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How to Be a Better Human

English, Education, 1 season, 139 episodes, 3 days, 1 hour, 52 minutes
About
Join How To Be a Better Human as we take a look within and beyond ourselves. How To Be A Better Human isn’t your average self improvement podcast. Each week join comedian Chris Duffy in conversation with guests and past speakers as they uncover sharp insights and give clear takeaways on how YOU can be a better human. From your work to your home and your head to your heart, How To Be a Better Human looks in unexpected places for new ways to improve and show up for one another. Inspired by the popular series of the same name on TED’s Ideas blog, How to Be a Better Human will help you become a better person from the comfort of your own headphones.
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How to find food in your own backyard (w/ Alexis Nicole Nelson)

It’s easy to forget that the packaged lettuce you bought from the store originally grew out of the ground – but it did! What if you could cut out your trips to the store – and get more food right from your own backyard? Foraging is a fantastic way to reconnect to your natural environment and Alexis Nicole Nelson is an outdoor educator, food writer, and expert forager. This week, she’ll help ignite your curiosity about the green spaces around you, even if you live in the concrete jungle. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
4/15/202437 minutes, 2 seconds
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How to develop the habits you want – and get rid of the ones you don’t (w/ James Clear)

We all have habits - the good and not-so good kind. But can we use them to our advantage? In this week’s episode, Chris is joined by James Clear, entrepreneur and author of #1 New York Times bestseller, “Atomic Habits”, for a conversation about the power of habitual behavior. They discuss the science of habit formation, how to understand the forces that motivate you, and why the sum of many little habits can add up to a better life. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
4/8/202434 minutes, 9 seconds
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How to find “your thing” (or your many things) – (w/ Constance Hockaday)

Some people are born knowing exactly what they want to do with their life – and because of that, they’re able to get to the top of their field. But most of us have multiple passions and identities, making it difficult to visualize our own unique paths.. So, how do we explore who we are and what we love to do in our careers and in our lives? This week, guest & TED Fellow Constance Hockaday helps us navigate and voice our deepest hopes and desires. She walks us through her perspective as an artist, what she’s learned from immersing herself into small and sometimes very isolated communities, and gives tips on how to find liberation by pursuing your passion. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
4/1/202433 minutes, 44 seconds
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How to find wisdom and wholeness in a modern world (w/ Krista Tippett)

Keeping hope and courage alive before the many pains and promises of the world can be tough. So how do you do it? Journalist and host of podcast On Being, Krista Tippett, has spent a career interviewing some of the world's wisest people in search of answers to that question. Krista shares with Chris her thoughts on how to coexist with life’s existential questions, dives into the state of spirituality in modern life — and makes a case for finding the fundamental goodness that we all have to offer. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
3/25/202436 minutes, 49 seconds
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How to get workplace gender equity now (with Sara Sanford)

There are more opportunities for women in the workplace today than there ever have been. But with stagnant wage gaps, limited parental leave, and enduring bias in recruitment, have modern businesses changed THAT much?? Gender equity expert Sara Sanford says there's work to do–and in this episode, she shares how she developed a certified playbook that helps companies use data-backed standards to fight gender bias. Tune in to hear why inclusive work requires that we change not just how people think, but also how the workplace operates.
3/18/202436 minutes, 27 seconds
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What to do when the truth isn’t enough to be believed (w/ Dina Nayeri)

Stories are such a powerful human invention that even the fictional ones can feel completely true. Dina Nayeri is a writer of fiction and nonfiction whose work highlights just how influential the stories we tell can be – and what is at risk when the truth isn’t valued. Dina speaks from her experience as a storyteller and former refugee about the importance of shaping a society that is thoughtful about language, history, culture, and truth. Then, she suggests frameworks anyone can use to think critically about what they think they know -- and questions why certain stories are more likely to be believed. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
3/11/202436 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to cultivate the skill of happiness (w/ Dan Harris)

If you’ve ever felt apprehensive about trying something seemingly woo-woo to improve your mental health (like meditation, mindfulness, or simply touching grass) you're not alone. Dan Harris was a mindfulness skeptic anchoring on ABC News when an on-air panic attack sent him into a journey that had him searching for what constitutes well-being. Dan hosts the Ten Percent Happier podcast, and authored a book of the same name. This March, he celebrates the book's 10th anniversary. With a skeptic’s sense of humor and a curious, philosophizing mind, Dan talks about what he's learned in his exploration of meditation, mindfulness, and happiness. You’ll hear about the scientific data that could sway even the toughest cynic – and learn the tools and tricks that can help you build the skills that can make life (and you) a little bit better. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
3/4/202432 minutes, 46 seconds
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How to find connection –and love– in everyday life (w/ Barbara Fredrickson)

Romantic love isn’t all it’s cracked up to be – at least that’s one way positive psychologist Barbara Fredrickson puts it. Barbara’s decades of research suggest that emotions outside of our narrow definition of love are just as important to our well-being. In this episode, Barbara shares what to look for when we want to broaden our experience of positive emotions, and suggests ways to build the consistent connection and care at the heart of our best relationships. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
2/26/202432 minutes, 12 seconds
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Re-release: Why love –and therapy– means going in a direction you don’t yet know (w/ Dr. Orna Guralnik)

In her critically acclaimed Showtime docuseries, Couples Therapy, clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst Dr. Orna Guralnik thinks deeply about relationships, emotions, and connection. In this episode, Dr. Guralnik explains why she believes psychoanalysis helps us love better, dispels myths about the right time to go to therapy, and gives tips on how to unblock our relationship with the world around us. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
2/19/202435 minutes, 33 seconds
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How to be good enough in America (w/ Wajahat Ali)

If there's one thing this show believes in, it's that finding joy and comedy in life is essential when being human gets tough. Wajahat Ali is a writer who knows this well. His charming and powerful stories bring to light the funny -- and difficult truth-- of life outside of the mainstream. Chris hears from Wajahat about his experiences as a brown Muslim in America and as a father whose young daughter had a complicated health diagnosis. Wajahat's heartwarming wisdom on the importance of letting go (and celebrating the good with the bad, even in the bleakest times) will have you reassessing everything -- from your worst self-destructive tendencies to what you value most. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts Wajahat's latest book, "Go Back to Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations on How to Become American" is out now.
2/12/202435 minutes, 16 seconds
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How to discover your authentic self -- at any age (w/ Bevy Smith)

Wanting to “find yourself” isn’t something that only happens in coming-of-age movies – anyone, at any age, can wonder what it’d be like to have a different life. Bevy Smith knows this. A self-described late bloomer, Bevy shares what she’s learned from changing careers at the age of 38, and retells the story of how she completely uprooted her life to pursue her wildest dreams. Bevy also gives tips on how to stop second-guessing your desires – and names the one quality everyone needs to be their happiest selves. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
2/5/202432 minutes, 10 seconds
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How to make generosity contagious infectious (w/ Chris Anderson)

If you’ve ever opened up social media in the hopes that it would cheer you up only for it to leave you upset, angry, or tired, you are not alone. So what if we could turn that special power the internet has to change our emotions – and use it for good? The head of TED, Chris Anderson, joins Chris Duffy to talk about why he believes in what he calls infectious generosity. Join the two Chrises as they discuss how we can turn outrage back into optimism by tapping into one of the most fundamental human virtues. Chris Anderson’s book, Infectious Generosity, is out now. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/29/202436 minutes, 59 seconds
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Why you should start thinking about death (w/ Alua Arthur)

There’s a saying about two things that are inevitable in this world, and Alua Arthur wants to help you think about one of them with less fear. No, she’s not a tax professional – she’s a death doula, a person who supports dying people and their loved ones. A former lawyer, Alua shares what we can all learn when we purposefully think about the end of life, whether that is our own or someone else’s. From finding joy in our everyday lives to navigating the emotional, legal, and spiritual decisions that arise around, Alua’s wisdom will inspire you pursue to live, and “go”, with grace. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/22/202434 minutes, 38 seconds
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How to think critically about history -- and why it matters (w/ David Ikard) (Re-release)

Have you ever recalled a story only to have someone point out "that's not how it went"? Well, what happens when what we misrepresent are our historical narratives? David Ikard is a Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies at Vanderbilt University. In this episode, he talks about the societal and personal dangers of inaccurate history knowledge, and uncovers the real story of one of history’s most iconic figures. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/15/202428 minutes, 24 seconds
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Re-release: How to lead a happier, more fulfilling life (with Dr. Robert Waldinger)

What makes YOU happy? Dr. Robert Waldinger is the director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development, an 83-year-old project that tracks how life experience across decades affects health and wellbeing in middle age and beyond. Robert shares the surprising things he’s learned about what makes a meaningful life and what to do --or avoid-- in order to have a long, fulfilling existence. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
12/25/202328 minutes, 35 seconds
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Re-release: How learning about indigenous foods can open up your worldview (with Sean Sherman)

What’s your favorite dish — and what culture originated that recipe? Whether you’re thinking about grilled cheese, burritos, curry, pho… (we would go on but we are getting too hungry) trying something delicious opens you up to new experiences and conversations. Sean Sherman, Oglala Lakota, is a chef and food educator who focuses on revitalizing and reclaiming indigenous food systems in a modern culinary context. In today’s episode, he shares how increasing access to indigenous food practices can liberate more than just your taste buds. Sean, also known as The Sioux Chef, uses Native American recipes as well as farming, harvesting, wild food usage, salt and sugar making, food preservation, and land stewardship techniques to feed and educate communities in the Minneapolis/Saint Paul area. His vision of modern indigenous foods have garnered him many accolades, including the 2018 Bush Foundation Fellowship and the 2018 James Beard Award for Best American Cookbook, and a 2019 James Beard Leadership Award. You can follow Sean at https://sioux-chef.com/ To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
11/27/202329 minutes, 59 seconds
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Lessons from 102-year-old swimmer Maurine Kornfeld

Maurine “Mighty Mo'' Kornfeld will soon turn 102 years old, and most days, you can catch her doing laps in a Los Angeles public swimming pool. And that’s not just because she regularly competes in – and wins – world swimming championships! It’s because she loves being in the water, despite only picking up swimming as a hobby well into her sixties. In this special episode, Maurine shares what she’s learned from doing something she loves almost every day, why it’s never too late to start something new, and the three things anyone can do to improve their life, no matter their age. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
11/6/202324 minutes, 1 second
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What do our guests do to be better humans?

This show is all about growth – and it’s always inspiring to know that the amazing guests we bring on still see room in their own lives to become better humans. This season TED Audio Collective+ subscribers on Apple Podcasts received bonus content, where guests shared the ideas that inspire them and the issues they are passionate about working on. We picked our favorites as a thank you to all listeners – but if you WANT to support this show, you can learn more about TED Audio Collective+ at podcasts.apple.com/ted-audio-collective
10/30/202322 minutes, 2 seconds
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The perks of listening to the sounds of the world (w/ Dallas Taylor)

Keyboard and mouse clicks, the song of an ice cream truck, a neighbor’s yapping dog – what kind of noises soundtrack your life? Today’s guest, Dallas Taylor, is the host and creator of the Twenty Thousand Hertz podcast, a show about the world's most recognizable and interesting sounds. In this episode, he shares why sounds can tell deeper stories – and how tuning IN to the noise of the world can help us tap into the wild depths of our imagination. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
10/23/202337 minutes, 9 seconds
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How comedy helps us deal with hard truths (w/ Roy Wood Jr.)

There’s a saying that comedy is tragedy plus time. Perhaps that’s why some of our biggest problems feel easiest to manage with a dose of humor. Comedian, journalist, and actor Roy Wood Jr. has spent his career finding silly in the serious and using this tactic to influence real change. Listen in to learn how you can tap into the powers of humor in your own life. This episode was edited from a live conversation as part of TED’s Membership programming. TED Membership is the best way to support and engage with the big ideas you love from TED. To learn more visit ted.com/membership
10/16/202335 minutes, 49 seconds
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How to solve your problems through drawing (w/ Liana Finck)

Liana Finck’s cartoons explore life’s big predicaments: what to make for dinner, how to leave a party without being rude, how to feel like more than a snack machine once you have a child. In today’s episode, Liana shares how drawing has become a practice for her to answer questions, solve problems, and why creating art helps humans understand ourselves better. Liana also discusses why she’s not bothered by impostor syndrome (okay maybe it helps that she regularly contributes to The New Yorker) and how she navigates the feelings of doubt we all experience with honesty and humor.
10/9/202334 minutes, 42 seconds
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Why you should try birding (w/ Christian Cooper)

If you ask Christian Cooper, a science writer, editor, and the host of the show “Extraordinary Birder With Christian Cooper”, birding can teach us all kinds of lessons about life, self-acceptance, and joy. In this episode, Christian shares what he deems as the seven pleasures of birding, why inclusion is especially important in life-affirming pursuits, and how anyone (city-dwellers and countryside-residents alike) can commune with nature to unlock the awe and wonder of the world around us. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
10/2/202333 minutes, 15 seconds
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How do I know what my future self wants? (w/ Shankar Vedantam)

How well would you say you know yourself? Do you feel like the same person you were 10 years ago? Today’s guest, Shankar Vedantam, loves these kinds of questions and what they reveal about what we believe about ourselves and how we actually behave. Shankar is a science writer and the creator and host of the podcast “Hidden Brain”. In this episode, Shankar shares why he’s fascinated by the things we THINK we know, uncovers examples of what our brains hide from us, and shares how we can use that knowledge to live the lives we want to be living. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts.
9/25/202336 minutes, 55 seconds
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How to build better relationships between kids, parents, and ourselves (w/ Dr. Becky Kennedy)

One of the most important things that humans do is learning how to relate – to ourselves, one another, and, crucially, to our parents. Dr. Becky Kennedy, who was deemed the “Millennial Parenting Whisperer” by Time Magazine, might understand this better than anyone. In this episode, Dr. Becky and Chris discuss how we can raise kids in ways that help them be confident and resilient. But don’t fret, non-parents, Dr. Becky also shares rich insights about how to find and develop the relationship-mending skills we need to thrive as adults. This jam-packed episode has a little something for everyone – and if you want more from Dr. Becky you can listen to her talk on TED Talks Daily, or find her on her own podcast, Good Inside with Dr. Becky, wherever you are listening to this. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
9/18/202335 minutes, 20 seconds
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What vision loss helped Andrew Leland gain

When he was a teenager, Andrew Leland was diagnosed with a condition that causes a gradual loss of vision. Over the years, Andrew’s literal view of the world has narrowed – but the ways in which he can explore and embrace life have widened. In this episode, Andrew talks about what his transition into blindness has taught him about life and how to navigate change. He also shares enlightening and humorous insights into the culture of blindness and disability and reveals what we can learn about bringing joy and fun into our accessibility practices. Andrew is a writer, teacher, and audio producer. His first book, “The Country of the Blind: A Memoir at the End of Sight” is out now. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
9/11/202333 minutes, 30 seconds
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How labor unions create worker power (w/ Margaret Levi) (Re-release)

If the ongoing television writers' and actors' strikes -- and other labor organizing efforts happening across the world -- have been on your radar, this is the episode for you. It's also for you if you are a fan of weekends. Or social security. Or health insurance. Or if you're anti-child labor! Because all of these aforementioned workplace protections exist thanks to the advocacy of labor unions. In this episode, American political scientist Margaret Levi shares the long history of organizing labor, and explains how unions create equality and protect worker rights. Margaret also discusses her optimism about today’s young workforce and why she believes that an equitable future requires a revival of the labor movement. This is an episode we released last year but it feels more relevant than ever as we celebrate Labor Day today in the United States. We hope you enjoy it! For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
9/4/202335 minutes, 3 seconds
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How changing your story can change your life (w/ Lori Gottlieb)

Lori Gottlieb believes we all have an inner narrator. In this episode, she explains why the story you tell yourself is key to your happiness (or lack thereof). She also discusses the stages of change, why relationships are a dance, and the steps to finding a good therapist that can help you edit the story of your life. Lori is a therapist, the bestselling author of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, and a co-host on the Dear Therapists podcast. She was once also an executive at NBC, overseeing shows like the hit medical drama ER. It’s through these varied experiences that she’s realized the power of being aware of your personal narrative and being willing to edit your story. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
8/28/202335 minutes, 14 seconds
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Why your brain is an unreliable narrator (w/ Aparna Nancherla)

Impostor syndrome is one of many therapy-speak words that have gone mainstream in the past few years — but what is it, really? Aparna Nancherla knows all about it. Aparna is a comedian and the author of Unreliable Narrator: Me, Myself, and Impostor Syndrome. Despite her success as a performer, she isn’t immune to self-doubt. In this episode, she talks about the ways she’s learned to deal with impostor syndrome: like creating a resume listing all her failures, or making up words at parties to gauge other people’s reactions. She also shares how she learned to put less stock in success and what to do when your mind isn’t telling you the truth. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
8/21/202335 minutes, 58 seconds
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How to Love Criticism | WorkLife with Adam Grant

What if you could tell your co-workers what you really think of them? At one of the world’s most successful hedge funds, everyone is rated and ranked constantly – in front of everyone. They’ve figured out how to embrace negative feedback, and they swear it’s essential to their success. Adam Grant shows how you can learn to take criticism well – and get better at dishing it out. This is an episode of WorkLife with Adam Grant, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. WorkLife's sixth season comes out September 19th. To listen to more WorkLife with Adam Grant now find and follow WorkLife wherever you're listening to this. Find the transcript for this episode at go.ted.com/worklifecriticism
8/14/202331 minutes, 39 seconds
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Episode 1: The Internet’s First Main Character? | The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks

The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks is a new show from the TED Audio Collective, hosted by Dylan Marron. It’s 1999, and sixteen years after its original release, a new Star Wars is finally coming. Fans have been camping out in front of theaters across the country just to be the first to see it. The beloved intergalactic saga is set to debut a slew of brand new characters, one of whom is a revolutionary CGI creation named Jar Jar Binks. Whispers begin to spread about big changes coming to the galaxy far, far away – and not everyone’s happy about it. Listen to The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks wherever you get your podcasts. Transcripts for The Redemption of Jar Jar Binks are available at go.ted.com/jarjar
8/7/202331 minutes, 56 seconds
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How To Love Your Face (from Slate's How To!)

This is an episode from a podcast we think you'll love. It's called How To! and it's from Slate Podcasts. Earlier this year, our listener, Rell, nearly failed a promotion. Not because she was unprepared or unqualified, but because she didn’t maintain enough eye contact with the interviewers. Rell’s eye hasn’t been fully receiving information since she was born, a condition that’s outwardly visible and known colloquially as a “lazy eye.” It’s beginning to affect her self-confidence and is this “ugly thing [she] can’t let go of.” On this episode of How To!, host Carvell Wallace brings on Sarah Ruhl, an award-winning playwright and author who wrote about her experience with Bell’s palsy in her recent book, "Smile: The Story of a Face." Sarah has some wonderful advice for letting go of your inner rage, making interactions with strangers less painful, and even finding people who light up your mirror neurons. If you liked this episode you can find more of Slate’s How To! podcast wherever you get your podcasts.
7/31/202334 minutes, 25 seconds
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Do we have something to learn from conspiracy theories? (w/ Peter McIndoe)

There was a time when Peter McIndoe might see you on the street and ask: have you ever seen a baby pigeon? If you said no, he’d probably grin and say, of course you haven’t, because birds are actually spy drones created by the US government – and they emerge “fully adult” from “the factory.” Peter McIndoe peddled a crazy idea – that all birds are drones created and monitored by the U.S. government. As ridiculous (and hilarious) as this sounds, Peter’s conspiracy theory that “Birds Aren’t Real” gained a huge following. In this episode, Peter discusses why he’s used the framework of a conspiracy theory to explore the "us-versus-them" mentality that is so pervasive in us humans. He also shares what he witnessed as he took his performance across the globe, and why he finds it more important than ever that we talk to each other with empathy even in the most absurd situations. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
7/24/202333 minutes, 30 seconds
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How can art hold space for your pain? (w/ Jessie Reyez)

Jessie Reyez isn't afraid to make you cry when you listen to her music. The R&B artist, who was born in Toronto to Colombian immigrants, has amassed more than a billion streams globally, performed at Coachella, and been nominated for a Grammy. In this episode, Jessie opens up about her songwriting process and the journey of turning heartbreak into music. Then Jessie shares tips on how we can all create space for our emotions through art, and discusses why staying present is essential to creativity. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
7/17/202332 minutes, 37 seconds
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Why we should rethink what mental health means (w/ Sandy Allen)

It feels like talking about mental health, in our workplaces, homes and schools, is not as unusual – or as risky – as it may have been until very recently. But what do we really mean when we talk about de-stigmatizing mental health – and what gets left out of the public conversation? Sandy Allen is a writer, mental health advocate, and the author of the book “A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise: A True Story About Schizophrenia”. In this episode, Sandy speaks about the experience of writing a memoir about his uncle who lived with schizophrenia and what the process showed him about the diversity of the human mind and experience. Sandy then shares how he thinks and rethinks what “mental health” means, and imagines some of the ways we could begin to restructure society so everyone’s spirits and minds have access to equitable and dignified care. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
7/10/202331 minutes, 18 seconds
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Fixable: "How do I balance what I want to do with what I NEED to do?"

This is an episode of Fixable, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective hosted by Anne Morriss and Frances Frei. Lola Bakare is an author, marketer and advisor who was recently named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices in Marketing – unsurprisingly, she has a ton of projects on her plate. But recently Lola has been struggling with balancing her most energizing and creative endeavors with the, well, boring tasks that keep a business running. Anne and Frances dig into the things that stop Lola – and many of us – from creating space for our passions and suggest ways to reclaim the time needed for our most invigorating work. Frances Frei is a Harvard Business professor. Anne Morriss is a CEO and best-selling author. Anne and Frances are two of the top leadership coaches in the world. Oh, did we mention they're also married to each other? Together, Anne and Frances move fast and fix stuff by talking to guest callers about their workplace issues and solving their problems – in 30 minutes or less. Both listeners and guests will receive actionable insights to create meaningful change in the workplace. From CEOs to nurses, the restaurant world to Silicon Valley, Frances and Anne have a plan for anyone hoping to improve their their workplace. If you want to be on Fixable, call our hotline at 234-Fixable (that's 234-349-2253) to leave Anne and Frances a voicemail with your workplace problem or email [email protected] You can listen to Fixable wherever you're listening to this. Transcripts for Fixable are available at go.ted.com/fixablescripts.
7/3/202327 minutes, 58 seconds
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How to travel without even leaving home (w/ Saleem Reshamwala)

Whether you’re going somewhere new and exciting for the summer or taking a well-earned staycation, there are endless ways to venture into our world and plug into wonder. Saleem Reshamwala is a filmmaker, journalist, podcaster – and an expert world traveler. And even though he’s been to far and wide places, his hyperlocal and unique style of traveling will change the way you plan your next trip. If you want to keep traveling with Saleem after this episode, you can listen to Far Flung, Saleem’s travel podcast with the TED Audio Collective. You can listen to Far Fung wherever you are listening to this. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
6/26/202334 minutes, 49 seconds
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Listen to Ten Percent Happier ft. Get Fit Sanely series

Do you want to live longer, exercise smarter & eat better? Ten Percent Happier has a series of podcast episodes to help you do just that, featuring experts in science and Buddhism. Listen here: https://link.chtbl.com/vX0o7hLd.The Ten Percent Happier podcast is hosted by Dan Harris, a fidgety, skeptical journalist who had a panic attack on live national television, which led him to try something he otherwise never would have considered: meditation. On the Ten Percent Happier podcast, Dan talks with eminent meditation teachers, top scientists, and even the odd celebrity -- from Gabor Maté to Brené Brown to Karamo from Queer Eye. Listen as Dan ventures into the deep end of the pool, covering subjects such as enlightenment and psychedelics or science-based techniques for issues such as anxiety, productivity, and relationships. You can listen to Ten Percent Happier wherever you're listening to this.
6/25/20233 minutes, 39 seconds
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What will you do with your one wild and precious planet? (w/ Bill McKibben)

Most of us get that climate change is a global problem we need to solve, fast. But that can feel incredibly overwhelming when most of us don’t even know where to start. Bill McKibben is an environmentalist, author, and journalist who has written extensively about climate change and global warming. With a refreshing lightheartedness and frank outlook, Bill discusses the emotions, ideas and data that keep him moving forward in the battle against climate change and outlines ways you too can take action to save the planet you call home. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
6/19/202334 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to embrace – and challenge – the idea of “beauty” (w / Elise Hu)

Humans have always been captivated by beauty, and for almost as long, we’ve been marketed products and new technologies to help us achieve certain beauty standards. Elise Hu is a journalist and the author of “Flawless: Lessons in looks and culture from the K-beauty industry.” In this episode, she shares the fascinating insights she’s learned from years of studying the $10 billion K-beauty industry and the cutting-edge skincare, niche makeup products, and technology that promise to optimize our appearance. Elise and Chris talk about the real stakes of placing a premium on our looks, why a more inclusive version of “beauty” is worth pursuing, and how we can both enjoy and push back against the very human desire to feel beautiful. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
6/12/202333 minutes, 2 seconds
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How to be an adult – and how to raise one (w/ Julie Lythcott-Haims)

Whether it’s grades and test scores, cushy jobs or big salaries, our ideas of “success” tend to be incredibly narrow and often start incredibly early. Julie Lythcott-Haims is a New York Times bestselling author and former Dean of Freshmen at Stanford, and she is dedicated to helping people reconsider what really makes a happy, “successful” adult. Julie shares wisdom for parents and anyone who has been parented on why it’s crucial to question societal expectations, how to find your own path and why empathy towards yourself and others are the true key to loving who you’ll grow up to be. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
6/5/202334 minutes, 27 seconds
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What we can learn from great salespeople (w/ Colin Coggins)

Selling products, ideas or even yourself is a task that can feel daunting, or maybe even a little uncouth for some people. But Colin Coggins, author and adjunct professor at USC’s Marshall School of Business, believes that anyone can learn the skills needed to sell anything – and that you already have more “sales” experience than you think. Colin shares why he believes that the best salespeople defy the expectations of what society thinks of as a successful salesperson, how self-awareness can help you achieve your goals and why learning the art of selling could teach you a lot about life in general. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
5/29/202327 minutes, 33 seconds
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How to set boundaries and find peace (w/ Nedra Glover Tawwab)

Telling other people what you want – or need – can be a really difficult thing to do! Nedra Glover Tawwab is a therapist and New York Times bestselling author who helps people create healthy boundaries with themselves and others, both at work and in personal relationships. In this episode, she talks about why identifying your needs is so important, clarifies what healthy boundaries can look like and shares empowering tools so you can advocate for yourself – and get the treatment you deserve. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
5/22/202333 minutes, 48 seconds
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How to dive into your fears (w/ Jill Heinerth)

Jill Heinerth is a professional cave diver who faces threats big and small constantly – from dangerous technical dives deep inside underwater caves, to searching for never-before-seen ecosystems inside Antarctic icebergs. Jill recounts her incredible experiences in maneuvering through challenging times and shares tips on how to face what scares you – and dive into your own rich, rewarding adventures. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
5/15/202330 minutes, 9 seconds
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How to stop finding your self-worth through your job (w/ Gloria Chan Packer)

For some of us it’s easy to lose ourselves in our work. But a lack of boundaries between your personal and work life is something mental wellness educator Gloria Chan Packer would warn you twice about. Gloria speaks about the perils of gaining your sense of self-worth from your job, discusses her experience with burnout and stress and shares empowering insights on how to shift our perspectives to create – and maintain – a healthy distance. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
5/8/202333 minutes, 21 seconds
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The secret to making new friends as an adult (w/ Marisa G. Franco)

Making friends as an adult can feel like a baffling obstacle course. Why was it so much easier to connect as kids? To help you find well-rounded and fulfilling friendships, psychologist Marisa Franco discusses science-backed tips on how to make (and keep) friends, like the optimism-inducing "acceptance prophecy" and the shame-reducing "theory of chums." Learn more about the power of platonic love and how it can help you experience the full richness and complexity of who you are. This conversation, hosted by TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event, and later published on TED Talks Daily, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. You can find more episodes wherever you're listening to this or visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.
5/1/202333 minutes, 20 seconds
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The difference between easy and difficult beauty (w/ Chloe Cooper Jones)

Chloe Cooper Jones knows how it feels to be complicit. The critically acclaimed author has moved through life with a rare disability that brings incredible physical pain and plenty of outward judgment. And she’s even guilty of judging herself. But now, she’s challenging our ideas of motherhood, disability and beauty in her memoir, Easy Beauty. In this episode, she talks about using art to step outside of your own mind, sitting with difficult experiences, embracing the messy contradictions of the human experience, and more!
4/24/202333 minutes, 34 seconds
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ALOK is microdosing creativity and rejecting norms

ALOK doesn’t quite get the term multihyphenate – but how else to describe the internationally acclaimed author, poet, comedian, and public speaker? From exploring belonging and the human condition, to fighting to degender the fashion and beauty industries, ALOK is tapping into their creativity constantly. Today, they share their approach to the creative process, how art has helped them accept the beauty and pain of life, why poetry and comedy need each other and so much more! For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
4/17/202336 minutes, 37 seconds
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How to keep house while drowning (w/ KC Davis)

Let’s face it: if chores were fun, they probably wouldn’t be called that. Because for most people, life can be overwhelming – and that means it doesn’t always look like a cleaning commercial where everyone is dancing their way to do laundry, take out trash, or smiling while washing the dishes. KC Davis is a therapist, author, podcaster, and TikToker who knows that caring for yourself can be a struggle. In this episode, she shares how radically rethinking “care” tasks –like not seeing a lack of cleanliness as shameful, or viewing messiness as a moral failure– can improve our quality of life. She also shares small strategies that could help us take better care of ourselves, because we deserve it. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
4/10/202334 minutes, 25 seconds
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Fixable: Kelli - “How do I deal with a communication breakdown?

Kelli is a nurse at a leading teaching hospital where communication issues are not only leading to resentment – they could also be affecting patient care. After hearing from Kelli about the larger problems at play in the healthcare space, Anne and Frances discuss the link between communication and transparency and guide Kelli into taking matters into her own hands. This is an episode of Fixable, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. If you want to be on Fixable, call our hotline at 234-Fixable (that’s 234-349-2253) to leave Anne and Frances a voicemail with your workplace problem. To hear more episodes on how to fix your work problems, fast, follow Fixable wherever you're listening to this.
4/3/202327 minutes, 58 seconds
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Stephen Satterfield wants his meals to match his ideals

Stephen Satterfield, the host of Netflix docu-series “High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America,” thinks the bananas in the U.S. are gross. Sure, they’re convenient to produce and ship commercially, but they’re fibrous, bland and maybe worst of all inescapable! They’re also just one example of how what we eat is shaped by culture, politics, and history. In this episode, Stephen explains why he uses gastronomy as a way to understand the world and shares how we can use food to empower people who grow and consume what we eat. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
3/27/202329 minutes, 23 seconds
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Julissa Arce on why success isn’t worth her assimilation

When do you feel like you've reached "success"? Julissa Arce is an acclaimed social justice advocate, the author of four books, a former vice president at Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch, and was named a 2019 Woman of the Year by the City of Los Angeles. But if you ask her, she’s still redefining what success looks like, and if it matters. Julissa immigrated to the United States at 11, and was undocumented for almost 15 years. In her latest book, and in today’s episode, she rejects the idea that assimilation can create belonging and brings success – and asks what we can do instead to reconnect and celebrate all that makes us unique. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
3/20/202331 minutes, 55 seconds
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Why Kim Scott thinks you need to ask for feedback

You know what they say about unsolicited advice (don’t give it!) but when it comes to SOLICITED feedback, author and executive coach Kim Scott says: bring it on. Kim believes that when it comes to improving your life at home, work, and anywhere in between, it helps to ask for – and provide – kind, but radical, candor. In this episode, Kim shares what she’s learned about embracing candidness and care in the workplace, gives tips on how to engage in constructive conversations, and opens up about the benefits of addressing bias in communication. Her latest book, "Just Work: How to Root Out Bias, Prejudice, and Bullying to Build a Kick-ass Culture of Inclusivity" is out now. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
3/13/202336 minutes, 7 seconds
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Cord Jefferson's creativity is fueled by mental health

Television writer Cord Jefferson has written for the kind of shows that crack hearts open. From The Good Place to Watchmen, Station Eleven to Master of None, Cord has spent his career wrangling human emotions in the writers’ room – but also in his own life. In this episode, Cord speaks about the connection between his personal life and his creative work, how he thinks about vulnerability in making art and why he thanked his therapist in his acceptance speech for his first Emmy. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
3/6/202334 minutes, 25 seconds
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Anne Helen Petersen on changing your relationship to work and the guardrails that can prevent burnout

What does "burnout" even mean anymore? If you're asking yourself this question, you've come to the right podcast. Anne Helen Petersen is the writer who helped popularize the term and she thinks people are missing the big picture. In this episode, Anne Helen and Chris discuss the structures that are leading so many people, from nurses to teachers to office workers, to suffer from chronic, work-related stress. Then, Anne Helen suggests some of the ways that we can rethink our relationship to work – and offers practices that could protect us from laboring past our limits. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
2/27/202331 minutes, 2 seconds
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Pardon the Interruption… But Did Sports Debate Shows Change the World?

From risky snowboard halfpipe runs, to 400m sprints where every second counts, to high-stakes archery tournaments, performing well in sports requires mental toughness as much as physical toughness. How do athletes get “in the zone”? And what can we all learn about focus, flow, and mental resilience from athletes? Good Sport is a podcast from the TED Audio Collective about the fascinating psychology behind athletic competition. Each week, host Jody Avirgan guides you through an array of stadiums, pitches, pools, and slopes–all the ways that sports can shed a light on the ups and downs of being human. Follow Good Sport wherever you get your podcasts. 
2/20/202340 minutes, 3 seconds
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Why love –and therapy– means going in a direction you don’t yet know (w/ Dr. Orna Guralnik)

In her critically acclaimed Showtime docuseries, Couples Therapy, clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst Dr. Orna Guralnik thinks deeply about relationships, emotions, and connection. In this episode, Dr. Guralnik explains why she believes psychoanalysis helps us love better, dispels myths about the right time to go to therapy, and gives tips on how to unblock our relationship with the world around us. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
2/13/202335 minutes, 26 seconds
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Jody Avirgan learned everything from sports

When it comes to sports, it might seem like there are two kinds of people. Those who are religious about their love for the game and those who only see Super Bowl Sunday as a vessel for an epic halftime concert – if they think about it at all. Jody Avirgan argues this is a false binary. In Good Sport, his new show from the TED Audio Collective, Jody makes the case that sports are as good a lens as any to understand the world – regardless of whether you are an athlete, a fan or a begrudging bystander. In this episode, Jody shares the lessons he’s learned from playing and reporting on sports at the highest levels, and makes a compelling case that sports can help us uncover the amazing emotions that make us better humans. You can listen to Good Sport wherever you are listening to this. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
2/6/202333 minutes, 5 seconds
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Andrew Marantz doesn’t want you to give up on the internet

The internet can be a wonderful, but also a terribly unpleasant place. Andrew Marantz knows this well. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker who spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls to understand how regular people propel fringe talking points into the heart of online conversations. In this episode, he shares how ideas spread on the internet – and what we can do to make our digital experiences less about doom-scrolling, and more about real human connection. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/30/202335 minutes, 24 seconds
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The science of happiness (w/ Laurie Santos)

The phrase “comparison is the thief of joy” might be the kind of cliche that makes you roll your eyes – and yet, it’s an idea that is, scientifically, pretty accurate. In today’s episode, psychologist Laurie Santos – a Yale professor and host of “The Happiness Lab” podcast – discusses some of the surprising evidence behind what does and doesn’t make us humans happy. Laurie also shares strategies on how to improve our well-being, discusses the irony behind “self-care”, and explains why happiness is often a journey not just within, but beyond, ourselves. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/23/202335 minutes, 44 seconds
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How to care for the people who take care of us (w/ Ai-jen Poo)

Activist, and MacArthur Genius, Ai-jen Poo believes that caring for others is one of the fundamental acts that make us human. But from nannies to elder-care workers, house cleaners to living assistants, single parents and beyond, globally, caretakers do not earn fair wages or recognition for their essential, life-giving labor. The President of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, Ai-jen explains how society undervalues domestic work, and provides a framework on how we can start a conversation about the future of care for our loved ones – and ourselves. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/16/202339 minutes, 2 seconds
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There is no “grief starter pack” (w/ Michael Cruz Kayne)

There’s one thing that connects all living beings – an experience so profound yet so common. Today’s guest, Michael Cruz Kayne says it best: “It's gonna happen to you, to the people you love – even to the people you hate. Whether we like it or not, we are going to die. For sure.” Yet despite its inevitability, it can be so hard for us to speak about death and loss. So how can we begin to open up about grief, and show up for others who are experiencing it? Michael is a writer, comedian, and the host of the podcast “A Good Cry”. Michael’s son Fisher died when he was just days old. In this episode, Michael talks about his experience and how talking about his emotions helped him heal, and shares times when humor was -- and wasn’t -- able to capture the ineffable seemingly-endless experience of loss. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/9/202338 minutes, 43 seconds
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You can do better than a New Year’s resolution (w/ Gretchen Rubin)

Why do so many of us wait until a new calendar year to start setting our goals? For today’s guest, Gretchen Rubin, “there really is no magic to January 1st”-- and the best time to start a healthy habit is just, well, “now.” Gretchen is a podcaster and the author of several New York Times bestsellers, including “Better Than Before: What I Learned About Making and Breaking Habits--to Sleep More, Quit Sugar, Procrastinate Less, and Generally Build a Happier Life.” In this episode, she shares eye-opening frameworks on the different ways to make and achieve goals, gives tips on how to create habits that actually improve our lives and discusses why chasing happiness isn’t always fun – and why it doesn’t always make us feel happy. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
1/2/202337 minutes, 55 seconds
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How to answer your biggest questions—with data (w/ Mona Chalabi)

Whenever we have a question – about ourselves or the world around us – it can be helpful to visualize our answer in order to really understand it. But how do you conceptualize something as big as inequality, as complex as grief, or as silly as your probability of correctly guessing today’s Wordle? For data journalist Mona Chalabi, the answer is through data – and drawing. You’ve probably seen Mona’s illustrations on the internet. She’s known for interpreting data in a way that makes you GET it. In today’s episode, she explains how anyone could use analysis to answer their most personal questions – from whether or not to have a breakup to how many friends you should have. For the text transcript, visit go.ted.com/BHTranscripts
11/28/202235 minutes, 55 seconds
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How to have curious conversations in dangerously divided times (w/ Mónica Guzmán)

When was the last time you really connected with someone who disagrees with you? Or saw a post on social media that challenged your views? Or listened to a newscast from across the political aisle? Modern life places us in all kinds of echo chambers – so what happens when these divides stop us from actually seeing and understanding one another? Today’s guest, journalist Mónica Guzmán, is the daughter of Mexican immigrants who voted –twice– for Donald Trump. Now the chief storyteller for “Braver Angels”, an organization dedicated to political depolarization, Monica shares the tools she uses to find common ground with her loved ones. She talks about why interacting with (and listening to) different points of view is critical work – and how through curiosity we can achieve the seemingly impossible task of understanding those we tend to think of as our enemy. Her book, “I Never Thought of It That Way: How to Have Fearlessly Curious Conversations in Dangerously Divided Times” is out now.
11/21/202237 minutes, 52 seconds
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How to take charge of your money (w/ Wendy De La Rosa)

We hardly ever talk openly about our money. Today’s guest Wendy De La Rosa thinks that’s a costly mistake. She is a behavioral scientist who helps people understand and rewire their relationship with money. A former private equity investor at Goldman Sachs, Wendy is now an Assistant Professor of Marketing at the Wharton School and the co-founder of Common Cents Lab, which works to improve financial well-being for low- to moderate-income people. In this episode, Wendy shares actionable insights on how to prepare and invest in your financial future, explains why the emotional aspect of decision-making impacts how we spend or save, and breaks down why financial insecurity should not be a source of shame -- and why the issue of wealth inequality cannot be solved merely by budgeting.
11/14/202238 minutes
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How free solo climber Alex Honnold faces fear | ReThinking with Adam Grant

In 2017, Alex Honnold did what even the world’s best rock climbers thought was impossible. He climbed to the top of El Capitan– a granite rock mountain more than 3,000 feet high– without a rope, harness, or net. His audacious feat was the subject of the Oscar-winning documentary “Free Solo,” and it left Adam Grant with some burning questions about what we can learn from his unique approach to managing fear. In this episode of ReThinking, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective, Alex opens up about how he regulates his emotions when he’s hanging on by just a few fingers, what still scares him, and how he stays motivated to pursue ambitious goals. For the full text transcript, visit go.ted.com/RWAG2. And for more conversations on how the world’s most interesting people think, follow ReThinking with Adam Grant wherever you're listening to this.
11/7/202243 minutes, 49 seconds
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How labor unions create worker power (w/ Margaret Levi)

We don't know about you, but we are fans of weekends. And social security. And health insurance. And the end of child labor! And all of these workplace protections exist because of the advocacy of labor unions. In this episode, American political scientist Margaret Levi shares the long history of organizing labor, and explains how unions create equality and protect worker rights. Margaret also discusses her optimism about today’s young workforce and why she believes that an equitable future requires a revival of the labor movement.
10/31/202234 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to stand up for what you believe in (w/ Luvvie Ajayi Jones)

Most positive change starts with a challenge to the status quo. But going against the current and speaking up for the right thing can be a challenge–especially if you’re the only one voicing your concerns. Luvvie Ajayi Jones is a two-time New York Times bestselling author, podcast host, and a self-described professional troublemaker. In this episode, Luvvie shares why she’s reclaiming the term “troublemaker”, gives tips on gathering the courage to speak up, and explains why she thinks all of us would benefit from getting a little more comfortable with being uncomfortable.
10/24/202237 minutes, 33 seconds
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How to tell your authentic story (with Noor Tagouri)

Do you remember a time you ACTUALLY felt represented in pop culture? For Libyan American journalist Noor Tagouri, those moments of being portrayed in a way that feels real can actually be an important catalyst for positive social change. Noor has spent the last decade of her career in journalism, uncovering hidden stories and challenging biases in the mainstream. In this episode, she talks about the importance of telling a story from all angles–and why searching for truth despite pushback is a scary but necessary part of being human.
10/17/202231 minutes, 55 seconds
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How to get workplace gender equity now (with Sara Sanford)

There are more opportunities for women in the workplace today than there ever have been. But with stagnant wage gaps, limited parental leave, and enduring bias in recruitment, have modern businesses changed THAT much?? Gender equity expert Sara Sanford says there's work to do–and in this episode, she shares how she developed a certified playbook that helps companies use data-backed standards to fight gender bias. Tune in to hear why inclusive work requires that we change not just how people think, but also how the workplace operates.
10/10/202236 minutes, 26 seconds
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How to have great sex (with Siphumeze Khundayi and Tiffany Mugo)

Sex is a normal part of human life, but it can also get complicated–whether you’re having it or not! The way we approach, think, and engage with our sexuality varies widely our culture, community, identity, and more. But one thing we can all strive for is healthy and safe sex. Siphumeze Khundayi and Tiffany Mugo are two sex educators and the co-founders of HOLAAfrica (HOLAA!) a Pan-Africanist digital platform that focuses on creating spaces that deal with safe sex and pleasure. Today they share insights on the kinds of mental and emotional tools we can turn to in order to have great sex, why it’s ok to take small steps on your sexual journey, and why it’s important to take ownership of your pleasure.
10/3/202236 minutes, 6 seconds
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TED Tech: Why people and AI make good business partners | Shervin Khodabandeh

What happens when the data-driven capabilities of AI are combined with human creativity and ingenuity? Shining a light on the opportunities this futuristic collaboration could bring to the workplace, AI expert Shervin Khodabandeh shares how to redesign companies so that people and machines can learn from each other. After the episode, TED Tech host Sherrell Dorsey dives deeper into the potential promises (and pitfalls) of AI-work integration. TED Tech is another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. To hear more ideas on the intersection of tech and humanity, follow TED Tech wherever you're listening to this.
9/26/202216 minutes, 31 seconds
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How to be perfect (with Michael Schur)

Humans face ethical dilemmas big and small every day: Which product is the most sustainable? Can you separate the art from the artist? Should you really share your streaming platform passwords? Today’s guest, Michael Schur, has spent a lot of time thinking about morality, most recently in his Emmy-nominated show The Good Place, and in the New York Times bestselling book “How to Be Perfect: The Correct Answer to Every Moral Question,” and. In this episode, Michael talks about why he’s gone from working on shows like Saturday Night Live, The Office, Parks and Recreation, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, and Hacks, to reading and writing about Kant, Nietzsche, and Aristotle. Michael shares why he uses analogies and pop culture references to engage with philosophy, why he’s still chasing after the eternal and perhaps unanswerable question of “how to be perfect”, and why he believes caring about ethics –at any level– can actually make a difference.
9/19/202235 minutes, 52 seconds
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How to get motivated - by losing?! (with Monica Wadhwa)

If you’ve ever daydreamed o standing at an Olympic podium or delivering a big award speech, you probably pictured yourself as a winner. But according to today’s guest, marketing professor Monica Wadhwa, maybe you should imagine yourself as a runner-up. In this episode, Monica talks about why getting close to – but not quite achieving – triumph actually helps us gain the energy and motivation we need to chase after our goals, and shares tips on how we can change our mindset and create almost wins that will put us on the path to success.
9/12/202231 minutes, 18 seconds
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How to be okay when things are not okay (w/ Mollie West Duffy and Liz Fosslien)

Humans: we've got Big Feelings. From happiness to regret, delight to frustration, we all experience a rollercoaster of emotions. But while it's become more acceptable to talk about and even embrace them, it still feels like there is a stigma around admitting that you're grappling with a less-than-positive feeling. Mollie West Duffy (Chris’s wife!) and Liz Fosslien (not Chris’s wife!) are the co-authors of two celebrated books about feelings, “No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions At Work” and “Big Feelings: How to Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay.” In this episode, they share thoughtful insights on the across-the-board importance of talking about our emotions as well as offer tips on how to identify, manage, and learn from the big feelings that make us all human.
9/5/202236 minutes, 19 seconds
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How to embrace rejection (with Jia Jiang)

We experience rejection all the time–in job interviews, while dating, when pitching a story or even trying to join a new club or activity. But if rejection happens so often, why is it so scary? And worse, what if our fear of being rejected is keeping us from going after the things we want? Jia Jiang is kind of a rejection expert–he’s gone from a career in the corporate world to the risky world of entrepreneurship. To conquer his fear of rejection, he started the 100 Days of Rejection Therapy blog, where he documented an experiment in which he willfully sought rejection on a daily basis. Now he’s authored a bestselling book, and owns a company dedicated to helping people overcome their fear of rejection. In this episode, he shares what he’s learned over the years on how to turn fear into triumph.
8/29/202231 minutes, 17 seconds
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How to let go of being a "good" person (with Dolly Chugh)

Most of us want to be good people–but what even makes a person “good?” And is our fixation on whether or not we ARE good holding us back from becoming even better? Dolly Chugh is an author and social psychologist who studies the psychology of good people. In this episode, she explains how ethical behavior is full of complexity and paradox, and shares insights on why even striving to be a “good-ish” person can actually help us grow into the better, nicer person we want to become.
8/22/202234 minutes, 37 seconds
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The TED Interview: How to predict the future with Jane McGonigal

Future forecaster and game designer Jane McGonigal ran a social simulation game in 2008 that had players dealing with the effects of a respiratory pandemic set to happen in the next decade. She wasn’t literally predicting the 2020 pandemic—but she got eerily close. Her game, set in 2019, featured scenarios we're now familiar with (like masking and social distancing), and participant reactions gave her a sense of what the world could—and eventually, did—look like. How did she do it? And what can we learn from this experiment to predict—and prepare for—the future ourselves? In this episode, Jane teaches us how to be futurists, and talks about the role of imagination—and gaming—in shaping a future that we’re truly excited about. Jane’s new book, Imaginable: How to See the Future Coming and Feel Ready for Anything―Even Things That Seem Impossible Today is available now. This is an episode of The TED Interview, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. You can find and follow it wherever you're listening to this.
8/15/202243 minutes, 13 seconds
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How do you approach gender as a parent? (with LB Hannahs)

Thinking and talking about gender is complex for anyone, and for some people it’s a frequent conversation–especially for parents. In today’s episode, LB Hannahs, a genderqueer parent, shares their experience of parenting and discusses why they try to center authenticity and gender expansive thinking in the way they live their lives–both in how they interact with their kids, and how they work and show up in their community. Plus, from rethinking the gifts we give children to embracing the spectrums of identity, LB shares actionable recommendations for parents and non-parents alike on how we all can better support the LGBTQ+ people in our lives.
8/8/202235 minutes, 37 seconds
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How to make transformative ideas happen (with Frans Johansson)

You often hear that “there are no bad ideas” when brainstorming–but why is that? In those instances, doesn’t it feel inevitable that someone’s going to pitch a bad idea? Frans Johansson is a writer who argues that in fact, innovation actually happens when people, ideas, and disciplines intersect. Whether it’s one field of science collaborating with another, or many cultures mixing, Frans says that a wide range of perspectives are the key to seeing a problem in a totally new light. In this episode he shares examples of how diversity leads to transformation, and provides tips on how to unlock your next great idea.
8/1/202230 minutes, 29 seconds
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How to discover your humanity… through math? (with Francis Su)

Every day, we humans do math. Whether we are obsessed with a logic puzzle on our smartphones or even just calculating a morning alarm that gives you 8 more minutes in bed, our daily lives are full of numbers, quantities, shapes and patterns. And for Francis Su—a writer and Professor of Mathematics and the Former President of the Mathematical Association of America—math is actually one of the things that makes us human. In today’s episode he talks about how mathematics can serve as a tool for social justice, how math can enhance our sense of aesthetics and beauty, why math is one of the last refuges of truth in a time where misinformation is rampant, and how we can all learn to cultivate, and even come to love, the little daily mathematics of our lives.
7/25/202231 minutes, 23 seconds
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How to find your voice (with Greta Morgan)

What would happen if the thing that defined you disappeared overnight? Whether it’s our job, our abilities, or output—many of us meld our identities with the things we do, and often forget who we are in the process. Greta Morgan is a writer and musician whose musical projects include Vampire Weekend, Springtime Carnivore, and Gold Motel. In 2020, Greta was diagnosed with a disorder that completely changed her ability to sing. In this episode, she shares what her vocal loss and recovery taught her about her inner voice, and how we might find our voice and resilience in both art and the creative process.
7/18/202233 minutes, 26 seconds
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How to make yourself more human in an automated world (with Kevin Roose)

Humans can have a complex relationship with technology: tools like smartphones make our lives easier, but they can also be a source of anxiety or dependence. The internet can be an amazing place, or it can be a doom scrolling nightmare. And then there’s the always looming threat that our jobs–even the ones we thought only humans could do, like making art–could be lost to automation. Kevin Roose is a tech journalist who writes about the intersection of tech, business, and culture. In today’s episode, he talks about the shift of technology’s role in our lives and how we can set up boundaries with our devices to regain our autonomy. He also shares why he’s optimistic about the future, and his view on how futureproofing your job in an automated world has less to do with sharpening up our coding skills and more to do with leaning into our shared humanity. His new book, “Future Proof: 9 Rules for Humans in the Age of Automation” is out now.
7/11/202234 minutes, 10 seconds
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How to Find the Comedy in A Messed-Up World (with Maeve Higgins)

On a list of the least funny topics imaginable, the global refugee crisis, border disputes, and questions of citizenships are probably close to the top. And yet comedian Maeve Higgins has spent her career finding ways to make jokes about (and make sense of) the ways we draw lines across the globe. She’s a standup and a writer who speaks from the point of view of an Irish immigrant in the United States. In this episode, she talks about ways we can find funny and eye-opening vantage points to look at the realities and borders of the world, our place in it, and how imagination and laughter can help us through tough times.
7/4/202231 minutes, 54 seconds
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How to unite people through art (with JR)

Art can move us in deep, meaningful ways. A beautiful song, a good book, or a great film can change our perspectives and attitudes toward ideas, and sometimes people. Where does that magic come from–and how can we channel it when we’re creating? JR is an artist famed for his enormous black and white portraits that tell stories and adorn surfaces from the Louvre to the favelas of Brazil. His ambitious projects, like a recent massive mural outside a supermax prison in California or the boy who peers curiously over the wall at the Mexico–United States border, put a deeply human face to things we might have only read in the news while also highlighting and celebrating the connections between us humans. In this episode, JR talks about the importance of joy in his art-making process, speaks to the value of community and curiosity, and shares how his unique working style developed over the years.
6/27/202229 minutes, 3 seconds
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Body Stuff: Do you really need 8 hours of sleep?

We all know a good night’s sleep is essential, but for many people, sleeping well (or falling asleep at all) can be difficult and even stressful– and there’s no shortage of tales about what prevents people from catching their ZZZs. In this episode, Dr. Jen digs into ``how to sleep'' culture– from blue light blockers to sleep hygiene enthusiasts, to the 8 hours a night rule to… witches?! Don’t sleep on this episode–because it might just have you skipping the melatonin supplements and rethinking sleep rituals –before jumping into bed for a well-deserved snooze. This is an episode of Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. To hear more episodes on the lies we're told (and sold) about our personal health, follow Body Stuff wherever you're listening to this.
5/30/202233 minutes, 13 seconds
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How To Pitch Your Best Ideas | WorkLife with Adam Grant

Great pitches can seem like genius or magic. But you don’t have to be a great salesperson to give a great pitch. Whether you’re floating an idea at a team meeting, looking for investors for your startup, or applying for your next job, life is full of pitching moments. In this episode, we bust myths about what it takes to drum up excitement–and share insights from Hollywood and Silicon Valley on ways to improve your chances of getting your audience on board. This is an episode of WorkLife with Adam Grant, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. To hear more episodes on the science of making work not suck, follow WorkLife with Adam Grant wherever you're listening to this. For the full transcript of this episode, visit go.ted.com/WL44.
5/2/202243 minutes, 53 seconds
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How to talk to a colleague who offended you

Dionna and Denise had a professional relationship that mostly worked–until it didn’t. After a string of mishaps in their workplace, a comment Denise made online sparked a fallout between the two coworkers. In this episode, we hear from both women about the power of impact regardless of intent, how assumptions cloud communication, and why forgiveness requires accountability, transparency, and a willingness to put yourself in another person’s shoes. This is an episode of the podcast Conversations With People Who Hate Me, another show from the TED Audio Collective. You can find and follow the show wherever you’re listening to this.
3/21/202257 minutes, 20 seconds
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How to find gratitude everyday

As the year draws to a close and the collective mood turns reflective, we asked you—our listeners—to pick moments from the first season that stuck with you and inspired you. In today’s episode, we yield the floor in gratitude and compiled some of those insights that resonated most with our community. From psychologist Guy Winch’s thoughts on strategic discomfort to poet Sarah Kay’s meditations on compassion, tune in for an eclectic collection of ideas to set you on that path toward becoming a better human in 2022. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
12/20/202112 minutes, 22 seconds
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How creating space for joy can build resilience (with Miracle Jones)

With all the terrible things happening in the world lately, does the idea of maintaining a spark of joy in your day to day feel unrealistic? Or even inappropriate? Today’s guest, Miracle Jones, believes that all the collective tragedy makes the role of joy in our routines even more crucial. She is a community organizer and queer activist who currently serves as the director of policy and advocacy at 1Hood Media. In today’s episode, Miracle meditates on the importance of joy as a catalyst for resilience, growth, and collective action, and shares how we can cultivate its practice even (and perhaps especially) in the darkest of times. You can learn more about Miracle’s work at 1hood.org. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
12/13/202133 minutes, 14 seconds
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How to nurture your “emotional agility” (with Susan David)

Whether you’re the kind of person who “gets in their feels” or you’re more the type to sweep things under the rug, all humans experience emotions. And the way we tend to those emotions directly affects the way we see our lives, says today’s guest, Susan David. She is a psychologist and author of the book “Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change, and Thrive in Work and Life” (Avery, 2016). In today’s episode, Susan explains how “emotional agility”--a process that enables us to navigate life's twists and turns--, powers self-acceptance, and gives tips on how to cultivate our agility to lead more meaningful, successful lives. You can hear more from Susan on her TED Audio Collective podcast “Checking In with Susan David” streaming wherever you are listening to this. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
12/6/202127 minutes, 36 seconds
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How to enrich your everyday life with poetry (with Sarah Kay)

Roses are red, violets are blue, has poetry ever been intimidating for you? For many people, this art form can feel unapproachable for a myriad of reasons, but today’s guest, poet and educator Sarah Kay, suggests that people who don’t like poetry just maybe haven’t found a poem that really speaks to them. In this episode, Sarah proposes a fresh approach to this ancient art, talks about why playing with language can help you get in touch with yourself, and discusses the ways that writing and art help us form deeper, meaningful connections with others. Plus, she shares helpful, fun, and low-stakes writing exercises that might encourage you to put pen to paper. Read Sarah’s poetry and more at kaysarahsera.com To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
11/29/202129 minutes, 35 seconds
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How thinking critically about history shapes our future (with David Ikard)

Can you think of a time when you told a story and remembered it...wrong? Perhaps you forgot a small detail, like the color of someone’s shoes, or something much bigger, like where the event took place. In a personal context, that might not seem like a huge deal. But what happens when what we misrepresent are our historical narratives? David Ikard is a Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies at Vanderbilt University. In this episode, he talks about the dangers of inaccurate history, shares tips on how to find work that can contextualize and bring nuance to your historical knowledge, and uncovers the real story of one of history’s most iconic figures. You can follow David’s work on Twitter @blkeducator. We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
11/22/202128 minutes, 9 seconds
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How to co-parent as allies, not adversaries (with Ebony Roberts)

When you think of your home or your childhood, what comes to mind? Did you feel cared for and loved? Did you trust that your parents were always doing what’s best for you? Whether you are a parent or a child, healthy communication is one of the most important aspects of an intentional relationship with your family. Today’s guest, Ebony Roberts, is a writer, educator, activist, and mother. After ending their relationship, she and her ex-partner (author Shaka Senghor) decided to continue co-parenting their child. In this episode, she shares tips on how to establish good communication at home and gives deep insight on how to prioritize trust, open-ness, and of course, love. You can read more about Ebony’s story in her book, “The love prison made and unmade” (Harper Collins, 2019) and check out her talk at TED.com We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
11/15/202132 minutes, 58 seconds
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How to find health information you can trust (with Dr. Jen Gunter)

While technology and the internet have made accessing information easier than ever, how can we discern between the facts we need to make the right decisions and fictions that could actually cause us harm? Turns out there is a better way to search on the internet and find reliable information, both on- and offline. Today’s guest, Dr. Jen Gunter, is on a mission to help people find accurate health information online. In this episode, she shares tips on how to tell a reputable source from a questionable one, and how to foster a healthy sense of skepticism about the information that pops up into your life—from your social media feeds to random conversations. Dr. Gunter is an OB/GYN and pain medicine physician and a New York Times columnist. In addition to being both a doctor and a mother, she hosts the TED Audio Collective podcast “Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter”: https://www.ted.com/podcasts/body-stuff-with-dr-jen-gunter We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
11/8/202132 minutes, 53 seconds
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How practicing curiosity could help the world around you (with Joe Hanson)

Have you ever wondered why there are seven days in a week? Or, why glaciers are blue—or what color even is? Today’s guest, YouTube creator Joe Hanson, makes a living by asking—and trying to answer—these kinds of questions. A biologist turned video producer and educator, Joe spends his days thinking about how telling stories and encouraging curiosity can help people think more deeply about the universe they live in, and engage with science in more meaningful ways. In this episode, he gives tips on how to unleash our innate desire to know things, explains what makes good science, and shares how cool facts can help you save the planet— and win big at trivia night. Joe was a part of Countdown, TED’s climate conference, which you can learn more about at countdown.ted.com. You can check out “It’s Okay To Be Smart”, Joe’s award-winning science education show from PBS Digital Studios, on YouTube. We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
11/1/202133 minutes, 19 seconds
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Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi: How many friends do I need?

Time with friends just isn’t the same with a screen in between you. That’s a struggle many have faced recently, with half of Americans saying they’ve lost touch with at least one friend during the pandemic. It can be sad, but is falling out of touch with friends normal? How many relationships should we maintain, and what are the different kinds of friendships we need anyways? Evolutionary psychologist Robin Dunbar has been studying social relationships for 50 years, and he has answers. Data journalist Mona Chalabi maps out her own relationships against the averages, and invites us to do the same. This is an episode of Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. You can find and follow it wherever you're listening to this. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
10/25/202123 minutes, 25 seconds
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How to be a better steward of the environment

If there’s one thing that connects all humans, it’s that everything we walk on, breathe, drink, and eat comes from the same source: planet Earth. From composting to cooking to taking climate action, today’s guests (including Chef Sean Sherman, comedian Jo Firestone, and activist Luisa Neubauer) share the many ways they try to connect to and protect the home we share-- and invite you to get involved in whatever way you can. You can check out TED’s efforts to build a world that is safer, cleaner and fairer for everyone at countdown.ted.com. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
10/18/202116 minutes, 35 seconds
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How to find the humor in everyday life (with Jo Firestone)

When was the last time you really, really laughed? For some people, laughter comes easily and anything can set them off. But for many of us, finding humor in everyday life is something we might leave to the professionals. Jo Firestone is a comedian--and long-time friend of Chris’s--who frequently teaches all kinds of people the art of stand-up comedy. In today’s episode, she talks about how humor can be an act of connection, and how comedy can help us see the lighter sides of life, even in difficult times. Case in point: over the last year, Jo taught socially-distant stand-up to senior citizens over Zoom. Now, her students will be the stars of their very own comedy special, “Good Timing” which airs later this month. Barbara Bova, one of Jo’s hilarious students, also joins to share the comedy tips she learned and to tell some great jokes. Find more about Jo on her website at jofirestone.com and check out “Good Timing” on October 15. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
10/11/202133 minutes, 16 seconds
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How engaging with the natural world benefits you-- and science (with Mary Ellen Hannibal)

When you think of a scientist, do you think of a person in a lab coat? How about a teenager with a smartphone-- or even, yourself? Mary Ellen Hannibal is a science writer who argues that everyday people collecting data with simple tools like phones can make a big impact in the sciences, their lives, and their communities. She shares great tips on how to get involved with this vital, and hopefully enjoyable, work. Her book, “Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction”, was named one of the best titles of 2016 by the San Francisco Chronicle. Mary Ellen’s previous work has appeared in the New York Times, Science, Anthropocene, Nautilus and many other publications. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
10/4/202131 minutes, 50 seconds
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How to tap into your self-awareness-- and why it even matters (with Tasha Eurich)

Imagine someone just pointed out you have something stuck in your teeth. A comment like that would probably make most of us self-conscious, but you’d probably be grateful for the heads up if you were about to head into a meeting. Now imagine that situation but with higher stakes, like your attitude at work or the way you behave with your partner. What would happen if we went through life unaware of how we are perceived? In today’s episode, organizational psychologist Tasha Eurich talks about what self-awareness even is and why seeking out what others see in you can be in your best interest. She also shares exercises to get to know yourself and your values, and why this knowledge is an important part of achieving your goals. Tasha is an executive coach and author of the book “Insight: The Surprising Truth About How Others See Us, How We See Ourselves, and Why the Answers Matter More Than We Think” (Currency, 2018). Her work has been featured in Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
9/27/202131 minutes, 6 seconds
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How to have conversations with people who hate you? (with Dylan Marron)

If you are online and especially if you're on social media, it’s likely you’ve engaged with people whose opinions are different from your own. While those conversations can sometimes be informative, they often spiral into a vitriolic whirlpool of hurtful or even threatening comments. Dylan Marron is the creator and host of “Conversations with People Who Hate Me”, a podcast where he facilitates conversations and tries to explore the humanity of people online. In today’s episode, Dylan talks about why we shouldn’t forget that there are always people on the other side of our screens and shares what he’s learned about apologies, forgiveness, and the benefits of taking the time to explore and establish our personal boundaries. You can listen to Dylan’s podcast wherever you’re listening to this. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
9/20/202130 minutes, 11 seconds
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How to future-proof your career? (with Dorie Clark)

Hustle culture, burnout, “toxic productivity.” Does today’s fast-paced world ever leave you feeling rushed? Dorie Clark teaches executive education at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and at Columbia Business School. In today’s episode, she talks about the importance of “playing the long-game”-- the idea that when it comes to planning for your enduring future success, it might be better to prioritize long-term payoff above overnight “wins.” Dorie discusses how pressure in our culture pushes us toward doing what’s quick and easy in the moment and helps us value the slow burn of persistence and effort. A frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, she consults and speaks for clients including Google, Microsoft, and the World Bank. You can find more about Dorie at dorieclark.com
9/13/202133 minutes, 19 seconds
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How humility and bravery can help your career

Whether they are academics, designers, medical professionals, or anything in between, our guests are leaders in their fields whose expertise goes beyond their TED and TEDx talks. Unsurprisingly, they’ve garnered wisdom on how to navigate or forge a successful career. In today’s episode, organizational psychologist David Burkus, management professor Christine Porath, and Hollywood executive Franklin Leonard share powerful ideas and accessible strategies for anyone looking for thoughtful career advice.
9/6/202115 minutes, 33 seconds
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Design Matters with Debbie Millman: Celebrating Pride

Alison Bechdel. Eileen Myles. Kenny Fries. Saeed Jones. Four icons reflect on their journeys in this special Pride episode of Design Matters. For more episodes of Design Matters, find the podcast wherever you're listening to this.
8/30/202134 minutes, 59 seconds
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TED Climate: What happens to the plastic you throw away?

Plastic is everywhere. We know we should cut down on it where we can, but is plastic ever the answer? In this episode, a whole world of plastic you never knew about. Starting with: which bag is best: paper, plastic, or cotton? The answer might surprise you. Dan breaks down the pros and cons of each bag, and which you should carry on your next shopping trip. Then we follow the journey of three different plastic bottles after you throw them away, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to our world. Plus, three things you can do to put a cap on our plastic problem. This is an episode of TED Climate, another TED Audio Collective podcast. For more, find the podcast wherever you're listening to this. You can read the full text transcript for this episode at go.ted.com/TC1
8/23/202112 minutes, 32 seconds
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Science of Happiness: Scheduling Time to Feel Awe

Feeling awe can boost your mood and make you feel more connected with others. Comedian Chris Duffy learns how to tap into it. This is an episode of The Science of Happiness podcast. For more, find the podcast wherever you're listening to this.
8/16/202120 minutes, 37 seconds
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How to Be a Better Human Recommends

At the end of each interview, Chris asks guests: What idea, book, or piece of culture has made you a better human? In today’s episode, we compile never-before-heard answers from past guests for the ultimate recommendation list. From emergency physician Leana Wen’s favorite book to moral philosopher Christopher Robichaud’s must-watch show to comedian Aparna Nancherla’s most-listened podcast, tune in to find an eclectic mix of quality content that might inspire YOU. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
8/9/202116 minutes, 33 seconds
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How to really see patience as a virtue

Over the course of the podcast, our guests have shared insights for how anyone can be a better human-- in love, in the workplace, in our communities, and beyond. But, how are these experts trying to be better humans in their own lives? Today’s episode is an anthology on this season’s most popular answer: by being more patient. Listen as sleep scientist Wendy Troxel, Hollywood executive Franklin Leonard, psychologist Guy Winch, and more share the rich and surprising benefits of practicing this age-old virtue. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
8/2/202113 minutes, 27 seconds
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How to lead a happier, more fulfilling life (with Dr. Robert Waldinger)

Listening to your favorite song, going on vacation, chocolate… What makes YOU happy? Today’s guest, psychiatrist Dr. Robert Waldinger, is the director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development, an 83-year-old project--one of the longest-running studies of adult life ever--that tracks how life experience across decades affects health and wellbeing in middle age and beyond. Robert shares the surprising things he’s learned about what makes a meaningful life and what to do--or avoid--in order to have a long, fulfilling existence. Robert is the author of numerous scientific papers as well as two books, and he teaches medical students and psychiatry residents at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He is a Senior Dharma Teacher in Boundless Way Zen. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
7/26/202128 minutes, 19 seconds
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How to stop sabotaging your romantic relationships (with Raquel Peel)

Does it ever feel like you—or someone you know—is always entering a relationship that’s doomed? According to psychology researcher, Dr. Raquel Peel, you may be falling victim to a surprising foe—yourself. Raquel studies “romantic self-sabotage,” the patterns and behaviors that can keep a person from having successful relationships, or justify their failures. In this episode, she outlines common destructive habits to watch out for, and gives guidance on how to recover if you spiral into sabotage. Raquel is a Psychology and Counselling Lecturer at the University of Southern Queensland. Her research interests include relationships, suicide, bullying, stigma, medical education and research methodology. Originally from Brazil, Raquel currently lives in Brisbane, Australia, with her husband Matthew, their two cats Tigre and Patera, Miniature Pinscher, Lobinha, and Doberman, Urso. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
7/19/202128 minutes, 38 seconds
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How to deal with jerks in the workplace (with Christine Porath)

Have you ever had a rude co-worker or boss — or have you ever been told that the “jerk” is you? Today’s guest, Christine Porath, researches incivility in the workplace. She’s found that if you want to have a thriving business full of happy and talented employees, there is no room for any kind of disrespect. In this episode, she shares insights from her research and suggests ways anyone—bosses, managers, and employees alike—can up the civility at work. Christine teaches at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business and is the author of “Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace” and co-author of “The Cost of Bad Behavior: How Incivility is Damaging Your Business and What to Do About It”. She has written for the Harvard Business Review, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, McKinsey Quarterly and the Washington Post. Her new book, “Mastering Community” is forthcoming (Grand Central Publishing, 2022). To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
7/12/202126 minutes, 17 seconds
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How to become a better ally (with Nita Mosby Tyler)

What do we mean when we call ourselves “allies”? For Dr. Nita Mosby Tyler, being an ally means being a person that uses their own resources and privileges to stand beside people that are marginalized. She explains why we need "unlikely allies" in the fight for justice, and why people who are experiencing inequality first hand must be willing to accept the help if we all want the world to be a fairer, more equitable place. Dr. Nita Mosby Tyler is the Chief Catalyst and Founder of The Equity Project -- a consulting firm supporting organizations and communities in building diversity, equity and inclusion strategies -- as well as The HR Shop, a human resources firm designed to support non-profits and small businesses. Dr. Mosby Tyler, a consultant accredited by the Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competence and recipient of the Cornell University Diversity & Inclusion certification, is nationally recognized for her equity work with non-profit, community, government and corporate organizations. She has received many local and national awards for her service and leadership accomplishments including recognition from the U.S. Department of Health And Human Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Human Rights Campaign. She holds a doctorate in the field of Organizational Leadership from the University of Colorado, a Master of Arts degree in Management from Webster University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from the University of Alabama. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
7/5/202136 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to create a more just future with your community (with Raj Jayadev)

How would you describe your community? And what if the stories you tell have the power to save someone from injustice? With the popularity and support of movements like Black Lives Matter, it seems the world is reckoning with how we think about the systems and institutions that support mass incarceration. Today’s guest, Raj Jayadev, wants us to focus on “proximate, intimate change” in our local communities and courts. He is the co-founder and coordinator of Silicon Valley De-Bug, a community organizing, media and advocacy organization based in San Jose, California. For over a decade, De-Bug has employed a methodology they call “participatory defense”, an approach where families whose loved ones are facing the criminal court system can use their stories to transform the landscape of power in the courts. Raj and the De-Bug team have expanded their work into the National Participatory Defense Network, with hubs in more than 30 cities. His community organizing and writings have been featured in the New York Times, BBC, and TIME Magazine. In 2018, Raj was selected as a MacArthur Fellow. If you’d like to learn more about participatory defense or get involved, you can start at: https://www.participatorydefense.org/
6/28/202131 minutes, 16 seconds
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How to forget about finding “The One”— and build a lasting relationship (with Dr. George Blair West)

If you choose to be in a relationship —long or short term— how do you go about picking the right person to spend your time with? And once you are in that relationship, how can you be a good partner? Can you avoid it ending badly? George Blair-West is a relationship expert, researcher, and doctor specializing in psychiatry with a private practice in Brisbane, Australia. He co-authored the book "How to make the biggest decision of your life: Unlocking the secrets to a healthy lasting relationship” (Hachette Australia, 2021) with his daughter, a millennial dating coach. Today, he shares what he’s learned in his 25 years as a relationship therapist, debunks myths about love (is there such a thing as “The One”?), and suggests practices that can help build long-lasting relationships. In 2021, George and his wife celebrated 33 years of marriage.
6/21/202133 minutes, 26 seconds
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How to make language fun— and create a more inclusive world (with Juli Delgado Lopera)

Do you remember the first time you used “Google” as a verb? Or a time before there were “selfies”? Language is constantly evolving, and as a result provides limitless opportunities to change how we see the world. Juli Delgado Lopera is the author of the acclaimed novel “Fiebre Tropical” (Feminist Press 2020), which was recently awarded the LAMBDA Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction. A Colombian now living in the U.S., Juli breaks down boundaries of English and Spanish in their work by de-stabilizing our notions of language, gender, and geography. In today’s episode, they explain the benefits of bending the rigid structures that language upholds and suggest exercises that can help us appreciate and find joy in words. “Fiebre Tropical” was a finalist of the 2020 Kirkus Prize in Fiction and the 2021 Aspen Literary Prize. Juli is also the author of “¡Cuéntamelo!” (Aunt Lute 2017), an illustrated bilingual collection of oral histories by LGBT Latinx immigrants. Their work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in places such as Teen Vogue, The Kenyon Review, McSweeney's, The Rumpus, The White Review, LALT, Four Way Review, Broadly, and TimeOut Mag. They are the former executive director of RADAR Productions, a queer literary non-profit in San Francisco.
6/14/202133 minutes, 11 seconds
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How learning about indigenous foods can open up your worldview (with Sean Sherman)

What’s your favorite dish — and what culture originated that recipe? Whether you’re thinking about grilled cheese, burritos, curry, pho… (we would go on but we are getting too hungry) trying something delicious opens you up to new experiences and conversations. Sean Sherman, Oglala Lakota, is a chef and food educator who focuses on revitalizing and reclaiming indigenous food systems in a modern culinary context. In today’s episode, he shares how increasing access to indigenous food practices can liberate more than just your taste buds. Sean, also known as The Sioux Chef, uses Native American recipes as well as farming, harvesting, wild food usage, salt and sugar making, food preservation, and land stewardship techniques to feed and educate communities in the Minneapolis/Saint Paul area. His vision of modern indigenous foods have garnered him many accolades, including the 2018 Bush Foundation Fellowship and the 2018 James Beard Award for Best American Cookbook, and a 2019 James Beard Leadership Award. You can follow Sean at https://sioux-chef.com/ To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
6/7/202129 minutes, 49 seconds
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BODY STUFF: Why are we so awkward about poop?

When most people think about poop, they think about shame and embarrassment. It’s something they don’t want to talk about and that prevents us from learning things—like the number of times a day we should be going number two—that can keep us healthy! On this episode, Dr. Jen Gunter tells us why some of the things we’ve been told about poop are a load of crap, what makes the gut the “second brain” of the body, and how what you eat goes from food to feces. By the end, you’ll know everything you need to achieve “poophoria.” This is an episode of Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. To hear more episodes, find and follow Body Stuff wherever you're listening to this.
5/31/202130 minutes, 55 seconds
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How to tap into the transformative power of reading (with Michelle Kuo)

When was the last time you got lost in a book? If it’s been a minute, today’s guest might recommend you visit a local library or bookstore ASAP. Michelle Kuo is a teacher, lawyer, writer who is passionate about reading in communities with other people, whether that's through book clubs or in prisons. In this episode, we talk about how reading skills reveal the bridging power of the written word -- as well as the limitations of its power. In 2017, she released “Reading with Patrick”, a memoir of teaching reading in a rural county jail in Arkansas. The book explores Michelle’s relationship with a former student, Patrick, whom she wrote and read with, prompting questions about what we owe each other in a world where economic and racial inequality determine life outcomes. You can follow Michelle through her newsletter at ampleroad.substack.com To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
5/24/202133 minutes, 26 seconds
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How zombies, dragons, and superheroes could make you a better person (with Christopher Robichaud)

Roleplaying games and the Marvel universe may be fictional, but they can also teach us a lot about morality in the real world. Christopher Robichaud is a Lecturer in Ethics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. In this episode, he shares ways we can explore important, everyday issues in fun, safe, and unexpected ways. Christopher has made a career out of teaching ethics and philosophy using pop culture, dissecting moral questions using anything from zombie apocalypse simulations to superhero narratives. He received his doctorate in philosophy from MIT. In 2015 he won the Innovation in Teaching Award at the Harvard Kennedy School for creating a day-long simulation--using design elements from old school tabletop roleplaying games like D&D--where policy students wielded their leadership skills and confronted ethical dilemmas to deal with a zombie pandemic. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
5/17/202133 minutes, 29 seconds
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How to handle the ups and downs of social media (with Aparna Nancherla)

After scrolling through your social media feeds, how do you feel? Empowered and connected -- anxious, or exhausted? When stand up, actor, and writer Aparna Nancherla was just starting out, her jokes on Twitter got her recognition in a way that traditional comedy clubs probably could never have. But having built a comedy career for herself, in large part, by being on the internet, she recognizes that social media is not always fun and laughs. Now, for the sake of her mental health, she limits her time online. On today’s show, longtime friends Chris and Aparna talk about the good and bad of social media, and explore some advice on how best to use it-- or even if we should use it at all. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
5/10/202133 minutes, 8 seconds
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How to spend money to buy happiness (with Michael Norton)

Can money really buy happiness? Michael Norton is a social science researcher who studies how we feel about our spending decisions. His work explores questions like: What’s the best way to spend your cash? How much should you donate to charity? Do credit cards make us unhappy? In this episode, Michael shares the sometimes-surprising findings that can help you use our money to improve your life. Michael is a professor of business administration in the marketing unit at the Harvard Business School. Prior to joining HBS, Michael was a Fellow at the MIT Media Lab and MIT’s Sloan School of Management. His work has been published in a number of leading academic journals and has been covered in media outlets such as the Economist, the Financial Times, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
5/3/202132 minutes, 25 seconds
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How to Rethink a Bad Decision | WorkLife with Adam Grant

In life and work, we have a hard time changing course. When we wind up in a miserable job, a failing project, or a floundering romantic relationship, we rationalize, make excuses, and stick with our bad decisions—even when the writing's on the wall. Why? Usually we assume the driving force is sunk costs: we don't want to admit we've wasted that time or money. But in fact, the root of our stubbornness is a psychological trap called “escalation of commitment.” Once we understand that, we can start taking steps to protect ourselves from… well, ourselves. This is an episode of WorkLife with Adam Grant, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. For more episodes, find and follow WorkLife wherever you're listening to this. 
4/26/202138 minutes, 20 seconds
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How to turn climate anxiety into action (with Luisa Neubauer)

Sometimes it feels like fighting climate change is all about dealing with the many little things we as individuals are doing wrong (hello single-use coffee cups, plastic bags, and eating dairy). While these bad habits are important to address, are we losing focus on the bigger picture? Luisa Neubauer draws on her experience at the front lines of activism to strategically reframe the climate crisis and identify the unique ways we can make systemic change. Luisa Neubauer is a climate activist, author and leader of the "Fridays For Future" school strike movement. In 2018, Luisa Neubauer co-initiated the "Fridays for Future" school strike movement Germany, which was inspired by Swedish teen Greta Thunberg. In fear of growing up in a world of rising global temperatures, Neubauer is organizing mass action to urge governments to comply with the 2015 Paris Agreements. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
4/19/202130 minutes, 39 seconds
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How to sleep like your relationships depend on it (with Wendy Troxel)

How did you sleep last night? Whether you sleep next to someone or not, in today’s episode Wendy Troxel offers tips on how to catch better z’s. Wendy is a Senior Behavioral and Social Scientist at RAND who explores how sleep affects our relationships, well-being and society at large. As a licensed clinical psychologist, she specializes in behavioral treatments for insomnia and other sleep disorders. Wendy has received several awards and honors for her research from national and international scientific societies, and her work has been published in top-tier medical and psychological journals. Her research on sleep was featured in two best-selling books: Arianna Huffington's “Sleep Revolution” and David Randall's “Dreamland”, and she recently was one of the co-organizers and presenters at the first-ever national conference on Adolescent Sleep, Health, and School Start Times. Her latest book “Sharing the Covers: Every Couple's Guide to Better Sleep” comes out on April 20th. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
4/12/202131 minutes, 51 seconds
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How to care for your community with radical hospitality (with Doniece Sandoval)

Do you volunteer in your community? Don’t feel bad if the answer is no. Whether you are currently involved in a cause or not, you probably have some mental image of what it means to be a volunteer. Doniece Sandoval has been doing transformative work for years, most recently as the founder of Lava MaeX, a San Francisco-based nonprofit that began by converting public transportation buses into bathrooms on wheels for the homeless. In today’s episode, she shares tips on how to get started with a cause you care about, and debunks myths about volunteerism that might have kept you from taking action in the first place. Doniece’s work is driven by what she calls “radical hospitality”, the idea that raising the bar on how you serve people is revolutionary. Since launching its service, Lava MaeX has transformed the lives of more than 10,000 Californians. Before tackling hygiene for the homeless, Doniece worked in the arts as head of marketing at the San Jose Museum of Art, and in branding at several major private sector companies. Doniece was recognized as a 2017 CNN Hero. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
4/5/202131 minutes, 6 seconds
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How to have better conversations (with Celeste Headlee)

Humans need to have conversations every day-- at our jobs, in our homes, in government-- so how can we handle these better? Celeste Headlee is an award winning journalist who has done everything from anchoring morning news on public radio to covering presidential campaigns. In this episode, Celeste shares practical tips for anyone looking to improve their conversational skills, arguing that better conversations are well within our reach. Celeste is the author of “We Need to Talk: How to Have Conversations That Matter” and “Do Nothing: How to Break Away from Overworking, Overdoing, and Underliving.” Celeste is a regular guest host on NPR and American Public Media and a highly sought consultant.
3/29/202129 minutes, 59 seconds
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How to celebrate the ups —and downs— of family life(with Glen Henry)

Families can be the cause of both great happiness and deep struggle. In today’s episode, Glen shares how he uses humor and empathy to redefine fatherhood, equip parents, and inspire children. Glen Henry is a musician, writer, and content creator, who believes documenting and sharing the ups --and downs-- of family life can help everyone feel less alone. In 2015, Glen created the YouTube channel Beleaf In Fatherhood where he welcomes viewers into his home to show the misadventures of parenting. He shares four children with his wife of ten years, Yvette Henry. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
3/22/202129 minutes, 40 seconds
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How to bring confidence and joy into your sex life (with Emily Nagoski)

Sex is such a big part of being human. It's how our species persists, but it's also so much more than that. So why do we feel so uncomfortable talking about it? Emily Nagoski is a sex educator who argues that learning how to talk openly about sex — and unlearning some damaging misconceptions— can give you access to a more authentic and fulfilling sex life. She has a Ph.D. in health behavior, clinical internship experience at the Kinsey Institue, and is the author of the best-selling book “Come as You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life.” To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
3/15/202133 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to redefine your self-worth (with Meag-gan O'Reilly)

“What am I doing with my life? Where am I going?” During this isolated time, many of us are having to readjust our identities because our visions for what life was supposed to look like completely shifted -- and so perhaps has the locus of our self-worth. Dr. Meag-gan O'Reilly is a licensed Staff Psychologist at Stanford University's Counseling and Psychological Services. In this episode, she offers helpful frameworks for cultivating a life --and society-- that can better recognize the basic intrinsic value of each person. Dr. O’Reilly’s research interests focus on social class, college student mental health, resilience, and multicultural identities, particularly gender and ethnicity. She also operates a private practice in downtown Palo Alto, Inherent Value Psychology, in which she provides clinical services to Silicon Valley professionals. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
3/8/202128 minutes, 35 seconds
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How to be the set designer of your own world (with David Korins)

Many of us are spending the majority of our time confined to our homes and becoming aware of how the space we're in can affect our well-being. Design expert David Korins has made countless spaces come alive-- from corporate offices and Lady Gaga concerts to Broadway hits like Hamilton and Dear Evan Hansen. In this episode, he offers insights on how anyone can approach design and create the ideal environments in which to live, work, and play. David is the founder and principal designer of David Korins Design, a multidisciplinary creative firm developing and designing innovative experiences. David has worked extensively as a production designer in TV, film and award shows. He has been awarded an Emmy Award, Lortel Award, an Obie Award, two Drama Desk Awards, three Henry Hewes Awards, and three Tony Award nominations. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
3/1/202130 minutes, 43 seconds
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How to get the medical care you deserve (with Leana Wen, M.D.)

A doctor’s visit, even in the best of times, can be overwhelming to navigate. Dr. Leana Wen is an emergency physician and public health advocate who is committed to patient advocacy. In this episode, Dr. Wen shares tips on how to be a better patient and increase the effectiveness of your care. The author of dozens of scientific articles on emergency systems and patient-centered health reform, Dr. Wen is a visiting professor of health policy and management at George Washington University’s School of Public Health. A contributing columnist for The Washington Post and a CNN medical analyst, she previously served as Baltimore's Health Commissioner. Inspired by struggles during her mother’s long illness, she wrote When Doctors Don't Listen, a book about empowering patients to avoid misdiagnoses and unnecessary tests. Dr. Wen has received recognition as one of Governing's Public Officials of the Year, American Public Health Association's top award for local public health, Modern Healthcare's Top 50 Physician-Executives and TIME magazine's 100 Most Influential People. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
2/22/202131 minutes, 38 seconds
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How to become a better ally (with Dwinita Mosby Tyler)

What do we mean when we call ourselves “allies”? For Dr. Dwinita Mosby Tyler, being an ally means being a person that uses their own resources and privileges to stand beside people that are marginalized. She explains why we need "unlikely allies" in the fight for justice, and why people who are experiencing inequality first hand must be willing to accept the help if we all want the world to be a fairer, more equitable place. Dr. Dwinita Mosby Tyler is the Chief Catalyst and Founder of The Equity Project -- a consulting firm supporting organizations and communities in building diversity, equity and inclusion strategies -- as well as The HR Shop, a human resources firm designed to support non-profits and small businesses. Dr. Mosby Tyler, a consultant accredited by the Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competence and recipient of the Cornell University Diversity & Inclusion certification, is nationally recognized for her equity work with non-profit, community, government and corporate organizations. She has received many local and national awards for her service and leadership accomplishments including recognition from the U.S. Department of Health And Human Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Human Rights Campaign. She holds a doctorate in the field of Organizational Leadership from the University of Colorado, a Master of Arts degree in Management from Webster University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from the University of Alabama. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
2/15/202136 minutes, 22 seconds
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How to thrive in remote work (with David Burkus)

Water coolers, office bagels, frigid spaces with fluorescent lighting. Today's episode is all about work. It’s how we pay the bills, but it’s also how many of us derive purpose, meaning and structure from our days. Whether you're unemployed, salaried, or your own boss, the world of work is changing. David Burkus sees this as an opportunity to think consciously about what to change when it comes to how, where, and when we work. David is an author, podcaster and associate professor of management at Oral Roberts University. His latest book, Leading From Anywhere: The Essential Guide to Managing Remote Teams, tackles the key challenges of this new era of remote work. Burkus is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review and Inc. magazine. His work has been featured in Fast Company, the Financial Times, Bloomberg BusinessWeek and "CBS This Morning." He's also the host of the award-winning podcast Radio Free Leader. David challenges the traditional and widely accepted principles of business management. David lives in Tulsa with his wife and their two boys.
2/8/202130 minutes, 3 seconds
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How to fix our polarized conversations (with Robb Willer)

Is your family, community, or even your country more divided than ever? Today’s guest Robb Willer is here to share some compelling insights on how we might bridge the ideological divide and offer some intuitive advice on ways to be more persuasive. Robb is a professor of sociology, psychology and organizational behavior at Stanford University. He studies the role of morality in politics. His research shows how moral values, typically a source of ideological division, can also be used to bring people together. His political research has investigated various topics, including economic inequality, racial prejudice, masculine overcompensation and Americans' views of climate change. Willer's writing has appeared in the New York Times and the Washington Post, including his op-eds "The Secret to Political Persuasion" and "Is the Environment a Moral Cause?” Willer received a Ph.D from Cornell University and a BA from the University of Iowa. Before becoming a professor, he worked as a dishwasher, construction worker, mover, line cook and union organizer.
2/1/202130 minutes, 5 seconds
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How to cultivate resilience and get through tough times (with Lucy Hone)

Life can throw curveballs that you feel wholly unprepared for-- just ask Dr. Lucy Hone, a resilience researcher, who tragically lost her 12-year-old daughter in a road accident. While all of us may experience tragedy in our lives, not everyone knows how to manage it. In this episode, Dr. Hone shares the strategies that got her through unimaginable adversity and—in doing so—helped her find meaning through loss. Co-director of the New Zealand Institute of Wellbeing & Resilience, Hone's research is published internationally and her PhD was acknowledged for its outstanding contribution to wellbeing science at the World Congress of Positive Psychology in 2019. Her grief work now encompasses the best-selling book, Resilient Grieving, alongside other engaging online content. Hone's work has been featured in several documentaries by the BBC, Swedish Television, The Bolt Report Australia and TVNZ. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman Lucy's Resilient Grieving course will be published this week here: https://new-zealand-institute-of-wellbeing-resilience.teachable.com
1/25/202133 minutes, 19 seconds
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How to challenge conventional wisdom -- and change any industry (with Franklin Leonard)

Do you think Hollywood needs to change? How about your own industry? It’s difficult to get decision makers to step outside of the tried and true and attempt something new. Franklin Leonard is Founder and CEO of The Black List-- a company that elevates great screenplays and the writers who create them. In this episode, he discusses how he shifted the way Hollywood works and how anyone can catalyze change if they start by questioning whether the conventional wisdom is all convention and no wisdom. More than 400 scripts from the annual Black List survey have been produced as feature films, earning 250 Academy Award nominations and 50 wins, including four of the last ten Best Pictures and ten of the last twenty-two screenwriting Oscars. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
1/18/202127 minutes, 34 seconds
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How to find the emotional support you need right now (with Guy Winch)

Have you been feeling isolated or emotionally vulnerable lately? Loneliness is universal and while we can experience it at any point in our lives, we may be feeling it now more than ever. In this first episode, Guy Winch explains why your emotional health is so important and how you can find the support you need right now -- from cutting through the small talk to finding a deeper appreciation for what you already have. Drawing on extensive experience helping patients repair broken connections, we’ll explore how loneliness influences well-being — and Guy will offer strategies for practicing emotional self-care. Guy is a licensed psychologist who works with individuals, couples, and families. As an advocate for psychological health, he has spent the last two decades adapting the findings of scientific studies into tools his patients, readers, and audience members can use to enhance and maintain their mental health. As an identical twin with a keen eye for any signs of favoritism, he believes we need to practice emotional hygiene with the same diligence with which we practice personal and dental hygiene. In January, Guy partnered with TED to launch Dear Guy, a science-based advice column for TED's Ideas blog. His new podcast, Dear Therapists, is cohosted with fellow TED speaker Lori Gottlieb and executive produced by Katie Couric. He has also dabbled in stand-up comedy. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
1/11/202129 minutes, 13 seconds
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Welcome to How To Be a Better Human

Most of us want to be better, but we’re not sure where to begin. Well, start here. Each week, host Chris Duffy talks to guests and past speakers who offer actionable insights on How To Be a Better Human.
1/4/20211 minute, 25 seconds