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Law Report - Full program podcast Profile

Law Report - Full program podcast

English, Legal, 1 season, 549 episodes, 3 days, 20 hours, 9 minutes
About
Informative, jargon-free stories about law reform, legal education, test cases, miscarriages of justice and legal culture. The Law Report makes the law accessible.
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Judge rules, on balance of probabilities, Lehrmann raped Higgins

In a high-profile defamation case, justice Michael Lee found that former political staffer Bruce Lehrmann, on the balance of probabilities, raped his then colleague Brittany Higgins inside Parliament House in 2019.
4/16/202428 minutes, 35 seconds
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Do Queensland's criminal defence laws need to be reformed?

If someone is charged with a violent crime like murder or assault, what defences can they argue? That depends on what part of Australia you live in.The Queensland Law Reform Commission is conducting a review of the criminal defences which operate in that state – some of them very controversial. Warning: this episode contains descriptions of violence, including murder, assault and domestic violence.
4/9/202428 minutes, 35 seconds
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Two hundred years of the NSW Supreme Court

Next month, the Supreme Court of New South Wales marks its 200th birthday. A new book, Constant Guardian: Changing Times, tells the history of the court. In his first extensive interview since his appointment in 2022, NSW Chief Justice Andrew Bell tells Damien Carrick about some of the significant trials discussed in the book. 
4/2/202428 minutes, 34 seconds
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Movements in work safety: Victoria's first industrial manslaughter prosecutions and feedback on OH&S laws

The Law Report makes the law accessible.
3/26/202428 minutes, 37 seconds
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Protecting IP rights: a guide for divorcees and inventors

Dividing up intellectual property rights in a divorce settlement. And the case of a mining equipment company that legally can't stop competitors from copying its invention.
3/19/202428 minutes, 34 seconds
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"Trapped in silence": The campaign to end misuse of non-disclosure agreements

The global campaign to end the misuse of non-disclosure agreements. And record damages awarded in a sexual harassment case make it clear courts won't tolerate employers who intimidate complainants.
3/12/202428 minutes, 35 seconds
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Non-disclosure agreements in sexual harassment cases

How are non-disclosure agreements used in the settlement of sexual harassment claims? Damien Carrick speaks to the co-authors of a new study, "Let's talk about confidentiality".
3/5/202428 minutes, 37 seconds
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Do we have healthy industry competition in Australia?

Do we have healthy industry competition in Australia? Do we have the right regulatory framework? Damien Carrick speaks to the chairwoman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Gina Cass-Gottlieb.
2/27/202428 minutes, 33 seconds
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Julian Assange: Will Britain's High Court approve new appeal against US extradition?

Lawyers for Julian Assange will appear in Britain's High Court this week in what could be the final attempt to stop the WikiLeaks founder from being extradited to the United States, where he faces espionage charges.  
2/20/202428 minutes, 36 seconds
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Mother of US school shooter found guilty of manslaughter; the death penalty in China

Should a parent be held legally responsible for the crimes of their child? And Australian writer and academic Yang Hengjun is given a suspended death sentence in China after being found guilty of espionage.
2/13/202428 minutes, 36 seconds
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Derek Bromley to make new parole bid 40 years after murder conviction

After 40 years in jail — a new attempt to secure parole for the man said to be Australia's longest-serving Indigenous prisoner. Warning: this episode mentions Indigenous people who have died.
2/6/202428 minutes, 34 seconds
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ICJ issues interim measures in Israel genocide case; UK faces legal challenge over Northern Ireland amnesty law

The Law Report makes the law accessible.
1/30/202428 minutes, 33 seconds
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South Africa's genocide case against Israel at the ICJ

The International Court of Justice has held the first public hearings in South Africa's genocide case against Israel. And there's concern over the New Zealand government plan to wind back the principles of the country's founding document, the Treaty of Waitangi.
1/23/202428 minutes, 33 seconds
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High tech solutions to age-old crime of livestock theft

'Facial recognition for cows', GPS animal tags and DNA testing represent some of the technology being developed to help investigate and solve livestock theft and other farm-related crimes. This episode first aired in February 2023.
1/16/202428 minutes, 37 seconds
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Justice, but not in my language: Aboriginal interpreter shortage in NT courts

Lawyers in the Northern Territory say the shortage of Indigenous interpreters has become so critical that it's significantly contributing to the over-representation of First Nations people in the criminal justice system. This is the first in a two-part special investigation into the impact of interpreter shortages in Australian courts. This episode first aired in July 2023.
1/9/202428 minutes, 36 seconds
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Could sending an emoji land you in legal trouble?

Think twice before you fire off that lighthearted emoji – there could be serious legal consequences. This episode first aired in August 2023.
1/2/202428 minutes, 36 seconds
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Singing to the Sea

One year has passed since the Federal Court confirmed native title over more than 40,000 square kilometres of sea country in the Torres Strait region. For the first time the claim brought together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to achieve joint native title outcomes. Traditional singing provided crucial evidence in the proceedings. Damien Carrick travelled to Waibene, or Thursday Island, to attend the outdoor sitting and to speak with Traditional Owners. This episode first aired in December 2022.
12/26/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Sovereign citizens' in the courts

We've all heard of 'sovereign citizens', a term referring to people who don't believe the law applies to them. But how much do we know about this group and its impact on the courts? This episode first aired in May 2023. 
12/19/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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Avoiding the legal risks of office Christmas parties

After a long Covid hiatus the office Christmas party is back with a vengeance. We all want to enjoy ourselves, but also have to be mindful of the risks.
12/12/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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Grant Donaldson SC on balancing open justice and national security

The outgoing Independent National Security Legislation Monitor's final report recommends an overhaul of legislation that Grant Donaldson says can be 'unnecessary and oppressive'.
12/5/202328 minutes, 37 seconds
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Battle of the burger chains; hundreds sentenced in Italy mafia trial

Hungry Jacks has won a legal fight against McDonalds over the use of its Big Jack and Mega Jack trademarks. And a court in Italy has handed prison sentences to more than 200 people over their links to the ‘Ndrangheta crime group. 
11/28/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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Jurors who do their own research; prosecuting violence in sport

If a juror does their own research in a trial, does that mean that any guilty verdict reached by the jury is dangerous and should be quashed? And a look at when violence in sport crosses the line and becomes a criminal law matter.
11/21/202328 minutes, 26 seconds
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Why did the High Court rule indefinite immigration detention unlawful?

In an historic decision, the High Court has ruled that indefinite immigration detention is unlawful. And could convicted terrorist Abdul Nacer Benbrika be released following a successful appeal against a conviction that saw him stripped of Australian citizenship.
11/14/202328 minutes, 34 seconds
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Naming sexual assault suspects in the media; surveillance in the workplace

When should the identity of an accused facing sexual assault charges be named in the media? And how closely can your employer monitor you?
11/7/202328 minutes, 26 seconds
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Judicial capacity building in the Pacific

What are the unique challenges facing justice systems in the Pacific region?
10/31/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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Chief Justice Susan Kiefel speaks to the Law Report

In a wide-ranging interview, the outgoing High Court Chief Justice Susan Kiefel speaks to Damien Carrick about her unlikely journey to the top judicial job, women in the law, and her support for joint judgments.
10/24/202328 minutes, 26 seconds
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Voice referendum aftermath; Queensland introduces legislation to criminalise coercive control

What can Australia learn from the outcome of the Voice referendum? And Queensland's government has introduced legislation to make coercive control a standalone criminal offence. 
10/17/202328 minutes, 34 seconds
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Constitutional implications of Indigenous Voice proposal; could pill testing save lives?

In the lead-up to the referendum vote, the Law Report discusses the constitutional implications of the proposal for an Indigenous Voice to parliament. Also in the program, could pill testing of illicit drugs save lives? 
10/10/202328 minutes, 38 seconds
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Disability royal commission delivers findings; 'Fake nurse' jailed in Australian legal first

What recommendations does the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability make in its final report to the federal government? And, in a legal first, a South Australian woman has been sent to jail for impersonating a registered health practitioner. 
10/3/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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Victorian nurse becomes first voluntary assisted dying patient to donate organs

For the first time in Australia, a patient who chose to undergo voluntary assisted dying has donated their organs for transplant. So, how did the strict legal and regulatory frameworks governing the processes in Victoria interact in this case?
9/26/202328 minutes, 38 seconds
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'Voices' to parliament in Scandinavia

The Law Report makes the law accessible.
9/19/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Voice and how Indigenous knowledge can help close the gap

A Voice to parliament could see Indigenous knowledge and holistic approaches used to help close the gap. We hear from Indigenous leaders with different views.
9/12/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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Judge liable for wrongful imprisonment and a Palawa lawyer's case for No

Can you sue your Judge? "Mr Stradford", a father of two, has been awarded $300,000 in damages in recognition of the significant distress he experienced after he was wrongfully jailed by Federal Circuit Court Judge Salvatore Vasta.
9/5/202327 minutes, 57 seconds
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New legal service for whistleblowers and Australia’s worst case of malicious prosecution 

If you knew that something illegal, dangerous, negligent or corrupt was happening in your workplace – what would you do? Who would you turn to for advice?  A new report from the Human Rights Law Centre has found that there has not been a successful case brought by a whistleblower under the federal laws designed to protect employees speaking out about wrongdoing. They’ve now launched a new legal service to give  whistleblowers the support they need to navigate these laws. This week, we also look at the case of Bill Spedding, who will receive $1.8 million in damages for malicious prosecution. In dismissing an appeal by the State of NSW, three judges of the Supreme Court described what happened to the tradesman as the worst case of false and concocted allegations by police – they had ever seen. 
8/29/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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ACT leads the way in assisting vulnerable people in court

In recent years, a number of jurisdictions around Australia have introduced Vulnerable Witness Intermediary Services. These services assist complainants such as children and those with intellectual and cognitive disabilities to give evidence in court or answer questions in police interviews.  While this service in Australia is currently only offered to complainants, the ACT will follow in the steps of Northern Ireland and extend its Vulnerable Witness Intermediary Service to defendants.  
8/22/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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Community conversations on the Voice referendum; the Sofronoff inquiry leak

Can grass roots community meetings help build support for the Indigenous Voice referendum in Far North Queensland? And the ACT government is considering charges over the unauthorised release of the inquiry report into the Lehrmann sexual assault prosecution. 
8/15/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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Could sending an emoji land you in legal trouble?

Think twice before you fire off that lighthearted emoji – there could be serious legal consequences. 
8/8/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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Could sending an emoji land you in legal trouble?

Think twice before you fire off that lighthearted emoji – there could be serious legal consequences. 
8/8/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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02/ Justice, but not in my language

Hundreds of thousands of Australian residents, a figure now approaching one million, don't speak English well, or at all. The growing demand for interpreters and the shortfall in those who are suitably qualified to work in the legal sector is putting severe pressure on Australia's busiest courts. 
8/1/202328 minutes, 32 seconds
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02/ Justice, but not in my language

Hundreds of thousands of Australian residents, a figure now approaching one million, don't speak English well, or at all. The growing demand for interpreters and the shortfall in those who are suitably qualified to work in the legal sector is putting severe pressure on Australia's busiest courts. 
8/1/202328 minutes, 32 seconds
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01/ Justice, but not in my language

Lawyers in the Northern Territory say the shortage in Indigenous interpreters has become so critical that it's contributing to the vast over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the criminal justice system.
7/25/202348 minutes, 58 seconds
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01/ Justice, but not in my language

Lawyers in the Northern Territory say the shortage in Indigenous interpreters has become so critical that it's contributing to the vast over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the criminal justice system.
7/25/202348 minutes, 58 seconds
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Singing to the sea

This episode revisits the historic Federal Court decision to confirm native title over more than 40,000 square kilometres of sea country in the Torres Strait region last year. For the first time the claim brought together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to achieve joint native title outcomes. Traditional singing provided crucial evidence in the proceedings. Damien Carrick travelled to Waibene, or Thursday Island, to attend the outdoor sitting and to speak with traditional owners. (This program first aired in December 2022)
7/18/202328 minutes, 30 seconds
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Singing to the sea

This episode revisits the historic Federal Court decision to confirm native title over more than 40,000 square kilometres of sea country in the Torres Strait region last year. For the first time the claim brought together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to achieve joint native title outcomes. Traditional singing provided crucial evidence in the proceedings. Damien Carrick travelled to Waibene, or Thursday Island, to attend the outdoor sitting and to speak with traditional owners. (This program first aired in December 2022)
7/18/202328 minutes, 30 seconds
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'Tsunami of suffering': Robodebt royal commission findings explained

The Robodebt royal commission has made damning findings about government ministers and public servants who created and administered the automated debt recovery scheme from Centrelink recipients. And why is the technology company that created ChatGPT being sued in US courts? 
7/11/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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'Tsunami of suffering': Robodebt royal commission findings explained

The Robodebt royal commission has made damning findings about government ministers and public servants who created and administered the automated debt recovery scheme from Centrelink recipients. And why is the technology company that created ChatGPT being sued in US courts? 
7/11/202328 minutes, 27 seconds
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National Anti-Corruption Commission begins investigations; juror misconceptions in sexual assault trials

The National Anti-Corruption Commission commences operation this week. And a New Zealand researcher investigates how jurors respond to evidence in sexual violence cases. (Warning: the conversation discusses sexual violence and child abuse)
7/4/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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National Anti-Corruption Commission begins investigations; juror misconceptions in sexual assault trials

The National Anti-Corruption Commission commences operation this week. And a New Zealand researcher investigates how jurors respond to evidence in sexual violence cases. (Warning: the conversation discusses sexual violence and child abuse)
7/4/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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Kids' book points refugee mums to legal help

When refugees arrive in Australia, they face huge challenges. So, how do they access the support they need? Perhaps counterintuitively, a newly launched children's book is designed to help refugees get legal assistance.
6/27/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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Kids' book points refugee mums to legal help

When refugees arrive in Australia, they face huge challenges. So, how do they access the support they need? Perhaps counterintuitively, a newly launched children's book is designed to help refugees get legal assistance.
6/27/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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Does Australia need a Criminal Cases Review Commission?

Why did it take the justice system 20 years to work out that Kathleen Folbigg was wrongly convicted over the deaths of her four infant children? Does Australia need a better way to investigate possible miscarriages of justice?
6/20/202328 minutes, 34 seconds
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Does Australia need a Criminal Cases Review Commission?

Why did it take the justice system 20 years to work out that Kathleen Folbigg was wrongly convicted over the deaths of her four infant children? Does Australia need a better way to investigate possible miscarriages of justice?
6/20/202328 minutes, 34 seconds
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US lawyer faces sanctions over ChatGPT use; what family courts can do for Indigenous Australians

A New York Judge is considering what sanctions to impose on a lawyer who spectacularly misused ChatGPT. And Australia's only Indigenous federal judge Matthew Myers wants more First Nations people to use the family law courts to get the best outcome for their children.
6/13/202328 minutes, 29 seconds
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US lawyer faces sanctions over ChatGPT use; what family courts can do for Indigenous Australians

A New York Judge is considering what sanctions to impose on a lawyer who spectacularly misused ChatGPT. And Australia's only Indigenous federal judge Matthew Myers wants more First Nations people to use the family law courts to get the best outcome for their children.
6/13/202328 minutes, 29 seconds
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Ben Roberts Smith loses defamation case, Kathleen Folbigg released from prison

A judge has thrown out the defamation action brought by Ben Roberts Smith one of Australia’s most decorated soldiers against three newspapers. The judge was satisfied, to the civil standard of the balance of probabilities, that allegations Mr Roberts-Smith was involved or complicit in unlawful killings in Afghanistan were substantially true.  Also, convicted serial killer Kathleen Folbigg has been pardoned and released from jail after 20 years behind bars. New scientific knowledge around the cause of death of her four children was crucial in creating reasonable doubt in her 3 murder and one manslaughter convictions.
6/6/202328 minutes, 38 seconds
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Ben Roberts Smith loses defamation case, Kathleen Folbigg released from prison

A judge has thrown out the defamation action brought by Ben Roberts Smith one of Australia’s most decorated soldiers against three newspapers. The judge was satisfied, to the civil standard of the balance of probabilities, that allegations Mr Roberts-Smith was involved or complicit in unlawful killings in Afghanistan were substantially true.  Also, convicted serial killer Kathleen Folbigg has been pardoned and released from jail after 20 years behind bars. New scientific knowledge around the cause of death of her four children was crucial in creating reasonable doubt in her 3 murder and one manslaughter convictions.
6/6/202328 minutes, 38 seconds
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PwC tax leaks scandal; overcoming obstacles for deaf & blind jurors

The deepening crisis engulfing accounting giant PwC – is this a case of a few bad apples or is there a deeper structural problem? And the Victorian Law Reform Commission is proposing legislative changes to enable deaf and blind people to serve on juries.
5/30/202328 minutes, 39 seconds
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PwC tax leaks scandal; overcoming obstacles for deaf & blind jurors

The deepening crisis engulfing accounting giant PwC – is this a case of a few bad apples or is there a deeper structural problem? And the Victorian Law Reform Commission is proposing legislative changes to enable deaf and blind people to serve on juries.
5/30/202328 minutes, 39 seconds
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Remorse and the law

When calculating a sentence, a judge weighs up many considerations, including remorse. But is it really possible to determine if an offender is genuinely sorry? 
5/23/202328 minutes, 37 seconds
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How does a judge know if an offender is truly sorry?

When calculating a sentence, a judge weighs up many considerations, including remorse. But is it really possible to determine if an offender is genuinely sorry? 
5/23/202328 minutes, 37 seconds
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'Green transition', mining & Indigenous rights

In the race to decarbonise the economy, is there a risk of undermining the rights of Indigenous people? Mining companies Rio Tinto and BHP are proposing to develop north America’s largest copper mine on land considered sacred to the local Apache people.
5/16/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Green transition', mining & Indigenous rights

In the race to decarbonise the economy, is there a risk of undermining the rights of Indigenous people? Mining companies Rio Tinto and BHP are proposing to develop north America’s largest copper mine on land considered sacred to the local Apache people.
5/16/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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Compensation for sporting injuries; changes to Centrelink relationship assessments

Can the organisers of a sporting event be held liable for a participant's injuries? And new rules allow Centrelink staff to consider evidence of domestic abuse when assessing a person's relationship status to determine if they're eligible for income support payments.
5/9/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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Compensation for sporting injuries; changes to Centrelink relationship assessments

Can the organisers of a sporting event be held liable for a participant's injuries? And new rules allow Centrelink staff to consider evidence of domestic abuse when assessing a person's relationship status to determine if they're eligible for income support payments.
5/9/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Sovereign citizens' in the courts

We've all heard of 'sovereign citizens', a term referring to people who don't believe the law applies to them. But how much do we know about this group and its impact on the courts?
5/2/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Sovereign citizens' in the courts

We've all heard of 'sovereign citizens', a term referring to people who don't believe the law applies to them. But how much do we know about this group and its impact on the courts?
5/2/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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Murdoch, Dominion & Crikey; the secret trial of 'Witness J'

Is there a connection between the Fox News defamation settlement with US voting technology company Dominion and Lachlan Murdoch's withdrawal of legal action against the publisher of Crikey? And what do the sentencing remarks reveal about the secret trial of 'Witness J'?
4/25/202328 minutes, 26 seconds
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Murdoch, Dominion & Crikey; the secret trial of 'Witness J'

Is there a connection between the Fox News defamation settlement with US voting technology company Dominion and Lachlan Murdoch's withdrawal of legal action against the publisher of Crikey? And what do the sentencing remarks reveal about the secret trial of 'Witness J'?
4/25/202328 minutes, 26 seconds
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Court ruling raises questions about NSW Covid fines; What is the 'dark fleet'?

What happens to tens of thousands of COVID-related fines in NSW after a Supreme Court ruling raised questions about their validity? How dangerous are the ageing oil tankers that help Russia dodge sanctions?
4/18/202328 minutes, 38 seconds
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Court ruling raises questions about NSW Covid fines; What is the 'dark fleet'?

What happens to tens of thousands of COVID-related fines in NSW after a Supreme Court ruling raised questions about their validity? How dangerous are the ageing oil tankers that help Russia dodge sanctions?
4/18/202328 minutes, 38 seconds
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ACT law to ban non-urgent surgery for intersex children; cryptocurrency in crime

The ACT Legislative Assembly is considering a draft law to protect intersex children from undergoing deferrable and non-urgent medical treatments. And is the use of cryptocurrency really the marker of a sophisticated legal mind? A warning that this episode contains descriptions of surgical procedures.
4/11/202328 minutes, 34 seconds
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ACT law to ban non-urgent surgery for intersex children; cryptocurrency in crime

The ACT Legislative Assembly is considering a draft law to protect intersex children from undergoing deferrable and non-urgent medical treatments. And is the use of cryptocurrency really the marker of a sophisticated legal mind? A warning that this episode contains descriptions of surgical procedures.
4/11/202328 minutes, 34 seconds
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WA bikies convicted for displaying club tattoos

The Law Report makes the law accessible.
4/4/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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WA bikies convicted for displaying club tattoos

In a legal first, a court in Western Australia has convicted three members of an outlaw motorcycle gang for displaying their club tattoos in public.
4/4/202328 minutes, 36 seconds
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Indigenous Voice: Justice Kenneth Hayne speaks to the Law Report

Former High Court judge Kenneth Hayne, a member of the Constitutional Expert Panel, speaks to the Law Report about the Federal Government's proposed referendum, and constitutional amendments, to create an Indigenous Voice to Parliament.
3/28/202330 minutes
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Indigenous Voice: Justice Kenneth Hayne speaks to the Law Report

Former High Court judge Kenneth Hayne, a member of the Constitutional Expert Panel, speaks to the Law Report about the Federal Government's proposed referendum, and constitutional amendments, to create an Indigenous Voice to Parliament.
3/28/202330 minutes
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SAS Veteran charged with war crimes: protestor prison sentence quashed: Botox alternative in High Court

An SAS veteran has been charged with the war-crime of murder under Australian law. A NSW  judge has quashed the prison sentence of a protestor, and a cosmetic company selling a Botox alternative wins in the High Court.
3/21/202330 minutes
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SAS Veteran charged with war crimes: protestor prison sentence quashed: Botox alternative in High Court

An SAS veteran has been charged with the war-crime of murder under Australian law. A NSW  judge has quashed the prison sentence of a protestor, and a cosmetic company selling a Botox alternative wins in the High Court.
3/21/202330 minutes
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High Court overturns marijuana house murder convictions; tax help for prisoners

The High Court has overturned the murder convictions of four men found guilty of killing a man in an Adelaide cannabis grow house. And, if a prisoner has a tax-related question, who can they turn to? 
3/14/202330 minutes
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High Court overturns marijuana house murder convictions; tax help for prisoners

The High Court has overturned the murder convictions of four men found guilty of killing a man in an Adelaide cannabis grow house. And, if a prisoner has a tax-related question, who can they turn to? 
3/14/202330 minutes
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Duggan faces 'unusual' extradition charges; Australian regulators target corporate 'greenwashing'

Lawyers for former US marine Daniel Duggan have lodged a complaint to the UN Human Rights Committee citing 'degrading' detention conditions as his extradition case is set to return to court.
3/7/202330 minutes
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Duggan faces 'unusual' extradition charges; Australian regulators target corporate 'greenwashing'

Lawyers for former US marine Daniel Duggan have lodged a complaint to the UN Human Rights Committee citing 'degrading' detention conditions as his extradition case is set to return to court.
3/7/202330 minutes
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US ruling to ban caste discrimination; UN expert warns against gay conversion practices

The US city of Seattle has banned caste-based discrimination and there are calls for Australia to legislate similar protections. And, the UN independent expert on sexual orientation and gender identity, Victor Madrigal Borloz, is in Sydney to address the WorldPride Human Rights Conference.
2/28/202330 minutes
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US ruling to ban caste discrimination; UN expert warns against gay conversion practices

The US city of Seattle has banned caste-based discrimination and there are calls for Australia to legislate similar protections. And, the UN independent expert on sexual orientation and gender identity, Victor Madrigal Borloz, is in Sydney to address the WorldPride Human Rights Conference.
2/28/202330 minutes
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High tech solutions to age-old crime of livestock theft

'Facial recognition for cows', GPS animal tags and DNA testing represent some of the technology being developed to help investigate and solve livestock theft and other farm-related crimes.
2/21/202330 minutes
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High tech solutions to age-old crime of livestock theft

'Facial recognition for cows', GPS animal tags and DNA testing represent some of the technology being developed to help investigate and solve livestock theft and other farm-related crimes.
2/21/202330 minutes
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Visa cancellations & deportation

Could changes to visa cancellation policies under section 501 of the Migration Act signal a softening of Australia's stand on deportation on character grounds? Also, the sticky note at the centre of a legal challenge to deportation. And fugitive Darko Desic is allowed to stay in Australia.
2/14/202330 minutes
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Visa cancellations & deportation

Could changes to visa cancellation policies under section 501 of the Migration Act signal a softening of Australia's stand on deportation on character grounds? Also, the sticky note at the centre of a legal challenge to deportation. And fugitive Darko Desic is allowed to stay in Australia.
2/14/202330 minutes
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Victoria commits to overhauling strict bail laws

A Victorian coroner has described the treatment of an Indigenous woman in prison as inhumane and her death preventable. Arrested on the suspicion of minor shoplifting charges, the woman was denied bail. As the Victorian Parliament resumes sitting, Premier Dan Andrews has committed to overhauling the state's strict bail laws. With the permission of the family — we are using the name and the voice of a First Nations person who has died. If the contents of this program cause any distress there is help at Lifeline on 13 11 14 and also 13yarn that's 13 92 76
2/7/202330 minutes
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Victoria commits to overhauling strict bail laws

A Victorian coroner has described the treatment of an Indigenous woman in prison as inhumane and her death preventable. Arrested on the suspicion of minor shoplifting charges, the woman was denied bail. As the Victorian Parliament resumes sitting, Premier Dan Andrews has committed to overhauling the state's strict bail laws. With the permission of the family — we are using the name and the voice of a First Nations person who has died. If the contents of this program cause any distress there is help at Lifeline on 13 11 14 and also 13yarn that's 13 92 76
2/7/202330 minutes
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Surprising Decisions About Legal Liability in Car Accidents

If you are responsible for a motor vehicle accident, just how far does your legal liability extend?  A court decision could upend the assumption that in an accident, the car behind is always at fault. And a controversial case involving drug use in a parked car may be heading to the High Court.
1/31/202330 minutes
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Surprising Decisions About Legal Liability in Car Accidents

If you are responsible for a motor vehicle accident, just how far does your legal liability extend?  A court decision could upend the assumption that in an accident, the car behind is always at fault. And a controversial case involving drug use in a parked car may be heading to the High Court.
1/31/202330 minutes
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Why was the AAT abolished? The dangers of witnessing wills remotely

The Federal Administrative Appeals Tribunal or AAT is to be axed, why and what will replace it? Remote signing of Wills was introduced as a COVID emergency measure, but as a new decision shows, there can be traps.
1/24/202330 minutes
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Why was the AAT abolished? The dangers of witnessing wills remotely

The Federal Administrative Appeals Tribunal or AAT is to be axed, why and what will replace it? Remote signing of Wills was introduced as a COVID emergency measure, but as a new decision shows, there can be traps.
1/24/202330 minutes
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Judicial review to examine 'Croatian six' convictions

The New South Wales Supreme Court has ordered a judicial review in the convictions of the so-called 'Croatian Six'. Justice Robertson Wright said there are doubts and questions about the evidence used to convict the men in 1981. This episode first aired in September 2022.
1/17/202330 minutes
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Judicial review to examine 'Croatian six' convictions

The New South Wales Supreme Court has ordered a judicial review in the convictions of the so-called 'Croatian Six'. Justice Robertson Wright said there are doubts and questions about the evidence used to convict the men in 1981. This episode first aired in September 2022.
1/17/202330 minutes
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Who should be held legally liable for accidents involving e-scooters?

Electric scooters are becoming an increasingly popular form of transport, but there is a confusing mosaic of laws that regulate their use across Australia. So, when accidents happen – who should be held legally liable? 
1/10/202330 minutes
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Who should be held legally liable for accidents involving e-scooters?

Electric scooters are becoming an increasingly popular form of transport, but there is a confusing mosaic of laws that regulate their use across Australia. So, when accidents happen – who should be held legally liable? 
1/10/202330 minutes
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Can machines invent and animals create?

Should patents be granted to Artificial Intelligence algorithms? Should machines have copyright over the art works they generate? What about animals? This episode first aired in June 2022.
1/3/202330 minutes
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Can machines invent and animals create?

Should patents be granted to Artificial Intelligence algorithms? Should machines have copyright over the art works they generate? What about animals? This episode first aired in June 2022.
1/3/202330 minutes
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Gender diversity on the bench

In the second of a two-part series, the Law Report speaks with members of the International Association of Women Judges in several countries. They explain the obstacles women judges face and what gender diversity brings to legal decision making.
12/27/202230 minutes
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Gender diversity on the bench

In the second of a two-part series, the Law Report speaks with members of the International Association of Women Judges in several countries. They explain the obstacles women judges face and what gender diversity brings to legal decision making.
12/27/202230 minutes
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How Afghan women judges found safety in Australia

In the first of a two-part series on women judges, the Law Report focuses on the experience of judge Shakila Abawi Shigarf, who was forced to flee Afghanistan when the Taliban retook power in August 2021.
12/20/202230 minutes
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How Afghan women judges found safety in Australia

In the first of a two-part series on women judges, the Law Report focuses on the experience of judge Shakila Abawi Shigarf, who was forced to flee Afghanistan when the Taliban retook power in August 2021.
12/20/202230 minutes
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Singing to the sea

The Federal Court has confirmed native title over more than 40,000 square kilometres of sea country in the Torres Strait region. For the first time the claim brings together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to achieve joint native title outcomes.
12/13/202230 minutes
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Singing to the sea

The Federal Court has confirmed native title over more than 40,000 square kilometres of sea country in the Torres Strait region. For the first time the claim brings together Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to achieve joint native title outcomes.
12/13/202230 minutes
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Know Your Rights: overshadowing solar panels

In the final part of a special for the Law Report we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out what you can do when the neighbours want to build up and block the sunlight from hitting solar panels on your roof.
12/7/202210 minutes
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Know Your Rights: overshadowing solar panels

In the final part of a special for the Law Report we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out what you can do when the neighbours want to build up and block the sunlight from hitting solar panels on your roof.
12/7/202210 minutes
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Data breaches and the Privacy Act; what are your rights when it comes to your home's access to sunlight?

Medibank is the second high-profile company to be investigated by the Commonwealth privacy regulator over large-scale data breaches in recent months. Where does the government's legislative response fit within the broader review of the Privacy Act? And in the final part of a special for The Law Report, we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out your right when the neighbour plans to build up and block the sunlight from hitting solar panels on your home.
12/6/202230 minutes
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Data breaches and the Privacy Act; what are your rights when it comes to your home's access to sunlight?

Medibank is the second high-profile company to be investigated by the Commonwealth privacy regulator over large-scale data breaches in recent months. Where does the government's legislative response fit within the broader review of the Privacy Act? And in the final part of a special for The Law Report, we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out your right when the neighbour plans to build up and block the sunlight from hitting solar panels on your home.
12/6/202230 minutes
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Know Your Rights: pesky pets

When you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the third of a four-part special for the Law Report we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out your rights when it comes to keeping pets in apartments. 
11/30/202211 minutes, 30 seconds
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Know Your Rights: pesky pets

When you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the third of a four-part special for the Law Report we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out your rights when it comes to keeping pets in apartments. 
11/30/202211 minutes, 30 seconds
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Youth in detention; what are your rights when it comes to pets in apartments?

Five years on, has the NT royal commission into youth detention achieved what it set out to do? Why do some children commit crime? Research reveals calls for more government support for Indigenous kinship carers in WA. Also, when you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the third part of a special for The Law Report, we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out your rights when it comes to keeping pets in apartments.
11/29/202230 minutes
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Youth in detention; what are your rights when it comes to pets in apartments?

Five years on, has the NT royal commission into youth detention achieved what it set out to do? Why do some children commit crime? Research reveals calls for more government support for Indigenous kinship carers in WA. Also, when you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the third part of a special for The Law Report, we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out your rights when it comes to keeping pets in apartments.
11/29/202230 minutes
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Know Your Rights: troublesome trees

When you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on?
11/23/202210 minutes, 18 seconds
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Know Your Rights: troublesome trees

When you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on?
11/23/202210 minutes, 18 seconds
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Big banks settle insurance class actions; what are your rights in neighbour disputes over trees?

Hundreds of thousands of customers could be eligible to claim compensation after three of Australia's biggest banks – the Commonwealth Bank, ANZ and Westpac – settled class actions worth $126m over the sale of 'junk' insurance policies. Also, when you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the second of a four-part special for The Law Report, we dig through some recent cases with legal experts to find out who's in the right when a neighbour's tree is damaging your property. 
11/22/202230 minutes
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Big banks settle insurance class actions; what are your rights in neighbour disputes over trees?

Hundreds of thousands of customers could be eligible to claim compensation after three of Australia's biggest banks – the Commonwealth Bank, ANZ and Westpac – settled class actions worth $126m over the sale of 'junk' insurance policies. Also, when you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the second of a four-part special for The Law Report, we dig through some recent cases with legal experts to find out who's in the right when a neighbour's tree is damaging your property. 
11/22/202230 minutes
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Know Your Rights: Noisy neighbours

When you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the first of a four-part special for the Law Report we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out when it comes to noisy neighbours who's in the right.
11/16/20229 minutes, 6 seconds
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Know Your Rights: Noisy neighbours

When you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on? In the first of a four-part special for the Law Report we dig through recent cases with legal experts to find out when it comes to noisy neighbours who's in the right.
11/16/20229 minutes, 6 seconds
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NSW coronial reform; what are your rights when it comes to noisy neighbours?

The New South Wales government has offered a lukewarm response to a parliamentary committee report that calls for an overhaul of the state's coronial system. And, when you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on?
11/15/20220
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NSW coronial reform; what are your rights when it comes to noisy neighbours?

The New South Wales government has offered a lukewarm response to a parliamentary committee report that calls for an overhaul of the state's coronial system. And, when you are fighting with your neighbour over things like noise, trees or pets, whose side is the law on?
11/15/20220
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Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a forensic health facility

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne's forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness. This episode first aired in March 2021.
11/8/202230 minutes
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Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a forensic health facility

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne's forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness. This episode first aired in March 2021.
11/8/202230 minutes
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'Juror misconduct' ends parliament rape trial; 'proper inquiry' in road accidents

Why did the actions of one juror lead to a mistrial for Bruce Lehrmann? And the case of a Brisbane motorbike accident victim who failed to secure compensation because he couldn't identify the truck that caused the incident.
11/1/202230 minutes
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'Juror misconduct' ends parliament rape trial; 'proper inquiry' in road accidents

Why did the actions of one juror lead to a mistrial for Bruce Lehrmann? And the case of a Brisbane motorbike accident victim who failed to secure compensation because he couldn't identify the truck that caused the incident.
11/1/202230 minutes
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UN experts suspend detention visits; and the use of secret evidence in court

The head of a team of United Nations torture experts speaks exclusively to the Law Report about the decision to suspend inspections of detention facilities in Australia. And, in a court or tribunal hearing, can one side use secret evidence that the other can't see?  
10/25/202230 minutes
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UN experts suspend detention visits; and the use of secret evidence in court

The head of a team of United Nations torture experts speaks exclusively to the Law Report about the decision to suspend inspections of detention facilities in Australia. And, in a court or tribunal hearing, can one side use secret evidence that the other can't see?  
10/25/202230 minutes
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UN calls for unlimited access for team inspecting detention facilities

The UN is urging Australian governments to offer unlimited access to UN inspectors visiting prisons and other detention facilities around the country. And Justice Jayne Jagot has been sworn in as the newest member of the High Court and for the first time a majority of the sitting judges on Australia's highest court are women.
10/18/202230 minutes
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UN calls for unlimited access for team inspecting detention facilities

The UN is urging Australian governments to offer unlimited access to UN inspectors visiting prisons and other detention facilities around the country. And Justice Jayne Jagot has been sworn in as the newest member of the High Court and for the first time a majority of the sitting judges on Australia's highest court are women.
10/18/202230 minutes
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Lawyers 'pressure test' Indigenous voice proposal; how should judges be appointed?

What do Australia's leading lawyers think about the Federal Government's plan to enshrine a First Nations' voice to parliament in the constitution? The country's top legal minds have been meeting to 'pressure test' the draft model. And how should judges be appointed?
10/11/202230 minutes
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Lawyers 'pressure test' Indigenous voice proposal; how should judges be appointed?

What do Australia's leading lawyers think about the Federal Government's plan to enshrine a First Nations' voice to parliament in the constitution? The country's top legal minds have been meeting to 'pressure test' the draft model. And how should judges be appointed?
10/11/202230 minutes
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Does the Government's proposed anti-corruption legislation go far enough?

Does the Federal Government's draft legislation for a national anti-corruption commission go far enough? And retired UK Supreme Court judge Lord Jonathan Sumption speaks to the Law Report about Julian Assange's fight against extradition to the US, the arrests of protesters following Queen Elizabeth's death, judicial appointments, and Brexit.
10/4/202230 minutes
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Does the Government's proposed anti-corruption legislation go far enough?

Does the Federal Government's draft legislation for a national anti-corruption commission go far enough? And retired UK Supreme Court judge Lord Jonathan Sumption speaks to the Law Report about Julian Assange's fight against extradition to the US, the arrests of protesters following Queen Elizabeth's death, judicial appointments, and Brexit.
10/4/202230 minutes
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Police body cameras in domestic violence incidents

When police are called out to a domestic violence incident, do officers' body-worn video cameras always capture an accurate and complete record of what's taking place?
9/27/202230 minutes
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Police body cameras in domestic violence incidents

When police are called out to a domestic violence incident, do officers' body-worn video cameras always capture an accurate and complete record of what's taking place?
9/27/202230 minutes
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Fears states could expand use of 'post-sentence' detention after Garlett ruling

The High Court has upheld the constitutional validity of West Australian legislation that allows prisoners to be held in indefinite detention if a judge finds they could be at risk of committing a serious offence. It's feared the verdict may open the door for other states to expand the use of 'post-sentence' detention laws.
9/20/202230 minutes
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Fears states could expand use of 'post-sentence' detention after Garlett ruling

The High Court has upheld the constitutional validity of West Australian legislation that allows prisoners to be held in indefinite detention if a judge finds they could be at risk of committing a serious offence. It's feared the verdict may open the door for other states to expand the use of 'post-sentence' detention laws.
9/20/202230 minutes
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The Queen's role in Australia's constitution

A look at the legal and constitutional role of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II. And the Commonwealth Ombudsman Iain Anderson discusses the expected visit to Australia by the UN Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture. 
9/13/202230 minutes
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The Queen's role in Australia's constitution

A look at the legal and constitutional role of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II. And the Commonwealth Ombudsman Iain Anderson discusses the expected visit to Australia by the UN Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture. 
9/13/202230 minutes
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Judicial review to examine 'Croatian Six' convictions

The New South Wales Supreme Court has ordered a judicial review into the convictions of the so-called 'Croatian Six'. Justice Robertson Wright said there are doubts and questions about the evidence used to convict the men in 1981.
9/6/202230 minutes
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Judicial review to examine 'Croatian Six' convictions

The New South Wales Supreme Court has ordered a judicial review into the convictions of the so-called 'Croatian Six'. Justice Robertson Wright said there are doubts and questions about the evidence used to convict the men in 1981.
9/6/202230 minutes
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Chris Dawson trial: former teacher found guilty of wife's murder

New South Wales Supreme Court Justice Ian Harrison has found former teacher Christopher Dawson guilty of murdering his wife Lynette, who disappeared in 1982. And calls for legislative change to help relieve Centrelink debt for people fleeing family and domestic violence. 
8/30/202230 minutes
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Chris Dawson trial: former teacher found guilty of wife's murder

New South Wales Supreme Court Justice Ian Harrison has found former teacher Christopher Dawson guilty of murdering his wife Lynette, who disappeared in 1982. And calls for legislative change to help relieve Centrelink debt for people fleeing family and domestic violence. 
8/30/202230 minutes
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Government releases legal advice on Morrison's secret ministerial appointments

The Federal Government has released legal advice from the Solicitor General regarding the former prime minister Scott Morrison's move to secretly appoint himself to multiple ministries. And the High Court has ruled in favour of internet giant Google in a defamation case involving a Melbourne lawyer.
8/23/202230 minutes
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Government releases legal advice on Morrison's secret ministerial appointments

The Federal Government has released legal advice from the Solicitor General regarding the former prime minister Scott Morrison's move to secretly appoint himself to multiple ministries. And the High Court has ruled in favour of internet giant Google in a defamation case involving a Melbourne lawyer.
8/23/202230 minutes
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High Court rejects activists' challenge to NSW surveillance laws, and women bring prison stories to the stage

Should activist groups be allowed to use secretly filmed footage to expose the treatment of animals at farms and abattoirs? And Somebody's Daughter theatre company returns to the stage with stories of women's lives in prison, co-written and performed by former inmates. 
8/16/202230 minutes
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High Court rejects activists' challenge to NSW surveillance laws, and women bring prison stories to the stage

Should activist groups be allowed to use secretly filmed footage to expose the treatment of animals at farms and abattoirs? And Somebody's Daughter theatre company returns to the stage with stories of women's lives in prison, co-written and performed by former inmates. 
8/16/202230 minutes
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Life, death and the law

When parents and doctors disagree, how do courts decide whether to withdraw life support from a hospitalised child? The creation of a federal judicial commission is among the recommendations of the Australian Law Reform Commission's report on judicial impartiality. The high-profile defamation litigation between billionaire politician Clive Palmer and WA premier Mark McGowan has ended in a draw.
8/9/202230 minutes
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Life, death and the law

When parents and doctors disagree, how do courts decide whether to withdraw life support from a hospitalised child? The creation of a federal judicial commission is among the recommendations of the Australian Law Reform Commission's report on judicial impartiality. The high-profile defamation litigation between billionaire politician Clive Palmer and WA premier Mark McGowan has ended in a draw.
8/9/202230 minutes
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Legal decisions and analytics

Should researchers collect and publish statistics which reveal how judges and tribunal members decide refugee cases? Is this a way of understanding legal decision making or does it risk undermining confidence in the justice system? 
8/2/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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Legal decisions and analytics

Should researchers collect and publish statistics which reveal how judges and tribunal members decide refugee cases? Is this a way of understanding legal decision making or does it risk undermining confidence in the justice system? 
8/2/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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Who should be held legally liable for accidents involving e-scooters?

Electric scooters are becoming an increasingly popular form of transport, but there is a confusing mosaic of laws that regulate their use across Australia. So, when accidents happen – who should be held legally liable?
7/26/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Who should be held legally liable for accidents involving e-scooters?

Electric scooters are becoming an increasingly popular form of transport, but there is a confusing mosaic of laws that regulate their use across Australia. So, when accidents happen – who should be held legally liable?
7/26/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Queensland bans 'claim farming'; should media coverage affect sentencing decisions?

Queensland has introduced laws to crack down on 'claim farming', a practice where members of the public are contacted and encouraged to make compensation claims. And a new study has found 'inconsistencies' in the way courts consider the possible impact of media coverage on sentencing decisions.
7/19/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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Queensland bans 'claim farming'; should media coverage affect sentencing decisions?

Queensland has introduced laws to crack down on 'claim farming', a practice where members of the public are contacted and encouraged to make compensation claims. And a new study has found 'inconsistencies' in the way courts consider the possible impact of media coverage on sentencing decisions.
7/19/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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Vanuatu's push for international court action on climate change

The small Pacific island nation of Vanuatu is behind a campaign to raise the issue of climate change before the International Court of Justice. And how should culturally sensitive historical photographs be handled? A leading US university is sued for allegedly causing emotional distress.
7/12/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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Vanuatu's push for international court action on climate change

The small Pacific island nation of Vanuatu is behind a campaign to raise the issue of climate change before the International Court of Justice. And how should culturally sensitive historical photographs be handled? A leading US university is sued for allegedly causing emotional distress.
7/12/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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Victoria's Nazi swastika law prompts call for national ban

An in-depth look at Victoria's law to ban the public display of the Nazi swastika amid calls for the Federal Government to legislate a national ban on the symbol. And the case of a West Australian man who spent more than a decade in prison for a crime he didn't commit has led to new legal avenues for appeal for others who may have been wrongfully convicted.
7/5/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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Victoria's Nazi swastika law prompts call for national ban

An in-depth look at Victoria's law to ban the public display of the Nazi swastika amid calls for the Federal Government to legislate a national ban on the symbol. And the case of a West Australian man who spent more than a decade in prison for a crime he didn't commit has led to new legal avenues for appeal for others who may have been wrongfully convicted.
7/5/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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Attorney General Mark Dreyfus speaks to the Law Report

Reforming the Public Interest Disclosure Act "is a significant matter because it is linked to the national anti-corruption commission that we hope to legislate this year," the federal Attorney General Mark Dreyfus has told the Law Report. In a wide-ranging interview, Mr Dreyfus outlines his legislative priorities, including reforming the Privacy Act, media freedoms, and a review of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.
6/28/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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Attorney General Mark Dreyfus speaks to the Law Report

Reforming the Public Interest Disclosure Act "is a significant matter because it is linked to the national anti-corruption commission that we hope to legislate this year," the federal Attorney General Mark Dreyfus has told the Law Report. In a wide-ranging interview, Mr Dreyfus outlines his legislative priorities, including reforming the Privacy Act, media freedoms, and a review of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.
6/28/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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Can machines invent, and animals create?

Should we grant patents to Artificial Intelligence algorithms? Should machines have copyright over the art works they generate? What about animals?
6/21/202228 minutes, 31 seconds
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Can machines invent, and animals create?

Should we grant patents to Artificial Intelligence algorithms? Should machines have copyright over the art works they generate? What about animals?
6/21/202228 minutes, 31 seconds
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High Court curbs minister's citizenship powers, and landmark ruling on unpaid wages

The High Court has ruled that a decision by the former Home Affairs Minister Karen Andrews to rescind the citizenship of an Australian man suspected of joining the Islamic State group was unconstitutional. And, for the first time, unpaid workers can pursue the director of a collapsed company in the small claims tribunal of the Federal Circuit and Family Court.
6/14/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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High Court curbs minister's citizenship powers, and landmark ruling on unpaid wages

The High Court has ruled that a decision by the former Home Affairs Minister Karen Andrews to rescind the citizenship of an Australian man suspected of joining the Islamic State group was unconstitutional. And, for the first time, unpaid workers can pursue the director of a collapsed company in the small claims tribunal of the Federal Circuit and Family Court.
6/14/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Judge v jury trials

Why did actor Johnny Depp's defamation case against his former wife Amber Heard succeed in the US after failing at a similar trial in the UK? And a man ordered to face trial before a judge alone under the ACT’s pandemic emergency law says he was denied the right for his case to be heard by a jury. But does such a legal right exist in Australia?
6/7/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Judge v jury trials

Why did actor Johnny Depp's defamation case against his former wife Amber Heard succeed in the US after failing at a similar trial in the UK? And a man ordered to face trial before a judge alone under the ACT’s pandemic emergency law says he was denied the right for his case to be heard by a jury. But does such a legal right exist in Australia?
6/7/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Fiji environmental crime verdict 'sets precedent'

Freesoul Real Estate has days to appeal a ground-breaking fine imposed by Fiji's High Court after the Chinese resort developer carried out unauthorised works on a remote island. And environmental law in the Pacific.
5/31/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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Fiji environmental crime verdict 'sets precedent'

Freesoul Real Estate has days to appeal a ground-breaking fine imposed by Fiji's High Court after the Chinese resort developer carried out unauthorised works on a remote island. And environmental law in the Pacific.
5/31/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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Radio on the inside

The world's only nationwide in-house prison network broadcasts 24 hours a day and is produced by and for inmates.
5/24/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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Radio on the inside

The world's only nationwide in-house prison network broadcasts 24 hours a day and is produced by and for inmates.
5/24/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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When is a de facto relationship over?

A High Court decision raises questions about how a de facto relationship is defined, and what happens when a person’s mental capacities decline with old age. And, if a person granted humanitarian protection by Australia commits a serious crime, can they be deported to a conflict zone?
5/17/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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When is a de facto relationship over?

A High Court decision raises questions about how a de facto relationship is defined, and what happens when a person’s mental capacities decline with old age. And, if a person granted humanitarian protection by Australia commits a serious crime, can they be deported to a conflict zone?
5/17/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Fears US Supreme Court will overturn Roe v Wade after draft opinion leaked

The publication of a leaked draft opinion by conservative judge Samuel Alito has sparked fears the United States Supreme Court could overturn a landmark decision that enshrines abortion rights for women.
5/10/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Fears US Supreme Court will overturn Roe v Wade after draft opinion leaked

The publication of a leaked draft opinion by conservative judge Samuel Alito has sparked fears the United States Supreme Court could overturn a landmark decision that enshrines abortion rights for women.
5/10/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Russia accuses NATO of 'proxy war' in Ukraine, and juror misconduct

Does NATO’s increasing military support for Ukraine amount to waging “a proxy war against Russia”? And the High Court has overturned a number of sex offence convictions of a tutor due to juror misconduct.
5/3/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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Russia accuses NATO of 'proxy war' in Ukraine, and juror misconduct

Does NATO’s increasing military support for Ukraine amount to waging “a proxy war against Russia”? And the High Court has overturned a number of sex offence convictions of a tutor due to juror misconduct.
5/3/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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Employer liability for psychiatric injury

When is an employer liable for psychiatric injury sustained in the workplace?
4/26/202228 minutes, 20 seconds
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Employer liability for psychiatric injury

When is an employer liable for psychiatric injury sustained in the workplace?
4/26/202228 minutes, 20 seconds
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Why gender diversity on the bench is important

In the second of a two-part series, the Law Report speaks with members of the International Association of Women Judges in several countries. They explain the obstacles women judges face and what gender diversity brings to legal decision making. 
4/19/202228 minutes, 32 seconds
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Why gender diversity on the bench is important

In the second of a two-part series, the Law Report speaks with members of the International Association of Women Judges in several countries. They explain the obstacles women judges face and what gender diversity brings to legal decision making. 
4/19/202228 minutes, 32 seconds
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How Afghan women judges found safety in Australia

In the first of a two-part series on women judges, the Law Report introduces judge Shakila Abawi Shigarf, who was forced to flee Afghanistan when the Taliban retook power in August 2021.
4/12/202228 minutes, 31 seconds
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How Afghan women judges found safety in Australia

In the first of a two-part series on women judges, the Law Report introduces judge Shakila Abawi Shigarf, who was forced to flee Afghanistan when the Taliban retook power in August 2021.
4/12/202228 minutes, 31 seconds
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Cheng Lei awaits China trial verdict, and Vic court rules on wind farm noise

The national security trial of Australian journalist Cheng Lei in China. And two Victorian farmers have won a legal battle over noise pollution against a neighbouring wind farm.
4/5/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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Cheng Lei awaits China trial verdict, and Vic court rules on wind farm noise

The national security trial of Australian journalist Cheng Lei in China. And two Victorian farmers have won a legal battle over noise pollution against a neighbouring wind farm.
4/5/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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'Predatory lending', and supporting Indigenous people in NT watch houses

The High Court has ruled that a lender engaged in 'unconscionable conduct' by approving an asset-based loan to an unemployed man. And a look at how the Northern Territory Custody Notification Service supports Indigenous people detained in watch houses.
3/29/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Predatory lending', and supporting Indigenous people in NT watch houses

The High Court has ruled that a lender engaged in 'unconscionable conduct' by approving an asset-based loan to an unemployed man. And a look at how the Northern Territory Custody Notification Service supports Indigenous people detained in watch houses.
3/29/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Gathering evidence of possible war crimes in Ukraine

A former war crimes judge and prosecutor explains the challenges of collecting evidence in a conflict zone. And the humanitarian crisis spreading beyond Ukraine's borders as Russian forces intensify their attacks.
3/22/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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Gathering evidence of possible war crimes in Ukraine

A former war crimes judge and prosecutor explains the challenges of collecting evidence in a conflict zone. And the humanitarian crisis spreading beyond Ukraine's borders as Russian forces intensify their attacks.
3/22/202228 minutes, 38 seconds
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The legal needs of flood victims, and Kumanjayi Walker murder trial aquittal

Severe flooding in New South Wales and Queensland has created a range of tenancy and insurance issues for people in affected areas. And a view from inside the court where Northern Territory police officer Zachary Rolfe was acquitted of charges in the shooting death of Aboriginal man Kumanjayi Walker.
3/15/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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The legal needs of flood victims, and Kumanjayi Walker murder trial aquittal

Severe flooding in New South Wales and Queensland has created a range of tenancy and insurance issues for people in affected areas. And a view from inside the court where Northern Territory police officer Zachary Rolfe was acquitted of charges in the shooting death of Aboriginal man Kumanjayi Walker.
3/15/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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Ukraine: how clear are the laws of war? And women's rights to inherit land

As the war in Ukraine escalates, what does international law say about humanitarian corridors, civilian combatants and prisoners of war? And why dozens of countries don't allow women the right to own and inherit land.
3/8/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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Ukraine: how clear are the laws of war? And women's rights to inherit land

As the war in Ukraine escalates, what does international law say about humanitarian corridors, civilian combatants and prisoners of war? And why dozens of countries don't allow women the right to own and inherit land.
3/8/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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ICC to launch Ukraine war crimes probe, and NSW Chief Justice Tom Bathurst retires

As the International Criminal Court announces plans to investigate possible war crimes in Ukraine, what help can the country expect from international law frameworks and rules-based systems? And a wide-ranging interview with the Chief Justice of the New South Wales Supreme Court, Tom Bathurst, who is retiring after more than a decade in office.
3/1/202233 minutes, 59 seconds
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ICC to launch Ukraine war crimes probe, and NSW Chief Justice Tom Bathurst retires

As the International Criminal Court announces plans to investigate possible war crimes in Ukraine, what help can the country expect from international law frameworks and rules-based systems? And a wide-ranging interview with the Chief Justice of the New South Wales Supreme Court, Tom Bathurst, who is retiring after more than a decade in office.
3/1/202233 minutes, 59 seconds
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Sandy Hook settlement, and pets in family law disputes

Could a US$73 million settlement for relatives of the 2012 Sandy Hook school massacre open the door for other lawsuits against US gun manufacturers? And who gets the furry babies when a couple divorces?
2/22/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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Sandy Hook settlement, and pets in family law disputes

Could a US$73 million settlement for relatives of the 2012 Sandy Hook school massacre open the door for other lawsuits against US gun manufacturers? And who gets the furry babies when a couple divorces?
2/22/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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High Court rulings clarify contract worker status

The High Court has delivered two judgments that help clarify the legal distinction between the status of a contract worker and a employee, with potential long-term implications across Australian workplaces. Also in the program, a neighbourhood dispute that grew 'out of all proportion' ends in the New South Wales Supreme Court.
2/15/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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High Court rulings clarify contract worker status

The High Court has delivered two judgments that help clarify the legal distinction between the status of a contract worker and a employee, with potential long-term implications across Australian workplaces. Also in the program, a neighbourhood dispute that grew 'out of all proportion' ends in the New South Wales Supreme Court.
2/15/202228 minutes, 33 seconds
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Are Australia's political donation laws fit for purpose?

The Australian Electoral Commission has revealed that 10 donors account for a quarter of donations made to the country's political parties in the 2020-21 financial year. According to the Commission, the source of one third of all political income remains undisclosed. What does the data reveal and what does it hide? And what does it say about the rules governing political donations?
2/8/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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Are Australia's political donation laws fit for purpose?

The Australian Electoral Commission has revealed that 10 donors account for a quarter of donations made to the country's political parties in the 2020-21 financial year. According to the Commission, the source of one third of all political income remains undisclosed. What does the data reveal and what does it hide? And what does it say about the rules governing political donations?
2/8/202228 minutes, 37 seconds
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When does misrepresenting professional experience become a criminal offence?

When does inflating professional skills and experience cross a line to become a criminal offence?
2/1/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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When does misrepresenting professional experience become a criminal offence?

When does inflating professional skills and experience cross a line to become a criminal offence?
2/1/202228 minutes, 34 seconds
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Deporting Djokovic, and Catholic diocese found vicariously liable in historical child sex abuse case

The Federal Government's move to deport Serbian tennis player Novak Djokovic from Australia has highlighted the scope of discretionary powers held by the immigration minister. And the Supreme Court of Victoria sets a legal precedent in what is believed to be the first ruling to find a Catholic diocese in Australia 'vicariously liable' for child sexual abuse committed by a priest decades ago.
1/25/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Deporting Djokovic, and Catholic diocese found vicariously liable in historical child sex abuse case

The Federal Government's move to deport Serbian tennis player Novak Djokovic from Australia has highlighted the scope of discretionary powers held by the immigration minister. And the Supreme Court of Victoria sets a legal precedent in what is believed to be the first ruling to find a Catholic diocese in Australia 'vicariously liable' for child sexual abuse committed by a priest decades ago.
1/25/202228 minutes, 35 seconds
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Crime and justice in the Torres Strait, and Cape York’s Licensing Muster program

According to a study which explores how the Torres Strait's unique culture, geography and colonial experience has shaped the current crime and justice landscape, property crime in the region is very low. And the innovative Licensing Muster Project is helping Indigenous people living at the top of Cape York obtain birth certificates which are required when applying for a drivers licence.
1/18/202228 minutes, 32 seconds
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Crime and justice in the Torres Strait, and Cape York’s Licensing Muster program

According to a study which explores how the Torres Strait's unique culture, geography and colonial experience has shaped the current crime and justice landscape, property crime in the region is very low. And the innovative Licensing Muster Project is helping Indigenous people living at the top of Cape York obtain birth certificates which are required when applying for a drivers licence.
1/18/202228 minutes, 32 seconds
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Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a forensic health facility

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne's Forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness.
1/11/202228 minutes, 36 seconds
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Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a forensic health facility

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne's Forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness.
1/11/202228 minutes, 36 seconds
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Court rules couples can conspire, and how brain implants might transform criminal law

The High Court of Australia rules that a married couple can conspire to commit a crime. Also, the challenges posed by emerging neurotechnologies.
1/4/202228 minutes, 36 seconds
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Court rules couples can conspire, and how brain implants might transform criminal law

The High Court of Australia rules that a married couple can conspire to commit a crime. Also, the challenges posed by emerging neurotechnologies.
1/4/202228 minutes, 36 seconds
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How itchy underpants created Australia's consumer laws

If a consumer is injured by a faulty product, they can sue the manufacturer. In Australia, The law of Negligence or Torts forms a fundamental building block of our legal system. As reporter Carly Godden discovers, these laws owe much of their origins to a case from the 1930's involving a pair of woollen long johns.
12/28/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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How itchy underpants created Australia's consumer laws

If a consumer is injured by a faulty product, they can sue the manufacturer. In Australia, The law of Negligence or Torts forms a fundamental building block of our legal system. As reporter Carly Godden discovers, these laws owe much of their origins to a case from the 1930's involving a pair of woollen long johns.
12/28/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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'Squatters' rights', and UK health laws

The Law Report revisits a New South Wales Supreme Court ruling against a retirement village developer that claimed ‘squatters' rights’, or adverse possession, over a Sydney property. And two court decisions highlight important issues in Britain's health laws.
12/21/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Squatters' rights', and UK health laws

The Law Report revisits a New South Wales Supreme Court ruling against a retirement village developer that claimed ‘squatters' rights’, or adverse possession, over a Sydney property. And two court decisions highlight important issues in Britain's health laws.
12/21/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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US trademark dispute threatens ugg boot business, and deportation fears for returned prison escapee

A Sydney ugg boot maker says his 40-year-old business is at risk of bankruptcy following a trademark dispute in the United States courts. And can Australia deport a prison escapee, who surrendered after 30 years on the run, to a country that no longer exists?
12/14/202128 minutes, 33 seconds
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US trademark dispute threatens ugg boot business, and deportation fears for returned prison escapee

A Sydney ugg boot maker says his 40-year-old business is at risk of bankruptcy following a trademark dispute in the United States courts. And can Australia deport a prison escapee, who surrendered after 30 years on the run, to a country that no longer exists?
12/14/202128 minutes, 33 seconds
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Sue Neill-Fraser loses appeal against murder conviction

Tasmanian woman Sue Neill-Fraser's latest appeal has failed to overturn her murder conviction for the death of Bob Chappell, her former partner who disappeared from a yacht moored off Hobart in 2009. Has the appeal shed new light on a case in which a body was never found?
12/7/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Sue Neill-Fraser loses appeal against murder conviction

Tasmanian woman Sue Neill-Fraser's latest appeal has failed to overturn her murder conviction for the death of Bob Chappell, her former partner who disappeared from a yacht moored off Hobart in 2009. Has the appeal shed new light on a case in which a body was never found?
12/7/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Could AI help make the law more accessible for disabled people?

Could ‘chatbots’, a form of artificial intelligence technology, help make the legal system more accessible for people living with disabilities?  
11/30/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Could AI help make the law more accessible for disabled people?

Could ‘chatbots’, a form of artificial intelligence technology, help make the legal system more accessible for people living with disabilities?  
11/30/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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'Body modification' on trial

In a precedent-setting case, a New South Wales judge has found self-proclaimed extreme body modification artist Brendan Leigh Russell guilty of female genital mutilation, grievous bodily harm, and manslaughter. Is consent a valid legal defence when cosmetic 'body modification' procedures go wrong?
11/23/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Body modification' on trial

In a precedent-setting case, a New South Wales judge has found self-proclaimed extreme body modification artist Brendan Leigh Russell guilty of female genital mutilation, grievous bodily harm, and manslaughter. Is consent a valid legal defence when cosmetic 'body modification' procedures go wrong?
11/23/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Adriana Rivas mounts new appeal against Chile extradition

Should Sydney woman Adriana Rivas, who is accused of being a Pinochet-era intelligence agent, be extradited to Chile over alleged crimes against humanity? The full bench of the Federal Court is set to hear her latest appeal this week. And calls for Australia to investigate allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity in communities with links to conflict zones.
11/16/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Adriana Rivas mounts new appeal against Chile extradition

Should Sydney woman Adriana Rivas, who is accused of being a Pinochet-era intelligence agent, be extradited to Chile over alleged crimes against humanity? The full bench of the Federal Court is set to hear her latest appeal this week. And calls for Australia to investigate allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity in communities with links to conflict zones.
11/16/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Reforming NSW sexual consent laws

What impact could proposed changes to New South Wales consent laws have in delivering justice to victims and survivors of sexual assault?
11/9/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Reforming NSW sexual consent laws

What impact could proposed changes to New South Wales consent laws have in delivering justice to victims and survivors of sexual assault?
11/9/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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UK legal action over rugby league players’ brain injury, and deciding judicial recusals in Australian courts

Australia’s football codes are closely monitoring a class action brought by former rugby league players in Britain who allege the sport’s governing body failed to protect them from the risks of brain damage. And are judges best placed to decide when to recuse themselves from a court case?
11/2/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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UK legal action over rugby league players’ brain injury, and deciding judicial recusals in Australian courts

Australia’s football codes are closely monitoring a class action brought by former rugby league players in Britain who allege the sport’s governing body failed to protect them from the risks of brain damage. And are judges best placed to decide when to recuse themselves from a court case?
11/2/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Assange extradition appeal, WikiLeaks and journalism

Britain’s High Court is set to hear the United States government's appeal against a ruling blocking the extradition of Julian Assange on mental health grounds. And warnings that US attempts to prosecute the WikiLeaks founder for publishing classified government documents could have devastating implications for press freedom.
10/26/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Assange extradition appeal, WikiLeaks and journalism

Britain’s High Court is set to hear the United States government's appeal against a ruling blocking the extradition of Julian Assange on mental health grounds. And warnings that US attempts to prosecute the WikiLeaks founder for publishing classified government documents could have devastating implications for press freedom.
10/26/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Climate science dismissal case sparks academic freedom debate, High Court quashes Palmer $30bn WA compensation challenge

A long-running unfair dismissal case involving Queensland university professor Peter Ridd has sparked intense debate around questions of academic freedom. Also in the program: the High Court has quashed a legal challenge by mining magnate-turned-politician Clive Palmer against laws designed to ban his company from suing the West Australian government for compensation over a disputed contract.
10/19/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Climate science dismissal case sparks academic freedom debate, High Court quashes Palmer $30bn WA compensation challenge

A long-running unfair dismissal case involving Queensland university professor Peter Ridd has sparked intense debate around questions of academic freedom. Also in the program: the High Court has quashed a legal challenge by mining magnate-turned-politician Clive Palmer against laws designed to ban his company from suing the West Australian government for compensation over a disputed contract.
10/19/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Judicial impartiality, and court disclosure obligations for electronic evidence

Should judges have social contact with lawyers who appear before them in court? The Australian Law Reform Commission is conducting an inquiry into judicial impartiality. Also, is there an obligation on prosecutors to provide defence lawyers with all the raw data downloaded from a confiscated mobile phone?
10/12/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Judicial impartiality, and court disclosure obligations for electronic evidence

Should judges have social contact with lawyers who appear before them in court? The Australian Law Reform Commission is conducting an inquiry into judicial impartiality. Also, is there an obligation on prosecutors to provide defence lawyers with all the raw data downloaded from a confiscated mobile phone?
10/12/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Squatters' rights', and UK health laws

The New South Wales Supreme Court has ruled against a retirement village developer claiming ‘squatters' rights’, or adverse possession, over a Sydney property. And two court decisions highlight important issues in UK health law: the legality of severe disability as a reason for late-term abortions and access to puberty-suppressing drugs for children diagnosed with gender dysphoria.
10/5/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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'Squatters' rights', and UK health laws

The New South Wales Supreme Court has ruled against a retirement village developer claiming ‘squatters' rights’, or adverse possession, over a Sydney property. And two court decisions highlight important issues in UK health law: the legality of severe disability as a reason for late-term abortions and access to puberty-suppressing drugs for children diagnosed with gender dysphoria.
10/5/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Regulating Covid-19 misinformation and social media influencers

What do the federal politician Craig Kelly, anaesthetist Dr Paul Oosterhuis, celebrity chef Pete Evans and clothing brand Lorna Jane have in common? They have all been at loggerheads with various regulators over Covid-19 misinformation.
9/28/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Regulating Covid-19 misinformation and social media influencers

What do the federal politician Craig Kelly, anaesthetist Dr Paul Oosterhuis, celebrity chef Pete Evans and clothing brand Lorna Jane have in common? They have all been at loggerheads with various regulators over Covid-19 misinformation.
9/28/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Britain’s offshore detention plans, and investigating human rights violations

Britain seeks to overhaul immigration laws as asylum seekers and migrants continue to arrive across the English Channel from France.  How to investigate human rights violations when on-the-ground access becomes impossible? And the dangers facing human rights investigators in Afghanistan.
9/21/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Britain’s offshore detention plans, and investigating human rights violations

Britain seeks to overhaul immigration laws as asylum seekers and migrants continue to arrive across the English Channel from France.  How to investigate human rights violations when on-the-ground access becomes impossible? And the dangers facing human rights investigators in Afghanistan.
9/21/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Media impact of High Court defamation ruling, and NT youth bail laws

How could the High Court media defamation ruling affect social media use? And are changes to Northern Territory youth bail laws fit for purpose?
9/14/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Media impact of High Court defamation ruling, and NT youth bail laws

How could the High Court media defamation ruling affect social media use? And are changes to Northern Territory youth bail laws fit for purpose?
9/14/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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How does Australia’s Covid-19 vaccine injury scheme compare to compensation programs abroad?

The Commonwealth-funded No Fault Covid-19 Indemnity Scheme aims to compensate for medical expenses and loss of income resulting from an adverse reaction following vaccination.
9/7/202128 minutes, 30 seconds
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How does Australia’s Covid-19 vaccine injury scheme compare to compensation programs abroad?

The Commonwealth-funded No Fault Covid-19 Indemnity Scheme aims to compensate for medical expenses and loss of income resulting from an adverse reaction following vaccination.
9/7/202128 minutes, 30 seconds
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Passenger injured in stolen car denied compensation and Covid-19 death ruled workplace injury

Should compensation be denied to a passenger in a stolen vehicle who was seriously injured when it crashed? And a New South Wales Tribunal has ruled that a Covid-19 death can be classified as a work-related injury.
8/31/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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Passenger injured in stolen car denied compensation and Covid-19 death ruled workplace injury

Should compensation be denied to a passenger in a stolen vehicle who was seriously injured when it crashed? And a New South Wales Tribunal has ruled that a Covid-19 death can be classified as a work-related injury.
8/31/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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What future for Afghanistan after Taliban return?

What will the Taliban's return to power in Afghanistan mean for women and human rights?
8/24/202128 minutes, 15 seconds
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What future for Afghanistan after Taliban return?

What will the Taliban's return to power in Afghanistan mean for women and human rights?
8/24/202128 minutes, 15 seconds
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Victorian tenant evicted after COVID19 moratorium ends. Also, can you sue over negative online reviews?

The Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal has found that landlords can evict tenants for non-payment of rent during the big Victorian lockdown of 2020. It's a ruling that could affect thousands of vulnerable renters. And, should doctors, lawyers and other professionals be able to sue someone who posts a negative online review?
8/17/202128 minutes, 32 seconds
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Victorian tenant evicted after COVID19 moratorium ends. Also, can you sue over negative online reviews?

The Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal has found that landlords can evict tenants for non-payment of rent during the big Victorian lockdown of 2020. It's a ruling that could affect thousands of vulnerable renters. And, should doctors, lawyers and other professionals be able to sue someone who posts a negative online review?
8/17/202128 minutes, 32 seconds
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Balancing individual and community rights in a pandemic

As the COVID19 pandemic grips NSW, how do we balance the rights of an individual with those of the broader community? And the Victorian Ombudsman has released a report detailing human rights breaches, many dealing with ensuring compliance with COVID 19 public orders.  
8/10/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Balancing individual and community rights in a pandemic

As the COVID19 pandemic grips NSW, how do we balance the rights of an individual with those of the broader community? And the Victorian Ombudsman has released a report detailing human rights breaches, many dealing with ensuring compliance with COVID 19 public orders.  
8/10/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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WA Parliament debates new child protection laws

This week, the WA parliament is debating new child protection legislation.  Meanwhile a program called Aboriginal Family Led Decision Making is being piloted. Will new laws and programs reduce the vast over representation of Indigenous children in out-of-home care, currently seventeen times more likely than non-Indigenous children?
8/3/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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WA Parliament debates new child protection laws

This week, the WA parliament is debating new child protection legislation.  Meanwhile a program called Aboriginal Family Led Decision Making is being piloted. Will new laws and programs reduce the vast over representation of Indigenous children in out-of-home care, currently seventeen times more likely than non-Indigenous children?
8/3/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Covid19 vaccination litigation in the US and transporting jurors virtually to the scene of the crime

In the USA there is a growing number of legal disputes involving employees, consumers and university students who are challenging mandatory vaccination requirements. And new research suggests that virtual reality headsets could help jurors reach fairer verdicts in complex criminal trials.
7/27/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Covid19 vaccination litigation in the US and transporting jurors virtually to the scene of the crime

In the USA there is a growing number of legal disputes involving employees, consumers and university students who are challenging mandatory vaccination requirements. And new research suggests that virtual reality headsets could help jurors reach fairer verdicts in complex criminal trials.
7/27/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Proceeds of crime

If you earn a million dollars from selling drugs and are convicted under proceeds of crime legislation, you don’t get to keep it. But what if that conviction is quashed years later? Some of the most notorious figures in the gangland era are heading back to courts to appeal their convictions following the Nicola Gobbo scandal. What happens to the 70 million dollars confiscated? Greg Muller asks, what are the laws around proceeds of crime and are they always fair?    
7/20/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Proceeds of crime

If you earn a million dollars from selling drugs and are convicted under proceeds of crime legislation, you don’t get to keep it. But what if that conviction is quashed years later? Some of the most notorious figures in the gangland era are heading back to courts to appeal their convictions following the Nicola Gobbo scandal. What happens to the 70 million dollars confiscated? Greg Muller asks, what are the laws around proceeds of crime and are they always fair?    
7/20/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Climate change litigation

Climate change is increasingly being raised in courtrooms around the world. The latest was brought by eight Australian school students and a nun who argued that the government owed a duty of care to protect children from the harmful effects of climate change. As journalist Greg Muller reports, climate change is now seen as a legal and financial risk as well as an environmental one.  
7/13/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Climate change litigation

Climate change is increasingly being raised in courtrooms around the world. The latest was brought by eight Australian school students and a nun who argued that the government owed a duty of care to protect children from the harmful effects of climate change. As journalist Greg Muller reports, climate change is now seen as a legal and financial risk as well as an environmental one.  
7/13/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Bougainville independence talks underway. And are judges too lenient when sentencing sex offenders?

Could we soon see the creation of a brand new country immediately to Australia's north? PNG's Prime Minister and the President of the Autonomous Bougainville Government are negotiating Bougainville's future. Also, what are the most important factors that judges weigh up when sentencing sex offenders? And are judges out of touch with community expectations?
7/6/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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Bougainville independence talks underway. And are judges too lenient when sentencing sex offenders?

Could we soon see the creation of a brand new country immediately to Australia's north? PNG's Prime Minister and the President of the Autonomous Bougainville Government are negotiating Bougainville's future. Also, what are the most important factors that judges weigh up when sentencing sex offenders? And are judges out of touch with community expectations?
7/6/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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Overwhelming support for constitutionally enshrined indigenous voice

The Uluru Statement from the Heart called for a constitutionally enshrined indigenous voice to parliament. In response, the federal government created a co-design process, which produced an interim report outlining what form this voice might take. A new report has found that 90% of the 2500 submissions received following the interim report support constitutional enshrinement.
6/29/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Overwhelming support for constitutionally enshrined indigenous voice

The Uluru Statement from the Heart called for a constitutionally enshrined indigenous voice to parliament. In response, the federal government created a co-design process, which produced an interim report outlining what form this voice might take. A new report has found that 90% of the 2500 submissions received following the interim report support constitutional enshrinement.
6/29/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Witness K and the public interest. And should Australia adopt private sponsorship of refugees Canada style?

Can revealing Australia’s security operations ever be in the public interest? A former spy, Witness K received a three-month suspended sentence for revealing the Australian government spied on the Timor Leste government during negotiations over oil and gas resources in the Timor Strait. And, since the 1970s, over 300,000 refugees have settled in Canada under the country’s private sponsorship scheme. Could a similar scheme work in Australia?
6/22/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Witness K and the public interest. And should Australia adopt private sponsorship of refugees Canada style?

Can revealing Australia’s security operations ever be in the public interest? A former spy, Witness K received a three-month suspended sentence for revealing the Australian government spied on the Timor Leste government during negotiations over oil and gas resources in the Timor Strait. And, since the 1970s, over 300,000 refugees have settled in Canada under the country’s private sponsorship scheme. Could a similar scheme work in Australia?
6/22/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Crime and Justice in the Torres Strait and Cape York’s Licensing Muster program

Torres Strait's low crime rate, the Muster program
6/15/202128 minutes, 33 seconds
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Crime and Justice in the Torres Strait and Cape York’s Licensing Muster program

Torres Strait's low crime rate, the Muster program
6/15/202128 minutes, 33 seconds
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Vaccine passports and global snapshot of LGBTQI discrimination

Some countries and states have introduced a Vaccine Passport, to allow more domestic and international movement and businesses to return. What are the technical and legal obstacles to a COVID-19 vaccine passport here in Australia? And in this Pride Month, while the LGBTQI community has a lot to celebrate in Australia, in many countries they face ongoing legal discrimination, even the death penalty.
6/8/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Vaccine passports and global snapshot of LGBTQI discrimination

Some countries and states have introduced a Vaccine Passport, to allow more domestic and international movement and businesses to return. What are the technical and legal obstacles to a COVID-19 vaccine passport here in Australia? And in this Pride Month, while the LGBTQI community has a lot to celebrate in Australia, in many countries they face ongoing legal discrimination, even the death penalty.
6/8/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Porter v ABC and  AGL v Greenpeace

Former Attorney General Christian Porter has discontinued his defamation litigation against the ABC. And power company AGL is taking Greenpeace to court arguing breach of trademark and copyright. AGL says the activist group should not have used its trademark in a series of parody advertisements that highlights its CO2 emissions.
6/1/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Porter v ABC and  AGL v Greenpeace

Former Attorney General Christian Porter has discontinued his defamation litigation against the ABC. And power company AGL is taking Greenpeace to court arguing breach of trademark and copyright. AGL says the activist group should not have used its trademark in a series of parody advertisements that highlights its CO2 emissions.
6/1/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Victoria's Yoo-rrook Justice Commission and new research on Magistrate stress levels

We speak to the Chair and one of other the four commissioners who will preside over Victoria's ground breaking Yoo-rrook or Justice Commission. And new research has found that local court magistrates are the state-based judicial officers who suffer most from work-related stress.
5/25/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Victoria's Yoo-rrook Justice Commission and new research on Magistrate stress levels

We speak to the Chair and one of other the four commissioners who will preside over Victoria's ground breaking Yoo-rrook or Justice Commission. And new research has found that local court magistrates are the state-based judicial officers who suffer most from work-related stress.
5/25/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Improving the justice system for sexual assault survivors

Many victim survivors of sexual assault say they found giving evidence at trial a harrowing and re-traumatising experience. The Victorian Law Reform Commission is currently conducting an inquiry into ways to improve the responses of the justice system to sexual offences.  
5/18/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Improving the justice system for sexual assault survivors

Many victim survivors of sexual assault say they found giving evidence at trial a harrowing and re-traumatising experience. The Victorian Law Reform Commission is currently conducting an inquiry into ways to improve the responses of the justice system to sexual offences.  
5/18/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Federal Court rejects challenge to India travel ban. And rugby's no fault standdown rule [Updated audio]

The Federal Court dismissed a challenge to the Morrison government's ban on Australian citizens returning from India. Justice Thawley ruled that the government was acting within its powers under the Biosecurity Act 2015. And should professional sports people be able to continue playing when facing serious criminal charges?
5/11/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Federal Court rejects challenge to India travel ban. And rugby's no fault standdown rule [Updated audio]

The Federal Court dismissed a challenge to the Morrison government's ban on Australian citizens returning from India. Justice Thawley ruled that the government was acting within its powers under the Biosecurity Act 2015. And should professional sports people be able to continue playing when facing serious criminal charges?
5/11/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Drug driving truckies and outraging public decency

Mohinder Singh, the truck driver responsible for the deaths of four Victorian police officers has been sentenced to a non parole period of 18 years. Richard Pusey, who callously filmed the tragedy has also been sentenced to 10 months jail after pleading guilty to a number of offences including outraging public decency. And, why did the NSW Workers Commission award $500,000 to the family of a truck driver who was high on ice and died after crashing his rig into a home, injuring a sleeping pensioner?
5/4/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Drug driving truckies and outraging public decency

Mohinder Singh, the truck driver responsible for the deaths of four Victorian police officers has been sentenced to a non parole period of 18 years. Richard Pusey, who callously filmed the tragedy has also been sentenced to 10 months jail after pleading guilty to a number of offences including outraging public decency. And, why did the NSW Workers Commission award $500,000 to the family of a truck driver who was high on ice and died after crashing his rig into a home, injuring a sleeping pensioner?
5/4/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Australia's whistle-blower protection laws. And is it time for a vaccine injury compensation scheme?

Australia's whistle-blower laws will be in the spotlight when a long-running, high-profile prosecution involving former ATO officer Richard Boyle comes back before the courts. Also, if a vaccine causes an injury, many countries have a vaccine injury compensation scheme. Do we need one in Australia?
4/27/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Australia's whistle-blower protection laws. And is it time for a vaccine injury compensation scheme?

Australia's whistle-blower laws will be in the spotlight when a long-running, high-profile prosecution involving former ATO officer Richard Boyle comes back before the courts. Also, if a vaccine causes an injury, many countries have a vaccine injury compensation scheme. Do we need one in Australia?
4/27/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Court rules couples can conspire and how brain implants might transform criminal law

The High Court of Australia rules that a married couple can conspire to commit a crime. Also, the challenges posed by emerging neuro technologies.
4/20/202128 minutes, 39 seconds
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Court rules couples can conspire and how brain implants might transform criminal law

The High Court of Australia rules that a married couple can conspire to commit a crime. Also, the challenges posed by emerging neuro technologies.
4/20/202128 minutes, 39 seconds
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The findings of two significant Coronial Inquests

NSW State Coroner Teresa O’Sullivan has found that the murders of teenagers Jack and Jennifer Edwards by their father were preventable. The Coroner identified a series of serious systemic failures which contributed to the crimes. Also, Victorian Coroner Paresa Spanos has recommended the adoption of pill testing after investigating the deaths of five young men who died in separate drug related incidents between July 2016 and January 2017.
4/13/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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The findings of two significant Coronial Inquests

NSW State Coroner Teresa O’Sullivan has found that the murders of teenagers Jack and Jennifer Edwards by their father were preventable. The Coroner identified a series of serious systemic failures which contributed to the crimes. Also, Victorian Coroner Paresa Spanos has recommended the adoption of pill testing after investigating the deaths of five young men who died in separate drug related incidents between July 2016 and January 2017.
4/13/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Full decriminalisation of sex work on the cards in Victoria

The Victorian government is set to consider fully decriminalising sex work this year. Guest producer Carly Godden traces how, over the eras, the law in Victoria has regulated the commercial sex and adult industries.  *Note there are sexual references in this program
4/6/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Full decriminalisation of sex work on the cards in Victoria

The Victorian government is set to consider fully decriminalising sex work this year. Guest producer Carly Godden traces how, over the eras, the law in Victoria has regulated the commercial sex and adult industries.  *Note there are sexual references in this program
4/6/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Christian Porter no longer Attorney General. And eminent scientists petition for release of convicted killer Kathleen Folbigg

On advice from the Solicitor-General, the PM shifts Christian Porter to Minister for Industry, Science and Technology. And following the NSW Court of Appeal ruling that Kathleen Folbigg stay behind bars, the Australian Academy of Science issues a strong statement saying 'there are medical and scientific explanations for the death of each of Kathleen Folbigg's children'. A petition from ninety eminent scientists also called for her immediate release.
3/30/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Christian Porter no longer Attorney General. And eminent scientists petition for release of convicted killer Kathleen Folbigg

On advice from the Solicitor-General, the PM shifts Christian Porter to Minister for Industry, Science and Technology. And following the NSW Court of Appeal ruling that Kathleen Folbigg stay behind bars, the Australian Academy of Science issues a strong statement saying 'there are medical and scientific explanations for the death of each of Kathleen Folbigg's children'. A petition from ninety eminent scientists also called for her immediate release.
3/30/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a Forensic health facility

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne's Forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness.
3/23/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a Forensic health facility

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne's Forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness.
3/23/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Politicians suing for defamation and research on re-offending by forensic patients

Attorney-General Christian Porter has just lodged a defamation action against the ABC. And recently, the full Federal Court upheld a $120,000 damages payout to Senator Sarah Hanson Young by former Senator David Leyonhjelm. Also, new research on who is most likely to commit a serious crime. A former prisoner or former forensic hospital patient?
3/16/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Politicians suing for defamation and research on re-offending by forensic patients

Attorney-General Christian Porter has just lodged a defamation action against the ABC. And recently, the full Federal Court upheld a $120,000 damages payout to Senator Sarah Hanson Young by former Senator David Leyonhjelm. Also, new research on who is most likely to commit a serious crime. A former prisoner or former forensic hospital patient?
3/16/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Politicians suing for defamation and research on re-offending by forensic patients

Attorney-General Christian Porter has just lodged a defamation action against the ABC. And recently, the full Federal Court upheld a $120,000 damages payout to Senator Sarah Hanson Young by former Senator David Leyonhjelm. Also, new research on who is most likely to commit a serious crime. A former prisoner or former forensic hospital patient?
3/16/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Politicians suing for defamation and research on re-offending by forensic patients

Attorney-General Christian Porter has just lodged a defamation action against the ABC. And recently, the full Federal Court upheld a $120,000 damages payout to Senator Sarah Hanson Young by former Senator David Leyonhjelm. Also, new research on who is most likely to commit a serious crime. A former prisoner or former forensic hospital patient?
3/16/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Debate over independent inquiry into Christian Porter rape allegations

Should there be an an independent inquiry into historic rape allegations against Attorney-General Christian Porter and if so, what should it look like?
3/9/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Debate over independent inquiry into Christian Porter rape allegations

Should there be an an independent inquiry into historic rape allegations against Attorney-General Christian Porter and if so, what should it look like?
3/9/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Disability Royal Commissioner Ron Sackville. And legal win for Torres Strait native title holders

Ron Sackville QC, AO, the chair of The Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability has been hearing harrowing accounts of the experiences of people with cognitive disability in the criminal justice system. In a legal first, the Kaurareg people of Muralug island obtained an injunction under the Native Title Act preventing future damage. As a result the Torres Shire Council has just abandoned plans to build a harbour on a sacred site
3/2/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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Disability Royal Commissioner Ron Sackville. And legal win for Torres Strait native title holders

Ron Sackville QC, AO, the chair of The Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability has been hearing harrowing accounts of the experiences of people with cognitive disability in the criminal justice system. In a legal first, the Kaurareg people of Muralug island obtained an injunction under the Native Title Act preventing future damage. As a result the Torres Shire Council has just abandoned plans to build a harbour on a sacred site
3/2/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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Adventure tourism accidents and legal liability

If you go skydiving or hot air ballooning and tragedy strikes, who can you sue? The tour operator? In a unique unfolding case the Bureau of Meteorology is being sued.
2/23/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Adventure tourism accidents and legal liability

If you go skydiving or hot air ballooning and tragedy strikes, who can you sue? The tour operator? In a unique unfolding case the Bureau of Meteorology is being sued.
2/23/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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Convicted terrorist to stay in jail on continuing detention order. And sacked climate change skeptic to get his day in High Court

The High Court of Australia has upheld the Continuing Detention Order for convicted terrorist Abdul Nacer Benbrika. Even though his fifteen year sentence is over, he is deemed to pose an ongoing threat and he remains in detention. Also, the High Court has agreed to hear the case of sacked marine physicist Peter Ridd. He was terminated after being disciplined repeatedly by James Cook University over comments he made about the research of colleagues and associated entities. He is critical of science linking coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. with climate change and polluted water.
2/16/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Convicted terrorist to stay in jail on continuing detention order. And sacked climate change skeptic to get his day in High Court

The High Court of Australia has upheld the Continuing Detention Order for convicted terrorist Abdul Nacer Benbrika. Even though his fifteen year sentence is over, he is deemed to pose an ongoing threat and he remains in detention. Also, the High Court has agreed to hear the case of sacked marine physicist Peter Ridd. He was terminated after being disciplined repeatedly by James Cook University over comments he made about the research of colleagues and associated entities. He is critical of science linking coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. with climate change and polluted water.
2/16/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Queensland's outlaw bikie exit scheme. And international divorce property dispute can be heard in Australia

Queensland Police has launched an exit scheme to help outlaw motor cycle gang members break away from their clubs.  It's the first venture of this kind in Australia. And the High Court has ruled that issues around property division and maintenance can be heard in an Australian court, even when the divorce is overseas.
2/9/202128 minutes, 33 seconds
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Queensland's outlaw bikie exit scheme. And international divorce property dispute can be heard in Australia

Queensland Police has launched an exit scheme to help outlaw motor cycle gang members break away from their clubs.  It's the first venture of this kind in Australia. And the High Court has ruled that issues around property division and maintenance can be heard in an Australian court, even when the divorce is overseas.
2/9/202128 minutes, 33 seconds
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Can you be sacked if you refuse a COVID-19 vaccine? And is neglecting an overdosed friend a crime?

Two recent unfair dismissal cases may provide some insight into whether employers can sack workers who refuse a COVID-19 vaccination. Also, a recent decision in the NSW Court of Appeal upholds a manslaughter conviction involving a failure to help a friend who needed urgent medical help.
2/2/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Can you be sacked if you refuse a COVID-19 vaccine? And is neglecting an overdosed friend a crime?

Two recent unfair dismissal cases may provide some insight into whether employers can sack workers who refuse a COVID-19 vaccination. Also, a recent decision in the NSW Court of Appeal upholds a manslaughter conviction involving a failure to help a friend who needed urgent medical help.
2/2/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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How itchy underpants created our consumer laws

If a consumer is injured by a faulty product, they can sue the manufacturer. In Australia, The law of Negligence or Torts forms a fundamental building block of our legal system. As reporter Carly Godden discovers, these laws owe much of their origins to a case from the 1930's involving a pair of woollen long johns.  
1/26/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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How itchy underpants created our consumer laws

If a consumer is injured by a faulty product, they can sue the manufacturer. In Australia, The law of Negligence or Torts forms a fundamental building block of our legal system. As reporter Carly Godden discovers, these laws owe much of their origins to a case from the 1930's involving a pair of woollen long johns.  
1/26/202128 minutes, 36 seconds
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Retired Magistrate David Heilpern critical of NSW drug driving laws

In northern NSW, Lismore Local Court Magistrate David Heilpern has just retired at the age of 58. In a candid conversation about his working life, its challenges and stresses, he also outlines his misgivings about the NSW drug driving laws which played a big role in his decision to step down.
1/19/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Retired Magistrate David Heilpern critical of NSW drug driving laws

In northern NSW, Lismore Local Court Magistrate David Heilpern has just retired at the age of 58. In a candid conversation about his working life, its challenges and stresses, he also outlines his misgivings about the NSW drug driving laws which played a big role in his decision to step down.
1/19/202128 minutes, 34 seconds
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Family violence killing found to be a workplace death

The NSW Court of Appeal found that the killing of a woman by her de facto husband at home was a workplace death and her family are entitled to workers compensation. This decision was handed down in March, just at the time when millions began working from home due to the Covid-19 pandemic. So what are the implications of this case for workers and their employers? If you or anyone you know is affected by family violence there is help available at 1800 RESPECT 1800 737 732 Lifeline on 13 11 14 safe steps on 1800 015 188 Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800 MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978
1/12/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Family violence killing found to be a workplace death

The NSW Court of Appeal found that the killing of a woman by her de facto husband at home was a workplace death and her family are entitled to workers compensation. This decision was handed down in March, just at the time when millions began working from home due to the Covid-19 pandemic. So what are the implications of this case for workers and their employers? If you or anyone you know is affected by family violence there is help available at 1800 RESPECT 1800 737 732 Lifeline on 13 11 14 safe steps on 1800 015 188 Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800 MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978
1/12/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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Former Facebook moderator sues social media giant for PTSD

Social media can be useful connecting people and ideas but moderators are needed to keep disturbing and toxic material off the platforms. Chris Gray, a former Facebook moderator claims viewing such content in order to keep us safe, gave him PTSD. He's the lead plaintiff in an action against Facebook and CPL, the contracting company that employed him. *And a warning this program discusses disturbing material*
1/5/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Former Facebook moderator sues social media giant for PTSD

Social media can be useful connecting people and ideas but moderators are needed to keep disturbing and toxic material off the platforms. Chris Gray, a former Facebook moderator claims viewing such content in order to keep us safe, gave him PTSD. He's the lead plaintiff in an action against Facebook and CPL, the contracting company that employed him. *And a warning this program discusses disturbing material*
1/5/202128 minutes, 37 seconds
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Adolescents who turn homes into war zones

One in ten incidents of family violence are committed by adolescents. Most of the violence is carried out by young males towards their mothers and involves verbal and physical abuse, coercive and controlling behaviours, financial abuse, stalking and property damage. Are our legal and social responses adequate?
12/29/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Adolescents who turn homes into war zones

One in ten incidents of family violence are committed by adolescents. Most of the violence is carried out by young males towards their mothers and involves verbal and physical abuse, coercive and controlling behaviours, financial abuse, stalking and property damage. Are our legal and social responses adequate?
12/29/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Australia’s legal response to WW1 and the 1919 Spanish Flu

A timely reflection on the legal responses to two separate but intimately-linked tragedies. During war we saw restrictions on food prices, protests and the freedoms of German Australians. During the Spanish flu crisis we saw maritime quarantines, closed internal borders and spats between the states and feds. Sound familiar?
12/22/202028 minutes, 37 seconds
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Australia’s legal response to WW1 and the 1919 Spanish Flu

A timely reflection on the legal responses to two separate but intimately-linked tragedies. During war we saw restrictions on food prices, protests and the freedoms of German Australians. During the Spanish flu crisis we saw maritime quarantines, closed internal borders and spats between the states and feds. Sound familiar?
12/22/202028 minutes, 37 seconds
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Call for regulation of debt repair or credit management companies

New research finds that 8% of Australians have used the services of debt management or credit repair companies this year. The Consumer Action Law Centre who commissioned the research are calling for UK-style consumer protections that require these businesses to act in the best interests of clients.    
12/15/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Call for regulation of debt repair or credit management companies

New research finds that 8% of Australians have used the services of debt management or credit repair companies this year. The Consumer Action Law Centre who commissioned the research are calling for UK-style consumer protections that require these businesses to act in the best interests of clients.    
12/15/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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COVID-19 and jury trials

Don a mask and join a tour of the County Court of Victoria with Chief Justice Peter Kidd. Find out how jury trials are being made COVID-19 safe.  And while masks aren't mandatory in NSW criminal trials, there have been many changes including more judge-only trials.
12/8/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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COVID-19 and jury trials

Don a mask and join a tour of the County Court of Victoria with Chief Justice Peter Kidd. Find out how jury trials are being made COVID-19 safe.  And while masks aren't mandatory in NSW criminal trials, there have been many changes including more judge-only trials.
12/8/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Royal Commission into Lawyer X findings. And Family Court's Lighthouse Project new approach to family violence

The Royal Commission into the Management of Police Informants concludes that the behaviour of both the Victoria Police and Nicola Gobbo, who led a double life of both barrister and informant, may affect over 1,000 court findings. Among the 111 recommendations is the appointment of a special investigator, as well as a suitably qualified person to investigate a further eleven people who were human sources with potential legal obligations of confidentiality or privilege. And, in a world first, the Family Court are launching The Lighthouse Project, a pilot scheme that links support services to families experiencing violence.
12/1/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Royal Commission into Lawyer X findings. And Family Court's Lighthouse Project new approach to family violence

The Royal Commission into the Management of Police Informants concludes that the behaviour of both the Victoria Police and Nicola Gobbo, who led a double life of both barrister and informant, may affect over 1,000 court findings. Among the 111 recommendations is the appointment of a special investigator, as well as a suitably qualified person to investigate a further eleven people who were human sources with potential legal obligations of confidentiality or privilege. And, in a world first, the Family Court are launching The Lighthouse Project, a pilot scheme that links support services to families experiencing violence.
12/1/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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How well did ADF Legal Officers in Afghanistan perform their task? And the right to silence a focus in High Court decision

Justice Brereton’s report into alleged war crimes by our special forces in Afghanistan is triggering a lot of discussion around failures in lines of accountability. It raises questions about on-the-ground Australian Defence Force lawyers, the very people who are meant to be experts in the Laws of War. And the Right to Silence. The High Court of Australia quashes a conviction and orders a retrial because the trial judge made comments to the jury about the accused’s decision not to give evidence.
11/24/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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How well did ADF Legal Officers in Afghanistan perform their task? And the right to silence a focus in High Court decision

Justice Brereton’s report into alleged war crimes by our special forces in Afghanistan is triggering a lot of discussion around failures in lines of accountability. It raises questions about on-the-ground Australian Defence Force lawyers, the very people who are meant to be experts in the Laws of War. And the Right to Silence. The High Court of Australia quashes a conviction and orders a retrial because the trial judge made comments to the jury about the accused’s decision not to give evidence.
11/24/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Recycled print cartridges don't infringe patents says High Court. Also, reforms to responsible lending laws

The High Court of Australia rules that a company that buys used empty computer print cartridges, refills them with ink and sells them to consumers is not infringing the patents of the original manufacturer. Protecting Consumers vs Streamlining Access to Credit. With the aim of getting the economy moving and consumers spending, the government hopes to loosen 'responsible lending laws' contained in the National Consumer Credit Protection Act.
11/17/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Recycled print cartridges don't infringe patents says High Court. Also, reforms to responsible lending laws

The High Court of Australia rules that a company that buys used empty computer print cartridges, refills them with ink and sells them to consumers is not infringing the patents of the original manufacturer. Protecting Consumers vs Streamlining Access to Credit. With the aim of getting the economy moving and consumers spending, the government hopes to loosen 'responsible lending laws' contained in the National Consumer Credit Protection Act.
11/17/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Trump disputes election loss in court, Australian challenges to COVID-19 restrictions and First Nations art from Victorian prisons

Can Donald Trump challenge his election loss in the courts? Three challenges to COVID-19 restrictions thrown out by Australian courts. And a new exhibition Future Dreaming...visions of the future showcases art works from First Nations prisoners in Victoria.
11/10/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Trump disputes election loss in court, Australian challenges to COVID-19 restrictions and First Nations art from Victorian prisons

Can Donald Trump challenge his election loss in the courts? Three challenges to COVID-19 restrictions thrown out by Australian courts. And a new exhibition Future Dreaming...visions of the future showcases art works from First Nations prisoners in Victoria.
11/10/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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NT police officer to stand trial for shooting death. And the COVID legal responses helping businesses from going under

An Alice Springs local court judge has ruled that Constable Zachary Rolfe will face a murder trial for the death of 19 year old Yuendumu man, Kumanjayi Walker. In a separate development, a NSW coroner referred a death involving corrective services officers to prosecutors. And with restrictions easing and some borders opening up, what are the legal and financial challenges ahead for business?
11/3/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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NT police officer to stand trial for shooting death. And the COVID legal responses helping businesses from going under

An Alice Springs local court judge has ruled that Constable Zachary Rolfe will face a murder trial for the death of 19 year old Yuendumu man, Kumanjayi Walker. In a separate development, a NSW coroner referred a death involving corrective services officers to prosecutors. And with restrictions easing and some borders opening up, what are the legal and financial challenges ahead for business?
11/3/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Landmark Victorian report on image based sexual abuse

The Victorian Sentencing Advisory Council has released an in-depth study into how non-consensual recording or distribution of sexual images or videos offences are handled by Victorian courts. It's the first report of its kind in Australia. What's surprising is the connection between prosecutions and domestic violence.
10/27/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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Landmark Victorian report on image based sexual abuse

The Victorian Sentencing Advisory Council has released an in-depth study into how non-consensual recording or distribution of sexual images or videos offences are handled by Victorian courts. It's the first report of its kind in Australia. What's surprising is the connection between prosecutions and domestic violence.
10/27/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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South Australia reduces sentencing discounts. Also, direct democracy in NZ and the US

All around Australia if an accused pleads guilty to a criminal offence, they become eligible for a reduction in prison time. But just how big an incentive should we give an accused if it’s a serious crime? The South Australian parliament has passed legislation reducing the maximum possible prison discount from 40% down to 25%. And during NZ's national election, our Kiwi cousins voted on two referendum questions. One was a private members bill which was literally pulled out of the NZ Democracy Biscuit Tin. Meanwhile in upcoming presidential election US citizens will also vote on a staggering number of state-based ballot propositions. In Colorado voters will be asked whether grey wolves should be re-introduced into the northern Rockies.
10/20/202028 minutes, 39 seconds
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South Australia reduces sentencing discounts. Also, direct democracy in NZ and the US

All around Australia if an accused pleads guilty to a criminal offence, they become eligible for a reduction in prison time. But just how big an incentive should we give an accused if it’s a serious crime? The South Australian parliament has passed legislation reducing the maximum possible prison discount from 40% down to 25%. And during NZ's national election, our Kiwi cousins voted on two referendum questions. One was a private members bill which was literally pulled out of the NZ Democracy Biscuit Tin. Meanwhile in upcoming presidential election US citizens will also vote on a staggering number of state-based ballot propositions. In Colorado voters will be asked whether grey wolves should be re-introduced into the northern Rockies.
10/20/202028 minutes, 39 seconds
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Appointing judges in the US and Australia and our consumer watchdog at work

Over the next few months two justices of the High Court of Australia will retire. What is the process for choosing their replacements? How different will our process be from what’s taking place right now in the USA with the US Supreme Court vacancy? Also, the Federal Court has just fined price comparison site iSelect $8.5 million after it admitted to misleading and deceptive conduct. This comes just few days after the court imposed a $7 million fine on ticket reseller Viagogo. But these two wins, follow two courtroom losses for the ACCC, both involving products spruiking their green credentials, flushable toilet wipes and disposable picnic ware.
10/13/202028 minutes, 39 seconds
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Appointing judges in the US and Australia and our consumer watchdog at work

Over the next few months two justices of the High Court of Australia will retire. What is the process for choosing their replacements? How different will our process be from what’s taking place right now in the USA with the US Supreme Court vacancy? Also, the Federal Court has just fined price comparison site iSelect $8.5 million after it admitted to misleading and deceptive conduct. This comes just few days after the court imposed a $7 million fine on ticket reseller Viagogo. But these two wins, follow two courtroom losses for the ACCC, both involving products spruiking their green credentials, flushable toilet wipes and disposable picnic ware.
10/13/202028 minutes, 39 seconds
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Elder abuse and COVID-19

There have been over 660 COVID-19 deaths in residential aged-care facilities. The Royal Commission into Aged Care special report on COVID 19 has made a number of recommendations aimed at improving the safety and quality of life of residents. The pandemic has also increased the vulnerabilities of elderly where-ever they live. Physical, financial and emotional abuse as well as neglect and chemical restraint have all made worse.
10/6/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Elder abuse and COVID-19

There have been over 660 COVID-19 deaths in residential aged-care facilities. The Royal Commission into Aged Care special report on COVID 19 has made a number of recommendations aimed at improving the safety and quality of life of residents. The pandemic has also increased the vulnerabilities of elderly where-ever they live. Physical, financial and emotional abuse as well as neglect and chemical restraint have all made worse.
10/6/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Claremont murder trial, judges and apprehended bias and Victorian children on remand who never receive a custodial sentence

The Perth trial of Bradley Robert Edwards, found guilty of two of the three Claremont murders. How should we deal with judges who are biased or incompetent? And, a new Victorian report finds that two thirds of children who spend time on remand never receive a custodial sentence.
9/29/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Claremont murder trial, judges and apprehended bias and Victorian children on remand who never receive a custodial sentence

The Perth trial of Bradley Robert Edwards, found guilty of two of the three Claremont murders. How should we deal with judges who are biased or incompetent? And, a new Victorian report finds that two thirds of children who spend time on remand never receive a custodial sentence.
9/29/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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VALE Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg. High Court of Australia rules that an off-duty soldier can face trial in military court

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s death has ignited raw and intense political wrangling over how to fill her seat on the US Supreme Court. We reflect on her legacy and the political manoeuvering. And, in a case involving a soldier known only as Private R, the High Court of Australia has determined that a trial for ADF members can be held in the military justice system even when the alleged crime was not connected to military service.
9/22/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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VALE Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg. High Court of Australia rules that an off-duty soldier can face trial in military court

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s death has ignited raw and intense political wrangling over how to fill her seat on the US Supreme Court. We reflect on her legacy and the political manoeuvering. And, in a case involving a soldier known only as Private R, the High Court of Australia has determined that a trial for ADF members can be held in the military justice system even when the alleged crime was not connected to military service.
9/22/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Bill to ban mobile phones in immigration detention. And Supreme Court win for remote NT residents over poor housing

The House of Representatives recently passed a bill which will strip mobile phones from people in immigration detention. Will the bill pass the Senate? What does this mean for asylum seekers?     And residents of the remote Northern Territory community of Santa Teresa have just won a big legal victory over NT Housing. One elderly representative litigant Enid, whose house didn’t have a back door for 6 years has just had her compensation increase from $100 to $10,000, a win that will have big implications for other communities.
9/15/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Bill to ban mobile phones in immigration detention. And Supreme Court win for remote NT residents over poor housing

The House of Representatives recently passed a bill which will strip mobile phones from people in immigration detention. Will the bill pass the Senate? What does this mean for asylum seekers?     And residents of the remote Northern Territory community of Santa Teresa have just won a big legal victory over NT Housing. One elderly representative litigant Enid, whose house didn’t have a back door for 6 years has just had her compensation increase from $100 to $10,000, a win that will have big implications for other communities.
9/15/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Judicial inquiry into COVID-19 hotel quarantine in Victoria

The vast majority of COVID-19 cases in Victoria’s second wave of the pandemic are traceable to breaches of hotel quarantine. What went so horribly wrong? A judicial inquiry is trying to find out.   So far, a lot of the evidence has focussed on how the roles and responsibilities of private security guards fitted with those of the police, government authorised officers, health providers and hotel staff.
9/8/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Judicial inquiry into COVID-19 hotel quarantine in Victoria

The vast majority of COVID-19 cases in Victoria’s second wave of the pandemic are traceable to breaches of hotel quarantine. What went so horribly wrong? A judicial inquiry is trying to find out.   So far, a lot of the evidence has focussed on how the roles and responsibilities of private security guards fitted with those of the police, government authorised officers, health providers and hotel staff.
9/8/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Clive Palmer v WA, gag laws on sexual assault survivors in Victoria and considering personality disorders when sentencing

How might Clive Palmer challenge WA legislation designed to thwart his legal action against the WA government? Also, in Victoria, sexual assault survivors now require a court order before they can speak publicly about their experience. Following protests the law is currently under 'urgent' review. And the Victorian Court of Appeal has just handed down a landmark decision involving 19 year old Daylia Brown. It allows sentencing judges to consider an offender’s personality disorder when calculating an appropriate prison term.
9/1/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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Clive Palmer v WA, gag laws on sexual assault survivors in Victoria and considering personality disorders when sentencing

How might Clive Palmer challenge WA legislation designed to thwart his legal action against the WA government? Also, in Victoria, sexual assault survivors now require a court order before they can speak publicly about their experience. Following protests the law is currently under 'urgent' review. And the Victorian Court of Appeal has just handed down a landmark decision involving 19 year old Daylia Brown. It allows sentencing judges to consider an offender’s personality disorder when calculating an appropriate prison term.
9/1/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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VP Candidate Kamala Harris, Australian police accountability and body cams

What is Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Kamala Harris' record on law and justice issues? A review of the legal framework around Police Body Worn Video Cameras has just been released by the NSW Department of Communities and Justice. Who decides what gets recorded? And what factors are considered when a complaint is made against Victoria Police?
8/25/202028 minutes, 39 seconds
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VP Candidate Kamala Harris, Australian police accountability and body cams

What is Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Kamala Harris' record on law and justice issues? A review of the legal framework around Police Body Worn Video Cameras has just been released by the NSW Department of Communities and Justice. Who decides what gets recorded? And what factors are considered when a complaint is made against Victoria Police?
8/25/202028 minutes, 39 seconds
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Tackling modern slavery

In the battle to secure PPE to protect ourselves from COVID 19 are we turning a blind eye to forced labour? Is our federal Modern Slavery Act up to the task and why has the separate Modern Slavery legislation in NSW been put on ice? Also, the first criminal conviction for keeping slaves in New Zealand's modern history.
8/18/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Tackling modern slavery

In the battle to secure PPE to protect ourselves from COVID 19 are we turning a blind eye to forced labour? Is our federal Modern Slavery Act up to the task and why has the separate Modern Slavery legislation in NSW been put on ice? Also, the first criminal conviction for keeping slaves in New Zealand's modern history.
8/18/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Singapore introduces COVID 19 electronic bracelets. And media freedom in Malaysia

One in four Victorians supposed to be self-isolating for COVID 19 were found to be not at home.  Starting today Singapore will allow some new arrivals to wear an electronic bracelet, instead of quarantining in a state-run facility. Could this be a more effective way to monitor those who should be staying at home?. And in Kuala Lumpur, the offices of Al Jazeera were raided by police because the government objected to the Australian journalist's negative report on the treatment of undocumented foreign workers. It’s just the latest in a series of government responses to criticism that have many concerned for media freedom in Malaysia.
8/11/202028 minutes, 37 seconds
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Singapore introduces COVID 19 electronic bracelets. And media freedom in Malaysia

One in four Victorians supposed to be self-isolating for COVID 19 were found to be not at home.  Starting today Singapore will allow some new arrivals to wear an electronic bracelet, instead of quarantining in a state-run facility. Could this be a more effective way to monitor those who should be staying at home?. And in Kuala Lumpur, the offices of Al Jazeera were raided by police because the government objected to the Australian journalist's negative report on the treatment of undocumented foreign workers. It’s just the latest in a series of government responses to criticism that have many concerned for media freedom in Malaysia.
8/11/202028 minutes, 37 seconds
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What is a 'state of disaster'? And Sole Practitioner loses sexual harassment appeal

Victoria has just been declared a state of disaster. What powers does this confer? And the Full Federal Court has unanimously upheld an earlier decision of the Federal Circuit Court which awarded $170,000 in damages to Catherine Hill. Ms Hill was a junior lawyer who was sexually harassed by her employer, Owen Hughes, a Sole Practitioner based in northern NSW.
8/4/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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What is a 'state of disaster'? And Sole Practitioner loses sexual harassment appeal

Victoria has just been declared a state of disaster. What powers does this confer? And the Full Federal Court has unanimously upheld an earlier decision of the Federal Circuit Court which awarded $170,000 in damages to Catherine Hill. Ms Hill was a junior lawyer who was sexually harassed by her employer, Owen Hughes, a Sole Practitioner based in northern NSW.
8/4/202028 minutes, 33 seconds
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Queensland parliament to vote on legalising Torres Strait Island childrearing practices

Before the next Queensland election, state parliament will vote on The Torres Strait Islander Traditional Child Rearing Practice Bill. If passed, the legislation will officially recognise the adoption practices of Torres Strait Islanders. This ground breaking bill was introduced into the Queensland Parliament by the first Torres Strait Islander member of parliament, Cynthia Lui.
7/28/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Queensland parliament to vote on legalising Torres Strait Island childrearing practices

Before the next Queensland election, state parliament will vote on The Torres Strait Islander Traditional Child Rearing Practice Bill. If passed, the legislation will officially recognise the adoption practices of Torres Strait Islanders. This ground breaking bill was introduced into the Queensland Parliament by the first Torres Strait Islander member of parliament, Cynthia Lui.
7/28/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Family violence killing found to be a workplace death

The NSW Court of Appeal found that the killing of a woman by her de facto husband at home was a workplace death and her family are entitled to workers compensation. This decision was handed down in March, just at the time when millions began working from home due to the Covid-19 pandemic. So what are the implications of this case for workers and their employers? If you or anyone you know is affected by family violence there is help available at 1800 RESPECT 1800 737 732 Lifeline on 13 11 14 safe steps on 1800 015 188 Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800 MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978
7/21/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Family violence killing found to be a workplace death

The NSW Court of Appeal found that the killing of a woman by her de facto husband at home was a workplace death and her family are entitled to workers compensation. This decision was handed down in March, just at the time when millions began working from home due to the Covid-19 pandemic. So what are the implications of this case for workers and their employers? If you or anyone you know is affected by family violence there is help available at 1800 RESPECT 1800 737 732 Lifeline on 13 11 14 safe steps on 1800 015 188 Kids Helpline on 1800 551 800 MensLine Australia on 1300 789 978
7/21/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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New security laws are designed to confuse, says former Hong Kong barrister. And, should the Bernard Collaery trial be held in secret?

Hong Kong authorities warned voters choosing pro-democracy candidates in the primaries ahead of September elections that they could fall foul of new National Security legislation. A prominent former barrister says the new laws are designed to confuse. And, the Bernard Collaery trial. How should Australia's court system balance open justice with keeping state secrets?
7/14/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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New security laws are designed to confuse, says former Hong Kong barrister. And, should the Bernard Collaery trial be held in secret?

Hong Kong authorities warned voters choosing pro-democracy candidates in the primaries ahead of September elections that they could fall foul of new National Security legislation. A prominent former barrister says the new laws are designed to confuse. And, the Bernard Collaery trial. How should Australia's court system balance open justice with keeping state secrets?
7/14/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Melbourne public housing lockdown, and US online library sued for IP breaches

A voice from the towers in the Melbourne lockdown, and major book publishers sue the online library, Internet Archive, for breach of copyright.
7/7/202028 minutes, 27 seconds
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Melbourne public housing lockdown, and US online library sued for IP breaches

A voice from the towers in the Melbourne lockdown, and major book publishers sue the online library, Internet Archive, for breach of copyright.
7/7/202028 minutes, 27 seconds
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Covid-19 and family law

The Covid-19 crisis has transformed our family law courts. In response to a surge in disputes over parenting plans, the Family Law Courts created a Covid-19 List to hear urgent cases using Microsoft Teams. And this is not an isolated example, right now most hearings are taking place in a virtual space rather than in a bricks and mortar courtroom. So will these new virtual courts stay with us in a post-pandemic future? And if you're in an abusive situation, or know someone who is, call 1-800 RESPECT. That's 1-800 737 732. If it's an emergency, call 000.
6/30/202028 minutes, 31 seconds
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Covid-19 and family law

The Covid-19 crisis has transformed our family law courts. In response to a surge in disputes over parenting plans, the Family Law Courts created a Covid-19 List to hear urgent cases using Microsoft Teams. And this is not an isolated example, right now most hearings are taking place in a virtual space rather than in a bricks and mortar courtroom. So will these new virtual courts stay with us in a post-pandemic future? And if you're in an abusive situation, or know someone who is, call 1-800 RESPECT. That's 1-800 737 732. If it's an emergency, call 000.
6/30/202028 minutes, 31 seconds
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Sexual harassment findings against retired High Court judge. Melbourne lawyer sentenced to jail for theft

An independent investigation commissioned by the High Court found that six former staff members were sexually harassed by the former judge Dyson Heydon. A suburban lawyer has been sentenced to jail for stealing from his clients, including taking money from trust accounts. What is the best way to regulate lawyers?
6/23/202028 minutes, 31 seconds
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Sexual harassment findings against retired High Court judge. Melbourne lawyer sentenced to jail for theft

An independent investigation commissioned by the High Court found that six former staff members were sexually harassed by the former judge Dyson Heydon. A suburban lawyer has been sentenced to jail for stealing from his clients, including taking money from trust accounts. What is the best way to regulate lawyers?
6/23/202028 minutes, 31 seconds
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Sexual harassment findings against retired High Court judge. Melbourne lawyer sentenced to jail for theft

An independent investigation commissioned by the High Court found that six former staff members were sexually harassed by the former judge Dyson Heydon. A suburban lawyer has been sentenced to jail for stealing from his clients, including taking money from trust accounts. What is the best way to regulate lawyers?
6/23/202028 minutes, 31 seconds
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Sexual harassment findings against retired High Court judge. Melbourne lawyer sentenced to jail for theft

An independent investigation commissioned by the High Court found that six former staff members were sexually harassed by the former judge Dyson Heydon. A suburban lawyer has been sentenced to jail for stealing from his clients, including taking money from trust accounts. What is the best way to regulate lawyers?
6/23/202028 minutes, 31 seconds
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Retired Magistrate David Heilpern critical of NSW drug driving laws

In northern NSW, Lismore Local Court Magistrate David Heilpern has just retired at the age of 58. In a candid conversation about his working life, its challenges and stresses, he also outlines his misgivings about the NSW drug driving laws which played a big role in his decision to step down.
6/16/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Retired Magistrate David Heilpern critical of NSW drug driving laws

In northern NSW, Lismore Local Court Magistrate David Heilpern has just retired at the age of 58. In a candid conversation about his working life, its challenges and stresses, he also outlines his misgivings about the NSW drug driving laws which played a big role in his decision to step down.
6/16/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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George Floyd killer charged with 2nd degree murder. Australian Black Lives Matter protests. And the case of the Hitler meme.

As Derek Chauvin appears in court charged with 2nd degree murder, jurisdictions across the US are looking at how to change police culture. In Australia, what can be done immediately to end black deaths in custody? And a Perth refinery worker sacked for parodying his bosses using a well known Hitler meme returns to work after a decision of the full bench of the Federal Court.
6/9/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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George Floyd killer charged with 2nd degree murder. Australian Black Lives Matter protests. And the case of the Hitler meme.

As Derek Chauvin appears in court charged with 2nd degree murder, jurisdictions across the US are looking at how to change police culture. In Australia, what can be done immediately to end black deaths in custody? And a Perth refinery worker sacked for parodying his bosses using a well known Hitler meme returns to work after a decision of the full bench of the Federal Court.
6/9/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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In a legal first, a car driver evading police is jailed for murder. And is the Races Power in our Constitution an anachronism?

Kylee King, a drug affected driver who killed motor cyclist Jordan Thorsager while engaging police in a high speed car chase has been convicted of murder. And should our federal constitution contain a power that allows parliament to make laws for particular races?
6/2/202028 minutes, 37 seconds
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In a legal first, a car driver evading police is jailed for murder. And is the Races Power in our Constitution an anachronism?

Kylee King, a drug affected driver who killed motor cyclist Jordan Thorsager while engaging police in a high speed car chase has been convicted of murder. And should our federal constitution contain a power that allows parliament to make laws for particular races?
6/2/202028 minutes, 37 seconds
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Two coronial inquests make findings about unconscious racism

For Reconciliation Week, a reflective discussion on two significant recent coronial inquests where the families of the deceased asked the coroner to make finding about unconscious bias or racism. Yorta Yorta woman Tanya Day died after sustaining serious head injuries in a Victorian police cell in 2017, and Naomi Williams, a pregnant 27-year-old Wiradjuri woman, died of sepsis in hospital in regional NSW in 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples should be aware that this program and website contains images and names of people who have passed away and that traumatic events will be described.
5/26/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Two coronial inquests make findings about unconscious racism

For Reconciliation Week, a reflective discussion on two significant recent coronial inquests where the families of the deceased asked the coroner to make finding about unconscious bias or racism. Yorta Yorta woman Tanya Day died after sustaining serious head injuries in a Victorian police cell in 2017, and Naomi Williams, a pregnant 27-year-old Wiradjuri woman, died of sepsis in hospital in regional NSW in 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples should be aware that this program and website contains images and names of people who have passed away and that traumatic events will be described.
5/26/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Two coronial inquests make findings about unconscious racism

For Reconciliation Week, a reflective discussion on two significant recent coronial inquests where the families of the deceased asked the coroner to make finding about unconscious bias or racism. Yorta Yorta woman Tanya Day died after sustaining serious head injuries in a Victorian police cell in 2017, and Naomi Williams, a pregnant 27-year-old Wiradjuri woman, died of sepsis in hospital in regional NSW in 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples should be aware that this program and website contains images and names of people who have passed away and that traumatic events will be described.
5/26/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Two coronial inquests make findings about unconscious racism

For Reconciliation Week, a reflective discussion on two significant recent coronial inquests where the families of the deceased asked the coroner to make finding about unconscious bias or racism. Yorta Yorta woman Tanya Day died after sustaining serious head injuries in a Victorian police cell in 2017, and Naomi Williams, a pregnant 27-year-old Wiradjuri woman, died of sepsis in hospital in regional NSW in 2016. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples should be aware that this program and website contains images and names of people who have passed away and that traumatic events will be described.
5/26/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Covid-19 emergency responses for witnessing wills and redundancy payouts. And a win for traumatised US Facebook content moderators

Three states are now allowing virtual witnessing of wills. How does that work? Also how redundancy payments negotiated with Covid-19 affected employers? And, in a world first, Facebook pays $US52 million to content moderators who have been traumatised by sifting through distressing social media material.    
5/19/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Covid-19 emergency responses for witnessing wills and redundancy payouts. And a win for traumatised US Facebook content moderators

Three states are now allowing virtual witnessing of wills. How does that work? Also how redundancy payments negotiated with Covid-19 affected employers? And, in a world first, Facebook pays $US52 million to content moderators who have been traumatised by sifting through distressing social media material.    
5/19/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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Covid-19 public health rules and the police

As we begin to emerge from isolation we will all still need to continue to comply with safe physical distancing rules. As the rules change, we will need to adjust. How have we, and those that enforce the public health rules done so far?
5/12/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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Covid-19 public health rules and the police

As we begin to emerge from isolation we will all still need to continue to comply with safe physical distancing rules. As the rules change, we will need to adjust. How have we, and those that enforce the public health rules done so far?
5/12/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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Introducing Section 71: High Court cases that changed Australia

5/7/20209 minutes, 7 seconds
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Introducing Section 71: High Court cases that changed Australia

5/7/20209 minutes, 7 seconds
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Prisoners, drug users, the homeless and Covid-19

Prisoner Mark Rowson argued that he was particularly vulnerable if he contracted Covid-19, but the Supreme Court of Victoria has refused to release him. How Covid-19 has impacted on the illicit drug market and also healthcare responses such as the methadone program. And, a much praised initiative has been the emergency accommodation in hotels for the homeless, but some peer advocates say there have been unintended consequences.
5/5/202028 minutes, 32 seconds
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Prisoners, drug users, the homeless and Covid-19

Prisoner Mark Rowson argued that he was particularly vulnerable if he contracted Covid-19, but the Supreme Court of Victoria has refused to release him. How Covid-19 has impacted on the illicit drug market and also healthcare responses such as the methadone program. And, a much praised initiative has been the emergency accommodation in hotels for the homeless, but some peer advocates say there have been unintended consequences.
5/5/202028 minutes, 32 seconds
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Australia’s legal response to WW1 and the 1919 Spanish Flu

A timely reflection on the legal responses to two separate but intimately-linked tragedies. During war we saw restrictions on food prices, protests and the freedoms of German Australians. During the Spanish flu crisis we saw maritime quarantines, closed internal borders and spats between the states and feds. Sound familiar?
4/28/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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Australia’s legal response to WW1 and the 1919 Spanish Flu

A timely reflection on the legal responses to two separate but intimately-linked tragedies. During war we saw restrictions on food prices, protests and the freedoms of German Australians. During the Spanish flu crisis we saw maritime quarantines, closed internal borders and spats between the states and feds. Sound familiar?
4/28/202028 minutes, 38 seconds
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High Court ruling exposes gaps in Australia's protections for public interest journalism. And is it still murder if the victim dies eight months after the assault?

News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst could still face charges despite the High Court ruling that the AFP's raid on her home in June 2019 was carried out on the basis of a flawed warrant. What does this case mean for the public's right to know and press freedom? And an elderly man brutally attacked in a home invasion died eight months later, but the High Court ruled the attacker was responsible for his death. The case may have implications for the current NSW Homicide Squad investigation into the COVID-19 related deaths and infections on the Ruby Princess cruise ship.
4/21/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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High Court ruling exposes gaps in Australia's protections for public interest journalism. And is it still murder if the victim dies eight months after the assault?

News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst could still face charges despite the High Court ruling that the AFP's raid on her home in June 2019 was carried out on the basis of a flawed warrant. What does this case mean for the public's right to know and press freedom? And an elderly man brutally attacked in a home invasion died eight months later, but the High Court ruled the attacker was responsible for his death. The case may have implications for the current NSW Homicide Squad investigation into the COVID-19 related deaths and infections on the Ruby Princess cruise ship.
4/21/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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How will the $130 billion JobKeeper package work? And workers' compensation at home

The covid-19 crisis is forcing fundamental, previously unimaginable changes to way we organise and regulate employment. We take a look at the JobKeeper payment scheme. Also, if you have an accident while working from home, are you covered by workers' compensation?
4/14/202029 minutes, 5 seconds
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How will the $130 billion JobKeeper package work? And workers' compensation at home

The covid-19 crisis is forcing fundamental, previously unimaginable changes to way we organise and regulate employment. We take a look at the JobKeeper payment scheme. Also, if you have an accident while working from home, are you covered by workers' compensation?
4/14/202029 minutes, 5 seconds
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George Pell freed from prison following High Court decision

In an unanimous decision the High Court of Australia has quashed George Pell's convictions for historic child sex offences and has released him from prison. If this conversation raises issues or causes emotional distress please contact Lifeline 13 11 14
4/7/202028 minutes, 49 seconds
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George Pell freed from prison following High Court decision

In an unanimous decision the High Court of Australia has quashed George Pell's convictions for historic child sex offences and has released him from prison. If this conversation raises issues or causes emotional distress please contact Lifeline 13 11 14
4/7/202028 minutes, 49 seconds
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Criminal and civil courts in the age of COVID-19

Day by day our courts are being totally transformed by the COVID-19 crisis. Civil courts are using video and audio links. New criminal jury trials have been suspended and judge alone criminal trials are becoming rare. A recent major drug conspiracy trial in the NSW District Court was derailed after concerns about safe distancing, but it wasn't the jury that raised fears of catching coronavirus.
3/31/202028 minutes, 26 seconds
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Criminal and civil courts in the age of COVID-19

Day by day our courts are being totally transformed by the COVID-19 crisis. Civil courts are using video and audio links. New criminal jury trials have been suspended and judge alone criminal trials are becoming rare. A recent major drug conspiracy trial in the NSW District Court was derailed after concerns about safe distancing, but it wasn't the jury that raised fears of catching coronavirus.
3/31/202028 minutes, 26 seconds
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COVID-19, prisons and the courts. And the homeless man fined for dumpster diving

Should prisoners be released because of the risks around coronavirus? And the case of the homeless man, just released from prison who was fined $250 for salvaging pies and iced coffees from a dumpster.
3/24/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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COVID-19, prisons and the courts. And the homeless man fined for dumpster diving

Should prisoners be released because of the risks around coronavirus? And the case of the homeless man, just released from prison who was fined $250 for salvaging pies and iced coffees from a dumpster.
3/24/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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How the coronavirus crisis is stress-testing commercial contracts. And how enforceable are self-isolation orders?

As business reels from the impact of the coronavirus, lawyers are poring over contracts, looking for ways to help their clients either enforce, or escape from their contractual obligations. Also authorities are requiring certain groups of people to 'self isolate'. Will this work?
3/17/202028 minutes, 32 seconds
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How the coronavirus crisis is stress-testing commercial contracts. And how enforceable are self-isolation orders?

As business reels from the impact of the coronavirus, lawyers are poring over contracts, looking for ways to help their clients either enforce, or escape from their contractual obligations. Also authorities are requiring certain groups of people to 'self isolate'. Will this work?
3/17/202028 minutes, 32 seconds
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How the coronavirus crisis is stress-testing commercial contracts. And how enforceable are self-isolation orders?

As business reels from the impact of the coronavirus, lawyers are poring over contracts, looking for ways to help their clients either enforce, or escape from their contractual obligations. Also authorities are requiring certain groups of people to 'self isolate'. Will this work?
3/17/202028 minutes, 32 seconds
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How the coronavirus crisis is stress-testing commercial contracts. And how enforceable are self-isolation orders?

As business reels from the impact of the coronavirus, lawyers are poring over contracts, looking for ways to help their clients either enforce, or escape from their contractual obligations. Also authorities are requiring certain groups of people to 'self isolate'. Will this work?
3/17/202028 minutes, 32 seconds
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Protecting buyers from dodgy car loans

Should car dealers & retailers be exempt from the requirements of the National Consumer Credit Protection Act? The Royal Commission into Banking and the Financial Services Industry recommended the removal of the exemption. But until that happens, consumers will continue to have very troubling experiences.
3/10/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Protecting buyers from dodgy car loans

Should car dealers & retailers be exempt from the requirements of the National Consumer Credit Protection Act? The Royal Commission into Banking and the Financial Services Industry recommended the removal of the exemption. But until that happens, consumers will continue to have very troubling experiences.
3/10/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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High Court clears former London cop of blowing up his holiday home. Also, should juries in child sex-abuse trials hear about prior convictions?

The High Court of Australia has ordered the immediate acquittal and release of Queensland man Eamonn Coughlan who was serving a jail sentence for arson and attempted fraud. And, new laws to be introduced that will broaden what evidence a jury can hear in child sex-abuse trials.
3/3/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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High Court clears former London cop of blowing up his holiday home. Also, should juries in child sex-abuse trials hear about prior convictions?

The High Court of Australia has ordered the immediate acquittal and release of Queensland man Eamonn Coughlan who was serving a jail sentence for arson and attempted fraud. And, new laws to be introduced that will broaden what evidence a jury can hear in child sex-abuse trials.
3/3/202028 minutes, 35 seconds
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Legal diversity in Malaysia

Malaysia's complex politics and legal systems are shaped by the nation's ethnic and religious diversity. How religious and government authorities categorise you can have a huge impact on your life. Meet a Muslim feminist slam poet, a Hindu mother who won a landmark court case, a transgender activist and a government minister.
2/25/202028 minutes, 46 seconds
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Legal diversity in Malaysia

Malaysia's complex politics and legal systems are shaped by the nation's ethnic and religious diversity. How religious and government authorities categorise you can have a huge impact on your life. Meet a Muslim feminist slam poet, a Hindu mother who won a landmark court case, a transgender activist and a government minister.
2/25/202028 minutes, 46 seconds
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Former Facebook moderator sues social media giant for PTSD

Social media can be useful connecting people and ideas but moderators are needed to keep disturbing and toxic material off the platforms. Chris Gray, a former Facebook moderator claims viewing such content in order to keep us safe, gave him PTSD. He's the lead plaintiff in an action against Facebook and CPL, the contracting company that employed him. *And a warning this program discusses disturbing material*
2/18/202028 minutes, 36 seconds
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Former Facebook moderator sues social media giant for PTSD

Social media can be useful connecting people and ideas but moderators are needed to keep disturbing and toxic material off the platforms. Chris Gray, a former Facebook moderator claims viewing such content in order to keep us safe, gave him PTSD. He's the lead plaintiff in an action against Facebook and CPL, the contracting company that employed him. *And a warning this program discusses disturbing material*