Winamp Logo
PBS NewsHour - Supreme Court Cover
PBS NewsHour - Supreme Court Profile

PBS NewsHour - Supreme Court

English, News, 1 season, 90 episodes, 10 hours, 4 minutes
About
The latest news and analysis about key cases and critical arguments before the Supreme Court (Updated periodically)
Episode Artwork

Reviewing consequential and controversial decisions from the Supreme Court

The justices of the Supreme Court considered more than 60 cases this term before rendering their final decisions this week. Their rulings on abortion access, presidential immunity and the limits of executive branch agencies could have long-lasting impacts. They also showcased sharp divides among the justices. Amna Nawaz sat down with two Supreme Court watchers to reflect on this historic term. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/4/20249 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Historian discusses Supreme Court's immunity decision and shift in presidential powers

The Supreme Court's landmark decision on former President Trump's immunity from some legal prosecution has the potential to transform the powers of the presidency. Jeffrey Brown and Heather Cox Richardson of Boston College discussed how the ruling fits with history. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/2/20246 minutes, 7 seconds
Episode Artwork

How the Supreme Court immunity ruling reshapes presidential power

In one of the most anticipated rulings of the year, the Supreme Court declared that former President Trump is immune from criminal prosecution for any so-called "official act" taken as president, but not "unofficial ones'' taken as a candidate. Amna Nawaz discussed how the ruling reshapes presidential power with News Hour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle and William Brangham. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/1/20248 minutes, 9 seconds
Episode Artwork

Breaking down Supreme Court decisions on Jan. 6 cases, homeless camps and agency power

With just one day left in its term, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a trio of major decisions Friday. The justices upheld a law making it a crime for unhoused people to camp in public areas like parks, sidewalks and plazas, narrowed the scope of a law being used to prosecute Jan. 6 rioters and weakened the rule-making powers of regulatory agencies. John Yang reports. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/28/20246 minutes, 18 seconds
Episode Artwork

The far-reaching implications of the Supreme Court's decision curbing regulatory power

The Supreme Court has swept aside long standing legal precedent in its ruling overturning the Chevron doctrine, majorly curtailing the power of federal agencies to interpret the laws they regulate. The decision is expected to have far-reaching implications on everything from the environment to healthcare. Geoff Bennett took a closer look with Andrew Mergen. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/28/20246 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

Conservative Supreme Court majority takes aim at 'administrative state' in latest rulings

The U.S. Supreme Court handed down several high-profile decisions Thursday morning. One case blocked a controversial bankruptcy deal involving the opioid crisis, another reinstated access to abortions for those facing medical emergencies in Idaho and a third blocked an EPA rule regulating air pollution from taking effect. John Yang reports on the significance of the rulings. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/27/20246 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court blocks Purdue settlement in major blow to local governments fighting opioids

The Supreme Court ripped up a controversial bankruptcy deal that would have provided billions of dollars to states devastated by the opioid epidemic and shielded the controversial family accused of pushing pharmaceutical painkillers in search of profit. Amna Nawaz explored the details and impact of the Purdue Pharma case with Brian Mann. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/27/20242 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

How a draft opinion on Idaho's abortion ban was mistakenly posted by the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court handed down two opinions Wednesday but left some of the most politically fraught cases for the final days of its term. One left undecided for now is focused on abortion and a ban in Idaho. But we may have clues about how the justices will decide the case after a document was mistakenly posted. John Yang reports on how the mistake happened and what it could mean for the court. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/26/20243 minutes, 37 seconds
Episode Artwork

Ban on domestic violence abusers owning guns upheld by Supreme Court

The Supreme Court handed down a major victory for gun control advocates, ruling that domestic abusers can be barred from owning guns. In an 8-1 decision, the court rejected a 2nd Amendment challenge to the federal law that makes it illegal for people with domestic violence restraining orders to possess firearms. William Brangham discussed the case with News Hour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS News is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/21/20247 minutes, 5 seconds
Episode Artwork

Conservative Supreme Court majority strikes down ban on bump stocks

The Supreme Court handed down a ruling with major implications for firearm regulations. In a 6-3 decision, the conservative majority found that the government exceeded its authority when it banned bump stocks. The gun accessory allows users to re-engage the trigger continuously, dramatically increasing the rate of fire. Amna Nawaz discussed more with News Hour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/14/20246 minutes
Episode Artwork

Access to mifepristone remains unchanged as Supreme Court rejects abortion pill challenge

In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court ruled that a group of anti-abortion doctors does not have any legal basis to challenge access to mifepristone, one of the two common drugs used in medication abortion. As a result, access to mifepristone will not change. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/13/20243 minutes
Episode Artwork

Former neighbor disputes Alito's explanation of upside-down U.S. flag flying at his home

A former neighbor of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito said, "at worst, he's just outright lying," about his account of a neighborhood dispute that led to hoisting an upside-down American flag at his Virginia home. The inverted flag is associated with the effort to overturn President Biden's 2020 election win. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/6/20245 minutes, 8 seconds
Episode Artwork

Alito says he won't recuse himself from election and Jan. 6 cases after flag controversies

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito told lawmakers he won't recuse himself from cases involving the 2020 presidential election or the Jan. 6 Capitol riot despite concerns about two flags associated with far-right causes that have flown over his properties. Alito said his wife, Martha-Ann Alito, was responsible for flying the flags. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Kathleen Clark. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/29/20247 minutes, 34 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court rejects racial gerrymandering claim in South Carolina

The Supreme Court struck down a challenge to a congressional map in South Carolina that civil rights groups argued was a racial gerrymander. In a 6-3 decision, the conservative majority delivered a win to Republicans who said they used politics, not race, as the key factor when drawing the district bounds. Geoff Bennett discussed the decision with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/23/20245 minutes, 28 seconds
Episode Artwork

Flag associated with Christian nationalism flown at Alito's beach house, report says

The New York Times reports that an "Appeal to Heaven" flag, which has origins dating to the Revolutionary War but is now associated with Christian nationalism and efforts to overturn President Biden's election win, was seen flying outside Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito's New Jersey beach home last year. White House Correspondent Laura Barrón-López reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/23/20246 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

How the reversal of Roe v. Wade reshaped American life

It's been nearly two years since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and eliminated the federal right to abortion. Shefali Luthra, a health reporter at The 19th News, spoke to a variety of Americans about how their lives have been upended by the court's decision for her book, "Undue Burden: Life and Death Decisions in Post-Roe America." She joined Laura Barrón-López to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/19/20246 minutes, 41 seconds
Episode Artwork

Analyzing the consequential Supreme Court term and its ideological divide

The Supreme Court wrapped up oral arguments and has now turned to rolling out decisions in some of the most consequential cases of the year. Those decisions will shape policies nationwide on divisive issues like homelessness and reproductive rights, and some of them could affect the presidential election. John Yang discussed more with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle and Joan Biskupic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/2/20247 minutes, 58 seconds
Episode Artwork

Analyzing the Supreme Court hearing on Trump's presidential immunity claim

The Supreme Court heard debate over one of its most consequential cases, whether a former president is immune from prosecution for actions taken while in office. Arguments were heard on an appeal brought by Donald Trump, who's being prosecuted for attempting to overthrow the results of the 2020 election. John Yang discussed more with William Brangham and Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/25/20249 minutes, 25 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court weighs whether federal law allowing emergency abortions overrides state bans

It was a charged atmosphere at the Supreme Court as justices heard arguments in a major abortion case. The court looked at whether a federal law requiring hospitals to provide abortion care in emergencies would apply to states with strict bans. More than two dozen states ban or severely restrict abortion and six states have no health exceptions. Geoff Bennett discussed the case with Sarah Varney. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/24/20246 minutes, 31 seconds
Episode Artwork

National Labor Relations Board's authority faces challenge in Starbucks Supreme Court case

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a key case that could have major implications for labor rights. The court looked at a challenge brought by Starbucks against a lower court decision to reinstate seven baristas in Memphis who were fired by the company after they announced plans to unionize. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Washington Post labor reporter Lauren Gurley. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/23/20244 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court hears case on whether cities can criminalize homelessness, disband camps

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the most significant case on homelessness in decades. The case looks at challenges to laws in a small Oregon town fining homeless people up to $300 for setting up camps in public parks. The heart of the question is whether these laws classify as cruel and unusual punishment. Geoff Bennett and NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle discussed the case. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/22/20247 minutes, 34 seconds
Episode Artwork

What's at stake in the upcoming Supreme Court case on laws limiting homelessness

The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments Monday on whether laws limiting homelessness are unconstitutional because they punish people for being unhoused. The case is about laws in a small city in Oregon, but the outcome could reshape policies nationwide for years to come. John Yang speaks with Charley Willison, who teaches public health at Cornell University, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/21/20246 minutes, 19 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court questions use of obstruction law in Jan. 6 cases

The Supreme Court heard arguments on Tuesday in a case looking at an obstruction law used to prosecute hundreds of Jan. 6 rioters. The obstruction statute is also key to various legal challenges facing former President Donald Trump. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Politico's Kyle Cheney, who has been following the Jan. 6 legal fallout. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/16/20244 minutes, 16 seconds
Episode Artwork

Reproductive rights before Supreme Court again with abortion pill access at stake

The Supreme Court heard arguments in a major case that could further limit when and how women in America can get an abortion. The case centers on access to the most widely used abortion pill mifepristone. It's the latest in the ongoing legal battle over reproductive rights. William Brangham discussed the arguments with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/26/20246 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

Future of abortion pill mifepristone will be decided by Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday over whether to restrict access to mifepristone, one of two drugs used in medication abortions. The case will be the first the court has heard on abortion since it overturned Roe v. Wade. Special Correspondent Sarah Varney reports on what's at stake. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/25/20247 minutes, 49 seconds
Episode Artwork

Stephen Breyer on new book 'Reading the Constitution' and debate over how to interpret it

For as long as America has had a constitution, there's been debate over how to interpret it. That's particularly true when it comes to hot-button Supreme Court cases. For nearly 30 years, Stephen Breyer served on the nation's highest court, deciding on cases with ramifications still being felt across the country today. Amna Nawaz spoke with Breyer about his new book, "Reading the Constitution." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/25/202410 minutes, 31 seconds
Episode Artwork

Why 2024 may be the most consequential election for reproductive rights in 50 years

The Supreme Court will hear arguments on Tuesday in a case challenging FDA rules that make it easier to get mifepristone, the medication that accounts for more than half of all U.S. abortions. John Yang speaks with legal historian Mary Ziegler about the role executive branch agencies can play in a post-Roe world and the potential consequences of the 2024 election for reproductive rights. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/24/20246 minutes, 35 seconds
Episode Artwork

Controversial Texas immigration law back on hold as appeals court hears arguments

After a series of legal back and forths, an immigration law in Texas is back in the hands of an appeals court. The law gives state officials the power to arrest migrants who they believe crossed into the U.S. illegally. A Supreme Court ruling allowed Texas to enforce the law, but a federal appeals court put it back on hold. Amna Nawaz discussed the latest with Gaige Davila of Texas Public Radio. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/20/20245 minutes, 23 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court clears way for Texas police to arrest and deport migrants

The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for Texas to enforce a controversial immigration law that allows state officials to arrest and deport migrants who cross the border illegally. Challenges to the law are not over as the justices sent the case back to a lower court. Geoff Bennett discussed the ruling with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/19/20242 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

Analyzing the arguments as Supreme Court hears 2 cases centered on free speech

The First Amendment was at the center of two key Supreme Court arguments on Monday. One honed in on social media companies' handling of misinformation while the powerful gun lobby, the National Rifle Association, was at the center of the other. Geoff Bennett discussed the hearing with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/18/20245 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court says only Congress, not states, can remove Trump from presidential ballots

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that individual states cannot remove former President Donald Trump from their ballots based on the 14th Amendment. In an unsigned opinion, the court said only Congress, not states, can disqualify presidential candidates under the Constitution's so-called "insurrection clause." William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/4/20245 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court agrees to decide if Trump is immune from election interference prosecution

The Supreme Court says it will hear arguments over whether Donald Trump is immune from prosecution for his efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election. The justices set oral arguments for the week of April 22. Trump's pending trial in a federal court in Washington will remain on hold until then. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/28/20243 minutes, 27 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court hears cases involving free speech rights on social media

The Supreme Court heard arguments in highly consequential cases navigating First Amendment protections on social media. Tech companies are taking on state laws, decrying conservative censorship online. A decision could fundamentally change the use of speech on the internet. Amna Nawaz discussed the hearing with Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/26/20248 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

What Supreme Court justices signaled in hearing on removing Trump from Colorado ballot

The Supreme Court heard arguments in a landmark election case looking at whether Donald Trump's actions on Jan. 6 should disqualify him from appearing on Colorado's ballot. The justices scrutinized an obscure provision in the 14th Amendment at the center of this case. Amna Nawaz discussed the hearing with William Brangham and Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle who both were at the court. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/8/20249 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court to decide if insurrection clause can block Trump from Colorado ballot

The Supreme Court will hear arguments in one of the most consequential election cases in the nation's history. Does the Civil War-era insurrection clause of the 14th Amendment disqualify Donald Trump from holding higher office? The court will hear a case out of Colorado, where its state Supreme Court ruled Trump is ineligible to be on the ballot. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/7/20245 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Border standoff between Texas, feds intensifies as governor defies Supreme Court ruling

This week, the Supreme Court sided with federal agents to remove razor wire put in place by Texas along the Rio Grande. The state is using wire and state agents to block Border Patrol from accessing a section of the border in Eagle Pass. Homeland Security is demanding access to the area by Friday, but Gov. Greg Abbott is doubling down. Laura Barrón-López discussed the dispute with Stephen Vladeck. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/25/20245 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

Ruling blocking Trump from Colorado primary ballot sets up high-stakes legal battle

A court decision could have a major impact on the 2024 race for the White House. A divided Colorado Supreme Court ruled Donald Trump is ineligible to serve as president under the Constitution's insurrection clause and barred him from that state's primary ballot. The ruling sets up a likely showdown at the U.S. Supreme Court. Geoff Bennett discussed the ruling with Neal Katyal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/20/20238 minutes, 12 seconds
Episode Artwork

The barriers women still face in the legal profession decades after O'Connor's appointment

Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, lay in repose Monday, giving members of the public the chance to pay their respects. While the court has changed substantially since O'Connor first joined the bench more than 40 years ago, John Yang looks at the other ways the legal profession has not evolved. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/18/20237 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

Report gives an inside look at how the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade

The Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade upended the landscape of reproductive rights and made it a central issue in some elections. A story from The New York Times explains some of the internal dynamics of the court, from how the justices decided to hear the case, to how the decision was drafted and when it was ultimately handed down. Geoff Bennett discussed the report with Jodi Kantor. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/15/20234 minutes, 41 seconds
Episode Artwork

New Supreme Court ethics code 'does very little' to hold justices accountable, expert says

The nine Supreme Court justices handed down a surprise unanimous decision binding themselves to a new code of ethics. It comes after criticism over undisclosed perks for some of the justices. Amna Nawaz unpacked the court's new rules with Kathleen Clark, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis specializing in legal and government ethics. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/13/20236 minutes, 26 seconds
Episode Artwork

In domestic violence gun ban case, Supreme Court considers dangers and due process

The Supreme Court heard a case on Tuesday about whether people with domestic violence court orders should be barred from owning guns. Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle joins Geoff Bennett to discuss the arguments. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/7/20236 minutes, 14 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court takes on cases involving public officials blocking social media followers

The Supreme Court heard arguments in two key cases about how public officials use social media. The cases explore whether two school board members in California and a city manager in Michigan violated the First Amendment by blocking constituents from posting criticism on their personal social media pages. Geoff Bennett discussed the stakes with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/31/20236 minutes, 3 seconds
Episode Artwork

College admissions essays more important for students after end of affirmative action

Students who are starting to apply to colleges for the coming year are the first class to deal with the impact of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn affirmative action. For many high school students, this annual rite of passage is now trickier than ever to navigate. Special correspondent Hari Sreenivasan takes a look for our higher education series, Rethinking College. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/17/20237 minutes, 42 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court hears arguments in key racial gerrymandering case from South Carolina

The Supreme Court heard arguments in a key racial gerrymandering case out of South Carolina. The state redrew its congressional map and moved thousands of Black voters out of a competitive district, making it reliably Republican and diluting the Black vote. The outcome could determine the balance of power in Congress. Geoff Bennett discussed more with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/11/20235 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

Dred Scott's struggle for freedom honored with new memorial

The name Dred Scott is synonymous with the struggle for freedom. Now, 165 years after the Supreme Court case that bears his name, Scott's gravesite is a memorial befitting that legacy. NewsHour Communities Correspondent Gabrielle Hays reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/10/20234 minutes
Episode Artwork

The major cases on the docket as Supreme Court begins new term

A new term for the U.S. Supreme Court kicks off this week. On the docket are consequential cases that could determine the future of key issues like gun ownership and redistricting. Looming large over this term are also calls for greater ethics guidelines for the justices. Geoff Bennett and NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle previewed all that's to come. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/2/20235 minutes, 54 seconds
Episode Artwork

New investigation links Justice Thomas to Koch network fundraiser events

Another new investigation by Pro Publica raises serious questions over undisclosed connections between Justice Clarence Thomas and powerful people who have brought cases before the Supreme Court. William Brangham talks to ProPublica's Joshua Kaplan about Thomas' attendance at a Koch Network fundraiser that attracts wealthy, conservative donors. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/22/20236 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court blocks Purdue Pharma bankruptcy plan shielding owners from lawsuits

The Supreme Court blocked a bankruptcy plan for drug maker Purdue Pharma that would have paid out billions of dollars to address the opioid epidemic and shielded the company's owners from legal liability. The Justice Department argued that shielding the Sackler family from all future lawsuits was an abuse of the bankruptcy system. William Brangham discussed the implications with NPR's Brian Mann. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/11/20236 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

Report reveals Justice Thomas secretly benefited from network of wealthy patrons

There are new details about the gifts Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has gotten from wealthy businessmen. ProPublica provided the fullest account yet of the gifts and there are far more than previously known. John Yang discussed the story with Brett Murphy, one of the reporters who unearthed these details, and Joel Anderson, host of Slate's "Slow Burn" podcast. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/10/20237 minutes, 21 seconds
Episode Artwork

Affirmative action ruling prompts new push to end legacy admissions

The Supreme Court ruling against affirmative action in college admissions has renewed the debate over legacy admissions. A Boston-based nonprofit filed a complaint alleging Harvard's legacy and donor-based admissions favors white students, and the NAACP called on 1,600 public and private universities across the country to end legacy admissions. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Derrick Johnson. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/13/20235 minutes, 38 seconds
Episode Artwork

What the Supreme Court's latest term tells us about its future direction

The U.S. Supreme Court ended its term this past week with the six conservative justices again flexing their supermajority to make big changes in law and society. Marcia Coyle, the PBS NewsHour's Supreme Court analyst, joins John Yang to discuss how the new court is shaping up and what its most recent term can tell us about its future. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/2/20237 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Biden pledges alternative plan after Supreme Court strikes down student debt relief

The Supreme Court struck down President Biden's plan to cancel more than $400 billion in student loan debt. The decision affects more than 40 million borrowers, but the president insisted that his fight is not over and pledged an alternative relief plan. Geoff Bennett discussed more with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle and Danielle Douglas-Gabriel of The Washington Post. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/30/202310 minutes, 28 seconds
Episode Artwork

Colleges adapt admissions programs in wake of affirmative action ruling

As colleges and universities digest the Supreme Court ruling that effectively ended affirmative action, schools are left to grapple with how to revamp their admission policies to ensure the diversity of their campuses. That will be a challenge and some schools are better prepared for it than others. William Brangham discussed that with Jeff Selingo, author of "Who Gets in and Why?" PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/30/20235 minutes, 50 seconds
Episode Artwork

Brooks and Capehart on the implications of the Supreme Court's landmark decisions

New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Geoff Bennett to discuss the week in politics, including the implications of the Supreme Court's major decisions this week. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/30/202310 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Breaking down the Supreme Court's ruling ending affirmative action in college admissions

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a major blow to affirmative action in higher education, striking down race-conscious admissions programs at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina. The ruling has widespread implications for the future of higher education. Geoff Bennett discussed the decision with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/29/20234 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

Univ. of Michigan president on achieving diversity without affirmative action

The fallout of the Supreme Court's affirmative action decisions will have major implications on colleges and universities across the country. One that knows the impact of ending race-based admissions all too well is the University of Michigan. University President Santa Ono discussed that with Amna Nawaz. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/29/20234 minutes, 59 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court rejects legal theory that could have thrown 2024 election into disarray

The Supreme Court rejected a legal theory that state legislatures have almost unlimited power to decide the rules for federal elections and draw partisan congressional maps without interference from state courts. Trump allies raised the theory as part of an effort to reverse the 2020 election outcome. Geoff Bennett discussed the ruling with Neal Katyal, who argued the case before the court. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/27/20235 minutes, 14 seconds
Episode Artwork

Poll shows Americans' trust in Supreme Court remains low

This week marks the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade. It also marks critical days in the current Supreme Court term with major rulings expected on affirmative action, religious and LGBTQ+ rights. This as trust in the court remains low, according to a new PBS NewsHour/NPR/Marist poll. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/21/20234 minutes, 54 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court Justice Alito faces scrutiny over undisclosed luxury trip from GOP donor

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito took an undisclosed trip with billionaire donors, including hedge fund manager Paul Singer who later had business before the court. Coupled with previous reporting on Justice Thomas and megadonor Harlan Crow, it raises more ethical questions regarding the high court. Amna Nawaz discussed the latest with Josh Kaplan, one of the reporters who broke the story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/21/20236 minutes, 12 seconds
Episode Artwork

Major decisions expected from Supreme Court could reshape education and immigration policy

Major decisions expected from the Supreme Court in the coming days could reshape higher education and immigration policy. Geoff Bennett discussed the cases with NewsHour Supreme Court Analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/21/20236 minutes, 37 seconds
Episode Artwork

U.S. colleges divided over whether to end legacy admissions

In the coming weeks, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to issue its ruling on the use of race in college admissions. The case is focusing attention on other practices used in admissions that may need to change, including the children of alumni who often have preference and are often white and affluent. Geoff Bennett discussed legacy applicants with Evan Mandery for our series, Rethinking College. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/30/20235 minutes, 48 seconds
Episode Artwork

New book 'Shadow Docket' explores Supreme Court's growing influence on American law

A new book explores the Supreme Court's growing influence on the country through emergency actions on cases not on the official docket. For the past decade or so, the court has gotten involved in cases concerning big issues, often setting new principles without hearing arguments and without explaining their reasoning. John Yang discussed that with Stephen Vladeck, writer of "Shadow Docket." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/19/20236 minutes, 39 seconds
Episode Artwork

A look at primary elections and battles over abortion rights at the state level

There are political battles on the state level this week with a handful of primary races heating up and action on abortion laws. We check in with reporters Colin Campbell of North Carolina, Ryland Barton of Kentucky and Katie Meyer of Pennsylvania to help bring us up to speed. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/15/202311 minutes, 12 seconds
Episode Artwork

Payments made to Justice Thomas' wife raise more ethical questions about Supreme Court

For the fourth time in a month, a report raises questions about Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his rich friends. This time it's money going to Ginni Thomas, the justice's wife. According to the Washington Post, Leonard Leo directed pollster Kellyanne Conway to give Ginni Thomas "another $25k" and bill it to a nonprofit that Leo advised. John Yang discussed the report with Emma Brown. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/5/20235 minutes, 5 seconds
Episode Artwork

Senate probes Supreme Court ethics after questionable financial dealings by justices

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are spotlighting recent ethics concerns surrounding the highest court in the land. In a Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, senators debated how to address concerns involving Supreme Court justices, including whether they should apply ethical guidelines to the court themselves. Amna Nawaz discussed the hearing with University of Virginia law professor Amanda Frost. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/2/20238 minutes, 37 seconds
Episode Artwork

Breaking down the arguments as Supreme Court hears challenge to student loan relief plan

The fate of student debt relief promised for some 40 million Americans is in the hands of the Supreme Court. The justices heard arguments in high-stakes cases over the legality of President Biden's student loan forgiveness plan. John Yang discussed the arguments with NewsHour Supreme Court Analyst Marcia Coyle and Danielle Douglas-Gabriel of The Washington Post. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/28/202311 minutes, 13 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court says it hasn't identified Roe v. Wade draft opinion leaker

It was a political earthquake last May when the draft Supreme Court opinion overturning Roe v. Wade was leaked almost two months before the ruling was handed down. Chief Justice John Roberts launched an investigation but said the court has not been able to identify the leaker. Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle joined John Yang to discuss the report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/19/20235 minutes, 50 seconds
Episode Artwork

A look at the big issues that inspired new state laws taking effect in 2023

The start of this new year is bringing with it some new state laws. Thousands of bills were passed in state legislatures in 2022, but there are a few issues that stand out for which many states have decided to take action. Stephanie Sy has a look at some of the changes on the way. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/2/20236 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

Lawmakers pass landmark legislation aimed at protecting same-sex marriages

Congress gave final approval to a bill requiring all states to recognize same-sex and interracial marriages. It passed the House with nearly 40 Republicans joining Democrats in support. On the floor, arguments focused on protecting marriage rights against a conservative Supreme Court versus protecting religious freedoms. Kate Sosin, a reporter for The 19th, joins Lisa Desjardins to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/8/20225 minutes, 22 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court hears case pitting gay rights against religious freedom

The rights of same-sex couples are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court. Justices on Monday heard arguments in a case that wrestles with the blurred lines separating free speech, religious beliefs and discrimination. John Yang looks at the history of the case and speaks with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal to discuss the legal arguments on both sides of the debate. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/5/20227 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

A look ahead at two cases before the Supreme Court this week

The Supreme Court will hear two cases this week -- Creative v. Elenis and Moore v. Harper -- that have the potential to reshape anti-discrimination laws and the future of federal elections nationwide. John Yang joins Geoff Bennett to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/4/20225 minutes, 43 seconds
Episode Artwork

News Wrap: CIA director meets with Russian counterpart

In our news wrap Monday, CIA Director William Burns met with his Russian intelligence counterpart to convey the consequences if Moscow were to use a nuclear weapon in Ukraine, police arrested a Syrian woman suspected of carrying out the bombing in Istanbul that killed six and the U.S. Supreme Court will allow the Jan. 6 Committee to get phone records from the head of Arizona's Republican party. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/14/20224 minutes, 10 seconds
Episode Artwork

What's at stake in the Supreme Court affirmative action cases

On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in two cases seeking to overturn decades-old precedents that have allowed colleges to factor race into admissions decisions in order to create diverse student bodies. Opponents of the practice say that any decision based on race is wrong. Angel Perez, CEO of the National Association for College Admission Counseling, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/30/20225 minutes, 2 seconds
Episode Artwork

News Wrap: Supreme Court refuses Trump request in Mar-a-Lago documents case

In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court refused former President Trump's request for an independent arbiter to examine classified White House documents found at his Mar-a-Lago estate, the U.S. Labor Department turned in another tough report on inflation at the retail level and the U.S. and Saudi Arabia traded tough talk over sharp cuts in oil output. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/13/20225 minutes, 1 second
Episode Artwork

News Wrap: Biden reevaluating relations with Saudi Arabia after oil production cut

In our news wrap Tuesday, the White House confirmed President Biden is reevaluating relations with Saudi Arabia after OPEC cut oil production, the Supreme Court heard arguments on requirements that pork sold in California must meet animal cruelty standards regardless of its origin, prosecutors in Maryland dropped all charges against Adnan Syed whose murder case was chronicled in "Serial." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/11/20227 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

News Wrap: OPEC drastically cuts oil production to boost sagging prices

In our news wrap Wednesday, OPEC is drastically cutting oil production by two million barrels a day to boost sagging prices, Russian President Putin signed documents today to annex four regions of Ukraine as the Russian military is losing its grip on some of the areas and as many as 65 people were killed in an air strike in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/5/20225 minutes, 27 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court hears redistricting cases with major implications for future elections

The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a big case about the role of race in drawing congressional maps. The specific question at issue is whether Alabama's map violates what's left of the Voting Rights Act, which bars discriminatory practices and procedures. Lisa Desjardins explains what's at stake and John Yang discusses the oral arguments with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/4/202210 minutes, 8 seconds
Episode Artwork

Former Pence chief of staff Marc Short on tensions within Republican Party

Donald Trump's influence over Republicans still looms large, but the numerous ongoing investigations surrounding the former president are also raising serious questions for the GOP. Marc Short worked in the Trump White House and was later chief of staff to former Vice President Mike Pence. He joined Judy Woodruff to discuss the tensions within the party. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/4/20227 minutes, 44 seconds
Episode Artwork

University makes major push for diversity without considering race, gender in admissions

Past Supreme Court rulings have allowed colleges to consider race in their admissions processes and about 40 percent do. But the justices will soon revisit the issue and could overturn years of precedent. John Yang visited a university making a big push to improve diversity without the consideration of race or sex in the admissions process. It's part of our series, "Rethinking College." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/4/20227 minutes, 39 seconds
Episode Artwork

Supreme Court begins new term as public's trust hits historic low

The Supreme Court kicks off its first day of the term with fresh arguments and a new face. This as the public's trust in the institution hits a historic low. Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal and Josh Gerstein of Politico joined Judy Woodruff to discuss what's to come in the term. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/3/20229 minutes, 29 seconds
Episode Artwork

News Wrap: European Union inflation hits 10 percent, Cubans protest lingering power outage

In our news wrap Friday, the war in Ukraine sent natural gas prices and overall inflation soaring across the European Union, rare public protests have broken out in Cuba over lingering power outages from Hurricane Ian and Congress gave final approval to a short-term spending bill to avoid a partial shutdown this weekend. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/30/20224 minutes, 3 seconds
Episode Artwork

Capehart and Gerson on how immigration debate and abortion access will play into midterms

Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart and Washington Post opinion columnist Michael Gerson join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including controversies over immigration and how access to abortion is likely to play into the midterm elections. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/16/202212 minutes, 46 seconds
Episode Artwork

Conservative states continue to restrict abortion following overturn of Roe v. Wade

Conservative states continue to pass laws that restrict abortions. There are 14 states where bans are in effect and West Virginia will soon have a near-total abortion ban signed into law. Mary Ziegler, a law professor at the University of California, Davis and author of "Dollars for Life: the Anti-Abortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment," joined William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/15/20225 minutes, 33 seconds
Episode Artwork

Republican Sen. Rob Portman discusses his support for bill to protect same-sex marriage

The U.S. Senate is pushing off voting on a bill to protect same-sex marriage until after the midterms. The Respect for Marriage Act already passed the House with support from dozens of Republicans, but Senate negotiators could not get the ten GOP votes needed to pass the bill. Republican Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio, one of the key supporters of the plan, joined Lisa Desjardins to discuss the delay. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/15/20227 minutes, 34 seconds
Episode Artwork

Author Nina Totenberg on her decades-long friendship with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Nina Totenberg has been covering the Supreme Court for NPR since the 1970s. It was early in her reporting career that she formed what would become a decades-long friendship with the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Totenberg joined Judy Woodruff to discuss her new book, "Dinners with Ruth: A Memoir on the Power of Friendships." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/13/20227 minutes, 9 seconds
Episode Artwork

College students return to campus amid uncertainty over access to reproductive care

As the fall semester begins at colleges and universities across the country, students, parents and higher education health officials are grappling with how to navigate new restrictions after the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Amna Nawaz spoke with Bayliss Fiddiman of the National Women's Law Center about how the post-Roe landscape impacts students and their choices as they go back to school. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/5/20229 minutes, 42 seconds
Episode Artwork

South Carolina lawmaker explains why he supported abortion bill after initial opposition

South Carolina is the latest state to move toward a ban on abortions in the absence of Roe v. Wade. The state's House of Representatives passed a bill that allows abortions in just a few situations. Lisa Desjardins spoke with Rep. Neal Collins, a South Carolina lawmaker who decided to support the measure after initially opposing it. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/31/20227 minutes, 45 seconds
Episode Artwork

Florida judges rule teenage girl is not mature enough to have an abortion

A 16-year-old's request to have an abortion in the state of Florida has been denied by the courts. A state appeals court this week said she was not "sufficiently mature to decide whether to terminate her pregnancy." Jeri Beth Cohen, a retired Miami-Dade child welfare judge, joins John yang to discuss the details of the case and what it reveals about state abortion laws. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/19/20226 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

Faith leaders discuss how their religions approach the divisive issue of abortion

While many say the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade is the answer to decades of prayer, some faith leaders fear their religious rights will be infringed amid new abortion restrictions. Amna Nawaz spoke with three faith leaders about how their religions approach the issue of abortion. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/11/202212 minutes, 51 seconds
Episode Artwork

Kansas becomes first state to hold a vote on abortion rights after Roe reversal

After the Supreme Court struck down the national right to abortion access in June, the issue was returned to states, which have since implemented a patchwork of protections, restrictions or total bans. Abortion rights will now be on the ballot in at least five states this year. Ali Rogin reports from Kansas, the first state holding a vote since the end of Roe. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/1/20229 minutes, 22 seconds