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PBS NewsHour - Science Cover
PBS NewsHour - Science Profile

PBS NewsHour - Science

English, Sciences, 1 season, 129 episodes, 12 hours, 24 minutes
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The latest science stories and policy debates put in context (Updated periodically)
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How America's organ transplant system can be improved

Nearly 115,000 people are currently waiting for a new organ. But the shortage crisis is nothing new, as 5,600 people die each year waiting for an organ. Ali Rogin spoke with Barry Friedman, the former executive director of the AdventHealth Transplant Institute, about what can be done to revamp the nation's organ donation and transplant process. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/18/20246 minutes, 56 seconds
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Why young Americans are pushing for climate change to be taught in schools

As the planet warms and sea levels rise, eighty-five percent of Generation Z is concerned about climate change, according to a January Marist poll. In response, states like California, Connecticut and New Jersey are teaching kids about climate change in the classroom. Lauren Madden, a professor of elementary science education at the College of New Jersey, joins Laura Barrón-López to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/18/20246 minutes, 48 seconds
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Why scientists are concerned about the latest transmission of bird flu to cows

The outbreak of bird flu in the U.S. has alarmed researchers and prompted new efforts to track the virus that's already killed millions of birds from Europe to Antarctica. As H5N1 continues to jump into mammals, many scientists are concerned that we're not watching closely enough as this virus spreads. William Brangham reports. A warning: This story contains scenes of animals in distress. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/15/20247 minutes, 48 seconds
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News Wrap: Israel expands Rafah evacuation orders ahead of potential military operation

In our news wrap Saturday, Israel issued more evacuation orders forcing tens of thousands of Palestinians to flee Rafah, Russian forces took control of five villages outside Kharkiv amid a renewed offensive in Ukraine's northeast, flash floods in Afghanistan, Brazil and Kenya have killed hundreds of people, and unusually strong solar storms are producing brilliant northern lights on Earth. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/11/20243 minutes, 37 seconds
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The sun is super active right now. Here's how it can affect electronics on Earth

To most people, the sun is a steady, never-changing source of heat and light. But to scientists, it's a dynamic star, constantly in flux, sending energy out into space. Experts say the sun is now in its most active period in two decades, causing potential disruptions to radio and satellite communications. John Yang speaks with Bill Murtagh of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/28/20246 minutes, 49 seconds
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A look at NASA's new images of Io, Jupiter's 'tortured moon'

New research is revealing the secrets of Io, the mysterious volcanic moon of Jupiter. Four centuries after Galileo discovered Io in 1610, NASA sent a spacecraft called Juno on a five-year mission to Jupiter and its moons. Last week, NASA released animated artists' conceptions of Io based on data Juno collected during two flybys. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/28/20241 minute, 32 seconds
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'H Is for Hope' explores history of climate change and why there's hope for the future

Data shows that global levels of the three main heat-trapping greenhouse gases -- carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide -- all reached record highs in 2023 for the second year in the row, and experts say there's no end in sight. But a new book, 'H Is for Hope,' says there is reason for hope in the fight against climate change. William Brangham speaks with its author, Elizabeth Kolbert. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/27/20246 minutes, 26 seconds
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Millions of people witness rare total solar eclipse across North America

Millions of people on Monday watched a rare total eclipse cut across the U.S., Mexico and Canada, plunging some towns and cities into darkness for several minutes. In many other places it was a chance to view a partial eclipse. Miles O'Brien, who witnessed the spectacle from Dallas, has our report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/8/20248 minutes, 51 seconds
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Food waste is a global problem. Here are major drivers and what can be done about it

More than 2 billion people, about a third of the world's population, face food insecurity. At the same time, a recent UN report estimated that more than 1 billion metric tons of food went to waste in 2022, enough to give each person facing hunger around the world more than one meal a day. Ali Rogin speaks with Dana Gunders, executive director of ReFED, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/6/20245 minutes, 49 seconds
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Why air quality is getting worse in many places and how it puts human health at risk

While the U.S. has made great progress improving air quality in recent decades, air pollution is still a driver of many serious health conditions both domestically and globally. According to a new report, only seven countries met the World Health Organization's air quality guidelines for pollution in 2023. Glory Dolphin Hammes, North American CEO for IQAir, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/6/20245 minutes, 31 seconds
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Dozens of endangered sea turtles released off the coast of Georgia

On Jekyll Island off the Georgia coast, some sea turtles and people who care about their survival marked a small victory on Thursday. The Georgia Sea Turtle Center teamed up with volunteers from Northeast aquariums and conservation groups to move 33 Kemp's ridley sea turtles and one green sea turtle to warmer southeastern waters where they can thrive. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/6/20241 minute, 17 seconds
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What you need to know ahead of next week's total solar eclipse

We're less than three days away from the total solar eclipse that will be seen in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Monday's eclipse will cut across 13 states with more than 30 million people living in the path of totality while millions more are traveling to get a good look. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien and astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson have a viewer's guide on what you need to know. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/5/20247 minutes, 22 seconds
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Why Stumpy, D.C.'s beloved cherry tree, is seeing its final peak bloom this year

An annual, celebrated event took place this past week in Washington, D.C., and it didn't have anything to do with politics. It's known as peak bloom, the day 70 percent of blossoms are open on Washington's iconic cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. But for 158 of the trees, this year will be their last bloom. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/24/20242 minutes, 17 seconds
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The life and achievements of chemist Stephanie Kwolek, inventor of Kevlar

Kevlar is a fiber that's stronger than steel, and it's revolutionized everything from military and police body armor to sports equipment. For our "Hidden Histories" series this Women's History Month, we learn about Stephanie Kwolek, the pioneering researcher who invented Kevlar in 1965. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/17/20245 minutes, 47 seconds
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The plastic industry knowingly pushed recycling myth for decades, new report finds

The world produces an average of 430 million metric tons of plastic each year. The United States alone produces tens of millions of tons of plastic waste annually. Yet on average, only about 5 to 6 percent of plastic in the U.S. is recycled. NPR correspondent Michael Copley joins Ali Rogin to discuss a new report on the plastic industry's tactics to push recycling and avoid regulation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/16/20246 minutes, 33 seconds
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Conservationists track surge in great white sharks off the coast of Cape Cod

Environmental efforts to protect sharks in recent years have resulted in a huge increase in the great white shark population off the New England coast. It's a conservation success story, with potentially unnerving implications for beachgoers. Rhode Island PBS Weekly's David Wright reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/16/20245 minutes, 57 seconds
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Student Reporting Labs speaks with the U.S. surgeon general on youth mental health

The new season of PBS NewsHour's Student Reporting Labs podcast "On Our Minds" is underway. In this episode of the series that focuses on mental health challenges among young people, Bree Campbell and James Kim speak with U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/12/20243 minutes, 55 seconds
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Can science save the northern white rhino from extinction and even bring back the dodo?

The northern white rhinoceros is one of the world's biggest animals, and one of the most endangered. Only two are known to be alive, both female. But scientific breakthroughs are raising hopes for saving the rhino and perhaps even bringing other animals back from extinction. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/2/20247 minutes, 15 seconds
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A glimpse at some of the 100 new deep sea species discovered off the coast of Chile

Amid underwater mountains off the coast of Chile, scientists believe they've discovered 100 or so new species with the aid of a robot capable of diving more than 14,000 feet. Researchers say it demonstrates how the Chilean government's ocean protections are bolstering biodiversity and providing a model for other countries. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/2/20241 minute, 19 seconds
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A mind-boggling look at what might be the brightest object in the universe

According to a paper published this past week in the journal Nature Astronomy, scientists found what could be the brightest known object in the universe: a quasar produced by a massive and voracious black hole. It's estimated to be emitting light that's 500 trillion times more intense than Earth's sun. John Yang has more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/25/20241 minute, 10 seconds
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The potentially dangerous implications of an AI tool creating extremely realistic video

The realism of AI-generated video is one of the more remarkable, and potentially scary, developments we've seen so far with the technology. Oren Etzioni studies artificial intelligence and is the founder of truemedia.org, an organization that fights against AI-based disinformation. Etzioni joined William Brangham to discuss the future of AI. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/21/20246 minutes, 4 seconds
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How a new space race could be harming the Earth's atmosphere

According to data from the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs, 2023 was a record year for launching satellites, probes, landers and more into space. But scientists worry those plumes of exhaust trailing behind rockets could be scattering harmful pollutants into the pristine upper layers of the atmosphere. John Yang speaks with freelance science journalist Shannon Hall to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/17/20246 minutes, 13 seconds
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Conservationists take drastic measures to save coral reefs from climate change

Coral reef ecosystems support a quarter of all marine life on Earth, but they are slowly dying under the relentless stresses of overfishing, pollution, disease and climate change. As part of our ongoing series "Saving Species," William Brangham dives into the steps that scientists are taking to try to preserve the corals that remain. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/3/20248 minutes, 40 seconds
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14-year-old scientist Heman Bekele on his quest to fight skin cancer with soap

Heman Bekele spent the last year developing a bar of soap that could treat skin cancer. It was the winning entry at the annual 3M Young Scientist Challenge, considered one of the top science and engineering competitions for fifth through eighth graders. For our Weekend Spotlight, John Yang speaks with Bekele about his work. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/27/20245 minutes, 14 seconds
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News Wrap: Former Trump adviser Peter Navarro sentenced to prison for contempt of Congress

In our news wrap Thursday, former Trump adviser Peter Navarro was sentenced to four months in federal prison for contempt of Congress, the U.S. economy is showing more signs of surprising resilience thanks to robust consumer spending and the Hamas-run health ministry reported an Israeli strike killed 20 people waiting for food in Gaza. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/25/20245 minutes, 14 seconds
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Montanans fish for answers to mysterious decline in trout population

The number of brown and rainbow trout in some of Montana's best-known and most scenic fishing rivers is at historic lows. With experts at a loss to explain it, state agencies, fishermen, businesses and concerned citizens are all trying to find answers. Montana PBS's Joe Lesar reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/20/20246 minutes, 29 seconds
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Why you may be eating and drinking more microplastics than you thought

From takeout containers to water bottles, plastic seems unavoidable in our daily lives. Now, two new studies have found that we're eating and drinking more plastic than we might have realized. George Leonard, a co-author of one of the studies and chief scientist at Ocean Conservancy, joins John Yang to discuss the findings. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/13/20246 minutes, 25 seconds
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News Wrap: Blinken visits Qatar in diplomatic effort to contain Israel-Hamas war

In our news wrap Sunday, Secretary of State Blinken continued his urgent mission to the Middle East as the Israel-Hamas war enters its fourth month, Defense Secretary Austin took responsibility for delays in disclosing his hospitalization, major winter storms dropped snow in the Northeast and the West, and a rocket launch Monday aims to land the first U.S. craft on the moon in more than 50 years. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/7/20242 minutes, 39 seconds
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How the black-footed ferret is making a comeback from the brink of extinction

When President Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act into law 50 years ago, one of the first on the endangered list was the black-footed ferret, North America's rarest animal. Once thought to be extinct, they are making their way back thanks to the work of dedicated conservationists. John Yang reports on some of that work for our ongoing series, "Saving Species." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/10/20239 minutes, 46 seconds
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How studying arctic ground squirrels can help advance human brain health

When arctic ground squirrels hibernate for the winter, they can lower their body temperatures to freezing levels and stay dormant for up to eight months. Researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks are studying how these animals survive on the edge of life and the clues they may hold to treating injuries and disease in humans. Alaska Public Media's Kavitha George reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/3/20234 minutes, 4 seconds
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News Wrap: U.S. at COP28 commits to tripling renewable energy production by 2030

In our news wrap Saturday, Vice President Harris pledged $3 billion at COP28 to a global fund to help poorer nations adapt to climate change, a protestor is in critical condition after setting themself on fire outside the Israeli consulate in Atlanta, and record amounts of snow has dropped on much of Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic and Switzerland. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/2/20231 minute, 47 seconds
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What to know about the COP28 deal and new U.S. rules to cut methane emissions

At COP28 on Saturday, 50 oil and gas companies -- including industry giants ExxonMobil, Shell and BP -- pledged to reduce methane emissions to "near zero" by 2030. At the same time, the Biden administration announced new rules to enforce major elements of the agreement in the U.S. Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund, joins John Yang to discuss the importance of this deal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
12/2/20237 minutes, 48 seconds
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News Wrap: SpaceX's Starship rocket test launch ends with explosions

In our news wrap Saturday, a pair of explosions destroyed the booster rocket and spacecraft of SpaceX's biggest rocket during a test launch in Texas, and Comcast joined the list of advertisers stepping away from Elon Musk's social media platform X, formerly known as Twitter, over concerns about antisemetic content. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/19/20231 minute, 17 seconds
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Historically low water levels on the Mississippi River cause shipping woes

The Mississippi River is a superhighway for American agricultural products, but a warm fall and extreme drought conditions have contributed to its water levels dropping to record lows. Special correspondent Megan Thompson reports from Missouri on what conditions along this vital commercial route mean for farmers who rely on it to get their crops to market. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/12/20238 minutes, 5 seconds
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The story of John Herrington, the 1st Native American in space

For Native American Heritage Month, as part of our "Hidden Histories" series, we bring you the story of John Herrington, a decorated naval officer and trailblazing astronaut. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
11/12/20233 minutes, 13 seconds
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Winner of Nobel Prize in medicine discusses how her work helped fight COVID-19

This week's Nobel Prize announcements are highlighting groundbreaking work once again in the sciences and medicine. William Brangham has a conversation with one of the year's winners in medicine, whose work led to a profound change in tackling the pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
10/5/20236 minutes, 54 seconds
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Why some areas of cities like Austin get way hotter than others during summer

Cities across the U.S. broke thousands of heat records this summer, but in many of them, some areas were hotter than others. These areas are known as urban heat islands, which can mean higher energy bills and unsafe conditions for residents. Blair Waltman-Alexin of Austin PBS, in partnership with Austin Vida, reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/30/20235 minutes, 48 seconds
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What scientists hope to learn from asteroid sample returned to Earth on NASA spacecraft

You may have heard about a NASA probe that successfully brought some samples from a deep-space asteroid back to Earth. It took four billion miles to get them, but researchers believe it will be worth it. You also may be wondering just why scientists want these samples from what's essentially a huge rock flying through space. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien explains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/25/20237 minutes, 53 seconds
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News Wrap: GOP hardliner blasts McCarthy's plan to avoid government shutdown

In our news wrap Sunday, House negotiations to avoid a government shutdown enter their final week, France is ending its military presence in Niger, talks continued in the auto workers and Hollywood strikes, NASA retrieved its first asteroid samples from space, Ethiopian Tigist Assefa broke the women's world record at the Berlin Marathon, and Megan Rapinoe is playing her final game with the USWNT. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/24/20233 minutes, 8 seconds
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How light pollution is making it increasingly difficult to see the stars

Astronomers around the world are calling for international agreements to limit the spread of satellite constellations in space, with warnings that light pollution at night from the satellites damages vital scientific work. In Britain, the government is also being urged to impose new planning regulations to reduce light pollution to stop the loss of the nation's dark skies. Malcolm Brabant reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/20/20236 minutes, 38 seconds
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'Ghost gear' piles up in the Gulf of Maine amid plastic onslaught on oceans

Abandoned fishing gear, often called "ghost gear," is breaking down in our oceans and adding to the problems brought by plastics and microplastics. But there was a recent effort to get the United Nations to enforce tougher regulations, and a coalition announced new funding to remove some debris in the Gulf of Maine. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/19/20238 minutes, 15 seconds
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How climate change is making fall foliage less colorful

Next Saturday, the autumn equinox will mark the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere. For some, though, the real start of fall is when the leaves change color. But scientists say climate change is affecting both the timing and intensity of fall foliage. John Yang speaks with Bill Keeton, a professor of forest ecology at the University of Vermont, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/17/20236 minutes, 37 seconds
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What Africa's climate summit means for investment in the continent's future

Africa is the continent most vulnerable to climate change, despite being responsible for just 2 to 3 percent of global carbon emissions and receiving only 3 percent of funding committed to climate mitigation and adaptation. Caroline Kimeu, The Guardian's East Africa global development correspondent, joins Ali Rogin to discuss Africa's first climate summit held this week in Kenya and its outcomes. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/9/20235 minutes, 40 seconds
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New report sheds light on environmental, financial costs of invasive species

Invasive species harm ecosystems around the world and cost the global economy $423 billion a year, according to a new report backed by the UN. A number of researchers believe that estimate may be just the tip of the iceberg. William Brangham speaks with one of the study's authors, Laura Meyerson of the University of Rhode Island, about the ways invasive species affect us. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/9/20236 minutes, 39 seconds
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What's behind the alarming rise in near-collisions of commercial airplanes

There has been an alarming number of near-miss collisions between airplanes according to an investigation by The New York Times. In a review of FAA reports and a NASA database, the Times found there were at least 46 close calls involving commercial flights in July and runway incursions are 25 percent higher than a decade ago. Geoff Bennett discussed more with aviation correspondent Miles O'Brien. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
9/6/20235 minutes, 58 seconds
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Japan's problems developing stable energy sources 12 years after nuclear meltdown

While the world is focusing on the radioactive water released from the Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan, the country is grappling with other big questions about its use of nuclear energy. Japan dramatically changed its attitudes after Fukushima melted down in 2011. But since then, it's faced its share of problems with other energy sources and prices. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/31/20237 minutes, 56 seconds
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News Wrap: U.S. Marine Corps aircraft crashes in Australia, killing 3

In our news wrap Saturday, three U.S. Marines died in an aircraft crash in Australia, Florida is bracing for Tropical Storm Idalia heading toward the state, Russia confirmed that Yevgeny Prigozhin died in Wednesday's plane crash outside Moscow, and hundreds of volunteers and researchers converged in Scotland to search for signs of the mythical Loch Ness Monster. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/27/20231 minute, 58 seconds
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How climate change is disrupting the global food supply

The effects of climate change have been hard to miss across North America and Europe this summer: record heat, wildfires and warming oceans. There are also other, less obvious consequences that affect both the quantity and quality of food crops. Climate change scientist Jonas Jägermeyr joins John Yang to explain the relationship between climate change and global food supply. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/27/20236 minutes, 13 seconds
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News Wrap: Luis Rubiales suspended as FIFA investigates his World Cup conduct

In our news wrap Saturday, FIFA suspended Spain's soccer federation head Luis Rubiales for 90 days while it investigates his conduct at the Women's World Cup final, a new crew of astronauts launched for the International Space Station, thousands gathered at the Lincoln Memorial to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the March on Washington, and Bob Barker has died at the age of 99. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/26/20232 minutes, 13 seconds
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The significance of India's successful landing on the moon's south pole

It was a historic day for India as it became the fourth country to land on the moon. It comes after a failed attempt in 2019 and just days behind a failed Russian lunar landing. Prime Minister Modi watched alongside the team at the Indian Space Research Organization as the Chandrayaan-3 touched down in the moon's south polar region. Amna Nawaz and Miles O'Brien discussed the monumental moment. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/23/20236 minutes, 16 seconds
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A look at the plan to release Fukushima's treated radioactive water into the sea

Japan is expected to release treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant as soon as Thursday. The government and the utility operating the facility say it is safe and the release is being closely monitored, but nearby countries oppose the move. It's also a concern for Japanese fishermen. Miles O'Brien has his latest report in a series of stories with access to Fukushima. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/23/20238 minutes, 36 seconds
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Inside the Fukushima nuclear plant 12 years after catastrophic meltdown

Japan will soon begin the process of releasing radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean from the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant. As final preparations are being made, Science Correspondent Miles O'Brien has a rare look inside the facility. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/16/20238 minutes, 30 seconds
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News Wrap: Hawaii governor surveys Maui fire damage, warns death toll will grow

In our news wrap Sunday, the Maui wildfire is now the deadliest in the U.S. in more than a century as search efforts continue and the death toll keeps rising, at least 21 people died in a mudslide and flash flood in western China, Russian shelling killed 7 people in Ukraine's southern Kherson region, and the annual Perseids meteor shower peaked overnight. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/13/20232 minutes, 52 seconds
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New documentary explores mesmerizing, dangerous world of freediving

The extreme sport of freediving is growing in popularity and interest. A new Netflix documentary called "The Deepest Breath" goes inside the high-risk sport, following freedivers Alessia Zecchini and Stephen Keenan. Director Laura McGann joins John Yang to discuss the film. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/12/20238 minutes, 4 seconds
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Antarctic sea ice at record lows as global temperatures rise

As temperature records fall all over the planet this summer, scientists are also increasingly concerned about what's happening to the sea ice around Antarctica. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
8/10/20235 minutes, 8 seconds
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How urban heat islands make the impacts of excessive heat worse

Living in certain parts of a city can make the impacts of extreme heat worse. That's because of a phenomenon called the urban heat island effect. A recent report by the research group Climate Central showed that more than 40 million Americans live in these hot spots. William Brangham discussed what this means for those residents with Michael Mendez of the University of California, Irvine. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/27/20236 minutes, 12 seconds
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Lobster industry says regulations to save right whales will push them out of business

Right whales are a majestic sight to behold off the eastern coast of North America, but they are endangered and their numbers are shrinking. Many conservationists say fishing gear that causes entanglements is a big part of the problem. But lobster harvesters fear they may be driven out of business by pressure to change their practices even further. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/27/20237 minutes, 34 seconds
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News Wrap: Earth sees hottest July ever recorded in human history

In our news wrap Saturday, scientists say the first two weeks of July were the planet's hottest on human record as intense heat waves grip places around the globe, Ukraine says its drones hit an ammunition depot in Crimea after days of deadly Russian strikes on Ukrainian port cities, and the U.S. women's soccer team beat Vietnam 3-0 in its first game of the 2023 World Cup. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/22/20232 minutes, 13 seconds
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Shark tracking efforts ramped up after wave of encounters off Northeastern coast

After a recent spate of shark encounters, New York State is ramping up efforts to monitor the apex predator off the coast of Long Island. It comes as experts in Massachusetts are raising awareness about the surging population of great white sharks off Cape Cod. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/21/20236 minutes, 34 seconds
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Deadly flooding hits Northeast as heat wave tightens grip on western and southern U.S.

The nation remains at the mercy of nature, but nature is showing no mercy with 100 degree heat stretching from the far West across the Deep South. It comes as a weekend deluge in the Northeast washed out roads and claimed lives. Geoff Bennett discussed the extreme heat in California with Wade Crowfoot, the secretary of the state's natural resources agency. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/17/20238 minutes, 7 seconds
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James Webb Space Telescope prompts scientists to rethink understanding of the universe

Wednesday marks a year since the world first started seeing spectacular images of the cosmos that were captured by the powerful James Webb Space Telescope. But getting those images is only part of the important work being done by the $10 billion telescope. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/12/20237 minutes, 15 seconds
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Historic storm brings catastrophic flooding to Vermont with more rain expected this week

In New England, a storm for the ages has ravaged Vermont. There've been no reported deaths or injuries, but parts of the state capital are under water and property damage could reach the tens of millions of dollars. Geoff Bennett reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/11/20232 minutes, 32 seconds
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Why extreme heat is more dangerous than many realize

Tens of millions of people living in the Southwest are dealing with what the National Weather Service says it's one of the longest heat waves in modern record. That extreme heat is even more dangerous than some might realize. Geoff Bennett discussed that with Jeff Goodell, a climate journalist and author of "The Heat Will Kill You First: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/11/20236 minutes, 40 seconds
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Eastern U.S. hit with flooding as heat wave drags on in West and South

Extreme weather is making an impact from one end of the country to the other. Ferocious heat and heavy rains persisted Monday and millions of Americans were left to cope and clean up. Stephanie Sy reports on flooding in the eastern U.S. and discusses the streak of 110-plus-degree days in Phoenix with David Hondula. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/10/20237 minutes, 54 seconds
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News Wrap: Russian shelling takes more Ukrainian lives on 500th day of war

In our news wrap Saturday, Ukraine marked 500 days since the start of Russia's invasion, Sudanese officials say at least 22 people died in an airstrike in Omdurman, a small business jet crash in Southern California killed at least 6 people, and more dangerous temperatures are forecast for much of the South and Southwest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/8/20232 minutes, 43 seconds
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The potential effect of an Affordable Care Act legal fight on HIV prevention

The latest legal battle over the Affordable Care Act centers on its mandate that private insurers cover preventive services, including drugs that prevent HIV infection. The retail price of those drugs can be as much as $6,000 for a 90-day supply, putting it out of reach for many who would benefit from it. The 19th News' health reporter Shefali Luthra joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/8/20235 minutes, 57 seconds
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Record-breaking global temperature, raging wildfires highlight effects of climate change

It has been a week of record-breaking heat around the world. The average global temperature on Wednesday hit 62.9 degrees Fahrenheit, matching the record-high set just on Tuesday. The grim milestones are the latest in a series of climate change driven extremes. Amna Nawaz discussed these events and what to take from them with Mike Flannigan of Thompson Rivers University. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/6/20235 minutes, 56 seconds
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Conservationists fight to save Northern Atlantic right whales from extinction

It's estimated there are fewer than 350 North Atlantic right whales remaining. They are dying faster than they can produce and it's largely due to human causes. With so few left, experts are closely monitoring for new offspring and working to keep the whale from extinction. Science Correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/6/20237 minutes, 21 seconds
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Why rising interactions between bats and humans pose major global health risks

The search for the origin of COVID-19 has highlighted the risks of viruses transmitted by certain species of bats. In the wild, they can incubate and spread diseases to other animals and humans. Dr. Neil Vora, a physician with Conservation International, joins Ali Rogin to discuss the global health concerns posed by an increasing number of interactions between humans and bats. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
7/1/20237 minutes, 32 seconds
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Gravitational wave discovery leads to greater understanding of the fabric of our universe

Albert Einstein theorized that as heavy objects move through space and time, they create ripple effects in the fabric of our universe. Now an international team of scientists have detected new evidence of that. Researchers found new signs of gravitational waves that are affected by huge movements such as the collision of black holes. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien breaks it down. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/29/20235 minutes, 42 seconds
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News Wrap: Extreme heat wave blankets Texas, southern states

In our news wrap Sunday, more than 40 million people are expected to experience dangerous heat in the southern U.S., and the Coast Guard announced that it ended search and rescue operations for the Titan submersible and is shifting its priority to recovering the vessel's remnants from the ocean floor. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/25/20231 minute, 24 seconds
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Search for missing Titanic sub reaches tragic end with all 5 on board dead

The U.S. Coast Guard confirmed Thursday the missing submersible in the North Atlantic Ocean was destroyed in a "catastrophic implosion." Its debris was found on the ocean floor near the Titanic and all five people aboard were killed. William Brangham discussed the accident and what it could mean going forward with Jules Jaffe of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/22/20238 minutes, 7 seconds
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More ships, equipment joining search for missing sub after reports of banging noises

The search for the missing submersible in the North Atlantic Ocean intensified Wednesday. The day began with a surprise, reports of banging noises detected by sonar. The U.S. Coast Guard said it is still treating the mission as a search and rescue operation even as the supply of oxygen is likely dwindling for the five people aboard. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/21/20234 minutes, 32 seconds
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Submersible visiting Titanic wreckage with five people onboard reported missing

Search operations are underway for a submersible that carries paying tourists to view the wreckage of the Titanic. The five-person craft is owned by OceanGate Expeditions and was reported overdue Sunday. It disappeared near where the Titanic went down in 1912 after hitting an iceberg. Geoff Bennett discussed the search effort with Kristin Romey of National Geographic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/19/20234 minutes, 22 seconds
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Scientists issue increasingly dire warnings as ocean surface temperatures spike

The ocean is rapidly heating up, hitting record-breaking levels. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported that ocean surface temperatures spiked in April and May to the highest levels recorded since the 1950s. All this could have dangerous consequences for aquatic life, hurricane activity and global weather patterns. Amna Nawaz discussed what's happening with Kevin Trenberth. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/15/20236 minutes, 36 seconds
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Group of orcas attack and sink vessels off Iberian Peninsula

A small group of orcas is causing a lot of damage to boats off the Iberian Peninsula. Last month, killer whales rammed a boat continuously for over an hour, managing to remove the rudder. In another incident, three orcas repeatedly struck a yacht causing it to sink. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/14/20234 minutes, 27 seconds
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2 out of 3 North American bird species face extinction. Here's how we can save them

As the climate crisis worsens, so does pressure on wildlife. The number of birds in North America has declined by 3 billion in the last 50 years. Brooke Bateman, director of climate science at the National Audubon Society, joins Ali Rogin to discuss why and what can be done to preserve and renew the populations of bird species at risk of extinction. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/11/20237 minutes, 11 seconds
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News Wrap: Trump lashes out at Justice Department at GOP convention in Georgia

In our news wrap Saturday, Trump spoke on the campaign trail a day after his federal indictment was unsealed, Ted Kaczynski died in federal prison, Ukrainian President Zelenskyy said his country's counteroffensive against Russia has begun, skies over the East Coast have started clearing of smoke from Canada's wildfires, and four children were found alive 40 days after a plane crash in the Amazon. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/10/20234 minutes, 59 seconds
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Millions of Americans warned to stay inside as wildfire smoke blankets eastern states

A heavy pall of polluted air still blankets much of the eastern U.S and it may not dissipate for days as fires in Canada send vast curtains of smoke south. The bad air has officials warning that breathing it can be hazardous to your health. It's also scrambling schedules from airports to schools to the White House. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/8/20234 minutes, 16 seconds
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Canadian wildfires blanket eastern U.S. with smoke, causing poor air quality for millions

Hundreds of wildfires continue to burn across Canada and many of them are out of control. The smoke is putting millions of Americans under air quality alerts, prompting warnings to stay indoors to avoid exposure to pollution. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/7/20234 minutes, 6 seconds
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Scientist lives underwater for weeks to raise ocean awareness

Dr. Joe Dituri, also known as Dr. Deep-Sea, has been living underwater for more than 75 days, breaking previous records and aiming to reach 100. Dr. Dituri fills his days with science and outreach in an effort to raise awareness about the value of the oceans. Nicole Ellis reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
6/5/20235 minutes, 19 seconds
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The UN wants to drastically reduce plastic pollution by 2040. Here's how

As plastic waste piles up in the world's landfills, sewer systems and oceans, the United Nations has set a goal to reduce plastic pollution by 80 percent by the year 2040. Inger Andersen, head of the United Nations Environment Programme, joins William Brangham to discuss the upcoming negotiations over how to realize this goal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/27/20237 minutes, 28 seconds
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Supreme Court decision weakens EPA authority, scales back scope of Clean Water Act

The Supreme Court has again weakened the authority of the Environmental Protection Agency. The case involved the EPA blocking an Idaho couple from building a house near a lake on their property, saying the construction would pollute water protected by the Clean Water Act. William Brangham discussed the case with Coral Davenport. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/25/20235 minutes, 24 seconds
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What the Colorado River water use agreement will mean for western states

The Biden administration reached a landmark deal with several western states to stave off an immediate crisis with the Colorado River and the communities that are dependent on it. Under the agreement, California, Arizona and Nevada will take less water from the drought-stricken river in exchange for federal funding for cities, tribes and water districts. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/22/20235 minutes, 12 seconds
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The promises and potential pitfalls of artificial intelligence in medicine

AI is finding its place in all sorts of scientific fields, and health care is no exception. Programs are learning to answer patients' medical questions and diagnose illnesses, but there are problems to be worked out. Dr. Isaac Kohane, editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine AI and chair of Harvard's department of biomedical informatics, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/20/20236 minutes, 37 seconds
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Native communities in Louisiana fight to save their land from rising seas

In Louisiana, coastal erosion is claiming an average amount of land equivalent to a football field every hour. Some Native American communities in the southeastern part of the state are the hardest hit. Special correspondent Megan Thompson brings us the story of three Indigenous communities fighting to save their tribal lands. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/20/20238 minutes, 18 seconds
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Why artificial intelligence developers say regulation is needed to keep AI in check

Artificial intelligence was a focus on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Many believe AI could revolutionize, and perhaps upend, considerable aspects of our lives. At a Senate hearing, some said AI could be as momentous as the industrial revolution and others warned it's akin to developing the atomic bomb. William Brangham discussed that with Gary Marcus, who was one of those who testified before the Senate. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/16/202310 minutes, 56 seconds
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Why the northern lights are being seen further south

Parts of the United States have recently been getting glimpses of the northern lights. John Yang and science correspondent Miles O'Brien discussed why this spectacle in the skies is now being seen further south. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/16/20232 minutes, 37 seconds
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American Museum of Natural History opens stunning new expansion

At a time when the public teaching of science is again being fought over, the largest museum of natural history in the U.S. just extended its reach. Jeffrey Brown got a look inside the American Museum of Natural History's stunning new expansion in New York for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/15/20237 minutes, 23 seconds
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A closer look at the novel celestial events thrilling scientists this month

It's been an exciting time for astronomers, astrophysicists and other scientists who specialize in deciphering the far reaches of space. Since the beginning of May, observations of some never-before-seen celestial events have been reported in science journals. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien joins John Yang to explain the latest findings. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/14/20236 minutes, 6 seconds
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Remembering Kalpana Chawla, the first Indian American to go to space

This Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we're highlighting people whose contributions have often been overlooked. Tonight, we explore the legacy of Kalpana Chawla, the first American of Indian descent to travel to space, who gave her life in the pursuit of research, science and exploration. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/14/20232 minutes, 23 seconds
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What's behind a severe decline in Florida's citrus harvest

Oranges have long been synonymous with Florida, as a key element of the state's economy. But this year, Florida projects the worst citrus harvest since the Great Depression, threatening a way of life for many. William Brangham reports on what's driving the decline and who is affected. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/13/20236 minutes, 44 seconds
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Proposed EPA rules would force power plants to slash carbon emissions

The Environmental Protection Agency laid out its latest move to cut the greenhouse gasses that are driving climate change, unveiling a sweeping new set of guidelines for the power plants that generate America's electricity. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/11/20235 minutes, 18 seconds
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'Godfather of AI' discusses dangers the developing technologies pose to society

This has been a week where concerns over the rapidly expanding use of artificial intelligence resonated loudly in Washington and around the world. Geoffrey Hinton, one of the leading voices in the field of AI, announced he was quitting Google over his worries about what AI could eventually lead to if unchecked. Hinton discussed those concerns with Geoff Bennett. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/5/20238 minutes, 27 seconds
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Communities along Mississippi River struggle with highest floodwaters seen in decades

While flooding along the Mississippi River happens every year, water levels are surging this year thanks to record snow across the Midwest that's been followed by a sudden thaw. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
5/2/20233 minutes, 36 seconds
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Demand for electric vehicles growing, but can charging network keep up?

Demand for electric vehicles is growing and a new report forecasts that one out of every five vehicles sold worldwide this year will be electric. But charging those vehicles and getting the power you need when you want it can be more complicated. Science Correspondent Miles O'Brien found that out for himself on a road trip in California. He reports in conjunction with Nova's "Chasing Carbon Zero." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/26/20239 minutes, 20 seconds
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How artificial intelligence is being used to create 'deepfakes' online

As technology grows more sophisticated, so does the potential for deception. Last month, images went viral that purported to show police arresting Donald Trump and the former president in an orange prisoner's jumpsuit -- but they were fakes. Jack Stubbs, vice president of intelligence at Graphika, a research firm that studies online disinformation, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/23/20237 minutes, 45 seconds
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Tensions rise as nations race for valuable resources in the Arctic

New research shows that climate change is causing the Earth's ice sheets to shrink much faster than previously thought -- the annual rate of sea ice loss has more than tripled since the 1990s. In the Arctic, melting ice is raising geopolitical tensions, kickstarting a global race for potentially priceless minerals, oil deposits and shipping routes. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/23/20236 minutes, 46 seconds
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What it takes to save some of the world's most threatened plant species

According to scientists, 80 percent of the Earth's living species are unknown to humans. Even as more are identified, more are disappearing -- and sometimes, we don't know what's being lost until it's too late. This Earth Day, we begin our series "Saving Species" with a look at the world of plants. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/22/20238 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ice sheets in Greenland, Antarctica melting faster than previously thought, research shows

New research shows that the massive ice sheets at the top and bottom of our planet are shrinking much faster than previously thought. The international study compiled satellite measurements over time and depict what one researcher described as a "devastating trajectory." William Brangham discussed the implications of the analysis with Twila Moon of the National Snow and Ice Data Center. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/20/20235 minutes, 31 seconds
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Starship test flight ends with explosion, Musk says SpaceX 'learned a lot' for next launch

Thursday, Elon Musk's SpaceX launched the first test flight of Starship, its 400-foot rocket meant to one day send people to the moon, and eventually, Mars. The most powerful rocket ever built blasted off from its launch base in Texas but exploded roughly four minutes into its flight. Musk says the next launch attempt will be in a few months. Science Correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/20/20236 minutes, 8 seconds
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A Brief But Spectacular take on the future of CRISPR

Jennifer Doudna is a Nobel laureate in chemistry and professor of biochemistry, biophysics and structural biology at the University of California, Berkeley. She has been a pioneer in CRISPR gene editing and continues to revolutionize research in her field. Doudna shares her Brief But Spectacular take on the future of CRISPR. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/17/20233 minutes, 27 seconds
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Young Pacific Islanders take industrialized world to court over climate change

For the first time, the UN's International Court of Justice has been tasked with determining what countries are obligated to do to fight climate change. William Brangham reports on the young people who were instrumental in bringing this issue to the world's top court. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/13/20236 minutes, 23 seconds
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EPA proposes strict limits on tailpipe emissions to speed up electric vehicle transition

The Biden administration rolled out its most aggressive effort yet to combat climate change with tougher emissions limits for cars and trucks. But several challenges remain, including the cost of electric cars, the batteries and how to charge them on the road. William Brangham reports on the proposed regulations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/12/20236 minutes, 16 seconds
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Driven by necessity, Bangladesh develops innovations to fight climate change

The low-lying nation of Bangladesh suffers disproportionately from climate change, despite producing just 0.5 percent of the world's carbon emissions. It's also creating innovative ways to predict and protect against climate-driven disasters, and discovering new ways to build resilience using natural resources. NPR international correspondent Lauren Frayer joins Ali Rogin to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/9/20236 minutes, 32 seconds
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California's reservoirs refill after historic storms, but snowmelt poses risks

After a barrage of severe winter storms, 12 of California's 17 major reservoirs have been replenished -- a silver lining for a state suffering from brutal drought. But officials also warn that when the enormous snowpack atop the Sierra Nevada starts to melt, the runoff could cause a new threat to those below. Los Angeles Times reporter Hayley Smith joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/8/20235 minutes, 17 seconds
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The potential dangers as artificial intelligence grows more sophisticated and popular

Over the past few months, artificial intelligence has managed to create award-winning art, pass the bar exam and even diagnose illnesses better than some doctors. But as AI grows more sophisticated and popular, the voices warning against the potential dangers are growing louder. Geoff Bennett discussed the concerns with Seth Dorbin of the Responsible AI Institute. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/5/20236 minutes, 18 seconds
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Global Seed Vault becomes more important than ever as climate change threatens crops

When you think of fresh produce and fields of grain, the Arctic may not spring to mind. But just 800 miles from the North Pole, the Global Seed Vault holds emergency stockpiles of most of the world's crops. It provides scientists with the tools they need to breed plants able to cope with a changing world. Special correspondent John Bevir visited the vault to learn more about the future of food. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/4/20237 minutes, 14 seconds
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Deadly storms, tornadoes lay waste to large areas of South and Midwest

A massive line of severe weather wreaked havoc from the Deep South to the Great Lakes. An estimated 85 million people were in the path of the storms, and at least 21 people were killed. We hear from residents affected by the tornadoes, and John Yang speaks with atmospheric scientist Walker Ashley for more on the storms. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
4/1/20237 minutes, 27 seconds
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What we know about toxic 'forever chemicals' and how to reduce our exposure

A class of toxic chemicals known as PFAS has made its way into food, soil, water and even most people's blood in America. In March, the EPA proposed the first regulatory standard limiting the quantity of PFAS in drinking water. Erin Bell, an environmental epidemiologist at the State University of New York at Albany, joins Ali Rogin to discuss these "forever chemicals" and our exposure to them. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/26/20236 minutes, 22 seconds
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How amateur fossil finds translate into scientific discovery

For fossil hunters, the thrill is often in the hunt. For 9-year-old Molly Sampson, her prehistoric shark tooth discovery along a Maryland beach is considered the find of a lifetime. And the dinosaur footprint English archaeologist Marie Woods spotted has revealed a new dinosaur behavior. Ali Rogin details these recent fossil finds that are helping advance scientific knowledge. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/25/20235 minutes, 45 seconds
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UN scientists warn drastic steps needed to prevent climate change catastrophe

Scientists warned that human-induced climate change is warming the planet to the point where it is causing irreversible damage in some parts of the world. The report was released by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Climate Scientist Katharine Hayhoe of The Nature Conservancy joined Amna Nawaz to look at what can be done to change the direction the planet is headed. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/20/20237 minutes
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A 5,000-mile-long mass of seaweed is coming to shore. Here's what will happen

The Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt, a 5,000-mile-long belt of seaweed weighing more than 11 million tons, is threatening to wreak havoc in the coastal waters and beaches of the Atlantic Ocean. It's so big that it can be seen from space, spanning the tropical Atlantic from West Africa to the Caribbean. Oceanographer Ajit Subramaniam joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/19/20235 minutes, 45 seconds
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The career of Chien-Shiung Wu, the 'First Lady of Physics'

This Women's History Month, we're highlighting stories of women whose contributions have often been overlooked. Tonight, we look at the career of Chien-Shiung Wu, a 20th-century physicist who made indelible changes to her field. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/19/20232 minutes, 49 seconds
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After near-collisions on airport runways, FAA calls for safety review

U.S. airports have seen an uptick in near-collisions involving commercial planes. The problem prompted the FAA to call for a safety summit, launching a review of standards and procedures to prevent catastrophe. Geoff Bennett reports on the close calls and discusses the possible factors with aviation correspondent Miles O'Brien. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/17/20236 minutes, 48 seconds
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Historic deal to protect ocean biodiversity reached at UN conference

Delegates at the United Nations have agreed on a historic international treaty to protect biodiversity on the high seas, a deal years in the making. The agreement is critical to reaching another U.N. goal: protecting 30 percent of the ocean by 2030. Liz Karan with the Pew Charitable Trusts joins John Yang to discuss the negotiations. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/5/20236 minutes, 46 seconds
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The story of Ellen Ochoa, the first Hispanic woman in space

This Women's History Month, we're highlighting stories of women whose accomplishments have often not received widespread attention. Today, we learn about NASA astronaut Ellen Ochoa, who became the first Hispanic woman to go to space in 1993. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/5/20231 minute, 22 seconds
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Aurora borealis puts on a dazzling display in unusual places

Thanks to some unusual sunspot activity, the northern lights are putting on a show much farther south than usual, giving more people chances to catch a glimpse. From Norway to Scotland to Alaska, we look at some spectacular sights captured recently in the night skies. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/4/20231 minute, 14 seconds
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New FDA guidelines on milk spark disagreements between farmers and plant-based companies

It's almost official. Soy, almond and other plant-based drinks that call themselves milk can keep using that name, at least according to new draft guidelines released by the FDA last week. Stephanie Sy explores the debate. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/2/20235 minutes, 21 seconds
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Is climate change accelerating the risk of disease spreading from animals to humans?

Scientists researching the aftermath of California wildfires say they are finding evidence that climate change is accelerating the risk of disease spreading from animals to humans. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
3/1/20237 minutes, 38 seconds
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The current hurdles to putting more electric vehicles on the road

In last week's State of the Union, President Biden reaffirmed his administration's commitment to get more electric vehicles in American driveways. It's estimated that half of all new vehicle sales will be EVs by 2030, but the industry still faces infrastructure hurdles, policy challenges and public misconceptions. Forbes senior transportation editor Alan Ohnsman joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/12/20236 minutes, 38 seconds
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Bird expert and poet Drew Lanham on how he's inspired by the natural world

Drew Lanham refers to himself as a 'rare bird.' The ornithologist, naturalist and writer says he believes conservation efforts must be a blending of rigorous science and evocative art. Lanham is among the new class of MacArthur Fellows, an honor often called 'The Genius Award.' Jeffrey Brown traveled to South Carolina to speak with Lanham for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/8/20237 minutes, 38 seconds
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Security expert warns of AI tools' potential threat to democracy

Artificial intelligence has the potential to dramatically alter how we gather information, communicate and work. Experts are also raising questions about how it will affect governance and what it will mean for the future of our democracy. Bruce Schneier, a fellow at Harvard University's Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/4/20236 minutes, 8 seconds
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Western states that rely on Colorado River fail to reach agreement on cutting consumption

This was an important week in the battle out west over water use. Seven states along the Colorado River basin were supposed to reach a collective agreement on how to use less water from an ever-shrinking river, but they failed to do so. William Brangham spoke with Rhett Larson for our series on water issues, Tipping Point. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/3/20235 minutes, 33 seconds
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20 years later, Mark Kelly reflects on the space shuttle Columbia disaster

Wednesday marks 20 years since the space shuttle Columbia disintegrated on its way home. The tragedy not only killed all seven astronauts on board but also was the beginning of the end for the space shuttle program and changed how we explore space now. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien spoke with retired astronaut and Senator Mark Kelly about the Columbia disaster. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
2/1/20237 minutes, 10 seconds
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News Wrap: Tensions high after 2nd shooting in Jerusalem wounds 2

In our news wrap Saturday, tensions remain high after a 13-year-old Palestinian boy shot and wounded two people in Jerusalem, floodwaters are receding in Auckland, New Zealand after record-breaking rainfall, Pope Francis clarified his words after saying that being gay is a sin, Trump hit the campaign trail for his 2024 presidential bid, and the Challenger space shuttle exploded 37 years ago today. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/28/20233 minutes, 2 seconds
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Salton Sea lithium deposits could help EV transition, support economically devastated area

The demand for electric vehicles is surging in the U.S., sparked in part by the Biden administration's Inflation Reduction Act and the subsidies it offers. But a looming supply shortage of lithium threatens to stall the EV transition. Stephanie Sy traveled to California's Salton Sea where lithium deposits could help meet the country's energy needs and support an economically devastated region. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/24/20238 minutes, 4 seconds
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Earth's ozone layer continues to recover, scientists report

In one of the great environmental success stories of our time, scientists say that a 35-year-old agreement has resulted in the steady and promising recovery of the Earth's ozone layer, a critical protective shield that blocks harmful ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Dr. Paul Newman, chief scientist for Earth sciences at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/22/20236 minutes, 29 seconds
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How an Alaska village's switch to renewable energy helps local Native economies

In the remote village of Ambler, Alaska, temperatures can fall to minus 60 degrees Fahrenheit in the winter, so heating the community is a big job. This past September, Ambler switched to a renewable energy option in an effort to go greener -- a change that also means a path toward a more sustainable economy for Alaska Native communities. Alaska Public Media's Elyssa Loughlin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders
1/21/20234 minutes, 51 seconds