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Irish Times Inside Politics Profile

Irish Times Inside Politics

English, Political, 1 season, 711 episodes, 4 days, 17 hours, 56 minutes
About
The best analysis of the Irish political scene featuring Irish Times journalists, political experts and the occasional politician. Hosted by Arts & Culture Editor Hugh Linehan.
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McDonald hits a nerve as Harris takes the reins

Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy join Hugh to talk about Simon Harris's appointment as Taoiseach and the details of his minimal Cabinet reshuffle. Did he go far enough to satisfy Fine Gaelers, or voters looking for change? They also talk about the new Taoiseach's speech delivery and Mary Lou McDonald's forceful criticism of his track record. But first they discuss the news that the reconstituted Government's first act will be to recognise the statehood of Palestine. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/9/202439 minutes, 15 seconds
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Can Simon Harris build any kind of policy departure before this government ends?

Ahead of Simon Harris’s first Fine Gael Ard Fheis as party leader, Cormac McQuinn and Jack Horgan-Jones join Hugh Linehan to discuss the potential quick wins and policy departures Harris can look to implement when his expected tenure as taoiseach begins next Tuesday. And while we were denied the excitement of hustings and voting, there is still much speculation as to the potential make-up of Simon Harris’s Cabinet. How does he find the balance between merit and geography? And will some Fine Gael party departees have their arms twisted to stay?Also on the podcast: the other recent earthquake in Irish politics was the unexpected resignation of DUP leader Jeffrey Donaldson, following his charging for historical sexual offences. Just a few short weeks after the Assembly was reconstituted, the revelation has been received with a certain level of calm by the political establishment, with interim DUP leader Gavin Robinson coming from the more moderate tradition within the party. But could the deal struck for power-sharing be tested in the months ahead? And will the looming Westminster election give rise to turmoil within a deeply divided DUP party? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/5/202440 minutes, 56 seconds
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David Rieff on Ukraine, Gaza, populism and the death of art

On today’s Inside Politics podcast, Hugh is joined by David Rieff. David is the author of many books, including In Praise of Forgetting. He reported on war in Bosnia in the 1990s, and has written on everything from the political and ethical complexities of humanitarian aid and international intervention in sub-Saharan Africa to political developments in Central and south America. He also has a Substack newsletter in which he reflects on the progress of the current culture wars and their implications for intellectual life. He currently spends half his time in Kyiv where he is observing and reflecting on the ongoing war against Russian aggression.  He talks to Hugh about the idea of a just war and its relevance to the conflicts in Ukraine and Gaza, the remilitarisation of Europe and the decline of Pax Americana, as well as the rise of anti-establishment populism and why he believes contemporary trends in technology, capitalism and politics will inevitably lead to the end of high culture and the triumph of kitsch. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/3/202443 minutes, 37 seconds
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Fintan O'Toole: What does Simon Harris stand for?

What sort of a politician is Simon Harris? What can we learn from his record? And what sort of a Taoiseach is he going to be? Columnist Fintan O'Toole joins Hugh Linehan and Jennifer Bray to dig into the presumptive taoiseach's record and the state of the Fine Gael party. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/27/202456 minutes, 43 seconds
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Simon Harris takes the reins of a party in trouble

Hugh is joined by Pat Leahy and Harry McGee to talk about the swift emergence of Simon Harris as Fine Gael leader and taoiseach-in-waiting. They look back at his career to date and identify a potential strategy to lead Fine Gael out of its current predicament. But first, more on the unexpected resignation of Leo Varadkar. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/22/202447 minutes, 10 seconds
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Why did Leo Varadkar choose this moment to go?

Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones join Hugh Linehan to discuss today's unexpected announcement by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar that he is stepping down. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/20/202435 minutes, 26 seconds
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'Rishi Sunak can't do politics' - British broadcaster Iain Dale on why he may not vote Tory for the first time ever

British political pundit, broadcaster and podcaster Ian Dale joins Hugh to discuss the upcoming UK general election and the state of British politics. A Conservative supporter, Iain explains why he may not be able to vote for the party for the first time in his life. Iain and his co-host, the former Labour Home Secretary Jacqui Smith, are bringing their politics podcast For the Many to Dublin for a live show on Sunday, March 24th. Find out more here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/20/202439 minutes, 22 seconds
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Gaza overshadows St Patrick's Day trips

Jennifer Bray and Cormac McQuinn join Hugh Linehan to discuss the week in politics, including the annual migration of Ministers to foreign lands for St Patrick's Day. But with the crisis in Gaza on many Irish voters' minds, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has a balancing act in how he raises the issue with President Joe Biden. Also on the agenda: More fallout from the recent referendums, and how housing asylum seekers will be an issue in local election campaigns. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/15/202439 minutes, 49 seconds
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Referendum aftermath: a deep dive into the political repercussions

Last weekend's referendum defeats have jolted the political establishment. How could all major parties and many other players have got it so badly wrong - and does the failure reveal something deeper going on?To discuss this, Hugh is joined by Jack Horgan Jones, Theresa Reidy and Jane Suiter. They discuss the the impact of the results on Irish politics, the role and effectiveness of citizens assemblies, and whether opposition to 'wokeness' is a genuine force in Irish politics. Dr Theresa Reidy is a senior lecturer and head of department at the Department of Government and Politics, University College Cork.Jane Suiter is Professor in DCU's School of Communications and director of DCU's Institute for Future Media, Democracy and Society. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/13/20241 hour, 2 minutes, 46 seconds
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‘Two wallops’ for Government as No-No vote emerges strong

Although counting is still underway in the family and care referendums, the Government has already admitted defeat, with a No-No result looking like the only outcome. Taoiseach Leo Varadkar described the result as two wallops for Government, while Tánaiste Micheál Martin, said there is “no single reason” why the proposals were rejected, and a time for reflection will ensue. As the political blame game now begins, what will be the fallout from the defeat? Hugh Linehan talks to Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/9/202431 minutes, 39 seconds
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Is Europe in a ‘pre-war phase’?

Pat Leahy and Cormac McQuinn join Hugh Linehan to look back on the week in politics:There were some interesting developments during the European People's Party (EPP) congress in Bucharest this week – Ursula von der Leyen was roundly endorsed for another five years as European Commission President, and Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk told delegates that Europe was no longer in a ‘post-war epoch’ and that borders had to be defended. The panel discussed whether Ireland’s military spending will soon reflect this new sense of urgency.Also on the podcast: Minister for Public Expenditure Paschal Donohoe’s refusal to meet demands on how to spend the continuing surge in corporate tax receipts has left some Cabinet members less than happy after a call to significantly boost the National Development Plan fell on deaf ears.And the panel compare the approaches of the Government and Sinn Féin when it comes to improving the lot of Northern Ireland. During his speech at the Alliance Party conference this week, Tánaiste Micheál Martin pushed the positives to be gained from the Shared Island initiative, whereas Sinn Féin’s line has consistently been improvement through a united Ireland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/8/202439 minutes, 37 seconds
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Could angry farmers upend European politics?

Farmer protest movements are becoming an increasingly important part of the political landscape across Europe, from Poland, where they have been spurred by the lifting of tariffs on Ukrainian agricultural produce, to the Netherlands, where Government plans to cut nitrogen emissions have led to the rise of a significant new party, and most recently to Germany, where a threat to cut agricultural fuel subsidies has caused a furious reaction.It appears that European farmers believe they are being ignored, their needs set aside. The ripples of all this are being felt at across the EU in advance of June's Parliament elections. So what is exactly happening and how likely is it that farmers unhappiness could lead to new political parties in Ireland as well as in Europe? Hugh Linehan talks to Naomi O'Leary and Jack Horgan-Jones. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/6/202435 minutes, 7 seconds
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Does it matter if the Government lose these referendums?

Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray join Hugh Linehan to look back on the week in politics:One week out from the care and family referendums taking place on March 8th and campaigning on both sides is finally in full swing, the panel debates whether the Government will be hurt by a failure to get both proposed constitutional amendments over the line considering how muddled their Yes message has been thus far.Also on the podcast: Sinn Féin’s unclear position on climate change was evident again this week after their sole MEP Chris McManus voted against the Nature Restoration Law, a landmark piece of EU environmental legislation, while Sinn Féin senator Lynn Boylan wholeheartedly welcomed it. And with her three-hour Oireachtas Committee grilling over the resignation of former chair of the RTÉ board, Siún Ní Raghallaigh, now behind her the panel discuss whether Minister for Media Catherine Martin, and indeed the wider public, can now move on from the RTÉ saga.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/1/202451 minutes, 18 seconds
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European elections: a battle between the heavy hitters

Political scientist Theresa Reidy and political correspondent Harry McGee join Hugh to look ahead to June's European elections, when voters in Ireland and across the EU will pick their Members of the European Parliament. Since the last election in 2019, the electoral map has changed, as has much else in Irish and European politics. There are a plethora of independent and small party candidates, but do the circumstances favour those put forward by the big parties, this time around? The panel pick over the candidates, constituencies, EU political dynamics, and more. Dr Theresa Reidy is a senior lecturer and head of department at the Department of Government and Politics, University College Cork. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/28/202446 minutes, 6 seconds
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Is Catherine Martin in political danger?

The latest scandal engulfing RTÉ and Minister for Media Catherine Martin may be more cock-up than conspiracy, but it is no less damaging for that. The fallout from the dispute over who knew what, when about retirement payments to outgoing executives has already resulted in the departure of RTÉ board chair Siún Ní Raghallaigh. Just how much damage the affair will do to the Minister remains to be seen. Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly has complained that €19 million of funding allocated to reduce waiting times for children in need of spinal surgery may not have been used as intended. Delays in the treatment of childhood Spina Bifida and scoliosis have been one of the worst features of our healthcare system, resulting in much pain and suffering. And we remember our colleague, former political correspondent and regular Inside Politics panelist Michael O’Regan, who died last week.  Plus the panel pick their Irish Times pieces of the week: Finn McRedmond on the drinking habits of the youngAn expert weighs in on whether a snail could outpace the development of Dublin’s Metro And Miriam Lord ’s dissection of a frustrating Dáil squabble Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/23/202439 minutes, 44 seconds
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Is Ukrainian democracy functioning after two years of war?

As the second anniversary of Russia's invasion approaches, Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskiy is still a very popular figure among voters. But with no elections having been held since 2019, and with martial law applying in the country, is democracy being undermined? Dan McLaughlin talks to Hugh Linehan about Ukraine's politics, the recent progress of the war, how critics of Zelenskiy are growing louder and whether there are any mainstream voices calling for compromise or negotiations with Russia. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/21/202440 minutes, 52 seconds
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Referendums: What the amendments would really mean

An Coimisiún Toghcháin, Ireland’s independent electoral commission, has taken over the functions previously held by the Referendum Commission in relation to referendums. That means it is responsible for explaining the forthcoming referendums on care and the family. Chair of An Coimisiún Ms Justice Marie Baker and Chief Executive Art O'Leary join Hugh to talk about about what exactly is being asked of voters and the legal implications of yes or no votes on March 8th. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/19/202443 minutes, 15 seconds
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Was Sinn Féin's licence fee amnesty proposal a misstep?

Jack Horgan-Jones and Cormac McQuinn join Hugh Linehan to discuss the week in politics:In another awful week for RTÉ before an Oireachtas committee, was it a mistake for Sinn Féin to raise the idea of an amnesty for those refusing to pay their licence fee? And is is sustainable for prominent ex-RTÉ figures like Dee Forbes, Rory Coveney and Breda O'Keeffe to avoid appearing at the committee? The spiralling cost of the National Children's Hospital means renewed analysis of the Government's ability to plan and deliver big projects.And as the Social Democrats get ready for their conference this weekend, the panel takes stock of the party's fortunes. Plus the panel pick their favourite Irish Times pieces of the week:What's in and what's out of the new CSO consumer basket.Replacing Ireland's small embassy building in Washington And has Trump awoken Europe's sleeping beast? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/16/202440 minutes, 53 seconds
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Head-to-Head: The Yes and No arguments ahead of the family and care referendums

At this point we are definitively into the campaign for the two referendums on family and care due to take place on March 8th. The data from the recent Irish Times/Ipsos B&A poll showed substantial majorities in favour of both proposed amendments to the Constitution, but also showed a majority of voters that felt they knew very little about the issues that are involved, which might mean that the debates that take place over the course of the campaign itself could possibly change a lot of people’s minds. The opinion pages of the Irish Times have already played host to a range of differing views on the subject, but two weekly columnists have been particularly forthright – Justine McCarthy has argued strongly in favour of the changes and Michael McDowell has been equally forceful against them. They joined host Hugh Linehan to give their thoughts ahead of March 8th. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/14/20241 hour, 2 minutes, 17 seconds
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Sinn Féin poll slump: ‘tide not gone out for them just yet’

Pat Leahy and Cormac McQuinn join Hugh Linehan to look back on the week in politics:The latest Irish Times/Ipsos B&A poll shows support for Sinn Féin took a significant dent, down six points – its lowest level in three years. As Pat explains, a lack of clarity around immigration and the misstep that was the ill-judged motion of no confidence in Justice Minister Helen McEntee last December are just two reasons why the party are losing ground to smaller parties and Independents.And data from the poll also threw up some interesting insights into what way voters will vote in both proposals in the upcoming referendums recognising non-marital families and care in the Constitution, and how much they know actually about what they are voting for.Former taoiseach John Bruton passed away this week, the panel discuss the profound consequences of his time leading government, not least the beginning of runaway economic success and the road to the Good Friday Agreement.Plus, they pick their favourite Irish Times articles of the week, on diverse topics: Ukraine war updates, Dublin traffic transformation and Dee Forbes. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/9/202431 minutes, 6 seconds
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Will immigration hand the White House back to Trump?

Washington Correspondent Keith Duggan talks to Hugh Linehan about the seemingly inevitable rematch between US President Joe Biden and former president Donald Trump. What issues will dominate the campaign? It's early days, but the flow of immigrants at the southern border seems certain to play to former president Trump's advantage. On the other hand, voters are not yet listening to President Biden's warnings of a threat to democracy should Trump win. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/7/202430 minutes, 37 seconds
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Britain and Ireland will change. It's time to get ready

In the past decade relationships between the different parts of the UK and Ireland have changed. The push for Scottish independence, growing support for Irish reunification and the Brexit process have all challenged the status quo. But what comes next? Common Ground is a new initiative by The Irish Times that will seek to elevate debate around the future of Ireland, Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom. On today’s podcast Common Ground editor Mark Hennessy talks to Hugh about the big questions the residents of these islands will grapple with in the years ahead.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/5/202428 minutes, 58 seconds
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Who's who in the Yes and No campaigns, Orbán bows to EU pressure

Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray join Hugh to look back on the week in politics:Pat is in Brussels where the EU has agreed on a €50 billion package for Kyiv. He reports on how Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán was finally cajoled into supporting the move. Ahead of the March referendums on care and the family, Jennifer has been looking at who's who in the Yes and No campaigns. And the panel discuss a significant shift in Government's tone on immigration which became apparent this week.Plus they look at their favourite Irish Times articles of the week on diverse topics: St Patrick's Day, The National Mood and kebabs. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/2/202446 minutes, 29 seconds
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Stormont will return: analysis from Belfast, London and Dublin

Pat Leahy, Freya McClements and Mark Paul join Hugh to discuss the DUP's acceptance of a historic deal that allows power-sharing in Northern Ireland to resume. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/31/202446 minutes, 49 seconds
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As the ICJ rules against Israel, Gaza remains an issue in Irish politics

Jack Horgan-Jones and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to discuss the week in politics: Gaza is proving a persistent issue in Irish politics, and today’s ruling at the International Court of Justice could place more pressure on the Government to support South Africa’s case and intensify its criticism of Israel. Meanwhile Sinn Féin has faced its own criticism for Mary Lou McDonald and Michelle O’Neill’s decision to visit the White House on St Patrick’s Day, given the military support provided to Israel by the United States. Minister Catherine Martin struggled to satisfactorily answer questions in a radio interview about the Grant Thornton report that laid bare RTÉ’s failures in the planning and conception of Toy Show: The Musical. Will there ever be accountability for the board’s failures to control the loss-making project? In the US presidential election, the primary season seems to coming to a premature end, as opposition to Donald Trump dries up and Democrats show no sign of replacing President Biden on their ticket. But what will that re-run race look like? Plus the panel pick their Irish Times pieces of the week: My article of the week is this, which goes some way to (politely) calling out some of the terrible bullshit in the whole mental health discourse: Social media and mental health: The glorification of illness is becoming a real problemNaomi O'Leary on a strange and tragic story involving a restaurant, a review and an online backlash. Martin Wolf on the bitter lessons of Brexit for BritainGeraldine Walsh on the downsides to a growing openness around mental illness Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/26/202444 minutes
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Under pressure: Roderic O'Gorman on tackling the refugee accommodation crisis

Minister for Integration Roderic O’Gorman is the man at the centre of one of the most severe and contentious problems facing the State: how to handle the huge increase in people arriving to seek International Protection.The war in Ukraine exacerbated the trend and helped scupper the Green Minister’s plan to end the system of direct provision within the lifetime of this Government, instead leaving it in perpetual crisis-management mode as it struggles to accommodate tens of thousands of refugees.On today’s Inside Politics podcast Minister O’Gorman talks to Hugh Linehan and Jack Horgan-Jones about his handling of the crisis.Ireland should support Ukrainians to return home by rebuilding infrastructure and possibly paying for travel back there, he says.The European Union needs to soon decide whether to extend additional rights enjoyed by Ukrainian refugees beyond their expiry date of March 2025, he adds.The Minister also says he expects between 13,000 and 15,000 asylum seekers to arrive in the country annually from now on.They discuss the struggle to accommodate such unprecedented numbers of arrivals and why local communities have not always been informed in advance when International Protection Applicants are to be housed in their midst.Plus, Minister O’Gorman makes the arguments in favour of a Yes vote in the two upcoming referendums on care and the definition of the family. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/24/202451 minutes, 50 seconds
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Is the political system starting to bend to asylum seeker protests?

Host Hugh Linehan is joined Cormac McQuinn and Jennifer Bray on this week’s wrap with housing for refugees and asylum seekers, and the lack of alternative accommodation, now a perennial talking point, especially in this year of elections. But has a certain tension developed between Minister Roderic O’Gorman’s department of Children, Equality, Integration, Disability and Youth and the Department of Housing? And have asylum seeker protests gradually started to impact political decision-making here?A somewhat comical exchange in the Dáil on its first day back after the Christmas recess saw Roderic O’Gorman and Independent Clare TD Michael McNamara engage in a debate on the upcoming referendums and the proposal to amend the Constitutional definition of a family. The durability of ‘throuple’ relationships saw a complete breakdown in communication after the Clare TD misheard the minister.And are Government putting off big decisions with that general election creeping into view later in the year? Jennifer Bray describes a certain mania she witnessed firsthand at Leinster House as TDs can’t seem to think about anything other than the date for GE 2024. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/19/202448 minutes, 38 seconds
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Are Britain's media and politics broken? With James O'Brien

British broadcaster and author James O'Brien returns to Inside Politics to talk about his most recent book, How They Broke Britain. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/17/202444 minutes, 36 seconds
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‘Referendums that won’t grasp the imagination’

There are two referendums around the corner on March 8th, but are they too complex and less immediately understandable than other referendums in recent times? Hugh is joined by Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray and on the podcast, with Jennifer spelling out exactly what changes we will be voting on. Protests against the influx of male asylum seekers have been a fixture on the front pages since the start of year, with Ballinrobe and Roscrea making headlines in recent days. But are the Government running out of road in terms of policy or are they simply responding to an unfolding humanitarian crisis?And with numbers in emergency accommodation at record levels, the panel teases out the political impact of ill health and death on the street and how the public expect more from those in power when it comes to protecting people forced to sleep rough. Plus, could Leo Varadkar or Micheál Martin be in line for a top job in Brussels after Charles Michel’s surprise decision to step down as European Council president? While both have distanced themselves from the role, Jennifer explains why Micheál is the more likely candidate of the two. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/12/202440 minutes, 26 seconds
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Vote! Vote! Vote! A year of election predictions in one podcast

In the first half of 2024 highly consequential elections will take place in India, Pakistan, Indonesia, South Africa and Mexico among others. Things get closer to home later in the year with European parliament elections, local elections and possibly a general election in Ireland. And the UK and US both go to the polls in November.On today’s Inside Politics podcast, Irish Times China Correspondent Denis Staunton joins us from Taipei to discuss this week’s Taiwanese election with presenter Hugh Linehan and Political Editor Pat Leahy. Denis, who has reported for The Irish Times on the election victories of Angela Merkel, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson, gives his perspective on what’s at stake in elections across the Global South, as well as in Europe and the US. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/10/202456 minutes, 12 seconds
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‘Irish people love elections!’

Still less than a year in existence, the Electoral Commission is set for a packed 2024 with local and European elections in June, a referendum in March and strong odds of a general election too before the year is out. Art O’Leary is Chief executive of the Electoral Commission, and he sat down with Hugh Linehan to discuss the logistics and preparation for the year ahead, balancing geography versus maths for the boundary review and why E-voting is unlikely to make a comeback any time soon.Art also goes through a few items on his wish list – a revamp of the electoral register, getting more young people out voting, and developing a system where Irish people can vote from anywhere in the world. Plus, with so many upcoming elections, what can the Electoral Commission do to combat the likely deluge of online misinformation?Produced by Declan Conlon. JJ Vernon on sound. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/3/202435 minutes, 18 seconds
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Ask us anything, 2023 edition - part two

It's part two of the traditional Inside Politics end-of-year Ask Us Anything podcast. Hugh Linehan, Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray, Harry McGee and Cormac McQuinn are in celebratory mood as they answer your questions about elections, policies and politicians.Wishing a Happy New Year to all our listeners. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/29/202342 minutes, 40 seconds
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Ask us anything, 2023 edition - part one

It's part one of the traditional Inside Politics end-of-year Ask Us Anything podcast. Hugh Linehan, Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray, Harry McGee and Cormac McQuinn hit play on a range of listener queries and even help one to settle a bet. Part two will be out on Friday December 29th. Thanks to all our listeners in 2023. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/27/202342 minutes, 32 seconds
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A closer look at attitudes to reunification

North and South, how open are citizens to constitutional changes in order to make a United Ireland work? How much economic pain would they be willing to bear? What level of short-term pain would be felt worth any long-term gains?Understanding such attitudes is one of the goals of North and South, a collaboration between The The Irish Times and ARINS, itself a joint research project of the Royal Irish Academy (RIA) and the Keough-Naughton Centre for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame.The continuing collaboration also makes it possible to track changing attitudes to reunification over time - and there have already been some significant changes.To discuss the findings of the latest series of polls in the North and South project, Hugh Linehan and Pat Leahy are joined by Professor Brendan O’Leary.Brendan O’Leary is a professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania and chair of the Public Opinion Committee of ARINS. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/22/202349 minutes, 53 seconds
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Mary Lou McDonald on house prices, migration policy, defamation cases and more

Sinn Féin party leader and Dublin Central TD Mary Lou McDonald sat down with Pat Leahy to talk about a range of policy areas, from housing to migration and reunification. They also discussed the practice of some Sinn Féin members to take legal proceedings against media outlets and journalists. Pat and Hugh Linehan listen back and analyse the potential taoiseach's answers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/20/202338 minutes, 44 seconds
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Summit surprises, wrapping the year

Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan for the final weekly politics wrap of 2023.Jennifer Bray is dialling in from Brussels, where the EU Council summit has been taking place, with national leaders meeting to discuss difficult issues including the wars in Gaza and Ukraine. And Pat fails miserably to tell the political story of 2023 in 60 seconds. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/15/202337 minutes, 51 seconds
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Cop 28, the geopolitics of Net Zero and the future of energy - with Helen Thompson

An agreement has been reached at Cop 28 that includes a commitment to phasing out the use of fossil fuels, with some hailing it as an historic moment in the struggle to mitigate climate change. But an agreement is not a substitute for action and the actions required to achieve Net Zero by 2050 amount to one of the most fundamental changes in all human history. The effort is going to have repercussions for how we live, how states interact with each other and for domestic politics. To discuss all this Hugh is joined by Helen Thompson, professor of political economy at Cambridge and cohost of These Times podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/13/202349 minutes, 4 seconds
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Sinn Féin lose confidence in their own motion

On today’s Inside Politics podcast, Cormac McQuinn and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to look back on the week in politics:There’s been a lukewarm reception to Cabinet-approved plans for referendums to amend the Constitution when it comes to removing the reference to the role of women in the home; and expanding the concept of the family within the constitution. The wording is not inspiring Key civil society groups.With Paschal Donohoe not ruling himself out of the running for the top job at the International Monetary Fund, what could the potential impact be if he took the role with a general election looming next year?And following the recent Dublin riots, was Sinn Féin’s inevitable motion of no confidence in Justice Minister Helen McEntee a misstep?Plus, the ‘rap of the week’ on the wrap of the week comes from Conor McGregor. Has the UFC star developed political aspirations? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/8/202335 minutes, 7 seconds
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The Origins and the Problems of 'The Great Awokening'

In his new book, The Identity Trap: A Story of Ideas and Power in Our Time, political scientist Yascha Mounk has written the most comprehensive and detailed account yet of how a new form of progressive thinking has taken over the politics of the left. Mounk chronicles the rise of a set of ideas which are “centrally concerned with the role that identity categories like race, gender, and sexual orientation play in the world.” This fixation on identity, rejecting “universal values and neutral rules like free speech and equal opportunity as mere distractions,” draws its strength, Mounk argues, from the way it took over cultural institutions, although it has not convinced more than a  small number of people. These ideas are not just frequently wrong but inimical to a functioning society, he tells Hugh Linhan in today’s Inside Politics podcast.Produced by Declan Conlon. JJ Vernon on sound. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/6/202350 minutes, 5 seconds
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2023's political highs, lows, winners, losers and funny bits

Hugh Linehan and podcast regulars Pat Leahy, Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray got together on Wednesday to look back on all the major (and some not-so-major) developments in Irish politics in 2023. And they did so in front of a live audience in Dublin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/1/202358 minutes, 49 seconds
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Talking about talking about immigration

Is it time for the political system to grapple more explicitly with how immigration is changing Ireland and what sort of model - integration? multiculturalism? - we as a state wish to pursue?  Or is such a conversation only ever destined to be hijacked by hateful voices and to result in a normalisation of the sort of prejudice that was on display in Dublin last week? To discuss and debate this and other related issues, Hugh talks to Kevin Cunningham, Una Mullally and Ronan McCrea.Kevin Cunningham is a lecturer in politics at TU Dublin. Ronan McCrea is a professor of European and constitutional law at University College Dublin. Una Mullally is a writer, an Irish Times columnist and the author of In the Name of Love: The Movement for Marriage Equality in Ireland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/29/202355 minutes, 49 seconds
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Riot response a major challenge for McEntee

This week the Friday wrap panellists are joined by Irish Times crime and security correspondent Conor Gallagher to talk about how Garda Commissioner Drew Harris, Minister for Justice Helen McEntee and the entire State apparatus will respond to unprecedented violence on Dublin's streets, encouraged by far-right activists, following the stabbing of several children outside a school on Thursday afternoon. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/24/202333 minutes, 45 seconds
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Will economic trouble mean an early election?

"With economic signals flashing amber, the next Irish general election might be sooner than we thought", argues Cliff Taylor in an analysis piece for The Irish Times. But does Cliff's economic reasoning survive contact with political logic? Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy let him know.Plus: Senator Malcolm Byrne is warning about the role AI technology and deepfakes could play in the next general election. What are the issues and how could they be tackled? And Jennifer has the details of how an Oireachtas committee has agreed our abortion laws should be changed to remove barriers to women accessing abortions in certain circumstances. The ball is now in the Government's court. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/22/202338 minutes, 52 seconds
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Are Fine Gael all out of fight ahead of a year that could define the party?

Hugh Linehan is joined in studio by Pat Leahy and Jack Horgan-Jones. First up for discussion is Fine Gael’s special conference taking place in Kildare this weekend. The conference comes just before a year that may see the party contest three elections, a year that could come to define the trajectory of Fine Gael and its leadership. But are Fine Gael generating enough momentum to meet the challenges that await them in 2024? Also in part one, the latest twist in the RTÉ saga as director general Kevin Bakhurst unveiled his strategic plan for the future of the broadcaster this week. Separate to that came confirmation from the Government that an additional €56 million in funding would be made available, but as the panel points out, there is still the sticky issue of the license fee problem that has yet to be confronted. And in part two, the value of diplomacy as Micheál Martin tours the Middle East this week, during which he met with his Israeli counterpart in Jerusalem before meeting representatives of the Palestinian Authority in the West Bank. And also happening this week, opposition motions to remove the Israeli ambassador and ICC referral were defeated in the Dáil.   Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/17/202338 minutes, 15 seconds
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Spain's turbulent politics : 'Phrases like coup d'etat are floating around'

It is almost four months now since Spain went to the polls to elect a new parliament. This week it looks as if Socialist Party leader Pedro Sánchez is finally about to be confirmed for a new term as Prime Minister. But the political road to that outcome has been complex and highly contentious, bringing to the fore all the divisions over ideology and identity which characterise the contemporary political scene in Spain, the EU's fourth largest country. On today's podcast Hugh Linehan digs into what is happening in Spain with author Paddy Woodworth, who wrote two books about the Basque region, and Madrid-based reporter Guy Hedgecoe. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/15/202340 minutes, 28 seconds
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Sinn Féin keep focus on housing and Palestine at Ard Fheis

Housing, housing, housing and Palestine. Anyone hoping to hear much about anything else at this weekend’s Sinn Féin Ard Fheis will have left Athlone disappointed. Pat Leahy was there and he joins Hugh Linehan to discuss what happened at the conference, including the warm welcome given to Palestinian ambassador to Ireland, Dr Jilan Abdalmajid.They also look at how party leader Mary Lou McDonald handled questions about members of her party taking legal action against journalists and media organisations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/12/202322 minutes, 54 seconds
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Suella Braverman the maverick, stances on war, Sinn Féin's direction

Harry McGee and Pat Leahy join Hugh to look back on the week in politics:The dire situation in Israel and Palestine continues to dominate Irish political discourse.UK home secretary Suella Braverman's controversial opinion piece may cost her her job. Sinn Féin's annual conference or Ard Fheis takes place this weekend. A new Irish political party was born this week - Harry McGee has the details.And the panel pick their favourite Irish Times articles of the week:A brilliant piece about displacement of Bedouins in the West Bank by Hannah McCarthyMartin Wall's coverage of Donald Trump's legal woes contrasts with the former president's growing chances of winning a second termShould religion get out of the classroom? A debate in our pages set out both sides. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/10/202339 minutes, 49 seconds
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Will the DUP finally return to Stormont?

Will they or won't they? DUP leader Jeffrey Donaldson must soon decide whether to lead his party back into power-sharing or to let devolution die and direct rule return. The decision he makes will be defining for Northern Ireland, for Unionism and for Donaldson himself. To discuss the forces at play, unionist commentator Alex Kane and Northern Editor Freya McClements join Pat and Hugh. Alex Kane is a commentator based in Belfast. He was formerly director of communications for the Ulster Unionist Party. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/8/202347 minutes, 57 seconds
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Don Tidey case: 'They've been getting away with murder for 40 years'

The Dail is in recess, and that means no Friday wrap today. Instead, we’re going to bring you a conversation that was originally published on the feed of our sister podcast In the News, hosted by Bernice Harrison, all about a story that gripped 1980s Ireland. You can subscribe to In the News for free here.On December 16th, 1983, after 23 days in captivity, kidnapped supermarket executive Don Tidey was rescued. He had been taken by members of the Provisional IRA posing as gardaí while driving his daughter to school in Dublin. With the whole country transfixed by the kidnapping, Garda intelligence tracked the culprits and their victim down to Derrada Wood outside Ballinamore in Co Leitrim. And while the release of Tidey safe and well was a success, the day was shrouded in tragedy because during the rescue his captors shot dead Private Patrick Kelly and recruit Garda Gary Sheehan.The murders shocked the country and no one has been brought to justice for them. Most of the kidnappers got clean away. While the event has been the subject of much media attention over the years, Tidey has never spoken about it until now. This year he talked to Tommy Conlon and Ronan McGreevy for their new book, The Kidnapping, A Hostage, a Desperate Manhunt and a Bloody Rescue. They talk to In the News about the events in 1983 and the aftermath. Presented by Bernice Harrison. Produced by Suzanne Brennan. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/3/202328 minutes, 11 seconds
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Fintan O'Toole on Israel, Gaza and the equality of human life

The response to the Hamas terror attack on October 7th has been fierce. In the weeks since then, Israel has unleashed a war against Hamas but in which thousands of civilians in Gaza have lost their lives. Where will that war lead, and who will rule Gaza if Israel achieves its goal of eliminating Hamas? Irish Times columnist Fintan O'Toole talks to Hugh Linehan about why the only viable process is a peace process - and why Israel's current government is not able to envisage one. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/1/202341 minutes, 51 seconds
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Podcast: Israel-Hamas conflict takes all the attention at the EU leaders’ summit

Hugh Linehan is joined in studio by Jennifer Bray, while Pat Leahy is on the line from Brussels where he is covering the EU leaders’ summit. As Pat explains in part one of today’s Inside Politics podcast, the Israel-Hamas conflict has been top of the agenda there, with hours of negotiation going into the European Union’s call for “pauses” in the conflict in Gaza.Also in part one, Jennifer highlights a Cabinet disagreement over future plans for housing Ukrainian refugees here, and the proposal for a 90-day time limit on State accommodation given our lack of capacity.And in part two, the pod discusses the novel suggestion by Minister of State for Northern Ireland and former Chair of the European Research Group, Steve Baker, that a united Ireland referendum should need a ‘super majority’ of 60 per cent in the North and the Republic to carry. Something he now feels the UK Brexit vote of 2016 should have required.Plus the panel pick their favourite articles of the week from irishtimes.com:·      Gerry Thornley celebrates Johnny Sexton’s remarkable rugby career·      Our corporation tax policies attracting unwanted international attention writes Cliff Taylor·      Karlin Lillington on the massive contradictions of Paddy Cosgrave and Web Summit Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/27/202346 minutes
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Rory Stewart on Keir Starmer, Liz Truss and the 'unseriousness' of UK politics

Former MP, Tory leadership candidate, author and now host of the UK's biggest politics podcast The Rest is Politics, Rory Stewart is today's guest on Inside Politics. His gripping memoir Politics on the Edge (now available in paperback) is the jumping off point for a wide-ranging discussion: How the West blundered in Iraq and AfghanistanWhy answering a call for new blood in politics led him to become a Tory MPHis difficult relationship with David Cameron His disillusionment with the fundamental ‘unseriousness’ of UK politicsMinister of State for Northern Ireland Steve Baker’s statement that a border poll should need a supermajority to pass The nature of constitutional politics and referendums His disbelief and disappointment when Boris Johnson became his party’s leader and UK prime minister Liz Truss as a Margaret Thatcher tribute act Why Keir Starmer will be the next prime minister - and the two things he lacks for the job. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/25/202346 minutes, 9 seconds
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Taking sides on Israel and Palestine, health money pit, flooding hits Cork

Pat Leahy and Jack Horgan-Jones join Hugh Linehan to look at the week in Irish politics: Foreign policy came to Dáil Éireann as Government and opposition tried and failed to agree a motion on the crisis in Israel and Palestine.Dismay at the Department of Health and the HSE over a shortfall in funding for next year spills out into the open. The political response to devastating flooding in Cork and the reality that climate mitigation will be among the State's biggest problems for - at least - decades to come. Plus the panel pick their Irish Times stories of the week: Does President Michael D. Higgins see Russia as a colonial power - and why should we care? A weary response to Time Out's claim that Smithfield is the second-coolest place on on the planet. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/20/202342 minutes, 4 seconds
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Northern Ireland's 'Dirty Linen' and the long tail of trauma

From Banbridge, County Down, Irish Times Books Editor Martin Doyle grew up in the heart of the 'Linen Triangle', home of Northern Ireland's biggest industry, and also within the 'Murder Triangle', a region blighted by sectarian violence during The Troubles. Martin has written a book, Dirty Linen, that explores that time through the stories of the people he grew up amongst. He talks to Hugh Linehan. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/18/202350 minutes, 56 seconds
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Michael Lewis on the rise and fall of Sam Bankman-Fried

Having already amassed a $26 billion fortune at 28, cryptocurrency entrepreneur Sam Bankman-Fried was the world's richest person under 30. He was also the most prominent advocate of the 'effective altruism' movement, pledging to donate millions of dollars to charities he judged would make the greatest positive difference. Then, it all came crashing down. Bankman-Fried is currently on trial in New York for fraud, after the collapse of his cryptocurrency exchange exposed the misuse of customer funds. But he is no ordinary greedy billionaire, says best-selling author Michael Lewis, who had already chosen Bankman-Fried as the subject of his next book before his fortunes changed. Lewis, whose previous books include Moneyball, The Big Short and Flash Boys, returns to the Inside Politics podcast to talk to Hugh Linehan about the highly unusual personality, methods and motivations of Sam Bankman-Fried. He also addresses the criticisms he himself has faced for his relatively favourable depiction of a man charged with conspiracy, money laundering and fraud. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/16/202349 minutes, 35 seconds
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Horror in the Middle East, Budget aftermath, FFG

The horrific events this week in Israel and the Gaza Strip are the subject of part one of today's podcast. Harry McGee has been watching the conflict, and Ireland's political response to it, unfold.In part two Jack Horgan-Jones talks about ongoing reaction to this week's Budget. With Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael working together in harmony as they control the State's finances, how can the parties differentiate themselves at the next election?Plus the panel pick their favourite articles of the week from irishtimes.com:Gordon Manning on the unlikely childhood GAA experience of a family of All Black rugby starsMark Paul on signs that next year's UK election could be nastyRemembering a legendary Irish philanthropist Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/13/202348 minutes, 12 seconds
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Deconstructing Budget 2024 - with Pearse Doherty

Budget 2024 was a missed opportunity to invest more in housing and tackle chronic problems in our health system, says Sinn Féin spokesperson for finance Pearse Doherty. Pearse joins Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Hugh to talk about Budget 2024 in detail and spell out what Sinn Féin would do differently. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/11/202343 minutes, 39 seconds
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Howlin retires, Budget run-in, Starmer pours water on reunification

Cormac McQuinn and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to look at the week in politics:If past years are anything to go by, most of the Budget 2024 measures will have been leaked by next Tuesday. The fact they haven't yet been shows how difficult negotiations are this year, with Ministers competing for cash to spend on pet projects.Labour TD for Wexford Brendan Howlin announced he will retire at the next election. We look back on the former party leader and minister for public expenditure's long career.UK Labour leader Keir Starmer cast doubt on the prospect of a vote on reunification, should he succeed in becoming Prime Minister.Plus our panellists pick their favourite Irish Times journalism from this week:Finn McRedmond isn’t into a proposed National Women’s Museum.Martin Wall reports from Washington on the dramatic ouster of Kevin McCarthy.Mark Paul on Rishi Sunak’ attempt to portray himself as a change-maker after his party’s 13-year reign. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/6/202337 minutes, 23 seconds
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Will 'common sense' policies revive Rishi Sunak's Tories?

On today's podcast:Jack Horgan-Jones on the darkening economic backdrop to next week's delivery of Budget 2024.Mark Paul reports from the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester where Prime Minister Rushi Sunak delivered some headline-grabbing 'common sense' pledges. But throughout the week he was overshadowed by those with an eye on replacing him. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/4/202328 minutes, 24 seconds
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Naomi Klein on conspiracies, climate and the 'personal brand'

Today’s guest is Canadian academic and author Naomi Klein. Klein shot to fame with her first book, No Logo, which offered an acute critique of how powerful corporations in the 1990s had profited off exploitation in a globalizing world. Her later books have examined a range of subjects including crisis capitalism, militarism, and the climate crisis. In her new book Doppelganger Klein uses the fact that she is commonly confused online for a very different writer, Naomi Wolf, who has called Covid-19 vaccine programmes ‘mass murder’, as a device to explore modern themes including online identity, conspiracy theories and the 21st Century supremacy of the ‘personal brand’.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/2/202344 minutes, 37 seconds
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Sinn Féin gain, no giveaway budget, Leo on Benefits Street

Harry McGee and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to discuss the week in politics:The latest Irish Times / Ipsos opinion poll shows Sinn Féin continuing to gain. Other poll results foreshadow the potential for difficult negotiations if the party needs to form a coalition with Fianna Fáil.Beyond the next election, the poll shows long term problems for Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael when it comes to attracting young voters. Budget 2024 is just over a week away and for now the message is that this will not be a pre-election giveaway - but will that hold?Taoiseach Leo Varadkar dropped an unusual and somewhat controversial reference this week, prompting our panel to speculate about his TV viewing habits.Plus the panel select their favourite reads of the week:Without even mentioning the song, Diarmaid Ferriter has (hopefully) the last work on Zombiegate.Michael McDowell calls for a new agency to reverse Dublin's declineAnd Pat commends our reporters' wide coverage of this week's historic drugs bust. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/29/202333 minutes, 29 seconds
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Why can't more of us vote in Seanad elections?

A constitutional stopwatch is now ticking for the way in which some senators are elected. And it’s finally time for the Seanad reform which successive governments have promised but failed to deliver. That’s according to Tomás Heneghan, the University of Limerick graduate who won a landmark Supreme Court case earlier this year over being denied the right to vote for the upper houses’s university seats. On today's podcast he talks to Hugh and Pat about his historic case and how complying with it could cause problems for the coalition. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/27/202335 minutes, 8 seconds
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Disturbance at Dáil Éireann

Our Friday wrap of the week returns with the start of the new political season. Jennifer Bray, Jack Horgan-Jones and Pat Leahy join Hugh to discuss the week in politics: What should we call the ugly scenes outside Dáil Éireann this week - and what sort of response should there be? As politicians gear up for a period with lots of elections, is Taoiseach Leo Varadkar creating friction with his coalition partners? The concerns of farmers were in focus at the Ploughing Championships this week - as was their dislike of the Greens. Plus the panel nominate their favourite IT articles of the week, including: Justine McCarthy on a growing healthcare controversyNaomi O'Leary on Ireland's risky exposure to the Chinese economyand Roísín Ingle's paean to the joys of day-drinking. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/22/202349 minutes, 12 seconds
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Can Britain ever come to terms with Brexit?

Peter Foster tells today’s Irish Times Inside Politics podcast that, while polls show a majority of British voters now think it was a mistake to leave the European Union, it is unlikely any UK government in the foreseeable future will seek to rejoin. What is needed instead, the Financial Times journalist says, is greater honesty on the subject from political leaders, in particular from Keir Starmer’s Labour party, which currently looks set to win next year’s general election. In his new book What Went Wrong With Brexit and What To Do About It, Peter argues the UK is facing a future of stagnation and decline unless its political leaders start to confront the challenges posed by Brexit.What Went Wrong With Brexit and What To Do About It is published by Canongate. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/20/202346 minutes, 57 seconds
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'Sinn Féin have pissed a lot of people off' - Aoife Moore on the struggle to write about Ireland's biggest party

How hard it is it to write a tell-all book about Sinn Féin, a political party known among journalists for its secrecy and its on-message discipline? Aoife Moore, author of The Long Game, a new book on the party, was expecting at least some cooperation - but it didn't really work out that way. Of those few who were willing to talk, she says, many had their own motives. In the Mindfield area at this year's Electric Picnic festival, Aoife sat down with Pat Leahy and Harry McGee to talk about the book, the party and its leaders, past and present. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/15/202339 minutes, 10 seconds
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Paschal Donohoe on spending v saving, RTÉ's future and Fine Gael's vigour

October 10th is Budget Day, so it is the time of the year for politicians and lobbyists to make their cases for extra spending and tax cuts in 2024.It will be a year when Ireland is forecast to run a surplus of over €10 billion, leaving lots of room to manoeuvre, and plenty of decisions in the hands of Minister for Finance Michael McGrath and Minister for Public Expenditure Paschal Donohoe.On today's podcast Mr Donohoe joins Hugh and Pat to talk about Budget 2024. Of specific measures, the Minister gives little away. But he does provide an insight into his thinking about the balancing act that must be struck. They also discuss the risk posed to stability by unpredictable corporate tax receipts, the future for RTÉ and whether Fine Gael still has something to offer in government beyond the next election.And Mr Donohoe takes the opportunity to criticise Pat's argument that the Government is short on ideas. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/13/202344 minutes, 23 seconds
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Licence fee revolt, speed solutions, think-ins

Harry McGee and Cormac McQuinn join Pat Leahy to talk about the big political stories of the week:News that RTÉ licence fee receipts have continued to plummet will be of concern when the Cabinet meets this weekA spike in road deaths is another issue for the coalition to grapple withPolitical party think-in season is about to commence, but the annual events are not what they used to be, lament our correspondents.Plus: Northern Editor Freya McClements on the waning prospects of a restoration of the Northern Ireland Assembly, and the attrition a lack of leadership is causing to day-to-day lives of citizens. What is in the mind of DUP leader Jeffrey Donaldson, in whose hands powersharing lies? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/6/202339 minutes, 52 seconds
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More seats and new constituencies: a first look at the redrawn electoral map

The Electoral Commission has published its highly anticipated constituency review which, as expected, recommends an increase in the number of Dáil seats to let representation keep pace with population growth. The review, which is expected to be approved by the Dáil, also recommends the creation of new constituencies and the adjustment of others. But what does it all mean for voters and politicians? Cormac McQuinn and Harry McGee join Pat Leahy to dig into the review. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/30/202339 minutes, 53 seconds
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Crime on the public's mind, politicians brace for constituency reform

Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray join Hugh to discuss the big stories of the past few weeks: Is Minister for Media Catherine Martin at risk of seeming too passive in her handling of the RTÉ payments controversy? The Electoral Commission will shortly reveal new constituency boundaries, amounting to a new political landscape for voters and politicians to get to grips with. And politicians are extremely keen to see what it will mean for them. The issue of crime on city streets is a difficult one for politicians like Minister for Justice Helen McEntee to handle - especially when there is little agreement on what exactly, or how severe, the problem really is. An Irish Times report revealed that Ireland will provide weapons training to Ukrainian soldiers. The news has prompted questions about whether the plan violates military neutrality. Could the policy cause strife between the coalition partners? Thanks to everyone who got in touch about The Bertie Years. Tell us what political history you would like Inside Politics to cover next by emailing us at [email protected]. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/23/202336 minutes
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The Ahern Years: Crash

The final episode of the series ends with a bang, or rather a crash, as Hugh Linehan and Pat Leahy detail how Bertie’s own finances are under the microscope as he faces into his last general election as leader of Fianna Fáil, while the global financial earthquake comes into view.This is part four of The Ahern Years. Parts one, two and three are also available. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/18/202353 minutes, 41 seconds
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The Ahern Years: Showtime

In this episode Hugh Linehan and Pat Leahy pore over what comes after Fianna Fáil's successful 2002 general election amid the ongoing boom. The defeats in local and European elections in 2004, the twin debacles of e-voting and decentralisation, and Charlie McCreevy exiting stage right, all raise questions about Bertie's decision-making.  This is part three of The Ahern Years. Parts one and two are also available. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/16/202341 minutes, 9 seconds
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The Ahern years: The tiger roars

In this episode Hugh Linehan and Pat Leahy delve into Bertie Ahern's first government as Taoiseach, a government which oversees unprecedented economic growth as the Celtic Tiger years begin. And Bertie writes his name into the history books for his role in bringing peace to Northern Ireland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/11/202352 minutes, 40 seconds
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The Ahern years: Bertie's path to power

His legacy is debated, but there's no denying that Bertie Ahern is one of the most significant figures in Irish political history. Over the next few episodes Pat Leahy tells the story of the life and political career of the former Taoiseach and assesses his impact on modern Ireland. In the first instalment Pat examines Ahern's rise to prominence within Fianna Fáil, how he first came close to power before having it snatched away by a political ally turned foe, and the smart general election campaign that saw him assume the office of Taoiseach on June 26th, 1997. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/9/202359 minutes, 53 seconds
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US politics special with Clare Malone of The New Yorker

There’s never a dull moment when it comes to US politics, as proved again today with the announcement of fresh criminal charges against former president Donald Trump. In this episode, Staff writer at the New Yorker Clare Malone joins Hugh to take a look at the state of US politics through the lens of current media trends, what we can expect from the year ahead and how an election paralleled with multiple criminal trials might play out. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/2/202352 minutes, 34 seconds
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Inside Sinn Féin

Who are Sinn Féin and what really makes the party different, if anything? Who holds real sway within the party? What role do activists play, and who are its up-and-coming stars? Freya McClements and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to talk about Ireland's most popular party. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/26/202345 minutes, 28 seconds
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The big end of term wrap

The Dáil summer recess has arrived and our political experts Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Cormac McQuinn have convened to look back on the political season:The relative political fortunes of Micheál Martin and Leo Varadkar.Do polls suggest Sinn Féin has hit a ceiling of support? Did the Government get a handle on the migrant accommodation crisis? Or can it claim real progress on broader issue of a lack of housing? How has the huge budget surplus perturbed politics?Plus, Jennifer reveals what the Leinster House gossip is saying about the timing of the next election. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/21/202348 minutes, 52 seconds
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Europe's climate is changing. Will European politics change with it?

In a summer heatwave gripping countries including Spain, Italy, France and Greece, Europeans are experiencing temperatures more commonly found in the Sahara desert. The consequences for human health, agriculture and the environment are expected to be severe. How are European political institutions responding to what seems to be a troubling new reality? Naomi O'Leary reports from Brussels. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/19/202340 minutes, 41 seconds
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Can the Government be generous to RTÉ? Hospital mess, braying donkeys

Pat Leahy and Harry McGee join Hugh Linehan to look back on the week in politics including hopefully the final week of RTÉ Oireachtas committee mania and the spiralling cost of delivering the National Children's Hospital. Plus they select the finest Irish Times articles from throughout the week, including what happens when you send a grumpy sportswriter to report on politics. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/14/202343 minutes, 14 seconds
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'No-one likes us and we don't care' - taking Unionism's temperature on the Twelfth

It's the Twelfth and to mark Unionism and Loyalism's day of celebration, Hugh talks to Dr Aaron Edwards, author of A People Under Siege: The Unionists of Northern Ireland from Partition to Brexit and Beyond. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/12/202343 minutes, 29 seconds
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Not another week of RTÉgate, summer statement, hate bill queasiness

On today’s Inside Politics podcast Hugh Linehan is joined by Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray to discuss the week in politics:The crisis at RTÉ is entering its third week but, with appearances by Ryan Tubridy and Noel Kelly before an Oireachtas committee and the takeover by Kevin Bakhurst as Director General all happening next week, the story is not going away, much as weary RTÉ executives and politicians might want it to.The Summer Economic Statement prompted some criticism from economists opposed to excessive spending - but little from opposition politicians. Why?Opposition to hate speech legislation currently making its way through the Seanad is filling up the inboxes of politicians like Fianna Fail’s Lisa Chambers. But do people’s concerns have much to do with what’s actually in the bill?Plus the panel recommend their Irish Times articles of the week:Newton Emerson on the complexities of talking about how a United Ireland would actually workJohn Fitzgerald on whether the IDA’s current strategy is right for an Ireland of inflation, full employment and overstretched services.Patrick Freyne’s guide to the year’s best TV Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/7/202337 minutes, 47 seconds
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The Social Democrats are different, says Holly Cairns - but how?

Under the leadership of Holly Cairns, the Cork South-West TD who took over from Catherine Murphy and Roisin Shortall in March, the Social Democrats are riding high among the smaller political parties in Dail Eireann - according to opinion polls at least. But what is the party all about? How is it different from Sinn Fein, the biggest party on the left? And if the Soc Dems were to combine with other political parties in a coalition of compromise after the next election, where would its policy red lines be? Holly Cairns sat down with Hugh Linehan and Pat Leahy to discuss leadership, politics and policy. But first, they talk about the latest revelations in the crisis at RTE over secret payments to Ryan Tubridy and the future of the national public service broadcaster. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/5/202349 minutes, 13 seconds
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'Nobody's brave enough to put their name to it' - Helen McEntee on maternity leave criticism and retaking the reins at Justice

In a wide-ranging interview in today's Irish Times, Minister for Justice Helen McEntee talks about remarks critical of her taking maternity leave while in office, the stint by Cabinet colleague Simon Harris in her job and her future ambitions. And on today's podcast Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray listen back to excerpts from the interview and apply some political analysis.But first, Jack and Jen threaten to establish a new world order in the absence of Hugh Linehan and the rest of the politics team, before settling down into a discussion of RTE's terrible week, as the broadcaster's top brass endured grillings in front of two Oireachtas committees over secret payments to Ryan Tubridy. Has the management team been irreparably damaged by its association with the week's events? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/1/202333 minutes, 55 seconds
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RTÉ still struggling with fallout from Tubridy’s secret pay deal

Hosting Inside Politics in Hugh Linehan’s absence, Pat Leahy is joined by Current Affairs Editor of The Irish Times, Arthur Beesley and Professor Jane Suiter from DCU’s School of Communications to discuss where we are now after yesterday's statement from RTÉ on Ryan Tubridy’s controversial pay deal.Are we likely to get satisfactory answers from today’s Oireachtas committee or the Public Accounts committee on Thursday? And the panel tease out how those running RTÉ can possibly re-establish trust when its own employees are protesting, as well as where its often-complicated relationship with politics goes from here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/28/202334 minutes, 59 seconds
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Can RTÉ be trusted to run itself?

Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones join Hugh to talk about the week in politics, including:The fiasco unfolding at RTÉ over Ryan Tubridy's unusual pay deal and its potential ramificationsThe Labour Party's confidential review that examines where it all went wrong while they were in governmentPlus, they share their favourite Irish Times piece of the week:Séamas O’Reilly on not mentioning the war while living in DublinMiriam Lord's amusing take on the political reaction to the hate speech BillUna Mullally and Patrick Freyne look back on 40 years since Ireland's first Pride parade Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/23/202348 minutes, 4 seconds
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Did the President go too far?

Columnist and former Fianna Fáil advisor Gerard Howlin joins Hugh Linehan, Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray to talk about two controversial topics: recent comments by President Michael D Higgins and the Hate Speech bill that is making its way through the Oireachtas. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/21/202348 minutes, 53 seconds
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Poll: Drop in support for Fine Gael and Sinn Féin

The latest Irish Times/ Ipsos opinion poll shows support for both Fine Gael and Sinn Féin has dropped, with Taoiseach Leo Varadkar also seeing a sharp decline in his personal rating. Fianna Fáil and the Social Democrats however, can breathe a sigh of relief after both experiencing an increase in support. Pat, Harry and Hugh analyse the results. Plus they share their favourite Irish Times piece of the week:Olivia Kelly follows in Bloom’s sticky footsteps around the capitalMark Paul on Boris Johnson’s adventures in parliamentSally Hayden on the normalisation of mass drownings in the Mediterranean Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/16/202337 minutes, 32 seconds
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Is Ireland neutral? Is anyone?

Conor Gallagher, Irish Times Crime and Security Correspondent, has a new book out Is Ireland Neutral? The Many Myths of Irish Neutrality. He sat down with Hugh Linehan to discuss what has been an accepted position since the foundation of the Free State but doesn’t actually stand up to scrutiny.Whether an attempt to form a military alliance with France at the end of the first world war through to the part Shannon Airport plays in US military operations, the definition of neutrality here is loose at best.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/14/202347 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ifac warning, IRA commemorations, and is James O'Connor a Jekyll & Hyde figure?

Pat Leahy and Harry McGee join Hugh to talk about the week in politics, including:Ifac cautions coalition on expenditure and its potential consequencesSinn Féin defend IRA commemoration in South ArmaghIs James O'Connor a Jekyll & Hyde figure within Fianna Fáil?Plus, they share their favourite Irish Times piece of the week:Kiss rocker Gene Simmons visits House of Commons as Ian Paisley's guestFAI request huge investment commitment from governmentGerard Howlin highlights parties on the wrong side of history for climate change Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/9/202342 minutes, 55 seconds
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Who speaks for 'middle Ireland'?

The podcast takes a look at the concept of ‘middle Ireland’, a concept that has been around for a long time in political discourse here, and one that has proved to be quite potent politically when comes to getting votes - but who exactly falls into the category of ‘middle Ireland’?Do Fine Gael alone speak for this cohort? Or perhaps each party, much like the CSO or Grant Thornton, has their own definition of who the ‘squeezed middle’ is.And could introducing some income tax reform lighten the load for middle earners here?Political Correspondent with The Irish Times, Jennifer Bray, and Political Economist Aidan Regan from UCD, join Hugh Linehan to give their thoughts. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/7/202346 minutes, 48 seconds
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Missing climate targets, Census talking points, and Helen McEntee returns

Jennifer Bray and Cormac McQuinn join Hugh to talk about the week in politics, including:Ireland is on course to miss its 2030 carbon emission targets by some distanceSome interesting takeaways from Census 2022, including lowering home ownership and fewer CatholicsHelen McEntee taking back the reigns as Minister for Justice Plus they share their favourite Irish Times piece of the week:Malachy Clerkin on why he misses the officeJustine McCarthy on new frontiers in the hatred warsDáil suspension over 'organic farmer' remark Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/2/202334 minutes, 23 seconds
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Decoding the culture wars - with Bryan Fanning

In his new book Public Morality and The Culture Wars, academic Bryan Fanning analyses what he calls the ‘triple divide’ between conservative, liberal and progressive viewpoints, how the moral views of those three groups differ and how they clash with growing intensity in what we call the culture wars. He talks to Hugh Linehan about public morality, the debate over the limits of freedom of speech and why liberal and progressive thinking has diverged.Bryan Fanning is Professor of Migration and Social Policy at University College Dublin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/31/202352 minutes, 42 seconds
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Serving 'middle Ireland': Leo Varadkar on tax break controversy, prioritising homeownership and the next election

The coalition Government still has plenty of time to run but, if the past week is anything to go by, the remaining months could be characterised by less cooperation and more shaping up for the electoral battles to come.On today's podcast Pat Leahy and Hugh Linehan take a listen back to an interview Pat conducted with Taoiseach Leo Varadkar on Thursday in which a picture emerges of how Fine Gael will differentiate itself come election time.In the interview the Taoiseach talks about a controversy over three Fine Gael junior ministers' decision to publicly call for a tax cut in the next budget, why Fine Gael supports lowering taxes for those on middle and upper incomes, why boosting the numbers of homes available to purchase is Fine Gael's housing priority, and how a decision will be made on the timing of the next general election.Mr Varadkar spoke about other subjects - you can read the full article here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/27/202326 minutes, 23 seconds
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How will the Electoral Commission reshape Irish elections?

The Electoral Commission is a newly established state body set up to oversee elections in Ireland. Taking on a range of existing electoral functions, it will also be responsible for deciding on the number of TDs in the Dáil and the boundaries and size of each constituency and local election area. The first report from the Commission on constituency boundaries is due out at the end of August. So what can we expect from it? To talk through the changes coming down the tracks for the electoral system and the wider impact on political parties, Hugh is joined by Cormac McQuinn, political scientist and lecturer with UCC Dr Theresa Reidy and Maynooth University lecturer Dr Adrian Kavanagh. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/24/202356 minutes, 57 seconds
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Migration and voters, Matt Barrett's posts, a good day for Sinn Féin

Jack Horgan-Jones and Pat Leahy join Hugh to talk about the week in politics, including:Government reaction to the agonising migrant accommodation shortage crisis. Will voters react too when they get a chance? Matt Barrett's apology for making jokes about King Charles III's coronation while there as the Taoiseach's +1At the time of recording, local elections in Northern Ireland are looking good for Sinn FéinPlus they share their favourite Irish Times piece of the week:Alex Kane on the need for Unionism to broaden its appealJustine McCarthy on the political motivations of news organisationsJoe Humphreys on the schism between liberalism and progressivism Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/19/202331 minutes, 11 seconds
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State facing a summer of strife over migrant accommodation

The ongoing crisis over a shortage of accommodation for International Protection applicants is an acute problem that risks becoming a chronic one for the State. After a week of violent clashes, arson and blockades taking place at accommodation sites, the podcast panel looks again at what's been happening, how bad the problem is and how the political system is reacting. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/17/202344 minutes, 47 seconds
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Government speaking loudly and carrying a small stick on prices

Jack Horgan-Jones and Pat Leahy join Hugh to discuss the big political stories of the week. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/12/202343 minutes, 4 seconds
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Where British politics went wrong - with Rafael Behr

Political columnist and podcaster Rafael Behr returns to the podcast to talk about his new book Politics: A Survivor's Guide. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/10/202356 minutes, 32 seconds
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Pros and cons of helping mortgage holders, President Higgins on economics and King Charles's big day

After yet another ECB rates rise, could we see the reintroduction of mortgage interest relief to take some pressure off homeowners? That was the first point of discussion on the Inside Politics podcast round-up this week.The panel also gave their view on President Higgins’ recent speech at a reception for think tank Tasc, in which he condemned the "obsession” with achieving economic growth at the expense of "ecology and ethics".There was also a noted lack of enthusiasm at the prospect of sitting through live coverage of King Charles the III’s coronation.And the team talk about some of the best Irish Times content of the week, including:Fintan O’Toole’s piece on the fanatical racism of John MitchellJack Horgan-Jones’s account of Donald Trump’s Doonbeg visitPat Leahy writing about Ireland’s approach to relations with China Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/5/202346 minutes, 27 seconds
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Fiona Hill on a global 'proxy war' in Ukraine

Fiona Hill returns to the podcast to talk to Hugh Linehan about how global attitudes to the war in Ukraine have shifted in the year since Russia’s invasion, the roots of widespread global apathy towards the Ukrainian cause and whether the conflict has become in some sense a ‘proxy war’ between the West and the rest, as well as a fight for Ukrainian independence and sovereignty. They also discuss how politics in Washington, Moscow and Berlin might affect the course of the war.Fiona Hill is a former White House official who advised presidents Bush, Obama and Trump on European and Russian affairs, and who is perhaps best known for her testimony in President Trump's impeachment hearings.She has written a book, There Is Nothing For You Here, about her life, her path to the White House and the declining politics of the US, Britain and Russia.She is a Senior Fellow at Brookings, a Washington-based think-tank. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/3/202337 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Tánaiste's Dáil outburst, the patchy provision of abortion care and Leo's tax cuts promise

Tánaiste Micheál Martin's rant in the Dáil was the first point of discussion on the podcast's round-up this week. The rant was aimed at the brand of investigative journalism being carried out by The Ditch, journalism that Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy agree, 'stands on its own'.  And while the Tánaiste's outburst was uncharacteristic, Pat felt it 'shouldn't distract from the questions' Fianna Fail TD Niall Collins had to be asked relating to the purchase of a vacant site in Co Limerick by his wife in 2008, even if the story isn't exactly 'Watergate'. Jennifer explains how the provision of abortion care in this country is 'not serving women as the law stipulated', and getting an opinion from senior politicians on barrister Marie O'Shea's independent report has proved to be challenging to say the least.Plus, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar played ‘one of his greatest hits’ this week when promising to cut taxes for those earners who are simply paying too much of it.And the team talk about some of the best Irish Times content of the week, including:Newton Emerson on how we could potentially contribute to the subvention scheme in Northern IrelandDiarmaid Ferriter gives a potted history of farmer parties in IrelandMiriam Lord explains the Kit-Kat apology and Niall Collins Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/28/202341 minutes, 59 seconds
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Eamon Ryan: We need to scale up the State to make it fit for purpose

Minister for Transport and Green Party leader Eamon Ryan talks to Hugh Linehan and Harry McGee about policies and politics. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/26/202353 minutes, 54 seconds
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How to spend it, TDs’ boundary obsession, robust discussions

Cormac McQuinn and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to discuss the week in politics:How should the Government use this year's forecast €10 billion budget surplus?TDs are obsessed with what the new Electoral Commission will do to constituency boundaries. History shows they have good reason.Secretary general at the Department of Health Robert Watt's appearance at the Oireachtas finance committee did the opposite of putting the story about Dr Tony Holohan's botched appointment to bed.Plus the panel pick their IT stories of the week:Ciara O'Brien on a big week in the world of Elon MuskNaomi O'Leary writing about free public transport in Luxembourg. It is popular but are people in their cars less? Find out here.Harry McGee on Eamon Ryan's strong opposition to Dublin Port's development plans. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/21/202338 minutes, 57 seconds
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Does the Dowdall connection harm Sinn Féin?

On today’s Inside Politics podcast Hugh Linehan is joined by Harry McGee and Jack Horgan-Jones from our political team to discuss this week’s stories, including:Focus on Sinn Féin’s link to discredited witness Jonathan Dowdall since the conclusion of the Regency trial this week. Will the connection harm the party at election time?Fine Gael TD John Paul Phelan’s intention to stand down at the next election is on the grounds of ill health. But there is also a broader trend of politicians leaving politics behind. A report into the botched appointment of Dr Tony Holohan to a state-funded position at Trinity College Dublin showed how surprisingly sloppy the process had been and revealed a major dispute among senior civil servants over who knew what, when.Will independent TD Michael Fitzmaurice really launch a new political party catering to farmers fed up with the Green agenda? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/19/202349 minutes, 8 seconds
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Has Biden found the right balance on his Ireland visit?

Irish Times Washington Correspondents past and present, Simon Carswell and Martin Wall, have both been covering US president Joe Biden's visit to Ireland this week.They join Pat Leahy to talk about what the visit has been like and how it has gone down at home in the US, here in Ireland and elsewhere.They look at Mr Biden's comments here and ask how well he's balanced the various diplomatic, political and emotional aspects of his presence.And they discuss some surprising comments Mr Biden made in Dáil Éireann that may give ammunition to those arguing the 81 year old is too old to run again in 2024. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/14/202332 minutes, 43 seconds
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The politics of Biden's visit

Gerard Howlin and Freya McClements join Pat Leahy to talk about all the politics surrounding US President Joe Biden's visit to Ireland. The four-day tour gets going in earnest today with an address at Ulster University in Belfast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/12/202333 minutes, 14 seconds
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Why is politics failing to solve problems like housing? With Ben Ansell

The whole world is a series of collective action problems, says Professor Ben Ansell. We want action taken to solve problems, but we want most of the benefits of those actions for ourselves while wanting others to bear the costs. These conflicts are at the heart of the failure of politics to solve many pressing problems, from housing to climate change.In his new book Why Politics Fails: The Five Traps of the Modern World & How to Escape Them, he looks in detail at these conflicts and why modern politics leaves us so disappointed.On today's podcast Ben talks to Hugh Linehan about how politics works on a human level, why trust in politics has declined, the importance of institutions, the evolution of political parties, and why housing is the defining issue of the age.Ben Ansell is Professor of Comparative Democratic Institutions at Oxford University. Why Politics Fails is his fourth book. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/5/202349 minutes, 51 seconds
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Fireworks in the chamber, Defence Forces in crisis, battle of the Irish Times columnists

Cormac McQuinn and Pat Leahy join Hugh to look back at the week in politics:Bad-tempered Dáil debates on confidence motions this weekDefence Forces in crisis following the Women of Honour reportUS president Joe Biden's Ireland visit schedule confirmedAnd the team talk about some of the best Irish Times content of the week, including:Mark Paul on the outcome of the SNP leadership race and the opportunity for the Labour Party in Scotland.Are private cars a bad thing or a good thing? Both views appeared in the opinion pages of The Irish Times this week.Forbes magazine's ongoing failure to make amends with Limerick city Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/31/202328 minutes, 14 seconds
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'Northern Ireland has moved on' - Fintan O'Toole on 25th anniversary of the Belfast Agreement

April marks 25 years since the Belfast or Good Friday Agreement was reached, ending the Troubles and establishing a new political arrangement on the island of Ireland.But today the institutions that were set up back in 1998 are in crisis.Irish Times columnist Fintan O'Toole talks to Hugh Linehan about the significance of the Agreement:The events that led up to the deal and the role of John HumeThe impact of the Agreement on the evolution of Sinn FéinHow Brexit trampled on the ideas underpinning the AgreementThe future of the powersharing institutions and how Northern Ireland has moved on Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/29/202347 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Independents’ policy setting power, unhappy Greens and a perilous position for the government

Despite the government's comfortable defeat of a motion of no confidence this week, the fallout continues as it reacts to the forthcoming lifting of the eviction ban. "They've made a hames of it," according to Pat Leahy. Jack Horgan Jones analyses how Green support is slipping among young voters and the number of WhatsApp leaks is indicative of a very unhappy party. Plus, the attitude to the Windsor Framework in Brussels and is Leo Varadkar in the make-or-break phase of his political career?Hugh's article of the week is Finn McRedmond's opinion piece on whether this generation is worse off than its parents.Pat particularly enjoyed Fintan O'Toole' grudging admission that he's finally fallen in love with rugby.Jack Horgan Jones recommends Mark Paul's London Letter, after attending the annual Press and Political Reception at the Irish embassy in Belgravia. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/24/202335 minutes, 40 seconds
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‘A pretty bruising contest’: SNP leadership race uncovers cracks within the party

The contest to replace Nicola Sturgeon has been heating up over the last number of weeks, as the three candidates vying for the position, have clashed over policy issues and the future of the party. The first leadership contest in 20 years; it’s generally believed to be a two-horse race between current Health Secretary Humza Yousaf and Finance Secretary Kate Forbes, with former Minister for Community Safety Ash Regan, trailing behind in popularity.  So what can we expect from the final days of the contest, will the next leader unite or divide the SNP and how will the emerging cracks be covered over?To discuss all this and more, Hugh is joined by Scotland Editor of The Spectator Alex Massie and London Correspondent Mark Paul who is following the contest from Edinburgh. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/22/202346 minutes, 38 seconds
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Has housing 'turned a corner'? Biden's welcome, Green Party disharmony

It's St Patrick's Day week and ministers are flying off to press the flesh around the world. Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray join Hugh to talk about everything that's going on back home in politics including: Joe Biden will visit Ireland next month. How will he be received North and South? Tanaiste Micheal Martin says Ireland has 'turned a corner' on housing. Is he right?An errant tweet has landed the Green Party's communications director in hot water and put the spotlight on divisions within the party. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/15/202338 minutes, 16 seconds
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Eviction ban, congestion charges and the state’s inability to look around corners.

One issue has dominated the agenda on what was an already busy week for politics. The decision to lift the eviction ban was a shock reversal of what was expected from Tuesday's cabinet meeting, according to Jack Horgan-Jones. The maelstrom of personal stories from worried renters gives the opposition an easily-understood attack line from now until the next election. Coalition tensions are also mounting over plans to reduce private car usage, with Green ambitions to introduce congestion charges. Cormac McQuinn also highlights the potential minefield for the government if it opts for holding three referendums relating to gender equality in November. Plus the panel choose their Irish Times article of the week:Kitty Holland's explainer on referendums relating to the constitution's article on 'women in the home' Fiona Reddan's deep dive into why Ireland has Europe's most expensive housing marketConor Capplis' passionate article in favour of Paul Mescal taking the Oscar for Best Actor at this weekend's Academy Awards Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/10/202335 minutes, 5 seconds
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'We are out to provoke' - PBP's Richard Boyd Barrett on policies, politics and trusting Sinn Fein

People Before Profit TD for Dún Laoghaire Richard Boyd Barrett talks to Hugh and Jen about a pamphlet recently published by his party that set out its unashamedly radical politics and questioned how far the electorate could trust Sinn Fein to implement left-wing policies if in government.They also discuss Richard's views on the need to nationalise industries, how to tackle the housing crisis and when it is appropriate to object to housing in a politician's constituency. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/8/202356 minutes, 21 seconds
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Questions for Niall Collins, Holly Cairns's opportunity, PBP stakes its territory

Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy join Hugh to talk about the week in politics:Minister of state Niall Collins fails to put questions over a planning application to bedPeople Before Profit publish a remarkable documentWhere new Soc Dems leader Holly Cairns can find votes for her partyPlus the panel talk about their favourite Irish Times pieces of the week:Matt Hancock's leaked Whatsapp messages Harry McGee talks to a Louth councillor who was targeted online for her stance on refugeesDenis Staunton paints a picture of springtime in Beijing Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/3/202335 minutes, 53 seconds
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A pivotal moment for Northern Ireland

The Government and the European Union expect British prime minister Rishi Sunak to proceed with the new deal on the Northern Ireland protocol even if the DUP ultimately rejects it, according to sources in Dublin and Brussels.But where would that leave politics in Northern Ireland? To talk about the deal and how it is going down in Dublin, London and Belfast, Hugh talks to Pat Leahy, Mark Paul and Sarah Creighton.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/1/202333 minutes, 38 seconds
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'When you go to a Social Democrats convention, you're struck by how young its supporters are'

Holly Cairns is seen as the most likely contender to succeed Roisin Shorthall and Catherine Murphy, who announced they’re to step down as co-leaders of the Social Democrats this week. Harry McGee observes the party’s younger generation of TDs and councillors may better reflect the profile of the party’s membership. The first Irish Times poll of 2023 is reassuring for Fine Gael and Sinn Fein while perhaps offering a jolt for Fianna Fail, which has seen a slight drop in support since Micheál Martin departed the role of Taoiseach. Pat Leahy says the poll is also noteworthy for the number of undecideds, suggesting there’s a large group of voters still to be won over before the next election. We were expecting a deal on the NI Protocol this week but it appears the British PM’s biggest stumbling block may be overcoming the objections of his own backbenchers. And there was embarrassment for Fine Gael in the Dáil this week after Minister of State, Kieran O’Donnell, forgot to oppose a PBP bill which allowed it to pass to the next stage. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/24/202322 minutes, 18 seconds
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How the world sees the war in Ukraine

How the war in Ukraine is seen in Europe and around the world is complex and always changing, but there's no doubt that global perceptions. and motivations will play a role in how the conflict plays out and ultimately comes to an end. To discuss the global aspect of the war, Hugh is joined by China correspondent Denis Staunton, Brussels correspondent Naomi O'Leary and Berlin correspondent Derek Scally. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/22/202345 minutes, 14 seconds
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Northern Ireland Protocol: how close are we to a deal?

Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray join Hugh to talk through some of the biggest political stories of the week including Nicola Sturgeon’s shock resignation and what it might mean for Scottish independence. They also discuss the latest Mick Wallace controversy which surfaced following a viral TikTok video. But first, progress continues on the protocol talks, but how close are we to a deal and what hurdles still remain? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/17/202331 minutes, 24 seconds
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David Runciman on Brexit's 'phoney war' and the urgent need to tame states and corporations

The political debate around the impact of Brexit on the United Kingdom and its future economic relationship with Europe is 'just on hold at the moment' according to one of the UK's leading political scientists, Professor David Runciman.He talks to Hugh about UK politics today, including Keir Starmer's cautious leadership of the Labour Party, Rishi Sunak's unpopularity, and what he calls a 'phoney war' as populist and Brexit issues lie dormant - but haven't gone away. He also talks about his lecture at UCC last week, where he argued that it is states and corporations, not individuals, that must adapt to avert the existential crises of climate change and biodiversity loss.David Runciman is Professor of Politics at Cambridge University. He delivered the annual Philip Monahan lecture at University College Cork. Thanks to UCC for helping to facilitate this episode. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/15/202342 minutes, 31 seconds
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Bertie's back

Jack Horgan-Jones and Cormac McQuinn join Hugh to talk about the readmission to Fianna Fáil of former Taoiseach Bertie Ahern, who led the party for 13 years before leaving under a shadow. How is Ahern's return being received within the party, and what are his ambitions?Then they discuss the imminent lapsing of various cost-of-living measures introduced by Government last year to help hard-hit citizens. But living in Ireland remains too expensive for many. Could payments like the energy credit be repeated? Could mortgage interest relief make a comeback? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/10/202333 minutes, 19 seconds
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North and South: We answer listener questions on reunification

Today we answer listener questions about the North and South project, with help from Professor Brendan O’Leary of the University of Pennsylvania and Professor John Garry of Queen’s University Belfast.The North and South research project – a collaboration between The Irish Times and ARINS [Analysing and Researching Ireland North and South], which is a joint research project of the Royal Irish Academy and the Keough-Naughton Centre for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame - sought to examine attitudes about the future of the island, and the likely outcomes of any Border polls.Listeners submitted questions about the nature of a border poll, reform of institutions in different jurisdictions and how much the Republic should be willing to change to make a United Ireland a reality. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/8/202352 minutes, 14 seconds
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Desperation as asylum seeker accommodation crises deepens

Jack Horgan-Jones and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to talk about the week in politics:A letter from Minister Roderic O'Gorman to cabinet colleagues asking for help in securing “sports centres… conference facilities, arts centres, student leisure centres [and] any other large buildings that are deemed safe” in order to house refugees shows just how bad this crisis has become.The Government is increasingly worried about the protests against the housing of refugees and asylum seekers around the country.A report this week that a deal between the UK and the EU over the Northern Ireland protocol was done turned out to be premature - but a deal may be imminent.The story about a legal strategy to discourage claims against the state by citizens overcharged for nursing home care shows again how the system favours the well-resourced when disputes ariseWith any subscription you'll get unlimited access to the very best in unique quality journalism from The Irish Times. Subscribe today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/3/202331 minutes, 4 seconds
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Can Labour ever be relevant again? Ivana Bacik says yes

Labour leader Ivana Bacik talks to Hugh Linehan and Pat Leahy about her efforts to revive the party's fortunes since taking over early last year. In a political landscape where most parties are promising similar things, how can Labour cut through? And how much of Sinn Féin's agenda would Labour be willing to support if a coalition agreement were on the cards after the next election? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/1/202340 minutes, 33 seconds
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Expense allowances, threats to politicians, home truths

Jennifer Bray and Cormac McQuinn join Hugh to look back on the week in politics.Claims of electoral expense irregularities expand to ensnare Sinn FeinFemale politicians speak out about threats and aggression Home building figures are not transformative enough to solve housing crisisWith any subscription you'll get unlimited access to the very best in unique quality journalism from The Irish Times. Subscribe today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/27/202333 minutes, 47 seconds
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Why 2024 will be a major year in Irish politics

No elections take place this year. But 2024 could see local, European and general elections all taking place in Ireland. And these looming political battles will shape what political parties do this yearUCC's Theresa Reidy joins Hugh, Pat and Jack to get ahead of the curve and discuss next year's elections. How important are next year's local elections in setting the scene for what's to come after?Will the "vote left transfer left" pact be repeated?How do the government parties compete with one another while fighting a surging Sinn Fein?Will the general election be called early? And will Micheal Martin still be Fianna Fail party leader heading into it? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/25/202348 minutes, 57 seconds
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Postergate: How much bother is Paschal Donohoe in?

Minister for Public Expenditure Paschal Donohoe has cultivated a reputation for being a safe pair of political hands, so it has been surprising to watch him fumble his response to revelations over donations-in-kind made to his reelection efforts in 2016 by businessman Michael Stone. You can read about the details of what has been alleged and how Mr Donohoe has responded here. On the podcast Harry McGee and Pat Leahy look at just how bad this is for Mr Donohoe. Plus: The asylum seeker accommodation crisis is now verging on catastrophe. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/20/202331 minutes, 52 seconds
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Peadar Tóibín on Aontú, Sinn Féin, immigration and ambition

"If we push honest views below ground, we simply push those views into the hands of real racists". That statement, referring to the hot-button issue of migration, is typical of Meath West TD and Aontú party leader Peadar Tóibín, who likes to portray Aontú as neither left nor right but a party of "common sense". Will that approach win Aontú many votes? It's now exactly four years since the party's foundation and, while it has had few electoral successes so far, polling suggests it enjoys similar support to some of the longer-established small parties. Peadar Tóibín talks to Hugh Linehan and Jack Horgan-Jones about what electoral success looks like for his party, the importance of "culture war" versus "bread-and-butter" issues and some reflections on his former party Sinn Fein. This episode is the first in a series looking at small parties. We'll be back on Friday with a round-up of the week's political news. With any subscription you'll get unlimited access to the very best in unique quality journalism from The Irish Times. Subscribe today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/18/202349 minutes, 50 seconds
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The growing influence of online gurus - with Helen Lewis

Struggling in your job, your attitude, your relationships? There are a growing number of self-declared online experts who have all the answers.Author and journalist Helen Lewis returns to the podcast to talk about her new podcast series The New Gurus, which takes a close look at the phenomenon of these online sages who have a major impact on the outlook and often the political views of millions of people worldwide.They talk about magnetic online personalities, from Russel Brand to Jordan Peterson. How much of it is a grift? And how much influence do the new gurus really have? You can listen to The New Gurus on BBC Sounds. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/16/202342 minutes, 20 seconds
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The fall of Damien English

Cormac McQuinn and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan to discuss the fallout from a report on The Ditch news website that Meath West Fine Gael TD Damien English made a false claim on a planning application which allowed him to build a second house. The news forced Deputy English to resign his post as a junior minister. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/13/202321 minutes, 16 seconds
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Cow dung attack on politicians, health crisis continues, protocol developments

On today's podcast:The crisis in Emergency Departments this winter reveals a lack of accountability in the upper echelons of the system, among other issues. Was an attack on TDs with bags of excrement at a public meeting indicative of “a creeping sinister aggression” against politicians, as Ciaran Cannon claimed? Pat explains what is going on behind the scenes in the negotiations over the Northern Ireland Protocol. How would the DUP react to a deal that left even a much-changed Protocol in place? With any subscription you'll get unlimited access to the very best in unique quality journalism from The Irish Times. Subscribe today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/11/202345 minutes, 45 seconds
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New year, old problems for Government

New year, new Taoiseach, but the same headwinds facing the Government in areas like housing, refugee accommodation and a struggling healthcare system. Jack Horgan-Jones and columnist Gerard Howlin join Pat to talk about political goings-on in the first week of 2023 and whether Leo Varadkar's second stint as Taoiseach will be any different than his first. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/4/202340 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ask Us Anything, Christmas 2022 edition - part two

It's part two of our annual Ask Us Anything, featuring questions on journalism, politics and a podcasting rivalry.Taking your questions in studio are Hugh Linehan, Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray, Harry McGee and Jack Horgan-Jones, with a cameo from Cormac McQuinn. Happy Christmas and a Happy New Year to all our listeners. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/28/202256 minutes, 18 seconds
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Ask Us Anything, Christmas 2022 edition - part one

You asked, we answered. It's part one of our annual Ask Us Anything, featuring questions on journalism, politics and a podcasting rivalry.Taking your questions in studio are Hugh Linehan, Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray, Harry McGee and Jack Horgan-Jones, with additional help from Europe correspondent Naomi O'Leary. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/21/202253 minutes, 3 seconds
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Is the little-changed Cabinet a sign of stability or of stagnation?

What happened in the Cabinet reshuffle? Not a lot, is one reasonable answer - there were no surprises, most ministers stayed where there were and any moves had been well flagged in advance.But the day’s events still raised interesting questions for our politics team Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones to answer on this episode of the Inside Politics podcast.Is the unchanged Cabinet a sign of stability - or a sign of stagnation and a death of new talent? How did Stephen Donnelly win the right to retain his position in Health?Why was Fianna Fáil’s Jack Chambers, moved sideways from chief whip to super junior in the Department of Transport, denied a bigger promotion?How can Micheál Martin lead his party while travelling the world as Minister for Foreign Affairs? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/17/202227 minutes, 15 seconds
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Disquiet over planning bill, corruption scandal in Brussels

Naomi O'Leary is on the line from Brussels where a money-for-influence corruption scandal has rocked the European Parliament. But first, Jack Horgan-Jones and Cliff Taylor on the significance a proposal to overhaul planning laws and potential opposition to the bill from within government. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/14/202245 minutes, 11 seconds
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Sipo documents reveal deep division over Varadkar leak case

Current affairs editor Arthur Beesley joins Hugh and Pat to talk about his report on what happened inside the Standards in Public Office Commission (Sipo) when its members considered whether to proceed with an investigation into the leaking of a document to a friend by Tanaiste Leo Varadkar. The five Sipo commissioners were split 3:2 in favour of not investigating, the first time in the commission's history a decision was not unanimous. The documents reveal the dissenting views of the two members, who voted to proceed with a preliminary investigation of Varadkar's behaviour in the matter and who expressed dissatisfaction with his rationalisation of events. That the two votes were those of Comptroller and Auditor General (C&AG) Seamus McCarthy and Ombudsman Ger Deering, two of the most senior independent watchdogs in the State, is an uncomfortable fact for soon-to-be Taoiseach Varadkar and Fine Gael. Plus: Pat talks about today's instalment in the North and South series on attitudes to Irish reunification. The latest poll shows that voters in both Northern Ireland and the Republic would want the model of a future united Ireland to be clear before they voted on the issue in any referendum - but the two jurisdictions differ in which model they prefer. North and South is a collaboration between The Irish Times and ARINS, which is a joint research project of the Royal Irish Academy and the Keough-Naughton Centre for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/10/202235 minutes, 54 seconds
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Poll findings lay down a challenge to advocates of unity

"Loser's consent" could be a critical concept in the event of a referendum on Irish reunification. Will the losing side accept the results? We got some idea of attitudes from new poll results published by The Irish Times this week as a part of our North and South series.Professor John Garry of Queens University Belfast and Northern Editor Freya McClements join Hugh and Pat to discuss the levels of willingness that exist on the island to compromise and accommodate the other side in the event of a united Ireland.Plus: How should we read the large number of "don't knows" in the poll on support for reunification? Could enough undecideds swing towards unity within the ten-year timeframe talked about by Sinn Féın?North and South is a collaboration between The Irish Times and ARINS, which is a joint research project of the Royal Irish Academy and the Keough-Naughton Centre for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame.John Garry is professor of political behaviour, and director of the Democracy Unit, at Queen’s University Belfast. He has published widely on public opinion, voting behaviour, and deliberation in Ireland, North and South. He wrote Consociation and Voting in Northern Ireland: Party Competition and Electoral Behaviour (University of Pennsylvania Press) and co-authored The Irish Voter (Manchester University Press). He is currently leading the Northern Ireland Assembly Election Study, 2022, funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/7/202248 minutes, 1 second
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North and South, Ireland is divided on the unity question

When should a referendum on Irish unity be held, and how would citizens north and south vote? The answer to those questions are the subject of the first instalment of a series on Irish reunification, North and South, published today in The Irish Times.Professor Brendan O'Leary and Irish Times features editor Mary Minihan join Hugh Linehan and Pat Leahy to discuss the findings of the poll.They also discuss what was learned from focus groups held north and south on the same issues, with factors including security, the economy and identity playing major roles in shaping attitudes.North and South is a collaboration between The Irish Times and ARINS, which is a joint research project of the Royal Irish Academy and the Keough-Naughton Centre for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame.Brendan O’Leary is Lauder professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, and honorary professor of political science at Queen’s University Belfast – and a member of its Democracy Unit. An honorary member of the Royal Irish Academy, his recent books include A Treatise on Northern Ireland (Oxford University Press) and Making Sense of a United Ireland (Penguin Ireland). He chairs the public opinion committee of ARINS, a joint initiative of the Royal Irish Academy and the University of Notre Dame. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/3/202243 minutes, 16 seconds
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December reshuffle: What to expect?

Next month Fianna Fáil's Micheal Martin will hand over the office of Taoiseach to Fine Gael's Leo Varadkar.The switch will necessitate a big reshuffle of cabinet positions. Or will it? Our political team has the latest Leinster House chat about how extensive the December reshuffle will be and which positions might be in the mix.Plus: Roderick O'Gorman struggles with migration challenges, a report from the Green Party convention and a decisive victory for Fine Gael in the battle to save Christmas. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/30/202242 minutes, 31 seconds
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Trial evidence embarrassment for Sinn Féin, housing discontent, Greens take stock

On the podcast today:How much of the East Wall refugee protest story is really an outworking of the housing shortage? With Russia's targeting of energy infrastructure in Ukraine likely to accelerate the flow of migrants, the shortage of space for refugees this winter looks increasingly like a major crisis.Evidence heard at the trial of Gerard Hutch for the murder of David Byrne has been embarrassing for Sinn Féin and party leader Mary Lou McDonald.As the Green Party hold their conference this week Harry assesses their place and performance in the government coalition so far. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/25/202227 minutes, 2 seconds
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East Wall protests: Government grapples with immigration and housing crises

Political correspondents Harry McGee and Jennifer Bray join Pat Leahy to discuss how the Government is grappling with some disquiet over immigration, as evidenced by protests against the arrival of refugees in the East Wall area of Dublin this week. Plus: Housing is never far from the agenda and this week a Private Members bill was introduced calling for the housing situation to be declared an emergency. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/23/202240 minutes, 59 seconds
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Bad days in Blackrock, Fine Gael prepare for Varadkar's return as Taoiseach, Florida man

Non-political stories have dominated the news agenda this week, but each has a political dimension. Cormac McQuinn and Pat Leahy join Hugh to discuss the week's events. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/18/202231 minutes, 49 seconds
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Can China's relationship with the West recover?

"After months of rising tensions between Washington and Beijing amid talk of economic decoupling and a new cold war, Joe Biden and Xi Jinping sought in Bali to turn down the heat" wrote Irish Times China Correspondent Denis Staunton about this week's G20 summit. Denis joins Hugh to talk about how the relationship between China and the West is evolving. But first Denis gives his early impressions of life in China, having taken up the role of China Correspondent this autumn. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/16/202238 minutes, 35 seconds
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How big tech traps consumers and shafts creators

The world’s most powerful media and technology companies use their market power to lock their customers into a relationship they can’t escape, while immiserating the creative people whose work the customers are paying for. Companies like Amazon, Google, Facebook, Spotify, Clear Channel, Live Nation and Ticketmaster have generated enormous revenues for their shareholders while slashing the incomes of writers, journalists and musicians.But it doesn’t have to be this way, say Cory Doctorow and Rebecca Giblin, who argue, as they explain in their new book, Chokepoint Capitalism, that it’s time to fight back against the power of big tech and big media. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/12/202245 minutes, 16 seconds
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Will tech woes remove Ireland's corporate tax cushion?

Jack Horgan-Jones and Pat Leahy join Hugh to look at the week's politics:A Supreme Court ruling creates a headache for GovernmentHow a stricken tech sector could change the political landscapeStill searching for that Brexit / Protocol "landing spot" Do US midterm results spell the end for Trumpism? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/11/202229 minutes, 23 seconds
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US midterms: Red wave fails to materialise

In the run up to the US midterm elections, polls and political spectators forecast a landslide for the Republicans, but as the results continue to pour in, a different picture is beginning to emerge. The red wave that was expected on the back of the cost of living crisis, failed to materialise, with the Democrats performing far better than anticipated. To go through the winners and losers so far and to discuss what the results will mean for the Biden administration, Hugh is joined by Washington Correspondent Martin Wall. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/9/202231 minutes, 41 seconds
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Will a new hate speech law impinge on free speech?

New legislation will give extra protection to members of groups affected by crimes motivated by hatred. But critics say the law will be an unacceptable infringement on freedom of speech. To dig into a thorny subject Hugh talks to speech rights expert Eoin O'Dell, a Fellow and Associate Professor at Trinity College Dublin's School of Law. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/2/202242 minutes, 52 seconds
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Support for Ukraine strong but accommodation worries grow - poll

The latest Irish Times/Ipsos opinion poll shows that despite a strong desire to support Ukraine, 61 per cent of voters are concerned that “too many refugees” are coming here. And more than half of voters also disagree that Ireland should continue to accept refugees from Ukraine “no matter how many arrive”. To discuss this and more of the findings from the poll, including an unexpected rebound in support for the government and a slightly more optimistic outlook for the country in terms of the cost of living crisis, Hugh is joined by Political Editor Pat Leahy.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/28/202222 minutes, 22 seconds
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What does Sunak's reshuffle mean for Ireland?

“Time to look at the big picture; what does it mean for me?”Pat Leahy and Harry McGee join Hugh Linehan on this week’s Inside Politics to discuss Rishi Sunak’s elevation to PM, his appointments to cabinet and what the changes might mean for relations with Ireland.This week saw another heated row between Sinn Fein’s Mary Lou McDonald and the Taoiseach in the Dáil; this time over the Ukrainian accommodation crisis.Plus, after McDonald’s husband, Martin Lanigan, threatened legal proceedings against Shane Ross over his new book, we ask how far should the scrutiny of politicians’ assets extend? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/26/202237 minutes, 39 seconds
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Liz Truss and the party leadership problem

The debacle of Liz Truss's short premiership has cast the entire UK political system into crisis. Not least the system used by the Tory party leadership to select its leader, which is now being accelerated to wrap up within a week. Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray join Hugh to talk about an extraordinary week and what comes next. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/21/202231 minutes, 35 seconds
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Fintan O'Toole on 'Up the 'Ra' and turmoil in Westminster

Many Irish Times readers were talking this week about Fintan O'Toole's column on the subject of the IRA and the appropriateness of chanting "Up the 'Ra'.Hugh talks to Fintan about his column, the debate around the chant and how the history of the Troubles is understood today.Plus, a look at what's happening in Westminster following an extremely turbulent week for prime minister Liz Truss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/19/202246 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ross interview saga, recession risk, crumbling block levy

"A grim agenda" of recession, UK bond crisis and global energy crisis awaits later in today's podcast, so first the team enjoy a relatively light topic: The mini-controversy over Shane Ross's axing from RTÉ radio. The former minister had been due on air to discuss his new biography of Sinn Féin leader Mary Lou McDonald. Censorship, or run-of-the-mill editorial decision?Plus: Is a u-turn on the controversial concrete block levy imminent? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/12/202242 minutes, 1 second
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Macron's talking shop, Brexit machinations

The European Political Community, a new forum for European leaders including wannabe EU members and Brexit Britain, met for the first time yesterday at a summit in Prague. The brainchild of French president Emmanuel Macron, the EPC seems to be going well so far, says political editor Pat Leahy - but what is it actually doing? Plus, how far is the UK really willing to go to secure agreement with the EU on the Northern Ireland protocol? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/7/202220 minutes, 28 seconds
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Paying for mica, generations divided, autumn reshuffle

Gerard Howlin, Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray join Hugh to talk about this week's politics:Who is satisfied or dissatisfied with last week's budget Irish politics and the generational divideThe complications that will come with the imminent swapping of jobs between coalition partnersSteve Baker's unexpected apology Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/5/202250 minutes, 11 seconds
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Concrete plans, UK turmoil

Follow-up analysis of Budget 2023 including childcare measures and the concrete levy, plus a look at the difficult political choices facing UK prime minister Liz Truss after a week of turmoil on the markets. Pat Leahy talks to Jack Horgan-Jones and Cormac McQuinn. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/30/202225 minutes, 52 seconds
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Making sense of Budget 2023

Now that the dust is beginning to settle on Budget 2023, it’s time to pick it all apart. With €11 billion to dish out, it was by all means “a budget day bonanza”, but will it go far enough? Will it work economically or politically and is there more to come? To discuss this and more, this week’s host Pat Leahy is joined by director of TASC Shana Cohen, economics columnist Cliff Taylor and political reporter Jack Horgan-Jones. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/28/202236 minutes, 45 seconds
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Budget previews, census shocks, pension policies

For a quick catchup on the political news of the week, Harry McGee and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan. Topics include: Sinn Féin holds a pre-budget press conferenceCensus in Northern Ireland shows Catholics outnumber Protestants for the first timeGovernment announced its plan for pensions Our panel's favourite reads from the week Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/23/202222 minutes, 51 seconds
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Understanding far-right gains in Italy and Sweden

Europe correspondent Naomi O'Leary talks to Hugh about forthcoming elections in Italy that look likely to return a government led by the far-right. What will that mean for the rest of Europe? They also discuss the recent victory of the far-right Sweden Democrats and the EU's ongoing dispute with Hungarian PM Viktor Orban. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/21/202239 minutes, 52 seconds
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How our Taoisigh saw the arts - and how the arts saw them

In a new book Kevin Rafter explores how art and artists have been treated by our taoisigh, from W.T. Cosgrave to Micheál Martin, and how those men have been portrayed by artists in turn. The book is a history of the relationships between well-known artists and the taoisigh of their day, such as that between Brendan Behan and Sean Lemass.Kevin Rafter is a professor of political communications at DCU and currently serves as chair of the Arts Council. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/16/202252 minutes, 53 seconds
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Party think-ins and Dáil debates signal start of political season

Party think-ins have been happening, a cost of living crisis is raging and the Dáil is back today - so there is lots to discuss. Harry McGee and Pat Leahy join Hugh to talk about Sinn Féin's positioning, the cost of living package being prepared by the government, failing to meet climate commitments and the opportunity for Liz Truss to take control presented by the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/14/202240 minutes, 55 seconds
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What can we expect from the new Prime Minister?

London editor Denis Staunton and political editor Pat Leahy join Hugh to discuss the dawning UK premiership of Liz Truss. How will she govern, and what approach is will she take on the Northern Ireland protocol? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/7/202246 minutes, 18 seconds
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Making sense of a united Ireland - with Brendan O'Leary

Professor Brendan O'Leary returns to the show to talk about his new book Making Sense of a United Ireland, in which he explores the issues around a possible future reunification in an accessible way. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/3/202257 minutes, 38 seconds
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Energy crisis: what can the government do to soften the blow this winter?

This winter, thousands of Irish households will be pushed into energy poverty, as the price of oil and gas continues to skyrocket. So, what options do politicians have to protect consumers and what trade-offs will have to be made along the way?On today’s Inside Politics Podcast, Cormac McQuinn and Jack Horgan-Jones join Hugh Linehan to discuss how the government will mitigate the energy crisis over the coming months. They also tackle the other political stories making waves this week including the public sector pay talks, a new report by the State’s commission on tax and welfare which recommends an increase on wealth, property and inheritance taxes, plus Dara Calleary’s new gig. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/31/202245 minutes, 56 seconds
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Troy affair raises questions about standards, transparency and conflicts

On Wednesday Fianna Fáil TD Robert Troy stepped down from his role as Minister of State after weeks of controversy over his failure to properly declare business interests, including rental properties and company directorships. To discuss the affair and what's been learned from it, Hugh is joined by Fintan O'Toole, Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/26/202229 minutes, 9 seconds
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Is political identity replacing religion in people's lives?

Religious belief has declined in Europe, but the strength of people's political views is stronger than ever - or at least, it often seems so online.Has political identity replaced religion in people's lives? British journalist and Atlantic magazine staff writer Helen Lewis explores this question in The Church of Social Justice, a new radio documentary for the BBC.She talks to Hugh about where political identity and religion overlap, the value and limitations of each, and the influence of American culture wars on discourse this side of the Atlantic.You can listen to The Church of Social Justice by Helen Lewis here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/24/202238 minutes, 1 second
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Robert Troy, budget rumours and refugee resources

Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray emerge from the misty miasma of August political coverage to tell Hugh what's going on in a number of stories: controversies over Fianna Fáil TD and Minister of State Robert Troy's declaration of property interests, problems at An Bord Pleanála, early speculation about potential budget measures and coping with the growing number of Ukrainian refugees in need of accommodation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/17/202246 minutes, 12 seconds
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The origin of America's opioid epidemic - with Patrick Radden Keefe (originally posted 2021)

Patrick Radden Keefe is an American writer and investigative journalist. His book Empire of Pain is a detailed history of the Sackler dynasty and their role in the American opioid epidemic. Known for their dedication to cultural philanthropy, the family built their wealth on pharmaceuticals, starting with tranquillisers like Librium and Valium, before eventually moving on to the highly addictive painkiller OxyContin. In this episode, the award-winning author talks to Hugh about the origins of the addiction crisis, the Purdue Pharma bankruptcy trial and the mark the family left on the world.First published in August 2021. Inside Politics will return with a new episode next week. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/10/202250 minutes, 34 seconds
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Is a united Ireland inevitable?

"It is not a question of whether, but when and how Ireland will be united", is the provocative opening argument made by author and journalist Frank Connolly in his recent book United Nation: The Case for Integrating Ireland. But he concedes it won't be easy.The book explores the steps that would be necessary in advance of a border poll and the changes that unity would bring, North and South. He talked to Hugh Linehan about his book recently. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/3/202242 minutes, 42 seconds
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Climate politics is here to stay

Jack Horgan Jones, Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy join Hugh Linehan, back after a two-month absence, to talk about the week's politics including tension within the the Government coalition over climate measures. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/27/202244 minutes, 33 seconds
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Is Ireland’s immigration and asylum regime close to crisis?

The Government this week moved swiftly to tighten Ireland's immigration and asylum regime, when it revoked automatic permission to enter Ireland for people granted asylum in other European countries. It comes as the system struggles to deal with the number of refugees arriving each week from Ukraine.Will it make a difference to a system that is in danger of toppling over? And, is it a sign of a greater shake up of Ireland’s immigration policy to come?Also in this episode of The Irish Times Inside Politics podcast, Pat Leahy is joined by Harry McGee and Jack Horgan-Jones to discuss the political challenges facing the coalition as the Greens seek to secure the agreement of Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael for deep cuts to greenhouse gas emissions in the agriculture sector. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/20/202244 minutes, 14 seconds
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Poll: Electorate sends mixed messages on refugees and abortion

Pat Leahy talks to guest host Mary Minihan about the results of this week's series of Ipsos opinion poll results. Read about the poll here: https://www.irishtimes.com/politics/poll/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/16/202227 minutes, 14 seconds
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Confidence debate a damp squib for Sinn Féin

Jennifer Bray and Cormac McQuinn join Pat Leahy to discuss the confidence debate and vote that the Government handily won yesterday. Plus, a look ahead to the autumn and beyond when Leo Vaaradkar's return to the Taoiseach's office will coincide with a winter of discontent over the cost of living. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/13/202235 minutes, 8 seconds
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US politics: Will the Roe v Wade ruling matter at the ballot box?

Crucial midterm elections for the US Congress will take place in the autumn, with the Democratic Party predicted to lose one or both houses to a resurgent Republican Party. But the recent overturning of the Roe v Wade case by the US Supreme Court, ending the constitutional right to abortion, has angered Democratic pro-choice activists and spurred them into action. Can that translate into a reversal of fortunes for Democrats at the ballot box? Washington correspondent Martin Wall reports. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/11/202218 minutes, 37 seconds
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Replacing Boris Johnson

With Boris Johnson on his way, however slowly, out the door, the Conservatives face a challenge to find a leader who can unite the party and retain its electoral support. Who will it be? And how will that person handle the issue of most importance to Ireland: The Northern Ireland Protocol? Host Pat Leahy and London editor Denis Staunton are joined today by Patrick Maguire, a political journalist with The Times. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/8/202227 minutes, 3 seconds
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How will the Tories remove their unwanted leader?

It seems to be a question of when, not if, for UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, whose mishandling of sexual misconduct allegations against an MP has turned his party against him. But how can the party get rid of the stubborn PM? Denis Staunton reports. But first: To talk about this week's summer economic statement and the choices that Ministers Donohoe and McGrath must make to alleviate the pain of the cost of living crisis, Pat Leahy is joined by Labour Senator Marie Sherlock and political correspondent Cormac McQuinn. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/6/202235 minutes, 45 seconds
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Do Fine Gael get it? Una Mullally debates Neale Richmond

Fine Gael under leader Leo Varadkar are hopelessly out of touch with young voters, says Irish Times columnist Una Mullally. Her criticisms are unfounded and unnecessarily personal, says Fine Gael TD for Dublin Rathdown Neale Richmond. They talk to Pat Leahy about whether Fine Gael get it and what "it" is. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/29/202240 minutes, 17 seconds
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Will the government take any pre-budget action?

Jennifer Bray, Jack Horgan-Jones and Irish Times Economics Correspondent Eoin Burke-Kennedy join Pat Leahy to discuss the long wait until October's budget and the mounting pressure on political leaders to ease the cost of living for Irish households. The group also discuss the proposed pay rises for top earning public servants, which is expected to provoke a strong backlash from Opposition politicians and the public. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/22/202240 minutes, 35 seconds
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Brexit wars reignite / Will the cost of living keep rising?

The rising cost of living is the most immediate issue facing governments all over the world. The Central Statistics Office reports Inflation at a 40-year high, but is the worst yet to come? UCC Economist Seamus Coffey and Irish Times Political Correspondent Jennifer Bray join Pat Leahy to discuss what to expect economically and politically over the coming months. But first, Pat is joined by London Editor Denis Staunton and David O’Sullivan, Director General of the International Institute of International and European affairs to talk about the Northern Ireland Protocol bill which was introduced by the UK government earlier this week. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/15/202244 minutes, 3 seconds
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Crèche pressure, GUBU, Johnson survives

Jack Horgan-Jones is one of many parents paying through the nose for childcare. The Government wants to take some of the financial pain out of early years education and care - will its plan work? Harry McGee plugs his new podcast GUBU, a seven-part thriller about a series of grisly murders in the 1980s and how they impacted the government of Charles Haughey. And Denis Staunton has the latest from London where PM Boris Johnson lives to fight another day after winning a confidence vote. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/8/202241 minutes, 39 seconds
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Europe grapples with Ukraine, food and energy crises

Not without difficulty, EU member states reached an agreement on new sanctions against Russia, this time banning most oil imports. Pat Leahy and Naomi O'Leary were at the summit. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/1/202240 minutes, 23 seconds
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Jon Ronson on the origins of the culture wars

Celebrated author and podcaster Jon Ronson talks to Hugh about his recent BBC podcast series Things Fell Apart which explores the origins of the culture wars through several unique stories. Jon Ronson will be bringing his live show about Things Fell Apart to Liberty Hall Theatre, on 10th June. You can buy tickets here.Jon will also be appearing at the Festival of Writing & Ideas, Borris House on the 11th & 12th of June. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/27/202236 minutes, 4 seconds
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Sinn Féin and the art of government

If Sinn Féin fulfils its ambition to be the first party other than Fine Gael or Fianna Fáil to form a government in the Republic, what challenges will it face to implement its ambitious agenda? That question is the subject of this week’s opinion piece by former political advisor Gerard Howlin. He joins Jennifer Bray, Harry McGee and Cormac McQuinn on today’s Inside Politics podcast. Plus: a new study shows trust in politics here is at an all-time low. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/25/202241 minutes, 10 seconds
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Green light for the National Maternity Hospital / Ripping up the Protocol

Part one: Following two weeks of intense debate and discussion on the relocation of the National Maternity Hospital, the plan has finally been approved by Cabinet. But at what political cost? Pat and Jen join Hugh to discuss.In part two, London Editor Denis Staunton and Northern Editor Freya McClements assess the Stormont stalemate and the latest on the Protocol. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/18/202253 minutes, 48 seconds
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Pandemonium: Jack Horgan-Jones and Hugh O’Connell

Pandemonium: Power, Politics and Ireland’s Pandemic, is the new book by Irish Times political reporter Jack Horgan-Jones and Hugh O’Connell, political correspondent for the Irish Independent. It examines the government handling of the coronavirus pandemic, revealing the moves, power-plays and tactics of those in charge. The co-authors join Pat Leahy, to discuss the extensive work and research that went into the book, the pivotal moments along the way and what lessons can be learned by the state’s response. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/11/202249 minutes, 55 seconds
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Stormont election special: Seismic or not, a significant result for Northern Ireland

Freya McClements, Mary Minihan and Pat Leahy join Hugh to analyse the results of last week's Northern Ireland Assembly elections. The major talking point is Sinn Féin taking the largest number of seats for the first time, while the Alliance Party's unprecedented success signals the importance of the middle ground in Northern Ireland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/9/202248 minutes, 40 seconds
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Voters go to the polls in Britain and Northern Ireland

Tomorrow Northern Ireland goes to the polls, in what’s been dubbed the most important vote in a generation. For the first time in more than a century, there is the prospect of a nationalist being elected to the top job in government. What could that mean for power sharing? In the rest of the United Kingdom, local elections are taking place. Will disgruntled Tory backbenchers use the results as an excuse to get rid of Boris Johnson? Hugh talks to our London Editor Denis Staunton and Mick Fealty, editor of the Slugger O’Toole political news and opinion website. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/4/202241 minutes, 18 seconds
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Turf wars, TD numbers and a row over surrogacy

Pat and Jen join Hugh to talk about all the political stories of the past week including tension within the coalition over a proposed ban on the sale of turf, the prospect of an increased number of TDs due to a growing population and what that will mean for politics, and an argument in the Seanad over remarks by one Senator during a debate on surrogacy legislation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/27/202244 minutes, 39 seconds
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Two very different elections, two defining moments

Next weekend, French voters decide whether Emmanuel Macron should remain president or Marine Le Pen should replace him. The latter result would transform France and Europe. Next month, Northern Irish voters elect their MLAs in a vote that could see a Sinn Féin First Minister appointed for the first time. Freya McClements and Lara Marlowe report on these two consequential campaigns. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/20/202243 minutes, 29 seconds
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Poll exclusive: majority favour keeping neutrality

There is overwhelming support for a retention of Ireland’s current model of military neutrality, according to the latest Irish Times/Ipsos poll. Two- thirds of voters do not want to see any change in neutrality, with less than a quarter (24 per cent) saying they wanted to see a change. Pat Leahy explains the poll results in detail. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/15/202220 minutes, 47 seconds
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Watt in the spotlight / State of the parties

Part one: The political controversy over the appointment of Dr Tony Holohan to a position in Trinity College has raised some awkward questions for Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly and his departmental Secretary General extraordinaire Robert Watt. Part two: The Dáil is in recess this week - time to run the rule over the performance of the various political parties and the challenges that lie before them in the rest of 2022. Guests: Harry McGee and Cormac McQuinn Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/13/202245 minutes, 35 seconds
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What is neoliberalism - and is it over?

Neoliberalism means different things to different people. As a set of economic policies it is mainly associated with reducing state intervention in commerce and society. In the course of its late 20th century heyday, neoliberalism transformed the world - for better or worse. But now its dominance is challenged by different models, such as the authoritarian capitalism of China. In his new book The Rise and Fall of the Neoliberal Order, Gary Gerstle looks at how neoliberalism took hold, how it shaped society in the United States and beyond, and what its decline means. Gary Gerstle is Paul Mellon Professor of American History Emeritus and Paul Mellon Director of Research at the University of Cambridge. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/8/202253 minutes, 25 seconds
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Zelenskiy’s historic address to Oireachtas, carbon tax increase, Seanad by-election

Hugh is joined by Jennifer Bray, Cormac McQuinn and Harry McGee to discuss the big political stories of the week, including Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy’s historic address to a joint sitting of the Oireachtas earlier this morning, the debate surrounding the impending carbon tax increase and the result of the recent Seanad by-election. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/6/202239 minutes, 49 seconds
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Ivana Bacik on Labour’s past, present and future

Ivana Bacik’s uncontested election as Labour Party leader came after the swift removal of Alan Kelly from the role and her own relatively recent appointment as a TD in the Dublin Bay South by-election. She talks to Hugh and Pat about her recent elevation, her vision for the future of the Labour Party and the challenges it faces in re-establishing itself as a medium-sized force in national politics. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/30/202248 minutes, 4 seconds
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A disappointing Patrick’s Day for the Taoiseach, Covid’s resurgence, inflation bites

Hugh catches up with Pat Leahy, fresh from his trip to Washington for Micheál Martin’s ill-fated St Patrick’s Day visit. They’re also joined by Jennifer Bray to discuss the future of the coalition and the big political challenges it faces, including the resurgence of Covid, the war in Ukraine and inflation.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/23/202240 minutes, 6 seconds
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Lionel Barber on Putin and how the West should deal with him

As Russia’s brutal assault on Ukraine enters its fourth week, with little sign of an outcome, the question of what an endgame of this war might look like is increasingly the subject of international debate. Former editor of the Financial Times, Lionel Barber, is one of the few Western journalists to have conducted an in-depth interview with Vladimir Putin. He talks to Hugh about Putin’s motivations, how this war could end and what the geopolitical consequences of it may be.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/16/202237 minutes, 24 seconds
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Helen Thompson, author of Disorder: Hard Times in the 21st Century

In her new book Disorder: Hard Times in the 21st Century, Helen Thompson, a professor of political economy at Cambridge University, gets to grips with the overlapping geopolitical, economic, and political crises faced by Western democratic societies in the 2020s. She talks to Hugh about some of these moments and the disorder that emerged from them. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/11/202258 minutes, 32 seconds
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Pearse Doherty on Sinn Féin’s policies, a united Ireland and issues of security and neutrality

Sinn Féin finance spokesperson Pearse Doherty joins Hugh and Pat to discuss what his party's priorities and policies would be, if they were to lead the next government. They also discuss Ireland’s neutrality and security into the future, in light of the war in Ukraine, and whether cuts to excise duties on fuel, announced by the Government today, go far enough. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/9/202257 minutes, 5 seconds
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Europe's turning point

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has brought about enormous changes in European policy in an incredibly short space of time. To discuss how it happened, what it means and what happens next, Hugh is joined by Europe correspondent Naomi O'Leary and Berlin correspondent Derek Scally. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/2/202241 minutes, 12 seconds
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"Putin can never show any weakness" - Bill Browder on war, sanctions and the outlook for Ukraine

Businessman-turned-campaigner Bill Browder returns to the podcast to talk to Hugh about Russian president Vladimir Putin's actions and motivations, the impact of sanctions and other measures on him and his inner circle as well as the outlook for Ukraine as it fights back against invasion.Browder has spearheaded a campaign against Putin and other Russian officials whom he blames for the death in 2009 of his lawyer Sergei Magnitsky in a Moscow prison. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/28/202228 minutes, 7 seconds
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NCWI spat raises interesting questions, Citizens' Assemblies, Sinn Féin's carbon stance

Professor Jane Suiter and political correspondent Harry McGee join Hugh to talk about the week's political stories. The National Women's Council of Ireland annoyed some government politicians by failing to invite them to an International Women's Day event. The row raised interesting questions about the role of civic bodies like the NCWI and their relationship with politics. Citizens' Assemblies were designed to help the political system digest divisive societal issues. But are they working as well as they could? Sinn Féin's opposition to carbon taxes sets it apart among the big parties. What's their alternative? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/23/202255 minutes, 35 seconds
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Lea Ypi, author of Free: Coming of Age at the End of History

Academic and author Lea Ypi talks to Hugh about her unique and insightful memoir Free, in which she recalls her youth in Albania under communism, the regime's economic and political downfall and the disappointment of what came after.Lea Ypi is professor of political theory at the London School of Economics. Free is published by Penguin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/18/202247 minutes, 13 seconds
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Covid restrictions, gender-based violence & do we need the Defence Forces?

Jennifer Bray and Pat Leahy join Hugh to talk about how a relaxation of the remaining Covid restrictions might play out, the merits of Ireland’s Defence Forces and the new statutory agency for domestic and gender-based violence. They also discuss Helen McEntee’s ministerial performance and how government policy is preventing local authorities from limiting Buy To Rent.www.irishtimes.com/podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/16/202243 minutes, 59 seconds
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The lessons of the pandemic - with Fintan O'Toole and Jack Horgan-Jones

The pandemic is not over but the emergency phase of the State's response to it is. So, how did we do? What lessons can be learned from the state's response and what's the best way to find out what those lessons are? To discuss Hugh is joined by Irish Times columnist Fintan O'Toole and by political reporter Jack Horgan-Jones, who is the co-author with Hugh O'Connell of a new book, Pandemonium, about the pandemic in Ireland and the State's response. Pandemonium will be available in April and you can preorder it now at the link below. https://www.bookstation.ie/product/pandemonium/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/9/202248 minutes, 18 seconds
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Fiona Hill on Russia, America and ending up in Trump's White House

Fiona Hill is a former White House official who advised presidents Bush, Obama and Trump on European and Russian affairs, and who is perhaps best known for her testimony in President Trump's impeachment hearings. Now she has written a book, There Is Nothing For You Here, about her life, her path to the White House and the declining politics of the US, Britain and Russia. She talks to Hugh Linehan about the book and the current tensions in Eastern Europe. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/4/202249 minutes, 46 seconds
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Politics after the pandemic

The Government is still under pressure over the so-called “champagne party” in the Department of Foreign Affairs on the night Ireland was elected to the UN Security Council two years ago, but will the incident have any lasting political impact? One issue that is certain to trouble the coalition in the coming months is inflation, as more of us begin to feel the effects of an increase in the cost of living. So, when Covid begins to fade from the headlines, what else will creep up the political agenda? Hugh talks to Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Harry McGee of The Irish Times political team. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/2/202244 minutes, 45 seconds
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Understanding what's happening in Ukraine - with Tom Wright

To understand the strategy and politics behind Russian president Vladimir Putin's buildup of military might on Ukraine's border and how Ukraine, the United States, Europe and Nato are responding, Hugh talks to foreign policy expert Tom Wright. Tom Wright is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute, a Washington-based foreign policy think tank, and the director of its Centre on the United States and Europe. He’s the author of two books: Aftershocks: Pandemic Politics and the End of the Old International Order (with co-author Colin Kahl) and All Measures Short of War: The Contest For the 21st Century and the Future of American Power. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/26/202240 minutes, 51 seconds
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Is Boris Johnson on the brink?

Pressure continues to build on UK prime minister Boris Johnson. Denis Staunton has the latest from London. But first Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray talk about Minister for Justice Helen McEntee's plan to tackle gender-based violence and the growing optimism that Covid-19 rules can be relaxed and ultimately dismantled. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/19/202241 minutes, 32 seconds
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Covid calm despite case avalanche, Sipo's intervention, State papers

Jennifer Bray and Harry McGee join Hugh to talk about the latest Covid-19 moves being considered by Government, an eye-catching ruling by the Standards in Public Office Commission and what we learned from the State papers released over Christmas. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/12/202234 minutes, 52 seconds
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2022 political preview: Taoiseach rotation, virus mutation and cost inflation

Pat is joined by Kevin Cunnimgham and Ed Brophy to talk about the major trends that could shape politics in 2022. Will the pandemic continue to dominate everything? How will the return of Leo Varadkar to the office of Taoiseach work in practice? If the cost of living continues its rise as a major issue of concern for voters, who will benefit politically?Dr Kevin Cunningham is a lecturer in Politics and Chair of the MA in Journalism course at TU Dublin.Ed Brophy is former chief advisor to Fine Gael minister for finance Paschal Donohoe and former chief of staff to Labour tánaiste Joan Burton. He is also senior associate with climate change think tank E3G. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/5/202246 minutes, 35 seconds
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Ask us anything 2021 - listener questions answered

Once again you asked and once again we will answer. Jen, Pat and Jack join Hugh to respond to listener queries on everything from the possibility of a far-right swing in one major political party's future to the role of expert advisors in the age of Covid-19 and the festive magic of Seanad reform.Thanks to everyone who sent in questions and apologies to those whose question we didn't get to this time.From everyone on the Inside Politics team, thanks for listening in 2021. We wish you a happy and safe 2022. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/29/202142 minutes, 33 seconds
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David Frost's departure, Omicron uncertainties

The resignation of Lord David Frost has introduced a new uncertainty to slowly-progressing talks on the Northern Ireland protocol. EU negotiators would be foolish to think Frost's departure is necessarily a good thing, says London editor Denis Staunton. But first, public affairs editor Simon Carswell on the uncertain situation faced by the country as we head into Christmas with the Omicron variant spreading. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/22/202143 minutes, 3 seconds
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Johnson loses the room, protocol moves, unionists and unity

A rebellion by Tory MPs against Boris Johnson's "Plan B" to suppress the Omicron variant left the PM in the embarrassing position of needing Labour support. Is Johnson on borrowed time? On the Brexit front, the UK government rowed back on its demand for European court supremacy over the Northern Ireland protocol, the Brexit agreement covering trade in Northern Ireland. Is the way now paved for a deal in the new year?In Northern Ireland, DUP leader Jeffrey Donaldson is "a mouse dodging under the feet of two elephants" when it comes to the protocol negotiations. Where will a deal leave the DUP with some of its more anti-protocol supporters? Plus: recent polls have added some interesting data points to the ongoing debate about the Irish reunification. The fiery politics of recent years may have hardened positions on all three - yes, three - sides. Today's guests are Denis Staunton and Newton Emerson. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/15/202143 minutes, 13 seconds
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Poll special: How much do we want a United Ireland?

According to our latest Ipsos MRBI poll, there's a desire for a United Ireland. But when we asked what changes to their lives people would be willing to accept to get it, the picture became more complicated. Political editor Pat Leahy shares the poll results with Hugh. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/11/202122 minutes, 6 seconds
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Fresh restrictions breed frustration

We assess the political fallout from the decisions taken over the past few weeks to introduce new Covid-19 restrictions covering international travel, masking children in primary school and the hospitality sector. Are more measures on the way before Christmas? Could school closures be back on the menu after Christmas? Hugh is joined by Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray from the politics team and Irish Times feature writer and columnist Jennifer O’Connell. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/8/202142 minutes, 16 seconds
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The life and legacy of Charles J. Haughey - with professor Gary Murphy

Depending on who you ask, Charles J. Haughey is either the great villain of Irish political life or the benevolent and forward-thinking saviour of a benighted nation. Professor of politics at Dublin City University, Gary Murphy, has written a biography of the former Taoiseach based on Haughey’s personal archives, as well as extensive interviews with his peers, rivals, confidantes and relatives. He talks to Hugh about writing about the man whose presence still looms large over Irish politics today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/1/20211 hour, 23 minutes, 48 seconds
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What has Brexit done to Irish-British relations?

Years of being on the opposite side of difficult Brexit negotiations have unarguably damaged Irish-British relations. But how bad is the damage? To find out, this week's host Pat Leahy talks to former Irish ambassador to the UK Bobby McDonagh and our London editor Denis Staunton. They also discuss the latest developments in the standoff over the Northern Ireland protocol. But first it's Covid-19 and the rising tide of the fourth wave that is scaring governments across Europe. Pat gets the latest from Derek Scally in Berlin, where a newly-formed coalition must grapple with Germany's worst stage of the pandemic so far, and Jack Horgan-Jones in Dublin, where we're not ready to talk about new restrictions just yet. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/24/202147 minutes, 10 seconds
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"No clear idea what to do next"

Once again, too many people are getting sick, and there aren't enough hospital beds. The Government is struggling to come up with a convincing plan to turn the Covid-19 situation around. Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray tell Hugh what the thinking is about how to tackle the crisis and how the latest reimposition of restrictions on nightlife and extension of the use of vaccine certs came about. Plus: the Mother and baby homes redress scheme is facing sharp criticism from activists and survivors. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/17/202145 minutes, 30 seconds
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The UK pulls back from triggering Article 16 - for now

For days now politicians in Ireland and the EU have been expecting UK Brexit negotiator David Frost to trigger Article 16, pausing the Northern Ireland protocol and creating a fresh crisis for EU-UK relations. But today Lord Frost made more diplomatic noises, saying negotiations had made some progress and still have longer to run. But if the threat was real, why the sudden reversal? Denis Staunton gives his analysis of UK government behaviour, and Pat Leahy explains how its being viewed here and in Brussels. Plus, the latest from Cop26 in Glasgow and Boris Johnson's sleaze crisis. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/10/202139 minutes, 23 seconds
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Sinn Fein: a party preparing for government

At Sinn Féin’s ardfheis in Dublin last weekend, a motion in support of the non-jury Special Criminal Court was passed, representing a considerable shift in position and removing a significant hurdle to the party’s ambitions to lead the next government. Banners declaring it’s “time for change” adorned the walls of the Helix in Dublin City University, as party leader Mary Lou McDonald made clear her wishes to become the next Taoiseach. Hugh talks to Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray about how those ambitions might be realised.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/3/202140 minutes, 52 seconds
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Covid, rising energy prices and internal strife spell a difficult winter for the EU - with Naomi O'Leary

Europe correspondent Naomi O'Leary talks to Hugh about the rising Covid numbers in many EU member states, the rising energy prices that are dominating the news and the row between Brussels and Poland over the rule of law. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/27/202142 minutes, 28 seconds
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Inside ten years as a government advisor - with Ed Brophy

Ed Brophy is a former chief of staff to finance minister Paschal Donohoe and to Labour’s Joan Burton when she was Tánaiste. Recently he stepped away from politics after ten years in the corridors of power. He talks to Hugh and Pat about the crises Ireland faced during his time as a government advisor, the challenges of governing under the watchful eyes of the Troika and what the future holds for Ireland’s economy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/20/202151 minutes, 9 seconds
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Noam Chomsky: ‘Ireland has robbed poor working people of tens of trillions of dollars’

Author and academic Noam Chomksy talks to Hugh about the US withdrawal from Afghanistan, the morality of Ireland’s tax regime and whether the human race can avoid the twin catastrophes of global warming and nuclear war.With thanks to the Institute of International and European Affairs for facilitating this interview. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/15/202139 minutes, 51 seconds
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Budget 2022: Understanding how key decisions were made

Pat Leahy talks to Seamus Coffey, Jack Horgan-Jones and Cliff Taylor about yesterday's budget and how the last-minute news that our economy has recovered more than expected played into spending decisions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/13/202141 minutes, 16 seconds
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National Development Plan: to-do list, or wish list?

The Government’s 10-year National Development Plan announced this week has been greeted with scepticism in some quarters and criticised by the opposition as more of a wish-list than a to-do list. The ambitious plan sets out to meet the needs of a growing population up to 2030. Can its goals be achieved? Hugh talks to The Irish Times political editor Pat Leahy and Dr Brian Caulfield of Trinity College Dublin’s Centre for Transport Research. Presenter: Hugh Linehanwww.irishtimes.com/podcasts  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/6/202136 minutes, 15 seconds
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Pre-budget discussions, Mica redress and a divisive pandemic bonus

Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones from the Irish Times politics team join Hugh to discuss the major considerations for the government ahead of Budget day on October 12th. They also look at the divisive politics of the public service pandemic bonus and the latest on the Mica redress scheme. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/29/202147 minutes, 39 seconds
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Germany election special: who will replace Angela Merkel?

Berlin correspondent Derek Scally joins Hugh for a deep dive into the most interesting German federal election in decades, which takes place on Sunday. How did Angela Merkel's centre-right CDU, now under the leadership of Armin Laschet, blow its lead in the election race? And who are the other leaders and parties in contention? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/22/202139 minutes, 3 seconds
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Talking about think-ins

After a turbulent summer break for the coalition, the country’s political parties hunkered down for their respective think-in meetings over the last two weeks, before the return of the Dáil. Pat Leahy and Jack Horgan-Jones of The Irish Times political team report back to Hugh on the dominant narratives to emerge from the Fine Gael, Fianna Fáil and Sinn Féin gatherings. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/15/202137 minutes, 41 seconds
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The legacy of ‘Celtic Tiger’ housing - with Eoin Ó Broin

Sinn Féin housing spokesperson Eoin Ó Broin’s latest book, Defects: Living with the legacy of the Celtic Tiger, tells the stories of some of the thousands of people living in dangerous homes with serious fire safety and structural defects in different parts of Ireland. The book also explains how decades of light touch building regulation and the decisions of successive governments allowed this crisis to happen. Ó Broin talks to Hugh and Jack Horgan-Jones about the book in today’s episode.Plus: Jack has the latest in the ongoing saga of the UN envoy appointment of Katherine Zappone and Simon Coveney’s appearance before an Oireachtas committee on the issue on Tuesday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/8/202152 minutes, 58 seconds
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A new Dáil term's afoot

Hugh is joined by Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Cormac McQuinn from the Irish Times politics team to discuss the Government's roadmap for the easing of pandemic restrictions, as revealed by Taoiseach Micheál Martin yesterday. They also look ahead to Minister Daragh O'Brien's much vaunted 'Housing for All' plan, the hurdles the Government is likely to face with October's budget and the welcome return of Leinster House. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/1/202135 minutes, 30 seconds
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Empire of Pain - with Patrick Radden Keefe

Patrick Radden Keefe is an American writer and investigative journalist. His new book, Empire of Pain is a detailed history of the Sackler dynasty and their role in the American opioid epidemic. Known for their dedication to cultural philanthropy, the family built their wealth on pharmaceuticals, starting with tranquillisers like Librium and Valium, before eventually moving on to the highly addictive painkiller OxyContin. In this episode, the award winning author talks to Hugh about the origins of the addiction crisis, the Purdue Pharma bankruptcy trial and the mark the family left on the world. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/25/202149 minutes, 50 seconds
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The Powerful and the Damned - with Lionel Barber

As one of the world's most respected newspaper editors, Lionel Barber spent over a decade at the helm of The Financial Times. His tenure coincided with some of the biggest events to shape the early part of the 21st century including the rise of China, Brexit, the tech boom and the crisis of western liberal democracy. Barber has documented his time in charge of the FT in his book, The Powerful and the Damned. In this episode, he talks to Hugh about the book, about how he transformed the FT for the digital era, the media's role in the financial crisis, why he got Brexit wrong and lots more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/18/202142 minutes, 1 second
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Aftermath of Zapponegate, a stark climate warning

Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray join Hugh to assess the damage done by the recent Zappone controversy. Now that the dust has settled, what will it mean for Coveney, Varadkar and the future of the government. The team also discuss the easing of Covid restrictions and the recent UN Climate Change report, which signals a ‘code red’ for humanity. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/11/202141 minutes, 58 seconds
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Washington Letter: Suzanne Lynch on her time in the US

Suzanne Lynch arrived in the US to take up her new role as Irish Times Washington correspondent ten days after Donald Trump's inauguration. As she prepares to leave the US capital this week for a new role in Brussels, she talks to Hugh about what it was like to report on the most extraordinary presidency in US history. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/4/202148 minutes, 15 seconds
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The next phase of the vaccine campaign / Dominic Cummings

This week, London Editor Denis Staunton engaged in a brief, yet courteous Twitter exchange with former Downing Street advisor Dominic Cummings. Here he tells Hugh the details behind their interaction and about Cummings’ latest musings on Brexit and the Northern Ireland protocol. But first, Hugh is joined by Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones to discuss the last Cabinet meeting of the Summer, the next stage of the vaccine rollout, Katherine Zappone’s new gig and the recent stirrings within the Social Democrats. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/28/202138 minutes, 1 second
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End of term AMA special / Des O'Malley

With the Dáil term drawn to a close, Pat, Harry and Jen join Hugh to answer our listener's questions about politics. But first, Pat recalls the influential political career of former minister and founder of the Progressive Democrats Des O'Malley, who has died aged 82. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/21/202146 minutes, 41 seconds
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How Ireland Voted 2020 - with Dr Theresa Reidy

The 2020 election marked the end of an era in Irish politics, with Sinn Féin winning the most votes for the first time ever and the previously dominant parties reduced to a fraction of their former strengths. In today’s episode Hugh is joined by Pat Leahy and UCC’s Dr Theresa Reidy to look back at the last general election and how it broke the mould. You can read the full story of the 2020 election in the 9th edition of the ‘How Ireland Voted’ series of books, edited by Theresa Reidy, Michael Gallagher and Michael Marsh, out now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/14/202148 minutes, 48 seconds
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Bacik gives Labour a much-needed good day out

Labour’s Ivana Bacik looked on course to top the poll in the Dublin Bay South byelection since tally figures on Friday morning put her on 30%. She went on to top the first count more than 1,000 votes ahead of Fine Gael’s James Geoghegan. Bacik’s win gives her party its first moment of electoral good news in a decade and leaves the government parties licking their wounds.Hugh gets the analysis from The Irish Times political team at the count centre: Pat Leahy, Cormac McQuinn and Harry McGee. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/9/202122 minutes, 10 seconds
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Delta: more tough decisions for Government

The Government is coming under increasing pressure from all angles, as it wrestles with the toughest decisions for months on how to manage the pandemic. The hospitality sector desperately wants indoor dining to resume on July 19th, but there is growing concern among public health advisers at the prospect of a surge in cases driven by the Delta variant. Meanwhile, all eyes are on England as Boris Johnson ploughs ahead with his country's reopening. Hugh is joined by Paul Cullen, Pat Leahy and Cormac McQuinn to discuss the difficult decisions facing the Government in the coming days. Plus: The final analysis of the runners and riders in the Dublin Bay South byelection, before polls open on Thursday morning. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/7/202139 minutes, 16 seconds
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What can be learned from byelections?

On Thursday July 8th, voters in Dublin Bay South will cast their votes in a byelection, triggered by the resignation of former Fine Gael TD Eoghan Murphy. What might the results tell us about the wider political picture here in Ireland and will this be an early indicator for the next general election? To take a look back through some pivotal byelections and their impact over the years, Harry McGee is joined by Gary Murphy, Professor of Politics at DCU and author of the forthcoming Charles Haughey biography. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/30/202138 minutes, 37 seconds
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Delta threat looms large, a new DUP leader at the helm

The DUP will have its third leader in the space of two months when Jeffrey Donaldson is officially appointed on Saturday. Can he lead the party out of crisis? Pat Leahy talks to editor of the Slugger O’Toole website, Mick Fealty, about the challenges he faces. But first, Pat is joined by Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones to discuss the threat posed to the July 5th reopening by the rise in Delta variant cases here and the latest in the ongoing saga over who owns, and who governs, the National Maternity Hospital. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/23/202147 minutes, 55 seconds
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Susan McKay on the lives of northern Protestants: "It's a full-blown crisis within Unionism"

21 years on from her book Northern Protestants: An Unsettled People, Susan McKay revisits the lives of that community in her new book Northern Protestants: On Shifting Ground. She talks to Hugh about the strong forces now acting on northern Protestants, Unionists and Loyalists. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/16/202146 minutes, 15 seconds
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Mother and Baby Homes: “The overall picture is not as it should be”

Five months on from the final report of the Mother and Baby Homes Commission of Investigation, controversy still surrounds the methodology used by the three inquiry members, the treatment of witness statements and the conclusions reached regarding the culpability of church and state. Members of the commission have not replied to calls to appear before an Oireachtas committee, despite the appearance of Prof Mary Daly at an online Oxford seminar last week. In today’s episode, Hugh is joined by Pat, Jen and archivist Catriona Crowe to talk about the shortcomings of the investigation and what needs to happen next. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/9/202146 minutes, 25 seconds
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Niall Ferguson: We’re obsessed with mass disaster, yet surprised when it happens

Historian Niall Ferguson’s new book 'Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe' offers a sweeping compendium of the many appalling catastrophes that have befallen mankind, and how we have dealt with their aftermath. He talks to Hugh about his book, Covid and the possibility of a war between China and the US. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/4/202155 minutes, 26 seconds
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The race for Dublin Bay South

With the Dublin Bay South byelection looking likely to take place in early July, Harry McGee and Jennifer Bray join Hugh for a deep-dive on the competitive constituency, as parties vie for the seat left vacant by the former housing minister Eoghan Murphy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/2/202147 minutes, 31 seconds
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Will Sinn Féin lead the next government?

Today the team take a look at what role Sinn Féin will play in forming the next government. Although there is a widespread assumption in political circles and elsewhere that Mary Lou McDonald’s party will take the majority, will their path to power be that straightforward? And if there is a Sinn Féin led government, what will it look like and how will they tackle issues on their change agenda? Joining Hugh to discuss this is Jen, Pat and Aidan Regan, Associate Professor of Political Economy at UCD. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/26/202147 minutes, 8 seconds
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Panic in government as politicians feel the heat over housing

Jennifer Bray, Pat Leahy and Kevin Cunningham join Hugh to talk about how the government is struggling to come up with a coherent response to the housing crisis. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/19/202147 minutes, 4 seconds
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How Not To Be Wrong - with James O’Brien

British broadcaster and writer James O’Brien has built a loyal listenership on his LBC radio programme, dissecting the opinions of callers live on air every day. In his 2018 book, How To Be Right... in a World gone Wrong, he set out his opinions on Islam, Brexit, political correctness, LGBT issues, feminism, Trump and other flash points. Now his latest book, How Not To Be Wrong, is a personal account about the importance of being able to change your mind. In today’s podcast, O’Brien talks to Hugh about some of the things he’s been wrong about. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/14/202140 minutes, 3 seconds
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Housing crisis overtakes Covid as number one priority

The political focus has shifted from the pandemic to the housing crisis, with Taoiseach Micheal Martin this week declaring it the Government’s “number one priority”. Jack Horgan Jones and Pat Leahy join Hugh to discuss the political decisions and policy failures that have led to the crisis and the resulting generational divide.But first, not escaping Covid entirely, the team take a look at the debate surrounding the role and reliability of antigen testing, the possibility of accelerating certain reopening plans and the progress of the vaccination rollout. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/12/202139 minutes, 23 seconds
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UK election special: Labour's leadership crisis and Scotland's referendum mandate

Denis Staunton talks to Hugh about the results of last Friday's local and regional elections in England, Scotland and Wales. The results have thrown up many stories, including how Labour's leader Keir Starmer contrived to turn a setback into a leadership crisis, and how pro-independence politicians increase their dominance of the Scottish parliament. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/10/202130 minutes, 38 seconds
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How will global tax reform affect Ireland?

For decades, Ireland has used a low corporation tax rate to attract foreign direct investment. That is now threatened by a major tax reform plan announced by US president Joe Biden, which proposes to tax the overseas earnings of US corporations at 21 per cent. Talks are also taking place at the OECD on a global minimum level of corporate tax, which is expected to be higher than the 12.5 per cent rate defended by successive Irish governments. To discuss the changing face of global tax and what the implications will be for Ireland, Hugh is joined by Feargal O’Rourke, tax expert and managing partner at PwC Ireland, and John Christensen, a co-founder and director of the Tax Justice Network. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/5/202143 minutes, 50 seconds
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Foster's exit bodes poorly for north-south relations

What led to Arlene Foster's ouster this week, who will succeed her and what will it mean for politics on the island? To find out we talk to Sam McBride of the Belfast Newsletter. Then Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray look at the other big political news of the week: the major moves towards reopening the country, and the surprise resignation of Fine Gael TD Eoghan Murphy. The former housing minister's departure means an intriguing byelection will happen later this year. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/30/202144 minutes, 2 seconds
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Heroes or Zeros? Discussing Ireland's Covid strategy with ISAG's prof Aoife McLysaght

For much of the pandemic, the Independent Scientific Advocacy Group (ISAG) has recommended that Ireland should aggressively suppress virus transmission as part of a zero-Covid policy. That strategy has, however, failed to find favour with either the Government or health officials. As we prepare for the next phase of reopening in May, ISAG spokesperson, professor Aoife McLysaght, talks to Hugh about what the group would do differently, why one wrong step now could quickly lead to disaster again and why ISAG's zero-Covid campaign has been worth it, even if it fails. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/28/202152 minutes
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'Politics on the Couch' - with Rafael Behr

To what extent can political beliefs and behaviour be understood through the science of psychology and the study of human cognition? In today’s episode, Hugh talks to award-winning political columnist and host of the excellent Politics on the Couch podcast, Rafael Behr, about the way our minds respond to politics and how psychology drives everyone’s political thought and behaviour. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/24/202146 minutes, 29 seconds
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Should we worry about the deficit? - with David McWilliams

Since coronavirus, governments around the globe have abandoned traditional concerns about deficits and enacted emergency measures in the interest of saving countries from the devastating effects of lockdowns. But in a post-pandemic Ireland, what should the role of the state be? Will the Covid crisis help bring to an end the old economic orthodoxies, or will there be return to a smaller state, balanced budgets and deficit reduction? Economist and The Irish Times columnist David McWilliams joins Hugh and political editor Pat Leahy to discuss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/21/202148 minutes, 15 seconds
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US politics special with John Dickerson, CBS reporter and author of "The Hardest Job in the World"

CBS News political reporter, Slate Political Gabfest panelist and proud Irish-American John Dickerson talks to Hugh about the office of President of the United States, which is the subject of his book "The Hardest Job in the World". He explains how the role has evolved in complexity and now places impossible demands on whoever holds it. They also discuss how the Trump presidency warped political journalism, and the significance of President Biden's Irish-American identity. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/16/202145 minutes, 11 seconds
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A very bad week for the Government's Covid-19 policy

The Government's Covid-19 policy was dealt a double blow this week, as it was forced to pause the mandatory hotel quarantine system and issues with two vaccines threw the planned inoculation programme into doubt. Hugh is joined by Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones from The Irish Times political team to discuss the latest hurdles the coalition must overcome to keep its coronavirus plan on track. Also on today's show: what does the future hold for the Fianna Fáil party? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/14/202141 minutes, 17 seconds
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Understanding the loyalist grievances that led to violence in Belfast - with Newton Emerson

It's not just Brexit, or the Bobby Storey funeral, or the constant talk of a border poll. Many factors fed into this week's violence and rioting on the streets of Belfast. The violent clashes involved youths from loyalist and nationalist areas, but today's conversation with Newton Emerson focuses on the roots of the anger and disillusionment felt by the working-class loyalist community, and the role of criminal gangs in fomenting violence against the PSNI. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/9/202125 minutes, 35 seconds
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Quarantine clashes and vaccine targets

The debate surrounding mandatory hotel quarantine rumbles on between government departments, but what are the logistical, legal and diplomatic issues at stake? Will the introduction of a vaccine passport or a digital green certificate be enough to smooth over the cracks? And with the long promised ramp up in vaccinations now on the horizon, will the government be able to keep up with their ambitious targets? Our political team made up of Jen, Pat and Cormac join Hugh to discuss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/7/202140 minutes, 2 seconds
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The psychology and the politics behind this week's Covid-19 moves

Behavioral economist Pete Lunn and political correspondent Jennifer Bray join Hugh to talk about the government's major moves in the Covid-19 fight this week: the easing of some restrictions, particularly around outdoor activities, and the simplification of the vaccine rollout, favouring older people over particular groups such as teachers, Gardaí or carers.  Pete, who advises Nphet on how the population might respond to Covid-19 regulations, explains why the hope is the relaxing of particular rules could actually lead to a reduction in risky indoor behaviour, while Jennifer takes us inside the political discussions around these controversial changes. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/2/202138 minutes, 19 seconds
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A moment of triumph and peril for the Greens

Last week was a very good one for the Green Party, but you could be forgiven for getting the opposite impression. Today, Hugh and guests spend a little time on the party's dangerous internal divisions (as demonstrated by the spat over party member and Lord Mayor of Dublin Hazel Chu's unsanctioned run for a Seanad seat) and more time on the significance of the Climate Action Bill, the piece of legislation published last week that is a major achievement for the party and its leader Eamon Ryan. Guests: political editor Pat Leahy and Sadhbh O'Neill, policy coordinator of the Stop Climate Chaos coalition. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/31/202142 minutes, 21 seconds
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Is free speech under threat?

In his new book Free Speech and Why it Matters, Andrew Doyle questions a new form of social justice activism, which as he puts it, casually disregards the principle of free speech for the sake of what is perceived to be a higher social priority. In today’s episode, the author and podcaster joins Hugh for a discussion on 'wokeness' and cancel culture, self-censorship and where the limitations of acceptable speech should be drawn. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/26/202154 minutes, 9 seconds
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Vaccine stockpiles, shortfalls and supply issues

The EU is set to tighten export controls in a bid to prevent Covid-19 vaccines leaving the bloc. It comes as Europe looks destined for a showdown with the UK over a stockpile of AstraZeneca vaccines, said to number up to 30 million doses, and coveted by both sides to shore up inoculation campaigns. As shortfalls and supply issues hold back the rollout in many European countries, including Ireland, can we expect any relaxation of the rules here on April 5th? Hugh is joined by Jack Horgan-Jones from our political staff and Europe correspondent Naomi O'Leary. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/24/202140 minutes, 47 seconds
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Interview: Derek Scally, author of The Best Catholics in the World

In today’s episode Irish Times Berlin correspondent Derek Scally joins Hugh to speak about his brand new book: The Best Catholics in the World. Having spent the last twenty years living and working in Germany, Scally has witnessed a nation engaging earnestly with their past, and asks why the same cannot be said for his native Ireland and the legacy left over by the Catholic Church. Speaking to campaigners, survivors, writers, and historians, Scally embarks on a quest to unravel the tight hold the Catholic Church has had on the Irish. In this conversation, they discuss the origins of the book, the intersection of church, state and people and the strands of religion still intertwined in Irish society. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/22/202140 minutes, 10 seconds
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Pandemic Politics: Ask Me Anything

In today’s episode, Pat and Jen join Hugh for a special edition of “ask me anything”. From the zero Covid strategy to concerns around global vaccine supply, the team tackle your questions on the politics of the pandemic.Thanks to everyone who sent their questions in. Happy St Patrick's Day. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/17/202141 minutes, 18 seconds
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Monarchies in modern times

Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Prince Harry and his wife Meghan dominated the news headlines all this week. The most watched programme on RTE so far this year, it shone a light on the inner workings of the long standing British monarchy. Allegations of racism and maltreatment now lead to bigger questions surrounding the legitimacy of the monarchy in a diverse and multicultural Britain. Joining Hugh to take a look back at the history of the royals from an Irish perspective, the potential fallout from the interview and how monarchies adapt to modernity are Irish Times London Editor Denis Staunton and John Gibney, Assistant Editor with the Royal Irish Academy’s Documents on Irish Foreign Policy and the editor of Ireland and the Monarchy. Next week, we’ll be recording another Ask Me Anything episode, which will take a look back at a pandemic year in politics. If you would like to put your question to the team, send it in by voice note to [email protected] before Tuesday, March 16th. The episode will be released on St Patrick’s Day. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/12/202136 minutes, 5 seconds
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Davy in crisis, Ireland’s illegal adoptions, vaccine delays and MHQ

It's just over a week since the Central Bank fined Davy stockbrokers €4.1 million for breaching market rules. On today’s show, Hugh talks to Jack Horgan-Jones and Cormac McQuinn from the Irish Times politics team about the political impact of the scandal. Also on the agenda today: continued delays in vaccine deliveries, progress on mandatory hotel quarantine and another dark chapter in Irish history, in the shape of the review of historical illegal adoptions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/10/202132 minutes, 48 seconds
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Empire, imperialism and Ireland - with prof Jane Ohlmeyer

President Michael D Higgins sparked a debate recently with his sharp critique of British imperialism. In a piece for the Guardian, he accused some academics and journalists of a "feigned amnesia" and a failure to address Britain's imperialist legacy, especially when compared to Ireland's reflections on nationalism, the war of independence and partition a century ago. In today's podcast, Hugh talks to Erasmus Smyth professor of modern history at Trinity College Dublin, Jane Ohlmeyer, about what exactly imperialism is and what its contemporary legacy might be. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/5/202138 minutes, 48 seconds
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Is affordable housing achievable?

In January, the Affordable Housing Bill was published by Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Darragh O’Brien. The Bill introduces a shared equity scheme and a cost rental scheme, both designed to tackle the housing affordability crisis in Ireland. However, with the supply of houses under extreme pressure, due in part to the construction sector shutdown, will a shared equity scheme only lead to higher house prices? When can we expect to see any positive effects on the market and what are the risks involved? Joining Hugh to discuss the plan is Minister O’Brien and Irish Times business journalist Eoin Burke-Kennedy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/3/202142 minutes, 12 seconds
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Poll: what is the public's attitude to lifting restrictions?

Political editor Pat Leahy joins Hugh to look at the results of this week's Irish Times / Ipsos MRBI poll on Irish people's attitudes to relaxing Covid-19 restrictions, as well as the level of support for parties and political leaders. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/26/202126 minutes, 51 seconds
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"The EU needs to look at its own problems" - Clare Daly on civil rights, Russia & life as an MEP

This week Harry and Hugh talk to MEP Clare Daly, who since her election as an MEP for Dublin in 2019 has been an outspoken voice in Brussels on the issues she champions, such as her opposition to defence spending and the imprisonment of Julian Assange. They talk about Clare's controversial comments on jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, Covid-19 restrictions and the challenge to get people back home to pay attention to what goes on in the parliament.But first Harry explains what went so badly wrong with the government's Covid-19 communications in the past week. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/24/202159 minutes, 47 seconds
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Politics, culture and the centenary of Northern Ireland

Following last week's podcast with professor Brendan O’Leary on the creation of Northern Ireland, today’s show looks at this year’s centenary in respect of the politics and culture of the region. Hugh is joined by unionist political commentator Sarah Creighton to discuss the future of Northern Ireland, its changing relationship with both the UK and the Republic, and her views on the prospect of a united Ireland. In the second part of the show, Hugh talks to Northern Irish writers Jan Carson and Rosemary Jenkinson about the centenary in terms of culture and identity. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/18/202153 minutes, 48 seconds
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The centenary of Northern Ireland - with Prof Brendan O'Leary

This year marks the centenary of partition on the island of Ireland. The official commemoration takes place in May, but what were the key political and legislative events that led to the establishment of Northern Ireland? On today's podcast, Hugh speaks to Brendan O'Leary, a professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, who last appeared on this podcast to discuss his three-volume A Treatise on Northern Ireland. He talks to Hugh about the creation of Northern Ireland, how its structures have changed in the past 100 years and what preparations for a referendum on Irish unity should look like, if there is to be one. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/12/202148 minutes, 4 seconds
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One year on from #GE2020

It may feel like a lifetime ago, but this week marks one year since the 2020 general election. And what an eventful twelve months it’s been. In today’s episode, we take a look back at the historic election result and the Sinn Féin surge which swept across the country. What important lessons have been learned by the political parties since then and how will their strategies change next time around? Joining Hugh to discuss this and more is Jennifer Bray, Pat Leahy and UCC political scientist and co-editor of How Ireland Voted, Theresa Reidy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/10/202147 minutes, 30 seconds
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Universal basic income: is now the time?

The concept of universal basic income (UBI) - paying everyone a regular, fixed amount of money to ensure a basic standard of living - has moved to the mainstream in recent years, driven by concerns over economic inequality and the erosion of traditional employment bases. More recently, the vast level of state support for workers in Covid-19-hit industries has shown that mass payments are feasible, if only for a limited time period. The Green Party supports UBI and won a commitment for a pilot UBI scheme in the programme for government. Late last year it was announced this trial would be aimed at artists, a group often not rewarded for their work with sustainable incomes. So is UBI a good idea, and how will this pilot work? To find out Hugh talks to Neasa Hourigan, Green Party TD for Dublin Central and co-author of the party's policy on UBI, Angela Dorgan, chair of the National Campaign for the Arts, and Ian Goldin, professor of globalisation and development at Oxford University. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/5/202140 minutes, 15 seconds
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The EU's vaccine blunder

Naomi O'Leary on how the EU commission made its biggest blunder in years, combining two incredibly sensitive issues - the vaccine rollout and the Northern Ireland protocol - in one embarrassing and consequential controversy. Denis Staunton on how the commission's cock-up is being used in London and Belfast to leverage concessions on the operation of rules governing trade into Northern Ireland. And Jack Horgan-Jones on the domestic politics of our own vaccine rollout. Who will we blame if Ireland lags behind? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/3/202139 minutes, 39 seconds
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Debt and taxes after Covid - with Marie Sherlock and Cliff Taylor

Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe is presiding over a massive expansion of national debt to meet society's needs during this pandemic. Prevailing economic wisdom says he's right to do so. But when the Covid-19 crisis passes, the old questions of how much to spend and how high to set taxes will return. To talk about the  political and economic choices ahead, Pat Leahy talks to Labour Senator and former trade union economist Marie Sherlock, and our economics columnist Cliff Taylor. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/29/202138 minutes, 50 seconds
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Covid-19: our losing battle with the travel problem

What to do about the risk of international travel bringing the virus into the country has been a problem for the Irish government since the pandemic began, one we've never really got on top of. New measures aim to tighten things up, but do they go far enough? And how do we compare to our neighbours? Naomi O'Leary, Jennifer Bray and Jack-Horgan Jones join Harry McGee to discuss. Plus, what's going on with the Astrazeneca vaccine? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/27/202140 minutes, 33 seconds
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An uncomfortable week for Leo Varadkar

This week the spotlight has been well and truly on Tánaiste Leo Varadkar following the release of internal Department of Health emails, which provide fresh insight into the controversial leaking of a GP contract back in April 2019. Following immense political and media criticism last November, Varadkar apologised in the Dáil for his actions. Now once again, he finds himself in the eye of the storm. Political editor Pat Leahy joins Hugh to discuss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/22/202121 minutes, 20 seconds
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Covid-19: plans to resume special education postponed

With levels of Covid-19 infection still at an all-time high, the Government failed to get teaching unions on side for a return to school this week for students with additional needs. On today’s podcast Hugh is joined by Jennifer Bray, Jack Horgan-Jones and Harry McGee from The Irish Times politics team to discuss how this happened. We also look at the vaccine rollout, the controversy over how it has been handled by some hospitals and why the next phase is likely to be even more politically difficult. And, one week on from the publication of the report by the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes, what is the Government going to do about it? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/20/202142 minutes, 46 seconds
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Mother and Baby Homes report

Earlier this week the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes published its long-anticipated report. It investigated decades of abuse at fourteen mother and baby homes and four county homes across Ireland between 1922 and 1998. In today’s episode, Hugh and Pat are joined by Caelainn Hogan, journalist and author of Republic of Shame and by mother and baby home survivor Elizabeth Coppin to discuss the findings within the report, the public apologies and what more needs to be done. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/15/202138 minutes, 59 seconds
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Covid-19: can our hospitals cope?

First, Simon Carswell on the wave of Covid-19 patients hitting our hospitals. When will the wave reach its peak, and will the system be able to handle it? And how are our nursing homes doing this time? Then Peter Foster, public policy editor at the Financial Times, joins Hugh and Simon to look at the difficulties bedevilling traders and hauliers since Brexit took effect on January 1st, and some of their surprising consequences. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/13/202139 minutes, 25 seconds
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Covid-19: was this inevitable?

In our first podcast of the year, Hugh talks to The Irish Times health and political editors, Paul Cullen and Pat Leahy, and political analyst and statistician Kevin Cunningham about the social and political ramifications of the recent dramatic rise in Covid-19 cases. How has the government responded to the latest crisis and what level of public support is there for the restrictions? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
1/6/202137 minutes, 5 seconds
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AMA 2020, part two: more listener questions answered

It's the second and final instalment of our annual "ask me anything" podcast! Hugh puts your questions, mainly about politics and the media, to Harry, Pat, Jen and Jack.Thanks to everyone who submitted a question and sorry to those whose questions we didn't get around to this time.Wishing all our listeners a safe and happy 2021. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/30/202024 minutes, 18 seconds
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AMA 2020, part one: your questions answered

It's the first instalment of our annual "ask me anything" podcast. Recorded on December 18th. Hugh puts your questions, mainly about politics and the media, to Harry, Pat, Jen and Jack.Part two will be published next week. Thanks to everyone who submitted a question and sorry if we didn't get around to yours this time. Wishing all our listeners a safe and happy Christmas. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/23/202034 minutes, 55 seconds
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It's Level 5 again

Cabinet has agreed to reimpose Level 5 restrictions, with some modifications, due to the rising numbers of Covid-19 cases. Pat Leahy joins Hugh to take us through what that means. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/22/202016 minutes, 33 seconds
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Vaccine rollout, political apologies and a Green divide

This week the Irish Government announced details of their national Covid-19 vaccination plan. Vaccines will be rolled out in three phases: an initial roll out followed by a mass ramp-up and finally, open access. It’s an extraordinary undertaking, which is sure to throw up plenty of challenges for Health Minister Stephen Donnelly and his department. In today's episode, Jen and Harry join Hugh to talk through the key points of the plan. The team also discuss yet another political apology, this time delivered by Sinn Féin TD Brian Stanley and they take a look at the CETA trade agreement diving the Greens. But first, with time running out for a Brexit trade agreement, tensions are running high in European Parliament. Joining us from Brussels to discuss the ‘narrow path’ which guides the final stretch of negotiations is Europe Correspondent Naomi O’Leary. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/16/202042 minutes, 11 seconds
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Brexit: Another deadline approaches

Following a meeting over dinner this week between Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, it’s clear that very large gaps still remain between the two sides. Negotiators have been given until this Sunday to figure out a path forward, but will this be yet another deadline ignored? The sticking points remain the same: fisheries; the level playing field; and governance, however the focus has narrowed onto a specific element of the level playing field – the so-called ratchet clause. Joining Hugh to discuss the likelihood of an agreement by Sunday and all the contentious issues at hand is London Editor Denis Staunton. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/11/202023 minutes, 51 seconds
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Brexit: What could scupper a deal?

With just four weeks until the official end of the Brexit transition period on December 31st, we still don’t know if an agreement will be reached. Fishing is one of the few issues still dividing EU and UK negotiators. Just how serious a matter is it? Are Irish companies prepared for trade with Britain on January 1st? And, if a deal is struck, will Boris Johnson get it past his party? To discuss what stands in the way of a Brexit deal before the end of the year, Hugh is joined by Europe correspondent Naomi O’Leary, London editor Denis Staunton and Public Affairs editor Simon Carswell. Live event: Join Hugh, Jennifer Bray, Jennifer O’Connell, Fintan O'Toole and Pat Leahy as they look back on this remarkable year in a live Irish Times Inside Politics event at 7pm on Thursday, December 10th. Get tickets to ‘A Year Like No Other’ here: https://www.irishtimes.com/virtual-events/a-year-like-no-other Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
12/2/202036 minutes, 5 seconds
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How to hold a referendum on Irish unity

The potential for a future referendum on Irish unity is explicit in the Good Friday Agreement, if certain circumstances are met. But how would an Irish unity referendum work in practice? A new report by a group of academics called "The Working Group on Unification Referendums on the Island of Ireland" says that planning by the Irish and British governments for a possible future referendum, or referendums, on Irish unification would be an essential condition of their legitimacy and stability. Hugh and Pat talk to Dr. Etain Tannam, one of the authors of the report and an Associate Professor of International Peace Studies at Trinity College Dublin, and Mick Fealty, a political commentator and editor of the NI politics website Slugger O'Toole. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/27/202041 minutes, 15 seconds
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Why talks on the CervicalCheck tribunal have broken down – with Vicky Phelan

The 221-plus group, which represents those affected by the CervicalCheck scandal, has walked away from talks with the Government on a tribunal aimed at providing the women affected with a quicker and less adversarial alternative to lengthy and confrontational court cases. Little over a year since then-Taoiseach Leo Varadkar apologised on behalf of the state to the more than 1,000 women affected by the cervical cancer controversy, how has it come to this? Advocate Vicky Phelan talks to Hugh and our political correspondent Jennifer Bray, about what has led to the disintegration of relations between the sides.Later, Pat Leahy joins to discuss the Government’s highly-anticipated plans to re-open the economy for Christmas and the Dáil business committee row. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/25/202046 minutes, 21 seconds
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Trump, Biden and American foreign policy in a changed world - with John Mearsheimer

President-elect Joe Biden represents a traditional approach to US foreign policy that was rejected by a majority of American voters in 2016. Now Biden is back, but the world has changed: China has emerged as a genuine competitor to the US. Can Biden adapt and respond? Are we facing into a new Cold War?Professor John Mearsheimer is a political scientist and geopolitical analyst. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/20/202031 minutes, 41 seconds
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Takeaway pints and shaky reopening plans

Today Hugh is joined by Pat, Harry and Jen to discuss another not-so-great week for the Government. We hear the latest on the Seamus Woulfe saga, the takeaway pints fiasco and get a look at the wrangling going on behind the scenes between cabinet and Nphet. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/18/202039 minutes, 48 seconds
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A vaccine on the horizon: how optimistic should we be?

This week Pfizer announced positive early results from its coronavirus vaccine trial, but how optimistic should we be about this breakthrough and how will it affect the decisions taken by government in the weeks and months ahead? Joining Hugh and Pat to discuss the latest developments is Irish Times health editor Paul Cullen. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/13/202035 minutes, 18 seconds
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Inside Politics special: the complete story of the Séamus Woulfe affair

The story of Supreme Court Justice Séamus Woulfe's attendance at the infamous Oireachtas Golf Society dinner has already taken many twists and turns. This week the crisis deepened with the release of an exchange of letters between Woulfe and Chief Justice Frank Clarke, in which Clarke calls on Woulfe to resign. Woulfe has refused, and the ball is now in the court of politicians who must consider whether to try to remove him.It's a complicated story so, with the help of actors portraying Woulfe and retired justice Susan Denham, who carried out a review of his actions, Ruadhán Mac Cormaic talks us through it from start to finish, and looks at where the story may be headed next. Plus, Pat Leahy on how the politics of impeaching a judge might play out in Leinster House. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/11/202044 minutes, 18 seconds
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The origins of Fine Gael - with Stephen Collins and Ciara Meehan

Irish Times columnist Stephen Collins and historian Ciara Meehan have written a book about the history of Fine Gael. "Saving the State" recounts the party's story, from the foundation of the state to this year's decision to go into coalition with its nemesis Fianna Fáil, and the party's periods in power as well as in the political wilderness. They talk to Hugh. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/9/202040 minutes, 15 seconds
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Victory in defeat: Trump and Trumpism are here to stay

Fintan O'Toole and Simon Carswell join Hugh to talk over the results - so far - of the US presidential election. Right now Donald Trump seems on course to lose the presidency to Joe Biden. But those who have seen his presidency as a dangerous aberration and hoped for a repudiation of Trumpism at the ballot box will be disappointed. Trump expanded his base and his party look to have held the Senate. Meanwhile, Democrats must face the fact that changing demographics alone will not deliver them power. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/5/202040 minutes, 4 seconds
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US Election: who's won what and what comes next

Recorded at 5.30 am. Hugh talks to Suzanne Lynch about the night's events in the US presidential election. The Democratic Party's hoped-for landslide has not materialised and their candidate Joe Biden's paths to victory are now fewer - but still clearer than those for President Donald Trump. . Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/4/202024 minutes, 39 seconds
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Varadkar takes questions over GP deal leak - reaction

Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray join Pat Leahy to talk about the day's events in the Dáil, where Taoisea... Tanaiste Leo Varadkar answered questions about his passing on of a confidential document to a friend of his back in 2019. For background information on the story go to irishtimes.com. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
11/3/202019 minutes, 43 seconds
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Shane Ross: "we were almost still in opposition when we were in Cabinet"

"I made no bones about the fact I was going to write a book", says former Independent Alliance TD Shane Ross, whose previous job as a feisty newspaper columnist marked him for suspicion when he joined Enda Kenny's Cabinet as Minister for Transport. He has now written that book, an entertaining inside-the-room account of recent events in Irish politics. He talks to Pat about his transition from enemy within to Cabinet colleague, his difficult relationships with Enda Kenny, Francis Fitzgerald and Charlie Flanagan ("I like him..he's probably quite angry about stuff in the book") and the controversial policies he pursued in judicial reform, drink driving penalties and the reopening of his local Garda station in Stepaside. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/30/202044 minutes, 31 seconds
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How the mother and baby archive controversy became a quagmire for government

LIVE US ELECTION SHOW: New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd joins Hugh and our Washington correspondent Suzanne Lynch for a special live online edition of Inside Politics, on Thursday October 29th at 7pm.If you're a subscriber, check your email to find out how to avail of a half-price ticket for just €10. Non-subscribers can buy a ticket for €20.To buy tickets, go here: www.irishtimes.com/inside-politics-liveThere's been a big political controversy over the government's legislation to deal with the archive created by the Commission of Investigation into mother and baby homes. Part one: Jack Horgan-Jones and Jennifer Bray take turns to outline both sides of the controversy - what the government says it was trying to do, and what opposition politicians, angry survivors of the institutions and activists say they have done wrong. Part two: Much of the political pressure came down on the head of Green Minister for Minister for Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth Roderic O'Gorman who introduced the legislation. In the wake of his botched handling of the crisis, Green Cork city councillor Lorna Bogue announced she would leave the party. Lorna talks to Pat about her reasons for leaving and why she thinks the Greens in government are failing to resist the influence of the powerful institutions of the state. Part three: Finally, Europe correspondent Naomi O'Leary on the worsening Covid-19 situation across the continent. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/28/202054 minutes, 10 seconds
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A dramatic week in Covid, Brexit and the US election

Jack Horgan-Jones, Suzanne Lynch and Denis Staunton join Pat to talk about an eventful week in Ireland's Covid-19 response, the Brexit process and Donald Trump and Joe Biden's race to the White House.LIVE US ELECTION SHOW: New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd joins Hugh and our Washington correspondent Suzanne Lynch for a special live online edition of Inside Politics, on Thursday October 29th at 7pm.If you're a subscriber, check your email to find out how to avail of a half-price ticket for just €10. Non-subscribers can buy a ticket for €20.To buy tickets, go here: www.irishtimes.com/inside-politics-live Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/23/202044 minutes, 58 seconds
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The decisions that led us into Level 5

So what is the national Covid-19 policy now? It seems to be: lockdown now, enjoy Christmas, lockdown again. But even that fairly bleak prospect is contingent on a lot of things going according to plan. To talk about the politics that led us to Level 5, the exclusively male composition of the Covid-19 decision makers and the rollercoaster we're facing over the winter months, today's host Harry McGee is joined by Pat Leahy and Jennifer Bray. LIVE US ELECTION SHOW: New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd joins Hugh and our Washington correspondent Suzanne Lynch for a special live online edition of Inside Politics, on Thursday October 29th at 7pm. If you're a subscriber, check your email to find out how to avail of a half-price ticket for just €10. Non-subscribers can buy a ticket for €20. To buy tickets, go here: https://www.irishtimes.com/inside-politics-live Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/21/202043 minutes, 35 seconds
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Budget 2021: government go big and "economic jihadis" go home - with David McWilliams

Hugh talks to economist and Irish Times columnist David McWilliams about the massive increase in spending announced in yesterday's budget and why this approach, the correct one as David sees it, won out against more conservative voices, or "economic jihadis". But first: the budget is an annual set piece of political theatre, but the stage of the National Convention Centre proved a poor one. Political editor Pat Leahy has a sketch of yesterday's events and analysis of the budget measures. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/14/202047 minutes, 25 seconds
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Can America's awful politics be fixed? - with Steven Levitsky

Once both sides in a two-party system start playing hardball - as we see in the battle over the US Supreme Court, for example - it's very difficult for either to stop, with potentially dangerous consequences. So can America's hyper-partisan politics deescalate a notch or two? Not easily, according to Steven Levitsky, a Harvard professor and co-author of How Democracies Die, a book about how healthy political systems can be destroyed if voters become extremely polarised. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/12/202023 minutes, 59 seconds
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Poll: support for Government and coalition party leaders falls

A short episode with analysis of the latest Irish Times / IpsosMRBI poll, which shows that public approval of the coalition Government and its party leaders has fallen, but support has remained relatively steady for the big three parties of Fine Gael, Sinn Féin and Fianna Fáil. The biggest losers: Eamon Ryan and the Greens. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/8/202011 minutes, 31 seconds
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A look ahead to Budget 2021

In today’s roundup, the team look ahead to next week’s budget. What has Paschal planned for the next twelve months? How can we live with Covid and keep the economy going? Which sectors will be prioritised? One thing is certain, this will be a budget like no other. Also on the agenda is the Climate Action Bill which was launched today and the aftermath of the Covid controversy. Pat, Cliff and Jen join Hugh to discuss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/7/202043 minutes, 8 seconds
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Two days of Covid controversy that unnerved the country

It's been a significant few days in Ireland's Covid-19 response, with controversy erupting on Sunday over Nphet's recommendation that the country move to Level5 restrictions, much to the Government's annoyance. Pat tells Hugh how it all went down and what the deterioration in relations between our elected officials and health experts means. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/6/202029 minutes, 33 seconds
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A positive test for Trump and the latest Brexit negotiations

President Trump and his wife Melania have tested positive for coronavirus. This opens up a range of questions about how the next four weeks leading up to the election will unfold. If Covid-19 proves serious for Trump, what then? To discuss the latest developments from the US, Hugh is joined by Eric S. Heberlig, Professor of Political Science and Public Administration at the University of North Carolina Charlotte.But first, London Editor Denis Staunton is here to discuss the latest Brexit negotiations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
10/2/202044 minutes, 58 seconds
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Fianna Fail’s big challenge

Following a disappointing election result and worrying trends in recent opinion polls, a huge challenge now lies ahead for Fianna Fail. Can this once all-powerful organisation ever hope to regain its popularity in a changed and newly fractured political landscape? Joining Hugh and Pat to discuss the past, present and future of the party is Professor of Modern Irish History at UCD Diarmaid Ferriter and Fianna Fail Senator Lisa Chambers. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/30/202045 minutes, 41 seconds
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Interview: Anne Applebaum, author of "Twilight of Democracy"

"Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism" is the new book by Atlantic magazine journalist Anne Applebaum. In it she writes about the "unbridgeable political chasm" that has opened between her and her former liberal and centre-right friends as they embraced populism and authoritarianism, and the personal motivations that drive people to adopt extreme politics.If you enjoy the podcast, you can also hear Anne participating in an online discussion with Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe as a part of The Dublin Festival of History, on Saturday October 3rd. The festival is a Dublin City Council event and runs online until Sunday, 4th October. All events are free and booking is available at dublinfestivalofhistory.ie. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/25/202032 minutes, 58 seconds
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Yet another blunder to add to the long list of blunders

It’s been another eventful week in politics with the reduction of the pandemic unemployment payment coinciding with the announcement of ten new advisors for junior ministers. All the while, four ministers are under restricted measures after coming into contact with a positive case of Covid-19. How will they get past this very ill-timed decision? Pat and Jen join Hugh to discuss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/23/202036 minutes, 19 seconds
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The far right in Ireland: who are they and what are their aims? - with Conor Gallagher

Ireland has long been notable for its lack of a successful "far right" political movement. But the lack of political success has not been for the want of trying by a small number of activist groups. Now in the age of Covid-19, some such groups are exploiting divisions over the pandemic to reach a wider audience with their anti-establishment and anti-immigrant message, as well as racist conspiracy theories, such as "the great replacement" theory. Hugh talks to Conor Gallagher about the far right movement, its tactics and its leaders. Can they turn a growing online presence into electoral success? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/21/202035 minutes, 38 seconds
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Beyond the blunders, does this Covid plan make sense?

Health editor Paul Cullen and columnist Una Mullally join Hugh and Harry this week to talk about a Tuesday of drama, and occasional slapstick, with the Government introducing its five-stage plan for society to live with Covid-19 in the months ahead. The messaging on the day was universally panned, but beyond that, does the plan make sense? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/16/202042 minutes, 54 seconds
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Brexit: "only four people know what the desired outcome is"

What is Boris Johnson's game? As the House of Commons debates Prime Minister Johnson's controversial Internal Markets bill, Pat and Hugh are joined by The Spectator's James Forsyth to discuss the levels of opposition and support the bill now enjoys, the strategy behind it and the impact it will have on negotiations with the EU. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/15/202024 minutes, 36 seconds
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A shared Island: exploring Ireland's political future

This week in The Irish Times has featured a series of articles on the theme of "A Shared Island", with our journalists talking to people of different political persuasions north and south, looking at the future of the island and trying to answer questions, including: How advanced is the drive for border poll? What might a shared island actually look like? Is there any way to include Unionism in a discussion that usually alienates unionists? To talk about some of those points, Mary Minihan, editor of the series, talks to Pat Leahy, Freya McClements and Naomi O'Leary. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/11/202042 minutes, 48 seconds
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A Brexit bombshell and a breach of trust - with Denis Staunton and Naomi O'Leary

The UK government will intentionally break international law with new legislation designed to let it off the hook for certain aspects of the Northern Ireland protocol, a part of last year's Brexit deal. It's a move that would have been unthinkable not long ago, but it shows just how much the Conservative party has changed under Boris Johnson, says Denis Staunton. From Brussels, it looks as though the UK abruptly decided to stop playing chess and begin wrestling, says Naomi O'Leary. Plus, the appointment of Mairead McGuinness as EU commissioner and the worsening Covid-19 news. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/9/202051 minutes, 15 seconds
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How "the special relationship" shaped the world for the worse - with Jeremy Green

It's one of the defining relationships of the western world, but it is largely misunderstood - the special relationship between the UK and the US is not built on shared language, foreign policy goals, culture or ideals. It's built on money; specifically the global financial system that the two nations created together. So argues Jeremy Green, a political economist at Cambridge University, in his new book "The Political Economy of the Special Relationship". The book tells the story of the interaction of American economic power and British capitalism in the 20th Century, and how that interaction has damaged economies and weakened the foundation of healthy societies. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/4/202031 minutes
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As the Dáil returns, can the Government regroup?

The Dáil returns today, earlier than scheduled due to the Golfgate scandal. Can the fractiousness of the Government's first few months be put behind it? It will need to be if ministers are to handle the challenges of reopening schools, agreeing a budget and forming a long-overdue plan of detail for living alongside Covid-19. Harry, Jennifer and Pat join Hugh to discuss. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
9/2/202044 minutes, 40 seconds
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Interview: Elif Shafak, author of How to Stay Sane in an Age of Division

Elif Shafak is an award-winning British-Turkish novelist, women’s rights advocate and political theorist. In her new book, How to Stay Sane in an Age of Division, Shafak reflects on the anger and anxieties of contemporary society and the divisions of modern politics. In this episode, the author speaks to Hugh about the importance of listening to each side of the debate and her hopes for a more empathetic post-Covid world. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/28/202030 minutes, 24 seconds
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Phil Hogan "hangs on by his fingertips"

Will he stay or will he go? While we wait for EU Commission president Ursula von der Leyen to decide Phil Hogan's fate, Naomi O'Leary joins Pat and Hugh to discuss the factors at play in her decision. In part two: Carl O'Brien on the thorny problems faced by Education Minister Norma Foley, as schools reopen and the moment fo truth for 2020's Leaving Cert students draws near.Naomi O'Leary is Europe Correspondent.Carl O'Brien is Education Editor. Subscribe to The Irish Times: https://www.irishtimes.com/subscribe/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/26/202048 minutes, 11 seconds
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The public is incensed; the Government is in danger

Pat Leahy and Jack Horgan Jones discuss the latest, and so far the worst, scandal to hit the Government: the attendance of Minister for Agriculture Dara Calleary and other politicians at a golf society dinner that breached public health guidelines. A weary nation feels disrespected and anger is red hot. Is the Government's authority fatally undermined? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/21/202032 minutes, 10 seconds
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How behavioural science informs the pandemic response - with Pete Lunn

In today’s episode, Hugh talks to Pete Lunn, a behavioural economist with the Economic and Social Research Institute. Lunn is also part of the behavioural change sub group of NPHET, which provides vital insights and evidence to support their communications strategy and wider work. They discuss the role behavioural science plays in the official response to the pandemic, the notion of lockdown fatigue and how the public will react to the reintroduction of restrictions. But first, Pat is here to talk us through ‘the most fractious cabinet meeting of the current government” which took place last night. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/19/202040 minutes, 21 seconds
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US Politics special with Michael Brendan Dougherty

Today Hugh speaks to Michael Brendan Dougherty, a senior writer with New York-based conservative magazine National Review. Dougherty is also the author of the 2019 memoir, My Father Left Me Ireland. In this episode, they discuss the ongoing realignment of the American electorate, the recent appointment of Kamala Harris as Joe Biden’s running mate and how the Republicans will contend with Trump’s legacy after the upcoming election. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/14/202050 minutes, 26 seconds
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Coronavirus: are we losing control?

Health editor Paul Cullen joins Hugh, Jennifer Bray and Jack Horgan-Jones to talk about an eventful week in Ireland's Covid-19 battle. Does the outbreak in the Midlands signal a major problem and a failure of governance, or is it a blip in an otherwise effective response?What is the thinking behind the proposed new colour-code system? And will the Leaving Cert blow up as a political issue, as adjusted exam results have in Scotland? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/12/202035 minutes, 3 seconds
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Lifting the lid on paid-for politics - with Peter Geoghegan

Hugh talks to journalist Peter Geoghegan about the murky world of political think-tanks and pressure groups that he writes about in a new book, Democracy for Sale. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/7/202044 minutes, 13 seconds
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Remembering John Hume - with Claire Hanna

SDLP MP for South Belfast Claire Hanna joins Hugh to look back on the life and legacy of John Hume, who died on Sunday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
8/5/202030 minutes, 39 seconds
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Government stumbles toward the recess

It's been another extraordinary week for the new government and a very uncomfortable one for Micheal Martin and some of his ministers, as stumbles over Pandemic Unemployment Payments and ministerial pay have undermined more positive messages on the reopening of schools and measures to stimulate the economy. Jennifer Bray and Harry McGee join Hugh to discuss the week in politics as we stumble toward the Dail's delayed summer recess. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/29/202035 minutes, 16 seconds
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Repost: Michael Lewis on Cronyism in The Trump Administration & The Unsung Virtues of Civil Servants

Author Michael Lewis (Moneyball, The Big Short, The Undoing Project)talks to Hugh about his new book 'The Fifth Risk'. The book concerns the Trump Administration and what Lewis says are astounding levels of cronyism and corruption in the appointments it has made in key government organisations with responsibility for everything from nuclear weapons to weather forecasting. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/24/202034 minutes, 34 seconds
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Green list confusion, EU recovery deal and the impending stimulus package

In today’s episode Hugh is joined by Pat Leahy and the newest member of the politics team, Jack Horgan-Jones to dissect the events of this week, including the mixed messages surrounding the newly published green list, the EU recovery deal and the eagerly awaited July stimulus package. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/22/202048 minutes, 34 seconds
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How damaged is Micheál Martin's leadership? (Live at The Irish Times Summer Nights Festival)

This week The Irish Times ran its "Summer Nights" online festival, featuring conversations with guests like Samantha Power, Anne Enright, Imelda May, Paul O'Connell, Dermot Bannon and David McWilliams. As part of the festival, the politics team got together to discuss, well a lot of things really. They started with what's been another horrible week for new Taoiseach Micheál Martin. How much harm has the Barry Cowen controversy done to his leadership?The Irish Times Summer Nights festival is sponsored by Peugeot. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/17/20201 hour, 45 seconds
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US politics: is Trump toast? With Fintan O'Toole and Suzanne Lynch

President Donald Trump is clearly behind in the polls, but is it too late for him to claw it back? What kind of campaigns will he and his rival Joe Biden need to run to secure victory? To talk about the 2020 race Hugh is joined by columnist Fintan O'Toole and Washington correspondent Suzanne Lynch. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/15/202047 minutes, 50 seconds
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FF's shaky start continues, economic dilemmas & Paschal's Eurogroup candidacy

Micheál Martin took hist first leaders' questions as Taoiseach this week, however much of the focus was on Agriculture Minister Barry Cowen and his drink driving apology. Jen Bray has the latest developments from the Dáil. Economics columnist Cliff Taylor and Europe correspondent Naomi O’Leary join Pat Leahy to discuss the EU’s path to economic recovery from the impact of Covid-19. Plus, a potential new position this week for Paschal Donohue? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/8/202036 minutes, 18 seconds
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Brexit: what's the latest and will there be a deal?

Brexit is still going and is still as infuriating as ever. With Britain now locked into a complete and final exit from the EU at the end of the year, London editor Denis Staunton updates us on the slow progress being made in negotiations on the future trade relationship, and helps us understand Boris Johnson's position. But first, Jennifer Bray recaps a fairly miserable week for the new leadership of both the Government and the opposition. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/3/202042 minutes, 10 seconds
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Coalition Teething Pains & Sinn Féin's Support

Academic and political analyst Kevin Cunningham joins Pat and Fiach to talk about the first week of the new coalition, new analysis of the source of Sinn Féin's support in #GE2020 and the difficult next stage in dealing with Covid-19. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
7/1/202045 minutes, 18 seconds
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New Government: FF, FG and Greens enter coalition

Fine Gael, Fianna Fáil and the Green Party have voted overwhelmingly to enter into government together . Pat Leahy is joined by Jennifer Bray, Harry McGee and Fiach Kelly to discuss this historic three-party coalition. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/26/202018 minutes, 9 seconds
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Interview: Masha Gessen, author of Surviving Autocracy

Masha Gessen is a Russian-American author, activist and journalist. In their new book, Surviving Autocracy, Gessen provides a punchy and persuasive analysis of the destruction the Trump administration has waged on US institutions, culture and sense of identity. In this episode, the author speaks to Hugh Linehan about the parallels between the US and Russia under Putin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/24/202040 minutes, 6 seconds
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Interview: Green Party Leader Eamon Ryan

Green Party leader Eamon Ryan joins Hugh Linehan and Irish Times political correspondent Harry McGee to discuss yesterday’s marathon Green Party convention, the divisions amongst party members and the outlook for the new programme for government. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/19/202044 minutes, 54 seconds
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The making of a PfG: negative externalities, biogenic methane & "absolute bastards"

What's in the FF-FG-Green programme for government, how is it going down with the grassroots, and what about that Irish Times / Ipsos-MRBI poll? Discussing it all are Pat, Fiach and Jen with host Hugh Linehan. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/16/202052 minutes, 14 seconds
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Green sticking points, is Direct Provision really finished?

First Harry McGee and Mary Minihan talk about the sticking points in negotiations between Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael and the Green Party to form a government, and a bit of Green Party history that casts light on the awkward phase it is going through. In part two, academic Liam Thornton joins in to discuss the fate of Direct Provision. The ending of the controversial system for dealing with those applying for asylum now seems all but certain. How did it come to this, and what comes next? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/10/202051 minutes, 20 seconds
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‘Phase Two Plus’ and decision time for government formation

Ireland is about to enter the next phase of the roadmap out of lockdown. 'Phase two plus' as coined by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar earlier today. Pat Leahy and Fiach Kelly speak to Hugh Linehan about the accelerated lifting of restrictions and discuss where we stand on this long and winding road to government formation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/5/202029 minutes, 56 seconds
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#BlackLivesMatter in Dublin too; Trump's gamble

The size of the #BlackLivesMatter demonstration in Dublin at the weekend took some by surprise, but it shouldn't have. Musician Sallay Garnett, also known as Loah, who has recently spoken out about her experience of racism in Ireland on social media, joins Irish Times journalists Fintan O'Toole and Sorcha Pollak to talk about the source of the energy behind the protest and whether Ireland is embarking on a reckoning with its own racism. After that: Washington correspondent Suzanne Lynch on the political gamble Donald Trump is taking with his hardline approach to protests over the killing by police of unarmed black man George Floyd in Minneapolis. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
6/3/202054 minutes, 12 seconds
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US politics: is America now an oligarchy? With Robert Reich

Robert Reich is an economist, professor, author, and political commentator who served as Secretary of Labour in the Clinton administration. Hugh talks to Robert about American society today, his contention that the US has become an oligarchy serving a select few, and how Donald Trump is a symptom of this decline.His latest book "The System: Who Rigged It, How We Fix" It is out now. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/29/202032 minutes, 29 seconds
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UK politics: how badly does the Cummings saga damage Johnson?

London editor Denis Staunton joins Hugh, Fiach and Jennifer to talk about the gripping story that has dominated UK politics for many straight days: Dominic Cummings' road trip (20.34). But first on today's podcast the team look at our own lockdown etiquette mini-scandal involving Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, revelations at the Covid committee hearings on the state's assistance to nursing homes at the start of the outbreak and those slow-moving government formation talks. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/27/202041 minutes
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How a legal challenge could unravel the EU - with Ronan McCrea

"Once taboos are broken, it's quite hard to reinstate them".A German court ruling challenging the primacy of European Court of Justice in EU matters poses a threat to the EU that even it can't fudge. The case hinged on the right of the European Central Bank to engage in bond-buying to support the EU economy. The top German court has ruled that the ECB hasn't sufficiently explained why the measures are necessary. But more importantly, it also ruled that its view is supreme over the ruling of the top European court, the ECJ. Among other problems, this could undermine attempts to rein in member states like Poland and Hungary that are challenging the EU's political norms. To explain how the ruling does this and why it matters, Hugh talks to Ronan McCrea, professor of constitutional and European law at University College London. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/22/202027 minutes, 32 seconds
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A Green Heave?

A move to challenge Eamon Ryan as Green leader is under way among a cohort within the party, with deputy leader Catherine Martin being urged to stand against him. That's the first topic on today's podcast with Irish Times politics team Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Harry McGee which also takes in government formation talks, a strange spat between Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil, the first hearing of the Covid-19 committee and how politics will handle the pressure to return public life to normality. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/20/202035 minutes, 39 seconds
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Eamon Ryan's long road back to power

It's been a difficult path for Eamon Ryan and the Green Party since the dark period following 2011, when the party lost all its seats and state funding. His stewardship of the party has earned him respect, particularly among the old guard. But do the fast-growing Greens' new recruits give him the same credit? Fiach Kelly writes about Ryan in this weekend's edition of The Irish Times and here he talks to Hugh about Ryan's leadership style and his party's difficult return to the government negotiating table. They also talk about how a relationship between the Greens, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael might work.This weekend's edition of The Irish Times features a series of articles about Green politics. You can read them all on irishtimes.com - or pick up a copy of the paper in your local newsagent. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/15/202029 minutes, 13 seconds
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Relaxing the lockdown

Different countries are taking different approaches at different speeds as they move to reopen their economies. London Editor Denis Staunton and Berlin Correspondent Derek Scally talk to Hugh Linehan about the politics of pandemic in the UK and Germany respectively. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/13/202036 minutes, 57 seconds
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The end of the beginning

As Ireland moves into the next, more complex phase of the Covid-19 pandemic, how can we hold the authorities to account? Is the current government being transparent enough about the decisions it is making and the rationale which underpins them? What happens when a new government is finally formed? And how well is the media covering the crisis? Hugh Linehan talks to columnist Fintan O’Toole and political editor Pat Leahy. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
5/6/202044 minutes, 30 seconds
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Can we reduce carbon emissions by 7% per year?

The Green Party has demanded that any government it joins implements cuts of 7 per cent each year to our national carbon emissions. Where does that figure come from, and is it achievable? We ask climate researcher Hannah Daly. Then Fiach Kelly explains how the overtures from Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil are going down with the Greens, and what we know about plans to ease the Coronavirus lockdown.Dr Hannah Daly lectures in energy systems modelling at University College Cork. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/30/202043 minutes, 54 seconds
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Interview: Philippe Sands, author of The Ratline

Phillipe Sands is a barrister, author and broadcaster. His new book The Ratline tells the story of Nazi war criminal and fugitive Otto Wachter, about whom Sands has already produced a popular podcast, also called The Ratline, for the BBC. Sands talks to Hugh about how he encountered Wachter's son, the nature of evil and the remembrance of the Holocaust. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/24/202048 minutes, 57 seconds
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Stark economic predictions for the year ahead - with Michael Taft

This week the Government published the worst economic projections since the financial crisis of 2008-11. Finance minister, Paschal Donohue, issued a bleak warning that Ireland is now in “severe recession”. How will the next government deal with the economic and fiscal challenges that lie ahead? Is there anything in the joint framework from Fine Gael and Fine Fail that can weather the storm? Michael Taft, a researcher for SIPTU and the man behind the blog ‘Notes on the Front’ joins Hugh and Pat to discuss the structural reforms and measures needed to grow the economy and control the national debt. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/22/202045 minutes, 49 seconds
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Can Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael lure a third party?

This week, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael's historic agreement to form a government together didn't make much of a splash among the distracted public. There are difficult decisions ahead, but no sign of them in the joint framework document that accompanied the agreement. Will a smaller party bet on going into government with FF and FG in a time of unprecedented uncertainty? And can Sinn Féin be ignored for much longer? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/17/202033 minutes, 38 seconds
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US Politics special with Clare Malone of FiveThirtyEight

Today Hugh talks to American journalist Clare Malone about the upending of US politics in an election year by the outbreak of Covid-19. Clare is senior political writer with FiveThirtyEight, a data-driven politics and sports website. She is also a regular on the popular FiveThirtyEight politics podcast. They talk about the response of the Trump administration to the outbreak, the potential impact of the virus on voting in November, rampant gerrymandering in some American states, and the strengths of presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/15/202051 minutes, 11 seconds
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Europe's dissonant coronavirus response - with Naomi O'Leary

Europe correspondent Naomi O'Leary joins Hugh and Pat to talk about the EU response to the coronavirus crisis and how differing national memories of anther crisis, the financial crash of a decade ago, are driving dissonance among member states. Plus, Pat digs into the government formation talks once again. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/10/202043 minutes, 24 seconds
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How are we handling this lengthy lockdown? With Jennifer O'Connell and Patrick Freyne

As we approach a sunny bank holiday weekend, and with several weeks of social distancing already under our belts, Hugh talks to Jennifer O'Connell and Patrick Freyne about how we are collectively handling the deprivations of life in lockdown. And we wonder some more about what permanent changes might come about as a result of Covid-19. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/8/202040 minutes, 28 seconds
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Politics in the age of isolation

Politics is still going on, so Jennifer Bray and Harry McGee talk to Hugh about the latest goings-on: government formation, Seanad elections and the Labour leadership. But first they reflect on the nature of work and politics in the age of isolation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
4/1/202044 minutes, 2 seconds
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The government's response steps up a gear - with Fiach Kelly

Fiach joins to Hugh to talk about the caretaker government's response to the Covid-19 outbreak, and how the intervention of a civil servant has brought focus back onto the creation of a new government. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/25/202027 minutes, 31 seconds
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What will the long-term consequences of Covid-19 be? With Fintan O'Toole

What will come in the wake of Covid-19? The end of the office and the transformation of cities? A new age of hedonism? A long-term increase of the role of the state in the economy? To talk about that and more, Hugh virtually sits down with Fintan O'Toole. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/20/202030 minutes, 32 seconds
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A new government must be formed - but how?

What a week it has been since our last podcast. Hugh and Pat talk about Leo Varadkar's national address, what the Coronavirus outbreak means for politics now and in the future, and the dilemma facing our system of how to form a new government under such novel and trying circumstances. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/18/202032 minutes, 1 second
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Coronavirus transforms the political reality

Jennifer and Pat join Hugh to talk about the Coronavirus outbreak. How ready is Ireland? They also discuss the accelerated government formation now taking place. As the situation worsens, all parties will come under even more pressure to bring a new government into existence. Like many of you, the Inside Politics team is making changes to how it does things in light of the Coronavirus outbreak. Today's episode was recorded remotely. You may notice a slight change in audio quality. Thanks for your continued support. irishtimes.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/11/202027 minutes, 22 seconds
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Does it matter what Sinn Féin calls Ireland? - with Newton Emerson

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar lambasted Sinn Féin this week for “burning a Tricolour before our eyes” by referring to the Republic of Ireland as "the Southern State". He's wasting his time if he expects Sinn Féin to change in this respect, but he's also missing a more important point, says Irish Times columnist Newton Emerson. Southern politicians should learn from the peace process in Northern Ireland that Sinn Féin can be encouraged to respect democratic and political norms when brought into the fold. Hugh and Newton also discuss the DUP's "evolving" position on the Northern Ireland protocol (the agreement between the UK and the EU that Northern Ireland will remain more closely aligned with the EU post-Brexit, requiring checks on goods crossing the Irish Sea). Having missed a chance to support Theresa May's "best of all worlds" deal, are they now getting ready to spin their satisfaction with Boris Johnson's "worst of all worlds" compromise, having no other choice? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/6/202019 minutes, 38 seconds
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How Can Labour Become Relevant Again? / The ‘Bonkers’ Seanad Election

As government formation talks rumble on behind the scenes, Fiach Kelly and Harry McGee join Hugh Linehan in studio to discuss the first of the Labour hustings which took place in Cork on Monday night. Labour have struggled to win the youth vote and provide a clear party message, so how can they stay relevant to an electorate who are moving further away from them?Also, Irish Times parliamentary correspondent Marie O’Halloran joined Hugh and Fiach in studio to talk through the fundamentals of the 'bonkers' Seanad Election. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
3/4/202045 minutes, 19 seconds
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Post-Brexit Trade Talks: Who Will Triumph?

With Brexit negotiations due to take place on Monday between Britain and the European Union, each side is accusing the other of bad faith. Britain’s negotiating mandate is at odds with the European Union’s on a number of issues. So what are these key points of contention and will there also be issues surrounding the Northern Irish Protocol? London Editor Denis Staunton and Europe Correspondent Naomi O’Leary join Hugh and Pat to discuss each side’s differing perspectives. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/28/202040 minutes, 20 seconds
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How Can Sinn Féin Get Into Government? - with Louise O'Reilly

Sinn Féin TD for Dublin Fingal and party health spokesperson Louise O'Reilly joins Hugh and Pat to talk about the party's reasons for holding public events this week and its ambition to be a part of the next government. What would it take for Fianna Fáil's stance to shift in favour of a deal? They also discuss the governmental response to the global Coronavirus outbreak. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/26/202034 minutes, 6 seconds
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Diatribe and Vitriol on Day One of The Dáil

Who was Fianna Fáil leader Michéal Martin really speaking to when he attacked Sinn Féin last night in Leinster House? Fiach Kelly joins Hugh to discuss a fraught first meeting of the 33rd Dáil. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/21/202018 minutes, 17 seconds
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"It's Up To Sinn Féin", Fianna Fáil In A Bind, Alan Or Aodhán

On today's podcast: Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil are both spinning that Sinn Féin must step up and try to form a left-wing government - hoping that Mary Lou McDonald will fail, of course. Michéal Martin and Fianna Fáil arrive at a major inflection point: should they try to court younger working class voters or older middle class voters? The future of the party may be at stake. And the Labour Party faces its own dilemma. Which section of the party's traditional support base should its new leader represent? Hugh is joined by Fiach Kelly and Jennifer Bray. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/19/202032 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ask Us Anything: #GE2020 Edition

Now that the dust has finally settled on the Irish general election, Hugh is joined in studio by Pat Leahy, Jennifer Bray and Harry McGee to answer any of your lingering questions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/14/202045 minutes, 44 seconds
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Sinn Féin and The IRA: Anything to Worry About?

Sinn Féin is poised to take power in the next Dáil after winning a strong mandate in #GE2020, but for many people questions remain over its relationship to the Provisional IRA. Today we attempt to sort through what we know and what we don't know on this question. Does the IRA Army Council still remain at the top of the republican political movement? If so, does it pose a threat to security or has it become toothless? And to what extent does it influence modern Sinn Féin? Simon Carswell is here to help. Plus, Sam McBride on unionist reaction to Sinn Féin's political success down south. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/12/202034 minutes, 25 seconds
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Election Daily - So Long

Election 2020 is over and so is Election Daily. On this final episode, Fiach and Pat join Hugh to talk about what happens next. Leo Varadkar could remain as Taoiseach longer than people may realise, says Pat. There's a split in opinion as to whether Sinn Fein really wants to be in government, and agreement that Fianna Fail are in the most difficult position of all. Thanks to everyone who listened to Election Daily. Inside Politics will be back tomorrow. Email the podcast: [email protected] Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/11/202018 minutes, 18 seconds
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Election Daily - Monday - Day Two of the Count

Jennifer Bray joins Hugh Linehan from the RDS as the count rattles on into the evening there. Jennifer O'Connell was at the count centre in Waterford yesterday as Sinn Fein's David Cullinane won his seat with twice the required quota of first preference votes. It's been a dismal day for Fianna Fáil as the party continue to lose seats. Where are the transfers going & who is benefiting from the SF surge? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/10/202016 minutes, 45 seconds
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Election Weekend in The Newsroom (And What Now?)

Pat Leahy is here to assess the results of #GE2020. How did Sinn Fein turn its fortunes at the ballot box around so spectacularly in a few short months? And can Micheal Martin really do a u-turn on governing with Sinn Fein? But first we relive the weekend as it played out in The Irish Times newsroom. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/10/202026 minutes, 6 seconds
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Election Daily - Count Day - Sinn Féin Surge

The Sinn Fein surge is real and it's playing out in constituencies all across the country today. Harry McGee and Jennifer Bray are here to discuss the story of the election so far. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
2/9/202016 minutes, 9