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Making Chips Podcast for Manufacturing Leaders Profile

Making Chips Podcast for Manufacturing Leaders

English, Financial News, 1 season, 404 episodes, 3 days, 3 hours, 21 minutes
About
Welcome to MakingChips - We believe that manufacturing is challenging, but if you are connected to a community of leaders, you can elevate your skills, solve your problems and grow your business. Making Chips is a weekly podcast that will EQUIP and INSPIRE MANUFACTURING LEADERS to succeed in the challenging world of manufacturing. Our mission is for the METALWORKING NATION to Think Differently About Manufacturing In Order to Elevate their Game. Your hosts, Jason Zenger & Jim Carr, own manufacturing businesses and interview other leaders in the metalworking, machining, fabrication, tooling and machine tool industries. We have interviewed successful manufacturing CEOs you may have not heard of and also the biggest names in manufacturing like Titan Gilroy from Titans of CNC, John Saunders from NYC CNC, Mark Terryberry from Haas Automation and others from MakerCast, Sandvik Coromant, Autocrib and more. Think of us as your virtual community of manufacturing peers to help solve your toughest problems and grow your business. 'Making Chips has provided a transparent approach to sharing within the manufacturing community and a modern platform to do so. Thank you both for taking the lead on moving our industry segment forward!' Patricia Miller - CEO & Visionary (Matrix IV) I really think what you guys are doing is a great, great thing for manufacturing. I have learned so much already from many of your episodes, and am so thrilled to have met people that get as revved up about manufacturing as I do! Cassandra Haupers – Vice President of Operations (Swiss Precision Machining) I love being able to experience what manufacturers are doing to promote culture and engage their team members and community. All of us are smarter than one of us. That is why I am part of the Making Chips tribe. Barry E. Walter, Jr. – Chief Operating Officer (Barry E. Walter, Sr. Co.) Finally, relevant manufacturing media that is actually entertaining! Dietmar Goellner – Chief Executive Officer (Advanced Machine & Engineering / Hennig) The more manufacturing companies we can get to think this way, the stronger our industry will be. Thank you for sharing! Jess Giudici – Manager, Talent and Culture I’m thankful to you for creating MakingChips for the Metalworking Nation so that Owners / Employees can strengthen their companies. Phil Sponsler – President (ORBITFORM) I love the podcast! It really serves to fill a void in the manufacturing world. I will admit I always feel a little more inspired. Jason Falk – Senior Application Engineer, CMTSE (HURCO) Thanks to all the great info on your podcasts and the website. Dave Lechleitner – Director of Solutions and Product Marketing (KEYEDIN) I really love what you guys are doing to advance the mfg industry in a way that really reaches the right audiences. Jeff Rizzie – Senior Manager-Business Development (Sandvik Coromant)
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The Journey from Scan to CAD to Part at Hill Manufacturing, 404

My shop has been restoring a 1959 Ford F10. When we decided to recreate a digital dash for the truck, we decided to ask the LinkedIn world for help. That’s when I met Ira Laughy with rapid3D.  Rapid3D exists to solve complex measurement challenges to empower confident decision-making. We scanned the space and current dash and Ira and his team helped us reverse-engineer the process to design a CAD model to ultimately create the part we need. Ira shares how you can use a 3D scanner to reverse engineer a part in this fascinating forward-thinking episode of MakingChips. Because if you can’t make the part you need, you won’t be MakingChips, and you won’t be making money. BAM!  — Mike Payne Segments [2:28] Manufacturing Leadership Spotlight: Robin Moore [5:37] Introducing Ira Laughy with Rapid3D [9:44] What inspired Ira to launch Rapid3D [12:18] The cost associated with a 3D scanner [16:51] From scan to CAD to part [20:50] Make the move to Netsuite by Oracle [22:10] Ira’s experience bringing designs to life  [24:22] Working through a real-life scenario [28:41] The future of 3D scanning technology Resources mentioned on this episode Rapid3D.ca  Email Ira at [email protected] Connect with Ira on LinkedIn Creaform 3D scanners Geomagic Design X Autodesk Inventor SOLIDWORKS Netsuite by Oracle Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/19/202433 minutes, 36 seconds
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Are You Putting Too Much Trust in Your Supply Chain? 403

How important is building relationships and trust with your vendors? When you do have established relationships, are you placing too much trust in them? How do you balance being business savvy and trusting?  Mark McCormack is known for saying “All things being equal, people will do business with a friend; all things being unequal, people will still do business with a friend.” How much does this matter in the supply chain? Let’s see if we have an answer. We dissect the topic in this episode of MakingChips. – Nick Segments [0:22] Join the AMT Community at AMTOnline.org [5:21] The Chip on Mike’s Shoulder: Managing vendor relationships [7:48] “All things being equal, people will do business with friends” [13:53] When good intentions get in the way of business [16:21] Are you providing value to your vendors? [18:44] How much transparency should you provide? [27:03] Navigating price increases with your vendors [32:18] Tracking quality, price, delivery, and more Resources mentioned on this episode Join the AMT Community ProShop ERP What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/12/202438 minutes, 41 seconds
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How Businesses Can Collaborate with Technical Education, 402

What are the benefits of working closely with a local career & technical education center? You can have a huge impact on the local community, education system, and businesses. If you partner with a local technical center, it could have a far-reaching impact—and it just might help you recruit the next generation.  Nix Partners with a local career & technical education center in Southwest Indiana. David St. Clair and Hannah Lang join us in this episode of MakingSparks to share how collaboration can benefit the students, the community, and your business.  Segments [2:58] Learn more about David St. Clair [5:00] Casey’s dad joke [5:42] Learn more about Hannah Lang [7:36] Spark of Knowledge: Judging ability  [8:52] The impact of our welding competition  [15:41] Trends in the CTE system  [20:54] NetSuite by Oracle [22:11] Why you should partner with a CTE [27:20] More details about the tech center [31:10] What’s next for David’s CTE?  [32:53] How to work with a local tech center  Resources mentioned on this episode Get a product tour of NetSuite by Oracle Connect with Hannah Lang on LinkedIn Connect with David St. Clair on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/2/202437 minutes, 19 seconds
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SZN1: Should Women Entrepreneurs Choose the Manufacturing Industry? 401

POV: You’re a woman with an entrepreneurial edge. You want to start a business. Why not consider the manufacturing industry? There are only 6,431 women-owned manufacturing businesses in the United States (representing just 2% of all manufacturing companies). 20% of them are minority-owned. This industry needs a woman’s perspective and expertise. So what does it take to get into the industry? Nicole Wolter—the President & CEO at HM Manufacturing—shares her advice for budding female entrepreneurs in this episode of MakingChips.  Segments [1:22] Join the AMT Community!  [3:03] Manufacturing News: U.S. Women-Owned Manufacturers [7:04] Becoming a certified woman-owned business [15:11] Get NetSuite’s KPI Checklist for Free [16:43] The manufacturing industry is changing  [21:52] What Nick tells his daughter about manufacturing [25:20] Hiring more women in manufacturing  [30:53] Nicole’s advice for budding female entrepreneurs Resources mentioned on this episode Join the AMT Community!  What is a Woman Manufacturing Leader? Connect with Nicole on LinkedIn U.S. Women-Owned Manufacturers Infographic  Benefits of Becoming a Certified Women-Owned Business Get NetSuite’s KPI Checklist for Free Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/29/202440 minutes, 17 seconds
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Lights Out: How to Prioritize Flexibility when You Invest in Automation, 400

POV: You’ve decided to start the process of implementing automation in your machine shop—but it isn’t as easy as flipping a switch. It’s a process that consists of failing forward and learning from every mistake. Tom Schroeder—the Executive Vice President at PBC Linear—joins us in this episode of Lights Out to share how to prioritize flexibility when you invest in and begin to implement automation in your shop. Because if you’re not making the right chips, you’re not making money. – Nick Segments [1:28] Learn more about Kaleb Mertz [4:04] Today’s guest: Tom Schroeder  [5:16] What's the Chip on Your Shoulder?  [11:44] PBC Linear’s investment in an MCM  [16:52] Get NetSuite’s KPI Checklist  [19:31] Managing high mix low volume  [23:40] Steps to take before automating  [27:11] Why automation is necessary  [30:00] Innovation = learning to think differently  [32:30] Automation doesn’t take away jobs  Resources mentioned on this episode Get your free KPI checklist from NetSuite by Oracle!  Kaleb Mertz on LinkedIn Tom Schroeder on LinkedIn Episode #399: Do We Need More Manufacturing Entrepreneurs? Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/22/202436 minutes, 9 seconds
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Do We Need More Manufacturing Entrepreneurs? 399

There are around 17,000 contract manufacturing job shops in the US. That sounds pretty great, right? The truth is that growth is down 16% since 2008. Now, more than ever, we need new entrepreneurs in the manufacturing industry. Matthew Nix, Paul Van Metre, Drew Crowe, and Mike Payne join me in this roundtable discussion to talk about the vast opportunities available, how to take advantage of them, and why manufacturing leaders should encourage and grow entrepreneurs from within their businesses. Because if manufacturing isn’t growing, we aren’t MakingChips, and we aren’t making money. BAM! – Nick Goellner Segments [1:41] Matthew Nix, Paul Van Metre, Drew Crowe, Mike Payne [2:33] Manufacturing News: Leverage AMT’s custom research [11:07] Our reaction to the declining number of job shops [18:02] What Mike looks for in an acquisition [23:55] Join the AMT community! [24:48] Why every shop can leverage an ERP [28:00] There are vast opportunities available [33:55] Why you should grow future entrepreneurs  Resources mentioned on this episode The benefits of joining the AMT community  ProFab Alliance Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/12/202443 minutes, 56 seconds
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MakingSparks: Staying Connected through Your Front Line Leaders Part 2, 398

How can leadership remain connected to what’s happening on the shop floor? At Nix, we’ve found a creative way to bridge a gap that many businesses experience. We’ve implemented a program that allows our front line to address problems and propose solutions so that their everyday real-world problems are being fixed. Dakota Hunt and Jack Henry Hagan return to share how this program has positively impacted them and the business.  – Matthew Nix Segments [1:03] Netsuite by Oracle’s CFO's Ultimate KPI Checklist [4:56] Casey’s dad joke (stolen from his five-year-old) [5:41] The essential part(s) of an improvement program [15:48] Spark of Knowledge: Business development [16:59] Why communication is critical for success [19:37] The most rewarding part of this industry [21:55] The importance of a culture of respect Resources mentioned on this episode Netsuite by Oracle’s CFO's Ultimate KPI Checklist Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/5/202429 minutes, 56 seconds
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MakingSparks: Growing Shop Floor Front Line Leaders Part 1, 397

How do we recruit more young talent to fabrication? How do we navigate rapid growth balanced with training and development? How do we help develop young talent into our future leaders? These are just a few questions we wrestle with in this episode of MakingSparks with special guests Dakota Hunt and Jack Henry Hagan.  – Matthew Nix Segments [0:48] Join the AMT online community  [2:14] Introducing Jack Henry Hagan & Dakta Hunt [3:47] Casey’s dad joke [4:16] Dakota’s background in fabrication [8:27] Jack Henry’s background in fabrication [11:24] Sparks of Knowledge: CRMs [13:45] Why fabrication is rewarding work [16:28] Dos and don’ts for bringing in young talent [21:38] How to handle rapid growth  Resources mentioned on this episode Join the AMT online community  ProFab Alliance Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/27/202427 minutes, 6 seconds
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MakingSparks: Manufacturing Precision and Processes with BWXT GM Nate Foote, 396

BWXT Mount Vernon produces components for naval nuclear reactors, used in submarines and aircraft carriers. Their sprawling facility is home to CNC machine tools and sophisticated welding and heat-treating equipment. In this episode of MakingSparks, General Manager Nate Foote shares more about their commitment to processes, their recruiting practices, and why the work they do is incredibly important.  – Casey Segments [1:09] Learn more about AMT [2:38] Introducing special guest Nate Foote [7:57] Casey’s dad joke [9:31] BWXT’s team-building process [13:54] Their program with a local high school  [15:39] Spark of Knowledge: Strategic Planning  [17:28] The recruiting strategies they leverage  [26:38] Get Oracle’s KPI Checklist  [29:42] BWXT’s involvement in niche markets [31:18] Their commitment to processes [35:38] What’s keeping Nate up at night [36:35] What Nate’s most excited about Resources mentioned on this episode Learn more about AMT Get Oracle’s KPI Checklist Connect with Nate on LinkedIn BWXT Mount Vernon Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/20/202438 minutes, 14 seconds
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MakingSparks: How Technology Drives Innovation on the Other Side of Metalworking Nation, 395

What are the pros and cons of plasma cutters vs. water jets vs. lasers? How does cutting with nitrogen differ from cutting with oxygen? How is technology driving innovation in fabrication? R.J. Reed and Brendon DiVincenzo join us in this episode of MakingSparks to cover all things lasers and fabrication. Because if you’re not MakingSparks with the right tool, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:19] FREE IMTS 2024 Exhibitor Workshop [2:17] Nick’s dad joke [2:43] Learn more about R.J. Reed and Brendon DiVincenzo [9:45] The definition of precision [12:16] The history of lasers in machining [19:28] Netsuite by Oracle’s Ultimate KPI Checklist [21:29] Plasma versus water jet versus laser cutting [25:55] Cutting with nitrogen versus oxygen [31:05] How technology is driving innovation [38:48] Are people still G-code programming? Resources mentioned on this episode FREE IMTS 2024 Exhibitor Workshop When the Machine Stopped Connect with Brendon DiVincenzo Connect with R.J. Reed Netsuite by Oracle’s Ultimate KPI Checklist “The Goal” by Eliyahu M Goldratt FABTECH 2024: October 15-17, 2024 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/13/202444 minutes, 1 second
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An Important Update on Jason Zenger and the Leadership Lessons We Learned from It, 394

On December 7th, 2023, Jason had a heart attack, the type well-known as the “widow-maker.” Miraculously, Jason survived. Then he survived a heart transplant. January 19th, 2024, he went home. Jason beat the odds. In this episode of MakingChips, we’ll share Jason’s miraculous story. We’ll also share some of the lessons we’ve learned throughout the last couple of months. Be ready to be awe-struck.  – Nick Segments [0:18] IMTS 2024 [2:01] Miracle #1: Making it to the hospital [8:35] Miracle #2: Getting a heart transplant [12:01] Miracle #3: Being near the right hospital  [14:41] Miracle #4: Hearing Jason on the phone [21:22] Netsuite by Oracle KPI Checklist [24:16] Takeaway #1: Focus on your health [26:59] Takeaway #2: Create an estate plan [29:23] Takeaway #3: Build a team you can trust [32:19] Takeaway #4: Don’t take anything for granted  Resources mentioned on this episode Jason’s CaringBridge page Netsuite by Oracle KPI Checklist IMTS 2024 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/6/202436 minutes, 21 seconds
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MakingSparks: Expanding and Transitioning a Family Business in Manufacturing with Joe Patterson, 393

Every family business that’s growing and expanding runs into some challenges. From navigating tough conversations with family to determining a centralized versus decentralized model, there are numerous things to consider. Joe Patterson’s family business overcame the challenges that came their way and expanded globally.  However, they had lofty goals for the business and ultimately needed more capital to realize those goals. Joe shares how they expanded their family business and why they sold the majority of their shares to private equity in this episode of MakingSparks. Listen to learn how you can help your family business make sparks, grow, and make money. Segments [1:20] Palo Alto Networks Zero Trust OT Security [5:03] Matthew’s dad joke [6:20] Learn more about Joe Patterson [10:50] Why Joe initially left the family business  [13:30] Sparks of Knowledge: Host “tryouts” [14:33] How to have the conversation with family  [17:05] How Flanders scaled the family business [20:51] Netsuite by Oracle KPI Checklist [22:23] The difference between offering services and products [24:40] A centralized versus decentralized model [31:35] Why the family decided to sell the business [40:08] How to join the AMT Community  [41:00] How to scale your family business  Resources mentioned on this episode Palo Alto Zero Trust OT Security Netsuite by Oracle KPI Checklist Join the AMT Community by reaching out to [email protected] or going to AMT Online Connect with Joe Patterson on LinkedIn Flanders Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/30/202444 minutes, 50 seconds
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MakingSparks: Embracing the Family Aspect of Business with Tad Dickel Part 2, 392

communication with your family? How do you foster open communication in difficult conversations?  Running a family business is full of unique challenges—and successes—that many other businesses don’t have to think about. But navigating those challenges doesn’t have to be difficult. Tad Dickel returns in this episode of MakingSparks to cover it all.  – Matthew Nix If you missed part 1, go back and listen HERE. Segments [0:56] Palo Alto Zero Trust OT Security [4:38] Casey’s dad joke [5:30] Common challenges family businesses face [7:28] Spark of Knowledge: Social media [8:40] How to have hard conversations  [10:07] Tad’s thoughts on family governance [16:50] The purpose of the family council [19:49] Palo Alto Zero Trust OT Security [21:24] Open communication is the goal [26:08] When a small business should start [31:10] Think about the future now [32:30] Thomasnet programs Resources mentioned on this episode Connect with Tad Dickel on LinkedIn T.A. Dickel Group Tad’s podcast Palo Alto Zero Trust OT Security The Family Business Consulting Group The Legacy Journey by Dave Ramsay Thomasnet Programs Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/23/202434 minutes, 58 seconds
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MakingSparks: Navigating a Family Business in Manufacturing with Tad Dickel Part 1, 391

Nix Companies is a fifth-generation family business in an industry that's predominantly privately held and family-owned. Family-owned businesses are the fabric of our economy. Today’s guest on MakingSparks, Tad Dickel, is a Leadership & Strategy Consultant with a special interest in family-owned businesses. He helps them with everything from governance to succession planning.  Tad shares why having difficult conversations with family early can make a profound impact on the long-term generational success of the business. He also covers how to have those conversations. Don’t miss this one!  – Matthew Nix Segments [0:38] Netsuite by Oracle [2:42] How Tad Dickel helps family-owned businesses [5:39] Why work with a Leadership & Strategy Consultant  [9:16] Challenges that family businesses face [12:42] Spark of Knowledge: The Ideal Team Player [13:57] Casey’s dad joke [14:25] Tad’s hope for this episode [17:43] Palo Alto Zero Trust OT Security [21:33] Using a Venn diagram to think through family dynamics Resources mentioned on this episode Connect with Tad Dickel on LinkedIn T.A. Dickel Group Netsuite by Oracle: CFO's Ultimate KPI Checklist The Ideal Team Player by Patrick M. Lencioni Palo Alto Zero Trust OT Security Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/16/202430 minutes, 15 seconds
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SZN1: Manufacturing Fuels Grit with Drew Crowe and Andy Mueller Part 2, 390

Cutting tool manufacturers have to remain on the cutting edge. If you do so, it’s possible to stay competitive. We know that a solid education and training for new talent is the best first step. But you also have to learn to embrace grit to make it through. We cover what else is important to remain successful and competitive in this episode of MakingChips.  – Drew Crowe Out call-to-action: Bring us someone who can talk about innovation in the tooling industry in North America.  Segments [0:13] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [2:32] Why collaborations are important [9:02] Manufacturing fuels grit  [11:18] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [14:58] The future of American manufacturing Resources mentioned on this episode Andy Mueller Missouri Tools Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security 5 Keys to A Successful Cutting Tool Manufacturing Business with Mike Polizzi Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/9/202422 minutes, 43 seconds
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SZN1: Manufacturing Fuels Grit with Drew Crowe and Andy Mueller Part 1, 389

Andy Mueller is a seasoned vet in manufacturing, one of the real OGs. I’ve leaned on him for advice and support throughout the years because he’s been through the seasons and weathered the storms. Andy was able to step in and teach my students things that I couldn’t with my limited resources. That’s why, in this episode of MakingChips, we have a conversation with Andy about inspiring the next generation and teaching them what they can’t learn in classes. Because if they aren’t MakingChips, they aren't making money. BAM! – Drew Crowe Segments [0:12] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [6:58] Drew’s passion for the metalworking nation [7:42] Where in the world is Tony Gunn? [12:36] Introducing Andy Mueller [16:00] Impacting the future of manufacturing [23:59] Check out Thomas™ Programs [25:18] Get your team invested in the process [27:00] Andy’s start in manufacturing  [29:37] The value Andy brought to Ranken students [39:00] What are you trying to achieve?  Resources mentioned on this episode Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Connect with Andy Mueller on LinkedIn Check out Thomas™ Programs Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/2/202449 minutes, 59 seconds
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SZN1: Manufacturing Fuels Gratitude with Drew Crowe and Kyle Stoff, 388

Kyle Stoff spent his high school years doing parkour and making butterfly knives by hand. By the end of his Junior Year in high school, he’d decided he wanted to get into manufacturing to perfect his knife-making process. He skipped his Senior Year and dove into a full-time program at Ranken, becoming one of my best—and youngest—students.  Now, Kyle works full-time for Orizon Aerostructures and makes his knives on days and weekends. His knives typically sell starting at $1,800—many are auctioned off even higher. He shares his story and why he’s passionate about manufacturing in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making knives, and you’re not making money. BAM! – Drew Crowe Segments [0:17] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [3:08] How MakingChips launched Drew’s career [8:40] Shoutout to Mark Bosworth at Southwestern Illinois College [11:12] Celebrating MakingChips hitting 1,000,000 downloads [17:11] Introducing today’s guest: Kyle Stoff with Orizon Aerostructures [24:07] Check out Thomas™ Programs [26:52] Shifting to making knives on a CNC machine [31:47] Kyle inspired a curriculum change [42:12] Kyle’s message to aspiring machinists [44:03] The trajectory of Kyle’s future Resources mentioned on this episode Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Brandon Dempsey with goBRANDgo! Kyle Stoff on LinkedIn Kyle’s Instagram page ComFlux SZN1: #ThankAMachinist, 367 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/26/202350 minutes, 40 seconds
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SZN1: Manufacturing Fuels Greatness with Drew Crowe and Dan Borders Part II, 387

Do you express gratitude for your team members? Do they know their work is appreciated? Do you help guide them through their career so they can continue to learn and improve? Too many shops overwork good employees because they achieve excellence. That’s a mistake. It’s one of many reasons machine shops struggle with retention.  In part II of our conversation with Drew Crowe and Dan Borders, we talk about the importance of showing appreciation. We also cover why it’s important for account managers to offer value, and how to retain young talent. Because if you’re not appreciating your talent, you won’t retain them. And if you can’t retain them, you’re not MakingChips, and definitely you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:21] Register for IMTS 2024 [2:22] We need to express gratitude [7:38] Recap of part I [8:16] Transitioning to Edge Technologies [15:35] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [17:19] What we look for when we hire [20:39] Recruiting the next generation [25:58] Thomas™ Programs Resources mentioned on this episode Drew Crowe on LinkedIn Dan Borders on LinkedIn Thomas™ Programs Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Register for IMTS 2024 STL GRILLZZ Oracle Netsuite: Ultimate KPI Checklist Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/19/202329 minutes, 16 seconds
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SZN1: Manufacturing Fuels Greatness with Drew Crowe and Dan Borders, 386

How can we attract the next generation to machining? How can small shops attract and retain talent? How can we fuel greatness? In this episode of MakingChips, guest host Drew “The MFG” Crowe—the force behind the American Manufacturing Renaissance—brings on Dan Borders with Edge Technologies to start to tackle these questions. Because if you’re not attracting and retaining top talent, you won’t have a team to make chips. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:16] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [1:50] Introducing Drew “The MFG” Crowe  [8:43] Why “Y’all” is universal [9:50] The Chip on Drew’s shoulder: Influencers [19:17] Netsuite by Oracle [20:47] Introducing Dan Borders [31:50] How Dan landed at Davis Tool & Die Co. [40:51] Thomas™ Programs Resources mentioned on this episode Drew Crowe on LinkedIn Dan Borders on LinkedIn Thomas™ Programs Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security IMTS+ STL GRILLZZ Oracle Netsuite: Ultimate KPI Checklist
12/12/202343 minutes, 58 seconds
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How Can the Golden Rule be Applied in Business? with Mike Ruge, 385

What separates successful shops from unsuccessful ones? The people. As a leader, taking care of your people is paramount. So how do you manage and lead your people better? By following the Golden Rule. How do you apply the “Golden Rule” in business? Mike Ruge—the Integrator and Experience Director at ZENGERS—shares what that looks like and it can transform your business in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you aren’t taking care of your people, they won’t be MakingChips and if they’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM!  Segments [0:16] Take advantage of Thomas™ programs [4:10] Manufacturing News: Tesla is changing perspectives  [8:45] Applying the Golden Rule in your business [14:33] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [16:07] Ask questions to collaborate on a solution  [22:26] How to shift your culture in the right direction [25:34] How to address underperformance  [35:02] Some BIG changes at ZENGERS and Hennig  [37:06] Learn how to be more empathetic [38:06] Learn more about IMTS+ [39:31] How to keep yourself accountable Resources mentioned on this episode Mike Ruge on LinkedIn Thomas™ Programs Tesla on YouTube Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Marketplace Chaplains IMTS+ Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/5/202342 minutes, 13 seconds
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BOTCHED! How Manufacturing Leaders can Avoid the Horror Story of a Failed ERP Implementation, 384

How do you select the right ERP for your business? What should the implementation process look like? What are some mistakes you must absolutely avoid making? In this episode of MakingChips, Paul Van Metre shares some of the lessons he’s learned from failed ERP implementations. Because if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM!  – Nick  Segments [0:17] Take advantage of Thomas™ programs [2:20] The definitions of ERP, QMS, and MES [6:08] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [7:47] The chip on my shoulder: Weaponizing contracts [11:02] Paul Van Metre’s background in the industry  [12:47] You need to involve every impacted department  [17:13] Choose a system that works for the whole shop [19:53] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [21:27] Use real data and processes in demos [23:34] The implementation process: Let go of the past [29:43] Overcoming analysis paralysis in the implementation process [36:46] Register for the exhibitor workshop for IMTS 2024!  Resources mentioned on this episode Paul Van Metre Thomas™ Programs Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Westec IMTS 2024 Exhibitor Workshop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/29/202340 minutes, 12 seconds
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Why Manufacturing Leaders Should Invest in Video to Tell their Story and Build Their Brand, 383

Why do you need to create video content, both for recruiting team members and bringing in new business? How do you get started when you don’t have the budget to hire a production company? Casey Voelker and Matthew Nix share what you can do to kickstart video marketing for your shop—and why it’s incredibly important—in this episode of MakingChips! Because if you aren’t Making videos, you’re losing out on money. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:16] Sign up for a Thomasnet™ program [3:11] Manufacturing News: Short-form video trends [9:12] How Casey started working with Nix Companies [13:27] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [16:16] How to get started creating videos  [22:33] Integrate video marketing into your business [24:16] Content marketing in manufacturing [27:57] A day in the life of a craftsman [29:05] Incorporating video into MakingChips [29:44] Join the AMT Community [32:00] Why you need to create video content Resources mentioned on this episode Thomasnet™ programs Matthew Nix on LinkedInLinkedIn Casey Voelker on LinkedIn 7 Short-Form Video Trends to Watch in 2023 Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security CapCut Video Editor Manufacturing Transparency: How Ken Parent is Inspiring the Industry Documentary: The Story of Content: Rise of the New Marketing Full Time Filmmaker  Join the AMT Community Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/22/202333 minutes, 5 seconds
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MakingSparks: Why Should a Manufacturing Leader Come to FabTech? 382

What is FabTech? Why should anyone in welding, fabrication, metal forming, or finishing attend FabTech? They not only hold seminars and have booths and exhibitors to visit. You won’t only learn about trends in technology and meet with potential suppliers. Most importantly, you’ll be able to network. In this episode of MakingSparks recorded live at FabTech 2023, we interview a couple of people we met at FabTech whose careers were positively impacted because they showed up. Don’t miss it. – Matthew Nix Segments [1:16] Why you should go to FabTech [2:35] Netsuite by Oracle [4:06] Networking opportunities at FabTech [6:13] Casey’s dad joke  [7:04] FabTech will help rejuvenate you  [11:38] What stood out at FabTech 2023 [13:38] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [16:27] Spark of Knowledge: Use a CRM  [17:49] Stephanie Hoffman with the AWS [22:39] Learn more about Weld.com [27:32] Check out Thomas™ services Resources mentioned on this episode FabTech Netsuite by Oracle Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Stepanie Hoffman on LinkedIn and Instagram Chris Ewing on LinkedIn Metal Shop Masters Weld.com Weld.com on YouTube Check out Thomas™ services Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/14/202330 minutes, 40 seconds
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MakingSparks: Part 2: Tactics and Strategies to Use for Recruiting in Manufacturing, 381

Recruiting in manufacturing can be difficult. Many students are taught the traditional “Graduate high school and go to college for four years” mentality. While there’s nothing wrong with taking that route, how do we capture the attention of young talent? How do we make them see the career trajectory available in welding or fabrication? Lindsey Nix and Angela Kirlin share some actionable tactics and strategies in this episode of MakingSparks! – Matthew Nix  Segments [1:13] Lindsey’s dad joke [2:35] Create a Thomas™ profile [5:02] The internship programs at Nix Companies [9:53] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [12:21] How Nix is investing in recruiting  [15:57] The benefits of video marketing  [19:54] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security [23:13] Spark of Knowledge: Try candidate tryouts [24:16] Leverage social media for recruiting [31:22] Now trending: work/life balance [34:23] Show children different career options [36:34] Register for IMTS 2024 [37:42] Be authentic and consistent  Resources mentioned on this episode Matthew Nix on LinkedIn Lindsey Nix on LinkedIn Angela Kirlin on LinkedIn Casey Voelker on LinkedIn ProFab Alliance Thomas™ Programs Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Join the AMT Community IMTS 2024 Exhibitor Workshop Married to Each Other and the Business with Matthew Nix Part 1, 369 Married to Each Other and the Business Part 2 with Lindsey Nix, 370 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/8/202340 minutes, 46 seconds
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MakingSparks: Part 1: Embracing Culture to Recruit Top Talent in Fabrication and Manufacturing, 380

Most mom-and-pop shops don’t have to worry about recruiting, hiring, and retaining talent until they decide they want to grow. When you find yourself needing to recruit and hire talent, where do you start? Start with your core values. Your company needs core values and a clear mission and vision to hire the right people, build the right culture, and retain your team long-term. Lindsey Nix and Angela Kirlin weigh in on what it takes to recruit top talent in this episode of MakingSparks. Segments [1:10] Introducing Lindsey Nix and Angela Kirlin [2:30] Casey’s dad joke of the day [4:02] Hiring and recruiting in the beginning [6:37] Sign up for a Thomas™ program! [9:38] How Angela learned the culture [12:18] Spark of Knowledge: Core Values [13:38] Angela’s role encompasses retention  [15:35] Recruiting women in fabrication  [18:15] Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security  [17:23] The importance of core values  [28:23] Join the AMT community Resources mentioned on this episode Matthew Nix on LinkedIn Lindsey Nix on LinkedIn Angela Kirlin on LinkedIn ProFab Alliance Thomas™ Programs Palo Alto Networks Industrial OT Security Join the AMT Community Married to Each Other and the Business with Matthew Nix Part 1, 369 Married to Each Other and the Business Part 2 with Lindsey Nix, 370 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/1/202330 minutes, 14 seconds
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MakingSparks: The Launch of MakingSparks with Casey Voelker and Matthew Nix, 379

MakingSparks has officially arrived! Matthew Nix and I, Casey Voelker, are here to speak to the welding and fabrication industry. And just like MakingChips, we want to equip and inspire while attracting the next generation. Everyone will have some takeaways from MakingSparks. In this episode, Matthew shares more about Nix Companies and their explosive growth over the last 20 years. We’ll also cover what you can expect from MakingSparks, who should listen, and give you a sneak peek at our next episode.  – Casey  Segments [3:24] Learn more about Matthew Nix and Nix Companies [5:33] Recruiting and talent retention in fabrication [7:27] Spark of Knowledge: Branding and marketing [9:25] Growing the company to 100x revenue [10:21] Who should listen to the MakingSparks podcast? [13:50] Learn more about IMTS+ [15:13] What should we talk about? [16:25] What’s happening in our next episode?  Resources mentioned on this episode Casey Voelker on LinkedIn Matthew Nix on LinkedIn Can You Scale Rapidly After 100 Years of Slow Growth? 308 Married to Each Other and the Business with Matthew Nix Part 1, 369 Married to Each Other and the Business Part 2 with Lindsey Nix, 370 ProgressiveFabricator.com IMTS+ Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/24/202318 minutes, 13 seconds
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Why MakingChips is Sparking a New Show for Fabrication Leaders, 378

Are you in welding or fabrication? Are you a long-time listener of MakingChips who’s just been waiting for content that speaks directly to you? The wait is over. In this episode of MakingChips, Casey Voelker and Matthew Nix join us to introduce a brand new addition to the MakingChips lineup: MakingSparks. Casey and Matthew will be hosting the show that will bring even more industry voices to the mic. Tune in to this episode to learn exactly what to expect from this new podcast! Because if you’re not MakingSparks, you’re not making money. BAM! — Jason  Segments [2:24] Why we created the MakingSparks podcast [6:19] What’s going to be different about MakingSparks? [7:16] Spark of Knowledge: Strategic planning [10:23] Free KPI checklist from Netsuite by Oracle [14:46] The evolution of Nix Companies  [18:44] What we want your takeaway to be [20:36] IMTS 2024: Sept 9th-14th in Chicago [21:57] Who will MakingSparks speak to? Resources mentioned on this episode Netsuite by Oracle: FREE KPI checklist  IMTS 2024: Sept 9th-14th in Chicago Casey Voelker on LinkedIn Matthew Nix on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/17/202324 minutes, 38 seconds
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SZN1: Diligently Doing "Due Diligence" in Your Next Manufacturing Acquisition, 377

You’ve found your acquisition target. They’ve committed to selling you the business. Now the real work begins. It’s time for due diligence. Where does due diligence start? What factors should you consider? How do you build a checklist?  Jason, Nick, Adam Schmitt, and I tackle due diligence in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re not doing due diligence, you may miss important factors that will impact your ability to make chips. And if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM!  – Matthew Nix Segments [0:57] Where does due diligence start?  [6:43] Don’t be afraid to walk away [9:33] Will leaders and employees stay? [11:01] Take a deep dive into processes [12:26] Asset purchase vs. stock purchase [15:45] Don’t stop asking questions [18:46] How to develop your own checklist Resources mentioned on this episode FabTech Adam Schmitt Matthew Nix ProFab Alliance Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/10/202321 minutes, 35 seconds
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SZN1: The Starting Point in Acquisitions with Matthew Nix, 376

How do you increase your capacity, make more chips, and bring on new clients without buying a new machine or pitching yourself to a single end user? Buying a company. Acquisitions are a large part of how we’ve all built our companies. But how do you start acquiring companies? Why would you want to?  In this episode of MakingChips, Adam Schmitt—the Managing Partner of ProFab Alliance—joins Jason, Nick, and I (Matthew Nix) to dive into the starting point of acquisitions. Because if you’re not making acquisitions, you’re not MakingChips, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Matthew Nix Segments [3:43] Manufacturing News: Trade School Programs [9:39] Why should you make acquisitions?  [16:04] How should you look for acquisitions?  [23:35] Buyout conversations gone wrong [26:39] Why you need to pay attention to due diligence Resources mentioned on this episode FabTech Adam Schmitt ProFab Alliance Trade School Programs Thrive Amid Overall College Enrollment Decline Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/3/202329 minutes, 23 seconds
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Building a Lean Culture Through Strategic Leadership Part 2, 375

Once you’ve implemented lean manufacturing, how do you sustain a lean culture? How do you motivate your team to focus on continuous improvement? How do you inspire them to keep reaching and passing their goals?  In this episode of MakingChips—part 2 of a live panel discussion at TSMA with special guests Doug Bawel, Femi D-Etti, and Jake Ward—we dive into what it takes to maintain a lean culture. It can be so easy to fall back into old patterns but it’s important to stay the course.  Because if you can’t sustain a lean culture, you won’t be MakingChips efficiently, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Jason Segments [0:52] Leading measures for lean manufacturing [5:34] Balancing day-to-day with improvement projects [11:46] Learn more about NetSuite by Oracle [13:17] How to sustain a lean culture [17:40] Their biggest wins in the lean process [24:58] Some final thoughts on lean manufacturing  Resources mentioned on this episode Tri-State Manufacturers Alliance (TSMA) Doug Bawel: President/CEO of Jasper Engines & Transmissions Femi D-Etti: Vice-President & General Manager of AstraZeneca Jake Ward: Vice President of Manufacturing of Anchor Industries Learn more about NetSuite by Oracle The Basics of an Employee Stock Ownership Plan Should Your Shop be an ESOP? #292 The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
9/18/202328 minutes, 54 seconds
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Building a Lean Culture Through Strategic Leadership Part 1, 374

What is your definition of lean manufacturing? One definition of lean is “Maximizing the flow of value through your business to your customer.” We all want our business to be customer-centric, right? It’s a given that we all want to reduce waste and improve efficiency. But how do you do that? On this episode of MakingChips, we recorded a live panel discussion at TSMA with special guests Doug Bawel, Femi D-Etti, and Jake Ward. Each of them shares how they’re finding unique ways to build a lean culture through strategic leadership.  Because if you’re not implementing a lean culture, you’re not MakingChips efficiently, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [2:50] What does lean manufacturing mean? [7:09] Introducing Doug Bawel, Femi D-Etti, and Jake Ward [14:50] The most important factor when introducing lean into your culture [22:33] How to use gamification to move your teams toward a goal Resources mentioned on this episode Tri-State Manufacturers Alliance (TSMA) Doug Bawel: President/CEO of Jasper Engines & Transmissions Femi D-Etti: Vice-President & General Manager of AstraZeneca Jake Ward: Vice President of Manufacturing of Anchor Industries The Basics of an Employee Stock Ownership Plan Should Your Shop be an ESOP? #292 The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
9/12/202332 minutes, 28 seconds
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SZN1: What's Going on With the Manufacturing Economy? 373

What is going on with the economy? We’re all feeling a slowdown in the manufacturing industry. So what gives? What happens in the economy can be directly impacted by politics. It can be impacted by war. It can be impacted by interest rates and the rising costs of consumer goods. Nicole Wolter—the President and CEO of HM Manufacturing—joins us again to dissect what we see happening with the economy and what you can do to start marking more chips. Because if you aren’t MakingChips, you aren’t making money. BAM! – Jason Segments [0:15] Netsuite by Oracle  [4:04] Nicole’s experience representing manufacturing at the white house [9:25] Lessons from manufacturing leaders: How AI will help manufacturing [15:23] What is the manufacturing economy like right now?  [18:27] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [26:05] Why are we in our current economic position?  [31:01] What should you do when the economy is down? Resources mentioned on this episode Nicole Wolters on LinkedIn Oracle Netsuite: FREE CFO's Ultimate KPI Checklist What is Industry 4.0? The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/28/202336 minutes, 12 seconds
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SZN1: What is a Woman Manufacturing Leader? with Nicole Wolter, 372

Today’s controversial topic: What is a woman…in manufacturing? We need to inspire the next generation of women to pursue a career path in manufacturing. But is the “sex sells” movement killing any chance of that? I’m Nicole Wolter—the President and CEO of HM Manufacturing. In this episode of MakingChips, I share how we can attract more women to manufacturing. Because if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! Segments Segments [0:19] Netsuite by Oracle  [2:44] Introducing Nicole Wolter [3:35] What’s the chip on your shoulder? [8:57] Is “Sex sells” corrupting the women in manufacturing movement? [13:06] How do we attract more women to manufacturing?  [15:17] Everyone is welcome in manufacturing [18:45] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [19:24] The “booth babe” rant [24:58] Getting girls interested in manufacturing  [27:38] What is a Woman in Manufacturing? [31:40] How to support other women in manufacturing Resources mentioned on this episode Connect with Nicole on LinkedIn HM Manufacturing  Oracle Netsuite: FREE CFO's Ultimate KPI Checklist The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop What the Heck is a Samurai CNC Machinist? 309 New Generation, New Ways w/Nicole Wolter Shifting Gears at HM Manufacturing – When Crisis Strikes On The Shop Floor (Part 1) MC116: Shifting Into Overdrive with Nicole Wolter - Overcoming Adversity (Part 2) Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/22/202335 minutes, 59 seconds
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SZN1: Taking a Lean Leap of Faith Toward Digital Transformation, 371

Many companies strive to move toward digital transformation. Some struggle with the process. Others—like JJR Fabrication—see remarkable results. They’ve seen enormous efficiency and throughput improvements by embracing digital workflows while ensuring the physical side of their shop is in full alignment.  This includes doing things like lean manufacturing work, Kaizen activities, and really embracing the ProShop way of doing things. Kevin Richards and Lynne DuBose from JJR Fabrication join us in this episode of MakingChips to share how their leap toward a digital transformation was a game-changer for their business.  Because if you’re not being efficient, you’re not making chips, and if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Paul Van Metre Segments [0:12] Learn more about Netsuite by Oracle [4:44] Lessons for manufacturing leaders [7:47] Introducing Kevin Richards and Lynne DuBose [11:09] How I met Kevin and Lynn [12:41] Making the transition to ProShop [20:20] The physical changes they’ve implemented [24:17] The premise of the book “2 Second Lean” [27:25] Why they implemented a morning meeting [29:16] Creating a thoughtful pre-production checklist [35:47] 4 Lessons for a successful digital transformation [37:33] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Resources mentioned on this episode Netsuite by Oracle ProShop ERP The Machine Shop Mastery podcast JJR Fabrication Connect with Lynne DuBose on LinkedIn Connect with Kevin Richards on LinkedIn 2 Second Lean by Paul Akers Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/11/202340 minutes, 53 seconds
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Married to Each Other and the Business Part 2 with Lindsey Nix, 370

How do you grow a business while raising a family? When you and your spouse are business partners, how do you choose what to prioritize and when? Matthew and Lindsey Nix have been navigating this challenging road together for years. In the second part of a two-part episode (check out episode #1 first), Matthew and Lindsey share some of the lessons they’ve learned about leadership and family life. Because if you aren’t making chips, you aren’t making money—and you aren’t providing for your family. BAM! – Jason Segments [0:20] Learn more about Oracle Netsuite [3:00] The BIG news: Baby #4 is on the way! [4:47] What’s more important: The business or the marriage? [6:11] What’s the chip on your shoulder? [9:34] Set boundaries for each other [12:50] Overcoming the negative voice in your head [14:49] “Treat people like you would want your kids to be treated.” [17:56] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [18:36] Balancing the kids and the business Resources mentioned on this episode Netsuite by Oracle The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/31/202327 minutes, 14 seconds
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Married to Each Other and the Business with Matthew Nix Part 1, 369

What is it like to be married to your business partner? Especially when both people are very involved in the business. The metalworking industry is dominated by family-owned businesses. I’d love to see more husbands and wives team up to grow manufacturing together. In the next two episodes of MakingChips, special guests Lindsey and Matthew Nix share what it’s like to grow a business as a united front. Because if you aren’t making chips together, you aren’t making money. BAM!  Segments [0:22] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [3:28] Introducing today’s guests: Matthew & Lindsay Nix [7:13] Manufacturing News: We Need More Hybrid Cars [14:58] How Lindsey became part of the business [17:57] What catapulted their major growth [19:25] Lindsey’s role throughout the years [23:50] The challenges of a married couple working together Resources mentioned on this episode Nix Companies Matthew Nix on LinkedIn Lindsey Nix on LinkedIn Toyota Is Right: We Need More Hybrid Cars and Fewer EVs. Here’s Why “People, Process, and Performance" A Special Live Event Interview Can You Scale Rapidly After 100 Years of Slow Growth? 308 Manufacturing a Successful Business and Marriage, 334 The MTForecast Conference Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/26/202329 minutes, 55 seconds
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LIGHTS OUT: How a Prototyping Shop is Shattering the Status Quo with Automation, 368

Are you embracing automation in your shop? Or are you hesitating because you’re unsure how to implement it so that you’re making the best use of your time and money? Brian Kippen—the owner and CEO of KAD Models & Prototypes—reframes how you can use automation.  In this episode of MakingChips, Brian Kippen, Steve DeGrasse, and I share how you can approach automation from a different perspective. Because if you’re not automating efficiently, you’re not MakingChips, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:15] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [1:48] Introducing Brian Kippen and Steve DeGrasse [3:12] What's the Chip on Your Shoulder? [5:30] Brian Kippen’s origin story [20:36] How Brian approaches automation differently  [24:28] Running his company like a barbershop [30:21] What Brian looks for in new talent [36:44] How Brian is using automated pallet delivery [41:10] Why Brian took a job as a high school teacher Resources mentioned on this episode The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect with Steve DeGrasse on LinkedIn Connect with Brian Kippen on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/17/202345 minutes
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SZN1: #ThankAMachinist, 367

I created a campaign to build awareness for machinists. Why? Because, sadly, the general public knows very little about manufacturing. They don’t look around them and see what we see: That almost everything is machined.  So in this episode of MakingChips, I’ll share a few ways you can highlight manufacturing in your communities. It’s not just to build awareness but to also grow interest in manufacturing in the next generation. Because what would happen if no one was MakingChips? – Paul Van Metre Segments [2:51] Leadership Spotlight: Jacob Sanchez [5:17] Everything is influenced or created by machines [9:28] What inspired #ThankAMachinist  [11:00] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [12:19] How to shine a spotlight on manufacturing  Resources mentioned on this episode Jacob Sanchez So God Made a Farmer Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/10/202317 minutes, 19 seconds
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How a Passion for the Manufacturing Community Caused This Shop to Transform into a Software Company, 366

Paul Van Metre is no stranger to MakingChips, and we’ve shared his story before. But this time, we’re looking at it through a whole new lens. Paul and his partners started in the industry running a machine shop. Then, it morphed into a software company: ProShop. What started as a solution to their problems became a solution for thousands of businesses.  How has ProShop become a game-changing ERP? How are they growing and supporting the industry at large? Find out in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re not making an impact, you’re not MakingChips. And if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:16] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [1:39] The manufacturing community down under [4:44] Lessons for Manufacturing Leaders [12:42] What’s more fulfilling to Paul? [13:54] From PRO CNC to ProShop ERP [16:58] Proving the concept [19:12] Will ProShop ERP grow to other industries? [24:19] How ProShop supports the industry at large [31:11] What’s next for ProShop ERP? Resources mentioned on this episode The End of the World Is Just the Beginning: Mapping the Collapse of Globalization The Machine Shop Mastery Podcast ProShop ERP Love Your ERP Eagle Manufacturing Cardinal Manufacturing Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/3/202332 minutes, 52 seconds
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Keys to Maintaining a Manufacturing Leadership Mindset, 365

How do you create and cultivate a manufacturing leadership mindset? What can you do to recharge? How do you take care of yourself so you can take care of your team? How do you unify your team toward a shared goal? Special guests Eric Nekich 5th Axis® Workholding, Michael Gaunce with SCHUNK USA, and Kaleb Mertz with AME help me tackle these questions in this special round-table episode of MakingChips. Because if you aren’t leading your team well, they won’t be productively making chips, and they won’t be making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [1:36] Introducing our three guests [3:54] Our daily routines to recharge [12:59] How to set realistic expectations  [18:40] Thomasnet™ Industrial Digital Marketing Services [19:22] Embracing a change-oriented mindset [26:28] The skills gap is becoming a wide-ranging reality [32:45] How to unify teams toward a shared goal [42:38] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [43:16] How to connect with our guests Resources mentioned on this episode Eric Nekich with 5th Axis® Workholding  Michael Gaunce with SCHUNK USA Kaleb Mertz with AME Thomasnet™ Industrial Digital Marketing Services The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop The No Asshole Rule Ray J. Green Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
6/26/202345 minutes, 27 seconds
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What Really Sells Machine Tools? 364

What is the most impactful factor that helps machine tool distributors sell tools? Is it the quality of the tools themselves? Is it the skill of the salesperson? Is it the service that the distributor can offer? Tony Harrod—General Manager at Methods Machine Tools, Inc.—believes that one of these things sets you apart: Service: But is the answer really that simple? If you aren’t providing quality service, will you be making fewer chips, and making less money? Find out in this episode of MakingChips!  Segments [2:53] Manufacturing News: February 2023 Orders Nearly 50% Above Average [6:20] Introducing the GM of Methods Machine Tool West: Tony Harrod [7:40] What sells machine tools? What is the most important factor?  [14:41] How they figure out what “doors to knock on” [17:25] What the machine tool industry needs to improve [18:29] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [19:10] Why machine tool and cutting tool distributors should partner  [26:56] Why Tony trains his customer on every machine they purchase [28:46] How the skills gap is impacting machine tool distributors Resources mentioned on this episode Connect with Tony Harrod on LinkedIn Methods Machine Tools February 2023 Orders Nearly 50% Above Average Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
6/19/202335 minutes, 52 seconds
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Bonus Chips: Manufacturing Happy Hour Interviews Jason Zenger & Nick Goellner about Manufacturing Leadership, 363

In this special Bonus Chips episode of MakingChips, we’re guests on Chris Luecke’s podcast, Manufacturing Happy Hour. Of all the manufacturing podcasts, we both double down on leadership topics. So in this episode, we seek to tackle one question: What does it mean to be a manufacturing leader? Tune in to hear what it takes to lead. Because if you’re not leading your team, they won’t be making chips, and if they’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [1:47] How we’d describe the MakingChips podcast [7:15] What listeners can expect from MakingChips [10:42] How you know it’s time to evolve [14:31] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [15:09] How creating content serves our businesses [20:43] What does it mean to be a manufacturing leader? Resources mentioned on this episode Manufacturing Happy Hour The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Chris Luecke on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
6/12/202327 minutes, 13 seconds
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ABC's of CMMC and Cybersecurity, 362

In 2018, the US Government set a standard for cybersecurity, so anyone in any industry that touched the US government had to meet the requirement—but it wasn’t happening. Now, CMMC is coming out and you will be audited. So what is CMMC? Does your shop need it? How can ProShop ERP help you accelerate the adoption of the different security standards? We cover it all in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re dealing with a security breach, you aren’t making chips, and if you aren’t making chips, you aren’t making money. BAM! – Paul Segments [0:14] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [2:49] Leadership Spotlight: David Hanna [8:18] Step #1 to secure your company  [11:32] Will AI impact cybersecurity?  [14:53] What is CMMC? [18:17] When do you have to have the CMMC?  [21:43] Can companies fake it ‘til they make it?  [24:39] Is high effort the answer?  [25:20] Who should get the CMMC [28:05] How ProShop can help you accelerate adoption [30:51] The potential cost of the certification  [33:15] How will CMMC work with different softwares/systems? Resources mentioned on this episode Paul Van Metre ProShop ERP ProShop SAFE™ The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)  David Hannah of G-Zero How to Delegate Yourself Out of a Job CMMC Certification Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
6/5/202338 minutes, 25 seconds
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SZN1: Haves and Have Nots with Paul Van Metre, 361

There is a widening disparity in the manufacturing industry: Insanely busy shops and shops that are barely treading water. In any business, there will always be companies that thrive and grow and those that don’t. But successful shops are doing something differently. In this episode of MakingChips, Kelsey Heikoop shares four things you can do differently to get more business and make more chips. Because if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Paul Van Metre Segments [0:15] Industrial Buying Engine at Thomas™ [5:52] The Leader Spotlight: Hernan Ricaurte [8:36] The gap between the haves and have nots [11:33] Solution #1: Become a sales-driven organization [18:04] Solution #2: Consistent adoption of technology [26:16] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [30:44] Solution #3: Invest in quality certifications (ISO, ITAR, etc.) [39:05] Solution #4: Invest in cybersecurity  Resources mentioned on this episode Paul Van Metre Kelsey Heikoop Hernan Ricaurte Ricaurte Precision Thomasnet™ Industrial Digital Marketing Services The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop The Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) program Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/29/202349 minutes, 21 seconds
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SZN1: Hot Sauce with Tony Gunn and Meaghan Ziemba, 360

We are melting our faces off with some hot sauces in this episode of MakingChips. Why? Because spices break down barriers. And as these hot sauces break down our mouths, you may just get some answers you weren't expecting about everything from mental health to making investments. So join us as we work our way through a Lethal Dose of The Hottest Sauce in the Universe and reach The End of this SpicyChips series. Because if we’re not learning from each other, we’re not MakingChips together, and we’re not making money. BAM! Now, excuse me while I go chug a gallon of milk… – Tony Segments [0:22] Check out the Oracle NetSuite ERP [3:27] What’s the chip on your shoulder? [7:14] What would you say to the world? [12:49] The End: How we take care of our mental health (milk time!) [18:55] Thomasnet™ Industrial Digital Marketing Services [21:17] Lethal dose: The best investment we’ve ever made [34:42] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [35:22] Why you should help your competitors Resources mentioned on this episode Batesville Tool & Die Mavens of Manufacturing Connect with Meaghan Ziemba on LinkedIn Connect with Tony Gunn on LinkedIn MTD CNC Thomasnet™ Industrial Digital Marketing Services The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Oracle Netsuite Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/22/202340 minutes, 27 seconds
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SZN1: Medium Sauce with Meaghan Ziemba from Mavens of Manufacturing, 359

We’ve moved on to medium sauce and we are on FIRE. We’re in manufacturing, so the MakingChips podcast covers all things manufacturing. But we’re also human, and we value the importance of being transparent and talking about things like mental health.  So in this episode of MakingChips, we cover some of the most challenging things we’ve faced both personally and as manufacturing leaders. So as we work through Reaper & Garlic Hot Sauce to The Death Stalker Sauce, we’ll share our biggest struggles and greatest achievements. Because there will always be challenges to overcome to make chips, right?  – Tony Segments [1:35] The manufacturing leaders spotlight [8:02] The hardest career challenge Meaghan overcame [13:00] The biggest career challenge Tony overcame [15:09] Thomasnet™ Industrial Digital Marketing Services [15:50] The difficulty of letting someone go [23:45] Our favorite influencers in business [29:01] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [29:39] The entire world is listening: What do you say? Resources mentioned on this episode Mavens of Manufacturing Connect with Meaghan Ziemba on LinkedIn Connect with Tony Gunn on LinkedIn Connect with Andrew Crowe on LinkedIn Connect with Nicole Wolter on LinkedIn Connect with Dwain Dy4er on LinkedIn Ivor Andrew MTD CNC Thomasnet™ Industrial Digital Marketing Services The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/15/202332 minutes, 17 seconds
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SZN1: Mild Sauce with Tony Gunn from MTD CNC, 358

We’re tasting our way through 12 different types of hot sauce chosen by none other than me, Tony Gunn, the Global GM at MTDCNC.com. Meaghan Ziemba of Mavens of Manufacturing also joins us as we work our way through some chicken wings.  We’ll talk about our backgrounds, how we balance life and work, and mental health in manufacturing. Balance is important, and if you don’t have it, you won’t be MakingChips efficiently, and you won’t be making money. BAM! – Tony Segments [3:25] Where in the world is Tony Gunn? [9:03] How Meaghan and Tony got into manufacturing  [14:49] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop ERP [15:29] How Tony balances life and work [22:08] Mental health in manufacturing  [27:15] The Industrial Buying Engine from Thomas™  Resources mentioned on this episode Mavens of Manufacturing Connect with Meaghan Ziemba on LinkedIn Connect with Tony Gunn on LinkedIn MTD CNC Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/8/202329 minutes, 10 seconds
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Bonus Chips: Q&A with Titan Gilroy, 357

Does Titan still run a shop? Does he believe in digital transformation on the shop floor? Why did Titan seek out jobs no one else wanted? In this special edition of MakingChips, Titan Gilroy answers burning listener questions while simultaneously sharing some spectacular advice for manufacturing leaders everywhere. We recorded a short and sweet episode so we could all get back to MakingChips, because if we aren’t MakingChips, we aren’t making money. BAM! Segments [0:20] Check out the Oracle NetSuite ERP [2:29] Does Titan still run a shop? [3:58] Does he have a team to alter posts? [4:27] Digital transformation on the shop floor [5:46] Good machinists comes down to leadership [9:20] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [10:00] Why Titan went after jobs no one else wanted [12:27] The future of US manufacturing  [13:38] The Industrial Buying Engine with Thomasnet™ Resources mentioned on this episode Oracle Netsuite Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/1/202315 minutes, 33 seconds
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Lights Out: Automation 101 with Chris Luecke Manufacturing Happy Hour, 356

Automation continues to be a popular and divisive topic in the manufacturing world. Automation is important for attracting and retaining young talent and growing your business. So we’ve been working hard to highlight the importance of automation—and where you can dive in—with our Lights Out series.  Chris Luecke—the host of Manufacturing Happy Hour—has a similar goal. We’re using our platforms to squash the rumors, lessen fears, and highlight how automation can and will benefit your business. Because if you’re not automating, you’re not making enough chips, and you’re missing out on money. BAM! Segments [0:20] The lean setup guide [2:26] When we embraced automation (and why) [4:03] Manufacturing News: NAM CEO Interview [7:33] Chris’s thoughts on our pre-show banter [10:38] How Chris got started in Manufacturing [19:53] Chris’s advice to sales management about new projects [22:38] Why automation has become a popular topic [26:07] Is the allure that automation has become more affordable?  [31:00] Automation 101: Where do you start? [34;21] Automation doesn’t take people’s jobs away [36:40] IT/OT convergence and why it’s important [43:25] Chris’s assessment of cybersecurity in automation  Resources mentioned on this episode NAM CEO talks on AI, banking, manufacturing, trade relationships, labor market The Manufacturing Happy Hour podcast Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/24/202348 minutes, 38 seconds
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Who is a CNC Expert According to Titans of CNC? 355

Titan Gilroy wanted to create a platform where aspiring machinists could hone their skills, share their work, and connect with leaders in the industry to get hired. So he launched CNC Expert. You can share projects, get hired (or hire someone), receive free training to get certifications, and much more.  CNC Expert certifications are based on real-world skills and aren’t just a piece of paper. Because at the end of the day, it’s about parts—not paper. You have to be able to machine top-notch parts. Because if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM!  Segments [0:15] The Industrial Buying Engine with Thomasnet™ [3:37] Manufacturing leadership lessons [5:14] Titan intentionally created a great culture  [11:46] What inspired the vision for CNC Experts [19:54] A conversation about influence [23:25] The future of CNC Experts [26:48] Making a certification legitimate  [31:26] How to become an inspector [32:54] Does CNC Expert replace NIMS?  [35:15] Can Titan bench-press Jason? [37:16] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Resources mentioned on this episode Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 The Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop The CNC Expert Platform Titan Gilroy on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/17/202339 minutes, 39 seconds
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Lights Out: Training Machinists with an Automation Mindset with Titan Gilroy, 354

Lights out manufacturing isn’t only a large topic of conversation but it’s also the way of the future. Shops around the world are embracing automation. Are you? If you haven’t become part of the automation conversation, don’t miss our first lights-out-focused episode with Special guest Titan Gilroy. He shares how automation has progressed, the mindset you need to embrace to be successful, and how to mitigate the risks. Because if you’re not automating, you’re not MakingChips. And if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Jason Segments [0:10] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [2:08] Manufacturing news: OK, Mexico, Save Me [7:09] How automation technology has progressed  [9:49] The use of robots in automation [11:38] Will robots replace machinists? [15:51] The Industrial Buying Engine with Thomasnet™ [16:23] Check out the Oracle NetSuite ERP [22:57] How to mitigate the risks of lights-out manufacturing  [27:20] If you don’t automate, you’ll get left behind [28:30] What’s next for Titans of CNC and automation? [31:53] How automation is different around the world [36:00] There is a place for everyone in manufacturing Resources mentioned on this episode Lights Out: Training Machinists with an Automation Mindset with Titan Gilroy How Defeat and Success Has Shaped Titan Gilroy, #286 TITANS of CNC Connect with Titan on LinkedIn Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/12/202339 minutes, 39 seconds
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MakingChips Seasons: Big MFG Leader to Small MFG Owner with Steve Burkett, 353

Steve Burkett has been in global aerospace manufacturing for 30 years. One year ago, he bought a well-established local shop and is now the President and CEO of Auto-Turn Manufacturing. Steve transitioned from being a big MFG leader to a small MFG owner. In this episode of MakingChips, Steve covers the good, bad, and the ugly of the transition. Is he MakingChips? Is he MakingMoney? There’s only one way to find out. BAM! – Mike Segments [1:56] Our warm MakingChips welcome for Steve Burkett [3:10] What’s the chip on your shoulder? [7:34] Big MFG leader to small MFG Owner [14:26] What Steve’s learned that benefits his company [17:23] The Industrial Buying Engine with Thomasnet™ [21:08] Why Steve chose to purchase Auto-Turn [27:03] How Steve connected with a private equity firm [28:07] Steve’s advice for those considering ownership  [31:01] The next steps for Auto-Turn Manufacturing [34:33] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Resources mentioned on this episode Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/3/202336 minutes, 27 seconds
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MakingChips Seasons: Real Life of a Small Shop Owner with Ken Parent, 352

Ken Parent keeps it real. Ken launched Parent Manufacturing in 2020 in the midst of the Covid pandemic. Navigating running a small shop and providing for his family hasn’t been an easy road. Instead of shying away from the reality of entrepreneurism, Ken shares the good, the bad, and the ugly on LinkedIn. The response has been overwhelming.  In this episode of MakingChips, we chat with Ken about the realities of being a small business owner in Oklahoma. He shares why he went into manufacturing, what his hope for the future is, and how he’s inspiring the manufacturing nation to make chips. Because if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM!  – Mike Segments [3:23] Jason’s “What are you learning?” segment [5:24] Learn more about Ken Parent of Parent Manufacturing [17:38] Why Ken became an entrepreneur [21:42] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [22:22] How LinkedIn has become a community of support [30:40] The impact of the manufacturing community on his family [36:00] Creating content for The Practical Machinist  [39:48] What Ken’s ideal job looks like  [43:36] The Industrial Buying Engine with Thomasnet™ Resources mentioned on this episode Father of 7 Builds Machine Shop From the Ground Up. So Can You. Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect with Ken on LinkedIn Oklahoma Manufacturing Alliance Mitutoyo Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/28/202345 minutes, 49 seconds
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What are Your Root Motivations as a Manufacturing Leader? 351

Did you know that we all operate from one of three root motivations? The majority of the decisions we make are because we’re striving for respect, value, or approval. When you know your root motivations as a leader—and in turn learn your team’s—it can help you become a better leader. Dennis Humphrey Ph.D. LCPC joins us in this episode of MakingChips to share how to narrow down your root motivation and how it can benefit your business. Because if your team isn’t syncing up because they don't understand each other’s motivations, you’re not going to be MakingChips, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM.  Segments [2:28] The three root motivations: Respect, value, and approval  [3:10] Manufacturing leader spotlight: Mike Rudy [6:55] Learn more about Dennis Humphrey Ph.D. LCPC [8:20] Where do our root motivations come from?  [10:22] The part where we make Nick the guinea pig [13:52] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop  [15:06] How do the “unhealthy” versions of these values manifest? [19:23] How to use your root motivation to be a better leader [24:20] Using someone’s root motivations to reach goals [30:28] How to frame root motivations correctly with your team [32:19] Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Resources mentioned on this episode The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop The 6 Types of Working Genius Eden Business Concepts  Thrive Space Podcast Root Motivations PDF Download Connect with Dennis on LinkedIn Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Connect With MakingChips  www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/20/202334 minutes, 19 seconds
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Does IMTS Really Change the Manufacturing Economy? 350

What is the greatest show on manufacturing Earth? IMTS. Every two years, the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) draws manufacturers from around the world to Chicago for six days. IMTS not only makes a huge impact on the economy in Chicago but also on the manufacturing industry. Peter Eelman—the Chief Experience Officer at AMT— joins us in this episode of MakingChips to share just what that impact is. Because if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:13] The Industrial Digital Marketing Services at Thomas™ [2:45] What our new show structure is going to look like [4:35] Manufacturing leadership spotlight: Karyn Ross [6:22] Today’s guest: Peter Eelman at AMT [9:28] What Peter’s been doing since IMTS [13:16] The impact IMTS has on Chicago [22:41] The economic impact on the manufacturing industry [27:02] Does the health of the trade show industry matter? [30:14] What impacted the attendance numbers in 2022? [35:17] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop  [35:55] How can you engage with IMTS and each other? Resources mentioned on this episode The Toyota Way to Service Excellence by Karyn Ross Karyn Ross on LinkedIn Michelle Edmonson on LinkedIn Peter Eelman on LinkedIn IMTS+ SPS Formnext Formnext Forum Mesago Messe Frankfurt GmbH The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/13/202339 minutes, 20 seconds
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MakingChips Seasons: Small Shop Owners Can Thrive with a PEO, 349

I’m Mike Payne, the President and Owner of Hill Manufacturing & Fabrication and the first guest host for MakingChips Seasons. When I first bought my company, I had to take on many of the HR functions. Enter Thrive PEO: Jon Scoggins came into the picture and took a lot off my plate.  So in this episode of MakingChips, Jon joins us to share what a PEO is and how it can not only benefit manufacturing leaders, but help them remain competitive in the workforce. Because if you can’t attract and retain machinists, you’re not MakingChips. And if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! Segments [1:48] Learn more about the MakingChips Seasons concept [3:14?] Why Mike Payne is our inaugural guest host [6:25] Introducing Jon Scoggins: President & CEO at Thrive PEO [8:08] What is a Professional Employer Organization (PEO)? [12:17] How a PEO can help you with employee onboarding [14:00] How Thrive PEO goes above and beyond a payroll company [15:38] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop  [16:16] A PEO can help you revamp your employee handbook [18:51] How a PEO stays up-to-date on local regulations [23:32] Is there a downside to using a PEO? [27:10] Can you justify the cost of a PEO? [28:20] Can a PEO work with an existing HR team? [29:44] Takeaways from this episode of MakingChips Seasons [30:53] Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Resources mentioned on this episode The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Affiliated Distributors Thrive PEO Mike Payne on LinkedIn Jon Scoggins on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/6/202333 minutes, 26 seconds
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Growth Roadmaps: Planning the Work and Working the Plan, 348

Where have we been? Where are we now? Where are we going? These three questions are a simple way to structure how we communicate the vision for our company. But to reach the goals we’ve outlined in our vision, we need a plan. And then we need to work the plan.  During our upcoming annual sales summit, I’ve asked my sales teams to create growth roadmaps for their goals and objectives. In this episode of MakingChips, I’ll share how we’re going to structure our roadmaps and how you can make the process work for you. Because if you don’t plan the work, you’re not MakingChips, and if you don’t work the plan, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [3:22] New Segment: Where in the world is Tony Gunn?  [9:10] Jason’s “Where, where, where” structure [10:34] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop  [11:13] The format for our annual sales summit [21:44] Thomas™ supplier analytics dashboard Resources mentioned on this episode Tony Gunn on LinkedIn The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/28/202324 minutes, 57 seconds
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How to Manufacture a Recession, 347

We know that 2023 is going to be a challenge. After all, a recession is being purposefully orchestrated. The Fed is trying to curb inflation. And truthfully, recessions are a normal part of the economic cycle. Will a recession negatively impact the manufacturing industry? Or will we be left untouched? Will a recession actually lead to new opportunities for the metalworking nation? In this episode of MakingChips, we continue with our recession obsession, because if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM!  Segments [0:10] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [1:32] Is a recession being purposefully orchestrated? [3:03] Manufacturing News: 3M cutting 2500 manufacturing jobs [5:53] We share why recessions are normal [8:08] Why is a recession going to happen? [11:07] How is this impacting the manufacturing industry? [13:27] How can you transform your company in 2023? [15:24] Learn about the Industrial Buying Engine (IBE) Resources mentioned on this episode The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop 3M cutting 2,500 production jobs Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/21/202317 minutes, 26 seconds
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Reflections on 25 Years at ZENGERS, 346

Reflecting on the past and learning from it helps shape our future decisions as leaders—both personally and professionally. I’ve worked in my family business for 25 years and recently spent some time reflecting on what I’ve learned.  So in this episode of MakingChips, I share 10 things I’ve learned during my time at ZENGERS. You need to learn and grow alongside your team. If they aren’t learning and growing with you, you won’t be effectively MakingChips. And if you’re not MakingChips, you aren’t making money. BAM! – Jason  Segments [0:19] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [3:54] Reflections on 25 years at ZENGERS [5:52] Manufacturing News: Tesla announces $3.6 billion investment [7:30] Why social media is for interacting [8:55] #1: Give your team a reason to wake up in the morning [10:18] #2: Don’t be afraid to blow things up and start a new business model [11:02] #3: Respect your mentors while being yourself [12:40] #4: Leaders need to acknowledge and own their influence [13:54] #5: Do something every day to keep learning [15:33] #6: Work a defined number of hours per week [19:08] #7: Collaborate from the heart, not the contract [20:06] #8: Hire a rockstar team with common values  [20:49] #9: Give your team autonomy to free you up  [21:53] #10: People are everything in your business  [23:03] Learn about the Industrial Buying Engine (IBE) Resources mentioned on this episode The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop Tesla announces $3.6 billion investment in electric semi-truck manufacturing Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/14/202326 minutes, 8 seconds
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Recruiting Manufacturing Leaders is a Lot Like Selling, 345

As a manufacturing leader, one of the most important things you can do is hire the right people. As I’ve been working through the recruiting process, I started to realize that it closely parallels the sales process. And if you excel as a salesperson, you’ll find it easier to recruit than you think. In this episode of MakingChips, we talk about recruitment in manufacturing. Because if you can't build the right team, you’re not MakingChips, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! Segments [0:15] The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop [1:37] We’re building a recording space at ZENGERS [3:53] Manufacturing News: GM to Sink Over $900M Into 4 Plants [9:23] The parallels between LinkedIn Recruiter and Sales Navigator [13:27] The list-building and prospecting process is the same [14:14] Prospecting and recruiting are the same grind [17:43] You have to qualify prospects and recruits  [19:33] Prospecting and recruiting are both about building trust [21:20] Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 [22:28] Both sales and recruiting require extensive negotiation Resources mentioned on this episode The Lean Setup Guide from ProShop GM to Sink Over $900M Into 4 Plants Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/7/202325 minutes, 48 seconds
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Fanatical Prospecting to Make Your Manufacturing Company Recession Proof, 344

This is a good time of year to start thinking about your sales pipeline and hunting for new business. Prospecting is one of the most important things you can do to grow your business—but it’s also something that everyone hates—even salespeople. So what is the concept of “Fanatical” prospecting? How do you bite the bullet and get started? We share some tips in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re not prospecting, you’re not growing, and if you’re not growing—you’re not MakingChips. BAM! – Nick Segments [0:20] Learn how Thomas™ can work for you [4:45] What’s happening in our businesses [5:42] Manufacturing News: Aerospace Industry Outlook [11:22] Why prospecting is an important piece of the sales puzzle [15:16] The concept of “Fanatical Prospecting” [18:32] Top performers utilize time blocking [23:37] How to start fanatically prospecting  [26:53] Balancing prepwork and numbers  [29:26] Why a recession is the best time to prospect Resources mentioned on this episode 2023 aerospace and defense industry outlook Fanatical Prospecting by Jeb Blount 5-Minute Selling by Alex Goldfayn EDA Data Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/31/202335 minutes, 41 seconds
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MakingChips Reviews Our Own Performance Reviews, 343

Are you conducting performance reviews in your business? Have you found a way to structure them to be useful? In this episode of MakingChips, Jason and I talk about how we structure our performance reviews, why we do them consistently, and why they matter. Your teams need to be performing at a high level. Why? If they’re not achieving their goals, they’re not MakingChips, and if they’re not MakingChips, we’re not making money! BAM! – Nick Segments [0:16] Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 [2:33] Jason’s favorite manufacturing memory from 2022 [4:08] Announcing one of our guest hosts for 2023 [8:03] Manufacturing News: U.S. manufacturing needs federal funding [13:51] Implementing a self-review alongside performance reviews [20:10] The #1 thing I learned from our performance reviews [22:28] Making sure performance reviews are a good use of time [25:33] Why peer reviews can be a useful tool to gauge performance [28:23] Start implementing performance reviews in your business Resources mentioned on this episode Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Op-ed: U.S. manufacturing needs federal funding to protect national security, spur innovation boom Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/24/202332 minutes, 31 seconds
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MakingChips Interviews ChatGPT about Manufacturing Leadership, 342

ChatGPT is a chatbot that is making waves in artificial intelligence. It’s not your typical chatbot that produces canned robotic answers. So in this episode of MakingChips, we put ChatGPT to the test. We asked the bot five questions about manufacturing and its answers will surprise you. Plus, we share how this AI can be useful to the manufacturing nation. Because if you're not taking advantage of technology, you’re not MakingChips, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Jason Segments [0:20] Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 [3:45] Why Mike Payne is excited about ChatGPT [7:27] MakingChips is alternating guest hosts to bring different perspectives [7:45] Manufacturing News: Statistics about chatbots [9:44] Learn more about ChatGPT, its functions, and its limitations [12:47] Question #1: How do I lead the manufacturing company of the future? [14:52] Question #2: What are the best technologies for automating a machine shop?  [16:50] Question #3: How can robots increase efficiency in a machine shop? [17:39] Question #4: How do you choose between a co-bot and a robot?  [19:56] Question #5: What is the #1 podcast for manufacturing leaders? [20:40] Our observations about the usefulness of ChatGPT for manufacturers Resources mentioned on this episode ChatGPT Key Chatbot Statistics You Should Follow in 2023 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/17/202325 minutes, 40 seconds
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Are Dogs a Manufacturing Leader's Best Friend? 341

Are you looking for a way to give back to your local community? We started MakingChips as a way to serve the manufacturing nation with no strings attached. Mike Payne—the President of Hill Manufacturing & Fabrication—found a unique way to do just that. He and his team started fostering dogs last year as a way to give back to their community. How has it gone? How has it also benefited his team? We share his unique story—and why giving back is so important for manufacturing leaders to embrace—in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re not giving back, you’re not MakingChips, and if you’re not MakingChips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Jason Segments [0:17] Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 [3:40] Manufacturing News: Bringing Manufacturing Closer to Home [7:36] Introducing today’s guest Mike Payne of Hill Manufacturing & Fabrication [9:42] Why Hill Manufacturing’s team is fostering hound dogs [13:58] How fostering hound dogs is benefitting Mike’s team [15:58] What happens when a foster dog isn’t a good fit?  [18:02] How dog fostering ties into serving the community [20:51] Balancing business objectives with being a good citizen Resources mentioned on this episode Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 How Smaller Companies Can Bring Manufacturing Closer to Home What to Consider Before Buying or Selling a Manufacturing Business with Mike Payne Helpless Hounds Dog Rescue Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/3/202323 minutes, 56 seconds
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A MakingChips Farewell to a Classic Carr, 340

It’s official: Jim Carr is leaving MakingChips. He’s stepping back to take more time to focus on Carr Machine & Tool. Jim has been an integral part of the success of MakingChips. So in this episode, I’ll share six things I’ve learned from Jim that are impactful in both business and  life. We’ll sure miss our banter, but we’ll keep MakingChips, because if we aren’t MakingChips, we aren’t making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [1:58] A MakingChips farewell to Jim Carr [4:58] Manufacturing news: Automotive manufacturing shifting south [7:14] Lesson #1: If you need time to think about something, take it [11:04] Lesson #2: If you’re gonna do something, do it with top quality [13:09] Lesson #3: Always provide a first-class experience  [15:24] Lesson #4: Dare to be different than other leaders [16:45] Lesson #5: Relationships fuel growth (the community is everything)  [19:04] Lesson #6: You can’t work hard without playing hard [20:54] The new direction MakingChips is going to take Resources mentioned on this episode Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/27/202223 minutes, 1 second
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Social Media in Manufacturing Part ll

In this special episode of MakingChips, we are taking my journey with MakingChips full circle by recording a follow-up episode to our very first episode, “Social Media in Manufacturing,” which aired in December 2014. This episode will cover why we still care about social media in manufacturing and what platforms you should leverage. Because if you aren’t leveraging social media, then you aren’t MakingChips. And if you aren’t MakingChips, then you aren’t making money. BAM! — Jim Segments [5:32] Why am I leaving MakingChips? [8:14] Do we need social media marketing? [9:46] What’s new at AME/Hennig and ZENGERS [13:56] Why should business owners care about social media? [15:42] The three different platforms that are relevant to business [18:45] Why a company page is important on LinkedIn [25:12] Building connections with a personal LinkedIn page [30:31] Don’t allow yourself to get overwhelmed with “the rules” [34:10] My final words of wisdom and some big thank-you’s Resources mentioned on this episode Get 25% off an annual Thomas™ subscription with code CHIPS25 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/20/202237 minutes, 36 seconds
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Extreme Ownership for the Manufacturing Leader, 338

Have you read the book, “Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win” by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin? The book talks about the mindset of Navy SEALs and how the techniques they employ in and out of combat can be embraced by leadership. So in this episode of MakingChips, we break down some of the facets of extreme leadership and share how they’re applicable to the manufacturing nation. Because if you’re not taking extreme ownership of your business, you’re not making chips. And if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [3:02] What the end of the year looks like for ZENGERS and Black [5:33] How Carr Machine & Tool is growing organically [8:40] Manufacturing News: Manufacturing Survey Report [15:59] Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win [17:22] Why do military officers make amazing business leaders? [19:04] The gist of Jocko Willink’s TEDx Talk [20:41] What do you do when you take extreme ownership? [24:17] What should you instill in your culture?  [27:40] What are your “laws of combat?” [31:18] Leading up and down the chain of command [33:55] How to avoid micromanagement  [35:32] The dichotomy of leadership  [37:03] Jason’s five takeaways for a small machine shop Resources mentioned on this episode LBMC Manufacturing Survey Report ProShop ERP Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win Jocko Willink’s TEDx Talk Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/17/202241 minutes, 36 seconds
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Using Discretion in Your Collection Tactics: It May Cost You the Customer

When do you ask customers to pay their invoices? How do you ask your customers to pay their invoice(s)? Collecting on a debt that’s owed is an art and a science. You have to be careful so you don’t lose a customer. In this episode of MakingChips, we cover a recent frustrating situation I dealt with that should have been handled differently—because they just might lose me as a customer. Don’t miss this episode to hear the whole story! – Jim Segments [3:06] What’s happening at ZENGERS and Carr Machine & Tool [7:12] Using discretion in your collection tactics [9:10] Manufacturing news: Indiana leads nation on manufacturing job growth [15:37] The reason why we’re talking about collection tactics [23:58] How we evaluate our collection tactics [26:51] Who is handling accounts receivable?  Resources mentioned on this episode Indiana is leading the nation on manufacturing job growth Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/29/202229 minutes
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People, Process and Performance (CV Manufacturing Conference)

We believe that there are three components to running a great manufacturing company: People, process, and performance. And properly managing each of these areas will drive the success of your business. In this episode of MakingChips, we moderate a panel at the CV Manufacturing Conference with special guests Mike Allison and Ryan Howard. We cover everything from finding and retaining top talent to achieving and sustaining high-output results. Don’t miss this special edition of the MakingChips podcast! Segments [1:20] How MakingChips got its start [4:28] Introducing Mike Allison and Ryan Howard [6:42] Strategies to find, hire and retain top talent  [14:05] How manufacturing can make an impact on your family [18:54] How to build on the strengths of your employees [26:32] Using personality tests to identify motivations for employees [30:46] The processes they use to meet customer’s demands [38:50] Key characteristics of a best-in-class supplier [42:20] What Mike and Ryan are doing differently with processes [46:16] How to achieve and sustain high output results [52:06] Using gamification to help motivate employees to level up [57:53] Sharing who’s receiving rewards for excellence in manufacturing [1:01:30] Make sure you actually implement your “open door” policy  [1:04:30] Setting the example for your employees post-Covid [1:11:36] Where to get started with the MakingChips podcast! Resources mentioned on this episode Mike Allison with Power Engineering and Manufacturing Ryan Howard with John Deere How to Create a Bonus Incentive Program that Drives Results Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/22/20221 hour, 16 minutes, 50 seconds
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Are Sleepy Leaders Better Leaders?

Do you struggle to sleep at night? Do you lay in bed and think about work and show up in the morning exhausted? Guess what—sleepy leaders are NOT better leaders. I’m going to share why I think that and how manufacturing leaders can get higher-quality shut-eye in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re not getting enough sleep, it’s like being drunk on the job. And if you’re drunk, you’re certainly not MakingChips, and you’re not making money. BAM! Segments [3:40] What’s happening in our businesses [6:24] What’s keeping you up at night?  [8:05] Why sleep is important to your overall health [13:17] My tips to help you achieve better sleep [23:42] Jim’s tips to help you sleep at night  [29:16] Some tips that experts recommend  Resources mentioned on this episode How drunk are you without sleep? CEOs: A Sleep Culture at Work Is a Competitive Advantage Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/15/202232 minutes, 44 seconds
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Manufacturing a Successful Business and Marriage

I met Jamie and Lee Marzilli at ProShop ERP’s happy hour event while we were at IMTS 2022. When I heard how they founded and grew a machine shop as a married couple, I knew we needed to have them as guests on MakingChips. So in this episode, Jamie and Lee share their background in machining and how they built Marzilli Machine from the ground up. Don’t miss hearing about their grassroots success story!  Segments [2:35] A husband and wife team on MakingChips! [5:31] The definition of teamwork (makes the dream work) [6:05] Recruiting and hiring in our businesses [9:12] The Hawkeye Community College visit [10:30] How rising inflation impacts manufacturing [14:37] Introducing Jamie and Lee Marzilli [16:37] How Jamie got started in manufacturing [24:01] Jamie’s temporary stint selling cars [28:05] How Jamie and Lee started their shop [34:40] Navigating a business and a marriage [39:06] The vision for the future of Marzilli Machine Resources mentioned on this episode Michael Watkins and David Capkovitz from EBITDA Growth Systems (EGS) 5 Steps to Detoxify a Toxic Work Culture, According to New MIT Research Marzilli Machine Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/8/202242 minutes, 45 seconds
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A True & Unique Manufacturing Success Story

Kelsey Heikoop and Paul Van Metre met in an entry-level engineering class. They hit it off right away—while simultaneously falling in love with machining. Once they graduated college, they started their own machine shop. How did that lead to founding ProShop ERP? They share the ProShop ERP origin story—full of overcoming challenges to reach success—in this episode of MakingChips!  Segments [2:17] Our aha moments from IMTS [5:49] Manufacturing news: Uptick in production [7:12] Learn more about Kelsey Heikoop and Paul Van Metre [15:54] From growing a custom machine shop to creating an ERP [19:08] Selling the idea of ProShop ERP to a developer [25:44] What helped them overcome their struggles [30:44] Onboarding ProShop ERP with their first customer [34:37] The outstanding success of ProShop Resources mentioned on this episode Connect with Kelsey Heikoop on LinkedIn Connect with Paul Van Metre on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/1/202240 minutes, 30 seconds
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Our Best and Worst Ideas for Industry Events

How do you make an industry event a worthy investment for your business? Can you prepare ahead of time to see an ROI? What should you avoid doing when you’re attending an event? In this episode of MakingChips—with IMTS fresh on our minds—we talk about the dos and don’ts for industry events. You have to be strategic because if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick Segments [1:09] What’s happening in our lives [4:42] Hear our manufacturing news [9:49] What we’re reading right now [11:37] The ROI of industry events [15:27] Craft a social media campaign [16:47] Set appointments ahead of time [18:12] Prepare specific questions [19:32] Bring a guest with you [21:12] The “don’ts” you need to avoid Resources mentioned on this episode Kiplinger Letter Good to Great The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win Selling the Price Increase The Terminal List ProShop ERP Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/25/202227 minutes, 11 seconds
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Finding Your Passion for a Rewarding Career

I believe if you find your passion you will have a successful and fruitful career. I didn't realize what my true passions were until later in life. In this episode of MakingChips, each of us will break down and share with the metalworking nation what we are passionate about. Because if you’re not passionate about what you’re doing, you’re not living to your full potential. And if you’re not happy with your job, you’re not making chips, and if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! — Jim Segments [3:21] The definition of “finding your passion” [3:53] What’s happening in our lives [8:05] Manufacturing News [13:56] What we’re passionate about [22:35] Be realistic about your passions Resources mentioned on this episode Biden signs China competition bill to boost U.S. chipmakers NAM Facts About Manufacturing Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/18/202230 minutes, 42 seconds
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LIVE at IMTS: Advancements in Machining Automation

In the final special edition episode of MakingChips recorded live at IMTS, we sit down with Craig Zoberis of Fusion OEM and RoboJob USA and Derek Goodwin with Trinity Robotics Automation to talk about a paradigm shift in the industry: Automation. We cover the difference between pallet automation and machine tending, implementing automation, and calculating the true ROI of automation. Automation can increase spindle utilization and help your shop make more chips to make more money. BAM! Segments [2:54] Learn more about Craig Zoberis and Derek Goodwin [5:13] The difference between pallet automation and machine tending [9:23] The first step toward lights-out manufacturing [16:19] Is automation easy to program and implement? [20:41] Is the cost of automation a barrier to entry? [22:26] How many untended hours can you achieve?  [30:00] RoboJob USA and Trinity Robotics Automation complement each other Resources mentioned on this episode  Connect with Craig Zoberis on LinkedIn Connect with Derek Goodwin on LinkedIn ProShop ERP Amper Robot ROI Calculator Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/11/202233 minutes, 10 seconds
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LIVE at IMTS: Leveraging Your CNC Machine Productivity from Data to Action

Have you implemented a machine monitoring system in your machine shop? Do you know how to leverage the data to make meaningful improvements in your shop? CEO and Co-founder of Amper Technologies Akshat Thirani joined us live at IMTS to talk about how his company has simplified machine monitoring and made it accessible to every shop. The bottom line is that your shop can take the data from machine monitoring to become more efficient, immediately. Because if you’re not efficient, you’re not making enough chips, and you’re not making money! Segments [5:07] We welcome Akshat Thirani to the IMTS stage! [6:49] Why Akshat developed Amper Technologies [8:24] How machine monitoring changed Carr’s KPIs [10:21] Making machine monitoring simple and accessible [18:30] How machine monitoring changed Jim’s shop [24:31] The data that can be extracted from machine monitoring [26:05] The length of time to see the ROI of Amper [28:20] Why you need a machine monitoring system Resources mentioned on this episode Amper Connect with Akshat Thirani on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/4/202230 minutes, 53 seconds
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LIVE at IMTS: How Will the Latest Technology Advancements Change Your Manufacturing Business?

What would the shop of the future look like? What’s more exciting—hardware or software? What can manufacturing leaders learn from B2C businesses? In this special LIVE episode at IMTS 2022, we chat with special guests Mike Payne with Hill Manufacturing  and Eike Huebner with Ellison Technologies about what they would do with their shops if they had 10 million dollars to spend. Listen to this episode to find out what the machine shop of the future looks like. You need to use technology to make chips efficiently because if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money! BAM! Segments [1:49] The US is on the cutting edge of manufacturing [2:30] Learn more about each of our guests [3:50] What would the shop of the future look like? [6:24] The future is focused on software development [9:12] Mike’s background in software and data collection [11:35] How Mike and Eike would build the shop of the future [15:16] How Mike doubled the size of his machine shop [16:48] What manufacturing leaders can learn from B2C  [19:05] The impact of technology on additive manufacturing  [22:06] Why style of CNC machine tools should you invest in?  [25:40] What is a human-machine interface? [27:30] Mike and Eike’s call to action to the manufacturing nation Resources mentioned on this episode Mike Payne with Hill Manufacturing  Eike Huebner with Ellison Technologies ProShop ERP Amper Technologies Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
9/27/202232 minutes, 51 seconds
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Connecting Machine Monitoring with Leadership

As a leader looking to grow his business, Tom Schroeder knew it was time to start gathering data to inform the growth process. So Tom began to implement machine monitoring technology in his shop. In this episode of MakingChips, hear how Tom implemented Amper Technology and the impact it has made on his business.  Because let’s face it, if you’re not monitoring your machines, you don’t know which ones are making enough chips, and if you’re not making enough chips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Nick BONUS: Akshat Thirani—the CEO and Co-Founder of Amper—also joins us in this episode to cover machine monitoring from every aspect.  Segments [3:24] Nick’s upcoming podcast: Light’s Out [5:29] Jim’s upcoming podcast: My True Position [7:16] Manufacturing News: Economy expectations [10:59] Meet the guests on this week’s episode [13:02] Learn more about Tom’s background [15:05] Shifting from product manufacturing to technology OEM [21:45] What inspired Tom to look for machine monitoring solutions [26:46] Why Tom wanted to monitor and measure his machines [32:45] Why is Amper easier to implement than the alternative(s)? [39:22] How Amper is helping PBC Linear improve [41:27] The core strategies moving into the future Resources mentioned on this episode Kiplinger Letters Don’t miss IMTS 2022 Connect with Tom Schroeder on LinkedIn Connect with Akshat Thirani on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
9/6/202247 minutes, 47 seconds
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What Most People Don’t Know About IMTS

According to Peter Eelman, if you walk every bit of carpeting at IMTS, you’d walk 69 miles. Those 69 miles cover everything from The Modern Machine Shop’s Top Shops’ Panel to the 3D Printing Workshop for Job Shops, from Women Make Manufacturing Move to The Smartforce Student Summit. In this episode of MakingChips, we go beyond the exhibits to cover what’s happening at IMTS 2022 that you can’t miss!  – Jason Segments [2:30] What’s happening in our lives [4:43] Manufacturing News: Food in Chicago [11:30] The Job Shops Specialty Program Day 1 [19:38] Modern Machine Shop’s Top Shops [21:17] The Modern Machine Shop’s Top Shops’ Panel [22:58] MakingChips will be on stage at IMTS! [25:45] 3D Printing Workshop for Job Shops [30:53] WMMM: Women Make Manufacturing Move [36:26] AMT Emerging Technology Center [39:46] Flying a 3D Printed jetpack [41:34] The Smartforce Student Summit [45:31] How registering for IMTS works  [46:49] Download the My Show Planner Resources mentioned on this episode Register for IMTS 2022! Chicago Air and Water Show IMTS Specialty Program: Job Shops Workshop Day 1 Modern Machine Shop Announces 2022 Edition of Top Shops Event Amper Technologies Machine Monitoring  3D Printing Workshop for Job Shops The Additive Manufacturing Conference Women Make Manufacturing Move Beyond the Exhibits: Attractions at IMTS AMT Emerging Technology Center Gravity.co The Smartforce Student Summit Sign up for the My Show Planner app ProShop ERP Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/30/202250 minutes, 51 seconds
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Employee Benefits: Are You Really Benefiting?

Does your team know what they’re really getting when you offer employee benefits, such as health insurance and a 401k? In this episode of MakingChips, Jason and I dissect the employee benefits we offer at Carr Machine & Tool. When we calculate what we’re investing in our employees, the number is shocking. Learn just how valuable offering employee benefits can be in this episode! After all, you have to incentivize your employees to make chips, so you’re making money! BAM! – Jim Segments [1:55] Employee benefits: Are you benefiting?  [3:47] The definition of employee benefits [6:35] Why employee benefits are important [9:21] Manufacturing news: Rivian laying off 6% of workforce [13:38] Breaking down the cost of employee benefits [24:05] Why benefits outweigh a higher hourly wage [29:48] Carr Machine & Tool and ZENGERS are hiring! Resources mentioned on this episode Amper Technologies Don’t miss IMTS! Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter
8/23/202231 minutes, 25 seconds
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Tips for Scheduling Production in Your Machine Shop

Scheduling is the art of planning your activities so that you can achieve your goals and priorities in the time that you have available. When it’s done effectively, it helps you understand what you can realistically achieve with your time. Why is it a big deal on the shop floor? As technology and automation are being implemented, it forces you to be faster. So you have to be efficient. Paul Van Metre joins us in this episode of MakingChips to share how ProShop can help your shop become more efficient. Because if you aren’t being efficient, you aren’t making enough chips. BAM! Segments [2:42] Why scheduling is important on the shop floor [5:39] Make sure you come see MakingChips at IMTS! [6:37] What’s happening in our lives and businesses [8:52] Paul Van Metre is back on the show [13:05] Tips for make your setups better [16:33] The secret to great scheduling is accurate estimations [23:31] How expediting impacts your scheduling in ProShop [25:08] Setup reliability is key to proper scheduling [26:38] Why Paul believes expediters are unnecessary  [28:23] Consistently monitor and update your setup and run times [31:00] ProShop’s pre-processing checklist  [33:42] Why fully automated scheduling isn’t realistic [36:14] How Dave Hannah saw improvements with ProShop scheduling Resources mentioned on this episode Register for IMTS 2022! ThomasNet ProShop ERP Paul Van Metre High QA G Zero CNC Machining  Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/16/202245 minutes, 2 seconds
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IMTS 2022: It's Big, It's Back, It's Safe, It's Fun!

The International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) is back! This is the first time that IMTS has been forced to go on hiatus since World War II. It’s taking place September 12–17 at McCormick Place in Chicago and will consist of 1.2 million square feet of exhibition space.  In this episode of MakingChips, Peter Eelman—the Chief Experience Officer at AMT—joins us to share what’s happening at IMTS, how to book your hotel stay, how Chicago is safer than ever, and even shares what to do to enjoy your stay. Even better, we will be in the Grand Concourse Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Come by and say hi! Segments [2:50] Why Chicago is a safe and fun city to host IMTS [5:41] Learn about our special guest Peter Eelman [10:39] Book your hotel directly through IMTS [15:31] This years main stage is stellar [16:37] The Emerging Technology Center [20:11] The Additive Manufacturing Pavilion [21:35] Set up a my show planner account [23:48] Sign up for drawings every Thursday! [26:23] Some logistics about navigating Chicago [28:33] Things to enjoy while in Chicago [29:41] Learn about the IMTS Smartsource Student Summit [31:07] Find Me, Find Us, and Find It at IMTS!  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Book Your Hotel for IMTS 2022! Register before August 12th to take advantage of $50 tickets  McCormick Place Convention Center IMTS Show Planner Smartforce Student Summit Connect with Peter Eelman Chicago Architecture Tour Ingersoll Machine Tools ProShop ERP Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/9/202235 minutes, 59 seconds
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Coolant Problems and How to Solve Them

We’ve all gone into plants that smell awful because they’re dealing with coolant problems. But that smell is a symptom of other, bigger problems. If you have a smelly shop, foggy and dirty windows, and gunk on your tables, you’ve got a coolant problem that’s creating an unhealthy environment for your team. Learn how to identify coolant problems and how to solve them in this episode of MakingChips!  Segments [7:45] What’s happening in our lives [9:27] Manufacturing News: Peloton abandons building manufacturing plant [11:09] How coolant problems impact your team [13:35] How coolant problems impact your equipment [16:21] Solution #1: Preventative maintenance [20:54] Solution #2: Wash your hands [22:50] Solution #3: Wear nitrile gloves [23:37] Solution #4: Use mist collectors [24:30] Solution #5: Use high-quality water [24:53] Solution #6: Proper filtration systems [29:19] Solution #7: Choose the right coolant [32:49] Leave us a review on your favorite platform! Resources mentioned on this episode IMTS 2022! O’Keeffe’s Working Hands Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/2/202234 minutes, 21 seconds
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Tooling Management for Success Using Your ERP System

The key to being a good salesman is to add value wherever you can for your customers. I want to be able to talk with ZENGER’s customers about integrating their tooling management with their ERP system and why it can help them. That’s why, in this episode of MakingChips, Paul Van Metre comes back to share how tooling management works using ProShop ERP. Because if you’re not properly managing your tools, you’re losing money (and definitely not making chips).  – Jason! Segments [3:24] What’s happening in our lives [7:14] Manufacturing News: Amogy Powers a Tractor Using Ammonia [10:34] Why is tooling management important?  [15:31] Process stability and setup reduction [20:16] Differences between high-production and project-based shops [22:22] Walking through the tooling management inventory system [26:41] A success story from Faircloth Machine Shop [37:58] Be more scientific with your tooling management system Resources mentioned on this episode ProShop ERP Tooling Management Webinar Thomas™ IMTS 2022 Amogy Demonstrates First Ammonia-Powered, Zero-Emissions Tractor Faircloth Machine Shop Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/26/202240 minutes, 38 seconds
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Will You Find Your Next Manufacturing Customer, or Will Your Next Customer Find You?

Whether you rely on inbound marketing, outbound marketing, or a combination of both, sourcing new customers can be a hassle. But it’s how you grow your business, so you can’t give up. Thomas™, a Xometry company, is America’s #1 industrial sourcing platform and marketing powerhouse. It could also be your #1 driver of new customers. Thomas™ President Shawn Fitzgerald shares how in this episode of MakingChips. Because if you’re not gaining new customers, you’re not making chips, and if you’re not making chips—you’re not making money! BAM! – Nick Segments [2:54] The exciting things happening in ours lives [5:13] Learn all about what’s happening at IMTS [6:27] Manufacturing News: Reverse Logistics Booms [9:25] Shawn Fitzgerald’s origin story [14:53] Learn more about the evolution of Thomas [17:42] How Thomas works for buyers and suppliers [27:50] Inbound, outbound, and account-based marketing [?:??] A discussion about what’s most-sourced [35:09] Thomas is a single-source platform to get everything you need [37:41] How Thomas and Xometry transformed someone’s business [39:10] What’s happening next at Thomas and Xometry? Resources mentioned on this episode Don’t miss IMTS 2022! Thomas Reverse Logistics Booms as Americans Return 17% of All Retail Purchases Connect with Shawn Fitzgerald on LinkedIn Wonder Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/19/202243 minutes, 46 seconds
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What Can a Skills Gap Analysis Do for Your Manufacturing Business?

Why is a skills gap analysis helpful? How can it make your company more efficient? What does the process look like? In this episode of MakingChips, we define a seven-step process you can use to help you run a skills gap analysis on your manufacturing business. Special guest Crystal Van Vleet shares how she’s brought the process to life in her role with Advanced Machine & Engineering (and at MakingChips). The bottom line is, if you don’t have skills, you’re not making chips, and if you're not making chips, you’re not making money! — Nick Segments [2:06] Why a skills gap analysis can help your business [4:56] Manufacturing News: Skills Gap Analysis for the Future of Work [12:43] Learn all about our guest Crystal Van Vleet [17:59] Step #1: Make a plan for the skills gap analysis [22:09] Step #2: Define your organization's future goals [24:58] Why Crystal got her CMTSE certification [26:47] Step #3: Catch up on the future of work trends  [28:04] Step #4: Determine key skills needed for the future [30:18] Step #5: Measure your current skills [33:16] Crystal’s experience with self-assessment tools [35:03] Step #6: Find out where the gaps are [39:23] Step #7: Put a plan into action Resources mentioned on this episode Skills Gap Analysis for the Future of Work Connect with Crystal Van Vleet on LinkedIn Don’t miss IMTS 2022! ProShop ERP Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/15/202241 minutes, 54 seconds
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Levers to Pull to Double the Value of Your Manufacturing Company

What can you do to double the value of your manufacturing company and increase your likelihood of selling it exponentially? In this episode of MakingChips, Michael Watkins and David Capkovitz from EBITDA Growth Systems (EGS) share how they can help you increase your profitability and Paul Van Metre from ProShop ERP shares how he partners with EGS to bring value to his clients. They are all passionate about improving business performance in manufacturing companies and impacting lives. Don’t miss this episode packed with actionable insight. Segments [4:38] What’s happening in our businesses [6:45] Manufacturing News: Industrial manufacturing deals outlook [9:30] Learn all about EBITDA Growth Systems’ mission [16:02] How Paul is connected to EBITDA Growth Systems (EGS)  [19:17] How EBITDA Growth Systems (EGS) can help your business [27:29] Does EGS focus on internal systems or external marketing? [29:25] How they meet their brand promise with businesses that realize success [34:00] The #1 thing that Michael and David focus on to drive more revenue [35:09] The investment that’s required to drive change in your company [38:04] The synergy between ProShop ERP and EBITDA Growth Systems Resources mentioned on this episode IMTS 2022 ProShop ERP Xometry Supplies Flex Industrial manufacturing: Deals 2022 midyear outlook The End of the World Is Just the Beginning: Mapping the Collapse of Globalization EBITDA Growth Systems The E-Myth Revisited The World is Flat Scaling to Exit by Michael Watkins Connect with David Capkovitz Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
7/5/202242 minutes, 11 seconds
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How One Manufacturing Leader Closed the Skills Gap with Incredible Results

Many manufacturers are facing a common struggle: Their team members are retiring. Even worse, they’re struggling to replace them. Matt Carr—the President of Storch Products Co—found an ingenious way to solve the skills gap at his company by attracting talent from a local technical college. How? He shares a strategy that any manufacturing leader can adapt in this episode of MakingChips. After all, you need talent on your team to make chips!  Segments [2:45] The definitions of reshoring and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) [5:14] Reshoring Initiative® IH2021 Data Report [8:00] Learn about Matt Carr—the President of Storch Products Co [17:20] The advantages of a magnetic chip conveyor [20:20] How Matt solved the skills gap at his company [26:45] How Matt has attracted talent from a local school [29:45] Matt’s experience implementing EOS at Storch  [35:46] Why scaling back and niching down solves problems [40:40] What the class looks like Resources mentioned on this episode ProShop ERP Video Library Reshoring Initiative® IH2021 Data Report Don’t miss IMTS 2022 Shop thousands of raw materials at Xometry Traction by Gina Wickman Entrepreneurial Operating System Connect with Matt Carr on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
6/27/202246 minutes, 49 seconds
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AS9100 Credentialing in 4 months? One Man's Success Story, 316

AS9100 is a standardized quality management system for the aerospace industry. If a manufacturer wants to work in this field, they have to be AS9100 certified. The credentialing process is difficult to achieve quickly. Integrating it into your quality management system (QMS) can be even more time-consuming. In this episode of MakingChips, special guest John Jones shares how he used ProShop to speed up and complete the implementation in just 4 months. Listen to this episode for his strategies! Segments [2:52] What is the AS9100 credential? [6:29] Manufacturing news: Solar panels [9:41] What’s happening in our lives [11:11] Learn all about John Jones [17:29] Implementing AS9100 into ProShop [25:04] John’s experience being audited [31:44] Learn about ProShop’s Flying Start Package Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Check out the IMTS 2022 Investor Forum Biden invokes Defense Production Act to boost solar panel manufacturing Find buyers and suppliers at Thomas Become a supplier with Xometry ProShop Flying Start Package Paul Van Metre Clinkenbeard John Jones on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
6/22/202239 minutes, 38 seconds
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Our Sales & Marketing Pet Peeves and What to Do Instead

Do you struggle with any pet peeves? We’ve compiled a list of three sales and marketing tactics that people utilize that drive us crazy: misusing lead capture forms, cold calls, and spammy LinkedIn connections. But instead of just complaining about these things, we’re going to share what anyone in sales or marketing should do instead. There’s a right way—and most definitely a wrong way—to do it. Find out which side you’re landing on in this episode of MakingChips! – Nick If you enjoyed this episode, share it with someone you know! If you know someone who struggles with spammy sales tactics, it might be a nice way to nudge them in the right direction.  Segments [3:18] Bring a nanny on your vacation [4:15] The good things happening in our lives [5:57] Manufacturing news: Recession Unlikely in 2022 [14:30] Things that drive us crazy (other than Jason) [17:30] Pet Peeve #1: Misusing lead capture forms [21:40] Pet Peeve #2: The dreaded cold call [25:15] Pet Peeve #3: Spammy LinkedIn connections Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Don’t miss IMTS 2022! ProShop ERP Recession Unlikely in 2022 The Remedy by Pascal Dennis Claim Your Company at https://www.thomasnet.com/claim Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
6/6/202235 minutes, 4 seconds
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Finding Your Niche: Right Customer—Right Seat, 314

Gino Wickman and Jim Collins popularized the term, “Right people, right seat” in reference to getting the right employees in leadership positions. But what if we take that terminology and apply it to customers? How do you decide what type of customer is the right fit for your manufacturing business? What type of customer will be the most profitable for your business? Those are the questions that we dissect in this episode of MakingChips. Don’t miss it! Any great tips I can use to find THE right customers for Carr Machine & Tool? Email me at [email protected].  Segments [6:28] The definition of “right people, right seat” [7:22] What’s happening in our lives right now [10:35] Business News: Dow falls for sixth straight day [15:43] How do you decide who the right customer is?  [16:52] Step #1: Focus on solving problems [20:10] Step #2: Focus on sales not vanity metrics [23:15] Step #3: Get the word out about your business [26:14] Step #4: Improve your customer retention [28:14] Step #5: Track your analytics [32:14] How we filter our customers at Carr [36:07] What work is the most profitable? [39:02] Study your customer’s behaviors Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Dow Falls for a Sixth Straight Day After Another Wild Session Gaining Customer Traction: 5 Steps to Customer Growth Traction by Gino Wickman Good to Great by Jim Collins Don’t miss IMTS 2022! ProShop ERP Learn about Xometry’s Flex program Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/23/202240 minutes, 51 seconds
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Time Management for the Manufacturing Leader

Do you struggle with time management? Do you find yourself overwhelmed and exhausted at the end of the week with an endless backlog of things to do? After a rough week of long workdays and back-to-back dinner meetings, I felt like a zombie. I thought it wise to dive into an episode about time management. So in this episode of MakingChips, Jason and I tackle mastering time management in three areas: your phone calls, your calendar, and your time off. Because if you’re not managing your time efficiently, you aren’t making chips efficiently, which means you aren't making money, are you? — Nick Do you have a great system for time management? Let us know! Email us at [email protected] Segments [2:23] What’s happening in our lives [8:57] Manufacturing News: China Opposes Semiconductor Bill [15:15] Tip #1: Schedule phone calls and Zoom meetings [22:17] Tip #2: Share your calendar to avoid availability ping pong [24:33] Tip #3: Time block your calendar to get work done [29:59] Tip #4: What’s required and what’s optional changes [35:36] Tip #5: Manage “out of office” time the right way [43:14] Jason is certified as a “Full Focus” professional Resources mentioned on this episode Schedule a meeting with Jason! Full Focus Planner ProShop ERP Xometry Don’t miss IMTS 2022! China Opposes Semiconductor Bill Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/18/202244 minutes, 51 seconds
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Manufacturing Lessons from King Richard

“King Richard” is a movie about Venus and Serena’s dad, Richard Williams. I remember watching their rise in tennis and was fascinated by this movie that followed their path to success. Their father was a large driving force behind their successful careers. So in this unique episode of MakingChips, we talk about 7 takeaways from King Richard and how they can be applied to the manufacturing world. If you want to rise to the top, you have to make chips. Because if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! Segments [3:01] The sacrifice(s) it takes to achieve success [6:25] What’s happening in our lives [9:21] Manufacturing News: Manufacturing Activity Slows [15:08] Takeaway #1: The importance of planning [18:41] Takeaway #2: What are you willing to sacrifice? [21:31] Takeaway #3: Hard work and tenacity can take you places [23:20] Takeaway #4: The more successful you are the more haters you’ll have [24:25] Takeaway #5: Don’t make success about getting in the spotlight [26:23] Takeaway #6: The power of a positive mindset [28:20] Takeaway #7: Make no excuses Resources mentioned on this episode The movie: King Richard U.S. manufacturing activity slowest in more than 1-1/2 years as workers quit Xometry IMTS 2022!  ProShop ERP The CNC Samurai Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/9/202234 minutes, 1 second
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Implementing 5S: Simple Tips to Get You Started

5S is a methodology that I decided to implement when Carr Machine & Tool moved to a new location. We were meticulous about each decision we made so that we could create a clean and safe work environment to lead to increased productivity. The 5 S’s consist of sort, set in order, shine, standardize, and sustain. In this episode of MakingChips, I share how we implemented 5S in our shop. Our process is something that any shop can learn from and implement. It’s time to get organized and make sustainable changes so you can safely and efficiently make chips. BAM! Segments [3:13] What is the 5S methodology?  [7:07] What’s happening in our lives [11:18] How we implemented 5S in our inspection department [21:04] How we implemented 5S on our shop floor [23:13] The two hardest S’s: standardize and sustain [30:50] Why we bought a floor scrubber to shine our epoxy floors  [32:45] Don’t forget to register for IMTS 2022!  Resources mentioned on this episode Xometry’s alternate option for quoting  Don’t forget to register for IMTS 2022!  Check out LISTA for custom workstations Trump, Seiri, Shitsuke and 3 Other "S" Words Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
5/2/202234 minutes
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Get It Before It’s Gone! How to Extract Wisdom from Your Colleagues Before They Retire

There’s so much wisdom my generation needs to extract from our older colleagues before they retire. Many young people in this industry are naive because it takes time and experience to master a trade. I don’t want someone to retire and still have lingering questions I wished I would’ve asked. That’s why we NEED to document the wisdom of our elders. So how do I extract wisdom from my colleagues before they retire? In this episode of MakingChips, we talk through a few ideas you can use to learn as much as you can from your expert machinists.  We’d like to hear from you—How would you extract knowledge from peers? Reach out to [email protected]  Segments [3:25] A conversation about retirement [5:34] Why we never learned anything from our dads [7:21] Manufacturing news: Germany is in a recession [12:30] An impromptu ProShop ERP Shoutout [15:55] How to approach a conversation with a veteran machinist [18:52] Four ways to extract knowledge from veteran machinists [25:30] What inspired me to choose this episode’s topic [27:54] Don’t miss IMTS in September 2022! Resources mentioned on this episode Get 10% off Xometry EU ban on Russian energy would spark ‘sharp recession’ in Germany ProShop ERP helps you extract and codify knowledge  Make sure you’re at IMTS 2022 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/28/202229 minutes, 30 seconds
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What the Heck is a Samurai CNC Machinist?

How do gaming, programming, and the world of a machinist look intersect? In this episode of MakingChips, Steve Courchane—the CNC Samurai—shares his “origin story,” talks about how programming and gaming are aligned, and how to apply gamification to machining to motivate employees. Because if your employees aren’t making chips, you aren’t making money! BAM.  Segments [2:27] What’s going great in our businesses [4:37] Manufacturing news: Shoe manufacturing shifting to the US [8:00] Becoming the CNC Samurai: Steve Courchane’s origin story [15:02] The convergence of programming and gaming [19:37] The interface between Roblox and machining [24:37] Gaming: Attracting the next generation to manufacturing [26:08] How to apply gaming principles to motivate employees Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Grow your shop with Xometry - Get 10% off Connect with Steven on LinkedIn or follow him on Instagram Check out Roblox Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/18/202238 minutes, 27 seconds
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Can You Scale Rapidly After 100 Years of Slow Growth?

If your business has been slow-growing or stagnant, can you ramp up your growth? Matthew Nix would know—he’s grown his family business by a 100x multiple and spent seven straight years on the Inc. 5000 list. But how do you grow from a small mom-and-pop shop to an acquisition and growth machine? In this episode of MakingChips, Matthew shares how they’ve scaled their business with a three-prong strategy and how you can, too. Segments [3:40] What’s happening in our lives? [6:16] Learn all about Matthew Nix [8:23] What Nix Companies looks like 100 years ago [14:47] How Matthew rapidly grew his business [20:28] The difference between growing and scaling [24:31] Nix Companies’ three-prong approach to growth [26:52] Should you provide your leadership team with equity? [32:22] How to use acquisitions as a growth tactic [35:58] Financial advice for acquiring businesses [40:10] Manufacturing news: lead times & pricing Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Don’t forget to book a hotel for IMTS 2022! Should Your Shop be an ESOP? Growing Your ESOP to a New Level Good to Great by Jim Collins Connect with Matthew Nix on LinkedIn Nix Companies Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/11/202245 minutes, 7 seconds
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“People, Process, and Performance" A Special Live Event Interview

Today’s episode of MakingChips is recorded at a special LIVE Tri-State Manufacturing Alliance (TSMA) event in conjunction with the Evansville Regional Economic Partnership. We are joined by three amazing panelists: Leah Curry: The President at Toyota Motor Manufacturing Indiana David Conner: The CFO at Anchor Industries in Evansville, IN Matthew Nix: President at Nix Companies in Poseyville, IN Each panelist shares their perspective on the importance of taking care of your people, implementing the right processes, and how to compel and measure performance. We also have the pleasure of announcing this year's Manufacturing Excellence Award. Don’t miss out on a unique perspective from manufacturing leaders in the trenches! Segments [0:33] Don’t forget to register for IMTS! [1:43] Learn more about each of us! [7:41] Successfully hiring and retaining top talent [25:10] Processes and procedures to meet customer demand [35:55] The PDCA process: Plan, do, check, and act [39:10] The impact of compensation and benefits on performance [44:44] Applying gamification to impact performance [49:01] How to recover culture post-COVID [52:43] Making processes adaptable when hiring and promoting [56:52] Presenting the manufacturing excellence award [1:02:31] Make sure to listen to the MakingChips Podcast! Resources mentioned on this episode Register for IMTS Keeping the Culture High in A virtual World Leah Curry David Conner Matthew Nix Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
4/4/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 4 seconds
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Why is Travel so Important for Manufacturing Leaders? A Special MakingTrips Episode

We’re on a five-hour drive to a speaking event for the Tri-State Machining Association (TSMA) so we thought, why not do an episode on the importance of travel for manufacturing leaders? In this special episode of MakingChips, we cover the benefits of travel, the potential downsides, and how to use your time wisely when you’re on the road. Welcome to MakingTrips.  Segments [0:35] Don’t forget to book a hotel for IMTS 2022! [2:27] Welcome to our special edition: “MakingTrips” [3:16] Is travel necessary for a manufacturing leader? [7:04] Manufacturing news: The price of gas [11:23] The hidden benefits of travel [16:53] Use your time wisely when traveling [18:49] The dangers of traveling too much [21:14] You have to establish travel guidelines [23:41] Weighing the cost of travel against the ROI [26:07] Get out of your cave—go and see for yourself [28:20] Identify and connect with the decision-makers Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Book a hotel for IMTS 2022! Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/28/202234 minutes, 6 seconds
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What to Do When an Employee Leaves

What do you do when an employee resigns? How do you handle their departure in a dignified way? What do you do when you have to let someone go? You have to handle each scenario differently—and sometimes gingerly. So in this episode of MakingChips, we walk through navigating the exit process. Paul Van Metre joins us to share how ProShop ERP can make the transition easier.  Segments [0:26] Come see us at IMTS 2022! [3:14] What’s happening in our worlds [5:07] Manufacturing News: What’s happening in Ukraine? [7:28] What do you do when someone resigns? [10:37] The formalities of the exit process [13:38] Paul shares how ProShop ERP can ease the transition [19:50] What happens when you have to let someone go? [22:10] What Jim’s Dad would have done  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Register for IMTS 2022 ProShop ERP Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/18/202226 minutes, 5 seconds
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Bonus Incentive Plans to Drive Action

What do you expect from your employees? Do you expect them to think like an owner? Or just clock in and get their work done? Are they compensated for your expectations? In this episode of MakingChips, we’ll cover the bonus incentive plan I’ve structured for my core team. I’ll share the goals of the program, how to determine what behaviors to incentivize, what the reward(s) will be, and an easy way to manage it. Don’t miss it! Segments [2:16] ZENGERS new bonus incentive program [2:50] What’s happening in the lives of ZENGERS and Carr [5:59] Illinois and Chicago’s Vaccine and Mask Mandates to End Feb. 28th [9:03] How I structure my bonus incentive program [13:15] The 4 goals of my bonus incentive program [15:39] How to determine what behaviors to incentivize [23:53] The goal of the incentive program is to drive results [26:20] Determine the reward of your incentive program [28:17] How to manage your bonus incentive program [32:33] Are you incentivizing what someone is paid to do? Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Illinois and Chicago’s Vaccine and Mask Mandates to End Feb. 28th, Anticipation Builds for IMTS 2022 Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
3/7/202237 minutes, 12 seconds
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Does My Shop Need Middle Management?

As our team begins to grow at Carr Machine & Tool, I believe it’s time to hire for a middle management position. But what is middle management? What does a middle management role consist of? Will implementing this role truly solve our problems? Jason helps me talk through the challenges I’m facing in this episode of Making Chips! Any tips, tricks, or ideas to help me through this? Reach out at [email protected]. I’d love to hear from you!  Segments [2:00] Does my shop need middle management? [4:46] What’s happening in our worlds [7:33] BIG NEWS: Meet us at IMTS 2022! [8:36] Manufacturing is a high-tech frontier [15:48] What does a middle management role consist of? [18:54] How to determine if you need middle management roles [24:49] The core problem we’re trying to solve [30:45] What is the biggest role of a middle manager? Resources mentioned on this episode What Has Led to the Manufacturing Labor Shortage? Why Middle Management is So Exhausting and What to Do about it International Manufacturing Technology Show 2022 ProShop ERP Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/28/202234 minutes, 28 seconds
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Keeping the Culture High in a Virtual World

How do you keep corporate culture alive when your workforce is completely remote? How do you focus your company on your values, mission, and goals? When a thriving company culture is crucial to retaining your employees, it can’t be neglected. We dissect this problem we’re facing because of the COVID pandemic—and 6 possible ways to promote and maintain your unique company culture—in this episode of MakingChips.  Segments [2:11] How remote work impacts company culture [4:57] What is corporate culture?  [6:27] What’s happening in our worlds [8:09] Celebrating our 50th Anniversary our way [10:05] Artificial intelligence in manufacturing [15:20] Corporate culture in a virtual world [18:23] Tip #1: Populate your social stream [20:38] Tip #2: Start a virtual club [21:34] Tip #3: Embrace video calls [25:40] Tip #4: Gamify your platform [26:56] Tip #5: Create an expert’s area [28:27] Tip #6: Keep your company mission alive  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! ProShopERP.com OTT-JAKOB How to Keep Company Culture Alive When Remote Working: 6 Proven Strategies Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/21/202233 minutes, 31 seconds
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Getting a Grip on Workholding Automation and Leading your Elders

Is the labor shortage accelerating automation? Why is there a perception that automation is both risky and complex? How do you lead your elders with authority yet humility? To dovetail—or not to dovetail? These are the questions that we hash out with Michael Gaunce, the VP of Sales for Tooling and Workholding at SCHUNK. We take a deep look into the technical side of workholding and automation in this episode of Making Chips. Now is the time to embrace automation. Because if you’re not making chips efficiently, you’re not making money! Segments [2:55] What’s happening in our lives [5:23] 2022 Labor and Employment Outlook for Manufacturers [9:09] Learn more about Michael Gaunce [12:47] Is the labor shortage accelerating automation?  [15:20] The perception that automation is risky or complex [19:10] Two ways to do automation machine-tending [27:42] A conversation on workholding [32:55] To dovetail or not to dovetail? [39:01] Leading your elders with authority and humility Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss 2022 Labor and Employment Outlook for Manufacturers Connect with Michael Gaunce on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/14/202242 minutes, 24 seconds
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What is the Future of MakingChips?

MakingChips is NOT a cult of personality. We want MakingChips to be about the Metalworking nation. We want to interview you. We want to talk about your problems and how to solve them. We hope we equip, inspire—and sometimes entertain—you. With that being said, some BIG changes are coming. What will the future of MakingChips hold? Listen to this episode to hear our game-changing update for the Metalworking nation.  Segments [3:58] Learn more about the MakingChips hosts [5:22] We’re NOT a cult of personality [7:26] The numerous transitions of MakingChips [11:05] MakingChips 3.0: next steps [14:39] How to apply to become a podcast host [16:06] Jim’s new show: My True Position  [20:00] Nick’s new show: Design. Build. Grow. [22:30] Jason’s new show: At the Boring Bar Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! We want to bring on three new hosts of three NEW shows. If you believe you have a podcast the Metalworking nation can benefit from, connect with us. Send us a pitch at [email protected]. Share a description, your history, and why you believe it can become a monthly show. You may just become a member of the MakingChips podcast family! Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
2/7/202228 minutes, 57 seconds
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Doubling Down on Your People and Culture in 2022

Your people are the most important part of your business. If they’re not, they should be. When you hire someone, it’s always with the hope that they’ll become a long-term part of the family, right? So you need to cultivate a workplace culture they want to stay and thrive in. So in this episode of Making Chips, we’ll share nine simple tactics that you can implement immediately to transform your company culture.  Segments [5:01] Your culture is the muscle below the muscle [7:56] The good things happening in our lives  [13:30] Tactic #1: Fight for individuals that you care about [14:52] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry [16:48] Tactic #2: Get to know your employees [21:58] Tactic #3: Cultivate and promote friendships [23:38] Tactic #4: Don’t overly focus on profit and achievement [27:30] Tactic #5: Reward your people for success [29:06] Tactic #6: Believe in your mission and align everyone to that [30:33] Tactic #7: Be humble and treat everyone as equals [32:10] Tactic #8: Inspire your people to be better [33:44] Tactic #9: Be approachable in any circumstance Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! New Sales Simplified By Mike Weinberg Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/24/202236 minutes, 43 seconds
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How Manufacturing Leaders Can Have Better Meetings in 2022, 298

What are the things you HATE about meetings? Moving into 2022, would you like to have better, more productive meetings that don’t waste time and actually get things done? The MakingChips team is discussing the issue on this episode based on a book Nick read recently, called, “Death By Meeting.” Learn 3 steps you can take to make your meetings powerful for 2022. Segments [0:32] Holiday experiences from the guys (good ones) [7:35] Manufacturing news: supply chain issues: trucking, air, ocean, rail trends [13:30] Nick’s resolution: Lead better meetings in 2022 [21:45] How to have better meetings [26:25] Making it safe for participants to share differing opinions [36:19] Asynchronous meetings: what they are, how they work Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! OUR SPONSOR: https://www.xometry.com/makingchips/ BOOK: Death by Meeting MOVIE: The Santa Clause BOOK: Smart, Not Spoiled BOOK: The Advantage Supply Chain article Nick discussed BOOK: No Fail Meetings Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/17/202240 minutes, 38 seconds
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What Annual Goals Do For You - Not Just Tips and Tricks, 297

This is NOT another goal-setting podcast episode. You know, the kind that explains how to effectively set goals for the year… this one is about WHY you need to set goals. No tips and tricks. No newest approaches and apps. We’re going to talk about the impact goal-setting can have on your life and business. Jim and Nick come along for the discussion because this is something important to me, personally. We’re going to cover eight reasons annual goals will benefit you, so be sure to listen. BAM!  Segments [3:57] This episode’s topic [6:19 ] Manufacturing News: Industry Week Article: Taking action, future flexibility  [11:56] Closure of the preceding year  comes from annual planning [13:15] Goal-setting enables you to Identify opportunities [15:09 ] Prioritization flows from goal setting [15:39] Goal-setting enables you to develop an attitude of gratitude [22:26] You can focus on what is important throughout the year when you set goals [23:04] Goals enable you to say “NO” to things  [23:45] You can tell if you have won at the end of the year if you set goals [27:04] Annual goals set you up for 3 to 5 years Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! MT Forecast Conference Previous podcast episode about goal setting BOOK: Traction Two episodes about  the Entrepreneur Operating System: here and there Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
1/10/202234 minutes, 33 seconds
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Growing Your ESOP to a New Level, 296

In our previous conversation with Jeff Taylor (episode 292) we introduced the idea of ESOPS (Employee Stock Ownership Plans) as a way to give true ownership to your manufacturing business employees. We invited Jeff back for this episode to tell us more of the journey he’s been on with ESOPs and discovered that the outcome was more than he could have imagined. Going back to the beginning of the process for Jeff, he has spent his adult life working for others and adding value to their companies. But he never received any sort of extended value or equity in the company. His experience led him to think about how he could develop cultures and attitudes among working teams that enabled them to truly have ownership in the company (in terms of mindset AND equity). That’s when the idea of ESOPs (Employee Stock Ownership Plans) came onto his radar. This episode explores the topic in greater detail and will open your mind to how your manufacturing business could be organized to leave a legacy through your employees.   Segments [1:13] Thank YOU for being such loyal listeners [3:45] Manufacturing news: NASA “dart” mission [7:35] Resuming our previous conversation with Jeff Taylor about ESOPs [15:10] The conscious decisions and eventual growth that make and ESOP reality [27:49] Nobody set out to sell, but they wanted to be ready for the best situation [35:51] The timeline and summary and how the company is different now [37:52] Jeff’s view of the ESOP in the continuum of possibilities, pros and cons Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Visit our Sponsor Xometry Connect with Jeff on LinkedIn NASA “DART” mission BOOK: Progressive Partnerships BOOK: Name of the Wind BOOK: Hitler’s Monsters Crafts Technology - the company Jeff served and that sold to Hyperion Technologies Previous MakingChips episode (292) featuring Jeff Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/27/202155 minutes, 13 seconds
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What the Great Resignation Means for Manufacturing, 295

The “Great Resignation” as it’s been called, has created a wide variety of circumstances that have impacted the American workforce. 55% of workers making under $30K/year say they will be looking for a new job soon. Has this impacted manufacturing? If so, what can we do as manufacturing leaders to mitigate the impact? This episode focuses on what leaders can and should be doing to build the kind of loyalty that will sustain their companies and provide a culture and experience for team members that is “sticky,” keeping them around for years to come.  BAM! Segments [1:20] The Great Resignation: How it impacts manufacturing [6:22] Ripples across the country from this Great Resignation [12:50] Employment news: 55% making under $30K/year expect to look for a new job [16:20] If you lose people on your team, how can it affect your business? [18:45] Why do people leave your company? Why do they stay? [22:06] Hiring process: ways to win candidates and be smart in your process [26:32] How you can improve your retention rate [32:10] Tech company trends and how it might spread Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Visit our Sponsor Xometry Eden Business Concepts (gave Jason the inspiration for this episode) Bob Dylan song “Hurricane” BOOK: Reforming Marriage by Douglas Wilson 55% of people expect to find a new job soon Apple TV show: Ted Lasso Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/20/202135 minutes, 31 seconds
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Are We Losing Legacy IP at Our Shops?

There is a paradigm shift happening in the industry: many skilled machinists are retiring. As these long-term skilled machinists are leaving, they’re leaving with intellectual legacy knowledge that’s irreplaceable. Do procurement people sourcing machining parts know what the processes and procedures look like? Do they know the difference between a fabricated, turned, or machined, or five-axis part? What can we do as owners to mitigate the problem or offer solutions? We dive into the discussion in this episode of Making Chips! Segments [1:23] The challenges we face with retiring machinists [4:30] The definition of intellectual property [6:28] What is keeping us awake at night? [14:22] Boosting automation in manufacturing [18:18] A discussion of intellectual property  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! What is Intellectual Property? Report Outlines Difficulty in Boosting Automation in Manufacturing The Future of Manufacturing is Automated Production Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/13/202127 minutes, 22 seconds
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Finding Solutions to the Supply Chain Chaos

Finding Solutions to the Supply Chain Chaos, #293 What is the root cause of the supply chain crisis? How can manufacturing businesses mitigate those risks and find realistic solutions that work in the short and long term? Tom Hilaris—the President & CEO of Ergoseal—joins us to share the three things they focus on: risk mitigation, communication, and culture. In this episode of Making Chips we offer real, practical solutions your business can implement to overcome the supply chain chaos. Because—after all—if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money! BAM! – Jason Segments [1:10] Material lead times and pricing [5:10] What’s happening at Carr Machine & Tool [7:07] Manufacturing news related to supply chain issues [14:39] Learn more about our guest—Tom Hilaris [17:16] Step #1: Risk Mitigation [19:46] Managing pricing with redundancy of sourcing [22:58] Step #2: Communicating with your customers is imperative  [29:12] Elmhurst University Supply Chain Masters Program [32:15] Step #3: A great culture improves outcomes Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Connect with Tom Hilaris on LinkedIn Clean Energy Faces its Own Supply Chain Crisis What Everyone Gets Wrong About the Never-Ending COVID-19 Supply Chain Crisis Growing your Manufacturing Business Through Acquisitions with Tom Hilaris Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
12/6/202144 minutes, 39 seconds
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Should Your Shop be an ESOP?

What is an employee stock ownership plan ESOP? How does it work? How can it transform the buy-in of your team and lead to revenue growth? Jeff Taylor—the President and CEO of Crafts Technology—implemented an ESOP. Listen to this episode to hear about the impact it had on his business—and figure out whether or not it’s right for yours. Employee buy-in can lead to profitability which can lead to Making Chips! BAM! – Jim Segments [4:49] What’s happening at ZENGERS and Carr Machine & Tool [8:20] Disclaimer about implementing an ESOP [10:54] Welcome Jeff Taylor to Making Chips! [12:13] What is an employee stock ownership plan ESOP? [13:45] How Jeff got into manufacturing [20:15] What is Craft’s technology? [21:49] Choosing to create an ESOP [30:00] Who should consider an ESOP? [35:05] Pensions, profit-sharing, and ESOPs [39:45] What kind of return does an ESOP get? [45:36] Are you handing over control to your team? Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Crafts Technology Connect with Jeff on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/29/202152 minutes, 58 seconds
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Have You Defined Your Hiring Process?

What does your hiring process look like? Do you even have a hiring process in place? In this episode of Making Chips, we walk through what each of our processes look like and share some useful strategies that anyone can implement. A streamlined process leads to better hires which leads to Making Chips! BAM! – Jason! What are your tips and tricks for the hiring process? Let us know! Send an email to [email protected]!  Segments [0:30] Check out ProShop ERP for manufacturing software! [3:35] What’s happening in our lives and businesses [6:54] Manufacturing news: A discussion on composite materials [11:44] Shoutout to listeners who’ve left reviews! [14:26] Step #1: It’s all about the setup  [19:10] Step #2: The careers landing page [22:43] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry [24:31] Step #3: Screen your candidates  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! 6 of the Most Exciting Trends In Composite Materials Today Join the ZENGERS Team! LinkedIn Recruiter Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/22/202136 minutes, 30 seconds
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How Do You Forecast the Future of Your Manufacturing Business?

What factors should you consider when forecasting? What questions do you need to ask to determine your next steps? Who gets to make those decisions? We walk you through some common questions to ask yourself—and your company—about your business. We’ll also cover Miles and Snow's Typology of Defender, Prospector, Analyzer, and Reactor to see how your type impacts your decision-making process. Learn a great process to forecast and set goals in this episode of Making Chips! Now is the time to look ahead! BAM! – Nick If you have a great methodology for forecasting, let us know! Shoot us an email at [email protected]!  Segments [0:32] Check out ProShop ERP for manufacturing software! [3:16] How future proof is your business? [5:25] What we’re happy about right now [9:34] Discovering the Keys to U.S. Manufacturing Recovery [14:23] What factors should you consider when forecasting? [17:47] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry [21:39] The Miles and Snow's Typology of Defender, Prospector, Analyzer, and Reactor [24:56] Who makes the forecast in your company?  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Discovering the Keys to U.S. Manufacturing Recovery Miles and Snow's Typology of Defender, Prospector, Analyzer, and Reactor BOOK: Humanocrisy Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/15/202131 minutes, 10 seconds
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Beware of the Looming Recession

Nick jokes that I have a recession obsession—and it’s true. Recessions are painful. I want to make the experience less painful when a recession comes around again. So in this down-to-earth episode of Making Chips, I’ll share the common causes of most recessions and 8 tips you can use to prepare yourself—and your business—for a recession. Preparedness is key to helping your business survive and thrive. Because after all, if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money. BAM! – Jim Segments [0:43] Check out ProShop ERP for manufacturing software! [2:53] Shoutout to everyone involved with the research project with Xometry  [5:11] The reasons why Carr Machine & Tool is thriving [9:38] Manufacturing News: Hertz bought 100,000 Teslas [12:18] What’s new in Jason and Nick’s worlds [14:43] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry [15:53] Be smart with the buying decisions that you make [21:55] Learn about the common causes of recessions [24:39] 8 tIps to prepare yourself for a recession [28:28] Learn about Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! How to Prepare for a Recession: 8 Tips You Can Start Now Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
11/8/202131 minutes, 56 seconds
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Why Titan and His Team Moved from California to Texas

In round three with Titan Gilroy, we talk about why Titan decided to move his entire business from California to Texas. Was it a smooth transition? Was he able to retain his entire team? Titan also shares more of the “why” behind his business and his passion for serving his audience. Titan continues to go above and beyond the expected as he grows his academy. Listen to learn more. BAM! Segments [0:52] Why Titan moved his business to Texas [11:28] Solving people’s problems = success [18:28] Understand your audience + tell your story [26:50] Titan’s transition from regret to changing lives [29:34] Where did Titan’s “Boom!” come from Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/25/202131 minutes, 52 seconds
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Retaining and Training Top Talent with Titans of CNC Academy

In this episode of Making Chips, we dive back into the conversation with Titan Gilroy. This time, we talk about how Titan’s TV show, “American Built,” came to life. We also talk about how he almost gave up the TV show to do something he was passionate about—helping prisoners transform their lives and learn to become full-fledged machinists. This passion project eventually led to the creation of the Titans of CNC Academy, where you can learn everything from the fundamentals of machining to creating aerospace parts—all completely free. Don’t miss this episode with THE Titan of the industry. BAM! Segments [1:55] Why schools and colleges don’t have sufficient manufacturing training [7:35] How Titan’s TV show, “American Built” came to fruition [13:31] How Titan took inmates and helped them become full-fledged machinists [19:34] Why Titan uses the phrase “uniquely abled” instead of disabled  [32:48] Learn more about Titans of CNC Academy  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Titans of CNC Academy Check out Titan’s Youtube Channel: MakerSpace77 Follow Titan on LinkedIn Follow Titan’s organization on Twitter: @TitanGilroy Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/18/202147 minutes, 50 seconds
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How Defeat and Success Has Shaped Titan Gilroy, #286

This episode takes you (and us) to Texas to speak with Titan Gilroy. He calls himself an advocate for advanced manufacturing, and that’s a huge understatement. He runs two academies that teach what it takes to be a success in manufacturing. His personal stroy demonstrates that becoming a success in the industry — individually or as an organization — doesn’t happen overnight or without a significant amount of struggle. We skip the banter and back and forth typical of our episodes because we are so excited to bring you this conversation with Titan. So, without further delay, click the play button and hear what Titan’s got to share. BAM!   Segments [1:50] Titan Gilroy’s start in CNC machining came through a great deal of hardship [6:30] Moving to California and finding his first opportunity in a shop [10:15] Stepping into his first role in a machine shop and making the most of it [18:10] Moving into a troubleshooter role for large companies, then starting his own shop [22:15] The beginning of Titan Engineering in early 2005 [31:15] Raising the bar to eliminate variance and manufacture art for customers [40:35] The 2008-2009 recession hit hard — everything stopped & 15 people had to be let go [46:53] Lessons learned during the economic downturn were exactly what he needed  Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! https://titansofcnc.com - Find out about Titan’s training courses Follow Titan on LinkedIn Follow Titan’s organization on Twitter: @TitanGilroy Wall Street Journal article, “A Tale of a Young Boxer’s Redemption” Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/11/202154 minutes, 26 seconds
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Will the Supply Chain Woes Get Better Anytime Soon?

According to a recent article in Reuters, “The ISM said its index of national factory activity inched up to 59.9 last month from a reading of 59.5 in July. A reading above 50 indicates expansion in manufacturing, which accounts for 11.9% of the U.S. economy.” Manufacturing is on the rise, yet every industry is struggling with an impaired supply chain. Will things get better anytime soon? How can manufacturing businesses manage shortages in the meantime? We share some thoughts in this episode of Making Chips!  Segments [0:40] Check out ProShop ERP for manufacturing software! [4:15] A discussion about supply chain issues [6:57] What do we like right now? [11:30] U.S. manufacturing activity rises; shortages linger [14:08] The disruption that comes with reshoring [17:00] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry [19:40] How shortages are impacting industries [26:14] Learn about Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems [26:57] Will the supply chain get better anytime soon? [29:01] Tips to mitigate the pain of supply chain disruptions The Great Supply Chain Disruption Manufacturing is becoming increasingly busy but supply chain woes linger. It’s the #1 thing on our minds right now. Most machine shops are at or near capacity. But we’re having trouble getting aluminum, brass, steel, and finished goods. Even getting containers to ship the goods is a struggle. This phenomenon is being dubbed “The Great Supply Chain Disruption.”  Whenever you’re making a systemic change, it’s going to cause disruption. No matter how much planning you put into something, disruption happens. This should have been expected.  The disruption that comes with reshoring Reshoring is more relevant than ever. And this isn’t a new topic to our show. What is driving the reshoring initiative? COVID. Everything that was coming from overseas halted or decreased. Ships weren’t coming through the Panama Canal. Ships weren’t being unloaded because the workforce was at home.  When China started rethinking its business environment and they started to incorporate more free-market tendencies, they wanted to become an export economy. They didn’t have the technology to export high-end goods so they started on the low end. But now they’re catching up. Now, China is focused on export as well as making branded goods for their economy.  People spent their time in quarantine buying low-cost things that are sourced from Amazon—from exercise equipment to kitchen mixers. They’re buying computers, TVs, headphones, etc. Many things that are sourced from China.  Will the supply chain get better anytime soon? Lead time and prices are going to increase. Everyone is dealing with it right now. We can’t be the link that absorbs all the cost increases. The federal government knew that the influx of money into the economy plus the supply chain issues were going to lead to increased prices. This is going to lead to inflation. Inflation does slow growth. But everyone is saying that interest rates will be holding steady ingo 2022. We think the supply chain issues will continue into 2022 but it’s currently a game of wait and see. So what can manufacturers do in the meantime to mitigate the problems that come with supply chain issues? We share a few tips in this episode you don’t want to miss. Check it out!  BAM! – Jim Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Camino Island by John Grisham U.S. manufacturing activity rises; shortages linger Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
10/4/202133 minutes, 57 seconds
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Are Your Data Requirements Driving Your Employees Away?

Do your employees feel like they’re a means to an end? I think a lot of team members don’t realize—or believe—that we care about them. Some feel that when you hold them accountable to hit their numbers that data is all you care about. But that isn’t always the case.  At the end of the day, we’re all business leaders who need an efficient working environment. So where do we find a balance between data, accountability, and caring for our team members? How do we drive profitability without driving our employees away? Listen to this episode of Making Chips for the full discussion! Segments [0:40] Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! [3:24] Hold your employees to metrics they can control [7:33] Manufacturing News: A Generation of American Men Give Up on College [16:55] Learn about Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems [17:39] Avoid measuring data that is not helpful to the employee [37:33] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry Hold your employees to metrics they can control I’ve seen a trend where everything is about data. Everyone wants to harvest data. But can you take it a step too far? Can there be an imbalance in the data? On a recent episode of Russell Brand’s podcast, he talked about how Amazon’s delivery people have an app they have to use. The app tracks every move they make and everything they do when they deliver packages. But it appears that Amazon is tracking metrics that are outside of the control of the employee and using those metrics to evaluate them.  We believe when you hold people accountable with metrics it should be something that’s within their control. But Amazon has taken it so far that people are being fired when they don’t meet the metrics of the algorithm Amazon has in place for delivery drivers.  When Russell Brand described this, he pointed out that Amazon was treating their employees like zombies living in an algorithm—disposable cattle.  The data doesn’t always show the full picture Nick had a conversation with leaders at AME and Hennig about compensation for their salespeople. Commissions are results-based compensation and the result is why you work. But there are other activities salespeople do that add value. They do activities to achieve an objective to create a result. So his company talked about activity-based objectives they could compensate their salespeople for. They decided compensation should be a mix.  Salespeople are driven by increasing their compensation. So they tend to focus on what would compensate them the most. But if your company wants them to focus on other activities not directly tied to making a sale, you might have to compensate them. You have to match the compensation with the desired behavior.  Situations when data-tracking is necessary I just took off the month of August and ZENGERS had a record month of sales while I was gone. I’m not trying to micromanage my team. They have an overall objective—sales and profitability. My goal is to train them on the right things to do to achieve that goal. I’m not saying they need to make a certain amount of calls a day or track every detail. I give them an overall mission to achieve but I don’t track their every movement. I feel like asking your team to track everything they do is the kiss of death. But is that true for every business?  For Jim, due to Carr Machine & Tools AS9100 certification, they are mandated to document all of the results from their machining process. He runs a data-driven and oriented business where he has to measure, record, validate, time-track against jobs, and more.  And of course, each individual on my team has those types of quality measurements that they have to hit. We record data that contributes to useful management of your team. But I don’t want my team to record data that’s pointless. Nick’s brother always says that any data that you record and isn’t used to make an improvement is wasted money. Wasted information is wasted action.  The bottom line is that everyone needs to take a step back and think about this. Are the right activities being tracked? Are you gathering useful data, or just wasting time? You need to collect the right data that helps you drive profitability for your company. Listen to the whole episode for the full conversation.  BAM! – Jason Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! A Generation of American Men Give Up on College Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
9/27/202138 minutes, 43 seconds
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What Can Manufacturers Do about this Crazy Labor Market?

The U.S. labor market is still struggling despite record numbers of job openings. Businesses aren’t able to hire as quickly as they need to. What’s the holdup? Is there a lack of candidates in the market? Are people choosing not to return to work? In this episode of Making Chips we dissect what’s happening—and a few things you can do about it.  Segments [0:18] Check out ProShop ERP for manufacturing software! [2:30] What’s happening in the Making Chips world [8:43] Manufacturing news: The U.S. Labor Market [19:41] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry [20:36] What I’m learning through the hiring process [35:35] How to recruit high caliber candidates [41:34] Learn about Amper Technologies monitoring systems The U.S. Labor Market Isn’t Adding Up—And This Is Why According to Andrew Hunter’s research, we’re seeing a high level of job openings but low levels of hiring. Millions of Americans are quitting and many aren’t re-entering the labor market. It’s claimed that the labor market is healthy, but the numbers don’t add up. Why?  Subdued Employment: 8.7 million Americans remain unemployed. Before the pandemic, 5.7 million Americans were unemployed.  Record Job Openings: The number of job opportunities is high and rising, reaching 10.1 million at the end of June with 590,000 more openings than the month before.  Low Hiring: Hiring isn’t keeping pace with job growth. June saw 6.7 million hires, but that’s 3.4 million short of the number needed to fill open roles. High Quits: Referred to as the “great resignation,” 3.9 million people quit their job in June. It’s partly the response to job opportunities. Workers are confident in their ability to find better jobs.  The incentive to stay home and not work will decrease as the double unemployment payments are pulled back. The economy is recovering but worker confidence isn’t returning at the same pace. Autumn 2021 may bring the correction needed to balance the market. The outlook is optimistic. But until things turn around, what do manufacturers do? Find creative solutions to your problem A client of Jason’s had a key person in their shop that was doing some things that he deemed worthy of firing. But Jason’s client couldn’t afford to lose—and be forced to replace—this person. So he took a risk and sat him down for a conversation. He gave him the option to fix the problem or he’d be fired. This person turned his life around completely. This may not be an option for everyone, nor will it work in every scenario, but it was a creative way for this business owner to solve a problem.  Two ways to hire for difficult positions Recruiting for regional sales positions has been a huge focus of mine recently as we are restructuring our sales. But I don’t want to hire the first warm body. Everyone has heard “Hire slow, fire fast,” right? But if your machinist quits, you can’t hire slow because it causes production problems.  So what am I doing right now? Finding a way to work with a candidate before we commit to hiring them full-time. If there’s a way to test the relationship, do it. Making Chips is a podcast and marketing agency. We brought someone on as a contractor to try out on a trial basis before we commit to hiring him full-time. It’s great for both parties to make an educated decision about each other. You can even put it in writing so it’s transparent and fully agreed on.  What else can you do to hire for a difficult-to-fill position? Use LinkedIn’s recruiting tool. The price is steep—approximately $30,000—but you’re given access to highly qualified candidates interested in a new position. LinkedIn will even train you how to use it. The opportunity to do it yourself is available for larger companies who can make that number work.  Listen to the whole episode to learn more about how the hiring process has gone for me and get some in-depth details on my two strategies.  BAM! – Nick Shameless plug: If you are interested, we’re all hiring! Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! The U.S. Labor Market Isn’t Adding Up And This Is Why Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
9/20/202143 minutes, 44 seconds
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Do I Need a Designer for My Shop Floor? 282

I wanted to differentiate myself among other machine shops in the area with the new Carr Machine & Tool location. The shop floor is where we make our money. I took extra steps in the process to create a new image for my shop. I wanted to present it in a way that was sophisticated, high-tech, polished, and professional—while remaining efficient.  That’s where IMEC came in. I reached out to them for some technical collaboration to help design an efficient shop floor. I worked with both Dean Harms and Tim Maurer and it was an amazing experience. So in this episode of Making Chips, I’m sharing what the collaboration and design process looked like with IMEC. Segments [0:24] Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! [2:46] Why I chose the new Carr Machine & Tool location [4:17] What’s happening at ZENGERS? [6:19] Why investing in your business is important  [10:32] President Biden Announces Support for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework [12:55] The process of designing a new facility with IMEC  [15:10] What IMEC (the Illinois Manufacturing Excellence Center) is all about [19:16] Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems [19:59] How the infrastructure bill will be distributed to MEPs [25:43] My experience working with IMEC to design my shop floor [36:50] Other types of shops IMEC works with [38:55] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry What IMEC (the Illinois Manufacturing Excellence Center) is all about Dean Harms is a Regional Manager with IMEC. It’s his mission to help others any way he can on a daily basis and have fun along the way. Sounds like us, right?  IMEC is part of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) National Network. It’s connected to the US Department of Commerce through the NIST organization. IMEC launched in the 1990s and is about to celebrate its 25th anniversary. There are 51 MEPs (one in every state + Puerto Rico). Their overall mission is to provide solutions and improvements to small and medium-sized manufacturing companies to help them navigate the changing landscape, drive profitability, sustain growth, and become globally competitive.  IMEC is a non-profit that is both privately and publicly funded. They are a channel that brings tax dollars back into the state of Illinois by specifically serving manufacturing businesses. Dean Harms makes sure the money is applied where it’s needed most.  My experience working with IMEC Dean cold-called me after I was on a live Facebook interview. I mentioned I was about to move my shop, so he reached out. He knew that there was probably something IMEC could do to help with the move. I heard that they could help design my shop floor and I really wanted a high-end polished shop. Dean introduced me to Tim Maurer and said he would be the perfect guy to collaborate with to design my shop floor. Tim has decades of experience not only with IMEC but also with Caterpillar. After I met Tim, I knew I was dealing with someone who was competent and knew what a manufacturing floor should look like.  The shop floor design process Tim’s design process was thorough, starting with the vision for our future and ending with the execution of the move. We started by setting objectives: Where did we want to be? What type of work would we be doing? What new technologies will be utilized on the shop floor?  We did a physical walk of both of the properties. He took physical measurements of the new building, all of our tools, and made sure the room was big enough for a CMM. After he did the physical layout, we met again to go over the flow of the room and nail down the workflow. We placed the machinery and equipment in the prime areas of the floor to maximize the square footage.  He established power needs, air drops, water needs, an eyewash station, etc. He developed the CAD and we talked about future automation and made sure they’d be room around the machines. He delivered the final layout to us in a CAD model. The best part? On moving day we had a roadmap to mark where everything went. We knew where every single thing would go.  The design process was an investment in our future productivity. I would never have completed this process as well as Tim did. I highly recommend working with IMEC through a big move to create a more efficient shop floor. Don’t be afraid to delegate design to the experts.  BAM! – Jim Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Connect with Jason on LinkedIn Why Investing in Your Business is Important President Biden Announces Support for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework Connect with Dean Harms with IMEC Connect with Tim Maurere with IMEC Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
9/6/202141 minutes, 28 seconds
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Can Networking Change Your Manufacturing Business?

Everyone is familiar with the concept of networking. But how many people actually implement it to grow themselves and their businesses? In this episode of Making Chips, Jim, Jason, and I dive into how networking has impacted our businesses in unexpected ways. To hear the good, bad, and the ugly—give it a listen! Segments [0:18] Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! [3:04] Learn what’s happening at ZENGERS [3:51] Nick welcomed a baby boy to his family on June 27th! [4:54] Boeing Slows Dreamliner Production After New Manufacturing Issue [9:17] Can Networking Change Your Manufacturing Business? [12:41] How networking has changed Jim’s business [16:10] Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems [16:54] The Making Chips Network of Manufacturing Leaders [20:59] Should increasing sales be the objective of networking? [24:41] A working relationship built on mutual interests [26:15] Ad-hoc networking: Keep your ears to the ground  [28:58] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry [30:09] Networking is like growing a 401k Networking is what brings us together today I think it’s important to point out that networking is why all of us are here. It’s why we all know each other and host a podcast together. But where did this partnership start?  Jim was spending money at ZENGERS and was a great customer for them. So Jason loosely knew who he was. Why did Jim purchase from ZENGERS in the first place? One of his friends—a production manager at a shop—recommended ZENGERS. One would’ve thought that’s how their relationship started. But it wasn’t.  Jason and Jim were both asked independently to be on an AM radio show at 6 am on a Saturday (the time slot when you know only serious entrepreneurs and business owners would be awake and listening). Jason was talking about creating a vision for your company and Jim talked about social media marketing for manufacturers. They were both impressed by each other, their business acumen, and how well acquainted they were with the industry. They realized they’d make a great combination and the podcast was developed from there.  The question is—without networking, would they have gotten the opportunity to speak on the same radio show? How networking has changed Jim’s business Jim had a strategic vision for networking for his business. He became a member of the Technology and Manufacturing Association (TMA) who had recently hired a marketing manager to help machine shops with their marketing. Jim got on the phone with him and they got along. He became instrumental in helping Jim develop networking within the association.  Jim was asked to join a young leaders group where he was able to meet like-minded people. He knew if he committed his time to networking and building relationships within the community, that he would grow in some capacity. He didn’t know where it would take him but that he’d walk away from networking events learning more.  If you go to a networking event and leave feeling like you learned nothing, you’re doing something wrong. You’re either in the wrong place—or not asking the right questions.  Jim also joined the Greater O'Hare Association and the Valley Association. He met great people in all of them. Networking is a great way to listen to other people and learn from their experiences.  The Making Chips Network of Manufacturing Leaders Some of our Making Chips sponsors have been a great way for us to realize connections across the industry. Amper can help you better understand your shop and help you solve problems on your shop floor. Nick, our guest on a previous episode, also works with Amper. It was a game-changer for him. Nick had emailed me a year or so ago and I hadn’t followed up with him. Luckily, Jim met him again at a networking event and we all got back in touch. Another sponsor, Xometry, asked us to be part of a focus group consisting of manufacturing leaders. This shows that Xometry cares about their network. How often do companies hire a credible third party to dig into discovery? How often do they dig into their segments to find out what they care about and need? They got a third party to investigate and find out what’s happening. They wanted to re-engineer their value proposition to serve their customers better.  In the Xometry focus group, we heard that four of the individuals were all ProShop ERP users—and had heard about them through the Making Chips Podcast. These leaders all loved ProShop. It certainly gave us more structure for our processes. You’ll become more efficient, productive, detail-oriented, data-driven, and results-oriented.  They heard about ProShop because Jason and Jim had the courage to create a podcast just for the manufacturing industry. I joined them because I’m just as passionate about the space and I know that this show delivers valuable content. People tend to think networking has to be about growing your business and making connections to make sales. Why is that the wrong mindset to have? What mindset should you embrace instead? Learn more by listening to the whole episode! BAM! – Nick Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Boeing Slows Dreamliner Production After New Manufacturing Issue Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems Greater O’Hare Association Michael Gaunce YG-1 5th Axis Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/30/202131 minutes, 37 seconds
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Getting Dirty on the Factory Floor: What Does it Mean and Why Does it Matter?

8/23/202132 minutes, 19 seconds
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Cabernet, Coffee and Cancer: A Family Story

Part of being a machine shop owner—and a business owner in general—is that every day there’s a new challenge to navigate. A machine might break down. Perhaps someone who has been a team member for decades quits. Your factory could burn to the ground. Or your Dad—the owner and manager of the shop—gets sick with cancer. That’s how Nick Sainati was thrust into becoming the GM of Belden Universal. In this episode, he shares his journey. It will resonate with some of us, fascinate most of us, and impress all of us. Don’t miss this inspiring family story! Segments [0:26] Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems [6:24] Dealing with supply chain issues caused by COVID [8:09] Fun facts about family-owned businesses [14:07] Create a Formal Business Succession Plan in 7 Steps [16:52] Today's guest: Nick Sainati, GM at Belden Universal  [24:00] Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! [27:42] When everything changed: How Nick took over his Dad’s machine shop [40:10] Managing a machine shop through COVID [44:35] What the future looks like for Belden Universal [46:32] How Nick’s experiences have prepared him for the future [48:42] Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry The history of Belden Universal Belden Universal is an AS9100 manufacturer of precision universal joints and drive shafts. They started in 1970 as Belden Tools, founded by Nick’s grandfather and his brothers on Belden Avenue in Chicago. They used to buy tools from ZENGERS, which was just down the street!  Instead of going into the family business, Nick ended up in San Francisco in investment banking. He spent two years at an eCommerce startup and eventually moved back to Chicago. After both he and his wife got an MBA, they moved to Seattle for her job. After running a wine business, Nick transitioned into Starbucks Corporate in brand management. He helped launch the Starbucks evening program that tied-in with wine. He transitioned to a strategy team after that. He learned about culture, managing people, and running complex projects.  How Nick took over his Dad’s machine shop Two months after Nick’s first daughter was born, his parents came to visit them in Seattle. They told Nick that his Dad had a rare form of Leukemia. He needed to take time off of work for treatment. They were going to have to sell the business unless Nick or his sister could come back and run it. Nick was shocked. His parents were healthy active people who were never sick.  After processing the news and discussing it with his wife, Nick decided to move back to Chicago to take over Belden Universal, an AS9100 manufacturer of precision universal joints and drive shafts. Four months later, he was in Chicago running a machine shop—and he knew nothing about manufacturing. Nick bought a large book about manufacturing that was for a college-level manufacturing class and dug into back episodes of Making Chips, which helped him get immersed in the language of machining.  Navigating challenges while learning the ropes When Nick took over in 2018, the machine shop had just moved into a new facility, doubling the size of their manufacturing floor. They had a tenured team and people to help get Nick up to speed. But he was also their boss—and couldn’t do most of their jobs.  Soon after taking over, Belden lost their biggest customer—which was one of the reasons they had moved into the bigger space. They immediately lost what would have been ¼ of their business. Nick knew it would be his first challenge. But then his sales manager of 19 years quit three months in. Instead of panicking, he took stock of the situation and helped define where they wanted to go in the future. They hired an internal candidate for the sales management position. She blossomed as a leader and got their team back on track. They worked hand-in-hand on the culture so people were excited to come to work every day. In an era like today where every shop is competing for employees, the culture matters. A shop can’t survive with a negative culture. 18 months later, after continuous incidents with the production manager (who had been there 29 years), Nick decided it was time to part ways. They let him go. But this man had been involved in every part of the business. The benefit of letting him go was that Nick was forced to get more involved in floor operations. He began to work closely with his engineers on improvement projects and personnel issues. He got to know the people on the factory floor. He stepped up and earned respect from his team. How did Nick manage the machine shop through COVID? What does the future hold for Belden Universal? Listen to the whole episode to hear more of his unique story.  How Nick’s experiences have prepared him for the future What did Nick learn? The most important thing is that problems can look very daunting in the moment—especially multi-faceted problems. But the most important thing is to take a break, formulate a plan, understand what the desired end outcome is, and start chipping away at it. Family businesses have long timelines where things don’t have to be solved overnight. They can make progress every day, month, and year towards that vision. Eventually they will find success. A problem now may seem like a bump in the road over the arc of your career.  — BAM! Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Create a Formal Business Succession Plan in 7 Steps Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! Accelerate your digital transformation with Xometry Book: Humanocracy by Gary Hamel and Michelle Zanini Learn more about Nick Sainati Belden Universal Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/18/202150 minutes, 55 seconds
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What Is CMMC And Why Should You Be Concerned?

What is the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC)? The DOD is implementing the CMMC to normalize and standardize cybersecurity preparedness across the Federal government’s defense industrial base. Meaning? If you’re doing DOD work, they’re mandating that you get this certification. So you need to know what this is all about. We’ve brought in Paul Van Metre and John Bilek to help fill in the blanks. Check it out! Segments [0:00] Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems [3:39] Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) [5:05] Let’s talk acronyms (there’s one for everything) [7:20] What’s happening at ZENGERS? [8:20] The amount of money wasted on cybersecurity [11:05] We welcome our two guests to the show [14:48] What is CMMC really all about? [17:09] Who is impacted by the CMMC requirement?  [19:44] Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! [20:44] The five levels of CMMC compliance [21:56] The CMMC implementation process [27:19] What does “CMMC Compliant” mean? [29:02] What ProShop ERP is rolling out to enhance security The amount of money wasted on cybersecurity Cybersecurity is a large problem. Most attacks originate from Russia but there’s also a lot of domestic hacking happening. Because of this—according to MXD—the DOD is now spending more than $300 billion each year on government contracts. The DOD Directive 8140 requires that any contractor must satisfy specific training and certification provisions to ensure sensitive data remains secure. The qualifications can be transferable and useful across the board.  Jason points out that this cybersecurity effort is how we protect our country, industry, economy, and more. Our enemies want to steal our technology, which is why we must keep it secure. Because manufacturing is a huge part of what the DOD does, anyone in their supply chain must follow the same cybersecurity protocols.  Who is impacted by the CMMC requirement?  CMMC applies to anyone in the defense contract supply chain. That includes both contractors who engage directly with the DOD and subcontractors who fulfill and/or execute those contracts. The CMMC standards will affect over 300,000 organizations. If you want to continue to do work for the DOD, you will have to get certified over the next 4–5 years.  Paul has heard of shops that are starting to lose work because they aren’t on track to get the CMMC certification. John has been asked multiple times if he’s been certified. While you cannot get certified yet, he is working toward compliance. There are five different levels of CMMC compliance. Most machine shops are expected to be certified at level three. How soon do you have to implement this? Paul points out that you can’t sit on this. There are very few approved auditors, so if you wait until the last minute you’ll lose out on a significant amount of your sales. If 30% of your business deals with the DOD, you could lose millions without the certification.  The financial impact on machine shops In May 2021, an entity was announced that would start handling the CMMC audits. What kind of costs will be put on machine shops? It’s going to be far more expensive to implement than an AS9100 audit. The CMMC is built on cybersecurity standards, the main one being the NIST 800-171 standard.  If a company is already compliant with that standard, they can likely check off the boxes for CMMC Level one. If you aren't compliant with this standard, to reach level one compliance could cost you between $5,000 to $25,000. For level three, it will be around $15,000 to $100,000, depending on the size of your shop. This is going to be a large financial hit no matter what you do. The certification is costly—but if you don’t get it, the loss of business may cost you more. A shop in Florida was quoted $100,000 for a company to “help” them get CMMC certified. Be wary of who you look to for help—a lot of unscrupulous people will take advantage of this rollout. Find accredited and reputable consultants. There will be grant money offered to help companies get this certification. Can you swing the cost of the certification?  What can help cover some of these costs? IMEC gave Carr Machine a grant to get ISO certified years ago, which covered some of the implementation and auditor fees. IMEC will be giving grants out to augment the cost of implementing this. Paul points out that the MEP gets its money from the Federal government and allocates it to different organizations like IMEC. The unknown? The amount of labor you may have to invest in to get to level three certification.  So what does CMMC compliant actually mean? How is ProShop ERP implementing updates to help you walk through the process? John and Paul share a few examples, so keep listening! If you have an idea for a MakingChips message, please ask us a question or leave us a message at 312-725-0245 and let us know! Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! John Bilek MXD USA The DOD Directive 8140  ITAR IMEC Making Chips Episode #1 The NIST 800-171 standard 85 FR 51161 - Award Format for DoD Grants and Cooperative Agreements Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/9/202142 minutes
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Selling Your Machine Shop

In this episode of Making Chips, Jim and I chat with Paul Van Metre—the Co-Founder of ProShop ERP—about the process of selling his machine shop. We dissect the process, including how to understand the valuation of your company and how to make your shop more attractive to potential buyers. If you’re considering selling in the next few years, this episode is full of actionable tactics and strategies that will help you succeed.  BAM! - Jason Zenger Segments [0:07] Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems [3:10] How to sell your machine shop [5:11] Ozark Technical Community College offering a two-week manufacturing bootcamp [7:49] Jim shares what’s new at Carr Machine [8:42] Paul Van Metre’s experience selling his machine shop [13:42] Is this a big change in the manufacturing industry? [15:27] Why would a strategic buyer pay more?  [16:40] Understanding the process of valuation  [17:35] Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! [26:10] The experiences of Paul’s customers buying shops [28:12] How to make your company more attractive for buyers [30:53] How buyers can make sure they’re getting a fair valuation Now is a great time to sell—or buy—a machine shop  I bought ZENGERS from my Dad in 2019, right before the pandemic hit. learned that there’s a lot involved in buying/selling a machine shop. Not only that, but it takes multiple years to get to the point to learn how to run a shop by yourself. Running any business that employs a team of people takes a lot of work.  A lot of people are looking to retire and sell their machine shops. The youngest people of the Baby Boomer generation will be 65 by 2030. And of the 18,000 machine shops in America, the majority are owned by Baby Boomers. The vast majority will have some type of transition of ownership in the next 10–15 years.  Jim is getting calls from M&A companies all the time about buying his shop. He isn’t even close to ready to sell. I’m on the buy side, and I think this is a great time to buy a machine shop. Whether you want to merge, participate in a roll-up, etc. now is the time. Even if you’re not ready for several years, you need to start planning. The experiences of Paul’s customers buying shops Paul notes that owning a business is one of the most significant financial decisions anyone can make in their lifetime. These shops are the baby of their owners. They’ve poured 10, 20, 30, 40+ years into them. Leaving that behind and passing it on to the next generation is a difficult and taxing process. Some shops may close their doors and sell off their machinery.  A client of Paul’s, Mike, was deeply involved in the M&A and private equity space. He was trying to sell a shop where the owner wasn’t interested in making her business attractive for sale. They couldn’t sell the shop for years. So Mike decided to buy the shop himself. He knew it was a good business at the core and got it for a great deal. He also recently acquired another machine shop. Paul worked with a small shop in Colorado—Focused on Machining—who was in banking before moving into manufacturing. He looked at 4–5 shops before landing on this one. Because he was in banking he understood the financial side and has done an incredible job growing the business. Paul’s experience selling his machine shop Pro CNC was founded in 1997 when Paul was just 23—straight out of college. When they sold in 2014, they were a mature company with 17 years of experience under their belt (Paul shares his story in episode #98 of Making Chips). In hindsight, Paul had been preparing the company for sale for many years. They started hiring people to replace the three partners so they weren’t working in the business every day. They then hired an M&A company to take them to market (the whole process took around a year).  Sadly, Paul points out that 80% of businesses that get listed for sale never sell. Many businesses end up selling off their assets. Those people are likely making only a fraction of what their company could be worth. So how do you set your business up for success? What can you do now to make it more attractive to future buyers? Listen to the whole episode to learn the process! Resources mentioned on this episode Get The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Ozark Technical Community College offering a two-week manufacturing bootcamp Paul Van Metre’s Story: Episode #98 of Making Chips Check out ProShop ERP for more information on manufacturing software! Modern Machine Shop magazine Focused on Machining The E Myth: Why Most Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube
8/2/202135 minutes, 26 seconds
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276: RE-RELEASE: Evolutions in the Workholding Process with Alvin Goellner

Find all things MakingChips at www.MakingChips.com 
7/26/202142 minutes, 7 seconds
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Is Your Shop Protected From Being Hacked? (Cybersecurity Basics)

In this week’s episode of MakingChips, hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger bring in Federico Sciammarella, the President & CTO of MxD, to discuss the basics of cybersecurity, including the types of cyber attacks, and how a manufacturing leader can equip their shop with a strategic plan to prevent and deal with potential cyber threats. Segments 0:08 | Amper Technologies pilot program for machine monitoring 1:21 | Jason introduces manufacturing cybersecurity as the topic of the episode 4:57 | Jim and Jason talk about what’s new at their businesses 5:28 | Jason introduces the episode guest: Federico Sciammarella, the President & CTO of MxD 6:52 | Jason discusses manufacturing news, including a press release on the FBI’s internet crime report 10:17 | Jason explains Business Email Compromise, a type of phishing attack 12:21 | The hosts mention another type of cyber attack, Ransomware 13:52 | Jason mentions Malware attacks due to malicious software and brute force attacks 15:44 | The hosts and Federico discuss how to avoid and prevent coming under cyber attack 17:40 | ProShop ERP is being used in shops across the country 20:46 | Federico shares advice on how to avoid ransomware and how to prepare your business for potential cyber attacks 25:31 | Federico explains how MxD helps strengthen cybersecurity in the manufacturing industry 30:18 | Jason asks what a manufacturing leader can do to create a strategic plan to prevent cyber attacks 34:16 | The hosts share their thoughts on the new information they learned during the episode
7/13/202136 minutes, 24 seconds
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Behind the Scenes with the Product Manager of Methods Machine Tools

In this week’s episode of MakingChips, hosts Jim Carr and Nick Goellner talk with Nick St.Cyr, a Product Manager at Methods Machine Tools, about his history in the manufacturing industry, the role of a product manager, and the importance of establishing a vision of the future for your company. Segments:   0:11 | Jim mentions his experience with Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems through their pilot program 2:12 | Nick G. and Jim discuss CARR Machine & Tool’s move to their new, upgraded facility 3:40 | Nick G. talks about the current state of the manufacturing industry supply chain and reasons for the disruptions 7:30 | Jim introduces special guest Nick St.Cyr, a Product Manager at Methods Machine Tools, where he oversees the design, sales, support, and integration of MMT machine tools 9:45 | Nick S. shares his background and history in the manufacturing industry, and talks about his current position and responsibilities at Methods Machine Tools 17:14 | Jim talks about it’s important for machine shops to have a vision of the future 18:22 | Nick G. mentions how he sees ProShop ERP being used in shops across the country when he travels 19:22 | Jim explains the progression of his shop towards the established vision 21:40 | Nick S. discusses the expansion of the Methods facilities as they’ve grown 24:25 | Jim asks Nick S. about how Methods is preparing for the industry in the near future 26:30 | Nick G. asks how Methods is able to offer such quick, custom machine orders 30:38 | Nick S. talks about the change in the relationship between the product manager and the customer 33:52 | Nick S. shares his thoughts on automation’s role in the future of manufacturing 38:01 | Nick S. mentions taking a focused look at current products to create a roadmap for the future product lines and features
7/7/202141 minutes
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10 Steps To Simplify Your AS9100 Credentialing

In this episode of MakingChips, hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger meet with Paul Van Metre of ProShop ERP to discuss 10 things to consider when going through the process of getting AS9100 certified. Segments: 0:13 | Jim talks about his time using Amper Technologies machine monitoring systems under their pilot program 2:27 | Jim shares manufacturing news about past experiences with IMTS Rockstars and the current boom in manufacturing 4:24 | Jason mentions his 2021 sabbatical and how it’s okay to take a break from work 6:04 | Jim introduces the topic of the episode and offers questions you can ask yourself to decide if AS9100 certification is needed 8:58 | Jason introduces this week’s guest: Paul Van Metre of ProShop ERP 10:45 | Paul talks about his time at his former company implementing AS9100 features into ProShop ERP 12:30 | Jason asks if a cutting tool distributor would benefit from being AS9100 certified 25:10 | Paul shares how ProShop ERP can help you build your process for getting AS9100 certified
6/29/202130 minutes, 41 seconds
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IMTS 2022 - What's New For You?

In this episode of MakingChips, hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger talk with Peter Eelman, Vice President and Chief Experience Officer of AMT, about IMTS 2022, the return of their in-person trade show, and what’s in store for the future of IMTS events. Segments:0:08 | Jim talks about his time with the Amper Technologies pilot program for machine monitoring systems 1:27 | Jim and Jason introduce the episode and their past experiences with IMTS events 8:00 | Jason shares manufacturing news regarding Xometry’s move to the public market 10:16 | Jim introduces their guest Peter Eelman from AMT to discuss the history and return of IMTS 16:54 | Peter talks about the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on IMTS, and how they were able to adapt to the situation 20:33 | Jim asks Peter about the future of IMTS, as both physical and virtual events 23:21 | Peter explains the scale of IMTS, and its effect on the industry and the Chicago area 26:57 | Peter describes what’s next for IMTS, with the return of the physical event in 2022 30:20 | Jim asks about the future of automation in manufacturing, and how IMTS 2022 will feature it 34:52 | Peter explains how IMTS participants can prepare for the 2022 event and connect with other manufacturers through their website 38:30 | Jim talks about the upcoming Fanuc & Mitutoyo demonstration from CNC Machine Services Inc, and how you can register for the free event
6/22/202140 minutes, 7 seconds
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3 Easy Data Points to Learn From Your Machine

MakingChips hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger sit down with Akshat Thirani, the CEO and Co-founder of Amper Technologies, Inc., and Charles Morley, the President of Schleifring Medical Systems, to talk about how Charles implemented Amper technology in his shop, and the benefits it has had on his business. Segments: 0:21 Nick talks about how he sees ProShop ERP being used in shops throughout the country. 4:24 Jim and Jason share what’s new at their companies and at MakingChips HQ 6:06 Jason discusses new economic inflation data relating to manufacturing 7:50 Jason introduces Akshat Thirani, CEO and Co-founder of Amper Technologies, Inc., and his history in manufacturing 9:20 Jim introduces Charles Morley, the President of Schleifring Medical Systems, and his relation to Amper Technologies, Inc. 11:27 Akshat explains how Amper helps manufacturers be more Lean and improve day-to-day operations on the shop floor  13:17 Jim talks about his experience using Amper technology on his machines 15:53 Charles shares his background with Amper and how he implements and monitors their technology in his factory 18:57 Nick explains how you can source high-volume projects through the Xometry network 19:49 Charles discusses how Amper allows for collection of real, trackable efficiency data and can help increase productivity 23:26 Akshat talks about the simplicity of integrating Amper on the shop floor 24:45 Akshat explains the different ways the data provided by Amper can assist in company growth 26:58 Jim mentions that he shows off his shop’s Amper data while prospecting new customers 28:32 Charles shares why he chose Amper over other machine monitoring options 31:30 Charles explains how Amper technology relates to his shop’s Lean process 33:52 Akshat talks about how Amper offers a trial program for their technology 36:12 The hosts and guests offer their final thoughts on how this technology can improve many aspects of a shop
6/9/202138 minutes, 2 seconds
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Product Management vs Sales Management at a Manufacturing Company

Hosts Nick Goellner, Jim Carr and Jason Zenger are joined by Mark Cunningham and Kim Akimoto from CLEAR Solutions Sales Consulting to discuss the differences between product and sales management at manufacturing companies, and how strategic sales tools can lead sales teams to success. Segments: 0:06 Jim talks about how he found an easy-to-install machine monitoring system from Amper Technologies. 1:37 Nick introduces the topic of episode: Product Management vs Sales Management 3:01 The hosts discuss what’s new at their companies 4:21 Nick shares some manufacturing news about the computer chip shortage 8:53 Nick introduces the guests: Mark Cunningham and Kim Akimoto from CLEAR Solutions Sales Consulting 11:57 Mark explains his time spent in the business, and what opportunities he saw 13:44 Jason discusses the dynamic between himself and his wife in their business 14:12 Mark tells how he got connected with Nick and Hennig, Inc. and the projects that he helped them with 18:15 Nick mentions how he has seen ProShop ERP being used in shops across the USA 19:18 Mark shares how he develops electronic sales playbooks and how they can be used 22:50 Nick talks about how he restructured his sales management and business development units 26:19 Mark discusses the difference between product and sales management 28:10 Kim shares her story, from law school to a strategic sales consultant 30:26 Mark talks about how CLEAR Solutions Sales Consulting leads clients to the right solutions for their businesses through sales tools
6/4/202137 minutes, 56 seconds
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Retirement: Yes, No or Never?

In this episode of MakingChips, Jim Carr, Jason Zenger and Nick Goellner discuss  Retirement: Yes, No or Never. This could be a step in evaluating your decision whether you are a manufacturing leader at the highlight of your career or at the beginning stages of your career with plans for greatness. Segments: 0:14 | Jim talks about Amper Technologies, machine monitoring system, easy to install with minimal onboarding 3:08 | Jim, Jason and Nick talk about retirement, how manufacturers are approaching retirement age 7:55 | The hosts  announce great news that is happening on September 23, 2021.  MakingChips is having a Celebration for Manufacturing Leaders. 10:42 | Nick discusses with Jim and Jason, an article from Modern Machine Shop, March machine tool orders have been the biggest growth since 2019, unit orders have also increased 15:35 | Nick, Jason and Jim mention Xometry - custom manufacturing on demand 16:42 | Retirement talk. 17:25 | The hosts discuss how to tell if you are ready for retirement and signs you are NOT read for retirement. 29:55 | What are your takeaways from this episode?   
5/29/202131 minutes, 10 seconds
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Intro to the R&D Tax Credit for Manufacturing

In this episode of MakingChips, Jason, Jim and Nick discuss the R&D Tax Credit.  This could be a huge saving for your manufacturing company, but please don’t take this episode as legal, accounting or any similar advice; you should contact a professional after you have listened to this episode. Segments: 0:40 | Jim points out that he utilizes ProShop ERP tool "Work by Industry Dashboard" to receive real time data 3:12 | Jason asks Nick and Jim "Do you guys like paying taxes?" 3:45 | Jason references Oliver Wendall Holmes, Jr., Former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court - quoted "Taxes are what we pay for a civilized society" 4:22 | Jason references Billings Learned Hand, Former American Judge and Judicial Philosopher who served in the U.S. District Court of Appeals quoted "Anyone may arrange his affairs so that his taxes shall be as low as possible; he is not bound to choose that pattern which best pays the treasury.  There is not even a patriotic duty to increase one's taxes" 9:43 | Jason shares manufacturing news -  what are legislators trying to accomplish, when they come out with a new tax law? 12:45 | Jim calls Paul Van Metre of ProShop ERP to talk about how a client of his utilized the R&D Tax Credit 19:34 | Jason explains what type of research qualifies for the R&D Tax Credit 28:14 | Jim talks about ProShop ERP, to record Documentation Data Metrics 29:34 | Nick, Jim and Jason discuss what may qualify you for the R&D Tax Credit 32:40 | The hosts offer their final thoughts    
5/21/202134 minutes, 39 seconds
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Why You Need to Consider These New and Low-Cost Employee Benefits

In episode of #267 MakingChips, host Jim Carr and Jason Zenger discuss Why You Need to Consider These New and Low-Cost Employee Benefits"   Connect with us: www.MakingChips.com/contact Segments: :02 | Do you love your ERP? ProShop ERP. for additional details please visit: loveyourerp.com 1:30 | Jason and Jim discuss Employee Benefits, the shift in culture, how we pay benefits to our employee 5:21 | “Save the Date" Thursday, September 23rd, 2021 - Celebration of our industry and Manufacturing Leaders - a party that will Equip & Inspire @ MakingChips Headquarters in Rockford, Illinois 7:35 | Jim shares manufacturing news - Smart Manufacturing news i.e., Broad category of manufacturing that employs computer integrated manufacturing,  high levels of adaptability, rapid design changes, digital information technology and more flexible / technical workforce training 10:05 | Jason and Jim talk about Amper, how Jim is utilizing Amper software (30 day trial) and how it has helped him become more efficient 12:34 | Jason and Jim talk about innovative employee benefits and why to offer those benefits. 27:23 | Jim and Jason offer their final thoughts
5/11/202128 minutes, 31 seconds
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25 Trends Affecting the Future of Manufacturing in 2021 and Beyond.

In episode #266 of MakingChips, host Jason Zenger and co-host Jim Carr Discuss 25 Trends Affecting the Future of Manufacturing in 2021 and Beyond. Connect with us: www.MakingChips.com/contact   Segments: :22| Go to Loveyourerp.com and find out why so many manufacturing leaders love ProShop ERP 6:04 | Business Models, People, The World and Tools 6:25 | Business Models 13:56 | People 27:50 | The World 35:52 | Tools 36:32 | Check out Amper.xyz, a company that specializes in easy to install machine monitoring systems 41:50 | Final thoughts
5/4/202143 minutes, 42 seconds
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How to Create a Diverse Community in the Workplace to Solve Challenges in Manufacturing with Equity Machine Works

In episode #265 of MakingChips, host Jim Carr, Nick Goellner and Jessica Peterson discuss How to Create a Diverse Community in the Workplace to Solve One of the Biggest Challenges in Manufacturing with Justin Sherman and Andrew Crowe with Equity Machine Works Segments: :02 | Jim promotes Amper, a great company that specializes in machine monitoring systems, easy to Install with minimal on-boarding. Check them out at Amper.xyz and look under products for their pilot program 9:28 | Jessica introduces Justin Sherman and Andrew Crowe from Equity Machine Works 11:37 | Justin Sherman and Andrew Crowe from Equity Machine Works, explains Diversity of Manufacturing and how it relates to his business model;  ie; Manufacturing, Teaching, Trades Classes, Managing the Pre-Apprenticeship Program, Grant Funding, Educational Programs, Barriers that some grants create on their own 23:32 | Nick speaks to Manufacturing per prior discussion; Manufacturing needs a rebrand, needs to know how to communicate their brand better 24:37 | Jessica discusses to group how important StoryBrand is - Clarifying your message (using straight-forward language) as well how it can create barriers to entry  30:21 | Nick talks to Equity Machine Works; Are you a machine shop? What's different between your shop and Carr Machine Tool; Justin speaks to how Equity Machine Works benefits and adding value to the Community 46:52 | Jim and Nick offer their final thoughts on the episode
4/22/202148 minutes, 14 seconds
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When to Say No to an Opportunity

In this week’s episode of MakingChips, Jason Zenger discusses 4 reasons to say no to an opportunity.  Manufacturing leaders may need to say no more often to opportunities especially as the economy heats back up.   Segments: :09 | Jim and Jason discuss how ProShop ERP helped with Jim’s AS9100 virtual audit. 3:59 | Jason and Nick discuss two manufacturing news articles: #1 - article by "CNBC " Reddit founder Alexis Ohanian on what life Serena Williams taught him about sustained greatness 7:02 | #2 manufacturing news article: by "Wall Street Journal" Turbo charge economy leaves factory struggling to deliver goods that shoppers want. 8:04 | Jason expresses the four opportunity filters to put your decisions through - #1 Does fit your vision for the future, #2 Does it meet your core values, #3 It does have a measurable ROI, #4 Is it the best option for your client? 18:55 | Jason and Nick offer their final thoughts on the episode
4/13/202120 minutes, 13 seconds
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6 Communications Tools for the Manufacturing Leader

In this week’s episode of MakingChips, hosts Nick Goellner and Jason Zenger discuss 6 Communications Tools for the Manufacturing Leader. Segments: :57 | Nick and Jason discuss how a Manufacturer Leader can learn how to better communicate 4:39 | Nick shares Manufacturing News from an article by Jay Timmons, President and CEO of NAM (National Association for Manufacturers) regarding tax reform and investment incentives for manufacturers 12:25 | Jason recommends the book "Crucial Conversations" 15:43 | Jason talks people, culture, numbers and ProShop ERP - Can get data in real time 16:47 | Nick shares the first tool RACI chart (Responsibility Assignment Matrix) 19:53 | Approval Drawing Review (Approval Review meeting) 23:17 | PCP Program (Premiere Channel Partner Program)  25:12 | BrandScript (StoryBrand) Help companies tell coherent stories 28:05 | PSM (Process Success Map) - Making your customers successful 30:16 | VOC Program (Voice of the Customer/Client program) 32:83 | Jason offers his final thoughts on the episode  
4/7/202134 minutes, 51 seconds
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How Do You Communicate Change at Your Manufacturing Company?

In this week’s episode of MakingChips, host Jason Zenger and Nick Goellner discuss tips for effectively communicating to your team in the workplace Segments: :00 | Jim and Jason share how ProShop ERP helped them with the federal R&D tax credit 1:14 | Jason and Nick discuss changes in leadership at their companies 5:07 | Jason mentions article on Manufacturing predictions for the next  decade 10:57 | Jason and Nick discuss cloud-based data and how moving to Edge and 6G will be faster 11:58 | Nick shares his thoughts on communicating change to team members 17:02 | Jason touches on how you can make implementing changes into a win-win situation 27:26 | Jason and Nick offer their final thoughts on the episode 29:32 | Jessica introduces Xometry’s new purchasing system: Xometry Pay
3/31/202130 minutes, 25 seconds
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Workholding Evolves with Great Partnerships Featuring Eric Nekich of 5th Axis

In this week's episode of MakingChips, hosts Nick Goellner and Jim Carr are joined by Eric Nekich, a Sales Manager at 5th Axis, to talk about workholding, and the changes in sales tactics through the years. Segments: 3:30 | Jim and Nick play a manufacturing quiz game 10:30 | Nick introduces the episode guest Eric Nekich of 5th Axis 14:15 | Eric shares how he got involved in the manufacturing industry 16:00 | Eric talks about how 5th Axis grew from a contract manufacturer to a workholding brand 18:10 | Eric discusses how automation is growing in popularity in machine tool tending 22:00 | Jim talks about what his team likes about 5th Axis workholding 27:33 | Eric and Nick discuss how selling workholding has changed over time 37:14 | Eric explains the difference between the jaws on "dinosaur" vises and 5th Axis vises 40:44 | Eric talks about new modular automation components at 5th Axis 45:10 | Jim offers his final thoughts on the episode 47:09 | Jim and Jason explain the different technologies featured on IMTS Spark
3/10/202147 minutes, 57 seconds
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Marketing with a Tommy Gun with Metalworking Influencer Tony Gunn

In this week's episode the MakingChips hosts talk with metalworking influencer Tony Gunn and his career in the manufacturing industry. Segments: 0:00 | Jim talks about how simple ProShop ERP made his virtual shop audit 4:25 | Nick shares manufacturing news about the rise of firearm sales 10:00 | Nick introduces the episode guest, Tony Gunn, the General Manager of MTDCNC Global 13:18 | Tony discusses how he got his start in the manufacturing industry 17:40 | Jim asks if the manufacturing industry is still seen as a "dirty" or "lower-class" industry 22:00 | Tony shares some of his thoughts on social media, marketing, and fellow manufacturing influencers 29:19 | Tony talks about his new position at MTD CNC Global 35:30 | Jason asks Tony about what problems he is trying to solve in the manufacturing industry 39:43 | Jim and Jason talk about the knowledge centers at IMTS Spark
3/2/202141 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Power of the Production Meeting

In this episode of MakingChips the hosts discuss sections to include in their production meetings, and how they can benefit their shop and team's productivity. Segments: 0:00 Jim shares how he can access real-time data and reports using ProShop ERP. 1:32 The hosts talks about the virtual grand opening of the Boring Bar 5:20 Jim introduces "social intimacy" and how it strengthens relationships 9:40 The hosts discuss what's happening in their businesses 12:30 Jim explains what he uses production meetings for and why they're important 15:49 Jim shares the different sections he includes in his production meetings and the benefits they provide to the team 19:08 Jim discusses how he added weekly COVID-19 updates to his production meetings in response to the pandemic 26:44 Jim creates a "hot list" to update his team on what's going on in the shop 29:50 Jim opens the floor at the end of meetings for Q&A and team discussion 34:18 Jim and Jason talk about the different showcases at IMTS Spark
2/23/202135 minutes, 10 seconds
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Tom Brady and Manufacturing on the Moon with DARPA

In this episode, the MakingChips hosts discuss the career of NFL star Tom Brady, and how his personal keys to success are also applicable to the manufacturing leader. Segments: 0:00 | Jim and Jason talk about the different technologies featured on IMTS Spark 7:24 | Jason reads a press release from DARPA about off-Earth manufacturing of lunar structures 12:45 | Jason shares his points on how manufacturing leaders can take cues from Tom Brady's success  13:13 | The hosts discuss how manufacturing leaders might be retiring too early 24:49 | Jim and Jason talk about IMTS Spark Demo Days with Stephen LaMarco from AMT 31:53 | Jason explains Tom Brady's daily schedule and how having a routine helps with success 37:10 | Like Tom Brady, having a healthy diet and lifestyle can contribute to the success of a manufacturing leader 39:30 | Having core objectives can get you on the path to succeeding, as opposed to unrelated pursuits 43:40 | The hosts offer final thoughts on how Tom Brady's successes can be contributed to his strict regimen and practices  
2/17/202148 minutes, 57 seconds
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Can You Be Successful Running a Small Machine Shop?

In this week's MakingChips podcast, Jim and Jason discuss if you can be successful running a small machine shop, with Jim offering tips based on his own experiences. Segments: 0:00 | Jim and Jason talk about the different knowledge centers at IMTS Spark 1:10 | Jim mentions how he used ProShop ERP to extract the necessary data to collect the federal R&D tax credit 5:06 | Jim shares information on the failure rates of new businesses 7:45 | Jason explains why he's planning on taking a sabbatical from work 13:00 | Jim reads a news articles about the manufacturing economy bouncing back in 2021, and the different factors that will affect it 20:08 | Jim and Jason talk with Dan from Xometry and Vinny from PenCo Precision to discuss their experience with Xometry during the 2020 pandemic 26:22 | Jim asks "what is success in business?" 31:27 | Jim shares his tips for running a successful small machine shop 39:30 | Jim and Jason talk about how they analyze risks before they make business decisions
2/9/202143 minutes, 47 seconds
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How to Manage Your Triggers and Habits

In the newest MakingChips podcast, the hosts discuss how to use triggers to create new habits and systems for your business and your personal life. Segments: 0:00 | Nick talks about how he sees ProShop ERP on shop floors across the USA. 4:01 | Jason shares an article about a how people purchase books to display and pretend to look intelligent 7:27 | Jim and Nick explain a times they made changes to remain transparent as leaders 9:23 | Jason describes how he attempted to start changing certain habits at his company by creating new triggers 14:19 | Jason talks about the system he adopted to discuss and track the changing triggers and habits with his team 16:43 | The hosts talk to Chuck Matthews at DP Technology Corp. about IMTS Spark. 24:13 | Jim asks Jason and Nick how they store and utilize the information they gather through reading materials 27:53 | Jason explains how he's used triggers to create habits in his personal life      
2/2/202134 minutes, 8 seconds
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Talking About Talking About Politics

In this week's episode of MakingChips, Jim and Jason discuss how and when to talk about politics in the workplace, and why it should never affect business relationships. 0:00 | Jason talks about the 6 different showcases at IMTS Spark 2021 1:40 | Jim and Jason share their thoughts about political discussions in the workplace 4:05 | Jim discusses the new CMM in his shop 7:40 | Jason shares articles about President Biden's COVID-19 relief plan and new trade policies 15:00 | Jason explains why he thinks we need to listen to the political perspectives of others and discuss politics openly 20:10 | Nick tells us about how Xometry can help you with on-demand custom manufacturing 24:18 | Jason shares his notes on how politics can be discussed openly and honestly in the workplace, what basic guidelines you should adhere to, and what kind of environment it should foster 37:07 | Jim discusses how CARR Machine & Tool was able to have a virtual real-time audit through ProShop ERP
1/26/202138 minutes, 12 seconds
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How Does Your Manufacturing Company Go To Market?

In this week's episode, Jim, Jason, and Nick talk about the different sales channels that you can utilize for your manufacturing company, and their strengths and weaknesses. Segments: 0:00 | Nick explains how he sees ProShop ERP on shop floors across the country. 5:15 | The hosts share manufacturing news and purchasing trends for 2021 15:21 | Nick introduces different sales channels and how they function 19:55 | Jason discusses why companies such as Tesla don't go through local distributors and dealers 22:00 | Jim calls Matt Bain of Mazak North America to talk about IMTS Spark 30:38 | Nick introduces the concept of business development leaders, who handle distinct product groups at a national level 32:55 | Nick explains using regional sales managers as a direct channel 37:37 | Jim brings up how too many people in the sales channel could take a longer response time 42:55 | Nick discusses independent manufacturer's representatives as a sales channel 46:38 | Jason and Nick analyze the distributor relationship within a sales channel 49:56 | Jim shares the sales channels that he utilizes
1/19/202157 minutes, 30 seconds
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Lessons Learned While Running a Manufacturing Company During a Pandemic

As we move forward into 2021, the MakingChips podcast hosts look back at 2020, the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, and share more lessons they learned as a result. Segments: 6:06 | Jim shares information on the characteristics of a visual learner. 9:37 | The hosts discuss the potential usage of wearable technology in machine shops. 13:26 | The hosts emphasize the importance of cybersecurity, and how it will advance in 2021. 15:22 | The hosts discuss integrations of robotics in machine shops, as well as other possible future trends. 21:13 | Jim shares the thoughts and reactions of manufacturing leaders on the pandemic in March of 2020. 23:40 | Jason and Nick explain how they kept their team members informed during the pandemic. 25:00 | The hosts share how they used their organizations and affiliates to gather COVID-19 information for their peers. 29:20 | Jim talks about integrating virtual meetings, how taking risks may lead to new opportunities, and supply and demand issues during the pandemic.
1/12/202136 minutes, 25 seconds
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Committing to Details and Tap Testing with Guest John Miller (Part 2)

Part 2 of this 2-part series continues the interview with special guest John Miller, founder of Way of the Mill, an education platform for CNC milling. In this episode, John shares more of his manufacturing knowledge that machine shops can benefit from. 3:38 | John shares his thoughts on how a commitment to details can improve a shop 10:20 | John explains how shops may need to be more open to hybrid solutions across brands and suppliers 12:15 | John tells why he started Way of the Mill in the middle of a pandemic and what the goals for his clients are 17:06 | John explains the process of tap testing and what shops should be using it 24:20 | Jason asks how distributor employees can help manufacturing leaders make choices
1/4/202129 minutes, 56 seconds
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Milling Advice from Apple with Guest John Miller (Part 1)

In Part 1 of this 2-part series, the MakingChips hosts welcome guest John Miller, founder of Way of the Mill, an education platform for CNC milling. In this episode, John shares his background in the manufacturing industry, including his time at Makino and Apple, and why he chose to start Way of the Mill. 6:09 | Jason shares current news about the near future of the manufacturing industry due to COVID-19 12:10 | Guest John Miller, founder of Way of the Mill, tells his origin story in manufacturing 16:00 | John shares information on his experience working on turnkey projects at Makino 23:20 | John explains why he chose to share his milling advice online, and how good and bad fundamentals affect a company 27:05 | John discusses his time at Apple, and their involvement in the manufacturing industry 31:09 | John explains how he maintains unbiased content and the value it brings
12/28/202036 minutes, 25 seconds
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Estimating in a Digital World

In the 250th episode of MakingChips, the hosts discuss new factors and trends in the estimation process, especially when utilizing an ERP system. Jim Carr also shares his quoting process, and the tips and tricks he has used over the years that other manufacturing leaders should take into account. 3:30 | Nick tells a story about quoting 9:00 | Jim shares manufacturing news about the surge in metal prices 12:50 | Jim breaks down the estimation process into 3 factors: the estimator, the tools, and the tactics 19:30 | Jim explains his quoting process 23:30 | The hosts compare a traditional spreadsheet to an ERP system, and what columns to utilize 30:15 | The hosts discuss veteran quoting processes vs newer quoting tactics 34:50 | Jim lists some "red flags" to look out for during the estimation process 38:00 | Jim summarizes his thoughts on effectively quoting a job
12/21/202044 minutes, 39 seconds
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Leading, Learning, and Lessons From 2020

In this week's podcast, hosts Jason Zenger, Jim Carr, and Nick Goellner share the new leadership principles and processes they adopted during 2020 to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic, and how other manufacturing leaders can benefit by doing similar. 6:20 | The hosts share recent manufacturing news, plus Nick has his own special announcement 13:20 | Jason explains how he focused on growing his company's core values in 2020 16:15 | Jim discusses the new implementations he made at CARR this year 18:30 | Jason recounts how he increased communication between his employees 28:50 | Nick describes how his leadership team implemented new Lean practices and playbooks 33:09 | Jim shares the added business responsibilities he felt due to the COVID-19 pandemic 35:00 | Jason gives details on his experience of testing positive for COVID-19
12/14/202043 minutes, 18 seconds
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Is Imposter Syndrome Limiting Your Growth as a Manufacturing Leader?

In this week's episode, we share our experiences with imposter syndrome and discuss what it means. We talk about how it affects different generations and how to rise above the feeling that you aren't qualified or don't know what you're doing. 5:01 | Nick covers general manufacturing news - and improving market trends 8:55 | Nick defines imposter syndrome 10:05 | Jason brings up a bible verse that illustrates that everyone is a little bit of an imposter 13:32 | Jason asks how you'll learn anything if you never ask 22:26 | Jason and Nick discuss what imposter syndrome means for a manufacturing leader 25:42 | Nick shares a story about feeling like you can't ask questions or make mistakes 30:32 | Jason mentions how important it is to get your self-worth from multiple places, and Nick talks about how ego plays into imposter syndrome
12/7/202040 minutes, 50 seconds
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Listen In: MakingChips as Guest Speakers at DMG MORI National Sales Meeting

In this week's episode, we share our experience as guest speakers at DMG Mori's sales conference this year. We touched base on the evolving sales process during COVID, how DMG really sells, and what old school techniques you can implement in today's new normal. 3:53 |  DMG MORI's team announces keynote speakers - MakingChips 5:17 | Nick discusses the sales challenges brought on by COVID and how his team has adapted to overcome them 7:10 | DMG's area sales manager talks about how they've adapted to the closed doors 11:01 | Nick asks DMG MORI "How does your customer buy?" 20:14 | Jason talks about cultivating relationships and avoiding going silent  31:50 | Jim goes over old school sales tips in the new "not normal" world 39:21 | A new way to make "cold calling" work again 44:24 | Jason and Jim talk to Marty from Autodesk to talk about what they're doing with IMTS Spark 49:31 | Q&A with MakingChips and DMG MORI
11/23/20201 hour, 10 minutes, 43 seconds
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A digital destination for a connected manufacturing community

In this week's podcast, hosts Jason Zenger, Jim Carr, and Nick Goellner invite guest Peter Eelman, Vice President & CXO at AMT to discuss how IMTS pivoted into an online digital destination for Manufacturers. Segments: Missing IMTS - Everybody gets together (2:15) Good News with Jim Carr (6:30) Manufacturing News: Smart manufacturing platform revenue to pass $32B annually by 2025 (7:04) Introducing our Guest: Peter Eelman (14:12) IMTS Spark is a digital destination for a connected manufacturing community (16:45) Peter: This is not a virtual tradeshow (21:45) Jason: The main theme of 2020 is rebuilding the supply chain (30:20) IMTS is coming back in 2022 (38:30) Why you should sign-up for IMTS spark today (40:34) What happened to IMTS 2020 swag? (44:00) Takeaways from IMTS Spark (46:10) The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!
11/18/202048 minutes, 14 seconds
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Wraparound Blankets for the small manufacturer

In this week's podcast, hosts Jason Zenger and Jim Carr invite guest Jenn Ryan, SVP of Global Network Operations at Xometry to discuss how they pivoted during COVID and how it helped them transform who they are as a business. Segments: Jim and Jason’s businesses thriving when the industry is down (1:44) Good news at Carr’s: 4th new CNC machine (6:06) Jason Discusses the Manufacturing News: Foxconn fails to meet requirements in Wisconsin (6:47) Introducing our guest: Jenn Ryan, SVP of Global Network Operations at Xometry (11:40) Check out our previous episodes 122 & 189 with Xometry Jenn: Keeping the doors open during COVID shutdowns (14:10) Jenn: Changing the binary questions “What part of this job can I do?” (17:10) Jason: Why we created the Makingchips podcast (19:20) Jenn: Partner Success stories in 2020 (21:00) Jason: We need more manufacturing in the US (31:05) The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!
10/27/202037 minutes, 35 seconds
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Changing ERPs will change your company culture

In this week's podcast, hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger invite guests Paul Van Metre, Co-Founder of ProShop ERP, and Matt Gawlik, President of 3D Industries to discuss what it takes to properly implement a new ERP in a machine shop, and how it can change your culture. Segments: How the ERP revolution shifted our culture (1:47) Teasing our special guests (2:56) Putting on makeup is fun? IMTS interview (3:33) What’s new with Jason: Zengers, Black Industrial (5:00) Discussing this week’s manufacturing news (6:20) Introducing our guest: Paul Van Metre from ProShop (13:13) Introducing our other guest: Matt Gawlik, President of 3D Industries (14:10) The origin story of “3D Industries” (15:20) How Matt found ProShop (16:45) Jim: Using the wrong ERP for 20 years (19:52) Matt: Rehabilitating the company to implement the perfect ERP (20:45) Jason: What is a Pirate ship company? (27:25) Roadblocks when implementing a new ERP (28:00) ProShop features that hit the spot for Machine shops (30:45) What is your estimator doing all day now? (33:55) Matt: Extracting data from the minds of employees is a necessary safeguard (34:45) Culture Shift: Before and After ProShop (38:50) Paul: Implementing ERPs is a team commitment (43:45) The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!
10/20/202047 minutes, 59 seconds
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What is Your Legacy?

In this week's podcast, hosts Jason Zenger and Jim Carr discuss the process of building the right legacy you want to leave behind as a Manufacturing Leader. Segments: Getting morbid for a minute (0:45) Leaving a legacy after a transition (2:10) Jim compares MakingChips hosts to past music greats (3:30) Another new CNC machine at Carr Machine (5:06) Jason, the business coach? (6:27) Manufacturing News: New manufacturing facility for undersea drones (8:40) Jason: Leaving a positive legacy in the minds of others (11:51) A legacy gone wrong: Statues don’t make chips (16:30) Guiding principles towards a great legacy (19:40) Every manufacturing leader needs to think about their legacy (27:10) The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!
10/8/202032 minutes, 20 seconds
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Wisdom + Technology/ Strategic Ideas for Reducing Machine Set Up Time

In this week's episode, we get a look into Carr Machine's setup process. Hosts Jim Carr and Nick Goellner invite guests Ryan Carr, Operations Manager at CARR Machine and Tool, Inc., and Paul Van Metre, Co-Founder of ProShop ERP on to discuss the challenges they face with long setup times and explore how ProShop has helped them refine the process while providing measurable analytics for future improvement.  Segments Jim and Nick talk about manufacturing news 4:26 Jim Introduces Paul Van Metre and Ryan Carr 8:40 Jim introduces the age-old issue of setup times 10:34 Ryan talks about today’s setup process on the shop floor at Carr 14:18 Jim and Ryan talk about how their team uses ProShop 15:47 Paul Van Metre lays out the pre-processing checklist at ProShop 20:42 Paul and Ryan cover the impact of implementing ProShop 26:41 Jim addresses the transition of accountability 29:54 Nick asks about ROI and measurable results for improvement 31:55 Success stories with ProShop 36:05 The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!
10/2/202040 minutes, 55 seconds
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Rapid Fire/ Old School Machining Tips that Never Get Dated

In this week's podcast, hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger discuss old school manufacturing tips that still equip & inspire their team on the shop floor. Segments: The guys discuss this week's manufacturing news. (8:41) Solving today's shop problems with "old school" techniques: Tapping (18:10) Flatness on prints/Material Science (23:38) Using oversized materials for better accuracy (26:12) Bringing back old school collaboration (28:36) Machine tool distributors selling tooling (31:50) The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!
9/28/202037 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to Use Lean Manufacturing Concepts to Connect Marketing Strategy with Execution

This week on the MakingChips podcast, Host Nick Goellner, Jim Carr, and Jason Zenger discuss the Agile Marketing Process and how to have a marketing program in place that allows you to pivot when the time comes!   Segments: The guys discuss this week's manufacturing news. (6:12) What is ProShop: (10:40) What great marketing is and what great marketing isn't. (16:05) GPCT Workshop: Goals.Plans.Challenges.Timelines.(19:10) Begin with the end in mind—start creating vision backlogs. (20:55) Keys to success: Prioritize, Protect your sprints, Pull don't push, Park. (29:45) 4 keywords for meetings: Daily stand up, Plan, Review, Reflect. (35:15) How does a marketing program work for a small job shop? (37:42)  The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!
9/15/202043 minutes, 7 seconds
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Prototypes to Production/ Tips on How CARR Made the Move

This week on the MakingChips Podcast, Jim Carr shares 6 tips on what CARR Machine & Tool has done to pivot from prototypes to becoming a full production machine shop.   Jim shares this week's manufacturing news - "Making Robots Smarter & Safer."  (7:05) Tip #1: How do you quote a production job? (17:44) Tip #2: The importance of manufacturing planning. (21:25)  Tip #3: Determining the correct amount of pieces in your active setup. (24:10) Tip #4: Know your tools. (28:00) Tip #5: Understanding your Customer Demands (36:38) Tip #6: Look into automation, robots, and cobots. (38:10)
9/9/202042 minutes, 26 seconds
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The Secrets of Motor City Marketing Success on LinkedIn that Generates 5 Leads Per Day

This week's guest, Ted Ladzinski from Motor City Spindle Repair joins co-hosts Jim Carr, Jason Zenger, and Nick Goellner to discuss ways to increase your spindles’ longevity, how to know when to replace your spindle, as well as how to use short- and long-term social media strategies to generate leads. The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Segments: Nick shares this week's manufacturing news. (7:10) Nick introduces this week's guest Ted Ladzinski. (10:00) Ted shares his story on he got started in manufacturing. (12:56) Creating an impactful social media strategy in manufacturing. (14:18) Ted gives insight into creating a short- vs long-term strategy on social media. (21:00) Ted shares how to know when it's time to replace your spindle. (40:20) Tips to increase your spindles’ longevity. (48:15)  
8/26/202055 minutes, 57 seconds
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Solving the Diversity Gap by Manufacturing a Fruit Salad

Co-host Jim Carr, Jason Zenger and Nick Goellner are joined by Andrew Crowe, Ranken Technical College Instructor and Senior Machinist at Seiler to discuss the diversity and skills gap the manufacturing industry is facing today. Tune in as you learn Andrew's vision to create a more diverse manufacturing community and a ways recruiting, educating, and funding are impacting the skills gap we face today in this episode of MakingChips.   Segments: Jason shares positive news about Zenger's Industrial. (3:14)  The guys introduce this week's guest, Andrew Crowe. (8:29) Andrew shares his experience during the 2008 recession. (12:30)  Andrew gives insight on why and how he got involved in the manufacturing industry. (13:09) The guys discuss diversity in manufacturing. (19:40)  Dissecting the skills gap and diversity in manufacturing: Image or awareness? (21:35) Ways to expose manufacturing to different communities and cultures.  (23:02) Andrew shares his vision to create a more diverse manufacturing community. (24:18) Andrew shares his strategies in bringing in more talent into the workforce. (26:25) Awareness, curriculum and funding: How to solve them? (32:00)
8/18/202050 minutes, 58 seconds
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A Year With No Manufacturing Trade Shows

A year without IMTS, FabTech, etc. have you wondering what comes next for industry tradeshows? In this episode, Jim, Jason, and Nick talk all about the year without tradeshows. They cover everything from attendees to exhibitors and ways you can still market yourself without using large tradeshows. Connect with us: www.MakingChips.com/contact The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! Segments:  The podcast talks IMTS and trade shows during COVID 1:02 Jim shares his good news… a new HAAS on the shop floor 3:18 Jim shares manufacturing news… Second-quarter GDP plunges 5:10 Jason introduces this week’s topic: Why you go to trade shows 9:20 Going to trade shows to see new technology 10:03 Nicks talks about translating into the digital market 13:40 Jason asks, is losing IMTS a gain or a loss for your business? 14:39 Alternatives to trade shows: smaller shows and digital spaces 16:00 Finding the missing social connection that shows provide 19:51 Going to trade shows to buy and sell 22:43 Jason asks, what’s the alternative to selling at a trade show? 23:46 Are trade shows here for the long haul? The hosts perspectives 27:38 Chiptober Fest! Come join us 30:55
8/11/202033 minutes, 17 seconds
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How’s the Health of your Entrepreneurial Operating System

What exactly is EOS, and what is an L10 meeting? This week on the MakingChips podcast, co-hosts Jim Carr, Jason Zenger, and Nick Goellner share their experiences and discuss how to use the Entrepreneurial Operating System for leadership success.    Segments: Jason and Nick share their thoughts on expansion. (3:33) Jim announces 'Chiptober Fest' for the MakingChips Grand Opening event.  (5:45) Jim shares this week's manufacturing news: Indiana Lost nearly 8,000 Manufacturing Jobs in 2019 (6:50) Jim reads the first paragraph of Letting Go of The Vine, of the book Traction. (11:45) What is EOS? The Definition of the Entrepreneurial Operating System (12:39) Nick defines the process of kicking off your EOS (17:00) What is an L10 meeting and why is it called L10? (21:08) The structure of a Level 10 meeting: (23:46) One of the most important aspects of the L10 meeting- Rocks. (27:23) The 3rd aspect of the L10 Meeting: Client/Employee Headlines ( 30:40) What are To-Do lists? (31:40) Identify, discuss, solve: Issues List  (32:27) Differentiating the types of issues that belong on the issues list. (35:07) L10 Meeting: What is a parking lot? (38:55)  The guys share their success using L10 meetings for their businesses. (40:38)
8/4/202046 minutes, 55 seconds
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Effective Communication for Manufacturing Leaders

Are you communicating with your team effectively? Step up your communication skills this week as Jason Zenger shares 10 effective tips to improve your communication as a leader.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!   Segments: Jason discusses "miscommunication" (1:02) Jim shares good news about Carr Machine & Tool. (5:28) The guys discuss this week's manufacturing news. (7:44) Tip #1: How to be self aware to understand your team better. (14:30)  Tip #2: Why you should assume the best in others when you communicate. (15:47) Tip #3: Have a mutual best outcome in mind while communicating.  (17:01)  Tip #4: Be direct and forthcoming, but be empathetic. (19:02)  Tip #5: Be open with your team: Share your thoughts and ideas with your team. (20:33) Tip #6: Understand people can handle bad news better than they can handle lack of communication. (21:30)  Tip #7: Be specific with what you're asking for. (22:48) Tip #8: Seek to understand your team. (27:20) Tip #9: Over-communicate. (29:54)  Tip #10: Learn how others like to receive communication. (31:14)
7/28/202038 minutes, 7 seconds
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Setting the Standard for your Manufacturing Brand

In this episode, MakingChips hosts, Jim Carr, Jason Zenger, and Nick Goellner interview MakingChips Agency Director Jessica Peterson about what it means to have brand standards for your manufacturing business and why having a logo doesn't translate to having a brand.    Segments: The guys discuss this week's manufacturing news. (5:08) The guys introduce this week's topic of Brand standards with special guest, MakingChips Marketing Director Jessica Peterson (9:00)  Jessica shares the importance of brand standards and where to start. (11:16) Jessica gives insight on what should be part of your brand standards: Brand Book, Style Guide, and Media Kit (13:32) Jessica shares some core elements your brand book should include. (15:48) Jessica explains what a Media Kit is. (20:17) Jason defines what a Favicon is and how to use it properly. (25:05) The guys discuss the importance of defining your brand standards if you want to be a company that scales. (27:08) Jessica shares how a small shop can start creating their brand book. (30:40) Email Jessica at [email protected] 
7/21/202036 minutes, 39 seconds
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How to Get Your Sales Management in Order

When it comes to managing a sales team, it’s important not to confuse efforts with results. In this episode, co-host Nick Goellner draws on his experience as AME Sales & Marketing Director to discuss key sales results and metrics as they relate to manufacturing sales team management, customer service, and marketing efforts.   Segments: Co-host Jim Carr discusses what is keeping him positive at work right now. (1:37) Nick gives a Boring Bar update, announcing staff changes and new employment opportunities. (2:37) Co-host Jason Zenger gives a business update and introduces the topic of journalistic integrity. (4:49) The guys discuss this week’s manufacturing news regarding U.S. manufacturing hitting a 14-month high. (8:47) The guys introduce this week’s topic of sales and the impact it has on manufacturing businesses and how sales are managed at each business Nick explains his four types of sales management: territory, account, opportunity, call; and defines sales force enablement and how it can improve a team. (16:32) Nick provides details on the types of sales meetings he uses, including the frequency, order of operations, and desired outcomes. (20:19) The guys discuss utilizing the CRM (22:20)  Nick explains the difference between group vs one-on-one meetings at AME and provides details about performance criteria including: new business development, key account management, brand building. (29:33) Nick defines his expectations of what it means to be a brand builder and explains how he evaluates his sales team, including factors he uses to adjust compensation. (36:40) Mentioned on the Show: CRM Hubspot Salesforce Integration “U.S. manufacturing activity hits 14-month high”
7/14/202044 minutes, 5 seconds
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How to be a Change Agent for your Business with Robin Johnson

Times are changing and as manufacturing leaders, we need to adjust with these times. "In business, if we don't change, we don't grow and we don't survive." - Robin Johnson, a change agent, with a passion for helping organizational leaders move their organizations from current to future state joins MakingChips to discuss how to become emotionally intelligent as a leader during these changing times. Segments: Jim and Jason discuss how they are changing and adapting with their businesses through a global pandemic. (1:42) Jason and Jim discuss manufacturing news about the H.R. 6690 Act (5:46) Guest Robin Johnson explains what emotional intelligence is. (13:41)  Robin gives insight on how to use emotional intelligence as a manufacturing leader. Robin discusses the importance of having your employees feeling great about wanting to work for your business. (20:45) The 16 elements to emotional intelligence. (26:54) Robin and Jim discuss how to help nurture your employees to accept change. (28:18) The types of leaders you should look for to help grow your business. (34:35) Robin shares insight on how she got into change and development.  Mentioned on the Show: Bring Entrepreneurial Advancements To Consumers Here In North America Act (H.R.6690) Leaders Don't Have to Be Lonely: Eliminate the Loneliness by Leading Like a Coach (Book)
7/7/202046 minutes, 31 seconds
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Losing a Manufacturing Leader

In business and in life we all experience pain we can’t control. Jim Carr reflects on the recent death of his parents and gives practical advice on how business leaders can prepare for personal loss and grief.   Segments: Jason Zenger talks about the recent trend of companies coming back to ZENGER’S from large national integrators and discusses the value of high-level customer service. (3:20) Jason and Jim discuss manufacturing news about how the Reshoring Initiative aims to bring manufacturing back to the U.S. (5:15) Jim discusses multi-generational machine shops and the importance of mitigating a personal and professional plan for when a leader passes on. (13:30) Jason and Jim discuss the role of open communication in succession planning and the value of hiring of outside professionals to help. (18:10) Jim discusses the importance of creating a trust to avoid probate and insulate assets from creditors. (24:30) Jim answers Jason’s questions about the most valuable lessons he learned from his father. (28:30) Jim discusses the evolution of leadership styles from his father’s generation to now and explains how creating core values and adapting to modern business practices has helped him navigate succession and loss. (32:15)   Mentioned on the Show: Don’t Give Up on Bringing Manufacturing Back to the U.S. (article) Bellicose Rhetoric (definition)
6/30/202035 minutes, 38 seconds
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Leading through Fear

Co-hosts Jim Carr, Nick Goellner and Jason Zenger talk about their past experiences with fear in business, including navigating recession, unemployment, and the current pandemic, then offer seven steps for leading through fear, along with personal applications and examples.    Segments: Nick and Jim to talk about their most fearful time in business (1:30) Jim gives an update on Carr Machine Tool’s new business (5:15) Jason introduces manufacturing news about Apple’s manufacturing base (6:45) Jim, Nick and Jason talk about overcoming fear as business leaders and provide commentary on how taking certain steps have led to successful innovation, expansion and reinvention. (10:15) Jim, Nick, and Jason add their final thoughts and reflections. (27:40)   Mentioned on the show: The Strategic Coach Podcast  Killing Marketing: How Innovative Businesses Are Turning Marketing Cost Into Profit, by Richard Rose   Related links: https://sports.yahoo.com/apple-looking-diversify-manufacturing-headphones-072853788.html
6/16/202031 minutes, 32 seconds
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Manufacturing Creates Careers

Guest Steve Schubert, Chief Operating Officer at Advanced Machine & Engineering Co., talks with co-hosts Jim Carr, Nick Goellner, and Jason Zenger about his rise from high school apprentice to a manufacturing industry leader and provides advice and perspective on recruiting and training the next generation of manufacturers.   Segments: Jason provides a positive outlook on business-related changes prompted by COVID-19 (2:10) Nick introduces manufacturing news about a recent drop in Europe’s automotive industry sales (4:05) Guest Steve Schubert explains how he first got involved in manufacturing (10:00) Steve discusses his experience with formal apprenticeship and gives some thoughts on alternative educational opportunities and what it will take to build future manufacturing leaders (21:00) Steve gives insight into recruitment and discusses specific sources for finding future employees  (28:00) Jason and Jim discuss whether or not it is the company’s responsibility to teach soft skills (33:00) Steve provides advice on how small companies can benefit from apprenticeship programs and gives final thoughts on the benefits of a career in manufacturing (36:00) Jim, Nick, and Jason provide final takeaways (42:00)   Mentioned on the show: Rock River Valley Tooling and Machining Association German Precision Tool Industry Projects Decline in Consumption
6/9/202045 minutes, 4 seconds
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Resharpening Drills and End mills - When and Why

When it comes to your cutting tools, how do you know when it's time to resharpen or recycle? This week on the MakingChips podcast, hosts Jim Carr, Jason Zenger, and Nick Goellner discuss when and why you should consider resharpening your cutting tools as well as the cost to resharpen versus cost of buying brand new.
5/27/202033 minutes, 25 seconds
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Quick Response in Crisis Your Community As Your Customer with Noah Goellner

It’s tempting, in rapid response, to abandon procedures or suspend protocols in order to solve immediate crisis situations. This week’s guest, Noah Goellner, lean manufacturing expert and COO of Hennig Inc., provides practical methods for incorporating your company’s core values and internal processes to produce successful solutions, no matter the timeline or challenge.
5/12/202042 minutes, 9 seconds
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Cannabis on the Shop Floor - In the "Weeds" with Employment Law Expert, Jim Griffin

MakingChips guest Jim Griffith, an employment attorney for HR Source, answers timely questions about individual state and federal marijuana laws, and provides manufacturing leaders with three action steps to help address management and human resources issues related to the use of legalized cannabis.
4/30/202045 minutes, 28 seconds
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Manufacturing Numbers on COVID-19 from NAM's Chief Economist - Chad Moutray

Chad Moutray, chief economist for the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), talks with MC hosts Jim Carr, Nick Goellner, and Jason Zenger to provide insight into the current economic conditions for manufacturers during COVID-19 and offer an economic forecast for the future of our industry.
4/24/202045 minutes
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PANDEMIC CRISIS - MakingChips talks with Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle

In a timely interview, Jim Carr, Nick Goellner, and Jason Zenger sit down with Cook County IL Board of Commissioners President Toni Preckwinkle, who oversees one of the nation’s largest public health and hospital systems as well as one of the nation’s largest criminal justice systems, to discuss details of the COVID-19 management and response, the CARES Act, and how to utilize current and future available resources to meet the demands of the crisis. 
4/13/202046 minutes, 1 second
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Automation Goes Viral During a Pandemic

Are there any positives in this pandemic? With social distancing, working from home, schools and businesses closing, and travel being restricted, the physical and psychological impact of COVID-19 is hitting us all. The MakingChips podcast has always focused on equipping and inspiring leaders in the manufacturing industry and we are not changing course now. In this episode, Jim Carr and Nick Goellner talk with guest Karl Koenigsberger, Business Development Manager at IRIS Factory Automation, about finding opportunities to improve services, products, and management during this unprecedented time of change and challenge.
3/31/202036 minutes, 13 seconds
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SPECIAL REPORT: Coping with a PANDEMIC!

In this week's MakingChips podcast, hosts Jason Zenger, Jim Carr, and Nick Goellner discuss the impact of today’s Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, and consider its effect on the manufacturing industry, future investors, travel and much more.
3/24/202027 minutes, 56 seconds
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Multigenerational Manufacturing - Divorce and Succession, Manual and 5-Axis at CARR Machine & Tool, Inc.

When the family members running the family business comprise everyone from seasoned octogenarians to fresh-faced millennials, challenges arise that are not necessarily talked about in other industries. In this week’s MakingChips podcast, hosts Jim Carr, Jason Zenger and Nick Goellner (representing three separate generations) delve into some complex, and often emotional, leadership issues experienced in their own multigenerational family businesses, and provide guidance on how to navigate these delicate situations.
3/10/202056 minutes, 52 seconds
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CORONAVIRUS - The Impact on Manufacturing

As business leaders, the way we respond to unforeseen issues and crises can put a spotlight on both strengths and vulnerabilities within our corporate practices, culture, and personal character.      In this week’s MakingChips podcast, Jason Zenger challenges Jim Carr, Nick Goellner and the metalworking nation to examine the impact of today’s Coronavirus (CoV) pandemic, and consider its effect on the manufacturing industry as well as what can be learned from the way leaders around the world are reacting to this threat.  The guys discuss 4 points that every manufacturing leader can learn from this crisis as well as Xi Jinping, the paramount leader of the PRC, and the reaction from the Communist Party of China.
3/3/202037 minutes, 39 seconds
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Ask MakingChips: How Do I Turn Around an Uninspired Employee?

You are motivated, inspired and positive - your employee… not so much. How can you turn around an employee who does not match the positive energy in your workplace?In today’s episode of MakingChips, Jason Zenger, and Jim Carr, discuss a listener’s question and come up with 3 ways you can inspire your employees even if you’re new to your leadership role. Learn how to bring the energy, develop or redefine your core values, and find out what really drives your employees in this week’s new episode of MakingChips.   Feedback? Go to MakingChips.com/feedback
2/18/202032 minutes, 50 seconds
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How to Hold Yourself Accountable for a Strong Workplace Culture

Has anyone ever called you a control freak? Do you have trouble sharing responsibility? Is your inability to delegate holding back your potential? Divide and conquer is the name of the game on today’s episode of MakingChips. Jason Zenger, Jim Carr and Nick Goellner take a look at how to become the best version of yourself by taking simple steps such as learning to delegate and be more self-aware. Learn how to identify workaholic traits in yourself and how to combat them with the MakingChips team.
2/11/202047 minutes, 39 seconds
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What is the Manufacturing Multiplier Effect?

What exactly is the multiplier effect? How does manufacturing positively impact the economy and our communities? What makes manufacturing and other “creation industries” different from service industries?    In today’s episode of MakingChips, Jason Zenger tackles these questions and more as the MakingChips team dives into a listener question.  Do Jim Carr and Nick Goellner agree with the analysis?  Listen and let us know what you think!
2/4/202031 minutes, 33 seconds
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Connecting Manufacturing Leaders to the Future of Technology

This week’s guest on MakingChips, Federico Sciammarella, CTO at MxD, gives us an insider's glimpse of the “future factory” and offers practical ways to introduce digital to any size shop. Located in Chicago, MxD is one of 14 institutes that make up Manufacturing USA, a public-private funded partnership working to secure American manufacturing's future through innovation, education, and collaboration.
1/25/202059 minutes, 53 seconds
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2020 Goal Setting for the Manufacturing Leader

Sustainable growth for today’s manufacturing leader has as much to do with company values as it does with the value of your company. As industry leaders, setting meaningful personal and professional goals assure strong culture, inspire innovation and, ultimately, increase shareholder value. In this week’s MakingChips podcast, Jim Carr, Jason Zenger, and Nick Goellner each share the vision behind their own personal and professional goals for 2020 and provide inspiration on how to tackle the new year with meaning, purpose, and direction. Listen to the "guys that get dirty on the factory floor" on all major audio platforms and channels.        
1/21/202037 minutes, 9 seconds
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What to Consider Before Buying or Selling a Manufacturing Business with Mike Payne

What’s the one question to ask before making any investment decision? As leaders in the industry we are dedicated to growth, yet with quality manufacturing relying so heavily on process, it often seems safer to keep doing things the way we always have. In today’s episode of MakingChips, Jason Zenger talks mergers, acquisitions, and good ways to grow with Mike Payne, President of Hill Manufacturing and Fabrication, who spent the first half of his career buying, managing, and selling dozens of companies across multiple industries before successfully acquiring a machine shop of his own.   Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
1/14/202057 minutes, 27 seconds
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Be a Manufacturing Leader Who Leads with Team Health

A team of leaders who are not united will never reach their potential.  On today’s episode of MakingChips, the guys discuss the importance of team health after Jason Zenger shares an exercise he does with his leadership team at ZENGERS.  This exercise brings healthy conflict to the forefront of their end-of-year planning meetings. The process improves company culture and brings teams closer together by affirming what each member admires about each other and what they would like to see improved.   Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
1/7/202033 minutes, 10 seconds
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Quality Management in Manufacturing with Paul Van Metre and Michael Collins

Quality management in the manufacturing industry should be high on your list of priorities. Carr Machine & Tool is going through the auditing process with ProShop ERP to prepare for the AS9100 certification they’d like to obtain. In this episode of MakingChips, the guys will talk with Paul Van Metre and Michael Collins about ProShop ERP, AS9100, and everything you need to know to prepare for getting your shop certified.  Paul is the president of ProShop USA, and founder of Adion Systems, which develops ProShop, a web-based and paperless ERP, MES, QMS system specifically designed for elite companies in the metalworking industry. They partner with shops that seek to be elite and deliver cutting edge quality. Michael is an implementation specialist at ProShop USA, who trains clients on how to effectively use and implement ProShop in their shops. In addition, Michael provides QMS consulting in the areas of compliance, documentation, auditing and achieving management system certification such as AS 9100. Michael is also an ASQ certified quality auditor.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact ProShop takes quality management to a whole new level ProShop describes itself as a Digital Manufacturing Ecosystem (DME) that combines quality management system (QMS), enterprise resource planning (ERP), Computerized Maintenance Management System, and manufacturing execution system (MES) all in one.  Not only is ProShop ERP an all-encompassing system you need for your manufacturing business, but they are also completely paperless. The system takes you into the 21st century and helps you manage everything in one system.  This episode IS a shameless plug for ProShop because we 100% believe everyone needs to integrate it into their business—and we aren’t afraid to say it.  What you need to do to get AS9100 certified AS9100 is the international Quality Management System standard for the Aviation, Space and Defense (AS&D) industry (Rev D (2016) is the most recent version). If you want to work with the AS&D you must get your shop certified.  So what does the AS9100 certification process look like? According to Michael, you simply start with a gap assessment. He’ll come in and ask questions, look at records and evaluate where your business is currently at as far as conforming to the AS9100 requirements.  The gap assessment will help you narrow down where you need to focus and implement changes to become compliant with your quality management. According to Michael: “The whole idea of quality is continuous improvement”.  It won’t be achieved in a day, but you can take ongoing steps. There is always something to be improved upon. Be sure to listen as Michael goes into detail.  How does ProShop ERP simplify the auditing process?  All of the records that Michael needs to audit can be found within ProShop. There is no navigating through different programs or—heaven forbid—paper files. He can follow the audit trail from one thing to the next in one seamless platform.  ProShop cuts down the time it takes to do an audit to a third.  Jim points out that as a business owner, this is a weight off your shoulders. There are so many other areas where your time is better spent and if you’re decreasing the time spent on an audit bt 66% it decreases anxiety. It also allows you to get back to what you need to do much faster. Doing things paperless will become the new standard. An auditor can’t tell you that you have to use binders. Even if they aren’t familiar with ProShop, you can walk them through where to find any and all of the info they need.  ProShop raises the bar when it comes to excellence in quality ProShop integrated quality management into their system to benefit you. Here are just a few of the functionalities and updates they make that raise the bar:  They help you integrate updates into your system as revisions are made to the standard. They are always updating their ‘Flying Start’ package to reflect regulation updates. The integrate a vendor rating system so you can track the quality of the vendors that you work with. It always you to rank vendors on quality, communication, on-time delivery, and more.  ProShop offers different options to help make sure your system is secure and follows ITAR regulations (on-site server or AWS GovCloud).  We rely on ProShop ERP to automate our systems and help us go above and beyond expectations with the quality we deliver.  Listen to the whole episode for valuable information on quality management, ProShop ERP, ASQ9100 certification and much more.  Here’s The Good Stuff! What’s new at Carr Machine & Tool and Zenger’s & Black Manufacturing News: Automated Metrology by Quality Magazine Michael Collins and Paul Van Metre join Jason and Jim How Michael got started in the manufacturing industry What you need to do to get AS 9100 certified Having ProShop ERP cuts audits down to ⅓ of the time People Recognize that ProShop ERP is an efficient QMS system A conversation about the ProShop vendor rating system Is ProShop ERP a secure system? Tools & Takeaways ProShop ERP Automated Metrology by Quality Magazine American Society for Quality Amazon GovCloud ISO 9001:2015 This Week’s Superstar Guests Michael Collins on LinkedIn Paul Van Metre on LinkedIn ProShop ERP on Facebook ProShop ERP on Twitter Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
12/31/201938 minutes, 27 seconds
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Tips to Recession-Proof Your Manufacturing Business

Is it possible to recession-proof a business? With all the chatter in the economic world about the potential of a recession, how do you mitigate your losses? Are their things that you can do up-front that would help you survive a recession? Jim and Jason discuss the ‘dirty word’ in the industry and some steps you can consider implementing before—or when—a recession hits.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Why are so many NOT worried about a recession?  Many young people in the industry who dove into the workforce after 2008 don’t understand what it means to be in a recession. They haven’t lived through one. Those who remember what it felt like hate to talk or think about it. Jim points out that despite the emotion surrounding the word, it needs to be brought back into the vocabulary. Just because you avoid something doesn’t mean it won’t still happen. Jason and Jim emphasize that if you are educated and prepared a recession won’t impact you as much as it could. So what do you do? If a recession IS coming, what do you do? Jim notes that every recession he’s lived through “looks and feels a little bit different than the one before.'' The unfortunate reality is that we don’t know when a recession will come, how bad it will be, or how long it will last. When Jason’s Dad, Steve, led his business through a recession—he stopped taking a paycheck for a chunk of time. If you’re a business owner, you will have to take some hits. It’s inevitable. Jason’s dad knew he had to protect his business and employees, so he stopped paying himself to get them through the economic downturn. One way to mitigate the harshness of this reality in your own life is to build up a nest-egg. Create a savings account in case of a recession that can see you, your family, and your business through to the other side.  Labor is the #1 biggest cost in the manufacturing industry If cutting your pay isn’t enough to mitigate the financial losses, you have to address the elephant in the room: you might have to let someone go. It’s not easy to do, but sometimes it has to be done. It comes with the territory of being a business owner. It may come down to, “Who can we afford to lose?”.  Sometimes, there is a clear path. Steve Zenger had to ‘trim the fat’ in the last recession and fire a few people who were under-performing or unwilling to help them make it through the recession. If you’re not at the point where you need to make some layoffs, a tip to save some money is to reduce overtime. If you can’t afford to pay your team, you certainly can’t afford to pay time-and-a-half.  Reduce your overhead costs and develop sales skills Jason currently pays rent on three different locations for his business. He questions if a recession hits, could he consolidate locations to reduce overhead? Another option the guys point out is relocating the business somewhere with lower rent.  During the last recession, Jason’s Dad took him out for lunch, and point-blank asked: “What are you going to do about this?”. Jason wasn’t going to sit back and cry. Instead, he developed a passion for sales. If business wasn’t finding him, he was going to do everything possible to bring it in.  A recession is difficult to talk about, but Jim and Jason agree it’s stuff you need to know. A business owner must do everything they can to prepare. To hear the rest of their suggestions regarding surviving a recession, listen to the whole episode of MakingChips! Here’s The Good Stuff! Recession is a dirty word in the industry The potential of the electric vehicle Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to the Boring Bar Newsletter! America’s largest truck engine manufacturer is laying off 2,000 people Mitigating the risks that come with a recession When it comes down to reducing your labor force Jim and Jason discuss ways to lower your overhead costs Don’t get used to a lifestyle of expensive living Consider outsourcing work that isn’t profitable Tools & Takeaways Xometry Trucking Companies Going out of Business Cummins Diesel Announced Layoffs of 2,000 employees Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
12/17/201929 minutes, 40 seconds
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Job Creation in the Manufacturing Industry with Jon Klinepeter

Today’s guest on the MakingChips podcast is passionate about job creation in the manufacturing industry. Today’s youth are being pushed towards college degree—while racking up debt—which has led to $1.6 trillion in student loan debt in the country. It is staggering. Unfortunately, many students spend the majority of their working life paying off that debt.  Jon Klinepeter left a career as a Pastor to start Forrest Bradshaw Industries and the Better Good Group. His goal is to offer underprivileged youth a shot in an industry that is screaming for more labor. To hear more about his heart and mission in manufacturing, listen to the whole episode of MakingChips now! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Jon’s journey from Ministry to Machining Jon Klinepeter spent 22 years as a Pastor in Chicago (and Minneapolis, MN). He had a passion and love for the people he worked with. He was an advocate in his community. His faith has always been very important to him—but he didn’t love the church organizational structure. So he completed an MBA in Strategy and Innovation. Then, he bought a 38-year-old CNC Machining company from a Polish Immigrant.  But why machining? Jon’s grandfather was his hero growing up, and had spent his life as a machinist. According to Jon, what drew him in was “The intellect being expressed through your hands rather than through an education system that rewards a certain type of thinking”. He wanted to build a business with that thought in mind. A passion for job creation Jon’s passion is job creation, and he knows the manufacturing industry is constantly growing. Not only is it growing, but being a CNC machinist is the highest paying career you can have without a college degree. Jon wanted to take that knowledge and start creating generational opportunities for underprivileged youth. Nothing brings him greater joy than seeing the look of hope on someone’s face when they’ve been offered a job they never thought remotely possible. The purpose of Forrest Bradshaw is to inspire hope for a better future through living wage job opportunities in precision metal manufacturing. 100,000 jobs for at-risk youth is possible With his purpose and vision for Forrest Bradshaw, he launched an initiative to create 100,000 jobs for at-risk youth across the country. He wanted to inspire hope for a better future through living wage job opportunities in precision metal manufacturing. He’s watched thousands of kids walking into job fairs scared and hopeless, but leaving full of hope.  What is being offered is more than just a job, but a future.  Many kids don’t have the right guidance or mentors available to them. Those of us fortunate enough to have parents that were available had a safety net. Parents are ongoing mentors throughout our lives—but many underprivileged youths don’t get that. Providing jobs gives them hope for the next generation.  A business owner must lead with Integrity With his core vision in mind, Jon knew he had to build a business with his values at the center of everything he did. The foundational value he chose to build Forrest Bradshaw on was integrity. At times, practicing integrity can seem counter-cultural. Jon reminisced about getting some machinery fixed: The company giving him a quote for the job (that the insurance was going to cover) asked him what cut that he wanted from the quote.  With his team waiting to see what his response would be, he responded “Just whatever it costs, bill us for that”. Your integrity will cost you something. That would’ve been easy money in his pocket. Instead, he chose to honor his core values and lead with integrity.  To hear the rest of Jon’s mission, vision, core values, and advice for leaders in manufacturing, listen to the whole episode!  Here’s The Good Stuff! What would Jim do if he wasn’t at Carr Machine & Tool? What’s happening at Carr Machine & Tool  What’s new at Zenger & Black Subscribe to the Boring Bar Newsletter! Manufacturing News: Mike Rowe weighs in on student debt Why Jon Klinepeter left ministry for machining The purpose of Forrest Bradshaw Industries The core values Jon embraces in his business Jon’s advice for aspiring manufacturing leaders We chat with Mark at Xometry about ITAR compliant vs. registered Tools & Takeaways Lack of shop classes is why we’re $1.6T in student debt: Mike Rowe Technology and Manufacturing Association (TMA) International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) Registration Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation (DFAR) Connect with Mark Gallagher This Week’s Superstar Guest Forrest Bradshaw Industries Jon’s LinkedIn Better Good Group Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
12/10/201954 minutes, 51 seconds
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What Does a Successful Employee Onboarding Process Look Like?

Employee onboarding can be stressful and it’s hard to know what you should or shouldn’t be doing. What do you tell a new hire on day one? Do you start the process before their first day? When do you do performance reviews? The list of questions goes on! Today, Jim and Jason are going to walk you through the Carr Machine & Tool onboarding experience.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Hiring Millennials: A new era of employee onboarding? The overarching number of people applying to machinist jobs are millennials. For those of us in a different generation, do we need to change the way we onboard? According to Jungohr, there are some tips to make the process more successful.  Get on-board with preboarding: You can send the employee handbook and have them fill out the necessary paperwork before day one. Begin relationship-building: One fun way? Have them listen to the MakingChips Podcast! Clearly communicate: Communication is key to a successful onboarding process (this, of course, applies to every generation) Establish a sense of purpose: Millennials want to feel as if they are contributing to the greater good of the company and the world. Foster an environment where they know they are! Many of these points apply to every generation, but it’s been found to be especially impactful to Millennials. Let us know what YOU think! How to gauge if the potential hire is the best fit At Carr Machine & Tool, Jim has several ways to see if a potential hire is a fit for their culture. If he has a good feeling about a candidate, he will bring them into his weekly production meeting to see how they interact with the team. He also enjoys walking a candidate through the shop to see how they interact and engage with people. This could be labeled as “pre-boarding”—he’s involving the potential hire in his company culture before officially hiring.  If they’re not interested in engaging and don’t make an effort, you can end the process before it’s even started. It may seem time-consuming on the front-end but can save a lot of pain and problems throughout the next 30, 60, or 90 days. Make performance reviews meaningful  On a new hire’s first day, Jim lays out what the process looks like, and schedules a 30-day performance review. The first 30 days is a sort of trial period to see how they acclimate. There is no goal-setting or anything that would place pressure on the candidate. You want them to spend time shadowing (and there’s a lot of hand-holding) and learning new processes.  Jim makes sure to ask 6 different questions in the first performance review. He wants to let them know if they are on-par with expectations and see how they think they’re doing. Jim will even let them know if they are performing below expectations. The goal isn’t to be critical, but to let them know that you are going to take an active role in their success.  When should you do a compensation review? Listen to find out! Regular performance reviews are a proven process for success Within the first year an employee is hired, Jim does performance reviews at 30 days, 90 days, 6 months, and at the one-year mark. These reviews are based on goals they’ve set, improvements that were recommended, and so forth. If the employee has proven themselves exceptional, they reward the employee with a pay increase.  It allows the employee to learn new skills and be goal-driven.  The goal is to help your team members feel more connected and that they have a safe environment to grow in—you want to help them reach the next level of expertise. When you schedule reviews in a formulaic manner, it’s a structured way for both you and the employee to constantly move forward.  To hear some mistakes to avoid, be sure to listen to the rest of the episode! Here’s The Good Stuff! What’s new at Zenger! Subscribe to our newsletter: text CHIPS to 38470 4 Proven Ways to Successfully Onboard Millennial Employees The onboarding process at Carr Machine & Tool Check out Xometry’s helpful design guides! A proven process that works for Carr Mistakes to avoid making during reviews Tools & Takeaways Xometry’s Design Guide Jungohr’s Millennial Onboarding Article Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
12/3/201924 minutes, 51 seconds
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Special Re-Release: Employee Development and Retention Strategies with Jess Giudici

This re-release of one of our most popular episodes includes never released bonus content about development, retention strategies, compensation techniques and much more. Our returning guest, Jess Giudici, packs a punch with her on-point advice and skillful mastery of employee development. If you’re ready to grow and retain a team of motivated and fulfilled employees, don’t miss this special episode! Connect with us: www.MakingChips.com/contact Create development paths that aren’t leadership specific Human Resources (HR) is a faction of every company and the roles within HR can vary. On one hand, they must be focused on protecting the business. But new-school HR is about recruitment, development, training, and retention. As an employer, it is your job to make sure that the employees you’ve recruited feel understood and fulfilled in their role.  One means of doing that is crafting different development paths that allow team members to grow—that aren’t necessarily leadership. Not everyone wants to climb the career ladder with the end goal of being in leadership. How can you help individuals grow in their roles, take on more responsibility, or become more technically proficient?  To hear some of the questions that Jess recommends asking to gauge what an employee desires for their career path, keep listening! The conversation about compensation  Jess recommends having “touch-point” conversations with employees throughout the year where you gauge their engagement level and offer support. Sometimes, they may feel content with the role that they’re playing and aren’t looking to take on increased responsibility. Jess points out that this is great if they’re consistently achieving what is expected of them. But the guys ask—what if they want more money with no added responsibility? Jess takes the challenging question head-on, recommending that you be ready and equipped to answer. She points out that it’s okay to implement salary caps for positions and clearly define up-front that you understand the desire for a raise, but they are at the high end of the payscale for their position. If they would like more compensation you can start the conversation but be sure they’re aware that includes increasing responsibilities.  Jason, Jim, and Jess continue to talk about fair market value, offers from competition, and employee engagement. Don’t miss it! You need to implement two separate reviews Many businesses tend to do an “annual review” to assess employee performance and converse about the “expected” raise. Jess believes these conversations need to be split up. The annual review should only be about performance. It should be tying up loose ends regarding the conversations you’ve had throughout the year. Center the review around development and engagement. Be sure the employee knows that compensation is not part of this conversation, and they will be more engaged and open.  Compensation needs to be addressed separately, even perhaps as the employee is exceeding what is expected of them. Often, there is an expectation that an employee will get a “cost-of-living” raise, but this isn’t always the case. Your team needs to know that if they are exhibiting behaviors that detract from their productivity and performance, they may not get the expected raise. Jess points out that the team members should know that their performance has been lacking—it shouldn’t come as a surprise—and that you will work with them to further develop. Perhaps they’ll see that raise at a later date as they improve.  The guys open up a tough conversation about some of their pet peeves about expected yearly raises. Be sure to listen! Understanding employee turnover and developing retention strategies In most cases, Jim and Jason aren’t surprised when an employee announces they’re leaving, but sometimes it comes as a surprise. If an employee decides to leave unexpectedly, it’s important to know why. Were they engaged? Did they receive sufficient training? Did their pay scale not match the market? All of these questions can be incorporated into an exit interview. It allows you to reflect on your processes and making changes where necessary.  But how do you avoid employee turnover? Jess advocates for giving your employees a voice. When someone is employed in a culture where they feel validated and understood, they are likely to feel fulfilled in their role. You can cultivate a culture that gives everyone a voice while aligning with your core values. Hold round-table discussions, ask for feedback or have employees complete surveys—then be prepared to implement changes. This helps your team feel heard and respected. Jess, Jason, and Jim talk in detail about developing a culture of engagement in this episode. If you’re ready to create a company culture where no one wants to leave, this is the episode for you!  Here’s The Good Stuff! Uniting your team under the goal to constantly improve.  Manufacturing news: Millennials’ Skeptical About Manufacturing Careers Jess Giudici is back with the Metal Working Nation! Fostering a love of personal and company growth through HR development.  Understanding the individual: what drives your employees? What if someone doesn’t want to climb the career ladder? Balancing formal and informal development conversations.  Separating performance and pay reviews.  Understanding why people leave and why people stay.  Creating and cultivating a great company culture.  Bonus content: Compensation techniques with Jess Giudici.  Automated quoting process with Greg Paulson of Xometry Keeping file sharing ITAR compliant  Tools & Takeaways Millennials Skeptical About Manufacturing Careers Halogen Software Smalley ProShop ERP This Week’s Superstar Guest: Jess Giudici Jess Giudici  Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
11/26/20191 hour, 8 minutes, 3 seconds
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A Different Spin on Social Media Marketing for Manufacturers 

Is social media marketing for manufacturers really worth the effort? How should you market your brand in general? It may be hard to figure out where you fit in the social media world and what content to put out. In this episode of Making Chips, Jim and Jason talk about why social media marketing can make a positive impact on your business. Their answers aren’t what you expect! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Prioritize Self-Care above your business Jim and Jason had a scary Halloween—but not for the reason you'd expect. They were preparing to record a couple of episodes for the podcast. Instead, Jim was rushed to the ER with a case of Gastritis. Among other factors, severe stress is one of the things that contributed to his illness. Running multiple businesses and caring for unhealthy parents took a toll on him. The moral of the story? Know what’s going on with your body, and take care of yourself. As a business owner, you have an obligation to care for your company. However, it is impossible to do so if you aren’t healthy. Proper self-care should be the entrepreneur’s #1 priority. Jim is already active and watches his diet, but wasn’t limiting his stress. It was a wake-up call for him and he hopes that it’s a wake-up call for listeners as well.  Social Media marketing to promote company culture A listener pointed out that he doesn’t believe a machine shop must do any social media marketing. He doesn’t buy it. He believes that it’s a total waste of time for an industrial company. After all, what aerospace engineer goes on Facebook to look for a manufacturer? While Jim and Jason point out and understand that social media isn’t for everyone, there are some important reasons to utilize Social media.  Firstly, you’re not creating posts on Facebook to attract buyers. You are doing it to promote your company culture. You can promote new talent or offer a behind the scenes take of what your company does. Social media allows a business to share their values with the world. It is THE most effective way to do so—and costs you nothing but time.  Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn—where do you begin? As much as you may not want to give credence to the importance of the social space, they point out that people build careers in social media. Instagram influencers make thousands of dollars promoting services or products in posts. Instagram is a great model for the manufacturing space because it allows you to share visuals in a meaningful way. You can share photos of parts, people in your business, or of projects you’re working on. Or perhaps a short video of work in progress or a how-to piece. Whatever it is, it allows you to build an authentic connection with your audience. If you’re providing valuable information, social media marketing for your brand can certainly be worth the time and effort. LinkedIn can also be a useful tool to attract new talent. A new hire came across some of the content Jim had shared on LinkedIn. He saw that Jim was hiring a C & C Machinist, and messaged him about the opportunity. He already knew—based on their social media presence—that the company would be a good fit. And he was! Marketing isn’t a waste of time when done properly Marketing doesn’t necessarily reap immediate rewards as far as attracting new clients. However, the immediate reward is how it impacts your company. As you build a website or define a marketing strategy, you are defining how you want your business presented to the world. What are your values? What are your specialties? What is the #1 thing you want the general public to know about your company?  As you’re building a vision for your brand it helps lay out the vision for how you operate your business. You differentiate yourself in the industry by being different, and marketing helps you portray what makes you special. If you stand out and exploit what makes your business different, you attract the type of customers that are the right fit. They emphasize the importance of finding a good marketing agency to guide you through the process. It can make a world of difference.  Here’s The Good Stuff! Manufacturing leaders need to prioritize self care SIA latest news Social media marketing for manufacturers What can Instagram do for you? Is marketing a waste of time? Find a good marketing agency! What Upcoming episodes will look like A conversation with Peter Goguen of Xometry Tools & Takeaways ProShop ERP StoryBrand Marketing Xometry Titan Gilroy Zenger’s Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
11/12/201936 minutes, 35 seconds
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Why Manufacturing Leaders Should Employ Veterans with Andrea Biwer & Marne Deithorn

Making the decision to employ veterans may seem like a shot in the dark, but it could actually be the best hiring decision you will ever make as a manufacturing leader. Military veterans not only have the tangible leadership skills you need to grow and succeed in your business, but they also bring a rich set of attributes and experiences to the table. Making the transition from military life to a new, civilian career can be intimidating, however! Helping veterans thrive in their post-military chapters is what brought Andrea Biwer (Executive Director of the Des Plaines Chamber of Commerce) and Marne Deithorn (Director of Human Resources at the Des Plaines Rivers Casino) together to form the Veteran Boot Camp.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The “Aha moment” that created the Veterans Back to Work Boot Camp Andrea knew there was a shortage in the manufacturing workforce, but she didn’t see it as an opportunity for veterans until she watched her son and his friends come back from their service in the marines and have trouble finding work. Joining with Marne (a veteran herself!) at the Rivers Casino, the two women helped lead the charge in founding the Veterans Back to Work Boot Camp. The ten-week program is built to help and empower veterans who have given so much to our country and to fill job opportunities within various industries - including manufacturing!  A ten-week itinerary of life-changing self-discovery Over 250 veterans have applied to the boot camp since it began. 20 were chosen out of 85 applications for this past year’s program. While there are no set criteria for being accepted, Andrea and Marne explain that they painstakingly go through each application, looking for those they believe will most benefit from the experience and be committed to the learning opportunity. Those that aren’t accepted are still given access to the job fair put on by the Des Plaines Chamber of Commerce.  Mentors come alongside the veterans, sharing their own mistakes and experiences. Topics such as Who are You?, Persona, and Introversion vs. Extroversion are covered, as well as interviewing skills and resume building. Marne explains that in the military, everyone is told exactly what to do - all the time. Veterans are used to a life where they are told what to wear, where to move, and what they should do in their job. Suddenly living in a world without constant direction can be daunting. The Boot Camp endeavors to help veterans find themselves again after identifying themselves as “the military” for so long.  Employ veterans for their strengths and tangible leadership experience Andrea and Marne share that the veterans who leave the program are filled with newfound confidence and strength in their personal capabilities. The practical experiences they gain from the program, such as participation in networking events and community service projects, help give them a sense of purpose outside of the military. One of the greatest strengths of veterans is their desire for purpose - to give to something bigger than themselves. Veterans have so much to offer, and their military training and experiences have proven them to be men and women of integrity, loyalty, character, and principle. They know how to lead under pressure and how to build up those around them to greater achievements. They know how to make decisions. When you employ veterans, you aren’t just utilizing their skill-set, you are investing in the future.  Don’t stereotype - we all have things we struggle with  Unfortunately, there are many misconceived misgivings surrounding employing veterans. Firstly, veterans aren’t just line employees. Because of their military experience, they are ready for leadership positions at the get-go. While they may need to learn the details of a specific job, they already have the tangible leadership skills needed to succeed (know yourself, know your troops, and know your mission).  Secondly, not every veteran has PTSD. Andrea and Marne warn against placing veterans inside a box of mental disorders. “That negative stigma is absolutely ridiculous,” they say. Everyone has something they struggle with, and not only military members have PTSD. If you find that one of your employed veterans has some type of disorder, help them find the encouragement and aid they need.  Thirdly, not all homeless veterans have a debilitating habit that brought them to that condition. Again, everyone has struggles. Veterans are human too, and they deserve a chance. To learn more about the ways you can help give back to military veterans while also growing your business, listen to the episode!  Here’s The Good Stuff! Veterans know how to make decisions! The inspired beginnings of the Veterans Back to Work Boot Camp.  The three-fold mission of the Boot Camp.  How do veterans benefit from a mentorship-based program?  Overcoming obstacles on the road to self-discovery.  Training built to inspire and create the future.  Practical experiences make for a well-rounded education.  Unexpected reasons you should employ veterans.  How the manufacturing community can help make a difference.  Overcoming the negative stigmas surrounding employing veterans.  Tools & Takeaways Fifteen Benefits of Hiring Military Veterans Xometry ProShop ERP Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to The Boring Bar This Week’s Superstar Guests Andrea on LinkedIn Marne on LinkedIn Veterans Back to Work Boot Camp Boot Camp Videos Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
10/22/201947 minutes, 11 seconds
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Training for Performance - not Credentials with Montez King

Training to achieve top credentials has long been a goal of many in the Metal Working Nation, but what about training for performance? Montez King, Executive Director of NIMS, unpacks the power of training machinists to perform at their ultimate best. How do you measure performance? Listen to the episode to find out!  Montez grew up on the rough side of the tracks in Baltimore - eager to pursue something bigger than himself when he grew up. Encouraged by a high school instructor to pursue machining, Montez found himself learning the tricks of the trade in his high school machine shop. Over the years in various manufacturing jobs, Montez endeavored to find solutions to the issues he found riddling the manufacturing industry - namely, the habit of companies to reward their employees for hoarding their expertise. As he climbed the industry ladder, Montez encouraged a paradigm shift towards a community rich in growth, teaching, and learning.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Redefining the values: training for performance instead of credentials When Montez became the executive director at NIMS, he laid out a new mission for the organization - to train from the end. Manufacturers are always learning. Technology continues to grow at a rate that demands elite performance and an insatiable desire to learn. Montez explains that simply having a list of credentials doesn’t cut it anymore in an industry where performance equals compensation. Employers are coming up against unique problems every day that require quick and expert solutions. Performance has become the new measuring stick.  NIMS helps companies train for performance with specific goals and standards in mind. When measuring performance, they determine whether or not an individual can operate within the responsibilities of their job description while drawing upon the competencies associated with that job. The training isn’t just for the sake of training. It’s training with a specific performance goal in mind.  Empowering the standards while building the performance  Manufacturing leaders know that they can’t wander aimlessly when trying to improve their teams. There needs to be a goal - a standard of achievement. NIMS takes this need for standards and applies it to their performance measurement, creating training methods that enable the trainee to meet the performance goals of the employer. Trainees leave with the ability to make an analysis of the task at hand and to apply their expertise based upon their best judgment of the tools, time, and needs within their environment.  Montez makes it clear that standards should not be held above performance. The answer to the employer’s needs is the competent and consistent performance of the trained individual. Credentials are awarded to individuals who complete the training and meet the performance standards so that the trainee is recognized for their hard work, while also meeting the needs of the employer. It’s a win-win for everyone involved. It’s a three-way stop in the NIMS stakeholder environment  In order to make the performance training at NIMS a true win-win, Montez has helped create a stakeholder environment in his company’s training methods. Using the image of three bars, each one stands for a stakeholder in the training: the employer, the trainer, and the trainee. Everyone is reaching for the same goal, and each one is held accountable for their part in the deal. Validation is achieved when the trainee can draw upon the competencies they have learned and can successfully apply them to the environment that their employer has defined for them. The employer is responsible for establishing the standards, the trainer is responsible for creating a training method that builds performance and skill, and the trainee is responsible for mastering the craft and competence in applying knowledge to real-life situations. All three bars have to measure up. When one falls short - they all fall short.  NIMS is building an exciting opportunity for manufacturing teams at IMTS 2020 To Montez, performance measurement is preventative maintenance! In order to push the Metal Working Nation to the next level, NIMS will be hosting a one-of-a-kind challenge at the IMTS 2020 trade show. The goal will be to measure the performance of a team, since teamwork is such a vital part of the manufacturing industry. This PM will require multiple skill-sets to come together to design, create, and produce a task that will then be voted upon by the IMTS crowd. In accordance with the NIMS training methodology, the competition will include standards, inspections, and requirements modeled after real-life challenges. What’s the reward? You’ll have to find out at IMTS 2020!  Here’s The Good Stuff! From Baltimore to NIMs - Montez’s manufacturing story.  The detrimental trend of hoarding knowledge.  Changing the culture and mission of NIMS.  Measuring performance instead of credentials.  Creating a win-win training method for employer and employee. The magic of entanglement in training.  The importance of having standards and reliable methods.  It’s the employer’s job to define the desired performance standard.  NIMS is offering an exciting opportunity at IMTS 2020! Tools & Takeaways IMTS 2020 Rockford Rescue Mission Offers New Manufacturing Training Program Xometry ProShop ERP Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to The Boring Bar This Week’s Superstar Guest: Montez King Montez on LinkedIn Biographical video on Montez’s journey to NIMS NIMS Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
10/15/20191 hour, 2 minutes, 41 seconds
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Creating Company Presence through Value-Driven Content Marketing with Chris Fox

Content marketing provides an opportunity to expand your business and to offer something of value to the manufacturing community around the world. Chris Fox, the creative director at MakingChips, shares why every manufacturing leader should be investing in the development of a strong and value-driven content marketing strategy. It’s all about building your online presence as a company and growing your audience.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Provide content marketing with value to those that need your expertise Content marketing has grown from only a couple of usable platforms to several powerful mediums for sharing what your business offers - from products to educational knowledge. Blogging, social media, and YouTube are all avenues for content marketing. The goal is to establish the presence of your business and brand, while also meeting the needs of the Metal Working Nation. Chris explains that learning and teaching are things that every machinist and manufacturing leader can benefit from. Every manufacturing business has expertise and wisdom to share with the manufacturing community. Don’t be afraid to begin documenting the story of your company as you create, make mistakes, and overcome obstacles. Your knowledge can easily become rich building material for content marketing!  Create authentic content that offers a valuable return on investment Your audience craves and needs original, authentic content to help them accomplish their work at their very best. Being natural in your content marketing is vital. People easily see through facades and glossy content. Be honest and provide real solutions to real problems through your content marketing. If you want your audience to invest their time in watching your videos, reading your blog, or re-tweeting your twitter post, then you need to provide a valuable ROI.  Chris encourages listeners to put aside the notion of proprietary secrets. The goal is to grow as a manufacturing community - while also building your reputation as a brand. Value-driven content marketing can help establish your reputation as a trustworthy source for knowledge and product.  Vlogging helps establish credibility with your audience  Vlogging is blogging in a video format - most often through YouTube. The true value in a blog comes from the individuals in your business. Content marketing doesn’t have to be formal or impressively polished. Being real is vital, and showcasing the talent and knowledge of individual team members can help establish credibility with your audience.  Chris explains how to navigate the nuances of vlogging as a manufacturing company. Being honest with the titles of your videos is key. If your title claims to answer a question, make sure that the video actually answers it. Google is now smart enough to read the transcript of your video and match it with the title. If those two factors don’t match up, Google is less likely to promote your video.  The length of your videos should be tailored to the needs of your audience. If it takes an hour to demonstrate the solution to a real problem, then your video should be an hour long. If it only takes three minutes, then only create three minutes. Lots of ads and fluff in your videos will turn your audience away and detract from your credibility. Above all, be honest and be concise.  Equip and inspire your audience - and your team The value in content marketing is derived from the desire to give without thought of receiving anything in return. Take the time to understand what your customers, partners, and team members need. Know what platforms they use and what types of mediums they are most likely to engage with. While you may not be able to kick off a content marketing strategy that utilizes YouTube, LinkedIn, TikTok, and Facebook all at once, you can certainly start with one. Don’t have expensive camera equipment to film? Use your phone! Bring in the team and refer to their feedback when developing material. Companies aren’t people, but they are made up of people. Make sure that you are providing excellent content by ensuring that you are not only promoting your brand but also equipping and inspiring.  Here’s The Good Stuff! Why Jim and Jason see MakingChips as a way to pour back into the Metal Working Nation.  Introducing Chris Fox: Creative Director at MakingChips Is all marketing content marketing? The valuable knowledge that manufacturers have to share.  Tracking your marketing performance through content marketing platforms.  People want value - not excess material.  Knowing what platform is best for your company’s needs. Building credibility through vlogging.  How important is the title of your vlog video? Showcasing the people in your business - not just your products.  Gaging the appropriate length for your video.  Learning how to tag your videos.  Tools & Takeaways What Is Content Marketing? MakingChips on YouTube Xometry ProShop ERP Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to The Boring Bar This Week’s Superstar Guest: Chris Fox Creative Director at MakingChips Chris on LinkedIn Chris on Twitter Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
10/8/201944 minutes, 5 seconds
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A Manufacturing Career Could be the Answer for Those Willing to Learn with Sarah Wierman

Choosing a new career path or education route can be intimidating, but a manufacturing career may just provide the perfect solution! Sarah Wierman shares her inspiring story and helpful insights into joining the manufacturing industry and how being willing to learn and ask questions can open up new and exciting opportunities. Be sure to listen to the episode for a unique look into changing career paths and learning the ropes of manufacturing from a beginner’s perspective.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact From deaf studies to a manufacturing career: Sarah’s story of embracing change  Working on obtaining her bachelor’s degree in deaf studies, Sarah tried a job in sign language and teaching but found that she hated it. She decided to take a break from her education and took a job in sales at Raptor Workholding on the recommendation of a friend. Little did she know that she would soon fall in love with the manufacturing industry and find her new passion and calling.  The initial appeal in a sales job was the travel opportunities. Sarah soon discovered that manufacturing was more than producing and delivering products. It was creativity and masterful workmanship created to meet an incredibly wide spectrum of needs - from replacing knees to providing building supplies. Inspired, Sarah took it upon herself to learn as much as she could about the industry and asked questions of everyone she met. “I never stopped talking to people,” she shares. Vendor shows and visiting other shops to sell live tooling afforded her plenty of opportunities to deepen her knowledge of machining.  Don’t confuse lack of experience with the inability to take action When Sarah first began her job as a sales rep at Raptor, she didn’t even know what a CNC machine was. After a year of intense learning and diving into the new world of manufacturing, she realized that she wanted to stay in the industry long-term. Her eagerness to learn opened new doors, and she took a job as the regional manager at MD Tooling. “Your lack of experience in the industry doesn’t make you ignorant,” she says. “It makes you eager.” If you find that you truly want to be a part of the manufacturing industry, then you need to be willing to take on the responsibility of learning - and learning well. Listen to the episode to learn more about why Sarah fell in love with machining and why she decided to pursue a manufacturing career. Sarah’s positive experience as a woman in the manufacturing industry  Even though there are many women in the manufacturing industry, it still isn’t common. Sarah shares her experiences entering into and growing in an industry that is still considered a man’s world. “It is what you make of it,” she says. Even though some of the people she worked with initially found her presence odd, there was never any hostility or opposition. Once her fellow workers discovered that Sarah was willing to learn and put her best foot forward in every job and customer encounter, they embraced her unique perspectives and place within the team.  Sarah shares that while it can be intimidating entering a workforce made up almost entirely of men as a young woman, the important thing to focus on is the experience that you are offering customers and your teammates. View obstacles as challenges and find ways to overcome them. It’s about being collaborative and willing to find the solution and solve the problems that arise. Everyone has something unique to offer, and being confident in one’s perspective - while also acting and speaking in humility - will take you farther than you ever thought possible.  Use unique avenues to learn something new Learning about a new career opportunity can be daunting. Sarah shares some tips for exploring the manufacturing industry as a new career. Mentors can be invaluable in helping you navigate how to get started, who to talk to, and how to put your best foot forward. Investing in relationships should be a key component of your entire career, but especially when starting out. You will always need others to help you and provide a place for you to seek advice. Never stop asking questions and making room for edifying voices in your life.  Social media isn’t just a business marketing tool. It can be a learning tool for exploring new career paths as well! Sarah explains how she began an Instagram page for Raptor Workholding and soon discovered other manufacturing-related pages from which she learned an invaluable amount of insight and skill. Don’t be intimidated by having to learn a new industry. Put yourself out there. Use social media to learn more about the culture and the skills required. Ask questions and make it fun! Manufacturing isn’t just about the products. It’s about the people, meeting the needs of those across the nation and the world, and creating something beautiful out of ordinary hunks of metal.  Here’s The Good Stuff! A massive career change led Sarah to discover her true passion.  The importance of taking responsibility for your own education.  Live tooling allows machinists to take their tooling to the next level.  Appreciating the creative side of manufacturing.  Being a woman in the manufacturing industry.  Recognizing that everyone has a unique perspective.  The importance of mentors in launching your career.  Using social media as a marketing and learning tool.  Being brave enough to step out and ask questions. Tools & Takeaways ProShop ERP Xometry NIMS, Festo Didactic to develop Industry 4.0 skills standards The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe! This Week’s Superstar Guest: Sarah Wierman Sarah on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
10/1/201937 minutes, 22 seconds
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Elevating Knowledge through How-To Manufacturing Videos with Mark Terryberry, Bryan O’Fallon, & Scott Gasich

HAAS Automation is leading the way in how-to manufacturing videos as an education tool for manufacturing leaders around the globe - as well as a content marketing tool to demonstrate how to use the newest HAAS equipment. Guest speakers Mark Terryberry, Bryan O’Fallon, and Scott Gasich share their video-making and content marketing expertise in this fascinating episode of MakingChips! Want to learn what makes a great how-to video and how sharing your knowledge can help boost your business? Listen to the episode to find out!  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Trading manuals for how-to manufacturing videos After a couple of hit how-to YouTube videos demonstrating how to solve simple manufacturing issues, the HAAS Automation marketing team realized that there was no place for manufacturers to go to learn how to do new things or fix things outside of paper manuals. Jumping on the “video craze” bandwagon, they set out to fill the void of immediately available machining instruction by offering quality how-to and product video content.  Quickly finding that people prefer short, to-the-point videos, the HAAS team created short video series on different topics. They now average 4-5 videos per week with several series from “Tip of the Day” to “Don’t Fear 5-Axis” and the “Machine Tool Coolant Series.” Manufacturers today need quickly available and accurate demonstrations to help them master their art and easily find solutions. YouTube offers the medium that HAAS needs to accomplish its goal of meeting the needs of the manufacturing community while also marketing their latest products.  Overcoming roadblocks with authenticity  It can be overwhelming when trying to decide how much production value to put into video content creation. How polished do you make how-to manufacturing videos? Mark, Bryon, and Scott all share the need to be authentic with your audience. Just because you make a video doesn’t mean that people will watch it. Know who you are as a company and know who your customers and potential viewers are. What do they need and want to learn?  How-to manufacturing videos are a way to build trust with current and potential customers. If you are providing real solutions to real problems, then you will earn the trust of your viewers. Mark, Bryon, and Scott encourage listeners to use real-life machinists in their video production. The authentic empathy that machinists will have with viewer issues will come through in the videos and provide an added layer of reality and authenticity.  Using the needs of viewers as inspiration  Listening to your viewers is key! While the manufacturing community may still be pretty old-school, everyone consumes online material, and everyone is looking for answers through mediums such as YouTube. Be sure to read the comments people are leaving in your channel. Provide a phone number and email address so that viewers and customers have a way of reaching out with questions. Use your own company’s mistakes as opportunities for creating new content that demonstrates how to solve the problems you come up against.  Making the shift from traditional marketing to content marketing  Scott says that with digital marketing, you have to jump right in and get at it. While print marketing may still claim a slice of your resources, put most of your resources in digital marketing. With $3,000 of Facebook marketing, you can reach a million people. With $3,000 invested in print marketing, you may reach a few thousand. Invest in what works. Don’t know where to start? “Follow your gut,” says Scott. Think about how you would want the material presented to you. “Bet on yourself,” he says. Don’t go spend a fortune on production value right away. Use your phone and some good lighting tools and go from there. Build a script or storyboard to help guide the way. Speaking with passion and truth will win the trust of your viewers and help you build your business.  Here’s The Good Stuff! MakingChips receives rave reviews on iTunes! The shift from traditional marketing to video content marketing.  HAAS Automation as an early adopter of the video craze. Creating a needed learning space for manufacturers.  Overcoming the roadblocks of creating new video content.  Gleaning material from viewer feedback.  Why content marketing is the most effective way to reach your audience.  The behind-the-scenes of shooting a YouTube video.  Operator Certification through video training series.  Augmented reality may be the future of content marketing.  Tools & Takeaways Los Angeles is Largest Manufacturing Center in U.S., Government Says ProShop ERP Xometry This Week’s Superstar Guests Mark on LinkedIn Bryan on LinkedIn Scott on LinkedIn HAAS Automation HAAS YouTube Channel Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
9/24/201958 minutes, 13 seconds
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Closing the Manufacturing Skills Gap by Inspiring the Next Generation with Hernan Ricaurte, Brian Grigson & Brian Pendarvis

How can the Metal Working Nation close the manufacturing skills gap? As the manufacturing industry continues to grow with the demand for fast and excellent production, it is imperative that the proper skills be found, fostered, and taught. Even with the desirable technological sophistication of the modern manufacturing world, young talent isn’t being found quickly enough to fill the gap left by the retirement of the Baby Boomer generation.  Jim and Jason brainstorm with guest speakers Hernan Ricaurte (Owner of Ricaurte Precision), Brian Grigson (General Manager of Axxis Corporation), and Brain Pendarvis (Owner of Pendarvis Manufacturing) about how manufacturing leaders can take action to influence the next generation of machinists. Be sure to listen to the entire episode to catch the best insights into the real and persisting problem of the manufacturing skills gap!  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Putting a finger on the pulse of the manufacturing skills gap Ricaurte, Grigson, and Pendarvis all agree that the skills gap is certainly a major issue of the modern manufacturing world. The “great wave” is here; the older are retiring and the younger aren’t qualified or aren’t interested. Pendarvis shares the struggle of finding talent skilled in the newest manufacturing technology. Leaders know that you can’t just stick anyone on your CNC machines. While the skills gap is a real and present problem, it doesn’t have to remain that way.  Changing the perception of manufacturing is the first step. Most high schoolers don’t even know that trade school for CNC machining or similar work is an option. Many still think that they have to go to college to have a meaningful career. Manufacturing, however, offers so much at such little training cost. Building bridges with your community is the first step to closing the skills gap. Give presentations at the local middle and high schools, invite schools to tour your facilities and show them that what they need - and want - in a career can be found in manufacturing. “It’s not always money that people want,” says Grigson. A clean environment, security, incentives, and evident room for company growth are all attributes that can help your business attract young talent.  Effective training is grounded in effective culture  Who are you as a company? What is your niche? While there is a skills issue, it is important to only hire the skills that you need. What is your company culture? The culture that you want to foster within your business begins with you as the leader. One challenge created by the skills gap is finding someone who is not only talented but also a good fit within your company. Having more experienced employees shadow and oversee the work of new hires or interns provides the opportunity for not only the skills - but for the culture - to be taught.  Ricaurte shares the lessons he learned from studying the manufacturing culture of Japanese machinists. Fostering a culture of accountability and excellence if key. Attention to detail, respect for one another, and the willingness to learn are all necessary to an effective workplace Training the younger generation within that culture will help produce the future talent that you need. Don’t forget to listen to the rest of the episode for more insight into fostering effective culture! What makes a great modern machinist?  It actually depends on the work and skill-set required! With the advancement of technology, the skill sets needed by manufacturers grows more diverse. While not everyone will be adept in all areas of machining, they always need to be willing to learn and grow. Curiosity is a sign of a great future machinist. While genuine curiosity, humility, excellent work ethic, and personal drive are all hard to detect in an interview, they should be attributes that you are striving to discover.  Running an apprenticeship or internship program at your shop is also a highly effective way to discover and nurture new talent. Involve high schoolers in your company’s growth and demonstrate to them the future possibilities within manufacturing. Hiring part-time can also be a good tactic to see if you and your new employee are a good long-term fit.  Finding and providing opportunity in unlikely places Your local high school isn’t the only place to find potential future talent to invest in. Underprivileged communities are gold when it comes to finding young people with the passion and drive to try something unconventional - such as attending trade school to learn CNC machining. There are bright, curious minds everywhere! Many kids don’t know that manufacturing is even an option among today’s career paths. Manufacturing leaders need to begin investing in and inspiring the talent and ability of young people.  Yes, the manufacturing skills gap is a problem, but it’s not insurmountable. Listen to the full episode to learn more about how you can make a difference in inspiring the next generation of manufacturers!  Here’s The Good Stuff! Preparing for the retirement of the Baby Boomer generation.  Do the challenges created by the skills gap affect all parts of the country equally?  The tie between the skills gap and advancing technology.  Knowing your niche gives you vision in knowing what talent to pursue.  The challenges surrounding changing the old perception of manufacturing.  Different strategies for finding the right fit.  What you should be looking for in a potential hire.  What you value may differ with each job opening.  Creative inspiration for the next generation of manufacturers.  Tools & Takeaways 2018 Skills Gap Report NTMA Training Centers ProShop ERP Xometry The Boring Bar newsletter: Text CHIPS to 38470 This Week’s Superstar Guests Hernan Ricaurte on LinkedIn Ricaurte Precision Brian Pendarvis on LinkedIn Pendarvis Manufacturing Brian Grigson on LinkedIn Axxis Corporation Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
9/17/20191 hour, 4 minutes, 19 seconds
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Thriving as a Manufacturing Entrepreneur with John Saunders

Being a manufacturing leader is difficult, especially if you are a manufacturing entrepreneur! With so many possible opportunities and pitfalls, it can be hard to know how to navigate the small-business world of an entrepreneur. Guest speaker, John Saunders, shares his insight and experience as a leading manufacturing entrepreneur and the ways he has successfully set his business apart and thrived through slow growth.  Founder and owner of Saunders Machine Works, John is a serial entrepreneur with his hands in multiple jobs, including running the NYC CNC YouTube channel and overseeing the training and manufacturing sides of his small business. His YouTube channel has become a medium to influence, inspire, and encourage aspiring and seasoned machinists in their careers.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Defining the “why” helps drive the business forward Although he attended college to learn entrepreneurship, John found that his key takeaways came from practical experience in selling and machining. Originally wanting to create a business in order to provide a specific product, he quickly realized that creating an excellent product isn’t the same as creating an excellent business. In order to generate a successful business, you have to know the “why” behind the work and the products created.  Entrepreneurship isn’t for the faint of heart. John advises that if you are having doubts as to whether or not you really want to work for yourself and jump into the world of paperwork, legality issues, building, training, hiring, producing, and customer service, then you may want to work for someone else for a couple of years. Study how your boss leads and drives their business forward - and then go try it for yourself.  John’s business - Saunders Machine Works - grew out of his love for CNC machining and sharing its workhorse capability with viewers on YouTube via his NYC CNC channel. Continuing with the YouTube channel, he wanted a business that could also train individuals in machining and sell manufacturing tools and products. The three-part business has kept up steady - yet slow growth - just as John wants it.  Knowing when to jump at an opportunity and when to say NO Keeping a focus on who you are and why you do what you do helps you to navigate the way forward. Instead of chasing every glittering opportunity, consider whether or not it will help fulfill the goals of your business or help create a better experience for your customers. What you are selling isn’t just the object in the box - it’s the atmosphere, relationship, and experience that you are offering your customers.  For John, this means finding the best ways to share the modern world of manufacturing with others. His YouTube channel provides a place for machinists of all experience levels to ask questions, easily view videos that demonstrate solutions to popular machining problems, and be a part of the manufacturing community. The training classes that Saunders Machine Works offers provide practical experience in a variety of machining skills and open the door to both young and old to explore manufacturing as a hobby or career. John’s business also values offering internship and apprenticeship-modeled jobs to those who need practical experience through their product manufacturing side of Saunders Machine Works.  The goal in sorting through opportunities is to make continuous improvements in your processes - to make them as efficient and streamlined as possible - all without wasting resources. Bootstrapping is the ability of your business to leverage your equity for the greatest return on investment. Money and time are ever manufacturing entrepreneur’s most limited resources. In some phases of your business, you may find that you are lower in one of those resources than another. If you have the opportunity to grow in your knowledge and skills as a master of your trade, take them! Don’t be wasteful. Invest with results.  John’s take on managing growth as a manufacturing entrepreneur “Growth eats cash for breakfast,” John warns. We are trained to think that any growth opportunity is a good opportunity, but it’s wiser and more profitable to consider each one through the lens of your “why.” With such a large following, John often gets calls offering partnerships with other businesses. Due to a poor partnership experience in his early entrepreneurial days, John has decided to never partner with another business. The true 50/50 partnership is rare and often difficult to maintain. That doesn’t mean you should never try it, but know where you want your business to go and maintain integrity with those goals through your growth tactics. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for more insight into making the best growth decisions possible. Creating content that reflects your company’s values and meets your customers’ needs It can be easy for entrepreneurs to become overwhelmed by all the marketing and advertising mediums available. John stresses the importance of only utilizing what you need, what you can afford, and what will speak most authentically to your potential customers. John aligns his content creation with his goal to help others help themselves in their manufacturing stories. Be honest about what you are portraying through social media. Authenticity is a huge factor; make it a point to share the stories that surround the challenges that your business has faced and the solutions that you found. Make note of what you are personally drawn to on social media and study why you like it. At the end of the day, it’s not about you. It’s about your current and potential customers and the quality of what you are offering them.  Here’s The Good Stuff! Fostering a positive atmosphere among a multigenerational workforce.  Guest speaker, John Saunders - owner of Saunders Machine Works. The product isn’t always the business.  Knowing how to market yourselves requires a knowledge of who you are as a business.  YouTube, training, and machining. What you sell isn’t just the product in the box - it’s the experience you offer. Hands-on experience provides the best education.  John’s love of CNC machining and sharing what modern manufacturing looks like. The apprenticeship model of training provides key experiences. Why John says “no” to partnership opportunities.  “Growth eats cash for breakfast” - knowing the goal in your growth.  Using bootstrapping to reduce wasted resources and to grow where you are at.  Good content creation is about knowing your goals and customers.  The role of small businesses in the future of manufacturing.  “If you’re not making mistakes, you’re not making money.”  Tools & Takeaways How To Create a Thriving Workplace Culture podcast episode Small Business, Big Potential The E-Myth Revisited How To Win Friends & Influence People ProShop ERP Xometry This Week’s Superstar Guest: John Saunders John on LinkedIn Saunders Machine Works NYC CNC NYC CNC YouTube Channel Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
9/10/20191 hour, 5 seconds
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Machining Trade Schools Offer an Exciting Alternative to Traditional College Educations with Kurt Preisandanz & Lee Norton

With college skyrocketing in price every year, machining trade schools offer an affordable and promising solution to those looking for a meaningful - and even lucrative - career path. Kurt Preisendanz is the Director of Training at the NTMA Training Centers in Southern California. Passionate about sharing the opportunities that machining has to offer the next generation, Kurt explains the challenges that trade schools face and ways that manufacturing leaders can help lead the charge in alternative higher education. Lee Norton is a board member of the California Manufacturing Workforce Foundation, a 501c3 charity that uses their donations to provide tuition and funding to currently enrolled students who are pursuing technical careers. Be sure to listen to this inspiring and insightful episode to learn more about the amazing option of machining trade schools and how you can make a difference.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Overcoming the misperception that trade schools aren’t good enough  Kurt shares the struggles that he faces when representing the NTMA Training Centers at job fairs and high schools. Many parents and teachers push their children towards universities and traditional college paths because they believe those are the best options available. Trade schools are often looked down upon as not good enough for promising students or as a legitimate gateway into a successful career. Kurt explains that this is mostly an American view, as Europe has long viewed learning and mastering a trade as a proper way to begin a career and life as an adult.  Lee shares that while his children are attending university, they have a clear goal in mind. The problem isn’t that the traditional college route is wrong - it’s that it is often wasted and is perceived as the only path to success. That simply isn’t the case. Both Lee and Kurt believe that low trade school attendance and acceptance has to do with the fact that people simply don’t understand the value of what is being taught. The manufacturing world, especially, is still viewed as the dirty factory work that we all want to avoid and escape. Manufacturing, however, has become one of the most modernized and technological industries in the world. The robotics, engineering, building, and software developed and utilized within the manufacturing industry is extremely cutting-edge. The challenge is to overcome the misperceptions surrounding trade schools and machining and to effectively share the opportunity of a machining certification.  Machining trade schools offer modern, effective, and exciting opportunities  Forget the old days of dirty shop floors and being “doomed” to dangerous factory work. The modern world of machining and manufacturing is filled with incredible technology. Kurt explains that while students in machining trade schools are required to learn all the basics of machining, they are exposed to the many specializations that are available, including robotics, CNC machining, inspection, Master CAM, and CMM. Every one of NTMA’s students learns turning and milling and the fundamentals of machining so that they understand how everything is made. The program can be completed in as little as seven months, with daily hands-on instruction. Students graduate with a certification and are guided and encouraged in their job-finding journey. Many leave with job offers and the promise of an exciting and lucrative future.  Enabling and inspiring the next generation of manufacturing leaders to take action  Both Kurt and Lee believe that there is light at the end of the tunnel concerning the skills gap in the manufacturing industry. Many are beginning to understand and view a machining career as a valid and exciting opportunity. Kurt ensures that his presentations at job fairs and high schools accurately depict the advanced technological atmosphere that is machining. He shares the diverse culture of the manufacturing world as well. It’s not just men, but women as well, who are finding meaningful work in an industry where their talents are valued. Both young and old are finding new purpose and life in manufacturing. Lee knows that the manufacturing industry is all about giving back. Many who are in the industry grew up in it and have been a part of the Metal Working Nation for generations. Lee and Kurt believe that investing in the next generation of machinists is vital to the health of the industry. Being able to provide scholarships to currently enrolled students in technical fields of study is a huge part of keeping the manufacturing future strong. Be sure to listen to the whole episode for ideas on how you - as a manufacturing leader - can get involved!  Guiding students’ expectations towards a stable and meaningful future Kurt explains that many of the students who go to the NTMA training centers are excited about the opportunities ahead. Kurt makes sure, however, that they understand the level of hard work required. No, they aren’t going to make 100k in their first couple of years as machinists, but what they do have to look forward to is a lifelong career built on engaging and purposeful work. They can grow as fast as they want in the industry - there’s no limit to what they can learn and accomplish. They are investing in a career that can offer them a sense of pride in their labor and skillset, opportunities in aerospace and government - all while supplying them with a stable career that will enhance their marriage and family life. It takes work. But what an incredible opportunity!  Here’s The Good Stuff! The college price-tag keeps climbing. NTMA Training Centers provide an alternative education route.  The California Manufacturing Workforce Foundation enables students to achieve their goals. Why do parents and teachers continue to look down on trade schools?  Machining trade schools help close the manufacturing skills gap.  Technological advancements in manufacturing are enticing incentives.  The diverse and rich culture of the manufacturing industry.  Machining trade schools offer a promising and lucrative future.  Tools & Takeaways Price of College Increasing Almost 8 Times Faster Than Wages Xometry Design Guides The Boring Bar Newsletter - Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe!  This Week’s Superstar Guests: Kurt Preisendanz & Lee Norton Kurt on LinkedIn Lee on LinkedIn NTMA Training Center California Manufacturing Workforce Foundation Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
8/28/201940 minutes, 26 seconds
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Industrial Vending Machines are Optimizing Manufacturing Processes with Steve Pixley

Another amazing form of automation is here - the industrial vending machine! Guest speaker Steve Pixley - Founder & CEO of AutoCrib - dives into why vending machines are the Metal Working Nation’s new best friend on the shop floor. From solving the issue of lost tools and parts to supplying a charging station for electronics, industrial vending machines will help manufacturing leaders take their businesses to the next level of efficiency and safety.  Here’s The Good Stuff! Industrial vending machines are projected to rise in popularity.  The new way to manage inventory.  Steve’s manufacturing story - from sales to automation technology.  Solving the issue of stockouts on the shop floor.  Helping minimize FOD: Foreign Object Debris.  Overcoming the roadblocks to installing an industrial vending machine. From calibrated drill bits to police tasers.  Vending machines are simply another type of awesome robot.    Tools & Takeaways Xometry ProShop ERP Industrial Vending Machines   This Week’s Superstar Guest: Steve Pixley AutoCrib Steve on LinkedIn   Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube   Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify    
8/20/201935 minutes, 37 seconds
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Utilizing Artificial Intelligence for Efficient Data Collection with Akshat Thirani

Data collection has taken many forms in the history of manufacturing, and now is the time to embrace the most efficient form yet - artificial intelligence. Guest speaker, Akshat Thirani, shares how he solved the software disparity between computer engineers and manufacturers and created a tool to enable manufacturing leaders to meet their goals as efficiently as possible. AI isn’t something to fear. Without change - nothing will happen in your business! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact From India to Chicago: Akshat’s manufacturing journey Growing up in India, Akshat’s childhood was saturated in the manufacturing industry. All of his family and friends had some part in the local manufacturing and production business, and his father raised his children with a manufacturer's mindset. With manufacturing in his blood, Akshat set off for college at the age of 17, studying design engineering and computer software. It was at school that he first noticed the gaping disparity between what computer software engineers were utilizing and what leading manufacturing engineers were using - even though the manufacturers were handling some of the most complex and technical work in the world. Akshat knew he needed to create a tool that would enable manufacturers to work and live to their full potential - a tool that would help them track production time, maintenance, and the data produced by their machines.  Why manufacturers need to embrace AI and more efficient data collection  Akshat understood that it was no trivial thing to join an AI tool to a machine and start collecting data. Many shops utilize both old and new machinery - making the job of AI more difficult. Akshat knew that the tool he was creating needed to be simple and able to read the “heartbeat” of each machine and distinguish what job was being completed.  The “heartbeat” of a machine is the signature electrical current that it produces. During his senior year in college, Akshat and some of his colleagues created the prototype AI tool he had dreamed of. It eventually became the answer to the machinist’s problems with efficient data collection. Instead of jotting down on pieces of paper or having to manually insert data about a machine or job into an Excel spreadsheet, AI can be hooked up to a machine and learn the heartbeat of specific jobs and functions. AI then transmits that data to a centralized, online platform through cellular data - allowing the manufacturing team to quickly read the pulse on their machinery and work.  Meeting the needs of the Metal Working Nation through artificial intelligence  Every individual on a manufacturing team has expertise that is wasted when they are required to spend time collecting, recording, and analyzing data from each machine. Instead of having the professionals do the busywork, AI can read, transmit, organize, and analyze the data outsourced by the machinery. Providing real-time data to team members, Akshat’s AI tools can record the speed of each machine being used, which machines need maintenance, the estimated timetable for a piece or job, and the reasons why a machine is not running at optimum capacity. Meeting the core manufacturing goals of simplicity and practicality, AI is something that the leaders of the Metal Working Nation need to be taking seriously and educating themselves on.  Ensuring that your technology fits your company goals  Every manufacturing business will have different long-term goals and immediate needs. Akshat encourages listeners to walk through their shops and talk with their team members to identify what needs to be accomplished through an AI tool such as Akshat’s. Calculating the cost of integrating AI into the system may be surprisingly less than what is being spent on manual data collection. Identify what you need to accomplish work more efficiently - and then make it happen. Because if you’re not making chips, you’re not making money!  Here’s The Good Stuff! If you don’t change, nothing will happen.  Artificial intelligence is helping manufacturers pave the way forward.  Guest speaker Akshat Thirani - CEO of Amper Technologies.  Akshat’s love for manufacturing is a generational story.  Solving the disparity between online software and manufacturing tools.  Solving the code of machinery heartbeats.  Creating a more efficient workspace for all members of the team.  Know what the goal is - then take action.  Tools & Takeaways Xometry Supplies ProShop ERP How AI and IIoT Will Provide Insights to Manufacturers Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to The Boring Bar newsletter This Week’s Superstar Guest: Akshat Thirani Amper Technologies, Inc. Akshat Thirani on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
8/12/201940 minutes, 2 seconds
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Developing Machining Automation Systems in the THINC Developers Group with Randy Jokerst & Brad Klippstein 

With so many automation systems available, it can be hard to know which to use to meet your specific goals and needs as a manufacturing leader. Guest speakers Randy Jokerst and Brad Klippstein share how the THINC Developers Group enables the Metal Working Nation to perform at its best by solving manufacturing leaders’ problems through innovation.  Randy is the Director of Technical Services at Hartwig Inc. and one of the founding members of the THINC Development Group. Entering the manufacturing world by way of CNC engineering, he has used his gifting in engineering to amp up machinist’s efficiency by implementing automation systems into new machines. Also an engineer, Brad Klippstein is the Supervisor of the Okuma Product Specialist Group. His manufacturing journey began when he visited a machine tool fair fresh out of college and was asked if he wanted to program robots. Hooked, Brad dove into developing new technology and applications at the forefront of the programming world.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The THINC Developers Group brainstorms the automation systems of the future  Having trouble creating efficient processes or closing the skills gap of the next manufacturing generation? Founded in 2008, the THINC Developers Group was created to solve the issues of the Metal Working Nation and provide the cutting-edge applications needed to automate manufacturing systems. The THINC control for machining systems was originally PC-based, and while the developers understood how to navigate and decipher the data collected by the control, most users were unable to view what the control was collecting. The development group was created to enable customers to build their own control interface apps so that they could use the control system to meet their unique needs. The THINC group’s focus is on the communication between the machine tool side and the PC side - teaching people to write the apps to accomplish their machining goals.  The Okuma Sampling Path utilizes automation systems for optimal efficiency  Better efficiency is something manufacturing leaders are constantly working towards. One way to improve efficiency while also pouring into your team’s adaptability and performance is to automate the jobs that take away from time that your team can spend in their specific areas of expertise. Limiting distractions by utilizing automation systems to set and send reminders can also boost efficiency levels. Randy talks about how one of the U.S. mints had three separate operations that moved parts from one machine to the next to make the coin dies. Using an automation system developed by the THINC group, they were able to combine their operations into a three-machine/one robot cell that produced all the parts within hours instead of days.  Many of Okuma Inc.’s developments have come from the THINC Developers Group. Through the MyOkuma app, you can integrate the Okuma tools into your systems. Compatible with many different PC systems, the THINC Developers Group plays in the sandbox of the Application Program Interface (API), creating communication points between machines. The vision and goals of the customer are brought into being through the innovation of THINC and executed through their developments via the Okuma Sampling Path.  Brad explains that at Okuma, through the Okuma Sampling Path, they can read, write, and access thousands of data points within the controls of systems and machines. They can make the control do whatever the customer needs through the API. All of the solutions data can be viewed and interpreted by the customers so that they can make the best business decisions based upon the data provided.  Communicating between machines with MTConnect  MTConnect takes the guessing work out of machine data interpretation. Okuma machine tools and the Okuma control collect their machining data from MTConnect, which harvests data straight from the CNC machines, interprets it, and sends it to the Okuma control. Manufacturers have access to this data through their own Okuma controls because MTConnect is already attached to the control from the moment it hits the shop floor. MTConnect allows you to take all the information processed and pull it up via the data stream to your phone, tablet, or computer. With Okuma controls, there is no additional fee for MTConnect. Because it is sent via data stream to your devices, you can access necessary data even while offline.  Streamlining automation systems to meet your unique goals  Reading exuberant amounts of data can be overwhelming, which is why the THINC Developers Group created several unique dashboard bases to meet the different needs of manufacturing leaders and their teams. Streamlining your automation systems by utilizing a central dashboard for data collection and interpretation will enable you to view and make decisions more quickly. Instead of manually checking on the tools and machines being used and recording the health, run-time, and down-time of your tools, you can see all of that data displayed on a single dashboard. The idea is to create a condition-based, automated environment that allows you to be as hands-off as possible with the menial work required to run your business. Automation systems are all about keeping it simple and clarifying communication between your team and machines.  Remember! Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to The Boring Bar newsletter! Stay informed about what is happening in the Metal Working Nation and how you can better lead your manufacturing business!  Here’s The Good Stuff! Randy Jokerst and Brad Klippstein share their manufacturing journeys.  The birth of the THINC Developers Group.  The MyOkuma app gives manufacturers control over their automated systems. Creating what manufacturing leaders need with the Okuma Sampling Path.  The ease of function created MTConnect utilization.  How to read machining data without becoming overwhelmed.  The success stories and impact of the THINC Developers Group.  Tools & Takeaways The THINC Developers Group My Okuma App MTConnect Xometry Pro Shop ERP Okuma Manufacturing  Hartwig Inc. This Week’s Superstar Guest: Randy Jokerst & Brad Klippstein Randy on LinkedIn Brad on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
8/7/201935 minutes, 20 seconds
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Cobotics Innovation Paves the Way of the Future with Craig Zoberis

Cobotics are a current hot topic in the Metal Working Nation. Innovation within the AI spectrum is opening new doors and possibilities for manufacturing leaders who are willing to embrace change. Guest speaker, Craig Zoberis, shares his “Aha!” moment when he realized cobots could help him create a more efficient and life-giving environment to his team. His passion for innovation and the power of the cobotic ecosystem led him to create his own cobotics production line - empowering the Metal Working Nation to perform at their absolute best.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Enabling your team’s greatest potential by eliminating menial tasks Growing up working at his father’s manufacturing business, Craig entered the industry as a college graduate with a wealth of knowledge and familiarity. Starting his own business focused on assembly, he eventually recognized the need for in-house machinery. Wanting maximum control of his own schedule as well as his team’s, Craig began researching the impact that cobots can have on improving efficiency and helping to close the skills gap. Encouraged by his team to pursue a future in cobotics, he began implementing them into his workforce. The impact was so powerful that Craig and his team at Fusion OEM were inspired to create their own line of cobotics.  Collaborative robots - cobots - are designed to operate around people and often with people. Not only can they help you eliminate the menial tasks that take up your team’s valuable and limited time, but they can also help keep integration and employee turnover costs low. Cobots are easily taught by those working in their space. There is no need for a cobotics consultant to train it in every new function. Using cobots to fulfill repetitive and menial work frees up your team to focus on areas of work that require their expertise - allowing them to grow in their knowledge and application instead of being bogged down by time-consuming tasks.  Eliminating the dull, dirty, and dangerous  Craig explains that knowing where and how to utilize cobots can be overwhelming to those who are first installing them. He encourages listeners to focus on the jobs on the shop floor that are dull, dirty, or dangerous and to begin implementing cobots in those tasks. Cobots are especially helpful in highly repetitive work because they don’t slow down or speed up as a human would throughout the day. The consistent speed and functionality of the cobot allows for more predictable output timetables and eliminates the dull work that keeps your team tied. Deburring, polishing, sanding, quality inspection, sensing, and making/recording measurements are all tasks that a cobot can accomplish - freeing you and your machinists to focus on what really matters.  Investing in your team’s expertise by investing in cobotics Training up the new generation of manufacturing leaders and machinists is incredibly important, especially when considering the huge portion of the current manufacturing labor force that is made up of baby boomers. Planning for the turnover that comes with retirements can be made smoother by implementing cobots into your workforce. While training new employees, cobots can cover tasks left by retired machinists and keep your output steady. Cobots also allow you to put more time and energy into training new employees and seasoned team members in new skills. The skills gap dilemma doesn’t have to slow your business. Using cobots can not only help you close that skills gap but make your production time more efficient while doing so.  Educating yourself in the cobotic ecosystem Jumping into cobotics implementation and utilization can be intimidating. Craig encourages listeners to take small steps and to familiarize themselves with what the cobotic ecosystem is all about. Visiting manufacturing shops and production lines that use cobots will allow you to see for yourself what they can accomplish. Find easy wins for cobotics within your own workforce. Test out cobots on jobs that you know you could use them in. Cobotics is a paradigm shift, but it doesn’t have to be a difficult one. Chip away at the automation transition and watch your business grow!  Here’s The Good Stuff! Craig’s “Aha!” moment: implementing cobots for greater efficiency.  The difference between robots and cobots. Investing in future expert machinists by using cobots. The phases of training for a cobot.  Eliminating the three Ds with cobotics.  Understanding how cobots “talk” with other machines.  Ways to engage in the cobotic ecosystem.  Tools & Takeaways Xometry ProShop ERP The Factory of the Future Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to The Boring Bar newsletter! This Week’s Superstar Guest: Craig Zoberis Fusion OEM MakingChips Episode 46 MakingChips Episode 47 Craig on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
7/30/201936 minutes, 46 seconds
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Leading the Charge for Change in Manufacturing with Drura Parrish

Change in manufacturing is an inevitable and exciting necessity that Jim and Jason are ready for the Metal Working Nation to embrace and experience. Even though the industry has a history of sticking with what has worked for generations, it is now time to invest in the future by equipping and inspiring manufacturing leaders and teams to educate themselves on the progress of technology and process. Guest speaker, Drura Parrish, the president of Xometry Supplies, shares his manufacturing story and how leaders can take small steps towards big change for their businesses. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact “We’ve always done it this way” is no longer a valid mantra Growing up in the manufacturing world, Drura noticed that his grandfather’s business philosophy was built more upon hope in the future than on making that future himself with the manufacturing tools he owned. The machines that spent their lives unused - waiting for the “big deal,” caused Drura to question the processes in place. However, when he came back after college, he went to work for his grandfather and learned the important lesson of knowing when to ask why you are doing something before you set out to do it. Accepting a process because it has “always” been used isn’t a good enough reason to keep on using it. Be sure to listen to the episode for Drura’s personal experience in learning to ask “Why?”  Change in manufacturing begins with leadership It’s all about leadership. Drura explains that in many machine shops, the leader is often the one with the most expertise and experience in a specific field. But is that the way it should be? In today’s modern manufacturing world, everyone is an expert at something. People need leaders, but they don’t necessarily need a leader who is well-versed in every aspect of the manufacturing business. Instead, the leader needs to be the one asking questions - asking, “Why are we doing it this way?” Drura believes that it is the responsibility of the 21st-century manufacturing leader to instill in their team the mindset that the customer is always right and to provide the training their team needs to accomplish serving their customers well. Outdated software? Toss it out. Equip your people; instill in them a positive, service-minded attitude, and trust your people to produce a quality outcome.  Commit to the technological education of your people  Do your people know how to identify good technology? Drura explains that in a world that is saturated in options and new technology, it is vital that your team understand what makes good technology and what makes a good process. Jason and Jim both agree that while it is difficult to begin setting aside time in your business’s schedule for training and education of the team, it is essential to your company’s future success. Technology must be taken seriously in today’s manufacturing world.  What educating a manufacturing team looks like will depend on the individual business, the people, and the goals of the company. For smaller shops, it may be investing in one individual at a time instead of collectively training in new technology. For very large businesses, it could mean taking another, smaller shop under their wing and helping guide them in good business acumen. The idea is to promote in the Metal Working Nation an attitude of growth and effective change. When progressive change is made, take the time to celebrate!  Change is made one step at a time Jim, Jason, and Drura all know that change in manufacturing can be a slow process. But small progress is better than no progress! Drura suggests setting aside 1% of your time as a leader and business to invest in education. As your team explores the latest innovations in their area of expertise, they will grow in their own skills - making your business more efficient. Spending time training actually saves you time as a business in the long run. Equip your people. Inspire them to always be asking “Why?” Start with 1%, and grow from there. Change is the pathway to future success.  Here’s The Good Stuff! Robots replacing humans in the manufacturing world may actually be a good thing.  Guest speaker, Drura Parrish - president of Xometry Supplies.  Learning to ask “why?” from Drura's grandfather.  Knowing where to implement change and how to go about starting it.  Taking responsibility for change as a leader.  The vital necessity of educating your people on the latest technology.  Investing time in the education of your team will save you time in the long run.  Make it a goal to elevate fellow manufacturing businesses.  Xometry’s goal to spark the entrepreneurial spirit in manufacturers. Tools & Takeaways Robots Are Rapidly On Their Way to Taking 20 Million Manufacturing Jobs Xometry Supplies ProShop ERP Text CHIPS to 38470 to subscribe to The Boring Bar newsletter This Week’s Superstar Guest: Drura Parrish Drura on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
7/16/201945 minutes, 51 seconds
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Implementing Cobots for Cutting-Edge Automation with Elias Serruya

Are cobots the future of your manufacturing business? Collaborative robots can share the same space with your employees and help you automate the processes and systems that keep tying up your team’s time and energy. Guest speaker, Elias Serruya shares his passion for innovative thinking and why a future of cobots may just be your manufacturing dream-come-true.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Pursuing a passion for innovation while learning the tricks of the trade Elias shares his story of pursuing the future in innovation and automation while climbing the ladder at his father-in-law’s manufacturing company, EJ Basler. Beginning as an engineering intern, he quickly learned the ins and outs of the trade and made note of where processes could be made more efficient. Always asking the question, “How could this be made better?” Elias found his passion realized in building and implementing cobots and robots.  Elias explains that the automation offered by robotics and cobotics is mechatronics - the combination of mechanical and electronic systems. Mechatronic automation covers all the bases for a machine shop by combining software, mechanics, mathematics, chemistry, the cloud, and electronics for a truly all-encompassing automated system. As manufacturing leaders understand, time is money - and the more time their employees can spend on the tasks that require their expertise and less on the menial busywork - the better.  Saving time, money, and space with cobot automation  Elias unpacks the differences between robots and cobots and why cobots are a financially savvy investment for your manufacturing business. Unlike robots, cobots don’t need their own designated space with safety lines and regulations. Cobots (collaborative robots) share the same workspace as your employees and interact directly in your employees’ environment. Because they don’t need their own floor or taped-off space, and because they can’t hurt humans in their operations, there is no need to spend money and resources on building a separate and safety-ensured space on your shop floor. Cobots are slower in their movements and don’t have the huge amount of velocity behind them that regular, mechanical robots possess. If you touch a cobot outside of the designated process, they turn off. They are built to work with you - not overpower you. Applying cobots to both low and high production manufacturing businesses Are cobots for everybody? Elias explains that while the role of the cobots might change, they are useful in both low and high-production manufacturing businesses. A good strategy for both types would be to locate where you need to automate within the business. Where is time being wasted or being used inefficiently? What jobs - if freed up - could make room for greater growth and progress? Inspection and processing parts could be done by a cobot instead of your employees, allowing them to focus on work that requires their skill and expertise.  Elias shares the processes he uses to know where to implement automation within EJ Basler. Watching company costs is an extremely helpful way to see where your manufacturing team could benefit from the help of cobots. Taking a walk through your shop floor can also provide insight into identifying where processes could be made more efficient. If you are struggling with finding good hires, then using a cobot to make up the difference will save your team countless hours and headaches. Training your cobot to serve you so that you can serve your client-base  Cobots are trained by recording points in space - through logging specific conditions that build the logic of a certain job. Once all the steps have been taught to the cobot, it can carry out its task. For jobs that require unique grippers or handling parts, new grippers and tools can be 3D printed or made for the cobot. Even though cobots are serving in the role of automation, their workflow is in the hands of you and your team. Not comfortable with just one master controller? Use several for each part of the process so that you can have the flexibility of updating and controlling just one aspect of the job at hand.  Elias explains that automation is not only useful to your team - it’s attractive to your clients. When customers see that you are trying to keep up with the times, be progressive, and constantly improve, they will be more trusting and impressed by your diligence to keep on the cutting edge of manufacturing technology. The robotics industry is only growing, and those that want to keep up in the Metal Working Nation need to be thinking about how they can be progressive. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for examples of how Elias has used cobotics at EJ Basler and why cobots might need to be the next big step for your business.  Have questions about automation and cobots? Reach out to Jason and Jim at [email protected] and [email protected] Here’s The Good Stuff! What the inevitable robot takeover and “I Love Lucy” have in common.  Using cobots helps eliminate the busywork that keeps your employees tied up.  Guest speaker: Elias Serruya, quality and process engineer at EJ Basler.  Turning dreams into reality with robotic and cobotic innovation.  Saving time, space, and money with cobots.  The role of cobots in both high and low production manufacturing businesses. Teaching cobots to perform for your needs.  Tracking the costs and workflow of your shop for cobot implementation.  Using multiple control stations to help streamline your cobot.  The attractiveness of automation to the next generation of customers and co-workers.  Tools & Takeaways The Great Robot Takeover: Fact or Fiction? Xometry Text “CHIPS” to 38470 to subscribe to MakingChips!  FSBS: For Shops By Shops (ProShop ERP) This Week’s Superstar Guest: Elias Serruya Elias on LinkedIn EJ Basler on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
7/12/201944 minutes, 1 second
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Business Automation for Robust Efficiency with Paul Van Metre

Business automation can seem like an intimidating change, but the benefits are massive. Guest speaker, Paul Van Metre - president of Pro Shop ERP, shares how letting go of control can help grow your company and make it vastly more efficient. Automating your systems can help clear up communication, save you and your team energy and time, and help boost your profitability. Change can be daunting, but an automated system is definitely worth the cost.  Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Embracing the big changes that come with business automation  Some may think that there are too many barriers to push through to make business automation worth it. Paul explains that people fear what they don’t understand and what they don’t know. While such fear is normal, it shouldn’t keep manufacturing leaders from making the switch. The initial expense and time invested in uploading your company’s data may seem like a shock at first, but the efficiency that comes with automation is incredible. Letting go of control could be the best decision you’ve ever made.  The tools you use to automate your business are crucial to your success. Paul gives some examples of automation, including robots for the machine shop floor, apps, and entire manufacturing eco-systems - such as Pro Shop ERP. Paul shares that his company grew out of the need to solve the problems they faced as a start-up. No one offered the software they needed to automate their systems so that they could stay on top of their game and grow with their clients. Pro Shop ERP is the result of Paul’s team’s hard work and innovation. They wanted a way to tie all the details of their business together into one, centralized system. Paul encourages listeners to not be overwhelmed by the nuances of launching an automated system but to rather focus on the big picture: making chips so that you can make more money.  Why Excel simply doesn’t cut it anymore  In every small business, there are going to be people who wear too many hats. Inefficiency isn’t something that growing manufacturing businesses can tolerate for long. Miscommunication, confusion, and extended lead time can all be results of outdated processes and the struggle of having to do everything manually - from customer onboarding to running machinery. It’s easy to get caught up in the everyday chaos and not realize what could be easily solved through automation. Excel isn’t always going to cut it for logging your processes and keeping track of customer information and accounting. Before Pro Shop ERP, there was automating software to help with the accounting side of business, but there wasn’t anything that was built from the shop floor perspective. Pro Shop ERP offers that perspective in an automated format so that you can focus on what’s important to the growth of your business.  Streamline everything from redundancy to your vendor supply scores There are so many details to consider when running a manufacturing business, and tools like Pro Shop ERP help take the busywork out of the picture. Jim shares the improvements made to his company through the implementation of automation.  Redundancy: Jim explains that with an automated, centralized system, everyone knows where to find the native processes for different operations. Pro Shop is the one-stop shop to everything everyone in his team needs to know about any job within the company and any order a customer has placed. Jim can go find exactly what order was placed, who took it, what tools were used to make it, when it was delivered, how much it cost his company, and what types of inspections were required by the customer. Before, it took him hundreds of manual steps to fulfill an order. Now, everything is automated.  Vendor Supply Scores: Trying to log and remember which customer was excellent to work with and which ones weren’t can be time-consuming. Jim share that Pro Shop has enabled his company to automatically keep track of everything involving a specific vendor - from packaging to delivery and quality. Paul reminds listeners that while the system is automated, you CAN adjust all the settings and data manually. You define the details of all your processes.  Customer Information: Customer requirements, credit approval, financial information, preferences, and contact information are all logged by Pro Shop. Jim shares that this automation has saved him and his team incredible amounts of time. The automated system processes the details of how each customer wants each order completed - all the way down to whether the customer wants the paperwork for an order on the outside of the box or inside of it upon delivery.  Create greater impact by applying Pro Shop ERP to your sales processes  You can automate your sales process as well as your manufacturing processes. Jim shares that he uses Pro Shop even in the initial “interview” with new customers. Since quality communication is one of the pillars of Carr Machine & Tool, Jim likes to show new customers how well Pro Shop allows them to communicate as a team - both internally as a company and externally with their customers. He can also establish trust and openness by showing new customers the automated breakdown of pricing with Pro Shop so that there is no guesswork when it comes to quoting a price.  While there is a good bit of front-end work with uploading and customizing all of the data for an automated system, the end-product is invaluable to the efficiency of your manufacturing business.  Here’s The Good Stuff! The importance of a consistent routine to help you decompress for the night.  Automating your manufacturing business through a robust ERP system.  Manufacturing News: Don’t fear the recession.  Pro Shop ERP was born out of solving its own problems.  The fears surrounding beginning the business automation process.  Clearing up communication and creating a centralized system.  Jim shares improvements made to his company through Pro Shop ERP.  Implementing Pro Shop into your sales process. Putting in the initial work with automation is well worth it.  Tools & Takeaways Forget Recession Fears Xometry Pro Shop ERP This Week’s Superstar Guest: Paul Van Metre Paul on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
7/9/201944 minutes, 16 seconds
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Integrating Your Tech Stack for Optimal Performance with Kaleb Mertz

Is your tech stack doing its job? Jim and Jason know how hard it can be to keep all the balls in the air and not become overwhelmed. As the manufacturing industry continues to grow, it is vital that the Metal Working Nation become increasingly efficient - and smarter. Guest speaker, Kaleb Mertz - the integrator and marketing team lead of MakingChips - dives into why and how you need to integrate your tech stack to boost your company’s efficiency and ease the load on you and your employees. Making Chips and making money doesn’t solely rely on the mechanics of the shop floor. Take further steps to build your techstack and read Kaleb's article at www.makingchips.com/techstack Subscribe to The Boring Bar newsletter by texting the word CHIPS to 38470 This Week’s Superstar Guest: Kaleb Mertz Connect with Kaleb on LinkedIn Email Kaleb at [email protected] Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
6/27/201936 minutes, 58 seconds
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Moving from SaaS to MaaS with Michael Dickson

Just as software-as-a-service (SaaS) has been used to streamline the software needs of businesses and organizations around the world, Xometry has created the manufacturing-as-a-service (MaaS) platform to serve the pressing needs of the Metal Working Nation. Jim and Jason discuss the inner-workings of Xometry’s impressive success with the vice president of the company, Michael Dickson, in this week’s exciting episode of MakingChips. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Xometry’s success as the leader in manufacturing as a service As the largest manufacturing-on-demand platform in the country, Xometry makes parts for over 16,000 customers - including clients such as NASA and BMW. Michael explains that their ability to meet such high demands is because of their instant quoting engine, partner network, and through their online e-commerce site - Xometry Supplies. Michael shares that the passion and drive behind the company is to help manufacturers grow in their own businesses as well as helping the manufacturing industry thrive as a whole. The gift of instant quoting If you have a part that your shop doesn’t have the capacity to create, what can you do? Michael explains how Xometry’s instant quoting engine works to provide manufacturers and customers with instantaneous answers on how their needs can be met. Uploading a 3D CAD file of the part or project you need manufactured into the system allows the quoting engine to determine when the part or project can be made and delivered and by whom. The system allows users to select the type of tools they want to be used, custom finishings, and what types of inspections they want the project or part verified through. The instant quoting engine then calculates lead time and the deadline for a need. Payment is simple and savable for future orders. When there are extremely specific details needed to complete a project, the system prompts the user to insert PDFs detailing other needs. Xometry sends the orders to the proper manufacturer for completion. Carr Machine & Tool, for instance, could use Xometry in a partnership as a way to extend the business by fulfilling orders offered through Xometry. Understanding the as-a-service genre of business Just as Uber doesn’t actually own any cars, but they are still the largest taxiing company in the world, the goal of Xometry is to be the on-demand portal for manufacturing. Their success is derived through their leverage of the workforce capacity provided through their numerous partnerships. Xometry is the coordinating portal of the Metal Working Nation - not the workforce itself. Michael explains that one of the benefits of such a company is that the customer doesn’t have to send out quote requests or conduct research on which manufacturing business is the best for their specific need. Xometry simply takes the order and delivers it to the best partner for that specific job. Because Xometry has built such a solid reputation, people trust the process. Partnering with others for greater all-around success Xometry has about 3,000 partners - including those who make parts and fulfill orders for Xometry and those who order from Xometry. The process to become a partner is an easy one. Anyone can join - once approved - and there is no partnership fee. There is an on-boarding period and a trial period. Once Xometry is satisfied, they will open the business to work within the network. While certifications aren’t required, they are heartily welcomed. Feedback is one of the main driving factors for improvement of Xometry’s systems. Jason compares the improvement process to that of the housing market. If your house doesn’t sell within a few weeks, perhaps it is priced too high. If it sells in a day, perhaps you could have raised the asking price. It is the same with manufacturing parts. Supply and demand, feedback from customers and partners help Xometry’s instant quoting system to work at optimum capacity. Michael explains that Xometry is an excellent source of growth for new manufacturing businesses or start-ups. Partnership can help cover the costs of starting a business and help provide a more steady stream of work. The goal of Xometry, after all, is to leverage the manufacturing capabilities in the US and to help their partners make more chips - so that they can make more money and reach their goals. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for more about how manufacturing as a service can benefit you and your company! Here’s The Good Stuff! The 4th industrial revolution. MAAS: Manufacturing As A Service. Xometry - the country’s largest manufacturing-on-demand platform. Instant Quoting allows for smoother operations. How Xometry works as the Uber of the manufacturing world. What it takes to become a Xometry partner. The benefits of having over 3,000 partners in the manufacturing world. How small shops and start-ups can use Xometry to their advantage. Tools & Takeaways Pro Shop ERP Xometry Don’t forget the discount code for Xometry! CHIPS50 ($50 off $100 or more) This Week’s Superstar Guest: Michael Dickson MakingChips Episode #122 Michael on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
6/18/201929 minutes, 8 seconds
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Stop Handling and Start Machining with Stan Martin

Step up your machining game by utilizing tools such as trunnion tables and growing your manufacturing business through partnerships with other companies! Jason Zenger and Nick Goellner join Stan Martin - Kentucky entrepreneur and owner of Martin Manufacturing in this inspiring episode of MakingChips. Many call him “Stan the Trunnion Man,” and rightly so. Realizing how much time he and his team were spending handling projects and parts themselves inspired Stan to streamline the trunnion table for optimal performance - for his own shop and for the entire Metal Working Nation. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Working smarter - not harder Stan says that the reason he found himself and his team in the trunnion table business is because he is a lazy machinist. He knew that manually handling every part was wasting time and energy when it could all be done by a machine. Using CNC machines and trunnion tables, Stan began creating his own product line. Stan explains that most companies still look at trunnion tables as only useful for certain jobs. While they are standardized to meet the specifications of certain projects and parts, it is rare that a manufacturing business will see a job only once or twice. More likely, they will need the same parts made over and over, increasing the practicality and efficiency of a tool like the trunnion table. Instead of having someone on the shop floor spending their time clamping, unclamping, reversing, and rotating every set of parts, you simply place the material onto the trunnion table and let it do the work for you. The result is a precise, consistent, and perfect job every time. Meeting - and exceeding - customer needs Stan understands the need to create an atmosphere of support, consistency, and ease for his customers. Instead of going straight to the larger work holding companies, he focused on meeting the needs of job shops first and coming alongside each and every customer. Stan and his team make it a priority to ensure that every customer understands how, when, and where to use their trunnion tables. Some are built to optimize vertical machinery, while others are built to compliment a rotary table. Stan explains that his team goes the extra mile to produce a ready-to-use trunnion table for their customers. If a customer sends them a rotary table, they will put work holding onto the trunnion, mount it, and hand it back to the customer - ready to make chips. Don’t be greedy with your machining Partnerships not only supply you with the tools, resources, and skills that your own team doesn’t possess - they allows your business to grow. Partnerships can extend to supply chains, manufacturing partnerships, application engineering, sales, and so forth. Stan believes that partnerships are vital. The only way to grow as a company is to not be selfish. Working with others creates a larger and more diverse pool of ideas and jobs. Collaborative efforts can be an excellent learning and growing experience for everyone involved. Obviously, you want to make sure that whoever you are partnering with is trustworthy and produces consistently excellent work. There should always be honest and open communication. Constant improvement becomes constant growth Stan discusses the need to continually evaluate the processes and tools you are using - and producing - within your business and partnerships. Customers want convenience and excellence, creating a full-time need for assessment and improvement. For Stan’s business, this meant creating standardized kits as well as offering custom lengths on their trunnion tables. From a small manufacturing business to one of the leading manufacturing companies, Stan and the team at Martin Manufacturing understand the necessity for optimal machining performance, caring customer service, and allowing other companies to partner and spread the knowledge and resources they have to offer. Here’s The Good Stuff! Manufacturing News: NIMS partners with Festo. Guest speaker, Stan Martin - the owner of Martin Manufacturing. Empowering his team and clients through trunnion tables. Creating a customer-focused business. The importance of partnerships. Investing in the tools and resources to make your business grow. Tools & Takeaways NIMS Partnering with Festo This Week’s Superstar Guest: Stan Martin Stan on LinkedIn Martin Manufacturing MakingChips Bio The ROI on Customer-Centric Manufacturing Culture Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
6/11/201925 minutes, 37 seconds
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Applying the Franchise Model to Your Manufacturing Business with Paul Van Metre

We often don’t think of a franchise and a manufacturing business as being an easy match, but systematizing your business according to the franchise model can vastly improve the functionality and profitability of your company. Tools such as an ERP system can help you boost efficiency and keep track of everything needed to streamline your business. In this episode, the co-founder and president of ProShop ERP, Paul Van Metre, shares the practical steps to take towards a more refined and systematized set of processes for optimal company performance. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Applying the franchise model vs. becoming a franchise Paul explains that the goal of modeling your business after a franchise isn’t to become the next Subway or McDonald’s. Instead, the vision is to design a franchise prototype. Creating standardized systems for every process and goal within your company will help you create repeatability and redundancy for every task and will help you pinpoint problems - leading to continual refining. The goal is to have the same and reliable output as a franchise delivers - consistent value, low labor costs, impeccable organization, and documented workflow that produces predictable product. Whether your company is growing by leaps and bounds or not - establishing systems that streamline your processes and help ground the expectations and values of your business will help take your customer experience and your efficiency to the next level. The goal isn’t to duplicate your business into a thousand perfect replicas. The goal is to run your company in the most efficient and proven method available - with a franchise mindset applied to the small business structure. Streamlining your processes for optimal customer experience and efficiency What processes do you apply to the franchise model? Paul says that the answer is all of them. Systems like ERP can help minimize the labor involved in documenting your processes for storing fixtures, programming, job descriptions, hiring, training, company expectations, and procedures for making each and every product. Paul explains that one huge step for his company was standardizing jobs. Making sure that every person in your company is following the same procedures creates reliability. Jim uses the ERP system in his discussions with new clients, allowing them to view the numbers and procedures used to create the products they need. With a standardized system in place, every operation is itemized and trackable. All the details are available in one place - not scattered across different platforms and mediums. Documenting your systems in one location allows for a higher level of professionalism that makes everything black and white for your customers - and for your employees. Paul explains that you don’t need to create brand new procedures in order to streamline your business. Begin by bringing your team onboard with the mission to document every process you already have in place. It’s a team effort - unless you are a one-man shop. Each individual is going to have specific knowledge that is vital to the tribe. So much more information can be documented with ease when it is all inserted into one place - such as an ERP system. While it may seem daunting at first, it becomes easier the more your team utilizes it. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for Jim’s story of how implementing an ERP system in Carr Machine & Tool helped him keep a clear and focused approach to company growth. A systemized approach leads to greater profitability It’s surprising how many steps you can eliminate when you centralize all of your processes and procedures in one location. Eliminating needless or unprofitable steps creates greater efficiency, which leads to greater profitability. It also helps streamline your customer experience so that they know exactly what to expect and are met with quality time after time. Paul shares the 80/20 rule of profitability. Once you have the systems in place to track the profitability of each product, order, and customer, then you can begin to see the 80/20 rule take place. 80% of profits are derived by 20% of your jobs, and 20% of your jobs cause 80% of your losses. With a systemized process, you can see which jobs are losers and which are profitable. Having a procedure for killing off the losers will help keep your company moving forward and allow for less wasted time and resources. Prioritizing and tracking the needs of your company It’s important to analyze how you define job profitability and how you analyze the urgency of a request within your business. Streamlining your processes and procedures will lead to unearthed problems within your systems. Constant improvement needs to be an understood key-to-success by everyone on the team. Humility and honesty are vital to the improvement of a company, but leaders don’t need to be bogged down and notified of every problem that arises. Know, as a leader, how you will analyze and prioritize what needs to be addressed, when, and by whom. Jason shares his strategy of IDS (Identify, Discuss, and Solve). Encouraging your team to understand why a problem occurred and report it into a centralized system - like ERP - will help minimize the risk of the same problems occurring over and over again. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for more insight into why a franchise model may be the next step you should take with your manufacturing business. Here’s The Good Stuff! Can and should you franchise your machine shop? Manufacturing News: USMCA will replace NAFTA. Guest speaker: Paul Van Metre - president of ProShop ERP. Designing a franchise prototype to optimize your company’s performance. Generating consistent and predictable output. Streamlining your processes for ease of employee upscaling. The key to methodical profit growth. Analyzing and prioritizing job profitability. Tools & Takeaways Pro Shop ERP Paul on MakingChips: Episode 156 & Episode 98 The E-Myth Revisited by Michael Gerber This Week’s Superstar Guest: Paul Van Metre Paul on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
6/4/201947 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Marketing Automation Solutions to Help You Optimize Your Customer Experience

Excellent customer experience is vital to the success of your manufacturing business, and marketing automation solutions can help you not only sell your business but maintain your customer base as well. In this episode of MakingChips, Jim and Jason discuss the importance of utilizing marketing automation correctly with B2B consultant and advisor, Todd Hockenberry. Author of Inbound Organization: How to Build and Strengthen Your Company’s Future Using Inbound Principles and host of “The Industrial Executive Podcast,” Todd shares how to customize your marketing automation to your customers and how to map customer behavior so that you can provide the best service to each individual. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Understanding how the conversation works between your business and the customer “Marketing automation is using technology to facilitate conversations so that you can build relationships.” Todd explains that it all begins with the conversation between you and the customer. Many businesses aren’t even aware that the conversation is happening - how a customer found the business, what they were looking for, if or how they found the solution to their needs, and how they interacted with the people and media of the business. Without some type of automation system in place, you won’t be able to map out the journey that your customer is taking - and how you can best meet their needs. The role of the salesman is changing in the fast-paced world that we live in. Automated marketing is a necessity, and it is extremely powerful - if done well. Just as no one has time to invite a salesman in to talk and show off a product, no one has time to participate in poor marketing. Todd encourages marketers to consider whether the tools they are using are achieving the results that they want. Email, free downloads, and website forms have all been automation staples of the past, but they aren’t effective at speaking to the customer. Emails go unopened, downloads go unread. Marketing isn’t about how you want to communicate with the buyer. It’s about how the buyer wants to communicate with you. Familiarizing yourself with how the buyer acts and what they want can help you better serve them. Personalizing your automated marketing systems to meet your customer needs Everyone processes information differently. Some people absorb a message better audibly, visually, or through actual hands-on experience. Your automated marketing strategy must take this into consideration and be customizable to the buyer. Todd explains that he uses a myriad of mediums to relay a message and provide opportunity for conversation. Personalized video messages, pop-up chat boxes, marketing personnel available to answer phone calls, texts, and emails are all ways to make that personal connection with the customer. The key is to make sure that your customer needs are being met. Automated chat-boxes - or chat-bots - are a useful tool, if handled correctly. If customer questions are being answered then all is well, but if they aren’t being answered, how long does it take for the customer to reach an actual sales rep? Immediacy is vital in our fast-paced world of communication. If you do provide a phone number, make sure that there is actually someone there to answer it. Time is money, and people don’t want to wait for information. Todd gives some excellent insight into the importance of immediate gratification when it comes to your customer, so be sure to listen to the entire episode! Mapping out the journey of your customer is an extremely helpful step in understanding how to best serve them. Match technology with the needs of your customer - don’t just go shopping for technology and implement it into your systems without knowing if it is what your customers need to better communicate with you and vice versa. People want a seamless, helpful experience that helps them achieve their goals. Being able to track what an individual has downloaded, what they have clicked on or opened in your website or emails, and what mediums they have used to contact you - if any - are all part of the map that helps you locate what to improve in your marketing system. Matching the persona of your business with the right customer base People want to see themselves when they go onto your website - but you also want to see your business values in your customer. All relationships are two-way, and Jim and Jason understand the importance of aligning company values with the customer for an excellent, long-term relationship. Jim, for example, has set up filters that keep those he may not want to work with at bay. He doesn’t list his available machinery on his website - instead, he promotes the core values of his company and highlights what makes Carr Machine & Tool unique. His goal is to get people into a conversation with someone on his team as quickly as possible - whether that be through a chat-box, email, or phone call so that the relationship is built before anything is sold. Finding the right marketing automation solutions for your business While there are numerous tools out there to help you track and map customer behaviors, you don’t need every bell and whistle to get started. HubSpot is a favorite of Todd, Jim, and Jason. Automated marketing is a continuous task, needing a high level of attention. HubSpot helps cut back on time spent logging information and allows you to see what each website visitor is clicking on, if they signed up for a newsletter, or if they have opened an email once, never, or several times. Being able to see what a customer is interested in will allow you to better market to them so that they are given only what they need. CRM systems are also extremely helpful in building the relationship between you and the buyer. Don’t just use CRM systems as a place to drop email addresses to send automated messages to. Know the behavior of a person and send them the automated message that will speak to them personally. Keeping track of previous customers is another helpful aspect of a CRM system. If someone who bought your product a year ago is on your website again, then you know to reach out to them and update them on the latest and greatest that your company has to offer. Here’s The Good Stuff! Creating an optimal customer experience through marketing automation. Guest speaker: Todd Hockenberry - expert B2B consultant and advisor. Are you tracking the online conversation surrounding your business and product? Misuse of automation marketing. Ensuring a personable customer experience with marketing automation. The power of customization. Mapping a value stream: following and anticipating the journey of your lead. Creating a seamless experience for your customer. Aligning your company persona with the ideal customer. Content management systems are vital to your company’s performance. Tools & Takeaways Pro Shop ERP Top Line Results This Week’s Superstar Guest: Todd Hockenberry Todd on LinkedIn Inbound Organization The Industrial Executive Podcast Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
5/17/201944 minutes, 52 seconds
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The Fight Against Nepotism in the Family Manufacturing Business with Dietmar Goellner

Jason and Jim both felt the need to fight against the perspective of nepotism within their family manufacturing businesses by proving their merit within their respective companies. Growing up in the family business had its perks, but it also came with the need to overcome the stigma that they were successful simply because of their bloodline. There was a lot to prove - to both themselves and others as they mastered the manufacturing business and took on greater leadership and responsibility. Guest speaker, Dietmar Goellner - Nick Goellner’s father - shares his own experience and insight into keeping nepotism out of the family business, while also mentoring his three sons within the company. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The family business is still a business Dietmar grew up saturated in the heart and soul of manufacturing. His father immigrated from Germany in 1958 and founded Advanced Machine & Engineering (AME) in 1966. Dietmar is now the president, CEO, and co-owner of AME - as well as the president and CEO of Henning Inc. Dietmar was raised to become the next leader within his father’s manufacturing business, but he himself has taken a different approach with his own sons. Dietmar approaches the family business as a business - putting the needs of the company and team ahead of any desire to put a family member in a job where they may not need to be. “Being in the family might get you a job, but it won’t keep you a job,” he says. Having a managerial role in the company with shareholding and voting rights is earned by merit alone. It’s not a birthright. Dietmar never pushed his kids to follow his footsteps in the family business, but when one by one they said they were interested in pursuing their careers within the company, he took them in and placed them where the company needed them most. Each of his three sons joined the family business with unique talents, skills, and passions. Dietmar recognized this and placed them strategically within the company - where their aptitude met their passion and the need of the business. The needs of the company must be met - and that should come above the wishes of any individual. Treat the business like a business. Less micromanaging and more mentoring It is easy to micromanage any team - but especially a team made up of family members. Dietmar discusses the importance of fighting against the micromanagement of family members within the company. Coaching and mentoring are far more productive and impactful methods of training. Dietmar warns against ever forcing or coercing a person into a position that they either aren’t wired to take over or don’t even want in the first place. Not all family members who want a part in the business are going to want a leadership role. Mentoring begins with assimilation. Dietmar explains that with his sons, he explained the opportunity to be had by joining the company, but he also explained that they had to earn the right to vote and own shares. He did, however, include them in board meetings so that they could watch and learn what would be expected of them in the future. He also explained the importance of allowing family members to make mistakes and allowing for communication to be two-way. Whether you are the mentor or the one being mentored, you have a responsibility to communicate well. For Jim, that meant booking his dad’s schedule with a time-slot just for the two of them to go out and get martinis together and discuss business needs. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for more great insight into what mentoring and coaching the next generation looks like and how to keep from micromanaging your business. Fighting nepotism by sticking to your core values Core values are a key component of any company’s foundation. Dietmar encourages family businesses to communicate their stance against nepotism through their core values - and the determination to stick by them. At AME, the core value of servant leadership is vital. Anyone not displaying the humility that comes through leading by example is not considered for a place within the business - whether they are family or not. Arrogance and ignorance are two attributes that Dietmar doesn’t allow on the manufacturing floor. While he recognizes that everyone has flaws and that no one is perfect, he understands the importance of a humble and knowledgeable leader. When considering whether to promote someone - whether family or not - he looks to see whether the individual embodies the characteristics of a servant leader and also displays the manufacturing skills necessary to take the business to the next level. Dietmar explains that another aspect of a successful and healthy family relationship within a family business is respect. He warns against losing respect for one another over business issues and by not treating each other with professionalism in the workplace. Yes, you are family, but that doesn’t mean you can get away with disrespecting one another. Have a succession plan - but hold it loosely Having professionals come onto the board to help navigate succession plans and other business dynamics is hugely helpful. Dietmar suggests having an excellent attorney on board to ensure that you are getting it right when it comes to the details. Beginning the conversation early with family members about how the succession plan will work for the family business is important. Dietmar reminds listeners that arguments and misunderstandings will occur during the succession planning process. Be okay with that. Go in knowing that there will be miscommunication. Hold everything loosely and operate under grace. Be able to ask for forgiveness and forgive. Building a strong family connection while also making the right decisions for the future of the company can be difficult. Dietmar suggests that if there isn’t someone in the family who wants to take on the business, then look within the company for someone passionate and capable who does want the responsibility. Open communication and honesty should be the foundation of any succession planning. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for more helpful pointers on how to navigate the ups and downs of working with family in the family manufacturing business and how to keep nepotism at bay. Here’s The Good Stuff! The birth of The Boring Bar at MakingChips. Defining nepotism. Dietmar Goellner: president/CEO/co-owner of Advanced Machine & Engineering. Is it wrong to give your family jobs in the business? The issue of reverse nepotism. Placing family members in jobs that will impact them and the company. Less micromanaging - more coaching. Relating core values to the issue of nepotism. The dangers of arrogance and ignorance. Building strong communication between you and your family within the business. Don’t lose respect for one another! Having the succession conversation - and being willing to flex. Tools & Takeaways The Boss is Retiring... This Week’s Superstar Guest: Dietmar Goellner MakingChips Bio Dietmar on LinkedIn Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
5/8/201946 minutes, 3 seconds
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Creating an Impactful Company Culture

Jim and Jason both know the importance of fostering a great company culture within their businesses. Knowing where to begin and how to accomplish a thriving culture, however, can be daunting. In this insightful episode of MakingChips, Jim shares his personal experience building a company culture that won Carr Machine & Tool the Spark Award for Culture and Workforce Development. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact When the culture is great - the work is great When your team embraces the core values of your company, the result is hugely impactful. Jim and Jason have both discovered that when manufacturing leaders take the time to pour into their team and employees, more is accomplished and business goals are not only met, but exceeded. Your people matter, and how you communicate the mission of your company to them is key. Jim explains that learning to listen to your employees and making structured room for conversation is the foundation for company culture success. The core values of your company should be honed down to just a few. They should act as the internal compass of your business and be the why behind what you do. When your people are united behind a common set of core values and know that they are each valued and have a voice, making chips becomes that much easier. Mantra and motivation craftsmanship Every business should have a stated mission and vision. Jim took those building blocks and presented them to his team - with a twist. He sat down with his team and asked them what their mantra and motivation was. What was their why? He wanted to know what it was that inspired and motivated his employees to get out of bed every morning and come to work at Carr Machine & Tool. The process offered powerful insight that gave Jim the tools he needed to communicate effectively with his team and understand his employees on a deeper level. Jim knew that not everyone would have the same why and not everyone would understand what the company does in the same way. Jim explains that people’s answers change over time as well. For instance, not everyone on his team had the same answer for how the business actually made money. Jim encouraged his team to voice their differing perspectives so that he could better understand what areas he needed to clarify and unify his team. Structured round table discussions and reviews of the company’s goals, structure, and mantra help Jim keep a pulse on the health and vision of his company culture. Investing in the team is investing in the company Fostering a company culture where success is celebrated and failures can be discussed are aspects of investing in his employees that Jim deeply cares about. Group and individual successes should be noticed and celebrated, he explains. He also wants his employees to understand that mistakes will happen - and that is okay as long as everyone can learn something from them. “No one is perfect,” he says, and the culture he has built is one where everyone knows that someone else has their back when something goes wrong. Having fun together is also an important part of the company culture at Carr Machine & Tool. Jim organizes field trips for his team to conferences, IMTS, or group BBQs. Learning together and sharing a relaxed drink together helps build community. For Jim, the emotional and physical health of his employees is vital. He explains that when your people are healthy, they will be able to put forward their best effort. As a leader, he fosters emotional health by talking with his employees and encouraging open discussion. Sharing is key. As for the physical, Jim likes to supply healthy food options to his team throughout the day. For more tips on how to build up your people and create a thriving company culture, listen to the entire episode! How to begin changing the company culture Growing a company culture takes time. Jim utilizes professionals in the areas that he needs help. He organizes standups with financial advisors and makes sure that his team understands the systems, investments, and decisions that the company is making. Uniting his team behind common knowledge of the company’s net profits and sales keeps any guesswork at bay, and taking the time to discuss hiring decisions as a team helps build trust and unity. But where do you start? Jim encourages manufacturing leaders to simply begin the conversation with team members and employees. Giving your people the opportunity to speak and share is the perfect starting point. Structured dialogue can help foster a thriving culture while also keeping the focus on core values and business growth. “Everyone has a voice,” Jim explains, “and every voice is valuable.” As a leader, stay true to the decisions you make, limit distractions, and make it clear to your people that you are invested in them. Listen to the full episode for more tips on how you can set the example to your company and keep the culture thriving. Here’s The Good Stuff! Why laughter is better than caffeine. The criteria that won Jim’s company the Culture & Workforce Development Award. Manufacturing News: tips for company culture success. Empowering your team through strategic open communication. Crafting the mission and vision of your company. Encouraging emotional and physical health among your employees. Clarifying the why and how of your company. The importance of celebrating successes and discussing failures. Utilizing field trips to foster company community and learning. Hiring new team members as a team. Contributing to charity as a company. Utilizing professionals to help make sense of the details. The return on investment of pouring into your company’s culture. How to begin changing your company’s culture as a small manufacturing business. Tools & Takeaways 10 Tips for Changing Your Company’s Culture - and Making It Stick When the Workforce Becomes a Life-force w/ Tom Carmazzi Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
4/29/201938 minutes, 8 seconds
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Start Now: The Steps You Need to Take Toward Family Business Succession Planning

Knowing when to start the conversation about family business succession planning can be tough. Jim and Jason understand that the dialogue surrounding the family business can be hard as it is - without throwing in who is getting what and when. In this episode of the MakingChips podcast, Jim and Jason share their personal experiences as well as some insightful tips to help the manufacturing leaders of the Metal Working Nation get the ball rolling and keep the business growing. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Knowing where and when to start the conversation While bringing up succession is uncomfortable, it is important to start planning as early as possible. The earlier you begin the dialogue, the better. Jim shares that he knew the conversation needed to be brought up with his dad when he realized that the woman his father was dating at the time may have ended up being his stepmother - and an inheritor of all he had worked hard to maintain and create in the family manufacturing business. Family situations can get sticky, which is why it is vital to start now. Navigating all the discussions that need to take place, the legal issues, and the development of a practical, workable plan can take time. For Jim, it took several years from the time he began the conversation with his father to the time everything was legally settled on paper. Jason shares that while his family situation wasn’t as difficult as Jim’s, his dad still realized the necessity to begin succession planning early in case of unforeseen or unfortunate events. It isn’t only about settling who gets what and when - it is also about preserving the future of the business. Keeping interests and priorities in alignment Jim knew that he didn’t want the amount of effort and energy he was putting into the family business to go to waste. It is important to understand and be honest with your family members about who has the greatest or equal interest in pursuing the future of the company and who is best equipped to handle the financial ups and downs. Jim shares that he didn’t want the business to be pulled out from under him by someone else when he was the one that had put the greatest amount of effort into the company and knew that was where his passion lay. Similarly, Jason shares that while he and his sister both owned shares in the family business, Jason and his wife had sustainable future plans for the company and held a greater level of interest in its growth. Both Jim and Jason walked through the succession planning journey with their families, taking into consideration that it would be difficult and at least a little bit painful for everyone involved. The priority, however, always had to be the success of the business. Listen to the entire episode for details on how Jason and Jim helped their families walk the path of succession planning to cohesive decision-making. Navigating the waters of appraisals and attorneys Jim stresses the importance of seeking professional help when building a family business succession plan. Understanding which appraisals matter for tax purposes, payment plans, and divvying shares is vital. While conversations can create plans that seem doable, having everything put into a binding, written agreement is key. Having a business appraiser, attorney, and corporate account present can help you and your family make sense of everything involved and what needs to be done to make your succession plan a reality. Jason explains the importance of understanding the fine print. You and your family probably won’t come to complete agreement on the first draft of the succession plan. Is what is being handed to you what everyone needs? Jason knew he didn’t want to be handcuffed in any way when he took over ownership of the family business, and so further work had to be done on the succession plan before he and everyone else was content with moving forward. Jim & Jason’s call-to-action Get the conversation going - no matter what. Yes, it can be uncomfortable - whether you are the one giving everything away or the one receiving. Yes, it can give rise to rifts and pains that no-one in the family will want to feel. Jim and Jason stress, however, that the longer you wait, the worse it gets. They suggest networking with peers that may be going through the same thing and collecting thoughts and ideas on how to navigate the succession waters so that you don’t drown when you go in to start the conversation. The important thing to remember is that you do not want something such as succession planning to be a looming impediment to your family business. The growth and success of your business should always remain at the forefront. Because if you aren’t making chips - you aren’t making money. Here’s The Good Stuff! Jason and Jim discuss their personal experiences with family business succession. The importance of beginning the discussion early! Continuing the dialogue. Balancing interest with priority. Navigating Appraisals. Getting started ASAP. Tools & Takeaways Family Business Succession Planning - Tips for Success Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
4/18/201922 minutes, 15 seconds
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Dreaming and Succeeding as a Manufacturing Startup with Brandon & Mike Kane

Specific skills and savvy are needed to succeed in the manufacturing world, making a manufacturing startup difficult to achieve. Brandon Kane, however, knew he wanted hands-on work that made a difference in the world and began his own shop in the garage with his dad, Mike. Together, they have transformed a dream into reality through hard work, determination, and a willingness to learn. In this episode of the MakingChips podcast, Jim Carr and Nick Goellner explore what makes or breaks startup business endeavors and what we can learn from Brandon’s entrepreneurial spirit. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact   The statistics behind startups Entrepreneurship has many benefits. Most small business owners were inspired to create their own startup from a desire to work for themselves and be their own boss. Others had a passion they wanted to share with the world. The unfortunate reality, however, is that most startups don’t make it past their first couple of years. Jim and Nick share some surprising startup trends from the past few years. Most small business owners, for instance, are 50-59 years old - not young college graduates. The funding to start a business is often taken from the founder’s personal savings account, and family is usually a strong source of continued funding for the initial months of a small business. Learn more about the interesting statistics of startup businesses by listening to the entire episode! Inspired beginnings of a manufacturing startup Manufacturing is often seen as an industry that has a hard time inspiring the younger generation to follow in its footsteps and pave the way for the future. Brandon Kane, however, grew up watching his dad work in the manufacturing industry and fell in love with “hands-on” work. He attended a technical high school, learning skills that would help him late on when he decided to begin a manufacturing startup with his dad in their garage. Brandon’s dad, Mike, settled into his role as the visionary of the business - having seen needs in the industry that weren’t being met by the larger corporations and companies. While time is money, there should always be excellence in production, and Mike felt that smaller orders weren’t being met properly by the larger businesses. Mike helped Brandon begin a small business - Manufacturing Solutions - that saw a need and began filling it. Brandon’s love of design led him to experiment with CAM software on their first machines, creating a trigger for a firearm they use for hobby target practice. From there, the designs became more complex, and Brandon’s knowledge of software grew to produce prototypes, and he became more comfortable with different tool paths and CNC machines. Different learning paths - same passion for excellence Jim and Mike talk about the differences in the ways that they learned manufacturing skills as opposed to how the younger generation - such as Brandon - have picked up the skills needed to succeed. While it used to be popular to learn through hands-on experience with the machines themselves - learning to feel and listen to the tone of a machine and metal to determine whether or not the design would come out - Brandon learned through CAD-CAM software first. He and Mike purchased a video series on how to work the tools with the software, but much of the learning was done through experimentation and from mistakes made along the way. Mike explains that in a startup, you learn a lot through failure. He talks about the edge that modern technology can give a manufacturing startup by providing new software that can optimize a CNC machine to produce quality parts every time with a well-built design. Probing systems have also taken much of the guesswork out of machining, allowing for a more consistent product. Building the benchmarks for a strong foundation While there are many differences in the ways Mike and Brandon have learned the industry, they are united through the passion to produce quality products to fulfill a need and to inspire a positive atmosphere among manufacturing leaders. Much of their business's marketing has been done through word-of-mouth and through maintaining a strong social media presence on Instagram. Brandon loves sharing his day-to-day life with others, hoping that his business will inspire others to launch into their dreams with determination and hard work. Realistic benchmarks are important to any business, and Mike and Brandon have built theirs around practical goals. They both know that they would prefer not to compete with large, corporate companies and have tried to maintain steady growth without growing too big too fast. Mike wants to hire another employee with the same passion for learning and sharing the manufacturing industry. Brandon wants to become a bigger influence on social media and hopefully begin coaching others while also building the business he and his father have built. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for the rest of the inspiring story of a manufacturing startup done right. Here’s The Good Stuff! Surprising startup business trends. Brandon and Mike Kane: manufacturing entrepreneurs. Growing up inspired by design and hands-on work. Generational differences in learning and manufacturing application. Learning through failure. Marketing through word-of-mouth and social media. Shooting for practical benchmark goals. Creating a positive atmosphere and influence on the manufacturing industry. Tools & Takeaways Startup Statistics NSBA 2015 Economic Report Traction: Get a Grip on Your Business This Week’s Superstar Guests: Brandon & Mike Kane Brandon on Instagram Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
4/12/201943 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Tools You Need to Fight Stress

Life often gets crazy busy, and it can be hard to fight the stress that easily sneaks in and overwhelms the everyday. Jason and Jim unpack the causes of major stress and give practical insight and tactics for overcoming the stresses that keep leaders from performing at their very best. Speaking from personal experience, these two manufacturing leaders share their personal tools and explore the need to prioritize your priorities. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Pinpointing the major causes of stress Stress can come in quietly and pile up quickly. Life changes, bad news, distractions, and inefficient processes are only a few ways stress can overtake your work, family, and life. Businesses grow, teams expand, and life gets busy! Jason talks about a time when stressful business news impacted his health. Stress not only affects how you view and approach work, but it also affects your health, relationships, and effectiveness as a leader. Understanding why you are stressed is the first step. The connectedness of the modern business world is one major cause of stress for many industry leaders. Technology has created the opportunity to be connected to everything and everyone at all times. Overstimulation can lead to incredible amounts of stress because there is never time to simply turn off and relax. How do you overcome the limitations of stress-induced scars and build a life of minimal distraction? Be sure to listen to the entire episode! Eliminating distraction and reducing wasted time Jason and Jim share some of their personal tools for combating the stresses that permeate all of life - from work to family. Exercise, essential oils, writing out thoughts in short notes or lists, spending time with loved ones and friends, and taking the time to relax and laugh can all help reduce stress. Even spending time with a pet or taking the time to relax and drink a glass of wine at night can help mitigate the constant stimulation that your mind lives in throughout the workday. But what steps can you take to cut stress in the bud and mitigate its presence at work and as a leader? Jason shares seven tools for doing just that. (7) Turn off notifications on your phone! It is easy to get caught up in group chats or conversations that could be had later or under better circumstances. Jason shares that he only leaves notifications on for family and team members vital to his current work. Otherwise, the conversation can wait. (6) Use your calendar to plan ahead. Book out the next couple weeks so that you know what to expect and where you need to be and what you need to get accomplished. Knowing your calendar can also keep you from overbooking yourself. Have a plan and write it out ahead of time. Jim and Jason have also learned to be careful with which calendar invites to accept. (5) Say “No” often. As a leader, you have a choice as to what processes, meetings, and jobs you need to be a part of. Know where to delegate and where to partake and be honest about how much time you have available for jobs and meetings that could be run and accomplished by someone else. Take responsibility where needed, but don’t overextend. Creating an efficient and stimulating environment Jason and Jim explore tactics for fighting stress that require you, as the leader, to take a step back and take the time to dwell in objective observation. It is easy to become comfortable in the status-quo and not realize that things need to be changed. Jason and Jim share the following tools for creating that efficient and life-giving environment. (4) Align yourself with great partners. Being willing to delegate the jobs that someone else can accomplish better than yourself is vital. Who on your team knows more than you about a specific job, or who do you know that has expertise where you don’t? Who has more time to give to a project? By delegating to the right people, you can grow your business by ensuring that everyone is giving their best work in their best arenas. (3) Create a routine for yourself. Habits and a normalized routine can help keep the guesswork out of the workplace. Setting aside the time to accomplish what needs to be done while also creating space for creative work can help keep your day moving steadily forward. (2) Take time to reflect on whether or not you have the right people in the right seats. Are your team members able to give their best in their current positions? Being willing to take a step back and observe whether or not a person, project, or conversation need to move forward as they are can be helpful. By simply moving a team member to a different position or by eliminating a project, you can create a more efficient path ahead for your business. (1) Focus on the “ultra” important. Distractions can take away the energy and time you need to be channeling into what is truly important to you, the team, and your business. Being willing to utilize the tools above can help keep you from giving in to the distractions that riddle everyday life. Fight stress through prioritizing Prioritizing can be difficult - especially when you have so many vital priorities as a leader. The last tool Jason and Jim discuss is the need to focus. Jim explains the need for a leader to be flexible in his priorities for the day while not losing sight of the ultimate goal. Your checklist of to-dos will change throughout the day, and that is okay. What really matters is whether or not you are accomplishing the ultra important and moving steadily along the path to your personal and business goals. Be sure to listen to the entire episode for a more in-depth look at the tools and tactics listed above. Everyone is different and will utilize unique stress-fighting tactics to overcome obstacles and distractions and create a healthy lifestyle. Taking the time to create in yourself the focus and endurance to combat stress will enable you to be a better leader. The important thing to remember is that, “If you're not making chips, you're not making money. And if you're too stressed, you're not making chips.” Here’s The Good Stuff! What to do when life is crazy. DMDII switched to MXD. What causes stress? Personal tools for eliminating stress in your personal life. Tactics for overcoming stress in the workplace. Prioritizing your priorities. Discovering what works for you. Tools & Takeaways Digital Minimalism Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
4/4/201929 minutes, 56 seconds
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Utilizing LinkedIn Strategies for Business Success with Wayne Breitbarth

LinkedIn expert, Wayne Breitbarth, is back with more excellent insight into LinkedIn strategies to promote and grow your manufacturing business! Jim and Jason ask the hard questions about the worth of a premium account, when and how to say no to offending taggers and salesmen, and when, where, and how to post the good stuff. Be sure to listen the whole way through for all the tips and tricks to boost your business and put you on the leading edge of the manufacturing industry! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The premium life: LinkedIn strategies for greater coverage Is a premium account worth the cash? Wayne shares a helpful gauge to determine if it’s time for you or your business to bite the bullet for premium benefits. If you are running into what Wayne calls the “free wall,” then it’s time to pay. If trying to keep up with who has been viewing your profile is taking up all your spare time, then you may want to consider going premium. With the upgraded account, you can see the past 90 days of profile “stalkers.” Being able to go back and see who has been visiting your profile will help you determine who to reach out to and build relationship with. Another way to tell if it’s time for that premium account is if you are maxing out your search allowance for the month. A premium account will give you a wider berth for searching out the perfect people to build your business and professional alliances. Wayne suggests the “Sales Navigator/Professional” premium setting as the perfect “rocket-ship” to carry your profile to the next level. Dealing with unwanted attention Jim and Wayne both get frustrated and feel offended when someone tags them in posts that have nothing to do with them. Some people use tagging as a sales tactic to take advantage of others’ many followers. Wayne suggests that if this happens to you, untag yourself from the post. If it happens again with the same instigator, direct message that person, and politely - but firmly - ask them to stop. If it still continues, disconnect with that person. How do you respond when someone sends a connection request and within minutes of you accepting, direct messages you trying to sell you something? If there isn’t any effort being made to build relationship with you first, Wayne suggests disconnecting with that person. Learn why building relationship is important in establishing credibility before a sale and why pre-canned, automated systems aren’t the best tactic by listening to the whole episode! What to post and where to promote Earlier in LinkedIn’s history, one could post an article, and all of that person’s connections would be notified that an article had been posted. Articles, however, aren’t as profound as they used to be. Wayne explains that the tactic originally worked because LinkedIn was trying to garner quality material within its platform. Over time, however, people began cutting corners on the quality of their articles and began only posting a sentence from a blog post or a small paragraph. LinkedIn pulled back from the promotion of articles as the material deteriorated in quality. While it is important to include your latest blog posts and articles on your profile, make sure that your writing is of high quality. People viewing your profile will want to see professionalism throughout your material - including your writing. Excellent writing builds credibility. Wayne encourages the strategy of re-sharing articles that may be a month old and didn’t receive the attention it deserved. Unimpressive impressions What does a view or impression mean? Unfortunately, they aren’t as big of a deal as some might wish. Wayne explains that an impression or view is essentially someone sweeping by your post but not actually looking at it. The activity to get excited about is comments. Making sure you are active on your posts and promoting conversation is also helpful. A response to others on your own post still counts as activity that will help broadcast your post to even more connections. Personal pages are often more powerful than company pages because of the greater number of connections often found on personal pages. While posting on both will help generate greater activity, Wayne encourages users to focus their energy on their personal page. For more insight and tips on how to create the best content and broadcast it to the greatest number of connections, listen to the whole episode! Growing your business through LinkedIn isn’t as hard as you think. Here’s The Good Stuff! MakingChips News: Opinion articles to boost your competence. Understanding what it means to be a “change agent.” Wayne Breitbarth’s rise to LinkedIn success. The power of a premium account. Navigating the waters of unwanted tagging and sales. When and how to upload company content. Don’t be impressed by those impressions. Quality over quantity. Tools & Takeaways What Makes a Great Manufacturing Leader The Power Formula for LinkedIn Success This Week’s Superstar Guest: Wayne Breitbarth Wayne Breitbarth Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify *******************************************************************************************************
3/19/201944 minutes, 7 seconds
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LinkedIn Success Without Having to Obsess with Wayne Breitbarth

Gaining LinkedIn success is not as difficult as some may think. Utilizing the world’s largest database of professionals is key to marketing your manufacturing business and rising as a leader in the industry. Guest speaker, Wayne Breitbarth, is a LinkedIn trainer and shares his strategies and insights into the powerhouse of LinkedIn and how manufacturing leaders can effectively connect with other leaders, share their businesses, and expand their reach. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Why manufacturing leaders need to pursue LinkedIn Success LinkedIn is the largest database of professionals and business leaders that is available. As business leaders, LinkedIn is a powerful tool that can be used to market businesses, find competent employees, and connect with other influential industry leaders. An exuberant amount of time isn’t needed to establish yourself and your business on LinkedIn. Wayne explains that it is all about strategizing the processes and systems available on the platform and focusing on what matters to you and your company. Understanding the essence of LinkedIn The essence of LinkedIn is not only found in the opportunities of such a large database but in the opportunity to form relationships. Relationships are the foundation of any successful business venture. Wayne describes what your relationship status may look like on LinkedIn depending on the size and purpose of your company. Sometimes more is truly more, and sometimes it’s not. If you are selling a book or trying to reach a wide audience with a new podcast release, then you may want to accept all those connections with people you may not know. If your business belongs in a more niche atmosphere, then your number of connections may be smaller - and that’s okay. It is important to understand, however, that the search engine algorithms that rule LinkedIn like to see a large connection base. Wayne suggests creating a social media atmosphere on LinkedIn that is saturated with the people of your industry, whether that be followers, customers, or other leading manufacturers. To learn more about how to create and maintain effective relationships, listen to the whole episode! Strategizing your LinkedIn process Succeeding with your LinkedIn profile can be achieved through strategizing the tools that LinkedIn offers. Keyword optimization is a large part of making yourself known and finding the people you need to help grow your business. Include specific terminology in your headline, stories, and description. Stay away from broad terms such as “strategy” in your skill-set and include specified terms such as “Podcast Host.” Show off your unique professionalism and offerings. Your skill-set can be utilized through endorsements and recommendations. Search engines love using your list of skills as keywords. Make sure they reflect what you want to be known for. Wayne explains that recommendations and endorsements are gifts to you. Use them in business proposals and when sharing your business with others. Posting can be a confusing tool, but Wayne explains that success in posting is all about velocity. Tagging relevant people in your post will expand its reach. Be careful to not “spam” others with overabundant tagging, but instead talk with the people you plan to tag and explain that it is a strategy to help promote and grow the business. Velocity is gained through initializing and promoting activity on your posts. Use hashtags and comment on a post that someone else tags you in to begin a conversation. LinkedIn algorithms look for how fast your post is being responded to and how much activity is being generated by your post. The more activity the better. Creating an all-star profile Beginning a profile or revamping a stagnant one isn’t hard! Begin by understanding your audience. Who are you writing and creating your profile for? Headlines should be short but descriptive. If you have five jobs, then list all of them in your headline and title. Create stories that are relevant and captivating when describing your job positions. Ask yourself, “How can my job experiences benefit others?” Promote your strengths and don’t be shy about creating an eye-catching profile. For more insight into what makes a great LinkedIn profile, listen to the entire episode!   Here’s The Good Stuff! Is social media a distraction? Guest speaker, Wayne Breitbarth, is a professional LinkedIn trainer. Understanding the power of LinkedIn: the largest database of professionals in the world. Creating a strategic LinkedIn process. Optimizing the time you spend promoting your company. The essence of LinkedIn is relationship. Is more actually more? The art of tagging. How to create velocity in your posts. Effectively utilizing endorsements and recommendations. How to begin or revamp your LinkedIn profile. Tools & Takeaways Digital Minimalism Traction These Industries Will Face the Biggest Talent Shortages by 2030 This Week’s Superstar Guest: Wayne Breitbarth The Power Formula for LinkedIn Success Wayne Breitbarth Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
3/15/201946 minutes, 14 seconds
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Evolutions in the Workholding Process with Alvin Goellner

Having the best workholding system is just as key as having the best tools! Jim Carr and Jason Zenger know the importance of keeping up with the game as manufacturing leaders. Growing up working the shop floor, guest speaker, Alvin Goellner, is the Business Development Leader of North America at Amrok Workholding. In this episode of MakingChips, he shares the latest trends in workholding systems and why you need to implement them for optimal efficiency and quality performance in your manufacturing business. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Optimizing your workholding process is vital to overall success The workholding process is all about how rigid you can make your setup - creating a solid foundation that will hold your material for optimal performance. Without a steady and rigid workholding system, your process will be riddled with chatter, less tolerance, and damaging vibration. While it is less of an investment to just keep upgrading your cutting and milling tools, it is still key to keep your workholding system up-to-date. The way your tool and materials are being held is vital to the outcome of the end-product. The workholding system must be rigid, robust, and competent at holding your material and efficient at resizing and holding different projects. Alvin explains that you can own the best cutting tools in the world, but without a competent workholding system, your product will not be the best on the market. The grid system evolution Alvin explains that over the years, he visited different manufacturing shops and studied the varying methods and machining solutions to the workholding process. He then went back to his own company - Amrok - and built the workholding systems that solved the problems he had found in his travels. The result was the 2-inch grid system, which has become an industry standard. While there used to be odd-sized grid systems with varying sized plates, Alvin found that most products can fit into the 2-inch grid plate. An incredibly efficient system, the hardened bushing, lock-tightened, slip fitted grid retains center distance tolerance because of its minimal clearance. 2-inch sub-plates are the common sub-plate, which allows for efficient adjustment of the numbers for varying projects. To learn more about the efficient and customizable applications of the 2-inch grid system, listen to the entire episode! Vise system optimization When projects become large a TRIAG modular vise system is the most efficient. With modular clamps that can fit almost any shape, the system boasts serrated base rails that mount on a standard, 2-inch grid and locate with dowel screws. This system enables the spindle to keep moving, thereby creating a more efficient process. The modular components can be loosened in seconds, and you don’t have to spend time indicating because of the dowel screw location. Listen to the full episode for more information on how the TRIAG modular vise system works and why it improves overall performance. What to implement now for immediate impact With so many options available on the current market, Alvin supplies three workholding systems that will instantly improve efficiency in the shop. First, optimize your foundation. Implementing a 2-inch grid system enables you to work with a lot of different system types, tools, and materials. Second, hydraulic, dedicated fixtures that automatically fit the part with a flip of the switch will save you time and energy. Third, introducing a low mix, high volume TRIAG system to your shop floor will prove invaluable. Center-less vises that mount on a rail are lighter and more efficient. Alvin explains that if you need to move from one sized part to another, the application is easy and fast, allowing you to produce more chips and earn more money. Here’s The Good Stuff! Manufacturing news: manufacturing jobs are steadily growing! Alvin Goellner: Business Development Leader at Amrok. The birth of Amrok created out of the need for a solid foundation. The versatility of a 2-inch grid system. Why optimizing the workholding process is just as important as upgrading your tools. How’s your vise grip? European vs. American workholding systems. The three most impactful workholding systems that you can implement today. Tools & Takeaways makingchips.com/workholding Amrok This Week’s Superstar Guest: Alvin Goellner Alvin Goellner Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
2/15/201942 minutes, 7 seconds
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The Latest Cutting Tool Trends in Manufacturing with Tom Senger

The team at MakingChips knows how important it is for the Metalworking Nation to optimize efficiency and productivity. Having the right tools for the job is at the foundation of a leading manufacturing business. Guest speaker, Tom Senger, gives the run-down on the latest and greatest tools to utilize on the shop floor. Tom is the manager of the Vending, Integration, and Productivity (VIP) program at Zenger’s. Helping customers integrate new operations, realize new levels of productivity, and bring in greater revenue is his specialty. Manufacturing runs in his blood, and he understands what tools to use to get the job done.   Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact   The latest trends in cutting tools can help you make more chips...and more money The tools you use can make or break the impact of your manufacturing business. Hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger know you need to be making chips. Being on the cutting edge of cutting tools is imperative to saving money. Tom gives several suggestions for what tools to use for what job and explains that several improvements are being made throughout the manufacturing tool spectrum. Consistency is one of them. Small diameter, multifunctioning drilling tools have seen huge improvements in all-around consistency. It’s no longer the case that you need specialized tools for each part of the job. Not only do multi-functional drilling tools save you a ton of space in your collection storage, but they also get the job done with consistent quality and efficiency. Invest in one tool that can serve multiple functions. Coolant through is the new buzzword Coolant through is being implemented across the tool board. This quality helps reduce wear and tear on your drill bits, improves lubricity, and saves you time and money on maintenance, especially with solid carbide spindles and bits. It also improves consistency. Tom shares about some of the utilization of coolant through on the shop floor. Flat-bottom drills are excellent because they don’t have to be followed up by an end mill. They have replaceable tips and a myriad of products that you can place on the high-speed, coolant through, steel body. The flexibility of this tool enables you to save on carbide costs, and it is incredibly precise with diameters down to a millimeter and a half. Coolant through is also improving the performance of turning and cutting tools, cut-off and groove tools, and milling tools. Fast and high-speed milling tools are seeing smaller diameters, indexable end mills, and dynamic milling processes with the help of CAD CAM software. Different high feed cutters are being utilized to create more corners, even up to 6, 12, and 16 corners with repeatable functions. Turning and cutting tools are being improved with higher feeds and a greater depth of cut. The coolant through allows for less load on the spindle. It’s much the same story with cut-off and groove tools. Tom explains that the coolant through allows for a cooler cutting zone, cutting the cutting time by almost half. Be sure to listen to the full episode for all the details on how and why these improved tools need to become your next investment! Coating, and tolerance improvements As Tom points out, coating is king. Products and tools are no longer simply coated in a layer of tin. Now, there are several layers of different materials being applied for improved performance. Post-treatment coating is especially valuable, coming over the top insert and applying a clear, shining, polished surface. The polish protects and preserves carbide function and strength, improving the shelf-life of the tool up to 25%. Tolerancing is also an obvious ingredient of a great tool. Improved molding technology paired with coolant through enables tools such as the solid carbide spindle coolant drill to function with consistent quality up to a thousand repeatability. Slim the carbide and save on cash Carbide is expensive, and the more you can save on the life of your carbide tools and bits, the better. Solid carbide end mills have been a staple, but Tom explains that many are moving away from solid carbide and choosing steel shanks instead. Different types of end mill heads can be applied to the shank, and many of them have been made smaller for improved performance. Investing in coolant through applications and the right coating can have a huge, positive impact on the shelf-life of your carbide collection, allowing you to work harder, longer, and better without the constant maintenance costs. For more insight into the latest cutting tool trends, be sure to listen to the entire episode! Here’s The Good Stuff! To make chips you need the right tools. Manufacturing news: exciting award nomination for Carr Machine & Tool, and sales summit for Zenger’s. Tom Senger, manager of Zenger VIP program. The latest and great cutting tool trends. Coolant through, small diameter, multi-functioning drills. The power of the flat-bottom drill. Holding tolerance levels. Yes, the coating does mean everything. High feed milling tools and dynamic processing software. Turning and cutting tool trends. Cut off and groove improvements Shrink fitting tools is the way to go. Tools & Takeaways Foxconn Disappointment This Week’s Superstar Guest: Tom Senger Tom Senger Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
2/10/201940 minutes, 11 seconds
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Strategizing Your Employee Development with Jess Giudici

Understanding how to create an employee development plan can be difficult if your company is not striving towards constant improvement. Guest speaker Jess Giudici is back with the MakingChips team to discuss the importance of taking the time to focus on each employee’s goals and dreams and how to foster alignment between their goals and your company’s vision. Developing your team can help you better understand why people leave your company and why they stay. Listen to this episode for insightful advice on how to best strategize your development plan and build an ever-improving team! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Fostering a united vision to constantly improve through excellent employee development While a lot of people look at employee development as getting someone to the next level or role in a company, Jess encourages business leaders to view their development plan as a tool to foster continual growth in the individual. A good strategy is to diversify the development process. Don’t make your development plan entirely made up of formal meetings between you and the employee. While you should have planned discussions with documented goals and deadlines to meet those goals, you should also make an effort to informally engage in conversation on the floor. Learn about who they are and what they want from life, from work, from their skill-set. Jim and Jess agree that having a standard set of questions and procedures as a base to employee development is an excellent place to start - but allow space in the personal conversations you have as well. Documenting the conversations you have can help clarify future meetings, goal-making, and accountability. What motivates you? What is your passion, and how can we help? Each person is unique and will be motivated in different ways. The goal should be to align the skills that a person is motivated to learn and their aspirations with the goals and vision of the company. Ask your employees what they are passionate about. Ask what they find challenging in work and how you can help them overcome those challenges. What if someone doesn’t want to “move up the ladder” and take on leadership? Jess says that such an answer is perfectly okay - as long as your company can sustain the current position. The goal is to engage with your employees and make sure that they are feeling fulfilled in their positions. The Annual review: drawing the line between performance and pay Annual reviews are often a combination of performance review and pay review. Jess suggests that the two be separated and discussed independently of one another. While the pay may be influenced by performance, excellent performance doesn’t always mean a raise in salary. The focus should be on the employee, not the pay. This elevates the importance of performance and sends the message that you care about how the employee is doing and feeling in his or her job. When dealing with individuals who feel they should be paid more while being allowed to stay in their current skill-set and position, Jess encourages company leaders to be frank and honest about the company’s expectations and salary caps. Supporting your employees is key, but be clear about the policies. Listen to the entire episode for more advice on how to evaluate your employee performance and foster a thriving company culture! Why do they leave? Why do they stay? Understanding and evaluating retention and attrition can be confusing. Jess explains that employees leave for a wide variety of reasons, and you shouldn’t be surprised when you hear that someone is leaving your team. If you are surprised, then something probably went wrong in the development process. You should be self-evaluating your company’s processes to make sure you are doing your best at developing your employees and the company’s goals. Jess suggests having interviews with people who are leaving - as well as with people who love their work and want to stay long-term. Understanding why people want to stay can help you understand why some people may not be a good fit and want to go. Creating a company culture where everyone has a voice is vital to a thriving and happy atmosphere and excellent work ethic. Jason points out that a great culture comes from truly loving and caring about the business and the people who work it. Jess reminds leaders to understand who they are as an employer and to take the time to understand their employees’ voice. Here’s The Good Stuff! Uniting your team under the goal to constantly improve. Manufacturing news: Millennials’ perspectives on manufacturing jobs. Jess Giudici is back with the Metal Working Nation! Fostering a love of personal and company growth through HR development. Understanding the individual: what drives your employees? What if someone doesn’t want to climb the career ladder? Balancing formal and informal development conversations. Separating performance and pay reviews. Understanding why people leave and why people stay. Creating and cultivating a great company culture. Bonus interview about compensation techniques with Jess Giudici. Tools & Takeaways Millennials Skeptical About Manufacturing Careers Halogen Software Bonus Interview with Jess Giudici on Compensation Techniques This Week’s Superstar Guest: Jess Giudici Jess Giudici Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
1/25/201946 minutes, 3 seconds
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Streamlining Your Hiring Process with Jessica Giudici

Streamlining and optimizing your company’s hiring and onboarding processes can be difficult and sometimes daunting. Hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger bring helpful and common questions to the table with guest speaker Jessica Giudici - manager of organizational development at Smalley. Jess gives practical and engaging advice on how to approach your hiring process and create efficient, job-unique procedures for finding the best individuals for your company’s needs. Learn how staying true to your company’s vision and values can help save you time in the hiring process on this episode of the MakingChips podcast! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The hiring process: taking it back to the roots Where should manufacturing leaders start when assessing their company’s hiring process? Jess emphasizes that understanding who you are as a company is key. Branding isn’t just something that you talk about with the marketing team; who you are should permeate everything you do, including hiring and onboarding. Identify and establish who you are as an employer. What is your commitment to your employees and team members? Jess explains that when you understand who you are as a company and employer, it helps narrow down who you want to join your team and who will make a good fit. Create an optimized process centered around your company’s values Recognizing your identity is just the first step. The next is understanding who your audience is when marketing an open position. A cookie cutter approach to hiring won’t attract the unique candidates that you want to see applying for your specific job opportunities. From there, you can hone down which platform you will use to market the job. After you have identified who it is you need - and for what job - you need to walk through what the first conversation will look like. Put yourself in the candidate’s shoes and think about what they will find and feel when they walk through the door at the first meeting. Are your processes outdated? Is it all paper and work? Is it boring? Think again about who you are as a company and create an atmosphere that highlights your strengths, values, and vision. Interviewing: a process of identification Jess discusses why speed to hire must be executed within the framework of quality over quantity. You don’t need 10 or 20 candidates; you need one excellent candidate. Create an interview process for your company that focuses on finding the right fit. Jim and Jason agree, saying that making sure the candidate is aligned with your core values is essential. Jess recommends training your hiring managers to effectively engage the candidate and to listen to the entire team’s perceptions. She discourages the 2 on 1 interview, explaining that it is needlessly intimidating to the candidate, and it is easy for the emphasis of the interview to shift from the candidate to the communication between interviewers. To learn more about the best practices for interviewing and whether or not money should be discussed in the process, listen to the full episode! Breathing life into your onboarding process Having an optimized onboarding process is just as important as having solid hiring procedures. Jess recommends walking through the goals and desired impressions of the onboarding experience. She reveals that it only takes about 45 days for a new employee to decide whether or not they wish to stay with a company long-term or begin looking for new opportunities. The first few months are vital! Training your leadership on how to engage effectively with new recruits will quicken learning and make for a positive experience for all participants. The focus should be on creating an environment in which the new employee can thrive as a learner. For more excellent tips on how to streamline your manufacturing company’s hiring and onboarding processes, listen to the entire episode! Jim and Jason encourage you to not become overwhelmed but to take things one step at a time, leading to effective success. Here’s The Good Stuff! Carr Machine & Tool secured a finalists position for some exciting awards! Bill Gates invests in carbon-free steel manufacturing. Guest speaker, Jessica Giudici - a MakingChips veteran. The importance of a streamlined hiring and onboarding process. Where to start in assessing your company’s hiring process. Creating a step-by-step process that highlights your company’s vision and values. Best practices for the interviewing process. How to optimize the onboarding process and boost long-term employee retention. Don’t be overwhelmed! Improve one step at a time. Tools & Takeaways http://fortune.com/2019/01/09/boston-metal/ This Week’s Superstar Guest: Jess Giudici Jess Giudici Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
1/18/201950 minutes, 10 seconds
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Recession Planning and Where to Start

The word is out - the economy is changing, and you should probably start planning for a recession. MakingChips hosts Jason Zenger and Jim Carr help take the intimidation out of a looming recessional period by offering some practical advice based on their own personal experiences with leading manufacturing businesses during economic recessions. Learn how you can get a head start in your business and personal life by making just a few - and not too frightening - changes to your company’s lifestyle in this important episode of the MakingChips podcast! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Preparation prevents poor performance Jim and Jason explain that recessions in the economy are inevitable. While we can’t ever know for sure when or how harshly recessions will hit, we can take steps to prepare for the strike. There are difficulties in every season of the economy - even in the good times. Recessions simply provide a different set of challenges that can be weathered more effectively by those who plan accordingly. Jim and Jason point out that the manufacturing economy is at a booming national high, which makes now the perfect time to save and plan for a dive. The money game: where to spend and where to save A looming recession raises numerous questions on how to best manage company and personal finances. Jim and Jason give helpful starting points for long-term effectiveness, beginning with the important step of keeping your debt low and under control. The probability of needing to cut job margins is high, and there will not be as much room in the profit margin to play with. Keeping debt thin will leave more room for necessary funding. Saving money is also vital. Jim and Jason recommend bulking up the savings account to create a buffer for yourself and your company for when times get tight. Saving now can help counter the possible need to cut employment levels. A third way you can take precautions now is to be prudent with your company and personal spending. Determine what you can cut out of your business and personal spending and make a budget. Learn how sacrificing now can save you later by listening to the full episode! Building up your team and your machine Don’t leave your employees and team members in the dark on what is happening in the economy and of the changes that you will likely need to make in your business when the recession hits. Encourage your team to not overextend themselves and to prepare themselves. Build up morale by explaining the cyclical nature of the economy. Recessions don’t last forever! Give them tools to help them prepare (such as this podcast!). Refrain from purchasing new machinery leading up to the recession and during. Invest in your current machinery by making necessary repairs and keeping up on maintenance. Today’s machinery will be tomorrow’s money-makers. Invest now while you have the monetary means. Seizing the opportunity in a recession Jim and Jason point out that opportunity is available in every season of the economy. Diversify your customer base now so that when things get rough, your company’s well-being won’t be compromised by the collapse of just one or two of your clients. Not all of your customers will be affected by the recession in the same way. When the recession does hit, don’t sit back and wait it out. Look for ways to build your business by observing what is available when other companies are struggling. An example Jim and Jason give is acquiring your competition’s businesses or bringing them onto your team. Look for ways you can help yourself by helping others. For more tips and tricks on how to lessen the pain of a recession and effectively prepare your manufacturing business for the coming times, listen to the full episode! Here’s The Good Stuff! A recession is coming. Exciting news about national growth in manufacturing and Jim’s new trunnion table. Changes in the economy call for changes of plan: how to be prepared. Why you should keep debt low. Why you need to diversify your customer base. Communication with your team is vital. The importance of maintaining your current machinery and equipment. Building your savings account so it can do its job. How being prudent in company and personal spending NOW will save you later. Opportunities are abundant - even in a recession. Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
1/12/201929 minutes, 4 seconds
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Storytelling Matters with Christine Schmitz

In this episode of MakingChips, Jason Zenger and Jim Carr introduce a new team member, Christine Schmitz - an experienced editor and writer who explains why storytelling matters to manufacturers and their businesses. Having long been connected to the manufacturing world through her husband, Dr. Tony Schmitz (featured in a previous episode), Christine has an intensely valuable viewpoint on how and why it is important for leaders to be able to tell good stories. “Communications is the foundation of who I am,” Christine shares. To communicate well, one must build relationship, and relationship is founded in the sharing of stories. Want to know what makes a great story and how knowing how to write one can boost your game in the manufacturing business? Listen to the whole episode! Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Bringing process and art together Just as in manufacturing, there is a process of writing a good story. Christine shares the process of how to take your story and vision and work it into a compelling and useful tool. The process begins with the reader - the intended audience. Identify who your audience is and ask, “What do they want to know that I can share?” Identify what expertise you can share with your audience by knowing what problem you solve through your business or work. Your audience’s interest lies in the application of your knowledge and profession. Find an editor or another person you trust to give you feedback on your writing. Another set of eyes is invaluable and a vital part to the success of your story. Always reread your writing. Trust your professional intuition and make sure that your work, vision, and story is conveyed honestly and effectively. Creating a shared vision through your story Christine points out that most people only think of themselves when communicating. To build a lasting and effective relationship, however, one must think of the other person - in this case, the manufacturing leader must think of his or her business, employees, customers, and possible recruits. All of these categories are readers of your story who want to know, “What’s in it for me?” It can often be difficult for manufacturers to share the story of their work, the challenge of their highly technical fields, or the processes they use. Christine reveals that relevance is key to building the bridge between writer and reader. “When it’s hard to explain what you are doing to another person,” she explains, “it dramatically impacts the relationship you can have with them.” To learn how to best create a shared vision through your story, listen to the full episode! Connecting yourself and your audience through problem-solving Tailoring your message to your audience is vital for the survival of your story. But how should you convey your manufacturing story to capture your audience? Christine points out that manufacturing is something that permeates everybody’s lives. Manufacturers produce something tangible every day, whereas most other people do not. People want to know how and why you create the things you do - as long as the application applies to them. Your audience wants to know what the problem is that you solve and how and why you solve that problem. Connect yourself with your audience by concentrating your story on the end result of your work. Quality is always better than quantity Christine warns against the temptation to simply flood your readers and audience with information that they may not be interested in or need. Always take quality over quantity. One way you can ensure the quality of your writing is through an editor. While your professional expertise is needed to correctly tell the story, an editor can help you build the strongest and most effective bridge between your story and your audience. Also, realize that there is no one way to write. Find a process that works for you and don’t be afraid to change that process when it’s not working. To learn more about writing as a process and why storytelling matters to your manufacturing business and skillset, listen to the full episode! Here’s The Good Stuff! Manufacturing is storytelling. Manufacturing News: changes in tariffs. Introducing the new MakingChips member: Christine Schmitz. Why is it important to convey a good story? Storytelling as a process. Clarity in storytelling. What’s in it for me? Relevance in storytelling. Why should manufacturers write? Getting started: Connecting with your audience. Common storylines: everyone is touched by manufacturing. The importance of an editor. Quality over quantity in writing. Tools & Takeaways https://www.thestreet.com/technology/apple-considering-moving-china-manufacturing-14809167 https://storybrand.com/ This Week’s Superstar Guest: Christine Schmitz Christine Schmitz Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
1/4/201939 minutes, 3 seconds
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Machining Vibration with Dr. Tony Schmitz

The MakingChips podcast welcomes guest Tony Schmitz, professor at UNC Charlotte and assistant director, energy production and infrastructure center to talk about machining vibration. Tony teaches mechanical design, helping students design and build useful technology like robots. He also teaches mechanical vibrations, structural dynamics, and advanced manufacturing. He says, “At the end of the day, when you’ve made something, you never feel like you didn’t accomplish something that day.” During this episode, Tony gives helpful information about how to measure and mitigate machining vibration in manufacturing. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The 3 pieces of the machining dynamics puzzle Why are machining dynamics important for manufacturing leaders? Knowing the variables within a tooling machine and being able to adjust them appropriately can increase the longevity of the tool and increase productivity. Tony Schmitz explains that there are three pieces of the machining dynamics puzzle. Listen as he explains why considering these three factors are essential for manufacturers. Feel the machining vibration Whenever a force is being applied to a nonrigid structure, there will be vibration. The problem, according to Tony, is that CAD/CAM software encourages you to ignore vibration and the variables within the machining tool. CAD/CAM always drafts the cutting process perfectly. However, it doesn’t take into account the reality of a machining tool that vibrates. Vibration means displacement of your cutter that changes over time. However, Tony says that the math equations you learned in school can actually be applied to the shop floor. Hear how differential equations can actually be used in CAD/CAM software to help get higher axial depths of cut without chatter. Good vibrations v. bad vibrations “Just like we all have fingerprints, every cut has a fingerprint as well and it’s the frequency content of that sound signal,” says Tony Schmitz. Bad vibration, also called chatter, are unmistakable when you hear it in a shop. Tony talks about how he can analyze frequencies that a machine puts out and identify bad vibrations and problems in the chip making process. He also explains how viewing wave patterns produced by a machine can tell you how to adjust your spindle speed. Tony says, “The most powerful knob on your controller is not the feed override, it is the spindle speed override.” How to increase productivity in your shop In order to mitigate bad vibration and increase your productivity, Tony encourages collecting a minimum set of data. He describes how to select the 8-10 standard tools that you use the most and collect data on those tools, using an impact, or tap test. Results from a tap test can help you bid jobs more accurately. They can also help you make adjustments to your machines so that you can avoid chatter and be more efficient. Learn about that and much more on this episode of MakingChips. Here’s The Good Stuff! Manufacturing News: A Detroit entrepreneur applies lean auto manufacturing principles to build a beauty salon Introduction of guest Dr. Tony Schmitz, professor of at UNC Charlotte and Assistant Director, Energy production and infrastructure center Tony explains the three pieces of the machining dynamic puzzle How math and physics can be applied to the shop floor Analyzing frequency data to identify bad vibrations within a machining tool The correlation of feedback in a PA system and chatter in a milling tool How a tap test can help you measure your tools data, make adjustments, and increase productivity The pigskin professor and how Dr. Tony Schmitz put together videos for University of Florida football games This Week’s Superstar Guest Dr. Tony Schmitz Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
12/28/201840 minutes, 22 seconds
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Lean Process Improvement with Noah Goellner

On this week’s episode of MakingChips, guest Noah Goellner talks about lean process improvement for manufacturers. Noah is the Vice President of Continuous Improvement for Hennig Inc. He is also a lean expert with who presents lean practices in his role at Hennig and as a member of the board of directors of QRM. During this conversation with Jim and Jason, Noah shares why focusing on lean process improvement is important for manufacturers and how it can help transform their companies. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact Why do manufacturers need to focus on lean process improvement Manufactures should devote time to integrating lean into their companies for many reasons. There are cost saving benefits, improvement of throughput, better problem-solving skills and employee development and much more. Failure to have a lean process can put you behind the competition Noah says, “You can’t improve without changing and you can’t change without improving unless you are going the wrong way.” Listen as Noah explains the benefits of lean process improvement during this podcast. How lean flows value to the customer Success doesn’t begin on the shop floor. Most of what determines success happens upstream before the work ever reaches a machine. Quality engineering, supply chain, and employee development all determine whether or not your company can serve your customers well. Lean process improvement is all about flowing value to the customer by eliminating waste or white space, increasing efficiency and consistently improving in all areas of the business. Listen as Noah Goellner shares more ways that lean flows value to the customer. How can you start implementing lean into your company? As with any new process implementation, the key is to take the first step. You don’t have to wait until you have everything figured out. And you don’t have to do everything at once. Consider your pain points and areas of inefficiency and start with one challenge. Noah Goellner talks about taking a cata approach to solving problems. He encourages manufacturing leaders to avoid the shotgun approach and instead take a focused approach to implement lean. Lean process improvement over the natural approach Manufacturing leaders can fall into the habit of operating their companies under natural or organic processes and expectations. However, growth and improvement must be intentional. Noah explains that taking the natural approach allows you to work in your areas of strength while your weaknesses remain unaddressed. Lean process improvement can be an effective agent of change, especially in the areas of weakness. As you identify the challenges within the business, you can then start to implement strategies to change for the benefit of the company and the customers you serve. Hear all about that and more on this episode of MakingChips. Here’s The Good Stuff! Manufacturing News: Manufacturing’s mixed messages aren’t helping to close the skills gap. Why do small machine shop owners need to devote time to implementing lean into their businesses? How Noah Goellner defines lean and how it helps companies provide value to the customer Real-world practices for implementing lean into your manufacturing business How to work backward through the manufacturing process to set expectations and evaluate process to achieve those requirements. What is cata and how does it help with problem-solving? Noah Goellner shares some stories of success for companies have implemented lean processes. What is the best reason for implementing a process rather than allowing it to happen naturally Tools & Takeaways This Week’s Superstar Guest Noah Goellner Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
12/22/201839 minutes, 50 seconds
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MakingChips 2.0 with Nick Goellner

On today’s podcast, Jim and Jason share a very special announcement about MakingChips 2.0. Four years ago, MakingChips started with the goal of equipping and inspiring manufacturing leaders. The mission has not and will not change. However, what started as a hobby has now turned into something much more. And now there is an exciting new partnership that is going to take MakingChips to the next level. Listen to this episode to hear all about MakingChips 2.0 Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact A strategic partnership that is reshaping the future for MakingChips On this episode, Nick Goellner joins the podcast to reveal a new strategic partnership for MakingChips. Nick is the Marketing Director of Advanced Machine & Engineering and is now a Partner and Managing Director at MakingChips. He is joining the team to propel the company from a simple podcast to a media agency that can serve the metalworking nation. Hear about the bright new future that lies ahead for MakingChips and how you can be encouraged and equipped even more by joining the journey. The impact of content marketing for manufacturers Marketing has changed dramatically in the last twenty or thirty years. Companies used to talk to the consumer and tell them what they wanted. Now the key to marketing success involves interacting with your audience and talking with them, not at them. Content marketing isn’t a new strategy. Nick Goellner talks about how two companies that have leveraged it to help grow and solidify their brand. Listen to hear how content marketing can help your company expand its reach. How do you build a brand? How can you build your brand? Nick Goellner says that you build a brand by building an audience. That’s exactly what MakingChips has done over the last four years. By consistently creating quality content that educates your audience, you become a thought leader and expert in the industry. During this episode, Jim and Jason share with Nick how they have approached content marketing with MakingChips. They also discuss some of the exciting new opportunities that lie ahead. The future of MakingChips 2.0 MakingChips has provided interviews, information and inspiration for the last four years. Realizing how challenging manufacturing can be led Jim and Jason to seek out wisdom and knowledge from other leaders. Now, MakingChips is becoming an agency to serve manufacturers so they can experience greater success through marketing. Utilizing video, written content, and the brand new Chip-In program, MakingChips will continue to strive toward the mission that has driven them from the very beginning. Here’s The Good Stuff! The big announcement of MakingChips 2.0 with a very special new partner Manufacturing News: 2019 Manufacturing Content Marketing Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends report The mission of MakingChips when Jim and Jason started and where it is today Two classic examples of content marketing. Nick shares the six steps of building a brand by building an audience. How partnering with Nick will help MakingChips expand and grow. Ways that the metalworking nation can be a part of encouraging and inspiring manufacturing leaders. Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
12/8/201829 minutes, 1 second
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The Entrepreneurial Operating System

Jim and Jason are back in the studio to start their new series on process by talking about the Entrepreneurial Operating System. This podcast series on process is designed to help you evaluate your current processes and determine where in your company new ones can or should be implemented. During this episode, Jason talks about the EOS process and how he has applied it at Zenger’s Industrial, Black Industrial and Safety Supply, and at MakingChips. As they discuss EOS, Jason and Jim also give some helpful tips for starting your own process journey. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact What is the Entrepreneurial Operating System? EOS is a set of concepts and tools designed to help leaders and organizations get better. It includes the best business practices and process, combining them into a single system. EOS focuses on vision, traction, and health to help companies solve their problems and experience progress. Listen as Jason shares how the Entrepreneurial Operating System has benefited his teams during this podcast. The 6 components of EOS During this episode, Jim and Jason discuss the six components of the EOS. Each component is vital to growth and health. The first component is vision. Everyone in the company needs to know where you are going and how you are going to get there. Vision gives your company a common objective and defines success. EOS helps by giving eight questions for leaders to answer that will help them cast a vision. Right people, right seat The second component of the EOS is having the right people in the right positions on your team. In order to move forward, you have to have a team that is aligned with your core values. Hiring the right people first requires creating an organizational structure. Many companies structure their companies around the personalities already on the team. Jim and Jason talk about the importance of conflict management and solving problems methodically. Hear more about all 6 of the components during this episode. How to implement a process like EOS Knowing about a process like EOS isn’t enough. If you want to experience the benefit of such a process, you have to take a step and start implementing it. So how do you do that? Jim and Jason give some advice for how to begin utilizing a process like EOS. They also discuss how to experience the best results and how quickly change can happen. Be inspired to take a step in evaluating and upgrading your processes as you listen to this episode of MakingChips. Here’s The Good Stuff! Jason introduces the process system that he uses at Zenger’s Industrial Supply, Black Industrial and Safety Supply and at MakingChips The process that Jim uses at Carr Machine & Tool, Inc. Manufacturing News: Volvo upends U.S. manufacturing plans in reaction to China tariffs 6 components of the Entrepreneurial Operating System Having a vision that is compelling and well communicated Getting the right people in the right position The importance of gathering and utilizing data Solving issues methodically Running your business like a franchise How are you achieving your vision on a weekly, monthly or quarterly basis Tools & Takeaways EOS Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
11/30/201830 minutes, 19 seconds
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Giving Thanks with The Metalworking Nation

On this special Thanksgiving episode of MakingChips, the Metalworking Nation shares what they are thankful for. While Jason and Jim usually address the challenging issues that manufacturers deal with, on this episode they step back and make some space to express gratitude for the good things in life. You wrote in and shared what you were thankful for and many of those are read many on the show. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The struggle is real, but so are the blessings Jason and Jim kick off the show by sharing the things they are thankful for. While they admit that there are difficulties and struggles in life, they have great perspective to know that in the grand scheme of things, they are blessed. Jim shares how he has learned to make adjustments in life and leadership and the difference that has created. Even small changes can have a huge impact. They also give credit to their wives for their grounding and success. What would you be doing if not manufacturing? Consider for a moment what you would’ve done for a career had you not gone into manufacturing? Where would you be if you hadn’t started in this challenging industry? During this episode, Jim and Jason discuss that very question. Listen as they both guess what they think the other would’ve done for a career. Thankfully, both Jim and Jason became leaders in the manufacturing industry and started encouraging and inspiring manufacturing leaders through the MakingChips podcast. Giving thanks with fellow MakingChips listeners On this episode, you will hear several members of the metalworking nation share about what they are thankful for. As you listen, take some time to think about how you might give thanks during this Thanksgiving season. Kaleb Mertz shares some of the email responses from MakingChips listeners and past guests. While not everyone could be featured, the ones that are shared on the episode are inspiring and encouraging. The contagious gift of gratitude One highlight of the episode comes from Steve Zenger, Jason’s dad. He wrote in to share his gratitude for his family and friends. You can hear the emotions and sentiment in his response. There are many other great submissions that include gratitude for co-workers and teams, technology, success in business and family. Listen to hear some great people giving thanks on this episode of MakingChips. Here’s The Good Stuff! Since it is Thanksgiving week, Jim and Jason talk about what they are thankful for The metalworking nation shares what they are thankful for Tina Carnelli, Marketing Manager at MP Systems feels blessed by working with people she likes Bob Petrini, President of Chick Machine Company includes Making Chips in the list of things he is thankful for Steve Zenger, Jason’s dad, shares with MakingChips the things he is thankful for Todd Stukenberg is excited about robots and how they are making manufacturing safer and faster Shaun Bisordi owner/machinist at Rocky’s Wire EDM is thankful for the social community of manufacturers Matthew Guse is thankful to have been on MakingChips earlier this year Michael Pulizzi says he is thankful for his wife This Week’s Superstar Guest All mentioned resources LinkedIn Profile Never share an email address Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
11/23/201819 minutes, 15 seconds
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Dialing in Manufacturing Processes with Jim and Jason

It’s time for you to start dialing in manufacturing processes that can revolutionize your business. Manufacturing is challenging. But MakingChips is here to help through every aspect of running and growing your business. One of the best ways to jumpstart productivity and success in your company is by evaluating and implementing processes. Manufacturers are inherently process-oriented people. Once you understand the processes you have and the ones you need to add, you are on the way to taking your company to the next level. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact The new MakingChips series Edwards Deming said, “If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process then you don’t know what you are doing.” Needless to say, processes are important. MakingChips is launching a series on the podcast that is all about dialing in processes for manufacturing leaders. Over the next few weeks, Jim and Jason will address how you market and sell, how you produce and how you manage your finances. Upcoming episodes will include discussions about the most critical areas of business that manufacturing leaders deal with every day. Facing your fear of processes Even the thought of processes for some manufacturing leaders can seem daunting. You may feel like you don’t have the time or bandwidth to deal with them because you are trying to run a business. Jim and Jason talk about the 3 Ps of running a successful company, which includes people, product and process. Each one of the three legs of the business stool is important. Failure to address one can lead a gap in your company that could cost you money and opportunity. However, optimizing core manufacturing processes can take your business leadership to the next level. The new MakingChips series will help you face your process fear. Steps to elevate processes for success What do you do once you’ve decided to jump in and start evaluating the value of manufacturing processes in your company? What are the steps to improvement? During this episode, Jim and Jason share how to implement core processes. One of the keys is to involve a team of people so that you aren’t trying to bear the load alone. Jim even encourages the smallest shops to get together weekly to talk about the difficulties and areas of growth in their shops. Dialing in your manufacturing processes with MakingChips So many companies have unwritten processes that are guiding their operations daily. Those undocumented processes can be streamlined. You can start dialing in manufacturing processes by beginning at the 30,000-foot view and zooming in as you get more comfortable. The purpose of the upcoming series is to help ignite the flame in manufacturing leaders to start implementing processes in their companies. Doing so can propel you to greater levels of success. Here’s The Good Stuff! Jason and Jim introduce a new series on the podcast that will address manufacturing processes What are the steps to implementing processes in your shop Is not having a process and indication that you don’t have confidence in what you are doing? The process checklist How to start evaluating and implementing processes in your company Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify  
11/16/201819 minutes, 10 seconds
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ITMS2018 Wrap Up with Larry Turner and Peter Eelman

Welcome to the MakingChips IMTS2018 wrap up podcast, recorded live from the final day of the show with guests Larry Turner, President and CEO of Hannover Fairs USA and Peter Eelman, Vice President of Exhibitions & Business Development at AMT. After a long and exciting week, Jim and Jason reflect on some of the trends and themes that emerged from the show and discuss some of the takeaways for manufacturing leaders. IMTS2018 proved that it is an exciting time to be in the manufacturing industry. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact IMTS’ commitment to the next generation The future of manufacturing lies in the hands of young men and women who have not even graduated high school yet. Investment in next generation leaders is critical to seeing continued success in the manufacturing world. IMTS2018 displayed its commitment to students this year, drawing over 20,000 student registrations. The entire lower level of the C hall was devoted to students, including exhibit space and conference rooms. Students are increasingly interested in the unique machinery and technology that makes up modern manufacturing. How IMTS broke the record This year, there were over 130,000 registered attendees, an all-time record for IMTS. Why did so many people come to this event? Even though manufacturing is challenging, it is also seeing unprecedented growth. IMTS is capitalizing on the momentum that the rapid growth and change of the industry is ushering in. Peter Eelman describes how he sees the industry changing and how that change is having a positive impact on manufacturing in the United States. The manufacturing atmosphere is changing Upon reflection, IMTS proved to be a great representation of manufacturing as a whole. There was an excitement and energy at this year’s show that is prevalent throughout the entire industry. Peter Eelman believes that there is a sea change in attitude and culture. He says, “There is going to be continued growth in U.S. manufacturing. There is a desire to make things locally and closer to home.” He also thinks that shows like IMTS will stem the tide in the skills gap and will continue to foster interest in the industry. We are just getting started IMTS is meant to serve as a catalyst for manufacturing leaders. The real work begins when you get back home and start building a strategy for how to implement necessary adjustments for future growth. Both Peter Eelman and Larry Turner encourage manufacturing leaders to focus on learning. Mobilize your team to learn as much about the technology and opportunities on the horizon so that you can start implementing changes effectively. Here’s The Good Stuff! Introduction of Larry Tuner, President & CEO of Hanover Fairs Inc, and Peter Eelman, Vice President - Exhibitions & Business Development at AMT -The Association for Manufacturing Technology With over 130,000 attendees at IMTS, Peter Eelman describes what it means both to him and the manufacturing industry The theme of IMTS and how it was seen throughout the show What do metalworking leaders need to do to educate students on the opportunities in manufacturing? Will the skills gap increase or decrease in the next 24 months? How a culture of collaboration is emerging in the manufacturing industry What is one actionable step that manufacturers can take when they go back to work after IMTS Tools & Takeaways Hannover Fairs USA AMT This Week’s Superstar Guest Larry Turner Peter Eelman Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
11/2/201823 minutes, 52 seconds
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Industry 4.0 with Jim King, Andrew Benson and Meghan West

Jim and Jason are live from IMTS2018 Day 5 with guests Jim King, Andrew Benson, and Meghan West to discuss industry 4.0 and its impact on the metal-working nation. How does a machine tool manufacturer, tooling manufacturer and a CAD/CAM company work together to elevate a manufacturing business? What is industry 4.0? Listen to this episode to hear the panelists discuss their perspective on Industry 4.0 and how collaboration is driving innovation. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact How collecting data can make you better One of the benefits of Industry 4.0 for manufacturers is the ability to collect data and increase both speed and efficiency in their shop. Jim King says that Industry 4.0 means collecting data and then analyzing it to improve the quality of manufacturing. Ultimately, data collection can help business owners make good decisions. Jim also shares the benefit of interfacing with the end user to understand their needs so that his company can build better tools. Connectivity and integration are 2 keys for Industry 4.0 For Meghan West, President at CNC Software, Industry 4.0 is about connectivity and integration. Without a machine tool, the software that her company creates is useless. However, pairing the software with the tool allows users to optimize their experience. Throughout the panel discussion, the theme of collaboration emerges as everyone discusses the benefit of integration and shared information. Variability is the enemy of quality in manufacturing Andrew Benson says that Industry 4.0 is allowing Iscar Metals to eliminate variability through digitization. Using indexable tools has increased the precision and predictability so that the quality of the work coming from a manufacturing floor is better. He shares the value of repeatability and how reconditioned tools might become obsolete because of the unwanted variability they introduce. Just like the other panelists, Andrew Benson sees collaboration as an important component of manufacturing. He says, “to support the factory of the future, a company can’t be an island unto itself.” Collaboration that fuels innovation In the past, companies were very secretive about the machines they were building. Rather than working together, they considered competitors to be threats to their success. However, there has been a shift in the manufacturing world that now encourages collaboration. Companies are working together, sharing data and solving problems together to push innovation forward. Industry 4.0 is leading to more collaboration that is propelling the manufacturing industry. Here’s The Good Stuff! Introduction of guests Jim King, Andrew Benson, and Meghan West What is Industry 4.0 and what does it mean for the manufacturing industry How is CAD and CAM merging and how does that impact the end user? What is possible by connecting a cutting tool technology with a machine tool? Does the machine tool builder design differently based on the advancements in manufacturing software How does a machine tool builder connect all of the complementary products to deliver maximum value to the end user? The ways R&D has changed because of industry 4.0 This Week’s Superstar Guest Jim King Andrew Benson Meghan West Connect With MakingChips www.MakingChips.com On Facebook On LinkedIn On Instagram On Twitter On YouTube Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify
10/26/201835 minutes, 42 seconds
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How Manufacturers Can Sleep Better at Night with Barry Walter, Dietmar Goellner, Craig Zoberis, and Teresa Beach-Shelow

Live from IMTS 2018 day four in Chicago, Jason and Jim are joined by Barry Walter, Dietmar Goellner, Craig Zoberis, and Teresa Beach-Shelow to give their insight and advice that will help manufacturers sleep better at night. There are so many decisions and challenges that manufacturing leaders face that it is sometimes hard to get a good night’s sleep. The four panelists draw from their extensive wisdom and experience to share how you can handle some of those challenges so that you can sleep better tonight. Handing over the keys to the kingdom One issue that keeps manufacturing leaders up at night is succession planning. Manufacturers want to see their business last beyond them. How can you structure your company so that it will run well even if you are no longer the top leader? Barry Walter is a third-generation manufacturer who, despite swearing he’d never work for his father, is now in business with all four of his brothers in his father’s business. Dietmar Goellner is a second-generation manufacturer who has the third-generation working in his business. Listen as all four panelists discuss their succession plan experience and how they are planning to pass along their businesses to the next generation. Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact How company culture impacts the bottom line Teresa Beach-Shelow says, “Core values pour out the front door.” It’s true, culture is everything. It guides how you make decisions, how you serve your customers and how you treat employees. Craig Zoberis says, “If we take good care of our people, they will take good care of our customers.” Especially with the generation of millennial workers who want to be a part of something bigger than themselves, you have to clearly define the why in your company. Creating a great company culture takes massive amounts of time and energy. But will it translate to more profit? Hear what the panelists have to say about that topic and much more during this episode. The technology that is shaping businesses Technology can be a double-edged sword. New machinery and tools can keep your business relevant and give you the competitive edge over the competition. It can also be daunting, hard to understand, and a challenge that keeps manufacturing leaders up at night. During this panel discussion, each guest talks about how they approach technology and how it is defining their businesses. Find out from them how to sleep better at night by using technology to your advantage. A marketing and sales strategy to help you sleep better Companies used to have teams of salesmen that went business to business trying to sell products or services. It was a simple strategy, but one that wasn’t always effective. Marketing and sales has changed dramatically over the past few years. It is critical for manufacturing leaders and business owners to think about how they are developing their brand. While it can be overwhelming to understand the different marketing avenues, there are tools and resources available today that can help. Listen as the four panelists discuss their marketing and sales experience and give tips for how you can have a better marketing strategy for your company. Here’s The Good Stuff! Introduction of the four panelists at IMTS 2018 day 4 How to implement a succession plan for your manufacturi