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Neurodiversity Podcast

English, Fitness / Keep-fit, 1 season, 225 episodes, 5 days, 8 hours, 16 minutes
About
The Neurodiversity Podcast talks with leaders in the fields of psychology, education, and beyond, about positively impacting neurodivergent people. Our goal is to reframe differences that were once considered disabilities or disorders, promote awareness of this unique population, and improve the lives of neurodivergent and high-ability people.
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Experiential Therapy: Less Talk & More Action

Traditional talk-based therapy is sometimes less effective for neurodivergent people. On this episode, Emily Kircher-Morris welcomes ADHD-er and licensed social worker Chris Nealy, to discuss the effectiveness of experiential therapy for neurodivergent individuals. They talk about some of the different forms of experiential therapy, like applied theater, equine facilitated psychotherapy, and technology-based interventions. These forms of therapy focus on nonverbal communication and body language, allowing for more effective communication and engagement. They also discuss how experiential therapy has helped improve relationships and understanding within families. Takeaways Experiential therapy, which focuses on nonverbal communication and body language, can be highly effective for neurodivergent individuals. Applied theater and equine facilitated psychotherapy are examples of experiential therapy interventions that have shown positive results. Technology-based interventions, such as video modeling and incorporating personal interests like gaming, can also be effective in experiential therapy. Experiential therapy can help improve relationships and understanding within families by providing a different perspective and facilitating communication. Our courses in the Neurodiversity University are 50% off right now, for a limited time. Click here, and use the promo code SUMMER24. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Chris is a licensed social worker and military veteran service provider in the state of North Carolina. As a person with ADHD, he fully embraces the strengths and challenges of executive functioning differences experienced by those affected by ADHD and Autism. Chris enjoys helping others recognize their potential in personal, social, academic, and professional arenas. ADHD/Autism have huge impacts on intimate relationships as well, and Chris provides support for parents and couples who are navigating the hurdles of loving someone with these qualities. BACKGROUND READING Chris’s practice Triple Play Farm “Buck,” the film
5/17/202437 minutes, 49 seconds
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Bridging Brains and Hearts: Trauma and Neurodiversity

This week, Emily Kircher-Morris sits down with Jessica Sinarski, a mental health counselor who merges neuroscience with education and family dynamics. They dig into the complex relationship between trauma and neurodivergence, underscoring the critical need for trauma-responsive practices and a strengths-based perspective in supporting neurodivergent people. They explore how trust and early life experiences shape brain development, and the profound impact these factors have on individuals throughout their lives. They talk about creating neurodiversity-affirming and trauma-informed environments within schools, and discuss the often overlooked 'hidden senses' that are crucial in supporting neurodivergent students. All of that, packed into episode 224. Takeaways Understanding the intersectionality between trauma and neurodivergence is crucial in supporting neurodivergent individuals. Being trauma-responsive means using awareness of trauma to act accordingly and respond appropriately. A strengths-based approach recognizes that no part of the brain is bad and focuses on supporting and celebrating individual strengths. Schools should strive to be neurodiversity-affirming and trauma-informed, integrating a brain-based perspective and understanding the hidden senses. Building trust and maintaining trusting relationships is essential in supporting neurodivergent individuals who have experienced trauma. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link, and get in touch with us through the contact page if you have questions. If you see value in rethinking education and building a stronger classroom, consider joining the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub! It’s a group built for educators, and we’ll open registration again soon! Sign up to be alerted, and join us for the learning, sharing, and fun! Mental health professionals, get on the list and we’ll notify you when we open our upcoming community, the Neurodiversity University Therapist Hub. Jessica Sinarski, LPCMH, is an author, educator, and the founder of BraveBrains. She partners with school districts and child welfare agencies around the world, translating neuroscience into actionable steps for kids and adults alike. Jessica ignites both passion and know-how in audiences through her books, training, and deeply trauma-informed resources. BACKGROUND READING New book BraveBrains website Amazon author page New book on Audible Instagram Facebook LinkedIn Twitter/X YouTube
5/9/202433 minutes, 3 seconds
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Decoding ADHD in Children: Early Diagnosis, Leveraging Strengths

Today we’re tackling the challenge of decoding ADHD in children. Emily Kircher-Morris chats with Drs. Yael Rothman and Katia Fredriksen about the cultural and socioeconomic factors that influence the diagnosis, the disparities in diagnosis rates among different racial and ethnic groups, and the impact of stigma. They also explore the benefits of early diagnosis and intervention, and of recognizing and leveraging the strengths often inherent in ADHD. They touch on a host of other subjects as well, on episode 223. Takeaways Cultural and socioeconomic factors influence the diagnosis and management of ADHD in children, leading to disparities in diagnosis rates among different racial and ethnic groups. Early diagnosis and intervention are beneficial for children with ADHD, as it helps with de-stigmatization, self-esteem, and self-advocacy. ADHD individuals have unique strengths, such as creative thinking, hyperfocus, and resilience, which can be leveraged for success. Having conversations with children about their diagnosis is important for their understanding and self-acceptance. Parents should take time to process information, ask questions, and prioritize their own mental health throughout the diagnosis and management process. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link, and get in touch with us through the contact page if you have questions. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Dr. Katia Fredriksen and Dr. Yael Rothman are pediatric neuropsychologists at a private practice, where they complete assessments with children and adolescents with a wide range of conditions that impact learning, behavior, and/or socioemotional functioning. They recently published the first book of their Different Thinkers series, designed to provide elementary-age children with a resource to understand their diagnosis, manage the associated difficulties, and appreciate the many strengths that come along with their profiles. Their first book, Different Thinkers: ADHD, focuses on the diagnosis of ADHD. Dr. Fredriksen trained at Princeton University and the University of Massachusetts Boston. She lives with her family in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Rothman trained at the University of Michigan and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology. She lives with her family in Washington, D.C. BACKGROUND READING Website Instagram Facebook Twitter/X Different Thinkers: ADHD
5/2/202440 minutes, 53 seconds
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Phases & Stages: Executive Function Growth Throughout Life

Our guest is Jane Singleton, an executive function coach and consultant, and she talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about the development of executive functioning skills through different life stages, and how it impacts individuals. They talk about the importance of practicing these skills early on, to prepare for the increasing demands of independence. You’ll pick up strategies for parents to help their children build executive functioning skills, including asking questions, creating a safe space for planning, and celebrating small wins. A healthy skill set includes recognizing the significance of self-reflection, collaboration between home and school, and reframing struggles and failures as necessary tools for growth. Executive Function Growth Throughout Life, straight ahead on episode 222. Takeaways Executive functioning skills naturally increase with the level of independence required at each life stage. Practicing executive functioning skills at a young age prepares individuals for the challenges of adulthood. Parents can support their children by asking questions, creating a safe space for planning, and celebrating small wins. Self-reflection and reframing struggles and failures as learning opportunities are essential for growth. Collaboration between home and school is crucial for supporting neurodivergent individuals. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link, and get in touch with us through the contact page if you have questions. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Jane Singleton is the founder and executive coach at Launchpad for Life, LLC and specializes in helping clients understand their cognitive and emotional strengths and weaknesses, communicate more effectively, and build their self-awareness in order to meet academic, career, and life goals. She is an educational leader and specialist in analyzing cognitive profiles, creating behavioral interventions, and coaching families and  individuals through life transitions. Jane als has significant experience with team coaching with the goal of creating alignment of curriculum and protocols as it relates to inclusion, strategic priorities and academic outcomes. She has developed customized training for organizations on topics such as: executive functioning, growing and self-esteem and motivation, and parenting like a coach, as well as a variety of topics on neurodiversity. Jane is an International Coaching Federation (ICF) certified executive coach, a lifelong learner and an inclusion advocate for people with disabilities. BACKGROUND READING Website LinkedIn Instagram TikTok
4/25/202434 minutes, 42 seconds
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Beyond the Page: Empowering Young Minds

In episode 221, Emily talks with Brad Wright, a Neurodivergent Educator and Administrator, and author of the Infinity Blast series of middle grade books featuring neurodivergent characters. They discuss his work as an educator and how it influenced his decision to write fiction for young people. It’s important for educators to be educated about neurodiversity and provide accurate information to children. Brad also talks about the evolution of neurodivergent characters in children's literature and the role they play in the lives of young people. There is a need for more diverse and authentic characters in literature. Takeaways Educators should be educated about neurodiversity and provide accurate information to children. The representation of neurodivergent characters in children's literature has evolved, but there is still a need for more diverse characters. Authentic portrayal of neurodivergent traits is important to provide a nuanced understanding of different types of brains. Neurodivergent children should hold onto their special interests and stay true to themselves, as they will find their people and become fully actualized individuals. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link, and get in touch with us through the contact page if you have questions. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Bradley Wright is an author, educator, and administrator at an independent school. In his earlier years, he was a professional ballet dancer. Brad grew up in Seattle but has been slowly migrating southward with stops in Portland, Eugene, San Francisco, and now Los Angeles where he lives with his family. His current writing project is the Infinity Blast series for middle grade readers. Books one and two are out now. Book three will be released Spring 2025. BACKGROUND READING Mastodon Instagram Brad’s website  
4/19/202438 minutes, 3 seconds
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Unlocking the Power of Neurodiversity in STEM

We’re talking STEM today, and Emily Kircher-Morris is joined by Dr. Arash Zaghi, a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Connecticut, to discuss the importance of neurodiversity in STEM fields. They talk about the need for diverse perspectives and ways of thinking to solve complex problems in science and engineering. There’s a value in different types of contributions, such as creative ideas and detailed execution plans, and a need to shift the focus from deficits to strengths. They also discuss the importance of creating a sense of belonging for neurodivergent students in academia and the need for faculty to be more supportive and inclusive. Takeaways Neurodiversity in STEM fields is crucial for solving complex problems and creating innovative solutions. The focus should shift from individual skills to the true meaning of diversity, bringing together different perspectives and ways of thinking. Creating a sense of belonging is essential for the success of neurodivergent students in STEM fields. Faculty should be more supportive and inclusive, valuing diverse contributions and providing options for different types of learning and assessment. Neurodivergent individuals should embrace their strengths and bring their whole selves to their academic and professional pursuits. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link, and get in touch with us through the contact page if you have questions. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Arash E. Zaghi is a Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Connecticut. His research is focused on engineering education, emphasizing the role of neurodiversity in fostering creativity within the engineering workforce, as well as strength-based approaches to diversity. Arash’s interdisciplinary work aims to develop personalized tools for middle-school students with dyslexia to engage in STEM, leveraging AI, neuroscience, and education research. Professor Zaghi was diagnosed with ADHD at 33, and his dedication to neurodiversity in engineering education has earned him multiple recognitions, including from Prism Magazine of the American Society of Engineering Education. He holds a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno and is a strong advocate of neurodiversity in STEM education. He hosts the Square Pegs podcast, where he further explores these themes. Square Pegs Podcast via Spotify
4/12/202437 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ask Me Anything #8 with Emily Kircher-Morris

In this episode of the Neurodiversity Podcast, Emily Kircher-Morris answers questions submitted by members of the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy and Support Group on Facebook. The questions cover a range of topics including listening to the podcast with children, supporting processing speed issues, managing low self-esteem, diagnosing ADHD in older age, the overlap between cognitive giftedness and autism, exploring masking, and managing chores and responsibilities for individuals with a PDA profile. The episode provides insights, strategies, and resources for parents and individuals navigating neurodiversity. To submit questions for our next AMA, join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook!
4/4/202423 minutes, 7 seconds
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Parenting Self-Care: Looking Out for Number One

Jen Merrill, creator of Laughing at Chaos and author of If This is a Gift, Can I Send It Back?, shares her experience as a parent of a twice-exceptional child and discusses the challenges and benefits of homeschooling. She emphasizes the importance of self-care for parents of gifted and twice exceptional children. Takeaways Parents of gifted and twice exceptional children need to prioritize self-care to better advocate for their children and maintain their own well-being. Twice exceptional children can be both intellectually gifted and face other challenges that make life difficult for them and their families. Homeschooling can provide personalized education and allow children to pursue their passions at their own pace. Homeschooling can have financial and career implications for parents, and it requires careful management of family dynamics. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Jen Torbeck Merrill is an Illinois-based writer, musician, marketing project manager, and gifted family advocate.The mom of two boys, she homeschooled her twice-exceptional teen through high school while happily sending his younger brother off to his high school every morning. Those days now in the past, she is settling into the somewhat quieter life of an empty-nester. She is a music educator by trade, with degrees in music education and flute performance. Long before she picked up a flute as a child, however, Jen wanted to be a writer, something that didn’t happen until she opened a Blogger account in 2006 and never looked back. Since that time, her writing has focused more on gifted families and advocacy. Her book, If This is a Gift, Can I Send It Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional, struck a nerve with families who suspected Jen was living in their closet. Her second book, on the needs of gifted parents and self-care, is in progress; it is taking significantly longer than anticipated because the author herself struggles mightily with self-care and has been spending a lot of time banging her head on the keyboard and hyperventilating in writerly frustration. In the meantime she continues to blog at Laughing at Chaos. BACKGROUND READING Twitter Facebook If This Is a Gift, Can I Send It Back?
3/28/202431 minutes, 27 seconds
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Declarative Language: A New Strategy for Neurodivergent Communication

Often, neurodivergent people have a completely different communication experience than neurotypicals. They respond differently to regulation, attention, and motivation, and often parents struggle when trying to improve connections with their kids. Linda Murphy is the author of The Declarative Language Handbook, and we present an encore of our conversation from 2023, with ideas on how to reframe communication and break down barriers. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link, and get in touch with us through the contact page if you have questions. Amanda Morin’s The Empathetic Edge podcast can be found here, bookmark it! Linda Murphy is a speech language pathologist and RDI Consultant. She co-founded the “Peer Projects Therapy From the Heart” clinic in Beverly, Massachusetts, and has authored several books and numerous articles during her career. Linda has enjoyed working with individuals with social learning differences for over 25 years. BACKGROUND READING Website Instagram Facebook
3/21/202438 minutes, 29 seconds
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Challenging What We Know About Autism and PDA

Dr. Donna Henderson joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about the changes in the assessment process for autism, the importance of empowering therapists to diagnose autism, and the need for equity in masking. Their conversation also explores the double empathy problem and the challenges of balancing unmasking with the needs of neurodiverse individuals in educational settings. They also discuss the PDA profile and its place within the autism spectrum. That’s all waiting for you on episode 216. Takeaways The assessment process for autism is evolving, with a shift towards understanding subjective experience rather than relying solely on test scores. Therapists are adapting by relying less on formal tests and more on interview skills and understanding inner subjective experiences. Empowering therapists to diagnose autism is important for identifying and supporting individuals who may have been missed in the past. Masking and camouflaging are complex behaviors that can have both benefits and drawbacks, and it is important to find a balance that respects individual needs and promotes equity. Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) is not simply about avoiding demands, but rather an overriding biological drive for autonomy. Misdiagnosis and labeling are common for PDAers, leading to potential negative consequences, especially for minority boys. Understanding the core features of PDA, such as difficulty coping with demands, a wide variety of coping mechanisms, and challenges with social hierarchy, is crucial for accurate diagnosis and support. Dr. Donna Henderson has been a clinical neuropsychologist for over 30 years. She is passionate about identifying and supporting autistic individuals, particularly those who camouflage, and she is co-author (with Drs. Sarah Wayland and Jamell White) of two books: Is This Autism? A Guide For Clinicians and Everyone Else and Is This Autism? A Companion Guide For Diagnosing. Dr. Henderson provides neuropsychological evaluations and consultations for children, adolescents, and adults who would like to understand themselves better. She is a sought-after lecturer on the less obvious presentations of autism, autistic girls and women, PDA, and on parenting children with complex profiles. She also provides case consultations and neurodiversity-affirmative training for other healthcare professionals. BACKGROUND READING Donna’s website Is This Autism?
3/14/202440 minutes, 24 seconds
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Education for Everyone Through Universal Design for Learning

On this episode, Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Jeff Horwitz about the concept of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and its application in education. UDL focuses on creating learning environments and experiences that are accessible and beneficial for all students, regardless of their learning styles or abilities. How can UDL be implemented in both classroom and home settings? What are some common barriers to implementing UDL, and what are some strategies to overcome them? What’s the role of technology in supporting UDL practices? It’s a deep dive into UDL, on episode 215. TAKEAWAYS Universal Design for Learning (UDL) aims to create inclusive learning environments that meet the needs of all students. UDL can be implemented in both classroom and home settings, promoting autonomy and agency in student learning. Barriers to implementing UDL include resistance to change, lack of time, and perceived lack of training. Small changes and incremental adjustments can make a significant impact in implementing UDL. UDL fosters collaboration and empathy among students, promoting diverse perspectives and strengths. Technology can be a powerful tool in supporting UDL practices, providing options for engagement, accessibility, and personalization. Parents can advocate for their children by sharing their insights and experiences with educators, and by collaborating to create a supportive learning environment. Teachers should approach UDL with a growth mindset, recognizing that success is measured by meeting the needs of all learners. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link, and get in touch with us through the contact page if you have questions. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Jeff Horwitz is a 20-year educator and has been an administrator at independent schools in St. Louis since 2013. Prior to becoming an administrator, Jeff taught kindergarten through third grade in public and private schools. Jeff is passionate about providing students with opportunities for learning that will prepare them for the increasingly automated world we live in through collaborating with teachers, and using student-centered techniques. Jeff is an advocate for project-based learning and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). When Jeff isn’t immersed in schools, he’s spending time with his two kids, cooking, golfing and playing music with friends. BACKGROUND READING Twitter/X LinkedIn Novak Education
3/7/202438 minutes, 55 seconds
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A Quest For Meaningful Relationships

Friendships and relationships can be hard for neurodivergent people, especially if they experience lagging social skills, or struggle with executive function. Emily Kircher-Morris is joined by Caroline Maguire, author of Why Will Nobody Play With Me?, and they discuss the challenges and importance of neurodivergent friendships, particularly for individuals with ADHD. They talk about the lack of support for ADHD kids in developing social skills, and the negative impact it can have on their self-esteem. They discuss ways to build confidence and replace negative self-talk with positive thoughts. During a time when online friendships often outnumber in-person ones, they talk about ways to achieve a balance. A quest for meaningful relationships, on episode 214. Takeaways Neurodivergent individuals, particularly those with ADHD, often face challenges in developing and maintaining friendships due to executive function weaknesses and a lack of social skills practice. Rejection sensitivity dysphoria is a common experience for neurodivergent individuals, leading to intense reactions to perceived slights or exclusion. Building confidence is crucial for developing friendships, and it can be achieved by focusing on strengths, celebrating small wins, and replacing negative self-talk with positive thoughts. Shared interests and activities provide opportunities for neurodivergent individuals to connect with like-minded peers and develop authentic relationships. While online friendships can be valuable, it is important to encourage a balance between online and in-person relationships to fully support social development. To learn more about the Neurodiversity University courses for educators, click the link. If you have any questions or need help getting started, get in touch with us through the contact page. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group on Facebook! Caroline Maguire is the founder of a revolutionary social emotional learning methodology that helps teach social skills to children, teenagers, and young adults. She holds a Masters degree in Education with a concentration in SEL training, and is the founder and director of The Fundamentals of ADHD Coaching for Families training curriculum at ADD Coach Academy (ADDCA). Caroline is also a former coach for the Hallowell Center in Sudbury, Massachusetts. In addition to coaching and training, she is the author of Why Will No One Play With Me?, the winner of the Best Parenting and Family Book 2020 as awarded by American Book Fest, and a co-collaborator on the newly released HowToSel.com – a daily social emotional learning platform anyone can incorporate into daily life. BACKGROUND READING Caroline’s website Facebook Instagram Twitter/X LinkedIn YouTube
2/29/202437 minutes, 10 seconds
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Not a Disease: Understanding Autism as Difference

On episode 213, Emily is joined by Matt Lowry, host of the Autistic Culture podcast. They discuss the concept of autism as a neurotype and culture, Matt shares his personal experience as an autistic individual, and they discuss the importance of understanding autism in a non-pathologizing way. They also discuss the need for neurodiversity affirming evaluations and therapy, as well as the challenges of balancing autistic identity and social adaptation. It’s a challenge to create a life that matches your neurological makeup, and finding a supportive community can be key. This episode is brought to you by the Council for Exceptional Children, dedicated to high-quality education that is inclusive and equitable for individuals with disabilities and/or gifts and talents. Attend their Annual Convention & Expo, March 13-16, 2024 in San Antonio, Texas. Register now at cecconvention.org/, and if you’re a school principal, receive free registration by using the code 24CEC100. Here’s a link to check out the courses Emily talks about in the Neurodiversity University. Matt Lowry is an Autistic adult, parent of an Autistic son, and a Licensed Psychological Practitioner who works exclusively with Autistic clients, performing neurodiversity-affirming Autism evaluations and providing Autistic Centered Therapy (AuCT) - a form of therapy that he helped create. Matt works hard to expand autistic access and inclusion through his professional work as well as his advocacy work co-hosting The Autistic Culture Podcast. Among his latest projects, he is currently helping to create an Autistic-friendly, Autistic-run, medical facility in his home state of Kentucky. BACKGROUND READING Matt’s website The Autistic Culture Podcast
2/22/202440 minutes, 50 seconds
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Challenging the Status Quo in the Classroom and Beyond

On episode 212, Emily Kircher-Morris and Jess Lahey discuss the importance of understanding and supporting neurodivergent students. Jess highlights the need for teachers to question traditional teaching methods and adapt their practices to meet the diverse needs of their students. They talk about the value of formative assessments, peer-to-peer teaching, and creating an inclusive learning environment. They also explore the overlap between substance abuse and learning differences, emphasizing the importance of early intervention and support. They discuss the need for teachers to gradually release responsibility to students, and empower them to advocate for themselves. Open-minded, reflective, and responsive classrooms best serve the individual needs of students. Takeaways: Question traditional teaching methods and adapt practices to meet the diverse needs of students. Use formative assessments to gauge student understanding and provide targeted support. Create an inclusive learning environment that values peer-to-peer teaching and individual learning styles. Recognize the overlap between substance abuse and learning differences, and provide early intervention and support. Gradually release responsibility to students and empower them to advocate for themselves. This episode is brought to you by the Council for Exceptional Children, dedicated to high-quality education that is inclusive and equitable for individuals with disabilities and/or gifts and talents. Attend their Annual Convention & Expo, March 13-16, 2024 in San Antonio, Texas. Register now at cecconvention.org/, and if you’re a school principal, receive free registration by using the code 24CEC100. If you see value in rethinking education and building a stronger classroom, consider joining the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub! It’s a group built for educators, and we’ll open registration again soon! Sign up to be alerted, and join us for the learning, sharing, and fun! Jessica Lahey is the author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed, and The Addiction Inoculation: Raising Healthy Kids in a Culture of Dependence. Over twenty years, Jess has taught every grade from sixth to twelfth in both public and private schools, and has written about education, parenting, and child welfare for The Washington Post and The Atlantic, and her biweekly column, The Parent Teacher Conference, ran for three years at the New York Times. She also designed and wrote the educational curriculum for Amazon Kids’ award-winning animated series The Stinky and Dirty Show, and was a 2019 Pushcart Prize nominee. She co-hosts the #AmWriting podcast from her empty nest in Vermont. BACKGROUND READING Jessica’s website Instagram Threads Facebook LinkedIn The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter/X, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
2/15/202444 minutes, 18 seconds
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Turning Neurodiversity Barriers Into Benefits

On episode 211, Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Brooke Schnittman, founder of Coaching with Brooke and author of Activate Your ADHD Potential. They discuss the barriers faced by ADHDers, the strengths of ADHD brains, the influence of the neurodiversity framework, the shift in our understanding of ADHD, the importance of structure and systems, her favorite tool for getting thoughts out of the head, and more. It’s a great conversation with plenty of usable advice and ideas. Key takeaways: ADHDers often face barriers in trying to fit into societal expectations and meet the demands of teachers and employers. ADHD brains have strengths such as creativity, problem-solving, and intuition that should be explored and harnessed. The neurodiversity framework has influenced the understanding and approach to ADHD, emphasizing the need for structure and support tailored to individual strengths and learning styles. Getting thoughts out of the head and onto paper or through external processing can help with organization and reduce overwhelm. A message to a younger self with ADHD would be that it's going to be okay and that with the right tools and support, control can be gained over ADHD symptoms. This episode is brought to you by the Council for Exceptional Children, dedicated to high-quality education that is inclusive and equitable for individuals with disabilities and/or gifts and talents. Attend their Annual Convention & Expo, March 13-16, 2024 in San Antonio, Texas. Register now at cecconvention.org/, and if you’re a school principal, receive free registration by using the code 24CEC100. Brooke Schnittman is an esteemed expert in the field of ADHD management and support. She founded Coaching With Brooke in 2018, and offers tailored programs and strategies to support her clients with time management, organization, emotional regulation and self-advocacy. Brooke was diagnosed with ADHD later in life, and shares her passion as a public speaker and advocate. Her work has been featured on prominent media outlets such as Forbes, Entrepreneur, ADDitude Magazine, CBS and NBC, and has received a number of accolades in the ADHD community. Brooke has a Bachelor's in Elementary Education from Penn State University, and a Master's Degree from New York University, specializing in Students With Disabilities. BACKGROUND READING Facebook Instagram X (formerly Twitter) Brooke’s website Book - Activate Your ADHD Potential
2/8/202435 minutes, 52 seconds
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Dani Donovan on Motivation, Procrastination, and Her Viral Memes

On episode 210, we dive into a topic that resonates with many of us: the struggle between wanting to achieve our goals, and a lack of motivation. Today, we're exploring all of it with a guest who has transformed this challenge into an art. Emily chats with Dani Donovan, a renowned author, ADHD advocate, and the genius behind those viral illustrations that have likely caught your eye on social media. Dani's groundbreaking book, 'The Anti-Planner: How to Get Stuff Done When You Don’t Feel Like It,' offers a perspective on navigating the complexities of motivation and procrastination. We'll delve into the intricate relationship between our emotions and our drive to initiate tasks, debunk the myth that procrastination is simply laziness, and give you practical tactics for overcoming those daunting challenges. Dani Donovan is a purpose-driven creator, author, and ADHD advocate whose cathartic comics, TikTok videos, and #NeurodiverseSquad hashtag have helped build an online community for adults living with ADHD. She’s been featured in publications like The New York Times, BBC News, and NPR, and was the closing keynote at the 2021 International ADHD Conference. Her unorthodox self-help book, The Anti-Planner: How to Get Stuff Done When You Don't Feel Like It, offers creative strategies, activities, and games to help procrastinators understand their emotions and overcome productivity roadblocks. Dani's work has encouraged thousands of people to seek diagnosis and treatment. BACKGROUND READING adhddd.com Twitter/X Instagram The Anti-Planner
2/1/202439 minutes, 40 seconds
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Ask Me Anything #7 with Emily Kircher-Morris

What are the limits of IQ tests and scores? How can someone best advocate for gifted-affirming education for a 2e student? Why do some kids consider their neurodivergent diagnoses as failures, and how can we change that? What can we do about bullying? Plus many more questions and answers. This is episode 209, and it’s another Ask Me Anything with Emily Kircher-Morris. To be part of it, join us on Facebook in The Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group! Also, registration for the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub is now open, and only for a limited time! If you’re a teacher, you definitely need to check into joining this community of educators from around the world, who are learning and sharing ways to embrace neurodiversity in the classroom. It’s hosted and moderated by Emily Kircher-Morris, and features expert guests, roundtable forums, continuing education material and much more. The deadline to register is soon, so sign up and join us!
1/25/202427 minutes, 32 seconds
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The Tricky Transition From High School to Higher Ed

Entering college can be a pivotal and challenging journey, especially for neurodivergent individuals. On episode 208, we look at what happens when traditional paths don't align with diverse needs. From systemic shifts in college admissions to the importance of soft skills beyond academics, we're talking about what it takes to thrive in higher education. Joining us is Elizabeth West, CEO of EWC College Consulting, who brings a wealth of knowledge on guiding neurodivergent students through their college journey. Registration for the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub is now open, and only for a limited time! If you’re a teacher, you definitely need to check into joining this community of educators from around the world, who are learning and sharing ways to embrace neurodiversity in the classroom. It’s hosted and moderated by Emily Kircher-Morris, and features expert guests, roundtable forums, continuing education material and much more. The deadline to register is soon, so sign up and join us! Elizabeth West is the CEO of EWC College Consulting.  She found her passion working in higher education, helping students become successful through various positions in college admissions for 10 years. After leaving admissions, Elizabeth had the opportunity to work with students for an additional 15 years, teaching them how to become transfer students. Originally from upstate New York, Ms. West moved to North Carolina after graduating from the State University of New York at Potsdam. BACKGROUND READING Facebook Instagram LinkedIn
1/18/202434 minutes, 36 seconds
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Unique Learning Challenges of Neurodivergent Brains

Studying and learning skills are different for neurodivergent learners, and traditional teaching methods often fail to address their needs. So what happens when we rethink learning strategies to empower these students? On episode 207, we're unraveling these challenges with Gretchen Wegner, an expert in redefining study skills for neurodivergent minds. Creator of the AntiBoringLab YouTube channel, Gretchen will shed light on empowering students through innovative strategies. Registration for the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub is now open, and only for a limited time! If you’re a teacher, you definitely need to check into joining this community of educators from around the world, who are learning and sharing ways to embrace neurodiversity in the classroom. It’s hosted and moderated by Emily Kircher-Morris, and features expert guests, roundtable forums, continuing education material and much more. You have until midnight Friday January 19 to register. Get in touch about the Gifted & ADHD Study. Video clip Gretchen mentioned in the interview. Gretchen Wegner is a former middle and high school teacher who now inspires and coaches students to build executive function skills, time management, organization and study skills. Gretchen is the creator of “The Anti-Boring Approach to Powerful Studying”. She is also the inventor of the productivity toy MuseCubes. In addition to coaching, Gretchen is a public speaker, improvisational performer, lindy hop dancer, backpacker and proud resident of Oakland, California. BACKGROUND READING Gretchen’s YouTube channel Unlock Student Learning free gift Gretchen’s website
1/11/202435 minutes, 57 seconds
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Creating and Fostering Autonomy and Motivation

On episode 206 we talk about autonomy and motivation. In a world where autonomy is key to motivation and engagement, how do we navigate this with our children, especially those who are neurodivergent? Today, we're exploring the vital role of independence and control in fostering engagement and motivation, not just in kids, but in all of us. Joining us is Ned Johnson, founder of PrepMatters and co-author of The Self-Driven Child, and What Do You Say? How To Talk With Kids To Build Motivation, Stress Tolerance, and a Happy Home. If you're a teacher and not yet a member of the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub, we’ll be opening up registration in January. It will only be open for a limited time, so make sure you’re notified when it happens. Sign up here. Ned Johnson is the founder of PrepMatters, an educational company that helps students find success in high school and in getting into college. A professional “tutor-geek” since 1993, Ned has spent more than 50,000 one-on-one hours helping students conquer an alphabet of standardized tests, learn to manage their anxiety, and develop their own motivation to succeed. He co-authored The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives and What Do You Say? How To Talk With Kids To Build Motivation, Stress Tolerance, and a Happy Home with Dr. William Stixrud. Ned is the host of the The Self-Driven Child podcast and his work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, BBC, and many others. BACKGROUND READING The Self-Driven Child website TikTok Instagram X, formerly Twitter
1/4/202443 minutes, 1 second
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Perspectives Series: Emotional Regulation

In episode 205 we talk about how understanding and supporting the emotional needs of our neurodivergent children is like learning a new language.  This Perspectives episode brings the insights from three of our guests together to talk about how we can connect with our children and become fluent in interpreting those behaviors and helping them with emotionally. For guest bios, or to listen to the full episodes, here are the links: Episode 186, Parenting Through the Chaos and Finding Peace with Dayna Abraham Episode 155, Declarative Language: A New Strategy for Neurodivergent Communication with Linda Murphy Episode 180, Understanding Behaviors and Emotional Regulation with Mona Delahooke If you're a teacher and not yet a member of the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub, we’ll be opening up registration in January. It will only be open for a limited time, so make sure you’re notified when it happens. Sign up here.
12/29/202338 minutes, 15 seconds
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Perspectives Series: ADHD

As we wrap up 2023, we are presenting a series of episodes called Perspectives, and on episode 204 we talk about ADHD. The experience of being an ADHDer influences people throughout their lifetime. Whether it is understanding the experience of children, or reconciling a diagnosis as an adult, we know that the needs of ADHDers don’t go away - they just change. For guest bios, or to listen to the full episodes, here are the links: Episode 142, Understanding ADHD Children with Dr. Sharon Saline Episode 144, Adult Diagnosis ADHD with Sarah Snyder Episode 143, Girls and ADHD with Stephen Hinshaw If you're a teacher and not yet a member of the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub, we’ll be opening up registration in January. It will only be open for a limited time, so make sure you’re notified when it happens. Sign up here.
12/21/202328 minutes, 54 seconds
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Perspectives Series: Sensory Needs

As we wrap up 2023, we are presenting a series of episodes called Perspectives. Today, we talk about sensory needs. These varied needs impact a wide range of life activities for neurodivergent people. From unique processing needs of the five senses we were all taught in elementary school, to the newer and wider understanding we have of the proprioceptive, vestibular, and interoceptive sensory systems, having an awareness of how these systems impact our daily lives can make a big difference. For guest bios, or to listen to the full episodes, here are the links: Episode 146 Episode 138 Episode 191 If you're a teacher and not yet a member of the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub, we’ll be opening up registration in January. It will only be open for a limited time, so make sure you’re notified when it happens. Sign up here.
12/14/202332 minutes, 18 seconds
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Taming the Pull: Trichotillomania and Other BFRBs

Emily Kircher-Morris is joined by Barbara Lally, a certified professional coach and author who focuses on Body Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRBs). Barbara shares her personal story of living with trichotillomania, a chronic hair-pulling disorder, and discusses the stigma and misunderstandings surrounding BFRBs. She also offers advice for those struggling with BFRBs and their loved ones. There’s a lot to learn in episode 202. If you're a teacher and not yet a member of the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub, we’ll be opening up registration in January. It will only be open for a limited time, so make sure you’re notified when it happens. Sign up here. Barbara Lally is a teacher-turned certified professional coach, author, and body-focused repetitive behavior (BFRB) advocate. When she was 10 years old she developed trichotillomania, the chronic hair-pulling disorder which led to intense feelings of guilt, shame, and self-loathing. Nineteen years after her diagnosis, Barbara released her memoir, The Trichster Diaries, detailing her life with the disorder and her journey to self-love and self-acceptance. By sharing her story, Barbara’s life changed. She released a guided journal, My Trichster Diaries, and hosts a podcast where she interviews others with BFRBs called Trich Talks. Barbara realized she was meant to spread awareness of BFRBs and help others toward self-love and self-acceptance, so she left her teaching job after seven years and decided to go back to school to become a certified professional coach. BACKGROUND READING Website Instagram Tiktok
12/7/202335 minutes, 38 seconds
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Myths, Barriers, and Supports for Twice-Exceptionality

How important is early identification and evaluation of twice-exceptionality? And what are some common myths about 2e people? Julie Skolnick is the author of 'Gifted and Distractible: Understanding, Supporting, and Advocating for Your Twice-Exceptional Child,' and she joins Emily to bring insights that can empower parents who are starting on this journey with their children. This episode is brought to you by Gifted Learning Lab, offering a free email mini course about diffusing power struggles. If you feel stuck in endless negotiations or arguments, this free power struggles mini course could help. Click for access. Julie Skolnick, M.A., J.D., founder of With Understanding Comes Calm, LLC, passionately coaches parents of gifted and distractible children, mentors 2e adults, trains educators and advises professionals on how to bring out the best in and raise self-confidence in their 2e students and clients. Julie serves as Secretary to the Maryland Superintendent’s Gifted and Talented Advisory Council, is an advisor for the Masters of Education Program for the Bridges Graduate School of Cognitive Diversity, is the Maryland liaison for Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG), and is a Committee member for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC).. She produces Let’s Talk 2e! virtual conferences, hosts the Let’s Talk 2e! Parent Empowerment Series, maintains the free listing service, 2eResources.com, and publishes “Gifted & Distractible,” a free monthly newsletter. BACKGROUND READING Facebook Instagram YouTube Website
11/30/202338 minutes, 54 seconds
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Life at 200: We’re Grateful, Excited, and Pass the Pumpkin Pie

The Neurodiversity Podcast celebrates its 200th episode! We’re pretty sure we were surprised to hit 10. Probably shocked at 100. But at 200, we’re grateful and excited, and already planning our path to 300! There are few people with whom we’d rather celebrate our landmark than Amanda Morin. She’s Emily’s co-author on a book to be released in 2024, and for episode 200 they talk about the things they’re grateful for as we enter 2023’s holiday season. Thank you for your loyalty, and here’s to many more. Cheers! Amanda Morin has most recently served as the Vice President of Learning & Knowledge for The Jed Foundation (JED). She heads teams of committed researchers, subject matter experts, and learning and development professionals in efforts to build knowledge about mental health, neurodiversity, and disability, to ensure all the work she’s engaged in is evidence-based, and includes the most up-to-date thinking in the field. She’s a certified teacher who provides unique expertise, and innovative perspectives to mission-driven education and family-facing organizations and coalitions. She works in print and digital media as a writer, editor, and content creator empowering parents and educators to affirm the pivotal roles they play in education. She played an integral role in launching Understood.org in 2014.  Amanda has also worked with other organizations and publications, including: Bright & Quirky,  Matan, Hidden Sparks Without Walls, Edutopia,  Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD), Education.com, Parenting Special Needs Magazine, DotDash (formerly known as About.com), and Popsugar Moms. Amanda received special education advocacy training from the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates. She holds a certificate in Universal Design for Learning from the UDL Implementation and Research Network, sits on the Center for Inclusive Learning (CISL) advisory council, the advisory board of Digital Promise’s Learner Variability Project, the professional advisory board of Matan, and the Technical Expert Panel, of the American Academy of Pediatrics Center of Excellence on Social Media & Youth Mental Health. Amanda Morin is also the author of five books: The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education, The Everything Kids’ Learning Activities Book, On-the-Go Fun for Kids: More Than 250 Activities to Keep Little Ones Busy and Happy — Anytime, Anywhere!, What Is Empathy? A Bullying Storybook for Kids, and Adulting Made Easy: Things Someone Should Have Told You About Getting Your Grown-Up Act Together. BACKGROUND READING Amanda’s books on Amazon Amanda’s website LinkedIn Instagram
11/25/202332 minutes, 50 seconds
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Can We Blend Behaviorism and Neurodiversity-Affirming Care?

In the world of mental health, understanding the unique experiences of neurodivergent individuals is crucial, especially when it comes to addressing anxiety and OCD. Can behavioral interventions like CBT coexist with neurodiversity-affirming practices? And how can understanding learned helplessness transform our approach to anxiety and OCD treatments? Emily is joined by Dr. Jeremy Shuman, a neurodivergent psychologist specializing in these topics and more. If you missed the enrollment for the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub back in September, we are going to be opening it up for enrollment in the new year. To get on the waiting list, give us your info and we’ll let you know when the window opens again! Dr. Jeremy Shuman is a licensed psychologist in St. Louis, MO, specializing in the treatment of OCD and anxiety disorders, especially when these co-occur with other forms of neurodivergence. He practices from a cognitive-behavioral perspective and includes both exposure-based and non-exposure interventions according to client needs. Dr. Shuman works in private practice, supervises junior clinicians, teaches a seminar on OCD, provides consultations across the country, and does public speaking for advocacy work. Dr. Shuman is neurodivergent himself, and practices psychology informed by evidence based practice, clinical experience, individual preference, as well as his own lived experience. BACKGROUND READING Jeremy’s website Sign-up for 2024 OCD seminar
11/17/202340 minutes, 8 seconds
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Am I the Impostor Among Us?

There’s a nagging feeling most of us experience from time to time, that tells us maybe we’ve fooled everyone. We shouldn’t have been placed in a certain position, or we’re not qualified to take on a project. On episode 198 we revisit a talk with Lindsay Lee, the author of a study about impostorism. Why do we experience it? What can we do to tamp it down? Lindsay Lee is an educational scholar focused on ensuring that all advanced learners, regardless of their background or circumstances, have access to the resources and support they need to reach their full potential. She is currently working as a research analyst and professional development creator & facilitator on a Jacob K. Javits-funded project to optimize gifted identification practices across the United States. Her research interests include equitably identifying advanced students, psychological and educational measurements, talent development across domains, and developing learning environments that encourage creative growth. She has published several research and practitioner articles, as well as book chapters on these topics. In addition to her research, Lindsay is also an active member of several professional organizations, including the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and the American Educational Research Association (AERA). She has presented her research at numerous conferences and has received recognition for her work, including the 2021 NAGC Carolyn Callahan Doctoral Student Award and the 2022 NAGC Research & Evaluation Network Dissertation Award. BACKGROUND READING Twitter ResearchGate Google Scholar Lindsay’s Research Preprint accessible to anyone
11/9/202327 minutes, 22 seconds
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Exceptional Minds: Understanding and Nurturing Profoundly Gifted Children

Today we explore the intriguing world of profound giftedness, shedding light on a subject often shrouded in mystery. Blake Haygood is an educator in gifted and talented programs, and he joins us to help unravel the characteristics that define the mere 0.13% of the population considered profoundly gifted. We talk about his son, Clark, who is among this rare group, and discuss their personal journey, milestones, and aspects of his personality that make Clark so rare and unique. Don’t forget to pick up your pod swag! Our t-shirts, mugs, tote bags and more make great gifts for the upcoming holidays, and it’s a great way to help support our efforts. Check our merch page to see the full selection. Davidson Institute is a proud sponsor of episode 197. For more information, go to DavidsonGifted.org. Blake Haygood is a Gifted and Talented educator in Austin Independent School District, as well as a passionate advocate for gifted education. He and his wife are also the Program Directors for a member-run nonprofit called PG Retreat, which hosts annual retreats for profoundly gifted kids and their families. Blake volunteers with TAGT, the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented, and he and his wife work as homeschool parents to meet the needs of their profoundly/severely gifted 11-year-old child. BACKGROUND READING LinkedIn Email Clark’s music we featured: 1 2
11/3/202334 minutes, 53 seconds
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The Magic and Madness of Middle-School

We explore the unique world of tweens, who are at a critical juncture in their lives, grappling with identity, independence, and transition. Our guest is Phyllis Fagell, an advocate for strengths-based support. She and Emily talk about tween superpowers, the challenges and discoveries of navigating middle school, and how to help neurodivergent tweens recognize and use their unique abilities for personal growth. It’s all on episode 196. Don’t forget to pick up your pod swag! Our t-shirts, mugs, tote bags and more make great gifts for the upcoming holidays, and it’s a great way to help support our efforts. Check our merch page to see the full selection. Phyllis Fagell is a school counselor and therapist who works with children and teens. She’s the author of “Middle School Matters” and her newest book, “Middle School Superpowers”. In addition, Phyllis is a journalist and frequent contributor to the Washington Post, and freelances for Psychology Today, CNN, Working Mother, U.S. News & World Report, and Your Teen. Her ideas have been shared widely on a number of well-known news outlets as well. Phyllis lives in Bethesda, MD with her husband and three children. BACKGROUND READING Instagram X (formerly Twitter) Facebook LinkedIn
10/26/202331 minutes, 40 seconds
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Ask Me Anything #6 with Emily Kircher-Morris

10/24/202320 minutes, 1 second
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Low-Demand Parenting: Bridging Divisions, Fostering Trust

Entering the world of neurodiversity often enables personal discovery, and creates challenges. How can parenting nudge adults toward uncovering their own neurodivergence? What is 'low-demand parenting' all about? It’s not simply eliminating expectations, it’s deeper and more nuanced. We’re diving into the complex world of self-discovery and parenting with Amanda Diekman, a late-diagnosed autistic adult, and author of "Low Demand Parenting." Learn more about 2e students by taking our course, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. It’s great for CE credits for educators, and the course will be enlightening to anyone curious about helping 2e students thrive in the classroom. Amanda Diekman is an autistic adult, parent coach, and author in the neurodiversity community. Amanda became a leading voice in the movement for low demand parenting practices, with her book Low Demand Parenting, published back in July 2023. Amanda runs a successful coaching practice for parents of neurodivergent children, including online courses and a vibrant membership community. She lives with her husband and three neurodivergent children in Durham, NC. BACKGROUND READING Amanda’s website Instagram
10/19/202335 minutes, 51 seconds
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2E Or Not 2E: The Nuts and Bolts of Twice-Exceptionality

Many brilliant young people experience the dichotomy of disability layered on top of their intelligence. It’s called twice-exceptionality, or 2e for short. What are the common misconceptions about twice-exceptional individuals? How do traditional models fall short when identifying the learning disabilities of our brightest kids? And why is early recognition so pivotal? Emily talks with Dr. Danika Maddocks, a psychologist, parent coach, and founder of the Gifted Learning Lab, about the intricacies of twice-exceptionality, in childhood and beyond. Here’s a link to the free course about power struggles from Danika Maddocks. Learn more about 2e students by taking our course, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. It’s great for CE credits for educators, and the course will be enlightening to anyone curious about helping 2e students thrive in the classroom. Dr. Danika Maddocks is a psychologist, parent coach, and owner of The Gifted Learning Lab. She has supported gifted and twice-exceptional kids and their families for over 15 years as a teacher, therapist, school consultant, assessment provider, and coach. She has also published award-winning research on giftedness and twice-exceptionality. Much of her work is informed by her personal experiences growing up gifted and her experience raising a young gifted kid. BACKGROUND READING Danika’s 2e coaching program Free power struggles course Facebook Instagram
10/5/202335 minutes, 4 seconds
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Suicidal Ideation in Neurodivergent People

For many neurodivergent people, a world built for neuronormative people provides unique challenges, especially when mental health intersects with their identity. In this episode, Emily is joined by Dr. Jessica Revill, a psychologist and bereaved parent, whose autistic son Gregory died by suicide. How did he understand his identity in a world that viewed neurodiversity differently? How did factors like ableism create barriers for him? And most crucially, what signs should we all be vigilant about to prevent such tragic losses in the neurodivergent community? Join us as we delve deeply into Jessica’s journey, and the imperative of suicide prevention. The suicide prevention line is available 24 hours a day by calling or texting 988. Join the Neurodiversity University Educator Hub! Sign up by September 28 at midnight Pacific time. Use the coupon code FM20 for the Founding Member discount. Dr. Jessica Revill is a psychologist and a parent survivor to a son who died by suicide in 2020. Her autistic son, Gregory, developed tourettes, depression and possible psychosis which gradually robbed him of his will to live. Since his loss, his mother has written a memoir, “Find Him Among the Living”, and works within the suicide prevention space. She is an avid advocate of suicide prevention awareness and autism. BACKGROUND READING Website Prisoner of the Mind video podcast
9/28/202342 minutes, 16 seconds
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Interoception Is a Sense Few Understand

Interoception plays a pivotal role in how all people perceive and engage with their bodies and the world around them. For neurodivergent people, the differences we experience in interoception can have a bigger effect than we might expect. How well do we truly understand interoception? And how does it influence those who process it differently? From the very sensation of 'feeling our feelings' to the day-to-day experiences and potential supports for those with variations in their interoceptive system, we dig into the subject with Dr. Kelly Mahler, she’s an occupational therapist and professor at Elizabethtown University. You can still sign up for our free Crash Course on Creating Neurodiversity-Affirming Schools! It’s going on this week, and all of the events in the course will be live and interactive. You can talk to Emily and our expert guests, and share and compare ideas with your colleagues from around the world. You also have access to videos of each event, so you haven’t missed anything. Kelly Mahler is an occupational therapist who has served both school-aged children and adults for the last 20 years. She earned a Doctorate in Occupational Therapy from Misericordia University in Dallas, PA, and has won multiple awards, including the 2020 American Occupational Therapy Association Emerging and Innovative Practice Award & a Mom’s Choice Gold Medal. Kelly is an adjunct faculty member at Elizabethtown College as well as at Misericordia University, and is a co-principal investigator in several research projects pertaining to topics such as interoception, self-regulation, trauma & autism. BACKGROUND READING Facebook group Instagram X (Twitter) Website
9/21/202333 minutes, 25 seconds
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Emotional Regulation: Finding Peace Among the Chaos

Nurturing emotional regulation in neurodivergent kids can feel like a complex puzzle, yet it's vital for their wellbeing. Why is emotional regulation such a challenging problem for them? And how can the concept of co-regulation serve as a bridge to self-regulation? Sheryl Stoller is an expert on supporting families on their journey of raising neurodivergent children. She joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about the intricacies of empathy and non-judgment at home, the challenges faced by teachers in the classroom, and the many points in between. This is your last chance to sign up for our free week-long Crash Course on Creating Neurodiversity-Affirming Schools! The first event is next Tuesday, and all of the events in the course will be live and interactive, so you can talk to Emily and our expert guests, and share and compare ideas with your colleagues from around the world. It’s a great step toward meeting the needs of all students in the classroom. Also, we’ll be launching a membership community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. Sheryl Stoller is a Family Wellbeing Coach for parents of neurodiverse children, helping them to create a supportive environment (within themselves as well as externally) that result in peace of mind, confidence, and the ability to overcome challenges. Sheryl is also a PCI Certified Parent Coach, and Mastery Level Positive Intelligence Coach. In addition to her private practice, Sheryl serves as a Parent Coach in Debbie Reber’s TiLT Parenting community, and a Positive Intelligence Humanitarian Coach providing respite for those affected by the Ukrainian war. She’s a neurodivergent, highly sensitive, seasoned parent of three multi-exceptional young adults, and enjoys supporting other parents in their journey with their neurodivergent kids. BACKGROUND READING Sheryl’s website Facebook LinkedIn
9/14/202331 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Confluence of Neurodiversity and LGBTQ

At the intersection of neurodivergence and LGBTQ identities, self-realization is both complex and personal. The stigmas are multifaceted, and navigating the intricate overlaps between autistic experiences and gender identity is challenging. How can we best support, recognize, and uplift neurodivergent youth within the LGBTQ community? Julia Rutkovsky, a licensed clinical social worker specializing in this unique intersection, joins us today to shed light on the challenges, the overlaps, and the ways in which we can be effective allies and caregivers. Sign up for our free week-long Crash Course on Creating Neurodiversity-Affirming Schools! It happens the week of September 18th, and all of the events in the course will be live and interactive, so you can talk to Emily and our expert guests, as well as your colleagues from around the world. It’s a chance to learn and share ideas that will better position your classroom and school to meet the needs of all learners. Also, we’ll be launching a membership community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. Please take our listener survey. It’s quick and easy, and it will help us understand who is listening, so we can better choose the subjects and guests that matter to you. We value your privacy, and won’t share your personal information with anyone. To volunteer for the research study of gifted/ADHD women, email Jessica Williams at Denver University. click to email. Julia Rutkovsky is a clinical social worker and psychotherapist who specializes in working with neurodivergent and twice-exceptional children, adolescents, and their families. She also works closely with the LGBTQ+ population, and is interested in the confluence of those communities. Julia holds a Masters of Social Work from New York University’s Silver School of Social Work, and she holds a number of advanced training certificates, including child & family therapy, CBT, anxiety, meeting the needs of 2e kids, mindfulness, and dialectical behavioral therapy, among others. BACKGROUND READING Julia’s website
9/7/202330 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mixed-Neurotype Relationships

What are some common issues that crop up in relationships between people of different neurotypes? Are neurodivergent people more drawn to each other than to neuro-normies? Is effective communication more challenging between neurodivergent couples? What about intimacy and affection challenges between people with different sensory sensitivities? Laurie Budlong-Morse is a therapist who specializes in helping neurodiverse couples, and she talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about mixed-neurotype relationships, on this episode of the Neurodiversity Podcast. Sign up for our free week-long Crash Course on Creating Neurodiversity-Affirming Schools! It happens the week of September 18th, and all of the events in the course will be live and interactive, so you can talk to Emily and our expert guests, as well as your colleagues from around the world. It’s a chance to learn and share ideas that will better position your classroom and school to meet the needs of all learners. Also, we’ll be launching a membership community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. Please take our listener survey. It’s quick and easy, and it will help us understand who is listening, so we can better choose the subjects and guests that matter to you. We value your privacy, and won’t share your personal information with anyone. Laurie Budlong-Morse is a private practice therapist and online content creator who specializes in neurodiverse/mixed-neurotype relationships. She offers online workshops and courses for couples, as well as for partners of autistic adults. Laurie blogs regularly about neurodiverse relationships on Medium, and co-facilitates a local networking group for clinicians working with Autistic individuals. In addition to her professional experiences, Laurie grew up in a neurodiverse family and has built a neurodiverse family of her own. BACKGROUND READING Laurie’s website Facebook Medium
8/31/202334 minutes, 26 seconds
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Learning How to Learn, Studying How to Study

What does it take to be an effective learner, and how does a neurodivergent person’s experience differ from that of neurotypical people? Which study methods work better for our neurodivergent population? What role does confidence play in the learning process? Finally, we take no joy in breaking some news to people who fancy themselves good multi-taskers. Cinthia Nebel is a Cognitive Psychological Scientist, and she talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about learning and studying, on episode 187. Sign up for our free week-long Crash Course on Creating Neurodiversity-Affirming Schools that Emily talked about in today’s show. It happens the week of September 18th, and all of the events in the course will be live and interactive, so you can talk to Emily, our expert guests, and other attendees. It’s a chance to learn and share info that will better position your classroom and school to meet the needs of all learners.  Also, soon we’ll be launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. Finally, please take a minute to take our listener survey. It’s quick and easy, and it will help us understand who is listening, so we can better choose the subjects and guests that matter to you. Dr. Cynthia Nebel is a Cognitive Psychological Scientist who has broad interests in human learning and memory, and applying cognitive concepts to improve education. She is currently a senior lecturer in the Leadership & Learning in Organizations Program at Vanderbilt, and is part of the Learning Scientists team, which focuses on researching ways to motivate students, increasing efficacy of teaching strategies and more. BACKGROUND READING Twitter LinkedIn
8/24/202333 minutes, 36 seconds
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Parenting Through the Chaos and Finding Peace

Raising kids and teens who struggle with emotional regulation can be tough. Parents must navigate the complexities of societal pressures, and it can lower self-esteem and cause self-doubt. Today we talk about some essential strategies to establish a warm, connected relationship with a challenging child. We try to help find the balance between talking less, and setting clear, aspirational expectations that are crucial for both parents and kids. Our guest is Dayna Abraham, author of the newly released book “Calm the Chaos,” and we’ll try to help quell your fear of the emotional rollercoaster that often accompanies raising a challenging child. Sign up for our free week-long Crash Course on Creating Neurodiversity-Affirming Schools that Emily talked about in today’s show. All of the events in the course will be live and interactive, so you can talk to Emily, our expert guests, and other attendees, to share and learn how to better position your classroom to meet the needs of all learners. Also, soon we’ll be launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. Finally, please take a minute to take our listener survey. It’s quick and easy, and it will help us understand who is listening, so we can better choose the subjects and guests that matter to you. Dayna Abraham, bestselling author and National Board Certified Educator, is the founder of Lemon Lime Adventures, which provides resources to parents of neurodivergent kids, and helps them find peace, and meet their kids where they are. Dayna is a mother of three neurodivergent children, as well as being an ADHD adult herself, and brings an out-of-the-box perspective to parents raising kids in a modern world. Her work has been showcased in HuffPost, Scary Mommy, BuzzFeed, ADDitude Magazine, Parents Magazine and Lifehacker. She lives in Little Rock, Arkansas with her husband Jason, her kids, and two huge Newfoundland puppies. BACKGROUND READING Calm the Chaos book Dayna’s podcast Facebook Instagram YouTube TikTok LinkedIn
8/18/202334 minutes, 7 seconds
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Life With Synesthesia: Does This Color Smell Funny To You?

With synesthesia, colors can evoke sounds, numbers can generate tastes, and the lines between senses can blur. It also occurs more often in some forms of neurodiversity. Some people have mild forms of synesthesia and don’t realize it. Emily talks with Maike Preißing, a German neurodivergent psychologist and synesthesia expert, on episode 185. Here’s the link for TEFOS. Register for free for The Executive Function Online Summit, so you can join Seth, Emily, and a variety of other professionals this weekend, August 11-13. Don’t forget, we’re launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. This will be an exciting and helpful place, with plenty of activities and resources every week that will help members grow and learn, from experts and each other. Maike Preißing is a neurodivergent psychologist from Germany who supports other neurodivergent adults and adults with mental health issues. Her focus is particularly on the Autism Spectrum and Synesthesia, which inspired her to create a community for people with these conditions, as well as her podcast, “Let’s Talk Synesthesia”. Maike holds a Master’s degree from Leopold-Franzens University in Austria and is passionate about helping others lead happier, more fulfilling lives through her work. BACKGROUND READING Podcast Instagram Website
8/10/202330 minutes, 17 seconds
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When Procrastination Hijacks Your Executive Functioning

Procrastination is something we all do, but it’s even more common among people with executive function challenges. Do they do it for the same reasons as neurotypical people? How can we help lessen the anxiety associated with task initiation? What methods can a neurodivergent individual use to start or finish a project their brain is telling them to put off? Emily talks with Seth Perler about procrastination and task initiation, on episode 184. Here’s the link for TEFOS. Register for free for The Executive Function Online Summit, so you can join Seth, Emily, and a variety of other professionals August 11-13. Don’t forget, we’re launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. This will be an exciting and helpful place, with plenty of activities and resources every week that will help members grow and learn, from experts and each other. Seth Perler is a well-known Executive Function Coach, activist, educator, vlogger, and guy who cares about seeing outside-the-box kids succeed. His passion is coming alongside struggling, neurodiverse learners and giving them effective tools to launch a successful future. Seth also helps educate parents and teachers on how to support neurodivergent learners by hosting TEFOS, The Executive Function Online Summit. BACKGROUND READING Seth’s website TEFOS YouTube Facebook page Facebook group Instagram
8/3/202334 minutes, 20 seconds
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It’s Not You, It’s ADHD

Understanding ADHD is more than understanding its effects on learning or work. ADHD affects personal relationships and friendships too. How does ADHD impact the way we connect, communicate, and care for our loved ones? Alyssa Loman is a neurodivergent licensed clinical professional counselor, and she talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about the intricacies of ADHD within interpersonal bonds, and they share insights on fostering healthy connections. When we were putting together this episode, we were thinking about how many of you might really benefit from having a guide to either reflect on your own experiences and relationships as an ADHDer, or have a conversation with the ADHDers in your life. We decided to create a free resource that can help. It’s a set of reflection questions and printable journal pages to help both adults and kids & teens delve deeper into understanding how ADHD impacts their relationships. Download it for free here. Don’t forget, we’re launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. This will be an exciting and helpful place, with plenty of activities and resources every week that will help members grow and learn, from experts and each other. Alyssa Loman, LPC, LCPC, ADHD-CCSP, is a neurodivergent licensed clinical professional counselor and ADHD-Certified Clinical Services Provider. She specializes in providing neurodiversity-affirming and strengths-based support to ADHD adults, and is particularly passionate about working with individuals diagnosed in adulthood and ADHD women. Alyssa is devoted to improving access to quality mental health care and support, increasing understanding and awareness of neurodiversity, and creating trauma-informed environments to support the individual as a whole. In addition to being a mental health therapist, Alyssa is the co-founder of Empowered Pathways LLC, a training and consulting company focused on providing high-quality, neurodiversity-affirming professional development opportunities. BACKGROUND READING Empowered Pathways website Facebook Instagram LinkedIn
7/27/202333 minutes, 51 seconds
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Trauma-Informed Support for Adopted and Foster Children

The intersection between neurodivergence, trauma, and adopted and foster families has a lot of overlap. There’s a difficulty supporting kids who don’t fit the status quo, either because of their unique wiring, or life experiences. Emily Kircher-Morris is joined by Dr. Laura Anderson, the host of the Real World Parenting podcast, and they talk about her experiences and the strategies she’s learned, both as a therapist and an adoptive parent. Also, we’re launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. This will be an exciting and helpful place, with plenty of activities and resources every week that will help members grow and learn, from experts and each other. Dr. Laura Anderson has been a licensed child and family psychologist working with kids and teens for 25 years. Her expertise lies in learning and behavior assessments, and she specializes in areas of adoption, gender identity development, anxiety, neurodiversity, and third culture kids and families. Dr. Anderson provides training around the globe, and has been featured in the New York Times, The Guardian, and Psychology Today. She is also an adoptive parent herself, and continues to learn from the lived experience of adoptees. Dr. Anderson is passionate about helping families thrive by overcoming differences. BACKGROUND READING Real World Parenting Podcast Laura’s website LinkedIn Facebook
7/20/202337 minutes, 16 seconds
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Ask Me Anything #5 with Emily Kircher-Morris

What is the best kind of therapy for your child? What is DMDD? How can you support your child’s need for executive function skills? This is episode 181, and it’s another Ask Me Anything with Emily Kircher-Morris. To be part of it, join us on Facebook in The Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group! Also, we’re launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. This will be an exciting and helpful place, with plenty of activities and resources every week that will help members grow and learn, from experts and each other. Educators, here’s more information on our continuing education courses in the Neurodiversity University. Get in touch with us and find out how to make it available to everyone in your district.
7/13/202325 minutes, 30 seconds
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Understanding Behaviors and Emotional Regulation with Mona Delahooke

What is top down behavior, and how does it differ from bottom up behavior? Why is emotional regulation more difficult for neurodivergent people? How impactful or traumatic can a misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis be? Dr. Mona Delahooke, author of the book Brain-Body Parenting, discusses these questions and more with Emily Kircher-Morris on episode 180, a reprise of their timeless visit from one year ago. Educators, here’s more information on our continuing education courses Emily talked about in the Neurodiversity University. Get in touch with us and find out how to make it available to everyone in your district. Also, we’re launching a community for educators who are dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. This will be an exciting and helpful place, with plenty of activities and resources every week that will help members grow and learn, from experts and each other. Mona Delahooke, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist with more than thirty years of experience caring for children and their families. She is a senior faculty member of the Profectum Foundation and a member of the American Psychological Association. She is the author of Beyond Behaviors: Using Brain Science and Compassion to Understand and Solve Children’s Behavioral Challenges, and Brain-Body Parenting. Dr Delahooke is a frequent speaker, trainer, and consultant to parents, organizations, schools, and public agencies. She lives and works in the Los Angeles area. BACKGROUND READING Mona’s website Twitter Facebook Mona’s books on Amazon
7/7/202336 minutes, 45 seconds
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Working, Living, and Learning with ADHD

What is the impact of being diagnosed with ADHD as an adult, after having invested years struggling with neurotypical strategies? What are areas of ADHD that are under-recognized or misunderstood? Why are common strategies for building executive function and coping skills so useless to neurodivergent people? We’re talking with Skye Waterson, founder of something called the Unconventional Organisation, an international ADHD support service for adults with ADHD. Skye and Emily are talking ADHD, on episode 179. Educators, we’re launching a community for those of you dedicated to creating a neurodiversity-affirming learning environment for students! Click here to hop on the waiting list and get more information. Skye Waterson née Rapson is an ADHD coach and the founder of Unconventional Organisation, an international ADHD support service that provides research-backed support to adults with ADHD. Skye’s experience centers around adult education, as well as ssychology, sociology, and public health. She was diagnosed with ADHD as a doctoral candidate before making the decision to leave her candidature to work full-time on Unconventional Organisation, which has now grown to a team of 8 ADHD coaches, online courses and a podcast. BACKGROUND READING Skye’s website The ADHD Skills Lab podcast Instagram
6/29/202333 minutes
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Comfort Zone Ahead, Construction in Progress

We all know that uncomfortable feeling when we are around someone who is pushing us beyond our comfort zone. How can we understand where our own boundaries are, and effectively communicate those boundaries to others? Casey Jourdan works with neurodivergent people to develop coping skills, including setting boundaries, to live more fulfilling lives. She talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about the elusive ‘comfort zone,’ on episode 178. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity Join our Facebook group and take part in conversations about this episode and anything related to neurodiversity, and find a like-minded community of open support. Casey Jourdan is a growth coach who is passionate about supporting neurodivergent individuals. She has a Masters in Mental Health, and personal experience with ADHD, Autism, and traumatic brain injury. Casey helps people create and celebrate who they are without the weight of society’s expectations. She walks with her clients to help them heal their past, reframe their present, and find their new path forward. BACKGROUND READING Website TikTok YouTube Instagram
6/22/202334 minutes, 22 seconds
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Controlling and Harnessing Anxiety

Neurodivergence often comes with a side of anxiety. Is it possible to harness anxiety as a strength? Can we find ways to work with our anxiety, instead of against it? Today we talk with Morra Aarons-Mele, the host of The Anxious Achiever podcast and author of the book by the same name, about rethinking our relationship with anxiety. We’re conducting a two-hour continuing education course for mental health professionals called “Assessing and Treating Suicidality and Self-Injury in Neurodivergent Clients.” You can join online June 20th. To do so, sign up here. Join our Facebook group and take part in conversations about this episode and anything related to neurodiversity, and find a like-minded community of open support. Morra Aarons-Mele is an entrepreneur, communication executive, prolific writer and speaker who is passionate about helping people rethink the relationship between their mental health and their success. She has earned a number of entrepreneurial awards, and her new book, The Anxious Achiever: Turn Your Biggest Fears Into Your Leadership Superpower was recently published by Harvard Business Review press. Her podcast, The Anxious Achiever, spotlights stories from leaders who have reframed anxiety and mental health relating to their careers, and hosts experts to help listeners thrive. Morra holds degrees from Harvard Kennedy School and Brown University. BACKGROUND READING Morra’s website Books The Anxious Achiever on Spotify LinkedIn Twitter
6/15/202333 minutes, 49 seconds
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ODD - Oppositional? Defiant? Or Just Misunderstood?

One of the more misunderstood diagnoses in the world of neurodiversity is ODD, or Oppositional Defiant Disorder. We talk with Amelia Bowler, a behavior consultant and author of the book, The Parent’s Guide to Oppositional Defiant Disorder, about the diagnosis, and how to be better at decoding the message that kids are trying to send through their defiance. This is an encore presentation. We’re conducting a two-hour continuing education course for mental health professionals called “Assessing and Treating Suicidality and Self-Injury in Neurodivergent Clients.” You can join online or in-person on June 20th in Chesterfield, MO. Learn more and sign up for either version: Online virtual In-person Join our Facebook group and take part in conversations about this episode and anything related to neurodiversity, and find a like-minded community of open support. Amelia Bowler is an author, an artist, a parent, and a behavior consultant. Growing up twice-exceptional with undiagnosed disabilities gave Amelia some firsthand experience with neurodivergence, and she is now raising a fantastically neurodivergent child of her own. Her book, The Parents' Guide to Oppositional Defiant Disorder, was published in 2020. BACKGROUND READING Amelia’s website The Parent’s Guide to Oppositional Defiant Disorder Instagram
6/8/202332 minutes, 30 seconds
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Reducing Anxiety Through Mindfulness

Mindfulness is definitely a buzzword today, but what’s the reality of mindfulness and how can it help neurodivergent people? What are some usable techniques for kids? How does mindfulness reduce anxiety? Has the growing trend towards mindfulness caused a skeptical view of its benefits? Emily talks to Dr. Christopher Willard from Harvard Medical School, and together they answer these questions and more on episode 175. We’re conducting a two-hour continuing education course for mental health professionals called “Assessing and Treating Suicidality and Self-Injury in Neurodivergent Clients.” You can join online or in-person on June 20th in Chesterfield, MO. Learn more and sign up for either version: Online virtual In-person Join our Facebook group and take part in conversations about this episode and anything related to neurodiversity, and find a like-minded community of open support. Dr. Christopher Willard is a clinical psychologist and professor at Harvard Medical School, author and international speaker, and consultant based in Massachusetts, focusing on mindfulness and mitigating anxiety. Dr. Willard has presented at two TEDx events and is the author of twenty books, including Alphabreaths (2019), Growing Up Mindful (2016), and How we Grow Through What We Go Through. (2022) His thoughts on mental health have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, mindful.org, cnn.com, and elsewhere. BACKGROUND READING Facebook Twitter Instagram
6/1/202334 minutes, 22 seconds
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Authenticity, Unmasking, and Zest

Living an authentic life is a goal we all have. In the neurodiversity world, that can be a tricky concept. Masking has often become a habit born of self-preservation, and letting go of that can be difficult, and sometimes unsafe. On episode 174 we’re joined by Dr. Rebecca Jackson, a neurodivergent coach who uses her experiences to support her clients with a positive psychology approach. She and Emily talk about how acceptance is the key to being authentic and full of life. Self-regulation can be the key to motivation, and personal interests can be harnessed to help develop coping skills. For information about our SPACE Program, and to get registered, go here. Grab some podcast swag in the form of t-shirts, mugs, tote bags and much more! Dr. Rebecca Jackson is a positive psychology coaching research practitioner. She researches best practice in safely, effectively and inclusively coaching autistic and ADHD adults. She is autistic and ADHD, and so combines research, practice and lived experience in pursuit of neuro-friendly coaching. Rebecca's coaching specialism is helping clients self-regulate to promote their wellbeing and zest. When she's not eating, sleeping and breathing coaching, Rebecca can be found hiking with her dog or planning her next travel adventure. BACKGROUND READING Website Twitter LinkedIn
5/25/202333 minutes, 6 seconds
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Beating Gifted Kid Burnout

Burnout is something everyone occasionally deals with, but it manifests very differently in the world of neurodiversity. Today we talk about the burnout experienced by twice-exceptional and gifted kids. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Brian Housand and Andi McNair, and it’s a conversation all gifted people, and parents of gifted kids, need to hear. Our sponsor is The Gifted Learning Lab, which provides resources and coaching for parents who want to feel more confident raising their intense or sensitive gifted or twice-exceptional kid. Click here for more info and to get their free ‘diffusing power struggles’ course. Join our Facebook group and take part in conversations about this subject and many more. Dr. Brian Housand is the coordinator of the Academically or Intellectually Gifted program at University of North Carolina Wilmington, and creator of Gifted360.com. He is also a published author and speaker, and has worked in education as a classroom teacher, gifted ed teacher, and university professor for over 20 years. Andi McNair is a passionate educator, author and speaker. Andi taught in the gen-ed classroom for 16 years, and then switched to serving gifted learners where she found her calling. She enjoys sharing her passion for innovative education through her books for educators, speaking nationally, and finding meaningful ways to use technology. Andi currently works as the Digital Innovation Specialist in a Waco, Texas school district. BACKGROUND READING Brian Housand BH Facebook BH Twitter BH Instagram Andi McNair AM Facebook AM Twitter AM Instagram
5/19/202337 minutes, 20 seconds
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Technology, Gaming, Social Media, and Your Child

There’s a pressure on parents to allow more technology into the lives of their kids. Gaming and social media have positive and negative aspects, and neurodivergent kids often have a unique relationship to technology. Emily Kircher-Morris talks about it with Debbie Steinberg Kuntz, and they discuss the upcoming Screen Time and Mental Health summit, which starts May 15, and is available free of charge through the following Friday. To take part in the summit, get registered here, or find the link on the episode page of our website. Here’s the link for the summer camp program at Young Scholars Academy. Please use promo code YSANDP10 for 10% off, and to let them know you heard it on the Neurodiversity Podcast. If you’re on Facebook you need to be part of our group, the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy and Support Group. Join today and learn, share, and grow with us! Debbie Steinberg Kuntz, LMFT is a licensed marriage and family therapist and is the founder of Bright & Quirky. She specializes in helping bright kids and families with learning, social, emotional and behavioral challenges optimize their lives in order to thrive. Debbie has interviewed over 300 of the top psychologists and educators, and together with the Bright & Quirky team, has served over 100,000 parents in 150 countries through the Bright & Quirky Child Online Summit, the IdeaLab parent learning community, and a variety of Bright & Quirky programs and services. Debbie lives near Seattle with her husband and two sons. BACKGROUND READING Bright & Quirky Screen Time & Mental Health Summit Facebook
5/11/202333 minutes, 21 seconds
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The Misunderstanding About Motivation

Are kids really unmotivated, or are you just misinterpreting the signs? Dr. Ellen Braaten talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about the importance of understanding signs of a lack of motivation in neurodivergent children. They delve into the connection between motivation and executive functioning, and explore strengths-based interventions and ways to integrate them into our interactions with neurodivergent kids. They also touch on the controversial question of whether there’s any real value to extrinsic motivators. A meeting of the minds about motivation, on episode 171. Here’s the link for the summer camp program at Young Scholars Academy. Please use promo code YSANDP10 for 10% off, and to let them know you heard it on the Neurodiversity Podcast. For information about our SPACE Program, and to get registered, go here. Dr. Ellen Braaten is the Executive Director of Learning and Emotional Assessment Program at Massachusetts General hospital, and the Kessler Family Chair in Pediatric Neuropsychological Assessment. She also holds an Associate Professorship at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Braaten is also an experienced and prominent psychologist, researcher, speaker, and author of the upcoming book, Bright Kids Who Couldn’t Care Less. She received her Master’s from the University of Colorado, and her Ph.D. from Colorado State University. BACKGROUND READING Dr. Braaten’s website Bright Kids Who Couldn’t Care Less Massachusetts General’s Learning & Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) Twitter LinkedIn Instagram
5/4/202336 minutes, 29 seconds
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Can We Stop Pathologizing Kids Now?

Is the neurodiversity movement a social justice issue? How can we convince the world that differences aren’t deficits? Many of our widely-held beliefs are grounded in fairly obvious ableism. Dr. Bibi Pirayesh is a learning specialist and educational therapist, and founder of the Differences Are Not Deficits Project. She speaks out with Emily Kircher-Morris on episode 170. Here’s the link for the summer camp program at Young Scholars Academy. Please use promo code YSANDP10 for 10% off, and to let them know you heard it on the Neurodiversity Podcast. Get mom some swag for Mother’s Day and support the podcast at the same time. Dr. Bibi Pirayesh works with children in grades 1-12 with a wide range of learning difficulties, including dyslexia, ADHD, and spectrum disorders. Her work as a learning specialist and educational therapist in private practice emphasizes on remediating learning disabilities in a one-on-one setting. Dr. Pirayesh is also a speaker and community advocate for children and families around learning rights. In 2020, Dr. Pirayesh launched The Different is Not Deficit Project to promote the importance of seeing learning disabilities as a social justice issue. In addition to her private practice and advocacy work, she is also adjunct faculty at Pepperdine University’s Graduate School of Education and Psychology. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience and Education from the University of Pittsburgh, and a Master’s Degree in Developmental Psychology from Columbia University.
4/27/202334 minutes, 32 seconds
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PDA, Autism, and Parenting for Peace

As Autism Acceptance Month continues, we present a visit with Casey Ehrlich. Casey talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about the relationship between autism and PDA, and about her experience raising her PDA autistic son. She has a different approach that works for her, but rubs some people the wrong way. It’s all ahead, in episode 169. For information about our SPACE Program, and to get registered, go here. Register today and get started on our free executive function course from the Neurodiversity University! It's set up for educator professional develop and continuing education credit. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy and Support Group on Facebook. Casey Ehrlich, Ph.D., is the founder of At Peace Parents, LLC, an organization that gives parents and therapists tools to support kids with PDA. She’s also the co-founder of the PDA Parents community and podcast. With a background in social science, methodology, and research, Casey takes an objective and non-judgmental approach to supporting families. She’s conducted original research on conflict, peace, and non-violence in areas impacted by civil war in Colombia, and brings those insights to her work with families raising PDA children and teens, or those with hyper-sensitive nervous systems, fight, flight, and freeze behaviors, and trauma. She is also raising two sons, one of whom is PDA Autistic. BACKGROUND READING At Peace Parents At Peace Parents Podcast on Apple Facebook Instagram
4/20/202334 minutes, 33 seconds
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Autism Acceptance Month: Life as an Autistic Middle-Grade Fiction Author

Selah is an autistic 7th grader at a private school, and is navigating all of the expectations and social relationships of being neurodivergent. She’s the main character in a middle-grade fiction book called Good Different, by Meg Eden Kuyatt, and Emily Kircher-Morris talks to her about life as an autistic author. Who was the inspiration for Selah? Was it difficult to write her story completely in poem form? What advice does Meg have for neurodivergent kids growing up today? It’s all in episode 168, part of our celebration of Autism Acceptance Month. Here’s the link for the summer camp program at Young Scholars Academy. Please use promo code YSANDP10 for 10% off, and to let them know you heard it on the Neurodiversity Podcast. To get A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (2nd edition) at a 25% discount, click here and use the discount code NDPOD25. ABOUT THE GUEST Meg Eden Kuyatt is a 2020 Pitch Wars mentee, and teaches creative writing at colleges and writing centers. She is the author of the 2021 Towson Prize for Literature winning poetry collection “Drowning in the Floating World” (Press 53, 2020) and children’s novels, most recently “Good Different,” a JLG Gold Standard selection (Scholastic, 2023). BACKGROUND READING Meg’s Linktree Website Instagram Facebook Twitter
4/13/202329 minutes, 6 seconds
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Ask Me Anything #4 with Emily Kircher-Morris

Are there training and certification programs for medical practitioners? How can we help our kids deal with existential dread? Is there still no connection between taking Tylenol during pregnancy and autism? Plus many other questions, asked and answered, on our fourth Ask Me Anything. Emily Kircher-Morris dishes it out on episode 167!  To get in on the asking, join our Facebook group: The Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group. To get A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (2nd edition) at a 25% discount, click here and use the discount code NDPOD25.
4/10/202325 minutes, 1 second
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Autism Acceptance Month: Newly Diagnosed at Age Forty-Something

It’s common today for people to be diagnosed as neurodivergent as an adult, having survived childhood without the recognition or support that may have come along with a diagnosis. Our guest lived that experience. Carolyn Kiel is the host of the Beyond 6 Seconds podcast, and she joins Emily to talk about her life as an autistic woman. What are the hurdles and barriers to getting an autism diagnosis? Does a diagnosis even matter once you’re an adult? How can looking back at your childhood from that new perspective change the way you think about the world? It’s episode 166, and it’s part of our special series during April, Autism Acceptance Month. This episode is brought to you by SPACE - Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions. To register for SPACE, submit your information through this portal. For more details go to Neurodiversity University. Join the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy and Support Group on Facebook! ABOUT THE GUEST Carolyn Kiel is an experienced instructional designer of employee training programs. On her award-winning podcast, Beyond 6 Seconds, she features neurodivergent entrepreneurs, creatives and advocates who shatter misconceptions, break stigma, and showcase the diversity of the neurodivergent community. Carolyn has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Vassar College and a Master of Arts in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. BACKGROUND READING Website Instagram Twitter LinkedIn Facebook YouTube
4/6/202338 minutes, 55 seconds
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Autism Acceptance Month: The World is (almost) Ready For Neurodiversity

During Autism Acceptance Month, we’re reminding anyone who will listen that acting differently, speaking differently, or following different social rules, doesn’t make someone less human or deserving of respect. Dr. Barry Prizant is the author of Uniquely Human, and joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about moving the concept of neurodiversity forward, and how we can continue advancing society toward equality and respect for everyone, regardless of their wiring. This is a previously published interview with updated information for AAM 2023. Our new program is SPACE - Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions. To register for SPACE, submit your information through this portal. For more details go to Neurodiversity University. Emily is a co-author of A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (2nd edition), which will be released April 11! For 25% off, click here and use the discount code NDPOD25. ABOUT THE GUEST Barry M. Prizant, PhD, CCC-SLP is among the world’s leading authorities on autism and neurodevelopmental conditions, and is recognized as an innovator of respectful, person- and family-centered approaches for autistic and neurodivergent individuals and their families. With fifty years of experience as a clinical scholar, researcher, and international consultant, he is a Visiting Scholar at Brown University, a certified speech-language pathologist, and director of Childhood Communication Services at his private practice. Barry is coauthor of The SCERTS Model: A Comprehensive Educational Approach, now being implemented in more than a dozen countries. He has published four books, more than 140 articles and chapters and has received many awards, including the Honors of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association (their highest recognition), the Princeton University Eden Foundation career award for improving quality of life for persons on the autism spectrum, and the Divine Neurotypical Award of GRASP, the world's largest autistic self-advocacy organization. He has been a two-time featured presenter at the United Nations on World Autism Awareness Day. His recent best-selling book, Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism is now published in 22 languages, and he co-hosts and co-produces Uniquely Human: The Podcast. BACKGROUND READING Barry’s website Uniquely Human, the Podcast Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism (book)
3/30/202338 minutes, 1 second
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The Quintessential Book on Parenting Gifted Kids

Many consider “A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children: A Resource for Caregivers and Advocates” to be the most comprehensive and important handbook on the subject of giftedness ever published. However, it was originally released in 2007, and since then, updated research has placed giftedness under a much more focused lens. Our guest, Ed Amend, was one of the original co-authors, and he recruited Emily Kircher-Morris to co-author a second edition, complete with a wealth of new information and research. In this episode they talk about what’s new in the updated version, and how our understanding of giftedness has changed in the 16 years since its first release. This episode is brought to you by SPACE - Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions. To register for SPACE, submit your information through this portal. For more details go to Neurodiversity University. To get A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (2nd edition) at a 25% discount, click here and use the discount code NDPOD25.   ABOUT THE GUEST Edward R. Amend, Psy.D., is a Clinical Psychologist at The Amend Group in Lexington, KY. He has worked in both private practice and community mental health settings, as well as in consulting positions with clinics, hospitals, schools, and other organizations. Dr. Amend is co-author of A Parent's Guide to Gifted Children, and Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Asperger's, Depression, and Other Disorders. Dr. Amend has held various positions, including on the Board of Directors of Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted (SENG); President of the Kentucky Association for Gifted Education (KAGE) and Chair for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Counseling and Guidance Network. He has been a consultant to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development and a Contributing Editor for Roeper Review, a peer-reviewed journal for gifted education.   BACKGROUND READING A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children (2nd edition), available April 11, 2023 Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults The Amend Group Facebook Twitter
3/23/202333 minutes, 52 seconds
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Preparing for a More Independent College Experience

We welcome Elizabeth Hamblet, the author of Seven Steps for College Success: A Pathway for Students with Disabilities, to talk about how parents can prepare their neurodivergent kids for college. We talk about when to begin preparing, and how to develop processes and good habits. We discuss what most colleges offer (or don’t offer) to neurodivergent students, and when it might be best to alter plans. The truth about post-high school accommodations might shock you. We talk about it in episode 163. This episode is brought to you by On Your Marq, a College Success program for neurodivergent students at Marquette University. Call 414-288-0203, or go to www.marquette.edu/on-your-marq. To register for a spot in our SPACE program, submit your information through this portal. For more details, and for information on our courses for educators and parents, head to the Neurodiversity University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Elizabeth Hamblet began her career as a high school special ed teacher, then transitioned to working in a college setting, helping students with time management, organization, reading and study skills. Elizabeth is also a recognized author and speaker who utilizes her 20+ years of experience to help parents find an organized path through the college preparation process, get the real truth about accommodations for students entering college, and navigating the admissions process. She’s also a contributing writer for Disability Compliance for Higher Education, a journal for higher education disability professionals, and her work has also appeared in the Journal of College Admission, Teaching Exceptional Children, ADDitude Magazine, Attention, Raising Teens, and Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, and on platforms like Understood.org and ADDitudemag.com. BACKGROUND READING Elizabeth’s website Elizabeth’s book LD Advisory on Facebook Elizabeth on Twitter YouTube
3/16/202340 minutes, 25 seconds
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Multipotentiality: When There’s More Than One Right Answer

While career changes are possible later in life, our first choice defines much of our career so it’s important to make careful decisions. But when multipotentiality comes into play, there could be many solid options. Throw in something like perfectionism, and it can bring the process to a halt. Dr. Jon Goodwin from UC Santa Barbara joins Emily to talk about multipotentiality, and when there’s more than one right answer. This episode is brought to you by On Your Marq, a college success program for neurodivergent students at Marquette University. Call 414-288-0203, or go to https://www.marquette.edu/on-your-marq. Sign up for our free course, Using Fandoms + AI to Develop Coping Skills for Neurodivergent Kids, available through our learning portal, the Neurodiversity University.  Head to our new merchandise page to check out our popular “a little weird is good” t-shirt, along with lots of other shirts and swag to tell the world you support the podcast! ABOUT THE GUEST - Jon W. Goodwin, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where also serves as the Director of Clinical Training for the doctoral- and specialist-level school psychology programs. His research is focused on the assessment of learning differences and psychoeducational services for high ability students. As a licensed psychologist and nationally certified school psychologist, he provides advanced training and supervision in psychoeducational assessment, counseling and psychotherapy, and the delivery of psychological services in schools. BACKGROUND READING Jon at LinkedIn Gevirtz School at UC Santa Barbara
3/9/202336 minutes, 10 seconds
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What To Do When Kids Worry (encore)

Parents often struggle with helping their children manage anxiety. Dr. Eli Lebowitz of Yale University joins us to talk about his research and work with children and their parents on managing anxiety and OCD. He’s also developed a program to teach parents how to help their children with anxiety, and to help therapists learn new therapy techniques. To register for SPACE, submit your information through this portal. For more details, head to Neurodiversity University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Professor Eli Lebowitz studies and treats childhood and adolescent anxiety at the Yale Child Study Center. His research focuses on the development, neurobiology, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders, with special emphasis on family dynamics and the role of parents in these problems. Dr. Lebowitz is the lead investigator on multiple funded research projects, and is the author of research papers, books (including Breaking Free of Child Anxiety & OCD) and chapters on childhood and adolescent anxiety. He is also the father of three boys. BACKGROUND READING Research via Google Scholar Breaking Free of Child Anxiety & OCD SPACE on Facebook
3/2/202344 minutes, 50 seconds
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Getting Verbal About Non-Verbal Intelligence

Intelligence is divided into several categories, and today we’re talking about non-verbal intelligence. It’s often harder to recognize, so it can be a struggle for people with higher non-verbal intelligence to show their abilities. What are the signs of high non-verbal intelligence? How can we tease out those signs in people who mask, or those who have spiky profiles? Mark Hess is the editor of the SENG Library, and President of the Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented. Mark and Emily are talking about non-verbal intelligence, today on episode 160. Here’s a link to register for our free webinar about the SPACE program, happening Monday, February 27 at 8:00pm eastern/5:00pm pacific. SPACE is a service provided through the Neurodiversity University. Get more info on the website. Bridges Academy Online is a proud sponsor of episode 160. For more information go to bridges.edu. ABOUT THE GUEST Mark Hess is the President of the Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented and editor of the SENG Library. He has published nine books for gifted specialists, including I Used to Be Gifted, as well as a number of resources for educators on critical thinking and social-emotional needs of gifted students. Through his role with Portable Gifted and Talented, Mark has shared over 25,000 free resources. You can visit his website at www.giftedlearners.org. When he’s not speaking or writing, Mark is the Gifted Programs Specialist in a large urban school district in Colorado Springs. BACKGROUND READING Mark’s website LinkedIn Facebook I Used To Be Gifted
2/23/202339 minutes, 14 seconds
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Autistic Girls Are Going Undiagnosed or Misdiagnosed

Often, autistic girls are called shy, introverted, perfectionistic, confused, anything BUT autistic. There is a pervasive impression, even in the medical community, that autism occurs in boys vastly more often than girls. The result is, autistic girls are missing out on services and tools that are available to them. Holly Blanc Moses is a therapist, and the host of The Autism ADHD Podcast, and she joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about missing autism in girls. On Your Marq at Marquette University is a proud sponsor of episode 159. For more information, go to http://www.marquette.edu/on-your-marq. Also, here’s the link to pre-order A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children, Second Edition. ABOUT THE GUEST - Holly Blanc Moses is passionate about helping neurodivergent children, adults and their families. Over the last 23 years, she has provided mental health therapy in the areas of emotional regulation, anxiety, social interaction, depression, parent-child relationship, and school success. She is the host of The Autism ADHD Podcast and Autism ADHD TV. Holly is also the mother of two neurodivergent children. BACKGROUND READING The Autism ADHD Podcast Autism ADHD TV Facebook group for parents Facebook group for professionals Holly’s practice Education and course website  
2/16/202333 minutes, 22 seconds
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Surviving in a Digital World

The technology world is changing quickly. For confirmation, look no further than ChatGPT. Parents, teachers, and mental health professionals are rushing to determine where to draw new lines, and which lines to erase, so that kids are able to safely utilize resources and entertainment. Also, what is okay to post publicly? How can kids cope with FOMO (fear of missing out)? How can we help them deal with anxiety when they see the highly filtered lives of others on social media? Dr. Devorah Heitner is the author of Screenwise: Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World, and the forthcoming book Growing Up in Public. Dr. Heitner joins Emily Kircher-Morris to discuss these issues and more. This episode is sponsored by Understood. Visit U.org for expert resources on ADHD, dyslexia, and other learning and thinking differences. If you’re a parent with kids who may be struggling with anxiety or obsessive & compulsive thoughts, make plans to join us for a free webinar to learn more about a new program we’re offering through the Neurodiversity Alliance, called SPACE. Here’s the link to register, and download the PDF for more information. Listen to episode 88 for our conversation with Dr. Eli Lebowitz about the SPACE program. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Devorah Heitner is a resource parents turn to for empowering advice on raising resilient and kind kids in an always-connected world. Her previous book, Screenwise: Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World, was an Amazon bestseller, and she is a featured speaker at conferences and independent & public schools in the United States and abroad. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN Opinion, Fast Company, and elsewhere. Dr. Heitner earned a Ph.D. in media/technology and society from Northwestern University and has taught at DePaul University, Lake Forest College, and Northwestern. Here's a link to Devorah's free email course, Seven Day Tech Habit Reset.  
2/9/202331 minutes, 48 seconds
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When Neurodiversity Meets Existentialism (encore)

We’re still in a years-long pandemic. Humanity feels like it’s crumbling. How do we deal with the inevitable feelings of existentialism? It’s common for neurodivergent people to experience it more intensely, and at an earlier age. They question life, worry about death, and generally ask, “what’s it all about?” Our guest is Leon Garber, author of a blog called Leon’s Existential Cafe, and we’re diving deep on episode 157. It’s an encore presentation of a chat from 2020, but is very pertinent today. Today’s episode is sponsored by The Council for Exceptional Children. For more information, go to exceptionalchildren.org. ABOUT THE GUEST - Leon Garber is a philosophical writer, and a Licensed Mental Health Counselor/Psychotherapist — specializing in Existential Psychotherapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Trauma Therapy. He’s also the author of Leon’s Existential Cafe, a blog exploring issues of death, self-esteem, love, freedom, life-meaning, and mental health/mental illness, from both empirical and personal viewpoints. His practice is based in Brooklyn, NY.
2/3/202332 minutes, 54 seconds
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How Much Does Biology Influence Behavior?

What more do parents need to understand about their neurodivergent kids in order to reach that “aha” moment? Does it ever even really arrive? Penny Williams, author of Boy Without Instructions, host of the Beautifully Complex Podcast, and co-founder of The Behavior Revolution, joins Emily Kircher-Morris on episode 156 to talk about understanding what motivates our kids to be who they are. This is an episode every parent should hear. Download the Behavior Wheel here. Today’s episode is sponsored by The Council for Exceptional Children. For more information, go to exceptionalchildren.org. ABOUT THE GUEST - Penny Williams is a coach for neurodivergent families and the award-winning author of four books on ADHD, including Boy Without Instructions. She’s the host of the Beautifully Complex Podcast, co-host of the annual Neurodiversity Summits, and co-founder of The Behavior Revolution, an initiative devoted to celebrating and supporting kids with ADHD or autism.  Penny empowers parents to help their neuro-atypical kids - and families - thrive.
1/27/202337 minutes, 54 seconds
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Declarative Language: A New Strategy for Neurodivergent Communication

Often, neurodivergent people have a completely different communication experience than neurotypicals. They respond differently to regulation, attention, and motivation, and often parents struggle when trying to improve connections with their kids. Linda Murphy is the author of The Declarative Language Handbook, and she’s joining us with ideas on how to reframe communication and break down barriers. Here’s a link to the Neurodiversity University, where you can find info on our first two courses, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students, and Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. We’ll be adding courses for parents, mental health professionals, and more as we enter 2023, so look for more information along the way. Episode 155 is brought to you by Bridges Academy Online, a high school education for twice-exceptional students. Find them at bridges.edu. ABOUT THE GUEST - Linda Murphy is a speech language pathologist and RDI Consultant. She co-founded the “Peer Projects Therapy From the Heart” clinic in Beverly, Massachusetts, and has authored several books and numerous articles during her career. Linda has enjoyed working with individuals with social learning differences for over 25 years.
1/19/202338 minutes, 18 seconds
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Counseling In a Neurodiversity-Affirming World

What does it take to make a counseling practice neurodiversity-affirming? What do we need for the wider mental health community to understand or embrace in order to better support neurodivergent people? Dr. Andy Kahn from Understood.org is here to talk with Emily Kircher-Morris about these subjects and many more. The Belin-Blank Center is a proud sponsor of episode 154, for more information, go to www.BelinBlank.org. Here’s a link to the Neurodiversity University, where  you can find info on our first two courses, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students, and Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. We’ll be adding courses for parents, mental health professionals, and more as we enter 2023, so look for more information along the way. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Andrew Kahn is a licensed psychologist specializing in working with neurodivergent individuals. He’s also the Associate Director of Behavior Change & Expertise for Understood.org. His extensive experience within the public school system encompasses providing training, evaluation, consultation and therapeutic support to students, families and staff. Dr. Khan has also worked closely with underserved communities, and supported school committees to develop policies on mental health supports, suicide prevention, and access to learning interventions. Dr. Khan himself identifies as a person with learning and thinking differences. He earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Syracuse, and both master’s and doctoral degrees from Nova Southeastern University.
1/12/202341 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ask Me Anything #3 with Emily Kircher-Morris

Destigmatizing labels. Teaching mental health professionals to be neurodiversity-affirming. Reasonable expectations of your kids, and when is it enough? Plus many other questions, asked and answered, on our third Ask Me Anything. Emily Kircher-Morris dishes it out on episode 153!  To get in on the asking, join our Facebook group: The Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy & Support Group.
1/10/202317 minutes, 34 seconds
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Discovering Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia. What is it? Why haven’t we heard more about it? What is its relationship with dyslexia? On the first episode of 2023, Emily Kircher-Morris sits down with Laura M. Jackson, author of Discovering Dyscalculia, and they talk about Laura’s journey with her dyscalculic daughter, the symptoms to look for, diagnosis, advocacy, and more. This episode is sponsored by Understood. Visit U.org for expert resources on ADHD, dyslexia, and other learning and thinking differences. By the way, here’s a link to the Neurodiversity University, where you can find info on our first two courses, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students, and Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. We’ll be adding courses for parents, mental health professionals, and more as we enter 2023, so look for more information along the way. And, join our Facebook group here! ABOUT THE GUEST - Laura M. Jackson is a writer, advocate, and consultant for individuals with dyscalculia. Her book, Discovering Dyscalculia, is a resource for children, parents, teachers, and adults struggling with or supporting someone with this little-known disability. She is also the mother of two daughters, one of whom is twice-exceptional and dyscalculic.
1/5/202337 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Stealth Nature of Dyslexia (encore)

We’re revisiting a conversation this week with Dr. Dan Peters. Dyslexia is often misunderstood, and educators and parents sometimes mistake it for a simple reading deficit. Dan joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about dyslexia, as well as dysgraphia, and dyscalculia; their indications, where to go for diagnosis, and ways to help your child adapt. The basics of, and the often stealth nature of, dyslexia, on episode 151. Here's a link to the Neurodiversity University, our online campus that features courses on subjects like twice-exceptionality and dyslexia. It's great for continuing education for teachers, as well as a tool to help parents advocate for their kids. Thank you to the sponsor of this episode, Bridges Academy Online, a high school education for twice-exceptional students. Find them at bridges.edu. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Dan Peters is a psychologist, author, and co-founder and Executive Director of the Summit Center. Dr. Peters has devoted his career to the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families, specializing in overcoming worry and fear, learning differences such as dyslexia, and issues related to giftedness and twice-exceptionality. Dan is also co-founder of Parent Footprint, an interactive parenting education community and website. He is host of the Parent Footprint Podcast with Dr. Dan, and is a contributor to The Huffington Post and Psychology Today. Dan is the author of Make Your Worrier a Warrior: A Guide to Conquering Your Child’s Fears, its companion children’s books, From Worrier to Warrior, and The Warrior Workbook. He is co-author of Raising Creative Kids, and many articles on topics related to parenting, family, giftedness, twice-exceptionality, dyslexia, and anxiety.
12/29/202232 minutes, 8 seconds
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Talking to Your Children

Talking to kids can be uncomfortable, but it doesn’t have to be. The basis of every conversation is trust, so once you build a comfortable and trusting rapport, healthy conversations will follow. But what is a healthy conversation? Today, Rebecca Rolland, author of The Art of Talking to Children, is here to talk about the hows, whys and whens of talking to kids. It’s all straight ahead on episode 150. Thank you to the Belin-Blank Center for sponsoring this episode. Head to our new merchandise page to get your swag just in time for holiday gift-giving! ABOUT THE GUEST - Rebecca Rolland is a speech pathologist, writer, and speaker who is passionate about using the power of conversation to cultivate creativity, further personal development, and enhance relationships. She has been published online at Psychology Today and USA Today, and offers professional development services, as well as coaching for both kids and adults.
12/15/202234 minutes, 49 seconds
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The Power of Positivity and Unique Thinking

On episode 149 we continue moving the world toward a more positive view of neurodivergence and its impact on society. We also talk about reimagining established thought processes, and using the plasticity of the brain to move toward compassion for self and others. We bring in the perspective of a neuroscientist, Dr. Nicole Tetreault. She’s the author of the book Insight into a Bright Mind: A Neuroscientist's Personal Stories of Unique Thinking, and she joins Emily Kircher-Morris for one of the final episodes of 2022. Here’s a link to the Neurodiversity University, where you can find info on our first two courses, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students, and Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. We’ll be adding courses for parents, mental health professionals, and more as we enter 2023, so look for more information along the way. And, join our Facebook group here! ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Nicole Tetreault is a neuroscientist, meditation teacher, international speaker, and author of the book, Insight Into a Bright Mind. She’s the founder of the Awesome Neuroscience blog, where she translates the most promising neuroscience and positive psychology for people to live their best lives. Dr. Tetreault received her Ph.D. from Cal-Tech in Biology, specializing in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. She believes we have the ability to wire our minds for positive plasticity through compassion and wisdom, and the ability to live the life we dream about.
12/1/202233 minutes, 22 seconds
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Processing Speed: Why Some Kids Are Faster Than Others

Dr. Ellen Braaten joins Emily to discuss processing speed and why it’s important. They also talk about when it’s not so important, and why it varies so much from child to child. They discuss the impact it has on intelligence testing scores, and ways to help kids increase their processing speed. Dr. Braaten is coauthor of the book Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up. This episode is brought to you by the Belin-Blank Center at the University of Iowa, at www.belinblank.org. With programs and resources to support neurodiverse students and their families. ABOUT THE GUEST -  Dr. Ellen Braaten is the Director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) at Mass. General Hospital and the Track Director of the Child Psychology Training Program at MGH/Harvard Medical School. She is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Braaten received her M.A. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Colorado, her PhD in Psychology at Colorado State University, and completed her internship training at Massachusetts General Hospital. She has been affiliated with Mass. General Hospital since 1998. Dr. Braaten is widely recognized as an expert in the field of pediatric neuropsychological and psychological assessment, particularly in the areas of assessing learning disabilities and attentional disorders. She is the co-author of Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up, and Straight Talk about Psychological Testing for Kids, a book that has become a classic for parents and professionals. She also authored The Child Clinician's Report Writing Handbook, which has been called "the most comprehensive child assessment handbook available." Her most recent book for parents is entitled Finding the Right Mental Health Care for Your Child, published by the American Psychological Association.
11/23/202234 minutes, 48 seconds
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Does Personality Impact Neurodiversity?

Today we talk with Dr. Alex Vuyk, a Professor of Psychology at the Universidad Católica Nuestra Señora de la Asunción in Paraguay. We discuss the Big Five Personality Model, the influence of personality on neurodiversity, and much more. Also, join our Facebook group to be part of the conversation, and get even deeper “into the weeds” on this and other subjects. This episode is sponsored by Bridges Academy Online, a high school education for twice-exceptional students. Find them at bridges.edu. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Alex Vuyk is a Professor of Psychology at the Universidad Católica Nuestra Señora de la Asunción in Paraguay. She has pioneered gifted education research, practice, and advocacy in Paraguay, and founded both the Aikumby Center for Giftedness and Creativity and REDPAC Paraguay to assist both gifted students and professionals working with high ability students. Dr. Vuyk holds degrees from the University of Kansas and Emporia State University. Her research interests include social-emotional development of intellectually and creatively gifted individuals, creative and non-linear career paths, and personality traits related to gifted individuals and their career paths.
11/17/202236 minutes, 23 seconds
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Occupational Therapy for Neurodivergent Kids

Occupational therapy. What you think it is, and what it actually is, might be completely different. Keri Wilmot joins Emily Kircher-Morris for a conversation about how occupational therapy can and does help neurodivergent kids and adults, and as the Toy Queen, Keri talks about how toys and play can be valuable tools. ABOUT THE GUEST - Keri Wilmot is an occupational therapist, toy expert, Dallas blogger, and parent, who shares popular toy reviews, tips, and toy unboxings. Keri is a full-time pediatric occupational therapist. With more than 20 years of clinical experience, professionally Keri specializes in working with infants, young children and their families by promoting developmental milestones in clients’ homes, in the public school system, and in the community. Keri is also the co-founder of ToyQueen.com. This online resource reviews toys, games, attractions, events, movies, experiences, and baby products for their developmental qualities. She's also the author of Wired Differently: A Teacher’s Guide to Understanding Sensory Processing Issues, and contributes to The Genius of Play and Understood.org.
11/10/202232 minutes, 13 seconds
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Books For “Kids on the Fringes”

There’s no doubt you remember a book from your childhood that changed your life, or at least had a profound effect on you. On episode 145 we talk with Jamie Sumner, who writes middle grade novels that feature kids on the fringes, including Roll With It and The Summer of June. We talk about why books affect us and how we can harness the positive impact to help along our neurodivergent kids and students. Be sure to check out our continuing education course called Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. It's also now available for independent study to teachers, parents, or anyone who wants to know more about twice-exceptionality. If you’re an administrator and want to utilize it district-wide, click this link and we’ll get in touch and answer your questions about the course, or about our newest course, Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. All of the details are at www.Neurodiversity.University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Jamie Sumner is a critically acclaimed author whose passion is to celebrate the grit and beauty in all kids - including those with special needs. She has written several middle grade novels for kids and nonfiction books for parents of special needs children, and been featured in The New York Times and The Washington Post.
11/3/202230 minutes, 10 seconds
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Adult Diagnosis ADHD

Being diagnosed with ADHD as an adult brings many questions to mind: What did I miss? What would my life be like if I had been diagnosed as a child? How can I adapt to the new diagnosis, or should I adapt at all? Sarah Snyder-Castañeda is the host of the Adulting With ADHD podcast, and she joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about ADHD as an adult. It’s episode 144, and our final special episode during ADHD Awareness Month. Be sure to check out our continuing education course called Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. Here’s the link to pre-order the course for independent study at a 20% discount! If you’re an administrator and want to utilize it district-wide, click this link and we’ll get in touch and answer your questions about the course, or about our newest course, Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. All of the details are at www.Neurodiversity.University. ABOUT THE GUEST - As the brains behind Adulting With ADHD, Sarah Snyder-Castañeda’s career went from striving to thriving within a year, after being diagnosed in 2015 at the age of 34. She’s had many ups and downs since then, many of which Sarah addresses on her podcast. Her writings on the topic can be found in ADDitude, The Mighty, Bustle, Bitch, and Bust. She’s also guested on other podcasts, like Faster Than Normal, See in ADHD, and LadyHD.
10/27/202229 minutes, 1 second
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Girls and ADHD

Generalizations about ADHD haven’t done girls any favors. ADHD often manifests very differently in girls than in boys. What causes parents, educators, and even doctors, to view the symptoms of ADHD differently with girls? We know that masking, and even variations in environments, often cause symptoms to be missed. How is that happening? And, the pandemic has impacted male and female ADHDers. What is that impact? Joining us is Stephen Hinshaw, a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley, and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at UC San Francisco. ABOUT THE GUEST - Stephen P. Hinshaw is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at UC San Francisco. His focus is on developmental psychopathology, child and adolescent mental health (particularly ADHD), and the use of clinical trials to understand underlying mechanisms. He also actively investigates mental illness stigmatization and attempts to reduce such stigma. Hinshaw has authored over 400 articles, chapters, and commentaries, plus 12 books. He has won numerous national and international research awards, including the James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award from the Association for Psychological Science, the Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from the American Psychological Association, and the Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health from the National Academy of Medicine. He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2021. His extensive media coverage includes the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Today Show, CBS Evening News, ABC World News Tonight, and many more.
10/20/202235 minutes, 52 seconds
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Understanding ADHD Children

Parents often believe they know their children, when in reality they haven’t made the effort to really understand them. That understanding can be even harder when adding ADHD into the mix. Dr. Sharon Saline is a clinical psychologist and author of the book, What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew. She talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about how to go about understanding your child better, and how ADHD can complicate the relationship. It’s part of our special ADHD Awareness Month series. This episode is sponsored by the Belin-Blank Center, at the University of Iowa. Belin-Blank has programs and resources to support neurodiverse students and their families. Find out more at www.BelinBlank.org. ABOUT THE GUEST - Sharon Saline, Psy.D., is a clinical psychologist and the author of the award-winning book, What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew: Working Together to Empower Kids for Success in School and Life, and creator of The ADHD Solution card deck, which specializes in working with neurodiverse children, teens, adults and families living with ADHD, learning disabilities, high-functioning autism, twice exceptionality and mental health issues. Working for years as a clinician, educator, coach and consultant, she translates complex information into accessible language and concepts that everybody can understand and apply in their lives. Her workshops offer practical, insightful strategies to improve managing workers, promote effective communication and increase productivity. She lectures and facilitates workshops internationally on topics such as understanding ADHD, executive functioning, anxiety, motivation and neurodiversity.
10/13/202234 minutes, 3 seconds
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Taming (and Embracing) the ADHD Beast with Eric Tivers

October is ADHD Awareness Month, and we’re spotlighting it with a special series of episodes. On #141, Eric Tivers from the ADHD Rewired Podcast joins us to talk about his journey, diagnosis, support, advocacy, and more. It’s a fascinating discussion you need to hear. ABOUT THE GUEST - Eric Tivers is a licensed clinical social worker, coach, podcaster, speaker, consultant, and entrepreneur who specializes in ADHD, and has worked extensively with individuals on the Autism Spectrum. He’s the host of the ADHD reWired podcast, currently at 449 episodes and counting, and the #1 rated ADHD podcast on Apple Podcasts. You can support our podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity
10/7/202237 minutes, 6 seconds
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Two Conversations About Dyspraxia

We are joined by two guests, Keri WIlmot and Rosemary Richings, both of whom are dyspraxia experts in their own right. Rosemary is dyspraxic, and Keri is an occupational therapist. We look at the condition from both perspectives, and talk about accommodations, diagnoses, and more. Also, if you’re an educator, we have a great continuing education course called Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. Here’s the link to pre-order the course for independent study at a 20% discount! If you’re an administrator and want to utilize it district-wide, click this link and we’ll get in touch and answer your questions. All of the details are at www.Neurodiversity.University. ABOUT THE GUESTS - Keri Wilmot is an occupational therapist, toy expert, Dallas blogger, and parent, who shares popular toy reviews, tips, and toy unboxings. Keri is a full-time pediatric occupational therapist. With more than 20 years of clinical experience, professionally Keri specializes in working with infants, young children and their families by promoting developmental milestones in clients’ homes, in the public school system, and in the community. Keri is also the co-founder of ToyQueen.com. This online resource reviews toys, games, attractions, events, movies, experiences, and baby products for their developmental qualities. Keri is the author of Wired Differently: A Teacher’s Guide to Understanding Sensory Processing Issues, and contributes to The Genius of Play and Understood.org. Rosemary Richings is a Canadian writer, editor, and author. She was diagnosed with dyspraxia when she was a little girl, and her writing is based on her lived experiences. Rosemary’s writing has been featured on sites such as Travel + Leisure, The Good Trade, The Unwritten, Shareable, and a long list of other websites. Rosemary currently serves on the board of trustees of Dyspraxic Me, an English charity specializing in peer support for young people ages 16-25. Her debut book, Stumbling Through Space + Time: Living Life with Dyspraxia, is available through Jessica Kingsley Publishers, and you can get 20% off using the discount code SPACETIMEPOD20.
9/30/202235 minutes, 57 seconds
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Depression and Suicide in the Neurodiversity Community

On episode 139, as part of Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month, we address depression and suicide among neurodivergent people. We talk about intervention techniques that can help parents, teachers, or anyone who interacts with neurodivergent people to understand and support them through trauma, depression, and suicidal ideation. We are joined by Kelsie Bacon, a licensed clinical counselor and play therapist who works with young neurodivergent people to help them feel connected and supported. Also, if you’re an educator, we have a great continuing education course called Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. Here’s the link to pre-order the course for independent study at a 20% discount! If you’re an administrator and want to utilize it district-wide, click this link and we’ll get in touch and answer your questions. All of the details are at www.Neurodiversity.University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Kelsie Bacon, LCSW-S, RPT, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker serving the Albuquerque, NM area. She graduated from UNM with a B.A. in Psychology and Family Studies and received her master’s degree from New Mexico Highlands University in Clinical Social Work. She’s currently earning her certification as a Registered Play Therapist. She provides school-based and agency-based therapeutic interventions for children, adolescents and teens. ​She utilizes DIRFloortime techniques with many clients, and finds it particularly rewarding to work with teenagers to help them feel understood and supported.
9/26/202231 minutes, 14 seconds
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Sorting Out Sensory Awareness

Many people don’t realize they’re neurodivergent until adulthood, after dealing with sensory sensitivities their entire lives. Robert Jason Grant joins us to talk about the various types of sensitivities, how to identify them, and how to cope with and accept them. We also dispel some popular myths, and talk about one of the lesser-known senses, interoception. Also, if you’re an educator, we have a great continuing education course called Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. Here’s the link to pre-order the course for independent study at a 20% discount! If you’re an administrator and want to utilize it district-wide, click this link and we’ll get in touch and answer your questions. All of the details are at www.Neurodiversity.University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Robert Jason Grant is a licensed Professional Counselor, National Certified Counselor, Registered Play Therapist Supervisor, and Advanced Certified Autism Specialist. He owns and operates the Robert Jason Grant Ed.D AutPlay Therapy Clinic. Dr. Grant is an international speaker and keynote presenter having presented for the American Counseling Association, Association for Play Therapy, American Mental Health Counselors Association, and The World Autism Congress. He is a multi-published author of several articles, book chapters, and books.
9/15/202235 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ask Me Anything #2 with Emily Kircher-Morris

We take questions from people in the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy and Support Group on Facebook, and Emily answers them. This is our second AMA, and you’re invited to take part in future ones. Look us up on any of our social media channels for details and to find out how to participate. Here’s the link to pre-order Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students for independent study. Anyone can take the course, and if you register now you’ll receive 20% off the tuition. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
9/8/202220 minutes, 51 seconds
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Mentoring Tweens Through Transitions

As parents and educators prepare for the start of the new school year, middle schools everywhere are welcoming a new crop of excited, nervous, and sometimes unprepared kids. On episode 136 we talk about the middle school transition, and the changes parents can expect to see as their kids adapt to their new surroundings. Guest Phyllis Fagell is the author of Middle School Matters, and she joins us with ideas and advice. (This conversation is also featured in episode 38.) Here’s the link to pre-order Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students for independent study. Anyone can take the course, and if you register now you’ll receive 20% off the tuition. ABOUT THE GUEST Phyllis Fagell is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, Certified Professional School Counselor and journalist. She has worked in both public and private schools with students in grades K-12, focusing on middle school for the last several years. She currently works full time as the school counselor for Sheridan School in Washington, D.C. Sheridan School has been named a 2017 National School of Character. Phyllis also provides therapy to children, teens and adults in private practice at the Chrysalis Group, Inc. As a journalist, Phyllis writes regular columns for The Washington Post on counseling, parenting and education. She writes a weekly advice column for PDK, Intl. for educators, and she blogs for a number of highly-respected national education associations and counseling publications, including AMLE (Association of Middle Level Educators) and Character.org. Her articles often are syndicated by Bloomberg, and they also are reprinted by newspapers throughout the world. BACKGROUND READING Phyllis’s website Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Middle School Matters book You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
8/25/202232 minutes, 38 seconds
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The World is (almost) Ready For Neurodiversity

Acting differently, speaking differently, or following different social rules, doesn’t make someone less human or deserving of respect. On episode 135, Dr. Barry Prizant joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about his work moving the world of neurodiversity forward, and how we can continue advancing society toward equality and respect for everyone, regardless of their wiring. Also, here's a link to our continuing education and professional development course for school district gifted/twice-exceptional programs. It's a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and get it for your district at Neurodiversity University. Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/neurodiversitypodcast ABOUT THE GUEST - Barry M. Prizant, PhD, CCC-SLP is among the world’s leading authorities on autism and neurodevelopmental conditions, and is recognized as an innovator of respectful, person- and family-centered approaches for autistic and neurodivergent individuals and their families. With fifty years of experience as a clinical scholar, researcher, and international consultant, he is a Visiting Scholar at Brown University, a certified speech-language pathologist, and director of Childhood Communication Services at his private practice. Barry is coauthor of The SCERTS Model: A Comprehensive Educational Approach, now being implemented in more than a dozen countries. He has published four books, more than 140 articles and chapters and has received many awards, including the Honors of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association (their highest recognition), the Princeton University Eden Foundation career award for improving quality of life for persons on the autism spectrum, and the Divine Neurotypical Award of GRASP, the world's largest autistic self-advocacy organization. He has been a two-time featured presenter at the United Nations on World Autism Awareness Day. His recent best-selling book, Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism is now published in 22 languages, and he co-hosts and co-produces Uniquely Human: The Podcast.
8/18/202237 minutes, 46 seconds
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Sensory Sensitivities, Parenting, and Neurodiversity

With neurodiversity comes a host of extra effects, sensitivities, and challenges. Parenting a neurodivergent child can require a willingness to reconsider your perspective and sometimes even change your environment, in order to help ease stress and anxiety. Jen Malia, author of TOO STICKY!, is here to lend her perspective as both a parent of neurodivergent kids, and as a neurodivergent person with her own sensitivities and challenges. Also, here's a link to our continuing education and professional development course for school district gifted/twice-exceptional programs. It's a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and get it for your district at Neurodiversity University. Join our Facebook group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/neurodiversitypodcast  You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity ABOUT THE GUEST - Jen Malia is the author of TOO STICKY! Sensory Issues with Autism, a children's picture book based on her own and her younger daughter's experiences living with autism and sensory differences. She is Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Norfolk State University. As a freelance journalist, she has written about autism and neurodiversity for the New York Times, the Washington Post, New York Magazine, Glamour, Woman's Day, Self, and others. She has also appeared on NPR's With Good Reason and was featured in Parent's Parenting Against All Odds video series. She has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Southern California and is currently pursuing an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults at the Vermont College of Fine Arts.
8/11/202233 minutes, 47 seconds
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Let’s Talk Executive Function with Seth Perler

Helping neurodivergent kids with executive function issues is tricky. You have to use the correct strategy for their personality, and they need to ‘buy in’ to getting the help. We talk with executive function coach Seth Perler about different approaches to solving neurodiversity’s executive function problem on episode 133. If you want to join us for TEFOS 2022, click here to sign up! Also, here's a link to our continuing education and professional development course for school district gifted/twice-exceptional programs. It's a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and get it for your district at Neurodiversity University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Seth Perler calls himself a renegade teacher turned executive function coach & 2e coach. He helps struggling students navigate their educational landscapes, and helps them “disrupt” and improve their educational experience. Seth specializes in executive function issues and twice-exceptional learners. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
8/2/202231 minutes, 14 seconds
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Beneath the Surface of Giftedness (encore)

Giftedness is complicated. By itself, it can be difficult to find curriculum, activities, or hobbies that will consistently engage gifted kids. How do you find the “Goldilocks Zone?” Jim Delisle and Emily Kircher-Morris talked about it, and we’re bringing you that conversation again because it’s as pertinent now as ever. Beneath the Surface of Giftedness, on episode 132. Also, here's a link to our continuing education and professional development course for school district gifted/twice-exceptional programs. It's a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and get it for your district at Neurodiversity University. ABOUT THE GUEST - James Delisle, PhD, was a professor of education at Kent State University (Ohio) for 25 years and was selected by faculty and students there as a "Distinguished Professor", the University's most prestigious teaching award. Jim has worked on behalf of gifted children and teens for nearly four decades. The author of hundreds of articles and 17 books that have been published in multiple languages, he continues to consult with schools worldwide in an effort to increase awareness of the needs of gifted children and adults. For the past several years, Jim has worked part time with highly gifted 9th and 10th graders at the Scholars' Academy in Conway, South Carolina. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
7/21/202229 minutes, 38 seconds
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Removing the Roadblocks of Dyslexia

A word many experts use to describe dyslexic people is “misunderstood.” Teachers often don’t catch the signs, parents often don’t know the best ways to advocate for their kids at school, and amidst all of that confusion, the child can feel completely misunderstood. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Jill Stowell, author of Take the Stone Out of the Shoe, about tearing down barriers and building communication. Also, here's a link to our continuing education and professional development course for school district gifted/twice-exceptional programs. It's a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and get it for your district at Neurodiversity University. ABOUT THE GUEST -Jill Stowell, M.S. is the founder and executive director of Stowell Learning Centers where she and her team have helped thousands of children and adults eliminate their struggles associated with dyslexia, learning differences, auditory processing, or attention challenges. She is also the host of the LD Expert podcast. Jill is a two-time best-selling author and speaker who is passionate about helping parents and educators understand their struggling students and the possibilities for real change. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
7/14/202234 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Utility (or Futility) of Labels

The reality of working within a system in flux. The meaning or usefulness of the term “gifted.” The utility (or futility) of labels. The confusion of overlapping diagnoses. Our conversation with Brandon Tessers runs in many directions, and covers many topics, sometimes straying into controversial areas. Nothing’s off the table in episode 130 of The Neurodiversity Podcast. Also, here's a link to our continuing education and professional development course for school district gifted/twice-exceptional programs. It's a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and get it for your district at Neurodiversity University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Brandon Tessers is a licensed clinical professional counselor (LCPC), a trained professional actor, an amateur singer/songwriter, a former schoolteacher and tutor, and a husband and father. Brandon has been helping children and adults with their executive functioning for over a decade, and has been doing so as a licensed therapist for the last five years.  His work focuses on people who exist outside the norm in one way or another and is particularly focused on helping people who consider themselves neurodivergent and/or creative. He’s also a playwright and the DM for his longtime D&D group. He’s a national presenter and has conducted professional development for therapists and teachers. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
7/7/202239 minutes, 4 seconds
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Our Bright and Complex, Twice-Exceptional Kids with Dr. Dan Peters

Quirky kids often become the most accomplished adults, especially when they are allowed to grow and mature in a welcoming, neurodiversity-affirming environment. Dr. Dan Peters joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about the progress we’ve made toward that goal, and some of the pitfalls teachers, parents, and mental health professionals encounter as they guide kids into the future. Other topics include underachievement, PDA, dyslexia, and what we can learn from the bright, complex kids in our lives. Also, educators and school administrators who are looking for continuing education or professional development material for gifted/twice-exceptional programs should consider our new offering, a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and sign up at the Neurodiversity University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Dan Peters is a psychologist, author, co-founder and Executive Director of the Summit Center. Dr. Peters has devoted his career to the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families, specializing in overcoming worry and fear, learning differences such as dyslexia, and issues related to giftedness and twice-exceptionality.  Dr. Dan is also co-founder of Parent Footprint, an interactive parenting education community and website. He is host of the Parent Footprint Podcast with Dr. Dan, and is a contributor to The Huffington Post and Psychology Today. Dan is a co-author of Bright, Complex Kids: Supporting Their Social and Emotional Development. He is co-author of Raising Creative Kids, and many articles on topics related to parenting, family, giftedness, twice-exceptionality, dyslexia, and anxiety.
6/23/202233 minutes
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What We’re Learning About (Pervasive) Pathological Demand Avoidance

If you suspect someone in your life has PDA (Pathological/Persistent Demand Avoidance), this is a conversation you need to hear. Sandra McConnell is a trainer, speaker, and blogger on the subject of PDA, and also the mother of a PDA child. She shares important insights into the struggles involved, and her unique and thought-provoking advice about how to approach life with a PDA-er. ABOUT THE GUEST - Sandra McConnell is a blogger, speaker, and trainer on Autistic Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA). She conducts webinars, workshops and conferences all across the country to train and inform people about PDA. She has two graduate certificates in Learning Differences & Neurodiversity specializing in Executive Functioning and Autism (Landmark College, 2021); a certification in PDA through the UK-based, OCN-accredited organization Neurodivergent Education Support and Training (NEST, 2020); a master's degree in Forensic Psychophysiology (Argosy University, 2006); and a bachelor's degree in Psychology and Criminology (UNM, 2000).  Sandra is the mother of three children, the oldest of whom is a 5th grader and both gifted and PDA. She lives with her family in Maryland, USA.
6/17/202240 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ask Me Anything with Emily Kircher-Morris

We took questions from people in the Neurodiversity Podcast Advocacy and Support Group on Facebook, and Emily answers them. This is our first AMA, and you’re invited to take part in future ones. Look us up on any of our social media channels for details and to find out how to participate. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
6/6/202226 minutes, 3 seconds
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Laying the Groundwork for Life After High School

What happens when scaffolding, such as a 504 plan or IEP, goes away at college? Some schools have transition programs, but many or most do not. We’re talking with Dr. Dawn Matera, co-founder of an institution called Westport College Prep, about how to get neurodivergent kids ready for the changes ahead. Also, educators and school administrators who are looking for continuing education or professional development material for gifted/twice-exceptional programs should consider our new offering, a 15-hour, 6-module course called “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” by Emily Kircher-Morris. Learn more and sign up at the Neurodiversity University. ABOUT OUR GUEST - Dawn Matera is a Dr. of Education with over 25 years of experience. She holds a BS in Psychology, a MS in Special Education, and Doctorate in Educational Leadership. Upon completing a teacher training program and obtaining her Connecticut State Teaching Certification, she taught complex learners at specialty schools, including Eagle Hill and Winston Preparatory, for more than a decade. In 2008, Dr. Matera founded her first education company, A Way to Learn, which provides tutoring, executive function coaching, and test prep to students. Additionally, in 2013, she co-founded The Westport Day School, a Connecticut state-approved special education school for internalizing students in sixth through twelfth grades. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
5/26/202230 minutes, 37 seconds
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Teaching Learners How To Learn

Educators are constantly learning how to better teach neurodivergent learners, but often we overlook the opportunity to help the students be better learners. How does educational therapy work? Is it dependent on the learner having a diagnosis? What is the process for working with families? We talk with Rachel Kapp and Stephanie Pitts, educational therapists and hosts of the Learn Smarter podcast, about helping learners learn, on episode 125. And if you’re an educator, we have a course that will help you understand and support those neurodivergent learners. It’s called Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. It’s available now to school districts, who are licensing it for their educators, and using it to fulfill CE/PD requirements. Here’s a link to more information. Join our Facebook group to participate in our June AMA! ABOUT OUR GUESTS - Rachel Kapp grew up in Los Angeles, California. She attended UC Berkeley, and studied abroad in Rome, Italy. She discovered educational therapy after teaching preschool for 7 years in Los Angeles, and then went on to open her practice, Kapped Therapy of Los Angeles. Stephanie Pitts is also a Los Angeles native, and was a student in both public and private schools. She attended USC, and later went on to teach elementary school. She served as an executive functioning mentor for a family of 9, after which she opened her educational therapy practice, My Ed Therapist. Together, they host the Learn Smarter Podcast. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
5/19/202228 minutes, 47 seconds
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Want To Help Kids? Help Their Parents

We talk a lot about the unique way neurodivergent kids see the world. Often, parents have a completely different view, and sometimes tend to try to rewire the kids to match theirs. Julie Skolnick guides and mentors parents, and has some advice on how they can adjust their approach, understand their kids better, and reap the rewards of a happier environment. We also talk about our new online PD/CE course for educators, “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” which is now available at www.neurodiversity.university. ABOUT THE GUEST - Julie Skolnick, M.A., J.D., founder of With Understanding Comes Calm, LLC, guides parents of gifted and distractible children, mentors 2e adults, trains educators and advises professionals on how to bring out the best and raise self-confidence in their 2e students and clients.  Julie serves as Secretary to the Maryland Superintendent’s Gifted and Talented Advisory Council, is an advisor for the Masters of Education Program for the Bridges Graduate School of Cognitive Diversity, is the Maryland liaison for Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG), is a Committee member for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and serves as an advisor to “The G Word” feature documentary, currently in production.  Julie produces Let’s Talk 2e! virtual conferences, hosts the Let’s Talk 2e! Parent Empowerment Series, maintains the free listing service 2eResources.com, and publishes Gifted & Distractible, a free monthly newsletter. She’s the mother of three twice exceptional children.
5/12/202233 minutes, 39 seconds
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Is This A Game To You? Let’s Talk Play Therapy

Play therapy is an often misunderstood counseling technique. On episode 123 we clear up some of the misunderstandings, with help from Katie Bassiri, a neurodiversity-affirming play therapist. We also talk about our new online course for educators, “Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students,” which is now available at www.neurodiversity.university. ABOUT THE GUEST - Katie Bassiri, LPCC RPT-S, co-authored the book "Congratulations, You're Autistic!" with her husband, Alex Bassiri. Katie and Alex met while living in a 24-hour quiet college dormitory in Flagstaff, Arizona, where they once got into trouble for playing a board game too rambunctiously. They’ve been coloring outside of the lines together ever since. Katie is a registered Play Therapist-Supervisor and Alex likes coming up with words that rhyme. Their autistic family lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico where they own and operate a play therapy agency that supports neurodiverse families. Their new book is now available on Amazon. You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and you’re invited to join our Facebook Group. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
4/28/202228 minutes, 8 seconds
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Attorney, Author, Artist, Autistic

A three-year-old with an autism diagnosis is looking at a completely different future than someone who has masked their neurodivergence for years. We talk with Haley Moss, an attorney, author, and consultant, who helps companies create a neurodiversity-friendly atmosphere. She was diagnosed at age 3, and now has strong opinions about what it takes to move the world in the right direction, but she also has the power and determination to do it. A reminder, we've just officially launched our new course for educators: Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students! It's a six-module, fifteen-hour continuing education course delivered by Emily Kircher-Morris, designed to help identify, understand, and educate our growing population of twice-exceptional students. Get more information via the Neurodiversity Alliance website. ABOUT THE GUEST - Haley Moss is a lawyer, neurodiversity expert, and the author of four books that guide neurodivergent individuals through professional and personal challenges. She is a consultant to top corporations and nonprofits that seek her guidance in creating a diverse workplace, and a sought-after commentator on disability rights issues. The first openly autistic lawyer in Florida, Haley is the recipient of the 2021 American Bar Association (ABA) Making a Difference by Breaking Barriers Award. Her books include “Great Minds Think Differently: Neurodiversity for Lawyers and Other Professionals'' (ABA Book Publishing; June 2021) and “The Young Autistic Adult’s Independence Handbook” (Jessica Kingsley Publishers; November 2021). Her articles have appeared in outlets including the Washington Post, Teen Vogue, and Fast Company. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, as well as on Twitter @neurodiversepod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
4/19/202235 minutes, 14 seconds
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Understanding Pathological Demand Avoidance with Harry J. Thompson

What is Pathological Demand Avoidance and how does it manifest among the neurodivergent? What can we do to educate parents, teachers, and counselors about how to approach it? Understanding demand avoidance can completely transform the way you look at a child. During World Autism Acceptance Month, we feature a conversation with Harry J. Thompson from 2019, on episode 121. ABOUT THE GUEST - Harry J. Thompson was born in Edgware and grew up in Barnet in north London. He is currently based in London, UK. An avid reader & researcher, Harry speaks publicly and is heavily involved in projects & research on all topics around neurodiversity and autism; namely, Pathological Demand Avoidance, a behavior profile within the Autism Spectrum. Harry began to write the first draft of his book in 2015. After connecting with many autistic & PDA families, he pivoted his direction and completed his book in about 6 weeks, a memoir entitled The PDA Paradox: The Highs and Lows of My Life on a Little-Known Part of the Autism Spectrum, published in February 2019. He launched his YouTube channel in 2017. Harry has been elected to a Fellowship of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), in recognition of his work in the field of PDA, and also in recognition of the publication of his book. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, as well as on Twitter @neurodiversepod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
4/11/202237 minutes, 27 seconds
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We’re Not Broken with Eric Garcia

World Autism Acceptance Month continues as Emily Kircher-Morris has a conversation with Washington DC policy and politics journalist Eric Garcia. Eric is autistic, and the author of We’re Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation. They talk about the shifts in how society views and supports autistic individuals, and what still needs to be done. Also don't forget the Bright and Quirky Summit 2022 is going on now. To register, follow this special link. ABOUT THE GUEST - Eric Garcia is the senior Washington correspondent for The Independent, and the author of We’re Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation. He is also a columnist for MSNBC. Previously, he was an assistant editor at the Washington Post's Outlook section, an associate editor at The Hill, and a correspondent for National Journal, MarketWatch and Roll Call. He has also written for the Daily Beast, the New Republic, and Salon.com. Garcia is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He lives in Washington, D.C. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, as well as on Twitter @neurodiversepod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
4/7/202229 minutes, 24 seconds
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Autism’s History and Neurodiversity’s Future with Steve Silberman

As part of our special coverage for World Autism Acceptance Month, we talk with Steve Silberman, author of Neurotribes, about autism, the neurodiversity movement, and where it’s going. We talk about the writing of Neurotribes, and discuss some other books you might want to check out. This is an encore presentation of an earlier interview from 2021. Also don't forget the Bright and Quirky Summit 2022 is going on now. To register, follow this special link. ABOUT THE GUEST - Steve Silberman is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in Wired, the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Financial Times, the Boston Globe, the MIT Technology Review, Nature, Salon, and many other publications. He is the author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity (Avery 2015). The book became a widely-praised bestseller in the United States and the UK, and won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction, a California Book Award, and a Books for a Better Life award. It was chosen as one of the Best Books of 2015 by The New York Times, The Economist, The Financial Times, The Boston Globe, The Independent, and many other publications. Steve gave the keynote speech at the United Nations for World Autism Awareness Day. He has given talks on the history of autism at Yale, Harvard, MIT, Oxford, the National Academy of Sciences, Queen Mary University, Apple, Microsoft, Google, and many other major institutions. His TED talk, “The Forgotten History of Autism,” has been viewed more than a million times and translated into 25 languages. Silberman’s Twitter account (@stevesilberman) has made Time Magazine’s list of the best Twitter feeds. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, as well as on Twitter @neurodiversepod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people.
4/4/202241 minutes, 27 seconds
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Embracing the Bright Without Quashing the Quirky

The landscape is slowly changing for neurodivergent kids, but progress is slow and we’re facing headwinds. Getting a diagnosis is still integral to receiving educational services and insurance benefits, but there are downsides that can work to impede progress. Debbie Steinberg Kuntz joins us on episode 118 to talk about those subjects, and the free Bright & Quirky Summit April 4-8. The summit brings together some of the world’s top neurodiversity experts, including our host, Emily Kircher-Morris. Panel members will host presentations and discussions designed to help parents, educators, counselors, and neurodivergent people understand and overcome challenges facing the neurodiversity community. It’s free for all April 4-8, so use our special link to get registered today. ABOUT THE GUEST - Debbie Steinberg Kuntz, LMFT is a licensed marriage and family therapist and founder of Bright & Quirky, an organization helping bright kids thrive, even with learning, social, emotional, and/or behavioral challenges. She specializes in 'twice exceptional (2e)' kids and families, primarily with ADHD, autism, anxiety, and/or learning differences, who have been the focus of her private practice for over a decade. Debbie received her BA from Middlebury College and MA in Child, Couple, and Family Counseling from Antioch University. She enjoys hiking the mountains near Seattle with her husband and two teen boys.
3/31/202229 minutes, 31 seconds
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Letting Your Geek Flag Fly: Guidelines for Strengths-Based Supports

Whether you’re a therapist, parent, or even teacher, it pays to embrace the gaming geeks around you by learning more about their world. Through efforts like relating to game characters, understanding the games they enjoy, and spending time in their world with them, you can learn new ways to help support them in the real world. Anthony Bean is the author of several books about the therapeutic implications of video games, and he joins host Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about letting your geek flag fly. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Anthony Bean is a licensed clinical psychologist, video game researcher, and executive director at the Telos Project, a nonprofit mental health clinic in Fort Worth, Texas. Dr. Bean holds a doctorate in philosophy from Pacifica Graduate Institute, with an emphasis in depth psychology, and teaches at Framingham State University in the psychology department. He specializes in the therapeutic implications of video games and gaming, working with children and adolescents, and the use of video game character identification as a therapeutic technique. He passes on his knowledge of Geek Therapy at Geek Therapeutics; an APA/NBCC/ACE/APT accredited company training professionals on how to use Geek Therapy in practice. He has authored multiple academic articles, book chapters, and the books Working with Video Gamers and Games in Therapy: A Clinician's Guide; The Psychology of Zelda: Linking Our World to the Legend of Zelda Series; The Psychology of Final Fantasy: Surpassing the Limit Break, and Integrating Geek Culture into Therapeutic Practice: A Clinician’s Guide to Geek Therapy.
3/23/202229 minutes, 17 seconds
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Understanding Behaviors and Emotional Regulation with Mona Delahooke

What is top down behavior, and how does it differ from bottom up behavior? Why is emotional regulation more difficult for neurodivergent people? How impactful or traumatic can a misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis be? Dr. Mona Delahooke, author of the new book Brain-Body Parenting (release date March 15), joins us to discuss these questions and more on episode 116. ABOUT THE GUEST - Mona Delahooke, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist with more than thirty years of experience caring for children and their families. She is a senior faculty member of the Profectum Foundation and a member of the American Psychological Association. She is the author of Beyond Behaviors: Using Brain Science and Compassion to Understand and Solve Children’s Behavioral Challenges, and the upcoming book, Brain-body Parenting. Dr Delahooke is a frequent speaker, trainer, and consultant to parents, organizations, schools, and public agencies. She lives and works in the Los Angeles area.
3/10/202236 minutes, 43 seconds
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The Rewards and Punishment Paradox with Alfie Kohn

The data tells us rewarding kids for good behavior and punishing them for bad doesn’t work. In fact, it harms relationships. In the education setting and at home, Alfie Kohn says we need to rethink the way we talk to kids, and how we help them learn behavioral skills, because rewards and punishment are ineffective. Emily Kircher-Morris has a conversation with Alfie Kohn, author of Unconditional Parenting: Moving from Rewards and Punishment to Love and Reason, on episode 115. ABOUT THE GUEST - Alfie Kohn is the author of 14 books on education, parenting, and human behavior, including Punished by Rewards (1993), The Schools Our Children Deserve (1999), Unconditional Parenting (2005), and The Myth of the Spoiled Child (2014).  He has appeared twice on Oprah, as well as on The Today Show and many other TV and radio programs. Kohn works with educators and parents across the country and speaks regularly at national conferences. He lives (actually) in the Boston area and (virtually) at www.alfiekohn.org. Alfie Kohn’s books https://www.alfiekohn.org/books/ Twitter https://twitter.com/alfiekohn You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
2/25/202229 minutes, 34 seconds
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Raising Twice-Exceptional Children, a Book Preview

A new book by Emily Kircher-Morris, “Raising Twice-Exceptional Children: A Handbook for Parents of Neurodivergent Gifted Kids,” is now officially released! Emily and producer Dave Morris talk about the book, preview the contents, and discuss why parents will find it helpful. ABOUT THE BOOK Just because a child is gifted doesn't mean they don't have other types of neurodivergence, like ADHD, autism, dyslexia, and more. Conversely, even children with one of these diagnoses can be cognitively gifted. Raising Twice-Exceptional Children provides you with a roadmap to understand the complex makeup of your "gifted-plus," or twice-exceptional, child or teen. The book helps you understand your child's diagnosis, meet their social-emotional needs, build self-regulation skills and goal setting, and teach self-advocacy. It also shows you effective ways to collaborate with teachers and school staff, and it offers advice on finding strength-based strategies that support development at home. For too long, these kids have fallen through the cracks. This book provides key information on how to best support neurodivergent children by leveraging their strengths while supporting their struggles.
2/4/202213 minutes, 28 seconds
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Technology: Keeping Kids Safe from the Digital Dark Side

Technology use, for both kids and adults, is in uncharted territory. With ‘sticky’ algorithms, misleading information, and the tracking capabilities of technology companies, it’s becoming more and more difficult to know where it’s safe to go, and how much exposure is too much. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Dr. Alex Packer, author of Slaying Digital Dragons, about how to navigate the murky waters of the digital dark side, and how to involve your kids in setting their own healthy limits. ABOUT THE GUEST - Alex J. Packer, Ph.D., is an educator and psychologist. A recognized expert on adolescent development, parenting, and substance abuse prevention, Alex served for 14 years as President and CEO of FCD Educational Services, the leading nonprofit provider of onsite K-12 drug education and substance abuse prevention services for schools throughout the United States and in over 60 countries abroad. Alex is the author of 11 books for parents, counselors, teachers, and teenagers, including Slaying Digital Dragons: Tips and Tools for Protecting Your Body, Brain, Psyche, and Thumbs from the Digital Dark Side, and How Rude!: The Teen Guide to Good Manners, Proper Behavior, and Not Grossing People Out. Alex graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy. He received undergraduate and Master’s degrees from Harvard University and the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Ph.D. in Educational and Developmental Psychology from Boston College. He served as headmaster of Parkmont School in Washington, D.C., and was the Director of Education for the Capital Children’s Museum. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
1/20/202234 minutes, 40 seconds
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What’s So Normal About Normal?

Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Jonathan Mooney, who authored a book called Normal Sucks, and who learned to read at the age of 12. They talk about the gap between normal and neurodivergence, and how advocates can help bridge it effectively and permanently. Who can advocate? How does the life experience of neurodivergent people affect how they parent their own kids? How does the deficit-model approach differ from strengths-based? What is the effect of lack of support on mental health? ABOUT THE GUEST - Jonathan Mooney is a neurodiverse author and advocate who did not learn to read until he was 12 years old. He went on to graduate from Brown University and is the co-founder of Eye To Eye, a non-profit advocacy organization for people with learning and attention differences. He is also the author of three books, most recently Normal Sucks. His work has been featured in the New York Times, LA Times, on ABC News, and National Public Radio, to name a few. Mr. Mooney speaks across the nation about neurological and physical diversity, inspiring those who live with differences, and advocating for change. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
1/13/202231 minutes, 51 seconds
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2021’s Biggest Conversations: Pathological Demand Avoidance (from episode 85)

The language around autism and neurodiversity in general is changing. As part of the review of 2021’s biggest conversations we present a chat with Kristy Forbes, founder of Australia-based inTune Pathways, about PDA (Pathological Demand Avoidance), the difference between PDA and other types of demand avoidance, and the changing language of autism, especially the terminology society uses to describe neurodivergent people. You can learn more about Kristy and PDA on the episode 85 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.
1/1/202242 minutes, 15 seconds
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2021’s Biggest Conversations: Helping Kids With Anxiety (from episode 88)

Parents often struggle with helping their children manage anxiety. Dr. Eli Lebowitz of Yale University talked with Emily Kircher-Morris about his research and work with children and their parents on managing anxiety and OCD. He’s also developed a program to teach parents how to help their children with anxiety, and to help therapists learn new therapy techniques. This was one of the biggest conversations of 2021, and for details go to the episode 88 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.
12/31/202144 minutes, 48 seconds
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2021’s Biggest Conversations: Supporting Bright Kids (from episode 89)

How can we knock down the walls that surround many neurodivergent kids? Should teachers play a role in their students’ social and emotional well-being, or is school only about academic rigor? What are some teaching techniques that will get kids talking and participating? Emily Kircher-Morris and Jim Delisle have a conversation about ways to release the potential often locked inside neurodivergent kids, and it was one of the biggest conversations of 2021. For more information about Jim Delisle’s work, visit the episode 89 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.
12/30/202136 minutes, 53 seconds
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2021’s Biggest Conversations: Oppositional Defiant Disorder (from episode 92)

One of the more misunderstood diagnoses in the world of neurodiversity is ODD, or Oppositional Defiant Disorder. We talk with Amelia Bowler, a behavior consultant and author of the book “The Parent’s Guide to Oppositional Defiant Disorder,” about the diagnosis, and how to be better at decoding the message that kids are trying to send through their defiance. This conversation is from another of the most-downloaded episodes of 2021. For more information about Amelia and her book, go to the episode 92 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.
12/29/202132 minutes, 44 seconds
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2021’s Biggest Conversations: Rejection Sensitivity Disorder (from episode 83)

Most of us have at least some rejection sensitivity, but with neurodivergent people it’s often magnified. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Brendan Mahan, an ADHD and executive function consultant, about how to reduce or overcome rejection sensitivity. This is an episode everyone can benefit from, and don’t forget to check out Brendan’s podcast, ADHD Essentials. This conversation is one of the most popular of 2021. For guest info and more, visit the episode 83 page at www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.
12/28/202139 minutes, 3 seconds
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From Illiterate to Doctor Dyslexia Dude: A Superhero Story

“By the time you’re 18, you’ll be dead or in jail.” When those words come from your teacher or coach, it takes a long time to unlearn that belief. This is the story of a troubled twice-exceptional teen who had no idea about his diagnosis until after he fought his way into college. Today, Dr. Shawn A Robinson is a reading instructor at Madison College, and a Senior Research Associate in Wisconsin’s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory. He and his wife are the authors of the Doctor Dyslexia Dude book series. This is an inspiring story you need to hear. ABOUT THE GUEST - Shawn A Robinson PhD is a full-time reading instructor at Madison College, a Senior Research Associate in Wisconsin’s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory (Wei LAB) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a social entrepreneur, co-founder of Doctor Dyslexia Dude, former board member of the International Dyslexia Association, and serves on the inaugural advisory council of Benetech. Robinson graduated from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh (UWO) with a Bachelor of Science in Human Services, a Master’s in Education from DePaul University, and a PhD in Language and Literacy from Cardinal Stritch University. Robinson has over 40 peer-reviewed publications and received several distinguished honors throughout his early career such as: the 2017 Alumni Achievement Award/New Trier High School Alumni Hall of Honor; the 2016 Outstanding Young Alumni Award from UWO; and received Educator of the Year from All-State Insurance (Chicago) 2005. Robinson is also a Life Member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
12/8/202132 minutes, 14 seconds
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Grateful

What are you grateful for regarding neurodiversity? Our listeners share their thoughts, and Emily Kircher-Morris reflects on the things she’s thankful for during this kickoff of the 2021 holiday season. While we’re on the subject, thank YOU for making 2021 the biggest year of growth in our history! You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
11/25/202112 minutes, 30 seconds
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Education’s Equity Challenge

Emily Kircher-Morris has a discussion with Joy Lawson Davis and Deb Douglas, authors of a new book called Empowering Underrepresented Gifted Students, about equity challenges in public education. They provide a snapshot of the contributors who helped write the book from their individual perspectives as marginalized, neurodivergent students, and describe why eliminating gifted programs won’t fix equity issues in gifted education. Many more topics as well, on episode 104. ABOUT THE GUESTS - Dr. Joy Lawson Davis is a career educator with over 30 years of experience as a practitioner, scholar, author, and consultant. A graduate of the College of William & Mary, Dr. Davis holds both Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Gifted Education. She is currently the Special Populations columnist for the NAGC publication Teaching for High Potential, and serves on the Gifted Child Today advisory board. Dr. Davis served a two-year term as chair of the NAGC’s Diversity & Equity Committee and is an at-large member of the NAGC Board of Directors. Deb Douglas has a Masters of Science in Curriculum and Instruction, and is the architect of the GT Carpe Diem Workshop, a system designed to empower gifted and high-potential children to self-advocate. She’s a past president of the Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
11/11/202137 minutes, 2 seconds
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Empowering People to Leap ADHD’s Highest Hurdles

Learning to empower our kids and students to do for themselves is often harder than just doing it for them. But ultimately they will need autonomy, so we must help them hone their executive function skills now. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Sarah Kesty about how to go about helping our kids, and how to retrain teachers to help their students be self-empowered. It’s another great conversation you shouldn’t miss. ABOUT THE GUEST - Sarah Kesty is an executive function expert, an international speaker, an autism specialist with the state of California, a published author, and a 504 and IEP expert. She’s also the host of The Executive Function Podcast. Sarah specializes in developing executive function skills in teens and tweens. She’s the author of Everyone Has Something, which she hopes will empower divergent learners to embrace their journeys and reframe their struggles in a positive light. She has worked with students with a range of disabilities for over 15 years, and writes for educational media such as KQED and Edutopia. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Neurodiversity Podcast, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com.
10/29/202133 minutes, 32 seconds
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ADHD Awareness Month - Another Brick in the Wall of Awful

People with ADHD have to face both the strengths and struggles that come along with their diagnosis. During ADHD Awareness Month, we’re presenting some important conversations we’ve had along the way about ADHD, including this conversation with Brendan Mahan, who shares his struggle with ADHD and executive function. This conversation was first released in October of 2019. ABOUT THE GUEST - Brendan Mahan, MEd., MS, is an ADHD/Executive Function consultant, coach, and speaker. As a veteran educator, he is skilled at teaching people how to effectively manage the challenges they face. He and his twin sons have ADHD, and he enjoys helping others with ADHD meet the challenges they face. Brendan is also host of the ADHD Essentials podcast. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Neurodiversity Podcast, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
10/25/202139 minutes, 8 seconds
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Gifted, Talented, and Neurodiverse Awareness Week

Emily Kircher-Morris previews the inaugural GTN Awareness Week with Marc Smolowitz, producer and director of the upcoming movie The G-Word. We talk about the organization behind the event and how you can get involved. GTN Awareness week is October 25-29, and will feature different events each day. To take part in the free activities and discussions, go to www.thegwordfilm.com. To hear the interview with Marc about the stories of the people featured in The G Word, and for more info about the movie, click here. ABOUT THE GUEST - Marc Smolowitz is a multi-award-winning director, producer and executive producer who has been significantly involved in 50+ successful independent films wearing many hats across the film and entertainment business. The combined footprint of his works has touched 200+ film festivals and markets on 5 continents, yielding substantial worldwide sales to theatrical, television and VOD outlets, notable box office receipts, and numerous awards and nominations. His long list of credits includes films that have screened at top-tier festivals such as Sundance, Berlinale, AFI Docs, IDFA, DOC NYC, CPH: DOX, Tokyo, Melbourne, Viennale, Krakow, Jerusalem, among others.  In 2009, Marc founded 13th Gen, a San Francisco-based film company that works with a dynamic range of independent film partners globally to oversee the financing, production, post-production, marketing, sales, and distribution efforts of a vibrant portfolio of films and filmmakers. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Neurodiversity Podcast, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
10/21/202127 minutes, 47 seconds
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ADHD by any other name? Try “Attention Divergent Hyperactive Giftedness”

People with ADHD have to face both the strengths and struggles that come along with their diagnosis. When ADHD is combined with giftedness (twice-exceptionality), those struggles can be magnified, or maybe worse, hidden. On episode 100 Dr. Matthew Fugate shares data from his research about ADHD and provides parents and teachers insight into better understanding our kids. This conversation was first published June 26, 2019. About the guest - Dr. Matthew Fugate received his doctorate in Gifted, Creative, and Talented Studies at Purdue University. Prior to this, he worked as an elementary teacher in the Houston Independent School District where he also served as a Gifted Coordinator and Magnet Coordinator. Dr. Fugate's past research has examined the relationship between working memory and levels of creativity in gifted students who have ADHD characteristics. He also examined the coping mechanisms of twice-exceptional girls in secondary school as they navigate both their academic studies and interpersonal relationships. He has presented to parents, teachers, and schools across the United States and internationally on topics such as creativity, curriculum compacting, identification, twice exceptionality, underserved populations, and total school cluster grouping. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Neurodiversity Podcast, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
10/18/202133 minutes, 27 seconds
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Improving the Anxious Lives of Neurodivergent Kids

Today’s classroom can feel like an alien environment for neurodivergent learners, and the resulting anxiety can derail and disrupt their educational experience. Simple and easily-implemented accommodations can completely change outcomes.  How important is placement for a child’s happiness and well-being? What do psychological professionals understand that educators often don’t? Creating an educational environment for neurodivergent kids in a system that isn’t made for them, on episode 99 of the Neurodiversity Podcast. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Laura Anderson Kirby is a licensed clinical psychologist, providing evaluations and therapy for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While ASD is her specialty, Dr. Kirby has broad training in child clinical psychology and works with children and families from various backgrounds with a wide range of presenting problems including anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and depression. She’s also the parent of two children. ​Dr. Kirby has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Duke University, a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park, and completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center. At Yale, she was trained in the Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions (SPACE) program, which is a parent-training program recently found to be quite effective for decreasing childhood anxiety. She’s the author of a children’s book called Henrietta’s Thistleberry Boots.
10/15/202129 minutes, 54 seconds
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Helping Autistic Students Succeed in College

Some colleges and universities are beginning to understand the challenges of autistic and otherwise-neurodivergent people to adapt to the higher education experience. One such university is Marquette, who has developed a program called “On Your Marq,” to equip autistic students for the new rigors of academia. Emily Raclaw runs the program, and Emily Kircher-Morris sits down to talk with her on episode 98. Emily Raclaw, MS, LPC is the director of Marquette’s On Your Marq program. She’s a lifelong Milwaukee resident and brings 15 years of disability in education expertise to the program. She has presented at several conferences and trained other college success programs on the topics of disability as diversity, neurodiversity, and programming.   Emily taught high school special education, worked as a vocational rehabilitation counselor, and coordinated a college success program for students with disabilities. She is an expert in program creation and development, as well as a disability advocate and professional. She is also a licensed professional counselor. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and our Twitter handle is @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
9/30/202127 minutes, 48 seconds
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Prosopagnosia - The Struggle With Face Blindness

On episode 97 we talk with Fleassy Malay about prosopagnosia, commonly referred to as “face blindness.” What are the symptoms? What can you do to lessen the effects, and how can you enlist the help of your friends and colleagues? Fleassy is a TEDx speaker and viral poet, is the host of the new “Fierce Gentle - The Courageous Voice Podcast,” and deals with the challenges of prosopagnosia every day. ABOUT THE GUEST - Fleassy Malay is a two-time TEDx speaker and viral poet. She’s a global advocate for women’s rights, LGBTQI+ visibility, and a fierce voice for the power of authenticity and courage as a social change tool. Founder and CEO of Melbourne’s acclaimed Women’s Spoken Word organization and monthly event, Mother Tongue, she has guided the voices of thousands of women into the world. Fleassy studied at the famous London stage institution The BRIT School, which was also the source of talents such as Amy Winehouse, Adele, Kae Tempest and more. She now writes and presents regularly to her online community of over 20k followers with poetry, talks, and opinion pieces. In 2017 she published her book, Sex and God, and in 2018, launched her album of spoken word, Unhear This. In 2020 she successfully crowdfunded her latest book Virago: A Poetic Manifesto. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
9/23/202131 minutes, 43 seconds
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Special Series, Part Three (reprise) - A Mother’s Story

This is the final installment of our series on suicide among gifted and 2e people. Today, Lisa shares the story of what led to her son’s suicide, and we get a glimpse of her current state of mind, nine months after Nick’s death. The Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 1-800-273-8255.
9/9/202121 minutes, 20 seconds
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Special Series, Part Two (reprise) - Suicide Among the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional

In part two of our series on suicide among high-ability and twice-exceptional people, we explore some of the signs of depression and suicidal ideation with Lisa Van Gemert, author of Perfectionism, and Living Gifted. We explore ways to identify problems that could lead to self-harm or suicide, and suggest ways to help you work through those problems. If you haven’t listened to episode 94 with Dr. Tracy Cross, we suggest you do. And as always, if you need help, the Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours every day at 1-800-273-8255. This is a reprise of an episode that first aired in 2019. ABOUT THE GUEST - Lisa Van Gemert is an expert consultant to television shows including Lifetime’s “Child Genius,” and a writer of award-winning lesson plans. She has written numerous published articles on social psychology and pedagogy, and is the author of two books - Perfectionism: A Practical Guide to Managing Never Good Enough, and Living Gifted: 52 Tips to Survive and Thrive in Giftedland. She is a co-founder of The Gifted Guild, a professional community for educators of the gifted. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Copyright © 2021 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
9/8/202143 minutes, 17 seconds
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Special Series, Part One (reprise) - Suicide Among the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional

Is suicidal ideation more prevalent among the gifted population? Do our beliefs about suicide square with statistics? In part one of our series on suicide among gifted and 2e youth, Dr. Tracy Cross joins us to shed some light on a dark subject, and shares his Spiral Model of the Suicidal Mind. This is a series all parents should hear. This is a reprise of an episode that first aired in 2019. Since then, new suicide statistics have been released. (see link below) A marked decrease in suicide was noted from 2018 to 2019. We caution that one year doesn’t make a trend, but it is at least encouraging. About the guest - Tracy L. Cross, Ph.D., holds an endowed chair, Jody and Layton Smith Professor of Psychology and Gifted Education, and is the executive director of the Center for Gifted Education and the Institute for Research on the Suicide of Gifted Students at William & Mary. He has a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, an Ed.S. in Educational Psychology and Guidance from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, an M.S. in Educational Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and a B.S. in Education from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received the Distinguished Service Award from The Association for the Gifted (TAG) and the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), the Early Leader, Early Scholar and Distinguished Scholar Awards from NAGC, and in 2009 was given the Lifetime Achievement Award from the MENSA Education and Research Foundation. He has edited seven journals and is the current editor of the Journal for the Education of the Gifted. He presently serves as president of TAG and is president emeritus of NAGC. Among other books, he’s the co-author of Suicide Among Gifted Children and Adolescents. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Copyright © 2021 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
9/7/202142 minutes, 1 second
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A Special Interview With Emily Kircher-Morris

Emily’s new book, “Teaching Twice-Exceptional Learners in Today’s Classroom,” is now officially released! This is a special episode, featuring an interview of Emily Kircher-Morris by her executive producer/husband Dave. They talk about her background, her experiences with 2e kids, and how she views the world of neurodiversity. They also preview the book! ABOUT "TEACHING TWICE-EXCEPTIONAL LEARNERS IN TODAY'S CLASSROOM" Twice-exceptional (2e) learners have often been misunderstood, disciplined, unchallenged, and left behind. Even as awareness of 2e learners has grown, educators are still in need of practical tools to recognize and support their twice-exceptional students. This book answers that need, providing teachers with accessible information about twice-exceptional diagnoses and suggested accommodations, modifications, and collaboration with other educational professionals. Dedicated to the needs of all 2e learners, the first part of the book covers identifying and understanding 2e students, strength-based instruction, motivation and self-regulation, and executive functioning skills. The second part details how gifted students are affected by another diagnosis, including: Specific learning disabilities ADHD Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Processing difficulties Anxiety-based diagnoses Depression and other mood disorders This book equips educators with information that will make it easier for them to advocate for their 2e students, including what they need to know about the individualized education plan (IEP) and Section 504 plan process. Special topics, such as gifted students with physical disabilities, students experiencing trauma, and gifted learners from diverse backgrounds, are also included. With Teaching Twice-Exceptional Learners in Today’s Classroom, educators can better identify, support, and meet the needs of their 2e students. You can buy the book via Amazon, Free Spirit Publishing, or wherever you buy books.
8/24/202119 minutes, 32 seconds
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Oppositional? Defiant? Or Just Misunderstood?

One of the more misunderstood diagnoses in the world of neurodiversity is ODD, or Oppositional Defiant Disorder. We talk with Amelia Bowler, a behavior consultant and author of the book “The Parent’s Guide to Oppositional Defiant Disorder,” about the diagnosis, and how to be better at decoding the message that kids are trying to send through their defiance. ABOUT THE GUEST - Amelia Bowler is an author, an artist, a parent, and a behavior consultant. Growing up twice-exceptional with undiagnosed disabilities gave Amelia some firsthand experience with neurodivergence, and she is now raising a fantastically neurodivergent child of her own. Her book "The Parents' Guide to Oppositional Defiant Disorder" was published in 2020, and her next book for teachers will be released in the spring of 2022. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com Copyright © 2021 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
8/20/202132 minutes, 37 seconds
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Creating a Neurodiversity-Affirming World

Emily Kircher-Morris and Joel Schwartz talk about what it would take to create a neurodiversity-affirming world where old stereotypes and perceptions are shed. Such a shift would allow neurodivergent people to be themselves, and society would benefit from a new perspective, where strengths and uniqueness of the neurodiversity community are recognized and embraced. Episode 91 is a conversation you shouldn’t miss. ABOUT THE GUEST - Joel Schwartz is a licensed clinical psychologist who co-runs Total Spectrum Counseling, a private practice in San Luis Obispo, CA with his wife Brittany Bovee Schwartz, LCSW. All of the practice’s providers are neurodivergent. Dr. Schwartz specializes in therapy and testing for the misunderstood. As a therapist, he is warm, compassionate, and strongly humanistic, allowing for all the oddities and unexplored aspects of his clients to emerge and be validated. As a testing psychologist, Dr. Schwartz specializes in difficult and complex cases. Dr. Schwartz grew up in Southern California. He developed an early interest in psychology, strangely enough, from a childhood filled with science fiction stories. These stories often provided fascinating looks into human psychology and the human spirit. Dr. Schwartz attended UCLA as an undergrad where he conducted research in the field of neurolinguistics. From there, he attended Yeshiva University’s Ferkauf School of Clinical Psychology for his Master’s and Doctorate degree. He has worked in various settings including colleges, clinics, a federal prison, and residential treatment centers.
8/10/202134 minutes, 58 seconds
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Neurodiversity at University: The Transition to College

How is college different from high school for neurodivergent students? There’s almost no comparison, and that makes the transition difficult for many. Elizabeth Hamblet is a specialist who helps neurodivergent people make decisions and successfully enter the higher education world. Emily talks with Elizabeth about the big move on episode 90. ABOUT THE GUEST - Elizabeth C. Hamblet is the author of From High School to College: Steps to Success for Students with Disabilities, published by the Council for Exceptional Children, and a laminated guide on college transition, available from National Professional Resources. Elizabeth has worked both ends of the college transition, beginning her career as a high school special education teacher and then moving to the college level in the late 1990s. She is now at her third university, where she helps students with time management, organization, reading, and study skills. In 2008, Elizabeth began offering programs to families and professionals on transition to college for students with disabilities, speaking locally and at national conferences. She’s also a contributing writer for Disability Compliance for Higher Education, a journal for higher education disability professionals, and her work has also appeared in the Journal of College Admission, Teaching Exceptional Children, ADDitude Magazine, Attention, Raising Teens, and Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, and on platforms like Understood.org and ADDitudemag.com. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
7/29/202133 minutes, 9 seconds
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Releasing the Potential of High-Ability Kids

How can we knock down the walls that surround many neurodivergent kids? Should teachers play a role in their students’ social and emotional well-being, or is school only about academic rigor? What are some teaching techniques that will get kids talking and participating? Emily Kircher-Morris and Jim Delisle have a conversation about ways to release the potential that’s often locked inside neurodivergent kids, on episode 89. ABOUT THE GUEST - James Delisle, PhD, was a professor of education at Kent State University for 25 years and was selected by faculty and students there as a "Distinguished Professor", the University's most prestigious teaching award. Jim has worked on behalf of gifted children and teens for nearly four decades. The author of hundreds of articles and 17 books that have been published in multiple languages, he continues to consult with schools worldwide in an effort to increase awareness of the needs of gifted children and adults. For the past several years, Jim has worked part time with highly gifted 9th and 10th graders at the Scholars' Academy in Conway, South Carolina. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
7/15/202136 minutes, 37 seconds
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What To Do When Kids Worry

Parents often struggle with helping their children manage anxiety. Dr. Eli Lebowitz of Yale University joins us to talk about his research and work with children and their parents on managing anxiety and OCD. He’s also developed a program to teach parents how to help their children with anxiety, and to help therapists learn new therapy techniques. ABOUT THE GUEST - Professor Eli Lebowitz studies and treats childhood and adolescent anxiety at the Yale Child Study Center. His research focuses on the development, neurobiology, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders, with special emphasis on family dynamics and the role of parents in these problems. Dr. Lebowitz is the lead investigator on multiple funded research projects, and is the author of research papers, books and chapters on childhood and adolescent anxiety. He is also the father of three great boys. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
7/1/202144 minutes, 19 seconds
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Say What? Neurodivergent Code Switching

Most of us code switch. Code switching is when someone uses a certain type of language in one environment, but then switches to a different style of communication in another environment. Sarah Nannery and her husband Larry join us to talk about Sarah’s experience with an autism diagnosis as an adult, and how, with Larry’s help, she relearned how to navigate her professional world, and overcome the communication hurdles she faced. ABOUT THE GUESTS - Sarah and Larry Nannery are a neurodiverse couple, loving (and stressed out!) parents, and the authors of What to Say Next: Successful Communication in Work, Life and Love with Autism Spectrum Disorder. They write about Autism, communication, parenting and partnership, and have been featured in Psychology Today and in the blog "What to Say Next." You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
6/17/202131 minutes, 39 seconds
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Social & Emotional Curriculum: Learning With Heart

What kind of specific social and emotional support do high-ability kids need? How can we help high-ability students deal with perfectionism? How can teachers in gifted programs thrive when they are forced to play the role of counselor? How can we help neurodivergent kids cope with potential asynchrony between their emotional and intellectual abilities? We talk about all of these topics and more with Mark Hess, a Gifted Programs Specialist, on episode 86. ABOUT THE GUEST - Mark Hess is a board member for SENG, editor or the SENG Library, and President-Elect of the Colorado Association for Gifted Students. He is the Gifted Programs Specialist in a large, urban school district in Colorado Springs. Mark’s articles often appear in the NAGC blog, and he is an advisory committee member for NAGC’s Teaching for High Potential. His 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade Gifted Social-Emotional Curriculum books are available from Prufrock Press. As Portable Gifted and Talented, Mark has shared over 24,000 free resources for teachers and parents of gifted children. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
6/4/202130 minutes, 14 seconds
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“Pathological” Demand Avoidance? Words Matter

The language around autism and neurodiversity in general is changing. We talk with Kristy Forbes, founder of Australia-based inTune Pathways, about PDA (Pathological Demand Avoidance), the difference between PDA and other types of demand avoidance, and the changing language of autism, especially the terminology society uses to describe neurodivergent people. ABOUT THE GUEST - Kristy Forbes is the founder of inTune Pathways, is autistic herself, and has been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA). She is a mother to four autistic children, ranging in age from 5 years to 21 years, all with varying autistic expression including non speaking and PDA, and she is married to an autistic man. Kristy has the unique experience and insight into many perspectives: the teacher, the support specialist, the parent, the partner and the person. She understands, accepts, and acknowledges the very real challenges neurodivergent people and their families face, and the severely misunderstood and often undermined position they are in. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
5/18/202142 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Power of #OwnVoices in Autism Advocacy

In this episode we’re talking with two of the editors of Sincerely, Your Autistic Child, a book about what autistic people wish their parents knew. Emily Paige Ballou and Morénike Giwa Onaiwu join Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about autism, neurodiversity, and ways to better understand your autistic child’s unique view of the world. ABOUT THE GUESTS - Emily Paige Ballou is a Senior Editor, Online Content Moderator, and is on the Publications Committee at the Autistic Women and Nonbinary Network. She is a self-described old Millennial from the midwest who graduated from the University of Georgia and now lives in NYC, where she primarily works as an AEA stage manager of new plays and new musicals. She was diagnosed with autism in her late 20s. Her writing has been published at the Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism, Barking Sycamores, and NeuroQueer, among others. Morénike Giwa Onaiwu is an American educator, author, and autism and HIV advocate. She is an editor of All the Weight of Our Dreams, an anthology of art and writing entirely by autistic people of color published by the Autism Women's Network in June 2017. Giwa Onaiwu received a BA in International Relations from United States International University in San Diego, California, and a Masters in Special Education from the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
5/5/202140 minutes, 7 seconds
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REJECTED! Now what? Overcoming Rejection Sensitivity

Most of us have at least some rejection sensitivity, but with neurodivergent people it’s often magnified. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Brendan Mahan, an ADHD and executive function consultant, about how to reduce or overcome rejection sensitivity. This is an episode everyone can benefit from, and don’t forget to check out Brendan’s podcast, ADHD Essentials. ABOUT THE GUEST - Brendan Mahan, MEd., MS, is an ADHD/Executive Function consultant, coach, and speaker. As a veteran educator, he is skilled at teaching people how to effectively manage the challenges they face. He and his twin sons have ADHD, and he enjoys helping others with ADHD meet the challenges they face. Brendan is also host of the ADHD Essentials podcast. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
4/22/202138 minutes, 30 seconds
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Homeschooling and Resilience

At a time when homeschooling has experienced a surge, Colleen Kessler talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about instilling confidence and resilience in neurodivergent kids. They also talk about how the Coronavirus pandemic changed the homeschooling experience. Colleen Kessler is the host of the Raising Lifelong Learners podcast and she joins us on episode 82. ABOUT THE GUEST - Colleen Kessler is the author of dozens of books for teachers, parents, and children, most focusing on hands-on learning, experiments, science, nature, and creativity in kids – especially gifted kids. She’s also the host of the Raising Lifelong Learners podcast.  She has a master’s degree in gifted education and spent over ten years as a gifted intervention specialist advocating for the gifted children with whom she worked. Colleen has been a full-time writer since 2007. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
4/16/202138 minutes, 1 second
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Neurodivergent Adulting Made Easy

Equipping a neurodivergent kid for the adult world can be a challenge. Amanda Morin from Understood.org talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about some of the things you wish someone had told you about that transition. You can download a free excerpt of her new book, Adulting Made Easy: Things Someone Should Have Told You About Getting Your Grown-Up Act Together, on the episode 81 page at www.neurodiversitypodcast.com. ABOUT THE GUEST - Amanda Morin worked as a classroom teacher and as an early intervention specialist for 10 years. She has been working as an education writer since 2007 and played an integral role in launching Understood.org in 2014. As an educator and parent of kids with learning issues, she has been an active member of numerous Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams and believes strongly in the importance of educators partnering with families. Morin received a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Maine and special education advocacy training from the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates. She is the author of five books. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
3/31/202131 minutes, 39 seconds
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Equity, ADHD, and 3e

Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Colin Seale about what it’s like to be diagnosed with ADHD as an adult. They discuss whether we’ve forgotten the real meaning of equity. They talk about teaching and promoting critical thinking, and they remind teachers about where to turn for guidance on motivating and inspiring their students. (hint: it’s the parents.) ABOUT THE GUEST - Colin Seale is a critical thinking expert, achievement gap educator, child welfare reformer, education-for-all advocate, and former attorney who founded ThinkLaw—an award-winning program that helps educators teach critical thinking to all students using real-life legal cases and other Socratic and powerful inquiry strategies. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
3/18/202136 minutes, 56 seconds
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Moving Beyond Surviving to Thriving

Dr. Michele Borba says it’s a popular myth that our children are predetermined to be thrivers, or destined to simply survive. Emily Kircher-Morris talks to Dr. Borba about her travels and research, and they discuss ways to instill the thriving instinct in others and ourselves, no matter the age. It’s episode 79 of The Neurodiversity Podcast. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Michele Borba is a globally-recognized educational psychologist and parenting, bullying, and character expert, whose aim is to strengthen children’s empathy and resilience, and break the cycle of youth violence. She has delivered keynotes and workshops to over 1,000,000 participants and authored 25 books translated into 14 languages. She received a Doctorate in Educational Psychology and Counseling from the University of San Francisco, an M.A. in Learning Disabilities and B.A. from the University of Santa Clara, and a Life Teaching Credential from San Jose State University. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
3/11/202133 minutes, 15 seconds
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Play Therapy: Meeting Kids On Their Turf

What is play therapy? How well-established is the process, and what are the misconceptions? What questions should you ask when looking for a qualified play therapist? On episode 78 Dr. Robert Jason Grant joins us to talk about his process, called AutPlay therapy, and the future of play therapy in the neurodiversity movement. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Robert Jason Grant is a licensed Professional Counselor, National Certified Counselor, Registered Play Therapist Supervisor, and Advanced Certified Autism Specialist. He owns and operates the Robert Jason Grant Ed.D AutPlay Therapy Clinic. Dr. Grant is an international speaker and keynote presenter having presented for the American Counseling Association, Association for Play Therapy, American Mental Health Counselors Association, and The World Autism Congress. He is a multi-published author of several articles, book chapters, and books. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
3/4/202130 minutes, 21 seconds
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The Battle For Dyslexia Services

When a parent is forced to take on the education system to advocate for their child, it can be difficult, intimidating, and frightening. Micki Boas shared the story of her experience in her book, One In Five, and with Emily on this episode of The Neurodiversity Podcast. ABOUT THE GUEST - Micki Boas is an entrepreneur and brand strategist who applied her knowledge of fixing broken systems for big national brands to help get support for her two dyslexic sons. The hobbled and ill-equipped education system would become her biggest project. During a four-year battle to provide educational services for her oldest son, she found herself asking questions about the ways in which our government and our schools fail to provide all children with equal access to quality education. As a result, she created Invisible Red Tape, a thought leadership forum designed to expose the inequalities in education for children with dyslexia, create public awareness around the problem, and crowdsource an insider’s guide to practical solutions. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
2/4/202129 minutes, 43 seconds
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A Neurodiversity Framework For Gifted and 2e

Gifted people often get lost in the shuffle within the neurodiversity movement. On episode 76 we talk with Dr. Matt Zakreski about how to keep them front and center, and ways to provide vital services to gifted and twice-exceptional people within the new neurodiversity framework. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Matt Zakreski has shaped his career around his passion for serving gifted kids, starting with being a counselor (and a camper) at the Center for Talented Youth summer program as a teenager. He’s cofounder of The Neurodiversity Collective, LLC, and in his practice he offers therapy, consultation/coaching, and assessment. ​Matt is a board member of PAGE, the Pennsylvania Association for Gifted Education, and works closely with multiple organizations around the country. He consults schools, presents at conferences internationally, conducts webinars, and leads discussions at his local library. ​He earned BAs in Psychology and Communications at Wake Forest University in Winston Salem, NC.  He assisted with research at Harvard Psychophysiology Lab at the Harvard University Business School in Cambridge, MA before making his way to graduate school at Widener University, where he earned his Doctorate in Psychology (PsyD) from the Institute of Graduate Clinical Psychology. He currently serves as an adjunct professor in the psychology department at Goldey Beacom College in Wilmington, DE. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
1/27/202129 minutes, 50 seconds
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Am I the Impostor Among Us?

There’s a nagging feeling most of us experience from time to time, that tells us maybe we’ve fooled everyone. We shouldn’t have been placed in a certain position, or we’re not qualified to take on a project. On episode 75 we talk to Lindsay Lee, the author of a study about impostorism. Why do we experience it? What can we do to tamp it down? ABOUT THE GUEST - Lindsay Ellis Lee is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of North Texas with a concentration in gifted and talented education. She currently serves as the Assistant Editor for the Journal of Advanced Academics and Co-Chair for the NAGC Research & Evaluation Network Graduate Student Committee. Influenced by her experiences as an advanced placement teacher, her research interests include psychological, behavioral, and environmental factors that influence the learning process. Her recent research has focused on gifted program evaluation, equitable access to advanced opportunities, creativity in schools, and the psychosocial development of talented students. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com
1/14/202127 minutes, 17 seconds
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Autism’s History and Neurodiversity’s Future

We talk with Steve Silberman, author of Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, about autism, what the neurodiversity movement is, and where it’s going. We talk about Sia’s controversial new movie (due for release in February), and some books you might want to check out. Episode 74 is here, and our new name is the Neurodiversity Podcast! ABOUT THE GUEST - Steve Silberman is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in Wired, the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Financial Times, the Boston Globe, the MIT Technology Review, Nature, Salon, and many other publications. He is the author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity (Avery 2015). The book became a widely-praised bestseller in the United States and the UK, and won the 2015 Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction, a California Book Award, and a Books for a Better Life award. It was chosen as one of the Best Books of 2015 by The New York Times, The Economist, The Financial Times, The Boston Globe, The Independent, and many other publications. Steve gave the keynote speech at the United Nations for World Autism Awareness Day. He has given talks on the history of autism at Yale, Harvard, MIT, Oxford, the National Academy of Sciences, Queen Mary University, Apple, Microsoft, Google, and many other major institutions. His TED talk, “The Forgotten History of Autism,” has been viewed more than a million times and translated into 25 languages. Silberman’s Twitter account (@stevesilberman) has made Time Magazine’s list of the best Twitter feeds. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, as well as on Twitter @neurodiversepod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about neurodivergent people. Copyright © 2021 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
1/7/202142 minutes, 26 seconds
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A Holiday Shopping and Celebration Guide (Encore)

We’re using the holiday break to retool our podcast and debut its new name in January - The Neurodiversity Podcast! In the meantime this is an encore presentation of episode 48, featuring Jen Merrill, who talks with Emily about the holidays. Shopping can be a headache, but choosing the right gifts for high-ability kids is extra-challenging. Between meal planning and decorating, Jen Merrill found time to pop in with holiday stories and gift ideas, and Emily divulges her darker history as a “peeker.” See you next year! Happy holidays, and here’s to a great (or at least better?) 2021! You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2020 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
12/22/202030 minutes, 41 seconds
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Mind Matters Composite: Creativity

We’re using the holiday break to feature some past guests, while we make some changes that will refocus the podcast just a little. When we return in January, Mind Matters will be known by a new name: the Neurodiversity Podcast. The new name better defines what we do, helps people recognize and understand what we’re about, and hopefully makes us even easier to find. And, we’ll be releasing episodes more often, with a larger variety of guests to help our listeners better understand the various areas of neurodiversity. Be here in January when Mind Matters becomes The Neurodiversity Podcast. The theme of today’s episode is creativity, and we’re featuring segments from past conversations with experts who know a thing or two about the subject. A creativity compilation, ahead on episode 72. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
12/4/202036 minutes, 30 seconds
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Executive Function: What You May Be Doing Wrong

Kids have two primary areas where executive functioning skills are crucial - school work and responsibilities. Seth Perler, an executive function advocate and coach, talks with Emily Kircher-Morris about what many parents and professionals are getting wrong when trying to help their kids with executive function skills. ABOUT THE GUEST - Seth Perler calls himself a renegade teacher turned executive function coach & 2e coach. He helps struggling students navigate their educational landscapes, and helps them “disrupt” and improve their educational experience. Seth specializes in executive function issues and twice-exceptional learners through his website, www.SethPerler.com. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
11/11/202038 minutes, 1 second
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Understanding Autism Diagnosis and Assessment

What is the process of evaluating a child for autism? What does the profile of an autistic twice-exceptional person look like? Why are girls’ autism symptoms often missed? Dr. Alissa Doobay from the Belin-Blank Center joins us to talk about autism, on episode 70 of Mind Matters. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Alissa Doobay received her PhD in Counseling Psychology from The University of Iowa in 2010. She is currently a Licensed Psychologist and Supervisor of Psychological Services at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development at The University of Iowa, where she provides clinical assessment, therapy, and consultation services. Her clinical expertise is in the area of twice-exceptionality (individuals who are high ability or “gifted” and have a disability), particularly students who have Autism Spectrum Disorder, Learning Disorders, ADHD, anxiety, and mood disorders. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
10/29/202038 minutes, 12 seconds
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Sifting Through IQ: What We Know About Intelligence

What is intelligence? What myths do we need to let go of, and how can we better evaluate intelligence? Is there a way to measure intelligence across cultures and continents? Dr. Russell Warne is here to talk about his findings as he wrote his new book, “In The Know: Debunking 35 Myths About Human Intelligence,” on episode 69. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Russell T. Warne earned his Bachelor’s of Science degree in psychology from Brigham Young University in 2007 and his PhD in educational psychology (with an emphasis in research, measurement, and statistics) from Texas A&M University in 2011. He has taught at Utah Valley University since 2011 and has obtained the rank of associate professor. Dr. Warne is the associate editor for the Journal for the Education of the Gifted and serves on the editorial boards for Intelligence, the Journal of School Psychology, Gifted Child Quarterly, and the Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment. Dr. Warne has published over 55 scholarly articles in peer reviewed journals and is the author of the acclaimed undergraduate statistics textbook Statistics for the Social Sciences: A General Linear Model Approach. His next book, In the Know: Debunking 35 Myths About Human Intelligence can be ordered now. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
10/14/202045 minutes, 20 seconds
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When Neurodiversity Meets Existentialism

With the death toll still rising from the coronavirus pandemic, it’s especially easy for neurodivergent people to wax existential. They question life, worry about death, and generally ask, “what’s it all about?” Our guest is Leon Garber, author of a blog called Leon’s Existential Cafe, and we’re diving deep on episode 68. ABOUT THE GUEST - Leon Garber is a philosophical writer, and a Licensed Mental Health Counselor/Psychotherapist, specializing in Existential Psychotherapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Trauma Therapy. He’s also the author of Leon’s Existential Cafe, a blog exploring issues of death, self-esteem, love, freedom, life-meaning, and mental health/mental illness, from both empirical and personal viewpoints. His practice is based in Brooklyn, NY. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
9/30/202032 minutes, 27 seconds
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Gifted and 2e’s Place in the Neurodiversity Movement

“Neurodiversity” is an umbrella term encompassing a variety of atypical diagnoses. Where do the gifted and twice-exceptional communities fit into that landscape? What are we learning about neurodiverse people? We’ll talk with Dr. Michael Postma about those subjects, and the groundswell of new information from the field of epigenetics, on episode 67. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Michael Postma is a teacher, administrator, consultant, speaker, and author, dedicated to the development of both gifted and twice-exceptional children through his company, Gifted & Thriving, LLC. Over the last two decades Dr. Postma has worked in the field of gifted/talented education as both a teacher and administrator in the public and charter school system in Minnesota and North Carolina, and was the architect of the Minnetonka Navigator Program, a magnet school for highly gifted and twice-exceptional students. Dr. Postma is the author of two books, including The Inconvenient Student: Critical Issues in the Identification and Education of Twice Exceptional Students. Dr. Postma holds a B. A. from McMaster University in Hamilton, ON; a M.A. in Gifted, Talented, and Creative Education from the University of St. Thomas in the Twin Cities, and a Ed. D. in Educational Leadership (Critical Pedagogy) also from the University of St. Thomas. He is a former Executive Director of, and the current Director of Programming for, SENG (Supporting the Emotional Needs of Gifted). He is the father of four children, three of whom are twice-exceptional. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
9/17/202026 minutes, 47 seconds
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Misinformation, Misunderstandings, and Myths in Education

When factual, peer-reviewed data is hard to find, or hidden behind paywalls, we often end up relying on pseudo-science or questionable information. In fact, some long-held beliefs in the area of neurodiversity are based on little more than anecdotal evidence. Erin Miller and Hope Wilson will be part of an NAGC conference panel in November examining pseudo-science in the area of neurodiversity. They share some of their findings with Emily Kircher-Morris on episode 66 of the Mind Matters podcast. ABOUT THE GUESTS - Dr. Erin M. Miller is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Bridgewater College. She received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology-Gifted from the University of Virginia, and teaches in the fields of Cognition Sciences, Measurement and Statistics, Cognitive Neurosciences and Creativity. She’s a member of the National Association for Gifted Children and will present during the 2020 NAGC Virtual Convention in November. Dr. Hope Wilson is an associate professor of education at the University of North Florida, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in assessment, educational psychology, and statistics. She has a Ph.D. in Gifted Education from the University of Connecticut. Her research focusing on early childhood giftedness has been published in Gifted Child Quarterly, Journal of Advanced Academics, Journal for the Education of the Gifted, and Roeper Review, and she is the co-author (along with Jill Adelson) of the book Letting Go of Perfect: Overcoming Perfectionism in Kids. She’s a member of the National Association for Gifted Children and will present during the 2020 NAGC Virtual Convention in November. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
9/3/202038 minutes, 15 seconds
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A Talk With a 2e Pioneer

The history of the term “twice-exceptionality” is not a long one. On episode 65 Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Dr. Susan Baum about her early experience with “green” kids, and how the term twice-exceptional was born. They also discuss ideas for parents and educators that will help them guide 2e kids to success. About the guest - Dr. Susan Baum is co-director of the International Center for Talent Development and Director of the National Institute for 2E Research and Development at Bridges Academy. Professor Emeritus from The College of New Rochelle, and an international consultant, Susan is published in a multitude of books, chapters, and articles in the areas of twice-exceptional students, primary-aged gifted students, social and emotional factors affecting gifted students, and multiple intelligences. She served on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children and is past president and co-founder of the Association for the Education of Gifted Underachieving Students. She is recipient of the Weinfeld Group’s Lifetime Achievement Award for her work in educating the twice-exceptional child. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
8/19/202030 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Ethos of Creativity

We’re talking about creativity on episode 64. We define it, because there are some misconceptions, and we discuss ways to foster creativity in your kids or students. Are there connections between neurodiversity and creativity? We have Dr. Todd Kettler from Baylor University, author of Developing Creativity in the Classroom, to share what he’s learned. About the guest - Dr. Todd Kettler is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology in the School of Education at Baylor University. He teaches courses in gifted education and talent development, creativity, and the history and systems of psychology with educational applications. Dr. Kettler conducts research on access to advanced academic learning opportunities in schools. His book, Modern Curriculum for Gifted and Advanced Academic Students won the Legacy Award for the best scholarly book in the field of gifted education in the United States in 2016. He also wrote Developing Creativity in the Classroom: Learning and Innovation in 21st Century Schools, which explores systematic development of creative capacity in learning organizations. Currently Dr. Kettler serves as editor of the Journal of Advanced Academics, and he is the chair of the Texas Commissioner of Education’s Advisory Council for Gifted Education in Texas. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
8/5/202038 minutes, 52 seconds
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Twice Exceptionality + Cultural Diversity = 3e

Kids who are both twice-exceptional and from culturally diverse populations have been dubbed “3e learners” by Dr. Joy Lawson Davis and others. On episode 63, Emily and Joy talk about identifying these students, and training educators to better help them reach their highest potential. About the guest - Dr. Joy Lawson Davis is a career educator with over 30 years of experience as a practitioner, scholar, author, and consultant. A graduate of the College of William & Mary, Dr. Davis holds both Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Gifted Education. She has conducted workshops, been a long-term program consultant, and served as a keynote speaker and distinguished guest lecturer in the United States, South Africa and the Caribbean. She has published numerous articles, technical reports, and book chapters. She is currently the Special Populations columnist for the NAGC publication Teaching for High Potential, and serves on the Gifted Child Today advisory board. Dr. Davis served a two-year term as chair of the NAGC’s Diversity & Equity Committee and is an at-large member of the NAGC Board of Directors. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
7/22/202032 minutes, 23 seconds
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Sticks and Stones: Neurodiversity and Bullying

Social norms, diverse personalities, and power dynamics, are some of the most valuable lessons of childhood. When children better understand bullies and how to stand up to them, they also better understand themselves. Amanda Morin joins Emily to talk about diverse personalities and power dynamics, and helping neurodiverse kids understand bullying, on episode 62. About the guest - Amanda Morin worked as a classroom teacher and as an early intervention specialist for 10 years. She has been working as an education writer since 2007 and played an integral role in launching Understood.org in 2014. As an educator and parent of kids with learning issues, she has been an active member of numerous Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams and believes strongly in the importance of educators partnering with families. Morin received a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Maine and special education advocacy training from the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates. She is the author of four books, including What Is Empathy: A Bullying Storybook for Kids. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
7/8/202029 minutes, 6 seconds
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Preparing for the SAT & ACT

College admissions in a post-Covid-19 world have changed, and many universities have stopped requiring SAT and ACT scores, at least for 2020-2021. We discuss testing and test prep with Mike Bergin and Amy Seeley, who help students prepare for testing and understand how it works. They are the hosts of the Tests and the Rest podcast, and are guests on episode 61 of Mind Matters. About the guests - Mike Bergin is an education industry expert who has designed, developed, or delivered instruction to countless students over the last 25 years. Mike started as a test prep teacher for Kaplan Test Prep, and became Center Director overseeing seven New York counties. Since then he’s worked for Huntington Learning Center, revising its test prep curriculum and systems, and in 2009, Mike founded Chariot Learning. Mike is a co-host of the Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry podcast. Amy Seeley is a certified and licensed secondary-education teacher, receiving her degree from John Carroll University.  She began her career in test preparation over 26 years ago working for Princeton Review, and went on to work for Townsend Learning Centers. In 2006 Amy began Seeley Test Preparation Services in Cleveland. As demand for her services grew, she founded Seeley Test Pros in 2012. Amy is the founder and co-host of Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry podcast. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
6/18/202032 minutes, 42 seconds
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Is Online Education Our Future?

Depending on what happens with Covid-19 this summer and fall, it’s likely there will be some influence on plans for the 2020-2021 school year. Whether it’s a delayed start, more online learning from home, or a different classroom setup, it looks like we’ll be writing more new rules for education. On episode 60, Emily Kircher-Morris talks with FlexSchool’s Jacqui Byrne about the future of online learning. About the guest - Jacqui Byrne is the founder of FlexSchool, a learning community for gifted and 2e students. She has a background in education, teaching, counseling, and writing. She is the co-founder of the widely respected Ivy Ed college preparation and counseling firm. Jacqui developed her own verbal test prep curriculum and also wrote a test prep book for McGraw-Hill. She has provided services for school district guidance counselors, spoken at college parent nights, and presented at professional conferences. Prior to founding Ivy Ed, she taught creative writing to gifted students at Milton Academy. Jacqui earned a B.A. from Yale, and has twice-exceptional children of her own. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
6/1/202034 minutes, 7 seconds
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The Stealth Nature of Dyslexia

Dyslexia is often misunderstood, and educators and parents sometimes mistake it for a simple reading deficit. Dr. Dan Peters joins Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about dyslexia, as well as dysgraphia, and dyscalculia; their indications, where to go for diagnosis, and ways to help your child adapt. The basics of, and the often stealth nature of, dyslexia, on episode 59. About the guest - Dr. Dan Peters is a psychologist, author, co-founder and Executive Director of the Summit Center. Dr. Peters has devoted his career to the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families, specializing in overcoming worry and fear, learning differences such as dyslexia, and issues related to giftedness and twice-exceptionality.  Dr. Dan is also co-founder of Parent Footprint, an interactive parenting education community and website. He is host of the Parent Footprint Podcast with Dr. Dan and is a contributor to The Huffington Post and Psychology Today. Dan is the author of Make Your Worrier a Warrior: A Guide to Conquering Your Child’s Fears, its companion children’s books, From Worrier to Warrior, and the Warrior Workbook. He is co-author of Raising Creative Kids, and many articles on topics related to parenting, family, giftedness, twice-exceptionality, dyslexia, and anxiety. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
5/13/202030 minutes, 45 seconds
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Preparing for Post-Pandemic Recovery

As part of our series on the coronavirus pandemic, on episode 58 we’re delving into the trauma aspect. How will we respond to the pressure to venture out? How will the human species be affected, changed, challenged? What will we tell our grandchildren about the experience? We’ll use Christine Fonseca and her new book, Healing the heart: Helping Your Child Thrive After Trauma, as a template for this compelling conversation. About the guest - Christine Fonseca is a licensed educational psychologist, critically acclaimed author, and a nationally recognized speaker on topics related to educational psychology, mental health, giftedness, and using storytelling to heal past wounds. Christine has written for Psychology Today, the parenting blog Parenting for A New Generation, Parents.com, Johnson & Johnson, and Justine Magazine. Her critically acclaimed books include her newest, Healing the Heart: Helping Your Child Thrive After Trauma. Other works include The Caring Child: Raising Empathetic and Emotionally Intelligent Children, Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students, Raising the Shy Child, Letting Go: A Girl’s Guide to Breaking Free of Stress and Anxiety, and the Young Adult series, The Solomon Experiments. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
4/21/202036 minutes, 16 seconds
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The Stresses of Sheltering in Place

It’s no secret that gifted kids often see the world differently than neurotypical peers. They also see the coronavirus pandemic differently, and experience stress and anxiety in different ways. We talk with Dr. Edward Amend about life in a pandemic, how to talk with kids about this event, things we can do to minimize anxiety, and how counseling and therapy sessions are adapting to meet the requirements of quarantine. It’s all on episode 57 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Edward R. Amend, Psy.D., is a Clinical Psychologist at The Amend Group in Lexington, KY. He has worked in both private practice and community mental health settings, as well as in consulting positions with clinics, hospitals, schools, and other organizations. Dr. Amend is co-author of A Parent's Guide to Gifted Children, and Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Asperger's, Depression, and Other Disorders. Dr. Amend has held various positions, including on the Board of Directors of Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted (SENG); President of the Kentucky Association for Gifted Education (KAGE) and Chair for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Counseling and Guidance Network. He has been a consultant to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development and a Contributing Editor for Roeper Review, a peer-reviewed journal for gifted education. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
4/3/202034 minutes, 20 seconds
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Surviving and Thriving in Quarantine

The world is at the same time both together and necessarily apart. We’re all going through the same pandemic, and most of us are practicing “social distancing.” How does that affect us? Some believe it can be a time for growth, and that’s the subject of episode 56. Our guest is author and family therapist Chris Crutcher, and this is a conversation you and your family won’t want to miss. About the guest - Chris Crutcher is a native of Cascade, Idaho. He spent the 1970s as a teacher, then as director of a K-12 alternative school in Oakland, California. The following 20+ years he was a therapist specializing in child abuse and neglect. Those years largely inform his thirteen novels and two collections of short stories. He has also written what he calls an ill-advised autobiography titled King of the Mild Frontier, which was designated by Publisher’s Weekly as “the YA book most adults would have read if they knew it existed.” Chris was awarded the American Library Association’s Margaret A. Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award, as well as two Intellectual Freedom awards, one from the National Council for Teachers of English and the other from the National Coalition Against Censorship.  Five of his books appeared on an American Library Association list of the 100 Best Books for Teens of the Twentieth Century (1999 to 2000). You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
3/25/202037 minutes, 10 seconds
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Gifted Boys: Behind the Mask of Masculinity

There are social, academic, and personal obstacles inherent to boys, and when you add other features like giftedness, things can get complicated. How can we help boys understand social expectations, and learn to be themselves, often in spite of those expectations? Dr. Tom Hébert talks with us about the things he’s learned as an educator, and as a trainer of educators working in gifted education. About the guest - Thomas Hébert, Ph.D., is a Professor of Gifted and Talented Education in the College of Education at the University of South Carolina. He has more than a decade of K-12 classroom experience working with gifted students and over 20 years in higher education training graduate students and educators in gifted education. He has also conducted research for the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented. He served on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and the Association for the Gifted of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) and has been a consultant to numerous schools nationally and internationally. His research interests include social and emotional development of gifted students, gifted culturally diverse students, and problems faced by gifted young men. His publications include over 100 refereed journal articles, book chapters, and scholarly reports. He is the author of the award-winning text Understanding the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Students. He has received numerous research and teaching awards including the 2000 Early Scholar Award from the National Association for Gifted Children, and the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award from the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
3/21/202030 minutes, 48 seconds
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Understanding Pathological Demand Avoidance

What is Pathological Demand Avoidance and how does it manifest among the neurodiverse? What can we do to educate parents, teachers, and counselors about how to approach it? Understanding demand avoidance can completely transform the way you look at a child. Harry J. Thompson joins Emily Kircher-Morris for this important discussion about PDA, on episode 54. About the guest - Harry J. Thompson was born in Edgware, and grew up in Barnet in north London. He is currently based in London, UK. An avid reader & researcher, Harry speaks publicly and is heavily involved in projects & research on all topics around neurodiversity and autism; namely, Pathological Demand Avoidance. Harry began to write the first draft of his book in 2015. After connecting with many autistic & PDA families, he pivoted his direction and completed his book in about 6 weeks, a memoir entitled the PDA Paradox: The Highs and Lows of My Life on a Little-Known Part of the Autism Spectrum, published in February 2019. He launched his YouTube channel in 2017. Harry has been elected to a Fellowship of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), in recognition of his work in the field of PDA, and also in recognition of the publication of his book. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
3/4/202039 minutes, 15 seconds
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Processing Speed: Why Some Kids Are Faster Than Others

Emily Kircher-Morris and Dr. Ellen Braaten discuss processing speed and why it’s important. They also talk about when it’s not so important, and why it varies so much from child to child. They discuss the impact it has on intelligence testing scores, and ways to help kids increase their processing speed. Dr. Braaten is coauthor of the book Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up. About the guest -  Dr. Ellen Braaten is the Director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Track Director of the Child Psychology Training Program at MGH/Harvard Medical School. She is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Braaten received her M.A. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Colorado, her PhD in Psychology at Colorado State University, and completed her internship training at Massachusetts General Hospital. She has been affiliated with Mass. General Hospital since 1998. Dr. Braaten is widely recognized as an expert in the field of pediatric neuropsychological and psychological assessment, particularly in the areas of assessing learning disabilities and attentional disorders. She is the co-author of Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up, and Straight Talk about Psychological Testing for Kids, a book that has become a classic for parents and professionals. She also authored The Child Clinician's Report Writing Handbook, which has been called "the most comprehensive child assessment handbook available." Her most recent book for parents is entitled Finding the Right Mental Health Care for Your Child, published by the American Psychological Association. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
2/19/202034 minutes, 22 seconds
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Developing Critical Thinking Skills

When a child asks a question, do you just give them the answer? If so, you’re missing an opportunity to help them develop critical thinking skills. On episode 52 we are joined by Colin Seale, founder of ThinkLaw, an organization committed to helping educators teach critical thinking. We talk about how kids learn the skill, and how teachers can better teach critical thinking. About the guest - Colin Seale is a critical thinking expert, achievement-gap educator, child welfare reformer, education-for-all advocate, and former attorney who founded ThinkLaw—an award-winning program that helps educators teach critical thinking to all students using real-life legal cases and other Socratic and powerful inquiry strategies. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
2/5/202045 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Crossroads of Academics and Art

Why is there a bright line between academia and the arts? Between cognition and creativity? Where should that line break down? Or should it? And, why do educators and others think of creativity only in terms of art or music, when it also applies to problem solving and cognition? We talk with Dr. Jennifer Fisher, who is both a university assistant teaching professor and an art education coordinator. We talk about how to bridge that gap, and hear from a gifted student’s struggle to be academic and artistic. About the guest - Jennifer Fisher, PhD, is an Assistant Teaching Professor and Coordinator of Art Education in the Department of Educator Preparation, Innovation and Research in the College of Education at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. She is a joint faculty member in the Department of Art & Design within the College of Arts and Sciences.  She holds a teaching certificate in the state of Missouri, where she is certified to teach Art K-12, Gifted K-12, and English Language Arts 5-12. She received a B.S.Ed. in Secondary Education-Art from Southeast Missouri State University in 2009. Dr. Fisher also earned a Master of Special Education-Gifted and Talented from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2011, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Teaching and Learning Processes from the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 2016. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
1/22/202034 minutes, 14 seconds
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Bright and Early: A Story of Radical Acceleration

On episode 50 we talk with Haley Taylor Schlitz, a 17-year-old first-year law student who began college at age 13. We discuss her education experience, some of the benefits and barriers of homeschooling, and we imagine what the perfect public school system would be like. About the guest - At age 17, Haley Taylor Schlitz has graduated from Texas Woman's University with a BS in Interdisciplinary Studies, and has chosen to attend SMU Dedman School of Law, after being accepted to many prestigious law schools. Homeschooling allowed her to advance through high-school at her own pace, graduating at age 13, ready for college. Haley excelled as an honors student while representing the College of Professional Education as a Student Senator. Additionally, Haley has been actively involved in meaningful extracurricular activities such as The Representation Project, where she works to eliminate limiting stereotypes in the media, and serve as a catalyst for cultural transformation. Haley lives with her family in Fort Worth, Texas. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
1/8/202027 minutes, 31 seconds
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Looking Back: A Decade Ends and 2e Wins!

As we move into the 2020s, we look back at some of the conversations we had in the two years of our podcast’s history. While we covered a variety of subjects, one seemed to pop up just above the fray. We’re revisiting some of our best conversations about twice-exceptionality, on this special 49th episode of Mind Matters. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
12/19/201936 minutes, 58 seconds
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A Holiday Shopping and Celebration Guide

Shopping for the holidays can be a headache, but choosing the right gifts for high-ability kids is extra-challenging. Between meal planning and decorating, Jen Merrill found time to pop in with holiday stories and gift ideas, and Emily divulges her darker history as a “peeker.” Shopping for the hard-to-buy-for kids in your life, on this special holiday edition of Mind Matters. About our guest - Jen Torbeck Merrill is an Illinois-based writer and gifted family advocate. The mom of two teen sons, she homeschooled one and is happily watching her public schooler thrive. She is a music educator by trade, with degrees in Music Education and Flute Performance. Still, long before she picked up a flute as a child, Jen wanted to be a writer. She began that career in 2006, focusing on gifted families and advocacy. Her book, If This is a Gift, Can I Send It Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional, struck a nerve with families who suspected Jen was living in their closet. Her second book, on the needs of gifted parents and self-care, is in progress. Jen has branched out into greater advocacy in gifted issues, particularly the needs of parents, personalized learning for gifted and twice-exceptional kids, and giftedness as wiring throughout life. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
12/4/201929 minutes, 47 seconds
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How To Get Gifted Kids Talking

Often, gifted kids feel isolated and unable to find like-minded peers, so they end up lacking opportunities to socialize and communicate. Dr. Jean Peterson joins us to talk about ways to bring gifted kids into the conversation, including tips on conducting gifted discussion circles and group counseling. Getting kids talking - on episode 47 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Jean Sunde Peterson, Ph.D., Professor Emerita and former Director of School Counselor Preparation at Purdue University, was a classroom and gifted-education teacher for many years and was involved in teacher education prior to graduate work in counseling at The University of Iowa. She is author of Get Gifted Students Talking, Gifted at Risk: Poetic Profiles, and The Essential Guide to Talking with Gifted Teens, as well as over 100 journal articles, books, and invited chapters. She is a former chair of the Counseling and Guidance Network and also served two terms on the NAGC Board of Directors. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
11/20/201924 minutes, 51 seconds
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Allowing For Uncertainty

In this bonus episode, Emily Kircher-Morris talks about uncertainty and doubt. How can we help our kids be less afraid of uncertainty, and more comfortable with doubt? And for advocates of gifted kids, she explains why it’s better to say “I don’t know” than jump to conclusions from anecdotal evidence. This is a bonus episode of Mind Matters, as Emily shares her thoughts after the National Association of Gifted Children’s annual conference, where she found the topic of uncertainty trending. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
11/13/201910 minutes, 29 seconds
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Executive Functioning - The Building Blocks of Success

How can educators, counselors, and parents help neuro-diverse kids learn executive functioning skills? Gifted and twice-exceptional kids often lag with this skill development, so we’ll talk about tools and techniques you can use to help kids grow. Our guest is Brendan Mahan, an ADHD/executive functioning consultant and speaker, a veteran educator, and the host of a podcast called ADHD Essentials. Executive functioning, on episode 45. About the guest - Brendan Mahan, MEd., MS, is an ADHD/executive function consultant, coach, and speaker. As a veteran educator, he is skilled at teaching people how to effectively manage the challenges they face. He and his twin sons have ADHD, and he enjoys helping others with ADHD meet the challenges they face. Brendan is also host of the ADHD Essentials podcast. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
10/30/201939 minutes, 35 seconds
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Accurate Assessment for Twice-Exceptional Kids

We’ve had mixed results in our efforts to identify 2e kids. It’s a complicated process, and many of the assessment tools used to identify ASD and other disorders need to be utilized differently when working with gifted individuals. Megan Foley-Nicpon joins us on episode 44 to tell us what she’s learned through various research projects about identifying the elusive 2e child. About the guest - Megan Foley-Nicpon is an Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology and Associate Director for Research and Clinic at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development, both at the University of Iowa. Dr. Foley-Nicpon’s research and clinical interests include assessment and intervention with twice-exceptional students, particularly gifted students with Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD, and emotional/learning difficulties, and the social and emotional development of talented and diverse students. She has over 35 referred articles and book chapters in the areas of gifted, counseling psychology, and twice-exceptionality. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
10/16/201930 minutes, 57 seconds
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School Counseling: Gifted Kids Need It Too

School counselors wear a variety of hats, but “giftedness expert” often isn't one of them. On episode 43, Jean Peterson and Susannah Wood, authors of Counseling Gifted Students: A Guide for School Counselors, join us to talk about ways school counselors can better meet the needs of their gifted students. About the guests - Jean Sunde Peterson, Ph.D., Professor Emerita and former director of school counselor preparation at Purdue University, was a classroom and gifted-education teacher for many years and was involved in teacher education prior to graduate work in counseling at The University of Iowa. She is author of Gifted at Risk: Poetic Profiles, and The Essential Guide to Talking with Gifted Teens, and is co-editor of Models of Counseling Gifted Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults, among over 100 journal articles, books, and invited chapters. She is a former chair of the Counseling and Guidance Network and also served two terms on the NAGC Board of Directors. Susannah Wood, Ph.D., is currently an Associate Professor at The University of Iowa, where she teaches both doctoral students and students who are pursuing their master’s in school counseling with an emphasis in gifted education in partnership with The Connie Belin and Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talented Development. Susannah received her M.Ed. in School Counseling and Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision from The College of William and Mary. She’s co-author of the book Counseling Gifted Students: A Guide for School Counselors. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
10/2/201937 minutes, 9 seconds
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The Fast Track to College

Advanced Placement is a good way for many kids to get a head start on college. On episode 42, Andrew Scanlan and Chester E Finn, Jr. of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, answer questions about the history of AP, where it’s going, and where kids may encounter difficulties. About the guests - Chester E. Finn, Jr. is Distinguished Senior Fellow and President Emeritus at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, and a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. He served as Fordham’s President from 1997 to 2014, after many earlier roles in education, academe and government. Over the years he has served in various capacities, including Counselor to the Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education and Staff Assistant to the President of the United States. Finn currently serves on the National Council on Teacher Quality, the Core Knowledge Foundation, and Maryland’s Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education. Author of over twenty books, Finn is co-author with Andrew Scanlan of Learning in the Fast Lane: The Past, Present & Future of Advanced Placement, which has just been released, and Failing Our Brightest Kids: The Global Challenge of Educating High-Ability Students, co-authored with Brandon L. Wright. Andrew Scanlan is a research and policy associate at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Growing up in Ireland, he graduated from Trinity College Dublin with a B.A. in European Studies before spending two years living in Honduras as a second grade classroom teacher and school administrator for Bilingual Education for Central America (BECA). He earned an M.A. in International Child Studies from King's College London, with a focus on children’s rights, education, and child migration. He is co-author, with Chester E. Finn, Jr., of Learning in the Fast Lane: The Past, Present, and Future of Advanced Placement. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters.
9/18/201942 minutes, 40 seconds
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Part Three: A Mother's Story - Suicide Among the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional

This is the final installment of our series on suicide among gifted and 2e people. Today, Lisa shares the story of what led to her son’s suicide, and we get a glimpse into her current state of mind, nine months after her Nick’s death. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
9/12/201920 minutes, 44 seconds
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Part Two: Suicide Among the Gifted and Twice Exceptional

In part two of our series on suicide among high-ability people, we explore some of the signs of depression and suicidal ideation with Lisa Van Gemert, author of Perfectionism, and Living Gifted. We explore ways to identify problems that could lead to self-harm or suicide, and suggest ways to help you work through those problems. If you haven’t listened to episode 39 with Dr. Tracy Cross, we suggest you do. And as always, if you need help, the Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours every day at 1-800-273-8255. About the guest - Lisa Van Gemert is an expert consultant to television shows including Lifetime’s “Child Genius,” and a writer of award-winning lesson plans. She has written numerous published articles on social psychology and pedagogy, and is the author of two books - Perfectionism: A Practical Guide to Managing Never Good Enough, and Living Gifted: 52 Tips to Survive and Thrive in Giftedland. She is a co-founder of The Gifted Guild, a professional community for educators of the gifted. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
9/4/201944 minutes, 48 seconds
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Part One: Suicide Among the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional

Is suicidal ideation more prevalent among the gifted population? Do our beliefs about suicide square with statistics? In part one of our series on suicide among gifted and 2e youth, Dr. Tracy Cross joins us to shed some light on a dark subject, and shares his Spiral Model of the Suicidal Mind. This is a series all parents should hear. About the guest - Dr. Tracy L. Cross holds an endowed chair, Jody and Layton Smith Professor of Psychology and Gifted Education, and is the executive director of the Center for Gifted Education and the Institute for Research on the Suicide of Gifted Students at William & Mary. He has a PhD in Educational Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, an EdS in Educational Psychology and Guidance from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, an MS in Educational Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and a BS in Education from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received the Distinguished Service Award from The Association for the Gifted (TAG) and the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), the Early Leader, Early Scholar and Distinguished Scholar awards from NAGC, and in 2009 was given the Lifetime Achievement Award from the MENSA Education and Research Foundation. He has edited seven journals and is the current editor of the Journal for the Education of the Gifted. He presently serves as President of TAG and is president emeritus of NAGC. Among other books, he’s the co-author of Suicide Among Gifted Children and Adolescents. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
8/21/201943 minutes, 36 seconds
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A Mind Matters Manual for Middle School

As parents and educators prepare for the start of the new school year, middle schools everywhere are welcoming a new crop of excited, nervous, and sometimes unprepared kids. On episode 38 we talk about the middle school transition, and the changes parents can expect to see as their kids adapt to their new surroundings. Guest Phyllis Fagell is author of Middle School Matters, and she joins us with ideas and advice. About our guest - Phyllis Fagell is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, Certified Professional School Counselor and journalist. She has worked in both public and private schools with students in grades K-12, focusing on middle school for the last several years. She currently works full time as the school counselor for Sheridan School in Washington, D.C. Sheridan School has been named a 2017 National School of Character. Phyllis also provides therapy to children, teens and adults in private practice at the Chrysalis Group, Inc. As a journalist, Phyllis writes regular columns for The Washington Post on counseling, parenting and education. She writes a weekly advice column for PDK, Intl. for educators, and she blogs for a number of highly-respected national education associations and counseling publications, including AMLE (Association of Middle Level Educators) and Character.org. Her articles often are syndicated by Bloomberg, and they also are reprinted by newspapers throughout the world. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
8/7/201933 minutes, 3 seconds
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You Never Outgrow Giftedness

Gifted kids turn into gifted adults, it’s something you live with for your entire life. When adults forget about their own atypical wiring, they open themselves up to social issues, and miss opportunities to continue growing. Guests Aurora Remember-Holtzman and Michelle Benedict talk to us about their experiences, and provide advice for people who may have forgotten they were gifted. About the guests - Aurora Remember-Holtzman is the host of the Embracing Intensity podcast, and is founder of www.EmbracingIntensity.com. After years of feeling “too much,” Aurora finally realized that intensity, in the form of excitability, is the source of her greatest power. Now instead of beating herself up about not measuring up to her own self-imposed standards, she is on a mission to help outside-the-box thinkers befriend their brains and use their fire without getting burned through her Embracing Intensity Podcast and community, coaching, facilitation and strengths-based psycho-educational assessment. Michelle Benedict has a Masters in Education and certification in Gifted Education. She also founded Mindful Transformations. She’s an educator in the Hazelwood, MO public school district. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
7/25/201937 minutes, 39 seconds
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Empathy With Intensity: Raising Emotionally Intelligent Children

Giftedness can be a double-edged sword when it comes to empathy and compassion. When we help kids realize their emotional potential, their capacity for empathy and kindness will grow. Christine Fonseca is our guest on episode 36. About the guest - Christine Fonseca is a licensed Educational Psychologist, critically acclaimed author, and a nationally recognized speaker on topics related to educational psychology, mental health, giftedness, and using storytelling to heal past wounds. Using her experience consulting and coaching educators and parents, Christine brings her expertise to Psychology Today, authoring the parenting blog Parenting for A New Generation. She has written self-help articles for Parents.com, Johnson & Johnson, and Justine Magazine. Her critically acclaimed books include The Caring Child:  Raising Empathetic and Emotionally Intelligent Children, Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students, Raising the Shy Child, Letting Go: A Girl’s Guide to Breaking Free of Stress and Anxiety, and the Young Adult series, the Solomon Experiments. How to win Christine Fonseca’s autographed book, The Caring Child - Share the Mind Matters Twitter, Instagram or Facebook page(s) on your corresponding feed and include the hashtag #mindmattersswag. One winner will be chosen at random from all shared posts! No purchase necessary, void where prohibited, enter as often as you’d like, contest is not sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with Instagram, Facebook or Twitter. Winner will be chosen July 23 at 11:59 pm CDT, prize will be shipped to winner, must 18 or older, US residents only (sorry Sri Lanka!). The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
7/10/201935 minutes
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ADHD By Any Other Name? Try “Attention Divergent Hyperactive Giftedness”

People with ADHD have to face both the strengths and struggles that come along with their diagnosis. When ADHD is combined with giftedness, a condition known as twice-exceptionality, those struggles can be magnified, or maybe worse, hidden. On episode 35 Dr. Matthew Fugate shares data from his research about ADHD and provides parents and teachers insight into better understanding our kids. About the guest - Dr. Matthew Fugate received his doctorate in Gifted, Creative, and Talented Studies at Purdue University. Prior to this, he worked as an elementary teacher in the Houston Independent School District where he also served as a Gifted Coordinator and Magnet Coordinator. Dr. Fugate's past research has examined the relationship between working memory and levels of creativity in gifted students who have ADHD characteristics. He also examined the coping mechanisms of twice-exceptional girls in secondary school as they navigate both their academic studies and interpersonal relationships. He has presented to parents, teachers, and schools across the United States and internationally on topics such as creativity, curriculum compacting, identification, twice exceptionality, underserved populations, and Total School Cluster Grouping. Mind Matters podcast features discussions with leaders in the fields of psychology, education, and beyond, with an emphasis on gifted/talented and 2e (twice-exceptional) children and adults. Host Emily Kircher-Morris explores parenting, counseling techniques, and best practices for enriching the lives of high-ability people. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
6/26/201933 minutes, 42 seconds
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Early to the Starting Line: Acceleration Begins at Kindergarten | Education

In school districts in the US and around the world, there are programs in place to help gifted and twice-exceptional kids overcome their educational challenges. But one of the least-expensive and easiest tools to utilize, acceleration, is often overlooked. Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik from the Belin-Blank Center at the University of Iowa joins us on episode 34 to talk about most kids’ first option for acceleration, early entrance to Kindergarten. About the guest - Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik, PhD is the Administrator for the Acceleration Institute and Research at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations, both at the University of Iowa. She founded the Carnegie Mellon Institute for Talented Elementary Students (C-MITES) at Carnegie Mellon University and was its director for 22 years. Together with Dr. Susan Assouline, she wrote Developing Math Talent: A Comprehensive Guide to Math Education for Gifted Students in Elementary and Middle School (2nd ed.). She is also a co-author of the Iowa Acceleration Scale, and co-editor of the 2015 report on academic acceleration, A Nation Empowered: Evidence Trumps the Excuses Holding Back America’s Brightest Students. Mind Matters podcast features discussions with leaders in the fields of psychology, education, and beyond, with an emphasis on gifted/talented and 2e (twice-exceptional) children and adults. Host Emily Kircher-Morris explores parenting, counseling techniques, and best practices for enriching the lives of high-ability people. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
6/12/201931 minutes, 27 seconds
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Note to Self: Be Nice to Me | Parenting | Education | 2e

One thing’s for sure about parenting - it’s hard. Even more so with gifted and twice-exceptional kids. But parents often get so caught up in taking care of their kids they forget the all-important self-care. Jen Torbeck Merrill is the author of If This Is a Gift, Can I Send It Back, and also a parenting self-care advocate. She’s our guest on episode 33 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Jen Merrill is an Illinois-based writer, blogger, flutist, and gifted family advocate. The mom of two boys, she homeschools her twice-exceptional teen while happily sending his brother off to middle school every morning. She is a music educator by trade, with degrees in music education and flute performance. Jen started blogging in 2006 and now runs the website LaughingAtChaos.com. Her book, If This is a Gift, Can I Send It Back, is available wherever books are sold. Jen can be found at An Intense Life, and has published articles in the Understanding Our Gifted Journal and Huffington Post. Jen is a Gifted Homeschoolers Forum Ambassador and has presented at several national and international gifted conferences, and she’s scheduled to present a keynote address as the SENG 2019 National Conference this year in Houston, TX. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
5/29/201932 minutes, 40 seconds
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Being a SPED Advocate for Twice-Exceptional Kids | Psychology | Education | 2e

Special education services can make a huge difference in the educational experience of a twice-exceptional child. On episode 32, author and education writer Amanda Morin joins us to discuss some of the services available and share best practices for parents and counselors to effectively advocate on behalf of 2e kids. About the guest - Amanda Morin worked as a classroom teacher and as an early intervention specialist for 10 years. She has been working as an education writer since 2007 and played an integral role in launching Understood.org in 2014. As an educator and also as a parent of kids with learning issues, she has been an active member of numerous Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams and believes strongly in the importance of educators partnering with families. Morin received a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Maine and special education advocacy training from the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates. She is the author of three books, including The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
5/15/201933 minutes, 51 seconds
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Fighting Fake News | Psychology | Gifted | Education

When your inner skeptic constantly nags at you saying something’s not right, what should you do? Dr. Brian Housand thinks you should celebrate. On episode 31 Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Brian about how to fight fake news, and the short answer is: question everything. About the guest - Dr. Brian Housand is the Coordinator of the Academically or Intellectually Gifted Program at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He is an educational consultant working with schools, districts, and educational organizations. He graduated from the University of Georgia with a BA in English, and earned a Masters and PhD from the University of Connecticut in Gifted Education. He co-authored Using the Schoolwide Enrichment Model with Technology with Angela Housand and Joe Renzulli, and authored Fighting Fake News! Teaching Critical Thinking and Media Literacy in a Digital Age. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
5/1/201929 minutes, 53 seconds
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Beneath the Surface of Giftedness | Education | IQ | Parenting

There is more to giftedness than just intelligence. Dr. James Delisle joins us on episode 30 to talk about what’s below the surface of giftedness, and how parents, counselors, and teachers can dig a little to find out what makes gifted kids tick. About the guest - James Delisle, PhD, was a professor of education at Kent State University (Ohio) for 25 years and was selected by faculty and students there as a "Distinguished Professor", the University's most prestigious teaching award. Jim has worked on behalf of gifted children and teens for nearly four decades. The author of hundreds of articles and 17 books that have been published in multiple languages, he continues to consult with schools worldwide in an effort to increase awareness of the needs of gifted children and adults. For the past several years, Jim has worked part time with highly gifted 9th and 10th graders at the Scholars' Academy in Conway, South Carolina. Dr. Delisle’s latest book is called Understanding Your Gifted Child From the Inside Out. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
4/17/201933 minutes
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Gifted Girls: Social Connections and Self-Care at School | Education | Gifted | 2e

For even the most academically successful student, the social aspect of school can be incredibly stressful. When you add the complexity of being gifted or twice-exceptional, school can be overwhelming. On episode 29 we talk with Dr. Kathryn Fishman-Weaver about the social impact of the educational experience for gifted girls. About the guest - Dr. Kathryn Fishman-Weaver is an educator, author, and advocate for student leadership. She serves as the Director of Academic Affairs and Engagement for Mizzou K-12, a global school district with 7,000+ students from over 100 countries. She’s the principal of the University of Missouri High School and Middle School. She is the author of two books on the importance of heart and high-expectations: Wholehearted Teaching of Gifted Young Women: Cultivating Courage, Connection, and Self-Care in Schools (2018, Prufrock Academic Press) and When Your Child Learns Differently: A Family Approach for Navigating Special Education Services with Love and High Expectations (Forthcoming, 2019, Prufrock Press). Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
4/3/201934 minutes, 41 seconds
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The G Word Movie | Psychology | Gifted | Intelligence | Education

There is a myth that gifted people are mostly financially secure, white, and don’t require the same attention as an average child. Our guest is Marc Smolowitz, who is making a film about America’s gifted and talented population that puts those myths to rest. “The G Word” will highlight the educational challenges, social isolation, and deep emotional sensitivities of gifted people. Listen to our discussion on episode 28 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Marc Smolowitz is a multi-award-winning director, producer and executive producer who has been significantly involved in 50+ successful independent films wearing many hats across the film and entertainment business. The combined footprint of his works has touched 200+ film festivals and markets on five continents, yielding substantial worldwide sales to theatrical, television and VOD outlets, notable box office receipts, and numerous awards and nominations. His long list of credits includes films that have screened at top-tier festivals such as Sundance, Berlinale, AFI Docs, IDFA, DOC NYC, CPH: DOX, Tokyo, Melbourne, Viennale, Krakow, Jerusalem, among others. In 2009, Marc founded 13th Gen, a San Francisco-based film company that works with a dynamic range of independent film partners globally to oversee the financing, production, post-production, marketing, sales, and distribution efforts of a vibrant portfolio of films and filmmakers. To support The G Word Kickstarter campaign, go to https://thegwordfilm.com/kickstarter. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
3/21/201939 minutes, 5 seconds
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Separating Truth From Mental Myths | Psychology | Gifted | Intelligence

On this episode we discuss some widely held ideas about education, giftedness, and intelligence that may not be as rooted in science as we thought. Explore some of our most revered and trusted theories along with us. Our guest is Dr. Devon MacEachron, who has spent much of her career tracking down the facts and sorting through the fiction. About the guest -  Dr. Devon MacEachron earned her B.A. from Amherst College (graduating in the first class of admitted women), her M.B.A. from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania (graduating in the top 3% of her class), and her Ph.D. in School Psychology from the University of California at Berkeley. She has a private practice in Manhattan, specializing in consultations and assessments of gifted and twice-exceptional learners. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
3/6/201940 minutes, 36 seconds
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All Work and No Play | Psychology | Parenting | Education

Have we inadvertently harmed our children by taking away play time? Does our tendency to make decisions for our kids, instead of allowing them to make their own choices, negatively impact executive function? Mead Ploszay, middle school learning specialist for an independent school district in the midwest, joins us to share results of her study of student choice and unstructured, free time. About the guest - Mead Ploszay is a middle school learning specialist for Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School (MICDS). She has a Master of Science (M.S.) in School Psychology & Counseling, and a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Psychology from Bucknell University. Mead is also a Licensed Professional Counselor. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
2/20/201935 minutes, 33 seconds
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Thinking Twice About Ways to Help Twice Exceptional Students | Psychology | 2e | Gifted

The systems in place for gifted kids in public education often fall short for 2e students. Sometimes 2e kids aren’t even identified with the limited testing resources of some schools. In the first of several episodes on twice-exceptionality this year, we talk with Chris Wiebe from Bridges Academy in Los Angeles CA about how they address the specific needs of twice-exceptional students, and how other school districts can help 2e kids thrive. About the guest - Chris Wiebe has a Doctorate of Education (Ed.D) from California State University in Los Angeles, as well as a Master of Arts in Philosophy and Literature (M.A.) from San Jose State University. He’s currently the High School Division Director at Bridges Academy in the Los Angeles area, and Managing Editor of 2E News. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
2/6/201931 minutes, 40 seconds
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True Grit: Fostering Tenacity and Resilience | Psychology | IQ | Gifted | Education

When we don’t provide a challenge for our gifted kids at school and let them fly under the radar, they can develop internal monologues that equate being smart with everything being easy. Emily Mofield and Megan Parker Peters, authors of Teaching Tenacity, Resilience, and a Drive for Excellence, on episode 24 of Mind Matters. About the guests - Emily Mofield, EdD, is an assistant professor in the College of Education at Lipscomb University. Her background includes 15 years experience teaching gifted students and leading gifted services. She has authored or co-authored several books and research articles on the social-emotional needs of gifted students, and received the NAGC Hollingworth Award for excellence in research (with Megan Parker Peters). Megan Parker Peters, PhD, is an associate professor and the Director of Teacher Education and Assessment at Lipscomb University. She is a psychologist, specializing in the needs of gifted and twice-exceptional learners. She is also the recipient of the National Association for Gifted Children's Hollingworth Award for research on achievement motivation (with Emily Mofield). Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
1/23/201934 minutes, 38 seconds
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Rethinking the Definition of Intelligence | Psychology | IQ | Gifted

Never afraid to bump up against some of psychology’s doctrines, Scott Barry Kaufman joins us for a discussion about how we evaluate gifted people. We talk about the role of IQ in that evaluation, and he reveals details of his personal journey as told in his book, Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined. About the guest - Scott Barry Kaufman is a Psychologist at Barnard College, Columbia University. Dr. Kaufman embraces a humanistic, integrative approach that takes into account a wide range of human variation – from learning disabilities to intellectual and creative giftedness to introversion to narcissism to twice exceptionality – to help all kinds of minds live a creative, fulfilling, and meaningful life. Scott writes the weekly column Beautiful Minds for Scientific American and hosts The Psychology Podcast. This spring, Scott will teach the course The Science of Living Well at Columbia University. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
1/9/201933 minutes, 39 seconds
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Special Edition: Live at the NAGC Convention in Minneapolis | Psychology | Gifted | IQ | 2E

For 65 years, the National Association for Gifted Children has been holding an annual conference to help provide guidance and learning opportunities for attendees. Mind Matters now gives you a peek behind the curtain at this year’s event, held November 15-18, 2019. In this episode we bring you interviews and sound from the professionals who presented, and from the people who attended. It’s a special presentation that will hopefully give you a fresh perspective on the professionals who care for gifted kids. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
11/19/201833 minutes, 53 seconds
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Opening Doors To Diversity In Gifted Education | Psychology | IQ

It’s a challenge for gifted and talented people of color to fight the headwind of implicit biases when it comes to being identified for gifted services. Dr. Joy Lawson Davis is working to help educators recognize signs of giftedness through the lens of cultural differences, and to fight inherent biases that prevent some students from achieving their maximum potential. Dr. Davis is our guest on episode 21 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Dr. Joy Lawson Davis is a career educator with over 30 years of experience as a practitioner, scholar, author, and consultant. A graduate of the College of William & Mary, Dr. Davis holds both Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Gifted Education. She has conducted workshops, been a long-term program consultant, and served as a keynote speaker and distinguished guest lecturer in the United States, South Africa and the Caribbean. She has published numerous articles, technical reports, and book chapters. Her award-winning book, Bright,Talented & Black: a Guide for Families of African American Gifted Learners is the first of its kind to specifically address the advocacy needs of Black families raising gifted students. She’s also co-author of the first "Equity-Based, Culturally Responsive Bill of Rights for Gifted Students of Color.” She is currently the Special Populations columnist for the NAGC publication: Teaching for High Potential, and serves on the Gifted Child Today advisory board. Dr. Davis served a two-year term as chair of the NAGC’s Diversity & Equity Committee and is an at-large member of the NAGC Board of Directors. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
10/31/201835 minutes, 49 seconds
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IQ Isn’t Everything: Reevaluating Evaluation | Gifted | 2e | Education | Psychology

IQ is the primary measure of giftedness, but sometimes the IQ test fails to reveal the whole story. Recommended guidelines from the National Association for Gifted Children are evolving, and a new position paper has been released on using the FSIQ score to identify gifted/talented kids. We talk with Dr. Linda Kreger Silverman about her position on the subject, as well as better ways to identify 2e kids, on episode 20 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Linda Kreger Silverman, PhD, is a licensed psychologist who founded and directs the Institute for the Study of Advanced Development and its subsidiaries, Gifted Development Center (GDC) and Visual-Spatial Resource in Denver, Colorado. Her PhD is in Educational Psychology and special education from the University of Southern California. For nine years, she served on the faculty of the University of Denver in counseling psychology and gifted education. She has been studying the psychology and education of the gifted since 1961 and has written over 300 articles, chapters and books, including Counseling the Gifted and Talented, Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner, and Advanced Development: A Collection of Works on Gifted Adults. Her latest book, Giftedness 101 (New York: Springer, 2013), went into third printing within 6 months of its release. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
10/17/201837 minutes, 6 seconds
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Potholes On Memory Lane: Gifted Kids and Trauma | Gifted | Parenting | Violence

Signs of trauma can easily be dismissed as symptoms of something else entirely. On episode 19, Emily welcomes author and trauma expert Heather Forbes to talk about how to identify the signs of trauma, and ultimately how to control and minimize its effects. About the guest - Heather T. Forbes, LCSW, is the owner of the Beyond Consequences Institute in Boulder, Colorado. Heather has worked in the field of trauma and healing since 1999. She is an internationally published author on the topics of raising children with difficult and severe behaviors, the impact of trauma on the developing child, adoptive motherhood, and self-development. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
10/3/201832 minutes, 48 seconds
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Family Ties: Connection Through Communication | Gifted | Parenting | Empathy | Psychology

Emily Kircher-Morris talks with family relationship expert Jennifer Kolari, author of “Connected Parenting: Set Loving Limits and Build Strong Bonds with Your Child for Life,” about ways to use the body’s natural chemicals and hormones in the formation of stronger ties with your kids or students. Giftedness often adds a layer of complexity to it, and we’ll talk about it on episode 18. About the guest - Jennifer Kolari, MSW RSW, is a child and family therapist, and one of the nation’s leading parenting experts. She’s the founder of the program Connected Parenting, and author of Connected Parenting: Set Loving Limits and Build Strong Bonds with Your Child for Life. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
9/19/201837 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Case for Differential Diagnosis | Gifted | Education | 2e | Psychology | Autism

When a parent suspects their child may be twice exceptional - that is, gifted and an additional diagnosis - what should they do next? Increasingly, the answer is something called a Differential Diagnosis. It’s the process of sorting through two or more different disorders which share symptoms that can mask each other. Our guest on episode 17 is Dr. Catherine Hasler, an expert in the area of Differential Diagnosis. About the guest - Dr. Catherine Hasler is a licensed psychologist who specializes in Differential Diagnosis and treatment of learning, behavioral, and emotional problems of children, adolescents and adults. She has an MA, PhD in Clinical Child Psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia, A BA in Psychology from Northwestern University, and did her Predoctoral Internship at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
9/5/201831 minutes, 53 seconds
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A Bright Minds Balancing Act: Finding Success in School | Gifted | Education | 2e | Psychology

Self-regulation is often discussed in the context of emotions. Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Dr. Richard Cash, author of Self-Regulation in the Classroom, about educational self-regulation. When should we expect students to show signs of maturity that indicate they are ready to learn self-regulation? How can we teach them? Catch the discussion, along with Q&A from listeners, and much more, on episode 16 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Dr. Richard M. Cash received a bachelor of arts degree in theater from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He then attended the University of Minnesota-Minneapolis, where he received a post-baccalaureate degree in Elementary Education. Dr. Cash later obtained a Masters in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. He returned to St. Thomas and received a doctoral degree in Educational Leadership. Dr. Cash has served as the Administrator of Gifted Programs in Rochester, Minnesota, and the Director of Gifted Programs for the Bloomington, MN Public Schools. He now provides workshops, presentations, and staff-development sessions throughout the United States, Europe, Asia and the Middle East. He’s the author of Self-Regulation in the Classroom: Helping Students Learn How to Learn, from Free Spirit Publishing. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
8/22/201835 minutes, 20 seconds
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Embracing Differently Wired - A New Tilt on Parenting | Gifted | Education | 2e | ASD

When gifted and twice-exceptional kids struggle, it’s often because people around them don’t recognize their perspective is different from the norm, and that we can try to meet them where they are. Debbie Reber, founder of TiltParenting.com and host of the podcast of the same name, discusses how we can help kids who are ‘differently wired.’ About the guest - Debbie Reber is a parenting activist, New York Times bestselling author, podcast host, and speaker who, before creating Tilt Parenting, spent more than fifteen years writing inspiring books for women and teens and speaking about issues like media literacy, self-esteem, and confidence. Since 2002, she’s written ten books, including Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child in a Conventional World, which was published by Workman Publishing in June 2018. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
8/8/201834 minutes, 35 seconds
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Profile of a Twice-Exceptional Kid | Gifted | ASD | Asperger’s | 2e

Some gifted people discover they have a second diagnosis which puts them into a different category - twice-exceptional, or 2e. On episode 14 of Mind Matters, Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Christen Leah, a college student who learned she was not only gifted, but was also diagnosed with Asperger’s, now part of a family of conditions known as ASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder. About the guest - Christen Leah is a twice-exceptional college student. At the age of eighteen she sought out an Asperger's diagnosis after identifying similarities between herself and other females on the spectrum through online videos. She is currently pursuing a degree in Psychology, but also maintains an interest in visual arts and music. Some of her hobbies include community theatre, playing the violin, and binge-watching animated shows and movies. She aims to be an advocate for girls with ASD to hopefully overcome the stigma and under-diagnosis presently facing girls and women with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
7/25/201827 minutes, 44 seconds
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Regulating Emotions Through Mindfulness | Holistic | Intelligence | Gifted | IQ

Mindfulness is the awareness of the moment, the ability to observe and accept your feelings, stresses and sources of anxiety from a different perspective, and deal with them calmly. On episode 13 of Mind Matters, Emily Kircher-Morris talks with Michelle Benedict, from the organization Be Mindful, about how we can help gifted kids learn and utilize the skill of mindfulness. About the guest - Michelle Benedict has a Master’s in Education and certification in Gifted Education. She recently joined the Be Mindful organization based in Denver as a Program Director. Be Mindful is a non-profit organization which provides training and education for both students and educators in utilizing mindfulness as a tool to improve educational outcomes. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
7/11/201828 minutes, 20 seconds
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All the Feels (And Then Some) | Emotional Intensity | Education | Intelligence | Gifted

Emotional intensity varies from person to person, but among gifted people, it’s often markedly higher, and more of a challenge to understand and control. Critically-acclaimed author and former school psychologist Christine Fonseca joins us with her insight into emotional intensity among gifted people, on episode 12 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Christine Fonseca works to help children and adults explore the authenticity of their own voices. She’s the author of several books in the area of giftedness and emotional intensity, including Emotional Intensity in Gifted Students. Christine provides professional development to help educators understand the social and emotional needs of the gifted. She has worked as a school psychologist in the elementary, middle, and high school levels, and currently works as a consultant to school districts on the behavioral and social-emotional needs of students. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
6/27/201837 minutes, 14 seconds
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Zero to Sixty: The Case for Acceleration | IQ | Education | Intelligence | Gifted

Acceleration is an option for students who are academically advanced compared to peers in their age group. When is it a good idea to consider acceleration? How can we know a student is ready? What are the social and emotional implications of acceleration? We talk with Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik of the University of Iowa about academic acceleration, on episode 11 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik, PhD is the Administrator for the Acceleration Institute and Research at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education, and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations, both at the University of Iowa. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
6/13/201842 minutes, 31 seconds
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The Importance of Empathy | IQ | Bullying | Intelligence | Gifted

Emily Kircher-Morris explores the concept of empathy with Dr. Michele Borba, author of the book “End Peer Cruelty, Build Empathy: The Proven Six Rs of Bullying Prevention That Create Inclusive, Safe, and Caring Schools.” They discuss ways to help students, children, and patients show empathy, and how to weave it into curriculum and social life. About the guest - Michele Borba is a globally-recognized educational psychologist and parenting, bullying and character expert whose aim is to strengthen children’s empathy and resilience, and break the cycle of youth violence. She has delivered keynotes and workshops to over 1,000,000 participants and authored 24 books translated into 14 languages. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
5/30/201837 minutes, 29 seconds
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The Over-Under on Achievement | Gifted | Education | 2e | Intelligence

Cookie-cutter curriculum can be Kryptonite to a gifted kid, and can often spark a decline into a place where underachievement becomes the norm. James Delisle, PhD, helps us probe the world of underachievement, and suggests ways to help people of various underachiever profiles break their chains. Dr. Delisle was a professor of education at Kent State University (Ohio) for 25 years and was selected by faculty and students there as a "Distinguished Professor", the University's most prestigious teaching award. Jim Delisle is the author of a book called Doing Poorly On Purpose: Strategies to Reverse Underachievement and Respect Student Dignity, and continues to consult with schools worldwide in an effort to increase awareness of the needs of gifted children and adults. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
5/16/201837 minutes, 33 seconds
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A Guide to Self-Advocacy | Gifted | Education | 2e | Intelligence

You might say Deb Douglas is an advocate for self-advocacy. Deb has committed her career to helping educators, school administrators, and parents teach their gifted and twice-exceptional kids the importance of self-advocacy. Now she’s sharing her knowledge on Episode 8 of Mind Matters. Deb Douglas has a Masters of Science in Curriculum and Instruction, and is the architect of the GT Carpe Diem Workshop, a system designed to empower gifted and high-potential children to self-advocate. She’s a past president of the Wisconsin Association for Talented and Gifted. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
5/2/201831 minutes, 52 seconds
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Transitioning to Adulthood | Gifted | Intelligence | IQ | Education

On episode 7, Emily talks with Garrett Hartman, LPC about the transition to adulthood for gifted people and their neurotypical counterparts. How can parents help? What should the education system do to prepare kids for a changing landscape? Adulting - on this episode of Mind Matters. Garrett Hartman is a counselor and the Director of Training and Development at the Center for Identity Potential in Chicago. Garrett works to help simultaneous development of clients and their families to affect overall positive change throughout the family system. Host Emily Kircher-Morris has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
4/18/201834 minutes, 51 seconds
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Overcoming Perfectionism | Gifted | Intelligence | IQ | 2e

On episode six of Mind Matters, Emily talks with Lisa Van Gemert, the “Gifted Guru,” about perfectionism. We clear up some common misperceptions and discuss strategies to deal with the challenges perfectionism presents. Lisa Van Gemert has written numerous published articles on social psychology and pedagogy, and is the author of Perfectionism: A Practical Guide to Managing Never Good Enough. She is a co-founder of The Gifted Guild, a professional community for educators of the gifted. Host Emily Kircher-Morris, LPC, has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
4/4/201842 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Creativity Crisis | Gifted | Creativity | Perfectionism | STEM

In this episode, Dr. Steve Coxon, Executive Director of the Center for Access and Achievement at Maryville University in St. Louis discusses the 'creativity crisis' and STEM. We also discuss ways to promote creativity and challenge gifted people. Steve holds his PhD in Gifted Education Policy, Planning, and Leadership from The College of William and Mary. Host Emily Kircher-Morris, LPC, has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
3/21/201839 minutes, 41 seconds
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When Intelligence and Violence Collide | Gifted | IQ | Guns | Mental Illness

Mind Matters examines recent mass shootings perpetrated by gifted or highly intelligent individuals. Noted author and expert Dr. James Delisle, Ph.D., helps us dig deeper into the backgrounds and motivations of the perpetrators of Newtown, Columbine, and other notable mass shootings, and we discuss the inspiring activism of the kids of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL. Dr. James Delisle, Ph.D., was a professor of education at Kent State University (Ohio) for 25 years and was selected by faculty and students there as a "Distinguished Professor", the University's most prestigious teaching award. Host Emily Kircher-Morris, LPC, has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children. Special thanks: CNN, NBC News, ABC News, The New York Times, CBS News, KARE TV
3/7/201841 minutes, 28 seconds
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The Problem of Bullying | Bullying | ADHD | Gifted | Intelligence | 2E

In this episode of Mind Matters, Emily discusses the impact of bullying on the learning ability and environment of gifted and 2e young people. Her guest is Cathy Risberg, M.A., Curriculum and Instruction, who owns Minds that Soar, and consults with parents, students, teachers, and administrators to identify and provide strength-based strategies to help all students, especially those who are gifted and twice-exceptional (2e), reach their full potential. Host Emily Kircher-Morris, LPC, has dual Masters degrees in Counseling and Education, and specializes in the area of giftedness throughout the lifespan. She founded the non-profit organization The Gifted Support Network, is the owner of Unlimited Potential Counseling & Education Center, and is the mother of three gifted children.
2/21/201832 minutes, 44 seconds
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Playing the Gifted Game | Gaming | ADHD | Intelligence | 2E

Host Emily Kircher-Morris delves into the world of video games. Does gaming affect gifted kids differently? What is special about the relationship between giftedness and gaming? We talk with Mark Talaga, M.A., LPC, and Brandon Tessers, LPC, from the Center for Identity Potential. Mark Talaga is a Licensed Professional Counselor who earned his Masters at the Adler School of Professional Psychology. Mark specializes in working with children, adolescents, and young adults.  Brandon Tessers is a Licensed Professional Counselor with a degree in Marriage and Family Counseling. He has particular interest in working with individuals and families struggling with issues related to technology and video games.
2/7/201837 minutes, 37 seconds
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A Vision for Gifted Education | ADHD | Intelligence | 2E

Host Emily Kircher-Morris and Kate Bachtel, board president of SENG (Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted), and the owner of SoulSpark in Boulder CO, discuss new approaches to educating the gifted, from a parent's perspective and as an educator. Kate Bachtel received a Master’s in Education with an emphasis in Educational Equity and Cultural Diversity from the University of Colorado-Boulder. She has a doctorate in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in gifted from the University of Denver. She is the owner of SoulSpark Learning of Boulder, CO, an organization dedicated to establishing inspiring, diverse, inclusive and sustainable learning communities where children and educators thrive. Related Links: SoulSpark Learning, SENG, Facebook, 6 Seconds
1/21/201833 minutes, 14 seconds