of tensions in the Middle East. The world is now waiting to see whether the strikes will accomplish their goal to stop the Houthis from harassing ships in the Red Sea or raise the risk of a wider conflict. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Nadwa Al-Dawsari, a nonresident scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/12/20245 minutes, 24 seconds
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United Nations relief agency describes the dire humanitarian situation in Gaza

Friday marks 97 days of the war in Gaza and the humanitarian toll on its population has been devastating. According to the U.N., 90 percent of Gazans are displaced, more than one in four are starving and there's not a single hospital in the strip that is fully functional. Ali Rogin spoke with the U.N. Relief and Works Agency to get an update from the ground in Gaza. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/12/20245 minutes, 50 seconds
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What's at stake for China and U.S. in Taiwan's presidential and parliamentary elections

In Taiwan, voters head to the polls on Saturday for presidential and parliamentary elections. The results will be as closely watched in Beijing and Washington as they will be in Taipei. China considers Taiwan a breakaway republic, and President Xi Jinping often speaks of reunification with the island. Nick Schifrin looks at the candidates and the stakes for the vote. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/12/20246 minutes, 24 seconds
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U.S. and U.K. strike Houthi targets in Yemen for attacks on ships in Red Sea

The United States and Britain launched strikes against Houthi targets in Yemen. The strikes are in response to numerous attacks against shipping vessels in the Red Sea in recent months. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/11/20243 minutes, 31 seconds
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South Africa accuses Israel of genocide against Palestinians at top international court

The International Court of Justice in The Hague heard arguments from South Africa accusing Israel of committing genocide against Palestinians in Gaza. It's a rare case and could drag on for years. But as Nick Schifrin reports, South Africa is requesting a preliminary ruling, which could have far-ranging implications for Israel and the United States. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/11/20244 minutes, 40 seconds
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Experts give 2 perspectives on accusations Israel is committing genocide in Gaza

Before an international court, South Africa is accusing Israel of genocide against Palestinians in Gaza. So how strong is the case and what will be Israel's defense when it presents its side on Friday? Nick Schifrin has two views from Kenneth Roth, former executive director of Human Rights Watch, and Yuval Shany, chair of international law at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/11/202412 minutes, 45 seconds
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Blinken urges Palestinian Authority to show it's ready to govern Gaza after war

The Biden administration has spent Wednesday pressing the Palestinian Authority to reform itself and show it's ready to govern Gaza after the Israel-Hamas war. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken carried that message to the authority's president, Mahmoud Abbas, in the West Bank. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/10/20244 minutes, 7 seconds
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Houthis launch largest drone and missile attack targeting ships in Red Sea

The U.N. Security Council demanded that Houthi rebels in Yemen stop attacking international ships in the Red Sea. The U.S. military says there have been more than two dozen attacks in the last seven weeks. The most serious attack was Tuesday when Houthis fired more than 20 drones and missiles at U.S. and allied warships. Nick Schifrin reports on the escalation and U.S. options. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/10/20248 minutes, 52 seconds
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How mental health experts are handling the Israel-Hamas war's lasting impact on children

The fallout from the Israel-Hamas war is far-reaching and the damage from the conflict will be felt for years. The Hamas attack on Oct. 7 and Israel's counteroffensive have left thousands dead and caused immense physical destruction. It's also left a mark on the collective psychology of an entire region, especially its children. William Brangham reports on a program trying to address the problem. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/10/20248 minutes, 12 seconds
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Austin faces more criticism for delayed notification of cancer diagnosis, hospitalization

Walter Reed officials confirmed Defense Secretary Austin underwent a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat prostate cancer in December. He's faced criticism for not immediately notifying President Biden and other senior officials about his hospitalization and complications. Both the White House and Pentagon are conducting internal reviews into the controversy. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/9/20244 minutes, 6 seconds
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News Wrap: Winter storm brings blizzard to Midwest, tornadoes to South

In our news wrap Tuesday, winter storms battered much of the country with everything from tornadoes to blizzards, Senate Republicans signaled that Congress will need to pass another short-term funding bill to avoid a partial government shutdown, more than 1,000 towns in Ukraine lost power amid Russian attacks on the electrical grid and NASA delayed sending astronauts to circle the moon until 2025. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/9/20244 minutes, 16 seconds
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Blinken tours Mideast in effort to keep Israel-Hamas war from spreading

Secretary of State Antony Blinken is back in Israel for his fourth visit since the war with Hamas began three months ago. It's part of a long, regional tour that has Blinken walking a fine diplomatic line as he tries to keep the conflict from spreading. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/9/20244 minutes, 44 seconds
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New book 'Our Enemies Will Vanish' recounts Ukrainian resistance against Russian invasion

The war in Ukraine will enter its third year next month with the battle lines nearly as frozen as the nation itself during this winter. But two years ago, there was concern Kyiv wouldn't last a week. Ukraine journalist Yaroslav Trofimov's reporting has been indispensable in helping define understanding of the war. He sat down with Nick Schifrin to discuss his new book, "Our Enemies Will Vanish." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/9/20247 minutes, 16 seconds
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Israel kills Hezbollah commander as Blinken visits region to stave off broader conflict

As Israel's offensive in Gaza continues, a new front is heating up on the country's northern border. Israel and the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah have been trading fire and Monday morning, an Israeli strike killed one of Hezbollah's high-ranking members. All this as Secretary of State Blinken traveled again to the region hoping to keep the conflict from spreading. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/8/20244 minutes, 28 seconds
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News Wrap: Blinken visits Qatar in diplomatic effort to contain Israel-Hamas war

In our news wrap Sunday, Secretary of State Blinken continued his urgent mission to the Middle East as the Israel-Hamas war enters its fourth month, Defense Secretary Austin took responsibility for delays in disclosing his hospitalization, major winter storms dropped snow in the Northeast and the West, and a rocket launch Monday aims to land the first U.S. craft on the moon in more than 50 years. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/7/20242 minutes, 39 seconds
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'This year is a nightmare': Gaza's children face starvation amid dire conditions

Three months ago, Hamas attacked southern Israel, killing about 1,200 people and kidnapping roughly 240 more. Ever since, Israel has bombarded Gaza with the goal of eliminating Hamas. The United Nations estimates that as many as 40 percent of Palestinians killed in Gaza are children. Jason Lee, Save the Children's country director of occupied Palestinian territories, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/7/20248 minutes, 3 seconds
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News Wrap: FAA grounds Boeing Max jets for inspection after mid-air emergency

In our news wrap Saturday, the FAA temporarily grounded about 171 Boeing 737 Max 9 planes after a window blew out during an Alaska Airlines flight, a major winter storm is bearing down on the East Coast, Hezbollah fired rockets into Israel, the FBI arrested three more people over the Jan. 6 attack, and Defense Secretary Austin remains hospitalized after complications from a medical procedure. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/6/20243 minutes
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The wider implications of Serbia's disputed election results and mass protests

Serbia is a flashpoint in the European struggle between democracy and autocratic leaders, with Russia's war in Ukraine heightening its importance. Now, the Balkan nation is being torn apart by protests accusing the government of authoritarian President Aleksandar Vučić, a strong Putin ally, of widespread election fraud. Foreign policy analyst Edward P. Joseph joins Ali Rogin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/6/20248 minutes, 14 seconds
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News Wrap: Islamic State claims responsibility for suicide bombings in Iran that killed 84

In our news wrap Thursday, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for a double suicide bombing in Iran that killed 84 people, Israeli forces in Gaza pressed their offensive on the southern city of Khan Younis, a U.S. drone strike in Iraq killed a top commander of an Iranian-backed militia and the death toll stands at 84 after this week's powerful earthquake in Japan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/4/20244 minutes, 56 seconds
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Russia attacks Ukraine with ballistic missiles provided by North Korea, U.S. says

A White House spokesperson said U.S. intelligence officials have determined that Moscow has acquired ballistic missiles from North Korea and fired at least one of them into Ukraine on December 30. The U.S. is now concerned Iran will soon agree to sell Russia missiles. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/4/20242 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ukraine should pivot from offense to defense and rebuild what it controls, expert says

The frontlines of the war in Ukraine have hardly moved in the last few months, but could the course of the war change in 2024? Geoff Bennett discussed two perspectives with Charles Kupchan, who served on the National Security Council staff during the Obama and Clinton administrations, and Andrea Kendall-Taylor, a former senior intelligence official who focused on Russia and Eurasia. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/4/20249 minutes, 2 seconds
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Palestinians describe harassment from Israeli forces over social media posts during war

Since Oct. 7, Hamas has pumped out propaganda on social media, prompting Israel to start its own media campaign to drum up support. Those efforts have also resulted in a social media crackdown with deep consequences. More than 2,000 Palestinians and Arab citizens of Israel have been arrested since the war began, hundreds of them for social media posts. Leila Molana-Allen has some of their stories. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/4/20249 minutes, 13 seconds
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Assassination of Hamas leader in Lebanon deepens concerns of broader regional conflict

Fears of a widening war in the Middle East are back on boil after Tuesday's killing of a top Hamas leader in Beirut, Lebanon. Israel has not acknowledged any role in the drone attack, but it spent Wednesday awaiting possible retaliation by Hezbollah, the powerful, Lebanese militia backed by Iran. Amna Nawaz discussed what this means for the region with Randa Slim of the Middle East Institute. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/3/202410 minutes
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News Wrap: Bombings in Iran kill at least 95 at ceremony honoring general killed in 2020

In our news wrap Wednesday, a double bombing in Iran killed at least 95 people and wounded more than 200, bomb threats across the U.S. forced evacuations of several state capitol buildings, Ukraine and Russia completed the biggest prisoner exchange since the war started and thousands of doctors in Britain are on strike in the biggest planned walkout in the history of the National Health Service. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/3/20244 minutes, 44 seconds
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News Wrap: Top Hamas leader killed in suspected Israeli drone strike in Lebanon

In our news wrap Tuesday, a top Hamas leader was killed in a suspected Israeli drone strike in Lebanon, former President Trump appealed to the Supreme Court of Maine asking to be restored to the state ballot, Russia fired hypersonic missiles at Ukraine's two largest cities in a stepped-up winter assault and the death toll from earthquakes in Japan climbed to at least 55. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/2/20245 minutes, 9 seconds
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Freed Israeli hostage pleads with Netanyahu and Biden: 'Stop the war and bring them home'

For 40 years, Aviva Siegel lived at kibbutz Kfar Aza near the Gaza Strip. During the Oct. 7 Hamas attacks, Siegel and her husband were both taken hostage. After 51 days in Gaza, Aviva was released on Nov. 26, but her husband is still being held. In her first interview, Aviva Siegel spoke with Amna Nawaz about surviving Oct. 7, her time in captivity and what she wants to happen next. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/2/202413 minutes, 28 seconds
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How airline passengers managed to survive fiery runway collision in Japan

A fiery runway collision at a Tokyo airport stunned the world Tuesday with dramatic imagery. All of the airline passengers survived, but five crew members on a Coast Guard plane involved in the accident were killed. Neil Connery of Independent Television News reports, and Geoff Bennett discusses how passengers managed to make it out alive with aviation correspondent Miles O'Brien. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/2/20248 minutes, 10 seconds
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What the ruling against Netanyahu's judiciary overhaul means for Israel and war in Gaza

Israel opened 2024 with what could be a major shift in the war, announcing it's withdrawing several thousand troops from Gaza. Amid the fighting, Israel's Supreme Court rejected a key part of Prime Minister Netanyahu's judicial overhaul. The plan sparked deep divisions, but they've largely been put aside since Hamas attacked on Oct. 7. Geoff Bennett discussed more with NPR's Daniel Estrin. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/1/20247 minutes
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News Wrap: Russia pounds Ukraine with 90 drones during early hours of new year

In our news wrap Monday, Russian forces pounded Ukraine with a record 90 drones during the early hours of the new year, central Japan's strongest earthquake in more than 40 years rocked the region killing at least four people and a court in Bangladesh convicted Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus of violating labor laws at his non-profit telecom company. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/1/20242 minutes, 41 seconds
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A look at 2023's discoveries in space exploration

In 2023, we saw incredibly detailed images from the most advanced telescope in space and the 25th year of a global partnership sending astronauts to orbit Earth. Digital video producer Casey Kuhn delves into the major discoveries from last year with our science correspondent Miles O'Brien. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/1/20246 minutes, 48 seconds
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News Wrap: Global trade concerns rise amid escalating Red Sea conflict

In our news wrap Sunday, Maersk paused its operations in the Red Sea after Houthi gunmen attacked one of their ships, Israeli airstrikes intensified in central Gaza as Netanyahu said the war would last "many more months," Congo re-elected its president in a contested landslide, singer Paula Abdul accused Nigel Lythgoe of sexual assault, and Denmark's queen announced she will abdicate her throne. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/31/20232 minutes, 34 seconds
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A look back at the biggest news events that shaped 2023 and made history

There is no question that we live in historic, unusual times, and 2023 added to the list of unprecedented events. We look back at the events that defined the year. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/31/202314 minutes, 20 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli tanks push deeper into Gaza as airstrikes on camps continue

In our news wrap Saturday, Gaza residents say airstrikes hit two urban refugee camps a day after U.S. Secretary of State Blinken approved a $147 million emergency weapons sale to Israel, Russia says at least 14 people were killed after Ukraine shelled the border city of Belgorod, flooding shut down a key rail tunnel between London and France, and British actor Tom Wilkinson died at age 75. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/30/20232 minutes, 38 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel widens offensive in central Gaza after flattening much of the north

In our news wrap Friday, Israeli forces widened their offensive on the central Gaza strip after flattening much of the north, landslides triggered by heavy rain in eastern Congo have killed at least 20 more people, forecasters warn of high tide and dangerous surf conditions in California and Ohio's Republican governor vetoed a measure that would have banned gender-affirming care for minors. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/29/20235 minutes, 59 seconds
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Russia launches one of its biggest air attacks on Ukraine in nearly 2 years of war

Russia unleashed a massive, 18-hour aerial assault on Ukraine, killing at least 30 people and wounding more than 140 others. The barrage comes as Ukrainian officials are urgently pleading for more air defense systems from their Western allies. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/29/20232 minutes, 50 seconds
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Israeli bombardment of Gaza cities and refugee camps continues, killing dozens

An Israeli American Canadian who was believed to have been taken hostage by Hamas was actually killed during the attack on Oct. 7, according to the Kibbutz Nir Oz where she was from. At the same time, Israel continues its assault on Gaza and the war of words between Israel and Hezbollah is heating up. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/28/20233 minutes, 28 seconds
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Escalating tensions between Israel and Hezbollah grow fears of wider outbreak of war

With the Israel-Hamas war in Gaza showing no signs of stopping, exchanges of fire across the Israel-Lebanese border are raising fears of a widening conflict. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Paul Salem, the president and CEO of the Middle East Institute, a Washington-based non-partisan think tank. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/28/20236 minutes, 2 seconds
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The online information war over fake content linked to Israel-Hamas conflict

The Israel-Hamas war is nearing its third month in Gaza, but there is another front in this war and it's taking place on screens worldwide. Fake or mislabeled content linked to the conflict has been viewed online millions of times. Amna Nawaz discussed the disinformation war with Shayan Sardarizadeh and Valerie Wirtschafter. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/28/20238 minutes, 23 seconds
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Israel shows no sign of slowing down, launching new strikes in central and southern Gaza

Israel's ground offensive in Gaza continues to expand. As the death toll rises, Gazans still desperately need basics to survive. Aid trucks roll in, but many Palestinians are starving or without water and Israel announced it will now consider United Nations employee visas on a case by case basis, instead of automatic admission. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/27/20233 minutes, 19 seconds
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Israeli ambassador to U.S. discusses strategy, war tactics and future of Gaza

As the Israel-Hamas war approaches the three-month mark, there are my questions about Israel's strategy and tactics and what the future of Gaza may look like. Amna Nawaz discussed that with Israeli Ambassador to the United States Michael Herzog, who is also a retired IDF brigadier general. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/27/202310 minutes, 28 seconds
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Envoy for hostage affairs describes efforts to free Americans detained abroad

While the United States was able to negotiate the release of detained Americans in Venezuela, there are at least four Americans in Russia and approximately seven held in Gaza. The U.S. government's point person working to get them all home is Roger Carstens, the Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs. Amna Nawaz spoke with Carstens about those still held captive. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/27/20236 minutes, 54 seconds
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Palestinians flee refugee camp in central Gaza as Israel expands ground offensive there

The Israeli military says it has expanded its ground offensive in the Gaza Strip. Operations now include the densely populated urban refugee camps in the central part of the territory. That comes as the United Nations appoints a new coordinator for humanitarian aid to Gaza, where more than 2 million people are in a food crisis and the risk of famine grows each day. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/26/20233 minutes, 16 seconds
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Why Egypt's proposed plan to end Gaza war met resistance from both sides

The death toll in Gaza has crossed 20,000, according to Palestinian officials. Every day that the war goes on, more civilians are killed and the path to a real, political solution to end it seems far. Amna Nawaz discussed what this means for Palestinians trapped in Gaza with Palestinian political analyst Nour Odeh. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/26/20237 minutes, 27 seconds
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News Wrap: Atomic watchdog says Iran increased production of near weapons-grade uranium

In our news wrap Tuesday, the International Atomic Energy Agency says Iran has increased its production of near weapons-grade uranium, officials in Nigeria say attackers armed with guns and machetes killed at least 140 people in a weekend rampage and a fierce winter storm swept across much of the central U.S. today making for treacherous holiday travel. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/26/20233 minutes, 9 seconds
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Israelis volunteer on farms to save agricultural supply after migrant workers flee war

When Hamas attacked Israel on Oct. 7 and Israel declared war, most foreign farm workers left the country and Palestinian workers were barred from entering Israel. Many Israelis were called to reserve duty, leaving the farming industry facing financial losses and in desperate need of workers. Jon Frankel reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/26/20237 minutes, 16 seconds
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Israeli airstrike kills more than 100 people in central Gaza refugee camp

The death toll in the Israel-Hamas war surged higher Monday as Israel ramped up its strikes on Gaza. Health officials there reported 250 Palestinians died and another 500 were injured in the last 24 hours alone. All this comes as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vows to intensify the fight. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/25/20233 minutes, 10 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli airstrike in Syria kills one of Iran's top generals

In our news wrap Monday, an Israeli airstrike in Syria killed one of Iran's top generals, Ukraine's air force says it shot down two Russian fighter jets, cruise missiles and dozens of drones, jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has been located at a prison colony above the Arctic Circle and police in Serbia detained at least 38 people protesting last week's parliamentary elections. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/25/20232 minutes, 55 seconds
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Paramedics struggle to save lives under harrowing conditions in Israel-Hamas war

The Oct. 7 Hamas attack against Israel and Israel's attacks against Palestinians has taxed the medical communities on both sides of the conflict. The ambulance drivers and paramedics are on the front lines of the war. Special correspondent Martin Himel has a look at the life of two medics, one in Gaza and one in Israel. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/25/20238 minutes, 48 seconds
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How 'chatty benches' are building connections and combating loneliness in Britain

Mental health experts believe one of the long-term consequences of lockdowns during the COVID pandemic is an increase in loneliness. In Britain, communities are trying to combat people's isolation by introducing so-called chatty benches and chatty cafes. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Kent. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/25/20235 minutes, 51 seconds
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News Wrap: Hundreds killed in Gaza over weekend of airstrikes, heavy combat

In our news wrap Sunday, Gaza saw some of the most intense and bloodiest fighting of the war this weekend, the streets of Bethlehem stood empty of crowds and festivities on Christmas Eve as celebrations were canceled amid the Israel-Hamas war, Germany tightened security after a terror alert at Cologne Cathedral, and Christmas Day is expected to be unseasonably warm for much of the United States. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/24/20233 minutes, 4 seconds
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'Glory to the Heroes' documents the resilience of those on Ukraine's front lines

With aid for Ukraine caught in a partisan fight on Capitol Hill, it can be easy to lose sight of the human toll of the war. In a new documentary "Glory to the Heroes," director Bernard-Henri Lévy turns the focus back on those he calls the heroes, from the fighters on the front lines to the civilians who remain in Ukraine in an act of defiance. Ali Rogin speaks with Lévy about the film. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/24/20238 minutes, 11 seconds
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What sustainable aviation fuel means for the future of airline emissions

Studies estimate that air travel accounts for about 4 percent of human-induced climate change, and the UN warns that airplane emissions will triple by 2050. The aviation industry's quest to cut emissions recently took a step forward with the world's first airliner flight using completely sustainable fuel. The Washington Post's climate solutions reporter Nicolás Rivero joins Ali Rogin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/23/20235 minutes, 40 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli ground forces near 'full' control of northern Gaza

In our news wrap Saturday, Israel's military says they are close to having "full operational control" of northern Gaza and will soon shift their focus to southern Gaza, two Colorado paramedics were convicted of criminally negligent homicide in the 2019 death of Elijah McClain, and the Czech Republic observed a minute of silence in mourning for the 14 victims of the nation's worst mass killing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/23/20232 minutes, 29 seconds
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U.S. abstains from UN Security Council vote calling for more humanitarian aid in Gaza

The United Nations Security Council came together Friday to approve a resolution calling for more humanitarian aid to flow into Gaza after a week of delays. The U.S. abstained from the vote, which did not demand a ceasefire. Meantime, American officials are saying Iran was involved in the planning of attacks against commercial shipping vessels in the Red Sea. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/22/20234 minutes, 37 seconds
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Palestinian poet Mosab Abu Toha on all he's lost in Gaza and hopes for his homeland

Award-winning Palestinian poet Mosab Abu Toha has lost his home, friends and family in the last two months. He was also detained by Israeli forces in Gaza and released only after international outrage. He's now out of Gaza and in Cairo with his wife and kids. He joined Amna Nawaz to reflect on all that he's lost and his hopes for his homeland. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/22/20237 minutes, 47 seconds
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Gunman kills 14, injures 25 in Czech Republic's worst mass shooting

One of Europe's capital cities was shattered by gunfire Thursday. A shooter at a university in Prague, Czech Republic, killed at least 14 people and wounded at least 25 more. Police say the gunman was a 24-year-old who had expressed suicidal thoughts and killed his father before going to Prague to continue the violence. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/21/20232 minutes, 2 seconds
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News Wrap: UN warns of famine in Gaza if more aid isn't allowed in

In our news wrap Thursday, the U.N.'s World Food Program warned the war in Gaza has left more than 570,000 people starving, a new burst of fighting in Sudan's civil war forced up to 300,000 people to flee what had been a safe haven and Rudy Giuliani filed for bankruptcy days after a federal jury ordered him to pay $148 million to two former election workers in Georgia. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/21/20234 minutes, 45 seconds
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Israel and Hezbollah trade fire in escalating conflict, raising fears of regional war

Hezbollah and Israel have been trading fire in a limited but slowly escalating conflict. So far, the skirmishes have killed nine Israeli soldiers, four civilians and more than 100 Lebanese, most of them Hezbollah fighters. Israeli officials have said they are prepared to invade southern Lebanon, raising fears of a regional war. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/21/20238 minutes, 24 seconds
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How Houthi attacks on ships in Red Sea are disrupting global trade

One of the world's top trading routes, the Suez Canal, is essentially closed for business to many shipping companies. That's because Houthi rebels in Yemen have been attacking ships in response to Israel's war in Gaza. It's a major route for oil and gas shipments so prices edged up this week. John Yang discusses the implications for international commerce with Ryan Petersen of Flexport. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/21/20235 minutes, 48 seconds
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Fugitive defense contractor returned to U.S. in prisoner swap with Venezuela

Leonard Francis, known as "Fat Leonard," was a defense contractor at the center of a huge scandal within the U.S. Navy. He is part of a prisoner swap between the U.S. and Venezuela announced Wednesday and was returned to the U.S. So who is Francis, what did he do and who was implicated? Amna Nawaz discussed that with Craig Whitlock, author of "Fat Leonard: The Con Who Corrupted the U.S. Navy." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/21/20236 minutes, 30 seconds
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The significance of the prisoner swap between the U.S. and Venezuela

In a historic prisoner swap, ten Americans are headed home after the U.S. freed a top ally of Venezuelan President Maduro. Six of the Americans were judged "wrongfully detained" by the State Department. The Maduro government also agreed to free 20 Venezuelan political prisoners and return fugitive defense contractor Leonard Francis to the U.S. Amna Nawaz discussed the deal with Jonathan Franks. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/20/20236 minutes, 30 seconds
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News Wrap: European Union reaches agreement on tougher migration rules

In our news wrap Wednesday, the European Union announced a breakthrough agreement on tougher rules for migration, security and logistical challenges in Congo caused disruptions in the presidential election, junior doctors in England began a three-day strike against the National Health Service and new vehicles had a record high fuel economy rating in 2022 averaging 26 miles per gallon. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/20/20233 minutes, 5 seconds
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Israeli strikes in Gaza continue as Egypt and Qatar mediate indirect cease-fire talks

The top leader of Hamas was in Cairo as talks to renew a deal for a cease-fire and hostage swap in Gaza gained steam. Meantime, Israeli operations there continue as the death toll among Palestinians, according to the Hamas-led health ministry, topped 20,000 people since the terror attacks of Oct. 7. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/20/20233 minutes, 45 seconds
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Daughter of Israeli held by Hamas discusses video showing him and 2 other hostages

Amid new talks for a second cease-fire and hostage swap between Hamas and Israel, we're speaking to the family of an Israeli still held in Gaza. Noam Peri's 79-year-old father, Chaim Peri, was one of the three men featured in a video released by Hamas Tuesday. Noam joined Amna Nawaz to discuss the potential cease-fire. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/20/20235 minutes, 17 seconds
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Area in Gaza where Israel told displaced Palestinians to seek shelter becomes battle zone

Israel's campaign in Gaza continues with deadly effect as diplomats work to secure another deal to pause the fighting to release hostages held by Hamas in return for Palestinian detainees in Israeli custody. An attempt at the U.N. to secure a vote in the Security Council on a cease-fire was delayed by at least one more day. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/19/20234 minutes, 51 seconds
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How the U.S. and allies plan to protect ships from Houthi attacks in Red Sea

Tensions are rising in the Red Sea, where about 12 percent of the world's global trade passes through. Houthi militias in Yemen say they are attacking ships to support Palestinians. Defense Secretary Austin announced a new multinational effort to protect ships in the region. Geoff Bennett and retired Gen. Frank McKenzie discussed how that will work. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/19/20234 minutes, 34 seconds
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Iceland escapes worst-case scenario as lava from volcano flows away from important areas

Iceland appears to have so far escaped the worst-case scenario after a volcano erupted overnight about 50 miles from the capital Reykjavik. The lava flow is moving away from important infrastructure, including a fishing port where 4,000 people had been moved waiting for just this moment. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/19/20234 minutes, 56 seconds
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Ukraine prepares for another round of Russia's winter attacks on energy grid

Ukrainian President Zelenskyy expressed confidence that both the U.S. and the European Union would deliver tens of billions of dollars in much-needed assistance. The aid is crucial for Ukraine's air defense, which is becoming more important as Russia begins what appears to be another winter-long campaign of strikes on Ukraine's infrastructure. Nick Schifrin and videographer Eric O'Connor report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/19/20236 minutes, 53 seconds
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U.S. military leaders urge Israel to scale back Gaza assault as civilian death toll mounts

America's two top defense officials are in Israel with a dual message: the U.S. supports the right to self-defense, but Israel must stop killing so many Gaza civilians and focus its operations. The war continues at a brutal pace with hundreds killed this past weekend. Leading to more calls for a cease-fire from Israel's non-U.S. allies. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/18/20234 minutes, 31 seconds
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Surgeon describes experience treating patients during Israeli bombardment of Gaza

The health system in Gaza has collapsed with 75 percent of the hospitals there not operational. Those that are open lack crucial medical supplies and are overcrowded and understaffed. Amna Nawaz spoke with Dr. Ghassan Abu-Sittah, a British Palestinian surgeon who spent a month-and-a-half in Gaza, tending to people at the peak of the Israeli bombing campaign. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/18/20237 minutes, 31 seconds
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News Wrap: Ukraine commander says weapons in short supply

In our news wrap Monday, a commander for Ukraine's army warned troops had to scale back operations as weapons are in short supply, Secretary of State Blinken signed a defense agreement with Finland, Pope Francis approved a policy change allowing priests to bless same-sex couples and a trial for democracy activist Jimmy Lye opened in Hong Kong as part of China's campaign to crush dissidents. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/18/20233 minutes, 49 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli military finds large Hamas tunnel near northern Gaza border

In our news wrap Sunday, Israel re-opened a border crossing in southern Gaza and released footage of a newly discovered Hamas tunnel at the Erez crossing in the north, Trump's anti-immigrant remarks at a campaign event drew criticism, a storm system drenched Florida as it moves north, Pope Francis turned 87, and Bostonians marked the 250th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party with a reenactment. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/17/20233 minutes, 2 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli protesters pressure government in wake of hostage deaths

In our news wrap Saturday, the mistaken killing of three hostages by Israeli forces in Gaza has increased public pressure on Israel's government to release Palestinian prisoners in exchange for the remaining hostages, a Roman Catholic cardinal was convicted of embezzlement by the Vatican criminal court, and GOP presidential candidate Ron DeSantis escalated his war of words with Donald Trump. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/16/20232 minutes, 51 seconds
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Israeli forces mistakenly kill 3 hostages in Gaza as U.S. urges more limited war

There is a fresh tragedy in the war between Israel and Hamas. Israeli troops mistakenly shot and killed three hostages Friday in Gaza City. That news came as Israel kept up an unrelenting bombardment of Gaza and U.S. National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan pressed them to curtail the combat. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/15/20232 minutes, 52 seconds
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Military experts discuss Israel's use of unguided bombs and harm to civilians in Gaza

There is a fresh tragedy in the war between Israel and Hamas. IDF troops mistakenly shot and killed three hostages in Gaza City. That news came as Israel kept up its bombardment and defended the use of unguided bombs. Geoff Bennett discussed those weapons with retired Air Force Lt. Gen. David Deptula and Marc Garlasco, former chief of high value targeting at the Defense Intelligence Agency. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/15/202310 minutes, 16 seconds
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Israel says Gaza war will continue 'more than several months' amid pressure for cease-fire

With global pressure on Israel growing over the war in Gaza, U.S. National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his top lieutenants Thursday. U.S. criticism of Israel's operations, which have killed more than 18,000 people, is growing, but Netanyahu said after the meeting that Israel would continue until "absolute victory." William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/14/20233 minutes, 15 seconds
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News Wrap: Authorities arrest 7 accused of plotting Europe terror attack

In our news wrap Thursday, authorities in Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands arrested seven people accused of plotting terror attacks, the U.S. House overwhelmingly passed a defense policy bill today worth $886 billion, Kenya's military intensified efforts to evacuate hundreds of people trapped by flooding and retail sales rebounded in November in a surprise start to the holiday shopping season. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/14/20233 minutes, 26 seconds
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Putin vows to press on with Ukraine invasion despite heavy Russian losses

Russian President Vladimir Putin held his first press conference that included international media in more than two years and insisted that he would continue to wage war in Ukraine until all his goals were met. Much of what he had to say bears directly on how the U.S. and Europe help Ukraine going forward. Nick Schifrin discussed more with Thomas Graham of the Council on Foreign Relations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/14/20239 minutes, 5 seconds
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Gaza civilians caught in crossfire face new threat with spread of deadly diseases

The United Nations says Gaza's health system has virtually collapsed, and Gazans who have survived daily bombings now face the risk of disease amid chronically overcrowded hospitals. William Brangham discussed that with Avril Benoit, the executive director of Doctors Without Borders in the U.S. The international humanitarian organization has been operating in Gaza since the start of the war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/14/20235 minutes, 56 seconds
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Israel meets renewed resistance from Hamas amid pressure to reduce civilian casualties

Israeli troops met renewed and heavy resistance from Hamas militants across the Gaza Strip and civilians remain caught in the middle. The Gaza health ministry says nearly 19,000 people have been killed in the enclave since the Hamas terror attacks of Oct. 7. John Yang discussed the pressure on Israel to increase humanitarian aid and reduce civilian casualties with Natan Sachs. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/13/20239 minutes, 51 seconds
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Nations at COP28 agree to transition away from fossil fuels, but loopholes remain

The COP28 climate conference closed with more than 200 nations agreeing they should transition away from the fossil fuels that are warming the planet. They also pledged to triple the amount of renewable energy deployed by 2030 and curb the release of methane. But reaction to the agreement has been mixed. William Brangham discussed that with Manish Bapna of the Natural Resources Defense Council. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/13/20236 minutes, 29 seconds
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How drone warfare has transformed the battle between Ukraine and Russia

With Congress deadlocked on whether to approve tens of billions of dollars in additional aid for Ukraine, that nation's domestic arms industry is becoming increasingly important. Perhaps the most vital weapons system it's producing is an army of drones. Nick Schifrin and videographer Eric O'Connor visited the frontline in southern Ukraine to understand how drones have transformed the war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/13/20237 minutes, 52 seconds
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Zelenskyy makes his case to Congress for more U.S. aid in Ukraine's fight against Russia

Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is in Washington urging Congress to unfreeze badly needed military aid. The debate over U.S. aid comes as a declassified intelligence assessment details staggering losses for Russia. It shows nearly 90 percent of its pre-war force has been killed or wounded in Ukraine. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/12/202312 minutes, 12 seconds
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Biden warns Israel is losing global support over 'indiscriminate bombing' in Gaza

The UN General Assembly approved a measure calling for a humanitarian ceasefire in Gaza. The U.S. was one of ten nations to vote against the non-binding resolution. Before the vote, President Biden said Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu needs to change his hardline government, adding that Israel is losing global support due to its "indiscriminate bombing" in Gaza. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/12/20232 minutes, 44 seconds
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Why some climate experts are criticizing what's happened at the COP28 climate conference

As the COP28 climate conference comes to a close, countries are racing against the clock. More than 100 nations are pushing for a firm commitment to stop the use of coal, oil and gas after earlier drafts advocated for eventually phasing out fossil fuels. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Michael Mann, one of the climate experts critical of what's happened at the summit. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/12/20236 minutes, 15 seconds
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Investigation reveals Chinese seafood caught and processed using forced labor sold in U.S.

An investigation into Chinese fishing fleets and processing centers has discovered that seafood produced with forced labor is making its way to American dinner tables. That's despite a U.S. ban on imports made by workers from China's Xinjiang province. That region is home to Muslim minority Uyghurs who have been the victims of well-documented human rights violations. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/12/20237 minutes
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International criticism grows as Israel says it's prepared for long fight in Gaza

Israeli officials said they're prepared for a long fight and they've forced Hamas to the breaking point in northern Gaza where militants in the field must "surrender or be killed." This comes as international criticism over Israel's war grows. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/11/20233 minutes, 40 seconds
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Israel targets infrastructure in Gaza to ramp up civilian pressure on Hamas, report claims

An investigative report says Israel is deliberately targeting civilian infrastructure in Gaza to ramp up "civilian pressure" on Hamas. The reporting by the independent +972 Magazine and the Hebrew-language outlet Local Call includes interviews with several current and former sources in Israel's intelligence community. Geoff Bennett discussed the story with its lead reporter, Yuval Abraham. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/11/20235 minutes, 49 seconds
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Russia's ethnic minorities disproportionately die in the war in Ukraine

In the nearly two years since Russia invaded Ukraine, 300,000 Russian soldiers have died or been wounded, many of them conscripts. For soldiers from Siberia and Russia's Far East, home to many of Russia's ethnic minorities, the price has been overwhelming. Nick Schifrin and producer Sarah Cutler have some of their stories. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/11/20236 minutes, 11 seconds
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News Wrap: Rescuers search for survivors in aftermath of Tennessee tornadoes

In our news wrap Sunday, emergency responders searched for survivors after deadly tornadoes tore through parts of Tennessee, the Palestinian death toll continues to climb amid heavy fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza, UPenn's president and board chair both resigned after backlash over testimony about antisemitism on campus, and Elon Musk restored conspiracy theorist Alex Jones' X account. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/10/20233 minutes, 26 seconds
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News Wrap: Texas high court grants AG Paxton's request to pause abortion ruling

In our news wrap Saturday, the Texas Supreme Court temporarily blocked a lower court's decision to allow a pregnant woman whose fetus has a fatal diagnosis to get an abortion, Israel hit targets across Gaza as its war with Hamas entered its third month, nations clashed at COP28 over reducing the use of fossil fuels, and baseball star Shohei Ohtani said he's signing with the Los Angeles Dodgers. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/9/20233 minutes, 1 second
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What to know about escalations in Venezuela and Guyana's territorial dispute

Tensions are rising in South America as Venezuela threatens to take over a large region of Guyana that's rich in resources. Venezuela on Saturday signaled openness to "high-level" talks to resolve the standoff, but Guyana has yet to respond. Ali Rogin speaks with Carolina Jiménez Sandoval, president of the Washington Office on Latin America, about the dispute's history and latest developments. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/9/20237 minutes, 29 seconds
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U.S. vetoes UN resolution for cease-fire as Israel ramps up airstrikes in Gaza

The U.S. vetoed a United Nations Security Council resolution that called for a cease-fire in Gaza. The move came as the UN is ramping up already dire warnings of a humanitarian catastrophe if more aid isn't sent into Gaza soon. According to the Hamas-run health ministry, nearly 17,500 Palestinians have been killed and the Israeli air and ground campaign is not slowing down. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/8/20234 minutes, 50 seconds
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Saudi foreign minister discusses Israel-Hamas war and wider challenges in Middle East

Foreign ministers from several Arab allies of the United States are in Washington this week for meetings with the Biden administration over the Israel-Hamas war. Nick Schifrin sat down with the foreign minister of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud, for a candid conversation about the way forward from the violence and Saudi Arabia's role in the region. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/8/20238 minutes, 59 seconds
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The troubled safety record of the Osprey aircraft fleet grounded by the U.S. military

The U.S. military will ground its entire fleet of V-22 Osprey aircraft while it investigates the cause of last week's crash off the coast of Japan that killed all eight service personnel on board. The extraordinary step was taken after a preliminary investigation found something wrong with the aircraft itself led to the crash and not errors by the crew onboard. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/8/20234 minutes, 52 seconds
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Brooks and Capehart on the political impact of the latest charges against Hunter Biden

New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Geoff Bennett to discuss the week in politics, including the latest charges and accusations against Hunter Biden, President Biden's push for more aid to Ukraine and Trump's comments about being a dictator. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/8/202310 minutes, 41 seconds
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Civilians caught in crossfire as Israel targets Rafah after militants launch rocket attack

The top United Nations humanitarian official says the delivery of food, water and other aid to Gaza is not nearly enough, and not arriving quickly enough for nearly two million people in need. Meantime, Israel pressed its offensive in Southern Gaza and its pursuit of top Hamas leaders there as the war marked two months since the terror attacks of October 7. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/7/20234 minutes, 33 seconds
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Israeli activists say world has ignored Oct. 7 sexual violence against women

A United Nations commission is investigating potential war crimes on both sides of the Israel-Hamas war. But the UN agency dedicated to gender equality has been sharply criticized for waiting until this month to express alarm over sexual violence perpetrated during the October 7 Hamas attacks. Special correspondent Leila Molana-Allen reports. A warning: The accounts in this story are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/7/20236 minutes, 12 seconds
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Ukrainian weapons production chief on why U.S. support is critical in fight against Russia

The U.S. signed an agreement with Ukraine this week to accelerate the co-production of Ukrainian weapons. But there's a long way to go before Ukraine has enough domestic armaments to fight the Russian military on its own. It comes as Congress is deadlocked over a $60 billion aid package. Nick Schifrin discussed more with Ukrainian Minister of Strategic Industries Alexander Kamyshin. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/7/20237 minutes, 4 seconds
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UN human rights chief warns of 'apocalyptic' crisis in Gaza as fighting intensifies

Israel intensified its military operations in Gaza's second largest city, forcing tens of thousands of Palestinians to flee and making it more difficult to deliver aid. The UN says nearly 1.9 million people, over 80 percent of Gaza's population, have been displaced by the war. They're now crowded into small areas with the humanitarian situation worsening by the day. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/6/20235 minutes, 1 second
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News Wrap: At least 3 wounded as gunman opens fire on UNLV campus

In our news wrap Wednesday, a gunman opened fire at UNLV and shot at least three people, the Justice Department charged four Russians with war crimes against an American living in Ukraine, Republicans are holding their fourth presidential debate and former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy is leaving Congress by the end of the year. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/6/20234 minutes, 53 seconds
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The scientific and cultural impact of the International Space Station after 25 years

This week marks the 25th anniversary of when astronauts first entered the beginnings of the International Space Station. A quarter of a century later, the station is manned by seven international crew members and has become an iconic and important part of space history. But the celebration is bittersweet as the ISS is set to be decommissioned. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Miles O'Brien. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/6/20236 minutes, 21 seconds
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Israeli troops move south into Gaza's 2nd largest city amid pleas to protect civilians

A new phase in the bloody war in Gaza is underway. Israel is assaulting the largest city in the south, Khan Younis, and most of Gaza's population is now in that region. Despite pleas for more precision and fewer civilian killings from the U.S. and other Israeli partners, the thunderous campaign to root out Hamas continues. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/5/20234 minutes, 48 seconds
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National security adviser discusses Ukraine aid as funding remains stalled in Congress

Tens of billions of dollars in military assistance for Ukraine and Israel, and money for U.S. border security, remain stalled on Capitol Hill. The Biden administration sent Congress a warning that Ukraine funding is set to run out by the end of the year. Geoff Bennett discussed the latest with National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/5/20238 minutes, 44 seconds
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The global implications of the U.S. debate over Ukraine military assistance

As Congress continues the debate over Ukraine funding, Amna Nawaz discussed the global implications of the aid with Lisa Desjardins and Nick Schifrin. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/5/20236 minutes, 50 seconds
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Young Palestinian released by Israel reflects on time in prison and hopes for the future

More than 200 Palestinians detained or imprisoned by Israel were released last week during the truce between Israel and Hamas. Most of them were women and children. They are just some of the thousands of Palestinians held by Israel for a variety of alleged, and convicted, offenses. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/5/20237 minutes, 18 seconds
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Israel expands Gaza invasion south, forcing many to flee areas previously considered safe

The focus of Israel's invasion and air campaign in Gaza is shifting south, where roughly two million Gazans have fled with few safe places left for them to go. Aid deliveries are continuing but in lower numbers since last week's truce ended, providing little relief to the civilians trapped there. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/4/20235 minutes, 1 second
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Thai workers held hostage by Hamas describe kidnappings and recovery after release

Before the war in Gaza resumed, the main focus of negotiations had been the release of hostages held by Hamas and Palestinians held by Israel. But of the 240 hostages, dozens were migrant workers from Thailand, the Philippines, Tanzania and Nepal. Nick Schifrin has some of their stories. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/4/20236 minutes, 28 seconds
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Solar system with 6 planets orbiting in-sync discovered in Milky Way

Astronomers have discovered a rare solar system with six planets moving in sync with one another. Estimated to be billions of years old, the formation 100 light-years away may help unravel some mysteries of our solar system. Miles O'Brien reports on this perfect cosmic dance. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/4/20233 minutes, 29 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel declares major city in southern Gaza a 'dangerous combat zone'

In our news wrap Sunday, Israel ordered more evacuations in southern Gaza and said it has expanded ground operations to include every part of the Gaza Strip, a U.S. warship shot down a drone during a Houthi attack on commercial ships in the Red Sea, violence in the Philippines and France is being investigated for links to terrorism, and one of the Palestinian students shot in Vermont is paralyzed. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/3/20233 minutes, 25 seconds
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Why production of Apple iPhones has been moving from China to India

Apple's new iPhone 15 is already looking like one of the hottest, in-demand items this holiday season. But several factors like shifting supply chains, labor disputes and geopolitics are combining to keep the smartphone hard to find. Nilesh Christopher, the South Asia correspondent for technology publication Rest of the World, joins Ali Rogin to discuss the latest developments. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/3/20235 minutes, 37 seconds
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Israeli offensive turns to southern Gaza as hopes of reviving truce dwindle

Hopes for a renewed cease-fire in Gaza any time soon have dimmed considerably, as Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu ordered his negotiators home from Qatar, saying talks had hit a dead end. Since the fighting resumed on Friday, the focus of Israel's aerial bombardment has shifted to southern Gaza as Palestinians there are ordered to evacuate and the death toll rises once more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/2/20233 minutes, 41 seconds
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News Wrap: U.S. at COP28 commits to tripling renewable energy production by 2030

In our news wrap Saturday, Vice President Harris pledged $3 billion at COP28 to a global fund to help poorer nations adapt to climate change, a protestor is in critical condition after setting themself on fire outside the Israeli consulate in Atlanta, and record amounts of snow has dropped on much of Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic and Switzerland. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/2/20231 minute, 47 seconds
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War returns to Gaza after cease-fire between Israel and Hamas ends

War has returned to Gaza after a week-long cease-fire. The pause saw Hamas release more than 100 hostages, Israel free more than 240 Palestinians and hundreds of aid trucks allowed into Gaza. Negotiators are working to reinstate the temporary truce that ended Friday, but the Gaza health authority controlled by Hamas said more than 175 Palestinians have already been killed. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/1/20234 minutes, 34 seconds
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Israeli officials repeatedly dismissed warning signs before Hamas attack, report claims

In our news wrap Friday, a federal appeals court panel ruled that Jan. 6 lawsuits against former President Trump will move forward, an inmate is charged with attempted murder after stabbing Derek Chauvin 22 times in a federal prison and Ukraine's spy agency has reportedly reached deep into Russia, blowing up two fuel tanker trains in Siberia. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/1/20236 minutes, 41 seconds
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UNICEF leader describes Israel-Hamas war's brutal impact on children in Gaza

Hamas freed more Israeli hostages in exchange for Palestinians held by Israel after an 11th-hour deal extended the temporary Gaza ceasefire through Thursday night. The conflict has had the deadliest impact on children with more than 5,300 reportedly killed. Geoff Bennett discussed the brutal impact of this war on its youngest victims with UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/30/20237 minutes, 12 seconds
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U.N. climate conference opens amid skepticism world will move away from fossil fuels

The United Nations Climate Conference, COP28, began Thursday in the United Arab Emirates. Negotiators from nearly 200 countries are hoping to hammer out agreements to limit the pollution that's warming the planet, and to agree on aid for the nations most impacted by climate change. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/30/202310 minutes, 1 second
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Former State Dept. official on what's next in Israel-Hamas conflict

Mediators in the Israel-Hamas war are working to win another extension of a six-day-old pause in fighting. Israel says it's willing to continue the pause if Hamas keeps releasing hostages. Hamas also claimed the youngest hostage was killed in an Israeli bombing before the ceasefire. The Israeli military said it's investigating the claim. Geoff Bennett discussed the latest with Aaron David Miller. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/29/20237 minutes, 36 seconds
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Southeast Asian cities face existential crisis as they sink while sea levels rise

Coastal cities in Southeast Asia, including Bangkok, Jakarta and Manila, face a mutually risky future: they're sinking as sea levels around them are rising. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Thailand, in partnership with the Under-Told Stories Project at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/29/20237 minutes, 46 seconds
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Negotiations continue to extend cease-fire and expand hostage release

Tuesday was the day the war could have resumed in Gaza with an initial truce set to expire. Instead, it was the fifth day of a pause in fighting, the fifth day of Hamas releasing mostly Israeli hostages, Israel releasing 30 detained Palestinians and more aid arriving in Gaza. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/28/20236 minutes, 31 seconds
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More hostages and prisoners to be released as Israel and Hamas extend temporary cease-fire

It appears the lull in the Israel-Hamas war will last a little longer. The two sides agreed to extend their cease-fire for two more days. It comes after the fourth hostage and prisoner trade under the temporary truce. Nick Schifrin reports on the latest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/27/20234 minutes, 55 seconds
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Freed Palestinian Prisoner: 'We have the right to defend ourselves'

Israel currently holds more than 7000 Palestinian prisoners. About 2000 of them are held in administrative detention, without charge. And of the 300 Palestinians whom Israel identifies as possible releases, one third are under 18. Nick Schifrin talks to one Palestinian woman who was recently released by Israel in exchange for Hamas releasing hostages. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/27/20234 minutes, 33 seconds
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Family of freed Israeli hostages discusses release and loved ones still held in Gaza

So far, about 70 hostages have been released by Hamas over four days of a cease-fire and as many as 175 people remain held in Gaza. Dori Roberts has family members in both situations. His cousin and her two daughters were just released, but other loved ones remain held hostage. Roberts joined Amna Nawaz to discuss the latest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/27/20234 minutes, 49 seconds
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News Wrap: Israeli-owned tanker likely seized by Somali pirates, Pentagon says

In our news wrap Monday, the Pentagon said militants who seized an Israeli-owned tanker were likely Somali pirates and not rebels from Yemen, Elon Musk visited Israel and said he supports neutralizing Hamas, southern and central Ukraine is struggling to deal with the fallout from a Black Sea storm and Sierra Leone authorities said they arrested leaders of an attack that killed 20 people on Sunday. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/27/20234 minutes, 15 seconds
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Relief, joy as more hostages are released on 3rd day of Israel-Hamas truce

Two Americans, including a 4-year-old girl, were among the 17 hostages Hamas released in the third exchange for 39 Palestinians released from Israeli prisons. The four-day cease-fire deal is also allowing aid trucks to cross into Gaza and deliver crucial supplies. Late on Sunday, Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu seemed to open the door to more pauses in fighting if Hamas releases more hostages. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/26/20232 minutes, 44 seconds
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News Wrap: 3 Palestinian college students shot and injured in Vermont

In our news wrap Sunday, a tanker with links to Israel was seized off the coast of Yemen, police say a gunman confronted and shot three young men of Palestinian descent enrolled in American colleges as they walked to dinner in Vermont, and a powerful winter storm swept through parts of eastern Europe. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/26/20231 minute, 28 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel, Hamas continue exchange of prisoners and hostages after delay

In our news wrap Saturday, 13 more Israeli hostages and four foreign nationals held by Hamas have been freed after frantic negotiations resolved a last-minute snag, Russia hit Ukraine with its most intense drone attack of the war so far, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is expected to survive being stabbed in prison, and journalist Betty Rollin died at age 87. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/25/20233 minutes, 46 seconds
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Israeli physician describes mental and physical recovery ahead for released hostages

The hostages released from Gaza face immense mental and physical trauma. Dr. Hagai Levine, the head of the medical and resilience team for the Hostages and Missing Families Forum, began to meet some of the 13 Israelis who once again are free. Nick Schifrin spoke with Levine about the recovery ahead. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/24/202310 minutes, 48 seconds
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Daughter of Israeli still held in Gaza discusses mixed feelings after 1st hostage release

Twelve of the 13 Israeli hostages released from Gaza Friday were kidnapped from one kibbutz, Nir Oz. One out of four of Nir Oz's residents were kidnapped or killed in the October 7 attacks. Chaim Peri is one of the hostages from the kibbutz who remains held in Gaza. His daughter, Noam Peri, joined Nick Schifrin to discuss the latest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/24/20235 minutes, 45 seconds
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Qatari official on role in mediating Israeli hostage release and temporary cease-fire

The hostage deal between Israel and Hamas was mediated by Qatar. Dr. Majid bin Mohammed Al Ansari is an advisor to the prime minister of Qatar and the official spokesperson for the Qatari foreign ministry. He joined Nick Schifrin to discuss the release of the first set of hostages and the temporary cease-fire. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/24/20234 minutes, 31 seconds
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Fighting between Israel and Hamas continues in Gaza ahead of pause for release of hostages

After more than six weeks of heavy fighting, a pause in the battle between Israel and Hamas in Gaza is expected to start soon. That's after the Israeli government approved a deal that includes the release of at least 50 hostages held by Hamas. Nick Schifrin reports and Geoff Bennett discusses the Biden administration's role in negotiations with National Security Council spokesman John Kirby. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/22/202311 minutes, 54 seconds
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News Wrap: Vehicle explosion kills 2 at border crossing in Niagara Falls

In our news wrap Wednesday, a vehicle exploded on the U.S. side of the border with Canada in Niagara Falls killing two people and disrupting cross-border travel, the U.S. military carried out new air attacks in Iraq targeting an Iranian-backed militia and the Dutch populist Geert Wilders appears headed for an election win in the latest far-right victory across Europe. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/22/20234 minutes, 19 seconds
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Israeli forces battle Hamas in Gaza refugee camp as deal to free hostages appears close

Weeks of negotiations have led to an agonizing day as talks continue to free some of the nearly 240 hostages held by Hamas in Gaza. In the proposed deal, Hamas would exchange 50 women and children they hold for 150 women and children in Israeli detention. Nick Schifrin reports on the negotiations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/21/20237 minutes, 13 seconds
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Families of hostages held by Hamas discuss weeks of agony and hope for release

The families of hostages held by Hamas have faced six weeks of horror and worry. Amna Nawaz discussed the ordeal with Abbey Onn and Liz Hirsh Naftali. Both are awaiting the return of loved ones. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/21/20239 minutes, 30 seconds
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Thailand program looks to reunite families separated by climate change-driven migration

The number of households where children are raised by grandparents is rising in lower and middle-income countries. Parents have moved away for opportunities as agricultural jobs no longer provide a reliable income due to climate change. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports for the series, Agents for Change, produced in partnership with the Under-Told Stories Project at the University of St. Thomas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/21/20238 minutes, 13 seconds
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Iceland scientists optimistic volcano may spare town as major eruption appears imminent

Scientists in Iceland say that a major volcanic eruption could occur within days. But they are increasingly optimistic that it may spare a town 40 miles southwest of the capital Reykjavik. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/21/20236 minutes, 23 seconds
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Another hospital in northern Gaza becomes battleground between Israel and Hamas

Israel's offensive in Gaza is focused in the north with civilians caught between the IDF and Hamas. The government media office in Gaza, run by Hamas, says more than 13,000 civilians there have been killed since the October 7 terror attacks that killed 1,200 Israeli civilians. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/20/20234 minutes, 57 seconds
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News Wrap: Defense Secretary Austin makes surprise visit to Ukraine

In our news wrap Monday, Defense Secretary Austin made a surprise visit to Ukraine in a bid to keep money and weapons flowing to its military, a federal appeals court ruling could curb enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, Donald Trump's lawyers urged a federal appeals court to revoke a gag order against him and a stretch of I-10 in Los Angeles reopened ahead of schedule after fire damage. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/20/20233 minutes, 44 seconds
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Voters in Argentina elect far-right political outsider as president

Argentinians went to the polls amid an economic crisis, soaring inflation and growing poverty. As many nations have in the last decade, they elected a populist outsider. Economist, author and media commentator Javier Milei is now president-elect thanks to an exhausted and angry electorate. Amna Nawaz discussed what Milei's win means for Argentina and beyond with Oliver Stuenkel. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/20/20238 minutes, 26 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel, Hamas nearing deal for partial hostage release, officials say

In our news wrap Sunday, there are growing indications that Israel and Hamas are close to a deal for the release of some of the roughly 240 hostages being held in Gaza, and polls closed in Argentina in the country's tightly contested and closely watched presidential runoff election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/19/20233 minutes, 22 seconds
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Humanitarian crisis in Ukraine worsens as U.S. funding stalls

President Biden has asked Congress for tens of billions of dollars to support Ukraine in its war against Russia. Most of it would be for military aid, but it also includes money to address the nation's worsening humanitarian situation. Zoe Daniels with the International Rescue Committee joins Ali Rogin to discuss the effects of the war on Ukraine's civilians, particularly millions of children. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/19/20235 minutes, 20 seconds
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More Palestinians flee south as Israeli troops search Gaza's largest hospital

Israel is again urging Palestinians in northern Gaza to move south, while patients, staff and displaced people leave Al Shifa Hospital in Gaza City amid conflicting claims of what triggered the departure. There is little refuge from the war in southern Gaza, where Israeli airstrikes continued to hit residential areas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/19/20232 minutes, 32 seconds
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News Wrap: SpaceX's Starship rocket test launch ends with explosions

In our news wrap Saturday, a pair of explosions destroyed the booster rocket and spacecraft of SpaceX's biggest rocket during a test launch in Texas, and Comcast joined the list of advertisers stepping away from Elon Musk's social media platform X, formerly known as Twitter, over concerns about antisemetic content. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/19/20231 minute, 17 seconds
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Israeli airstrike leaves at least 40 dead in southern city once a refuge for Gazans

United Nations officials said starvation is a possibility in Gaza as they were forced to stop food and aid deliveries due to a lack of fuel. Israel said it will allow two tankers a day to enter for UN operations, about half what they need, just for the most vital operations. This happens as Palestinian officials announced the death toll has surpassed 12,000. Leila Molana-Allen reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/17/20235 minutes, 3 seconds
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Israel drops evacuation leaflets in southern Gaza, signaling expansion of invasion

Communications with Gaza are mostly cut off because of a lack of fuel to power the system there. Israel is pressing its invasion in the north, and the IDF discovered the body of one of the 240 hostages held by Hamas. Her remains were found near Al Shifa hospital, the main medical center in northern Gaza. Leila Molana-Allen reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/16/20237 minutes, 52 seconds
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Blinken discusses improving relations with China, support of Israel amid ceasefire calls

Secretary of State Blinken is in San Francisco with President Biden for the APEC summit. He joined Amna Nawaz to discuss improving U.S. relations with China and the growing calls for a ceasefire in the Israel-Hamas war. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/16/20237 minutes, 21 seconds
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How Russian oil is reaching the U.S. market through a loophole in the embargo

After Russia invaded Ukraine, the U.S. and European allies banned the import of Russian oil and natural gas. But a new report reveals that fuel made in part from Russian crude is still ending up in American gas tanks. Nick Schifrin and producer Teresa Cebrian report on a new investigation released by the organization, Global Witness. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/16/20236 minutes, 42 seconds
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A look inside the Gaza hospital raided by Israeli Defense Forces

The United Nations Security Council approved a resolution calling for "urgent and extended humanitarian pauses" in the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza. It comes as Israeli forces have entered the Al Shifa hospital in Gaza and the compound that surrounds it. Israel and the U.S. say the hospital is used by Hamas as a command center, a charge the staff and Hamas deny. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/15/20235 minutes, 30 seconds
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News Wrap: Armed gang in Haiti takes hundreds hostage at hospital

In our news wrap Wednesday, a heavily armed gang in Haiti reportedly stormed a hospital and took hundreds of hostages including women, children and newborns, U.K. leaders insisted they'll keep trying to send asylum seekers to Rwanda even after Britain's Supreme Court rejected the policy and officials in Ukraine say forces established a critical beachhead in a bid to retake Russian-held Crimea. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/15/20233 minutes, 55 seconds
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Biden pushes for stable U.S. relationship with China during summit with Xi

Wednesday in San Francisco, President Biden met face-to-face with Chinese leader Xi Jinping for the first time in a year. The two leaders are announcing agreements on military communication and a crackdown on the Chinese chemicals used to make fentanyl. But as Nick Schifrin reports, the goal was less about breakthroughs and more about stabilizing a troubled relationship. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/15/20238 minutes, 25 seconds
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Father of Israeli American held hostage by Hamas on efforts to bring him home

Among the estimated 239 hostages believed to be held by Hamas in Gaza is 35-year-old Israeli American Sagui Dekel-Chen. He lives in kibbutz Nir Oz near the Gaza border, which came under brutal attack by Hamas terrorists on October 7. His father, Jonathan Dekel-Chen, is in Washington meeting with U.S. officials to help free his son and sat down with Amna Nawaz to speak about his efforts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/15/20236 minutes, 20 seconds
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Civilians shoulder burden of war as fighting rages around Gaza hospitals

It's a race against time in northern Gaza as just one hospital remains operational. Vulnerable and critical patients are still under treatment at several hospitals that the U.S. says Hamas is using for military purposes. U.S. officials said civilians must be protected as intelligence shows Hamas is using the patients as human shields. Leila Molana-Allen reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/14/20236 minutes, 4 seconds
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Treasury Secretary Yellen on economic competition and cooperation between U.S. and China

This week is an important moment in the strained and often tense relationship between the U.S. and China. President Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet face to face in San Francisco on Wednesday as part of the Asia Pacific Economic Conference summit. Geoff Bennett discussed the economic competition and cooperation between the U.S. and China with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/14/20236 minutes, 31 seconds
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Abbas Ibrahim discusses Israel-Hamas war and Hezbollah's looming threat

Much of the focus of this latest Israel-Hamas war is focused on Gaza and the brutal fighting there. But a larger, more threatening force in Hezbollah sits across Israel's northern border. Special correspondent Simona Foltyn recently sat down with a former top Lebanese intelligence official who knows the region well and is deeply involved in the negotiations over hostages taken by Hamas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/14/20237 minutes, 27 seconds
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A look at the destruction in Gaza after 5 weeks of war between Israel and Hamas

Gaza's healthcare system and central hospital are in collapse five weeks since the Hamas terror attacks launched the war with Israel. Leila Molana-Allen went to Gaza with the Israel Defense Forces on Monday and reports on the fighting there. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/13/20236 minutes, 2 seconds
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Civilians in crossfire as Israeli forces and Hamas battle around Gaza's main hospital

Israel claims a Hamas military command center is located beneath Gaza's Al-Shifa hospital. Monday, President Biden warned Israel to be "less intrusive" in its operations there as hundreds of patients and medical staff remain inside, facing dire conditions. Nick Schifrin reports on the legal arguments over whether the hospital and what's underneath it are legitimate targets. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/13/20235 minutes, 49 seconds
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Tensions rise in U.K. amid large-scale protests over Israel-Hamas war

In a day of political upheaval, British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak fired Home Secretary Suella Braverman after critics claimed her remarks contributed to violence during pro-Palestinian marches this weekend. The British government is also pledging to crack down on antisemitism, which has surged across Europe since the Hamas attacks in Israel. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/13/20236 minutes, 59 seconds
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Israel continues airstrikes, ground war in Gaza as hostage negotiations stall

With conditions in Gaza getting worse, Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu said any cease-fire agreement must include the release of all Israeli hostages Hamas is holding. Hospitals across Gaza are on the brink of collapse, while Israel's military pressed its ground operations in the north and continued deadly bombardment in the south. Leila Molana-Allen reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders