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Free Library Podcast

English, Literature, 1 season, 423 episodes, 2 days, 21 hours, 48 minutes
About
The Free Library Podcast is an easy way to participate in the author events and lectures that take place at the Parkway Central Library. Visit Author Events (https://libwww.freelibrary.org/programs/authorevents/) to find upcoming events.
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Daniel Schlozman and Sam Rosenfeld | The Hollow Parties: The Many Pasts and Disordered Present of American Party Politics

In conversation with author and Pennsylvania State Senator, Nikil Saval In The Hollow Parties, Daniel Schlozman and Sam Rosenfeld present a comprehensive history of the rise of American mass party politics through the Jacksonian era up through the years of Barack Obama to the presidency of Donald Trump. They posit that today's Democrat and Republican parties, at once overbearing and ineffectual, have emerged from the interplay of multiple party traditions that reach back to the founding, and they offer a vision for how these groups might fulfill their promise. An associate professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University, Daniel Schlozman studies political parties, American political development, social movements, and political history. He is the author of When Movements Anchor Parties: Electoral Alignments in American History, a member of the Scholars Strategy Network, and a trustee of the Maryland Center for Economic Policy. Sam Rosenfeld is an associate professor of political science at Colgate University, where he researches party politics and American political development. He is the author of The Polarizers: Postwar Architects of Our Partisan Era, and his writing has also appeared in The American Prospect, The New Republic, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Vox, among many other places. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/21/2024)
5/22/202457 minutes, 22 seconds
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Paul Hendrickson | Fighting the Night: Iwo Jima, WW II and a Flyer's Life

In conversation with Wil Haygood Paul Hendrickson's books include Sons of Mississippi, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Hemingway's Boat: Everything He Loved in Life, and Lost, 1934–1961, a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist; and The Living and the Dead: Robert McNamara and Five Lives of a Lost War, a National Book Award finalist. A creative writing teacher at the University of Pennsylvania for more than 25 years and a feature writer at The Washington Post for the two decades before that, he is the recipient of writing fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Lyndhurst Foundation, among other institutions. In Fighting the Night, Hendrickson tells the story of his father's World War II service as a nighttime fighter pilot and the sacrifices he, his family, and his generation made on behalf of their country. Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist Wil Haygood has, over a storied 30-year career, worked at the Boston Globe, The Washington Post, and as a globetrotting investigative reporter. He is most famous for his 2008 Washington Post article, ''A Butler Well Served by This Election,'' about the White House steward who bore witness to some of 20th century America's most notable events and figures. He later expanded the article into a bestselling book that was adapted into the critically acclaimed film The Butler, starring Forest Whitaker. Haygood is also the author of Colorization: One Hundred Years of Black Films in a White World and popular biographies of Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Sugar Ray Robinson, Thurgood Marshall, and Sammy Davis, Jr.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/16/2024)
5/20/202454 minutes, 41 seconds
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George Stephanopoulos | The Situation Room: The Inside Story of Presidents in Crisis

Meelya Gordon Memorial Lecture In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition. ABC News' Chief Anchor, the host of This Week with George Stephanopoulos, and co-anchor of Good Morning America, George Stephanopoulos joined the network in 1997 as an analyst for This Week. He previously served in the Clinton administration as the senior advisor to the president for policy and strategy. His book All Too Human, a political memoir about his time on the campaign trail and in the White House, was a no. 1 New York Times bestseller. A member of the board of directors at the Michael J. Fox Foundation and former Rhodes Scholar, Stephanopoulos' many honors include three Emmy Awards, a DuPont Award, three Murrow Awards, and two Cronkite Awards. In The Situation Room, he offers an insider's perspective on the highly restricted space in which 12 presidents have made their most critical, history-changing decisions. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/17/2024)
5/20/20241 hour, 1 minute, 45 seconds
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Claire Messud | This Strange Eventful History: A Novel

In conversation with Laura McGrath, Assistant Professor of English at Temple University ''Among our greatest contemporary writers'' (The Miami Herald), Claire Messud is the author of The Emperor's Children, a cutting portrait of life among Manhattan's junior intelligentsia that was longlisted for the Booker Prize. Her other acclaimed and bestselling novels include When the World Was Steady, The Hunters, The Last Life, The Woman Upstairs, and The Burning Girl. A PEN/Faulkner Award finalist, the recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe fellowships, and the winner of the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Messud teaches writing at Harvard University. Named one of the most anticipated books of 2024 by The Guardian, Oprah Daily, and New York magazine, This Strange Eventful History follows the seven-decade arc of an itinerant French Algerian colonial family born on the wrong side of history and forced to reckon with their interpersonal and larger political legacies. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/15/2024)
5/16/202457 minutes, 12 seconds
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Colm Tóibín | Long Island: A Novel

''His generation's most gifted writer of love's complicated, contradictory power'' (Los Angeles Times), Colm Tóibín is the author of an impressive list of novels, short stories, essays, plays, poetry, and criticism. His novels The Master, The Testament of Mary, and Brooklyn were shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and the last was adapted into a popular BAFTA Award-winning film of the same name. The Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University, Tóibín earned an Irish PEN Award and was named the Laureate for Irish Fiction for 2022–2024 by the Arts Council of Ireland, among scores of other honors. Set 20 years after the events of the international bestseller Brooklyn, Long Island finds the enigmatic émigré protagonist of that book alone in her marriage and facing the travails of middle age and unfulfilled dreams. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/13/2024)
5/14/20241 hour, 27 seconds
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Jen Psaki | Say More: Lessons from Work, the White House, and the World

In conversation with Annie Duke An ''unflappable and genial point-person'' (The New York Times), Jen Psaki served as the thirty-fourth White House Press Secretary under President Biden until May 2022. Currently the host of MSNBC's Sunday afternoon and Monday evening program, Inside with Jen Psaki, she spent the previous twenty years in public service. This includes stints as White House Communications Director under President Obama, as the spokesperson for the State Department under then Secretary of State John Kerry, work on three presidential campaigns, and numerous other campaign and communication roles. In Say More, Psaki employs her trademark wit and clearheaded analysis to reveal the surprising lessons she learned in the press room and from America's top leaders. Annie Duke is the bestselling author of Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away and Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts. A former professional poker player, she won a World Series of Poker bracelet and is the only woman to have won the World Series of Poker Tournament of Champions. She currently works with First Round Capital Partners, a seed stage venture fund, and teaches executive education at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2023 she completed her PhD in cognitive psychology. Duke is also the co-founder of The Alliance for Decision Education, a nonprofit whose mission is to improve lives by empowering students through decision skills education. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/10/2024)
5/13/20241 hour, 54 seconds
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Frank Bruni | The Age of Grievance

In conversation with Karen Heller, former national features writer and current contributor for The Washington Post, formerly a metro and features columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, and a finalist for the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in commentary. A journalist at The New York Times for more than 25 years, Frank Bruni has been the paper's Rome bureau chief, head restaurant critic, White House correspondent, and staff writer for its Sunday magazine, among other positions. In 2011 he became the Times' first openly gay op-ed columnist. His bestselling books include Ambling into History: The Unlikely Odyssey of George W. Bush; Born Round: The Secret History of a Full-Time Eater; Where You Go is Not Who You'll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania; and The Beauty of Dusk, a memoir about adjusting to suddenly losing sight in his right eye. Also currently a professor of public policy at Duke University and the writer of a popular weekly Times newsletter, Bruni formerly worked as a Pulitzer Prize-nominated writer for the Detroit Free Press. In The Age of Grievance, he examines the ways in which the blame game has come to define American politics and culture. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/9/2024)
5/10/202455 minutes, 22 seconds
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Erik Larson | The Demon of Unrest: A Saga of Hubris, Heartbreak, and Heroism at the Dawn of the Civil War

In conversation with award winning broadcaster and journalist, Tracey Matisak. ''America's most compelling popular historian'' (The Christian Science Monitor), Erik Larson is the bestselling author of eight critically acclaimed books, including The Splendid and the Vile, a chronicle of Winston Churchill and London during the Blitz; In the Garden of Beasts, the story of the first American ambassador to Nazi Germany; The Devil in the White City, a history of the serial killer who stalked attendees of the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago; and Dead Wake, the tale of the 1915 sinking of the RMS Lusitania. A former features writer for The Wall Street Journal and a contributing writer for Time magazine, he has contributed articles to The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and Harper's, among other publications. In The Demon of Unrest, Larson delves into the five pivotal months preceding the Civil War to expose the controversies, crises, and personalities that led America into its bloodiest war. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/5/2024)
5/6/202459 minutes, 36 seconds
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Karen Valby | The Swans of Harlem: Five Black Ballerinas, Fifty Years of Sisterhood, and Their Reclamation of a Groundbreaking History

Featuring: Lydia Abarça, Sheila Rohan, Marcia Sells, Karlya Shelton, and Khadija Tariyan (daughter of Gayle McKinney Griffith) In conversation with Shelly Power, The Dr. Carolyn Newsom Executive Director, Philadelphia Ballet Karen Valby's The Swans of Harlem tells the remarkable and-until now-rarely written about true story of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, a trailblazing troupe of Black men and women who performed some of ballet's most iconic works for the such audiences as the Queen of England, the White House, and Stevie Wonder. This history focuses on five foundational members of the group and their enduring bond, including Lydia Abarça, the first Black prima ballerina with a major international dance company, the first Black ballerina on the cover of Dance magazine, and an Essence cover star; and her equally accomplished friends, Gayle McKinney, Sheila Rohan, Marcia Sells, and Karlya Shelton. Valby is a frequent contributor to Vanity Fair, and has also published work in The New York Times, O Magazine, Glamour, Fast Company, and EW, where she spent fifteen years writing about culture. Shelly Power brings to Philadelphia Ballet, formerly Pennsylvania Ballet, her experiences in various artistic and executive leadership roles at Prix de Lausanne in Switzerland and Houston Ballet Academy. Since joining Philadelphia Ballet in 2018, Ms. Power has restructured the organization's administrative functions with new, innovative partnerships, with the goal of promoting that ballet is for everyone. Ms. Power received a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies, with a focus on business, psychology, and fine arts from the University of Houston. She furthered her education at Rice University's Leadership Institute for Non-Profit Executives and Case Western Reserve University's Weatherhead School of Management's Advanced Certification in Non-Profit Management. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 5/2/2024)
5/3/202448 minutes, 43 seconds
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Dasha Kiper | Travelers to Unimaginable Lands: Stories of Dementia, the Caregivers, and the Human Brain

In conversation with Dr. Jason Karlawish In partnership with the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society The clinical consulting director of support groups at The CaringKind (formerly The Alzheimer's Association), Dasha Kiper has an MA in clinical psychology from Columbia University. For the past decade she has worked with dementia patients, counseled caregivers, led support groups, trained and supervised mental health professionals, and counseled former caregivers who now lead support groups. Informed by her work as both a counselor and work as a caregiver herself, Travelers to Unimaginable Lands employs a wide range of compassionate stories to combat the myth of the so-called perfect caregiver. These ''moving and often surprising'' (The Wall Street Journal) case histories meld science and storytelling to show that caregivers don't just witness cognitive decline in their loved ones with dementia-they are its invisible victims. Dr. Jason Karlawish is the author of The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It. A Professor of Medicine, Medical Ethics and Health Policy, and Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, he is Co-Director of the Penn Memory Center, where he cares for patients. He also serves on the board of directors for The Greenwall Foundation, a grant-based organization dedicated to expanding bioethics knowledge. His essays have appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Forbes, and The Philadelphia Inquirer, among other places. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/30/2024)
5/1/202456 minutes, 22 seconds
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Amy Tan | The Backyard Bird Chronicles

In conversation with Beth Kephart A ''master of illusion, and one of the best storytellers around'' (NPR), Amy Tan is the author of the beloved novels The Joy Luck Club, a finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award, for which she also co-wrote the film adaptation screenplay; The Kitchen God's Wife; The Hundred Secret Senses, and The Valley of Amazement. Her prolific body of work also includes the memoir Where the Past Begins, several other novels and works of nonfiction, two children's books, and essays and stories that appeared in scores of periodicals and anthologies. In The Backyard Bird Chronicles, Tan pecks out a thoughtful ode to birding and the hidden beauty that lives around us, nested together with her own soaring illustrations. Renowned for her ability ''to generalize from her personal experience to the greater human one'' (The Washington Post), Beth Kephart is the author of more than 30 books across a wide range of genres, including poetry, young adult fiction, and, most notably, the memoir. These works include the award-winning how-to-guide Handling the Truth; A Slant of Sun, a National Book Award finalist; Love, an ode to all things Philly; and Wife | Daughter | Self, an interlocking essay collection about her various identities. A writing professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the co-founder of Junction workshops, she is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, a Pew Fellowship, and the Speakeasy Poetry Prize, among other honors. Her latest book is an illustrated memoir, My Life In Paper. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/29/2024)
4/30/202453 minutes, 12 seconds
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Bakari Sellers | The Moment: Thoughts on the Race Reckoning That Wasn't and How We All Can Move Forward Now

In 2006, Bakari Sellers defeated a twenty-six-year incumbent State Representative to become the youngest member of the South Carolina state legislature and the youngest African American elected official in the nation. The state's 2014 Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor, he currently heads the strategic communication and public affairs team at the Strom Law Firm in Columbia, South Carolina and works as a CNN political analyst. Recently named to TIME's ''40 Under 40'' list, he is the author of the New York Times bestseller My Vanishing Country, a memoir and historical analysis of the lives of America's often-overlooked black working-class, and hosts the Bakari Sellers Podcast, a twice-weekly show that addresses a variety of cultural and political topics. In The Moment, Sellers examines the politics and policies that most affect the future of Black Americans, including inequities in education, healthcare, and policing. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/25/2024)
4/26/20241 hour, 4 minutes, 23 seconds
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David E. Sanger | New Cold Wars: China's Rise, Russia's Invasion, and America's Struggle to Defend the West

In conversation with Robert E. Hamilton, Head of Eurasia Research - Eurasia Program, Foreign Policy Research Institute Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Endowed Lecture The White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times, David E. Sanger has been a member of three Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist teams, including in 2017 for international reporting. His bestselling books include The Inheritance: The World Obama Confronts and the Challenges to American Power; Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power; and The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age, which was adapted into an award-winning HBO documentary. Sanger is also a regular contributor to CNN and teaches national security policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. In New Cold Wars, he offers an in-depth account of the United States' high-stakes struggles against two very dissimilar adversaries-Xi Jinping's China and Vladimir Putin's Russia. Colonel (Retired) Robert E. Hamilton, Ph.D., is the Head of Research at the Foreign Policy Research Institute's Eurasia Program and an Associate Professor of Eurasian Studies at the U.S. Army War College.  In a 30-year career in the U.S. Army, spent primarily as an Eurasian Foreign Area Officer, he served overseas in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Germany, Belarus, Qatar, Afghanistan, the Republic of Georgia, Pakistan and Kuwait.  He is the author of numerous articles and monographs on conflict and security issues, focusing principally on the former Soviet Union and the Balkans.  He is a graduate of the German Armed Forces Staff College and the U.S. Army War College and holds a Bachelor of Science degree from the United States Military Academy, a Master's Degree in Contemporary Russian Studies and a Ph.D. in Political Science, both from the University of Virginia. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/18/2024)
4/19/202453 minutes, 38 seconds
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R. Jisung Park | Slow Burn: The Hidden Costs of a Warming World

In conversation with Patrick Behrer, Research Economist, Development Economics, World Bank How the subtle but significant consequences of a hotter planet have already begun-from lower test scores to higher crime rates-and how we might tackle them today. In Slow Burn, R. Jisung Park draws upon vast amounts of raw data and novel economics to examine the consequences of climate change on an astonishing array of social groups and institutions. An assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania, environmental and labor economist he holds positions in the School of Social Policy and Practice and the Wharton School of Business. He has spent more than a decade investigating and writing about economic inequalities and outcomes created by climate change. A Rhodes Scholar, a research affiliate at the Institute of Labor Economics, and a faculty fellow at the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania, Park has consulted with such organizations as the World Bank and the New York City Departments of Education and Health. Patrick Behrer is an Economist in the Sustainability and Infrastructure team of the World Bank's Development Research Group. Behrer's work focuses on the economics of air pollution, climate change, and climate adaptation. His work has focused on the impacts of air pollution and climate change on human capital formation and the relationship between agriculture and air pollution. His work leverages big data from online and administrative sources and recent advances in satellite remote sensing technology. Prior to joining the World Bank in 2021, he was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. in 2020 from Harvard University in Public Policy. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/17/2024)
4/18/202451 minutes, 15 seconds
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Dennis Yi Tenen | Literary Theory for Robots: How Computers Learned to Write

Dennis Yi Tenen is an associate professor of English at Columbia University, where he also serves as co-director of the Center for Comparative Media. Affiliated with Columbia's Data Science Institute, he is a former fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and worked as a Microsoft engineer in the Windows group, where he wrote code that runs on millions of personal computers around the world. His articles, which span topics ranging from literary theory to computational narratology, can be found in such journals as Amodern, New Literary History, and boundary2. In Literary Theory for Robots, Tenen takes readers on a centuries-spanning trip through automation to explore the relationship between writers and emerging technologies. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/11/2024)
4/15/202452 minutes, 20 seconds
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Tricia Rose | Metaracism: How Systemic Racism Devastates Black Lives-and How We Break Free

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak Acclaimed for her study of the intersections of pop music, contemporary Black U.S. culture, and sex and gender, sociologist Tricia Rose is the author of Longing to Tell, The Hip Hop Wars, and, most notably, Black Noise, which is considered a foundational text for the academic study of hip hop. She is the Chancellor's Professor of Africana Studies and the director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University, and she has presented seminars and workshops on a wide range of topics to scholarly and general audiences. The recipient of grants and fellowships from the Mellon, the Robert Wood Johnson, the Ford, and the Rockefeller Foundations, Rose has been widely profiled and featured on several national media outlets. In Metaracism, she presents a definitive map of the vast and often obscured practices, policies, and beliefs that proliferate systemic racism in the United States. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/10/2024)
4/12/20241 hour, 3 minutes, 54 seconds
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Lydia Millet | We Loved it All: A Memory of Life

Praised for her ''darkly funny and painfully sharp'' (Los Angeles Times) fiction, Lydia Millet is the author of the novel A Children's Bible, shortlisted for the National Book Award and a New York Times Top 10 book of 2020; the story collection Love in Infant Monkeys, a Pulitzer Prize finalist; and the novel Dinosaurs, a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. Her other honors include awards from PEN Center USA and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is a longtime editor and staff writer at the Center for Biological Diversity. We Loved It All, named a Most Anticipated Book of 2024 by Oprah Daily and Literary Hub, is a memoir that ponders the richness of the human experience amidst the environmental calamities that threaten life on Earth. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/9/2024)
4/10/202441 minutes, 11 seconds
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Julia Alvarez | The Cemetery of Untold Stories: A Novel

Barbara Gohn Day Memorial Lecture In conversation with Rebeca L. Hey-Colón, Professor of Latinx Studies, Temple University Awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Obama in 2013, poet, essayist, and fiction writer Julia Alvarez is renowned for her lyrical, poignant, politically insightful books. These many works include How the García Girls Lost Their Accents, which details the lives of four sisters before and after their exile from the Dominican Republic; In the Time of the Butterflies, a million-copy bestseller that was selected by the National Endowment for the Arts for its national Big Read program; and Afterlife, a novel that explores the notion of keeping faith with our fellow humans in a broken world. Alvarez's many awards include the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Achievement in American Literature, a Latina Leader Award in Literature from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, and the Hispanic Heritage Award in Literature. In The Cemetery of Untold Stories, Alvarez explores the very nature of storytelling in the tale of a fiction writer who finds that her buried untold stories have taken on lives of their own. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/4/2024)
4/9/202455 minutes, 7 seconds
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Stacey Abrams | Rogue Justice: A Thriller

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster, Tracey Matisak Introduced by State Rep. Donna Bullock Stacey Abrams is the Ronald W. Walters Endowed Chair for Race and Black Politics at Howard University. After serving eleven years in the Georgia House of Representatives-seven as minority leader-she became the 2018 Democratic nominee for governor of Georgia, where she won more votes than any Democrat in the state's history. Dedicated to civic engagement, she is the creator of multiple nonprofit organizations devoted to democracy protection, voting rights, and effective public policy. Abrams has also co-founded successful companies, including a financial services firm, an energy and infrastructure consulting firm, and a media company, Sage Works Productions, Inc. Her books include the New York Times nonfiction bestsellers Lead from the Outside and Our Time Is Now, and a thriller, titled While Justice Sleeps. Her latest thriller, Rogue Justice, follows the continuing intrigues of While Justice Sleeps' protagonist, Supreme Court law clerk Avery Keene, as she unravels a conspiracy involving a slew of federal judges.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/5/2024)
4/8/202453 minutes, 31 seconds
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Sloane Crosley | Grief is for People

''A fountain of observations'' (The Boston Globe), Sloane Crosley is the author of three New York Times bestselling essay collections, How Did You Get This Number, Look Alive Out There, and I Was Told There'd Be Cake, which was a finalist for the 2009 Thurber Prize for American Humor. Exploring various aspects of life's disappointments, morality, and modern love, her novels Cult Classic and The Clasp were named best books of the year by numerous publications. Crosley is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, a former editor of The Best American Travel Writing series, and her other work has appeared in The New York Times, Bon Appetit, The Village Voice, McSweeney's, Vice, and Smithsonian. In Grief Is for People, she offers an elegiac examination of loss in the aftermath of her close friend's death by suicide. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/3/2024)
4/5/202450 minutes, 24 seconds
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M. Nzadi Keita | Migration Letters: Poems

In conversation with Herman Beavers M. Nzadi Keita is the author of the poetry collection Brief Evidence of Heaven, a finalist for the Phillis Wheatley Poetry Prize that explored the life of Anna Murray Douglass, Frederick Douglass' first wife. Her other poems and essays have appeared in such publications as A Face to Meet the Faces: A Persona Poetry Anthology, Killens Review of Arts and Letters, and Poet Lore. She formerly taught creative writing, American literature, and Africana studies at Ursinus College, and was an adviser to the award-winning documentary BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez and to Mural Arts Philadelphia. Keita's latest collection of poetry, Migration Letters, is a reflection on Black working-class identity and culture from the 1960s to now. A professor of English and Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Herman Beavers teaches 20th Century and Contemporary African American literature and poetry writing. He is the author of the scholarly monograph Geography and the Political Imaginary in the Novels of Toni Morrison, the poetry chapbook Obsidian Blues, and his poems have appeared in Cleaver Magazine, Versadelphia, and The American Arts Quarterly, among other publications.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 4/2/2024)
4/4/202457 minutes, 8 seconds
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Fareed Zakaria | Age of Revolutions: Progress and Backlash from 1600 to the Present

Pine Tree Foundation Endowed Lecture Fareed Zakaria is the host of CNN's flagship domestic and international affairs program Fareed Zakaria GPS, which has aired around the world since its debut in 2008. Also a weekly columnist for the Washington Post, he formerly served as editor of Newsweek International, managing editor of Foreign Affairs, a Time magazine columnist, an analyst for ABC News, and the host of PBS's Foreign Exchange with Fareed Zakaria. He is the author of four New York Times bestsellers, including Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World, The Post-American World, The Future of Freedom, and In Defense of a Liberal Education. In Age of Revolutions, Zakaria melds historical study with contemporary analysis to map the ways in which societal upheavals and political paradigm shifts define our current culture of polarization. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 3/28/2024)
4/1/202459 minutes, 5 seconds
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Hanif Abdurraqib | There's Always This Year: On Basketball and Ascension

In conversation with Airea Dee Matthews Hanif Abdurraqib is the author of A Little Devil in America, a sweeping look at Black music, art, and culture that won the Carnegie Medal and the Gordon Burns Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Award. His other works include the essay collection They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, which was named a best book of 2017 by Esquire, the Chicago Tribune, and NPR, among other outlets; Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest, a New York Times bestseller and a National Book Critics Circle Award and Kirkus Prize finalist; and the poetry collection A Fortune for Your Disaster, winner of the 2020 Lenore Marshall Prize. His other essays, poems, and criticism have been published in a wide array of media. In There's Always This Year, Abdurraqib offers an emotional and historical meditation on basketball-who makes it, who we think should be successful in the game, and the very notion of role models. Airea D. Matthews is the 2022–23 Philadelphia Poet Laureate and directs the poetry program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulcra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Best American Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, and VQR, among other journals. Matthews' other honors include a 2022 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, a 2020 Pew Fellowship, and the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award. Her latest work, Bread and Circus, addresses themes of income inequality, commodification, and conventional economic theories through poetry, prose, and imagery. The book was nominated for an LA Times Poetry Book Prize. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 3/27/2024)
3/28/20241 hour, 7 minutes, 6 seconds
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Rahul Mehta | Feeding the Ghosts: Poems

Rahul Mehta's debut poetry collection, Feeding the Ghosts, explores the solace to be found in the everyday beauty sometimes overshadowed by larger calamity, as well as the author's identities, relationships, and culture. Also the author of the novel No Other World and the short story collection Quarantine, Mehta has contributed work to an array of publications, including the Kenyon Review, The Sun, the Massachusetts Review, and the New York Times Magazine. A creative writing teacher at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and named to Out magazine's 2011 ''Out 100'' list of inspiring individuals, they have earned a Lambda Literary Award and an Asian American Literary Award. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 3/26/2024)
3/27/202443 minutes, 22 seconds
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Rebecca Serle | Expiration Dates: A Novel

In conversation with Jo Piazza Acclaimed for her ''knack for writing beautiful stories that speak to the anxiety of forging a new road for oneself'' (Bustle), Rebecca Serle is the New York Times bestselling author of One Italian Summer, In Five Years, The Dinner List, and the young adult novels The Edge of Falling and When You Were Mine. Serle also adapted her YA book series Famous in Love into a hit television series of the same name and her book When You Were Mine was the basis of the 2022 film Rosaline. A tale of romantic aspiration and exasperation, Expiration Dates is a novel in which for each potential partner she meets, a woman magically receives a slip of paper that lists his name and the amount of time that they will be together. Jo Piazza is the international bestselling author of twelve books, including the Good Morning America Book Club pick We Are Not Like Them with Christine Pride. She's also the host of the critically acclaimed Under the Influence podcast. Her work has been featured in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications. Her new book is The Sicilian Inheritance. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 3/25/2024)
3/26/202442 minutes, 43 seconds
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Jenny Jackson | Pineapple Street: A Novel

In conversation with Lexy Bloom ''A delicious new Gilded Age family drama-almost a satire-set in the leafy enclaves of Brooklyn Heights'' (Vogue), Jenny Jackson's Pineapple Street tells the story of three women navigating the shoals of forbidden love, gender expectations, family money, and too much tennis. A New York Times bestseller and a Good Morning America Book Club Pick, it was named a best book of 2023 by numerous publications and media outlets, including Time, NPR, Town & Country, Elle, Harper's Bazaar, and the BBC. A vice president and executive editor at Alfred A. Knopf, Jackson is a graduate of Williams College and the Columbia Publishing Course. Lexy Bloom is Editorial Director at Knopf Cooks and Senior Editor at Alfred A. Knopf, where she works with writers such as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Haruki Murakami, Orhan Pamuk, Deb Perelman, Hetty McKinnon, Bill Buford, and many more Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 3/21/2024)
3/25/202447 minutes, 39 seconds
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Astra Taylor and Leah Hunt-Hendrix | Solidarity: The Past, Present, and Future of a World-Changing Idea

In conversation with author and Pennsylvania State Senator, Nikil Saval In Solidarity, Astra Taylor and Leah Hunt-Hendrix offer a comprehensive look at not just the popular and ethereal idea of solidarity, but how it can be used by political organizing movements to affect real societal change. Also a lively history of such movements from Ancient Roman revolts to Occupy Wall Street and BLM, it reveals the nuts-and-bolts methods through which solidarity is built and sustained. Leah Hunt-Hendrix earned a PhD in Religion, Ethics, and Politics from Princeton University, where she wrote her dissertation on the Ethics of Solidarity. In 2012 she co-founded Solidaire, a nationwide network of philanthropists who fund progressive movements; and in 2017, she co-founded Way to Win, an organization devoted to electoral strategy. A Senior Advisor at the American Economic Liberties Project and a member of the Board of Directors of the Solutions Project, she is an advisor to her family foundation, the Sister Fund. The cofounder of the Debt Collective, a union of debtors, Astra Taylor is the director of several documentaries and the author of The Age of Insecurity: Coming Together as Things Fall Apart, Democracy May Not Exist But We'll Miss It When It's Gone, and The People's Platform, winner of an American Book Award. Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and n+1, among other publications. She sits on the editorial board of Hammer & Hope and is an advisor to Lux Magazine. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/19/2024)
3/21/202453 minutes, 55 seconds
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Hamilton Nolan | The Hammer: Power, Inequality, and the Struggle for the Soul of Labor

In conversation with Kim Kelly A labor journalist who regularly contributes to In These Times magazine and The Guardian, Hamilton Nolan has written about inequality, politics, and class war for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Gawker, and Splinter, among other publications. He also regularly contributes articles about boxing to Defector. A member of the Writers Guild of America, East, Hamilton led the 2015 effort to unionize Gawker Media, where he was the longest-serving writer in the organization's history. In The Hammer, he offers a comprehensive overview of the contemporary American labor movement and highlights specific actions and organizations where politics and workers combine to affect change.   Kim Kelly has worked as a labor columnist for Teen Vogue since 2018, and her writing on labor, class, and politics has appeared in The New Republic, The Washington Post, The New York Times, and Esquire, among other places. Also a video correspondent for More Perfect Union, The Real News Network, and Means TV, she formerly served as the heavy metal editor at VICE's ''Noisey'' imprint. She was an original member of the VICE union, is a member of the Industrial Workers of the World's Freelance Journalists Union, and is a member and elected councilperson for the Writers Guild of America, East. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/18/2024)
3/20/202458 minutes, 31 seconds
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Nam Le | 36 Ways of Writing a Vietnamese Poem

In conversation with Airea Dee Matthews Referred to by Nick Cave as ''exquisitely crafted fire bombs of incandescent rage,'' Nam Le's 36 Ways of Writing a Vietnamese Poem is a debut collection of verse that both honors and shatters the tropes of diasporic literature. Le is also the author of The Boat, a short story collection that takes readers to such places as New York City, Tehran, his birth country of Vietnam, and Australia, where he was raised and now lives. Winner of the Dylan Thomas Prize, the Australian Prime Minister's Literary Award, and a Pushcart Prize, this work has been widely anthologized, translated, and taught. Le has also contributed writing to a wide array of publications, including Zoetrope, The American Poetry Review, The Paris Review, Bomb, Boston Review, and One Story. Airea Dee Matthews is the 2022–23 Philadelphia Poet Laureate and directs the poetry program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulcra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Best American Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, and VQR, among other journals. Matthews' other honors include a 2022 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, a 2020 Pew Fellowship, and the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award. Her latest work, Bread and Circus, addresses themes of income inequality, commodification, and conventional economic theories through poetry, prose, and imagery. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/14/2024)
3/19/20241 hour, 10 seconds
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Tamron Hall | Watch Where They Hide: A Jordan Manning Novel

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition. Tamron Hall is the Emmy Award-winning host and executive producer of the eponymous program Tamron Hall, ABC Disney's second longest running nationally syndicated talk show. Also the host of Deadline: Crime with Tamron Hall on Investigation Discovery, she formerly served as an anchor for Today, the host of MSNBC Live with Tamron Hall, and a national news correspondent for NBC. While at NBC, she earned a 2015 Edward R. Murrow Award for her reportage on domestic abuse. Hall also partnered with Safe Horizon to launch The Tamron Renate Fund, which aids victims and families affected by domestic violence. A sequel to her 2022 bestselling crime fiction novel As the Wicked Watch, Watch Where They Hide follows intrepid journalist Jordan Manning as she uncovers the truth about a missing young mother. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/15/2024)
3/18/202451 minutes, 59 seconds
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Morgan Parker | You Get What You Pay For: Essays

In conversation with Shantrelle Lewis Morgan Parker won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Magical Negro, a poetry collection that ponders the nuances of Black American womanhood. She is also the author of the young adult novel Who Put This Song On? and the poetry collections Other People's Comfort Keeps Me Up at Night and There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé. A Cave Canem graduate fellow, the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and the winner of a Pushcart Prize, Parker is the creator/co-curator of the Poets With Attitude reading series and is a member of The Other Black Girl Collective. Her writing has appeared in a variety of venues, including The Paris Review, The New York Review of Books, Best American Poetry, a Broadway playbill, and two Common albums. In You Get What You Pay For, she charts the generational and historical difficulties, traumas, and beauty of existing as a Black woman. Shantrelle P. Lewis is a multi-hyphen creative and scholar who accesses multiple disciplines to help elucidate African Diasporic history, aesthetics, culture and spirituality. After premiering at BlackStar Film Festival, her critically acclaimed directorial debut, In Our Mothers' Gardens, was released on Netflix via Ava Duvernay's Array. Her book, Dandy Lion: The Black Dandy and Street Style, was published by Aperture in 2017. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, LA Times, Variety, Hollywood Reporter, NPR, BBC, Washington Post, Slate, The New Yorker and the Philadelphia Inquirer. She co-founded Shoppe Black with her husband and fellow Howard alum, Tony Oluwatoyin Lawson. As an initiated Lukumi Sango Priest, hoodooist and New Orleans native, Shantrelle can be found waxing poetic about all things African spirituality online and in person at the Beaucoup Hoodoo Shop, the annual Beaucoup Hoodoo Fest this October and within her community, ATRS Book Club. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/13/2024)
3/18/20241 hour, 41 seconds
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Kara Swisher | Burn Book: A Tech Love Story

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition An award-winning journalist who has covered the business of the Internet since 1994, Kara Swisher is the host of the podcast On with Kara Swisher and the cohost of the Pivot podcast with Scott Galloway, both distributed by New York magazine. Also the cofounder and editor-at-large of Recode, host of the Recode Decode podcast, and co-executive producer of the Code conference, she is the author of aol.com and There Must Be a Pony in Here Somewhere, both of which explored AOL's position as an online cultural and business behemoth. Swisher is a former contributing opinion writer for The New York Times and host of its Sway podcast, and has also written for The Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair, and The Washington Post. A scathing but balanced account of the tech industry and its founders, Burn Book employs Swisher's many decades of experience with Silicon Valley's most important figures, failures, and innovations. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/12/2024)
3/18/20241 hour, 7 minutes, 15 seconds
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Xochitl Gonzalez | Anita de Monte Laughs Last: A Novel

''Packed with richly imagined characters and vivacious prose'' (Esquire), Xochitl Gonzalez's debut novel Olga Dies Dreaming tells a tale of family secrets, Latinx politics in a gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhood, and romance set against the backdrop of the most devastating hurricane in Puerto Rican history. Winner of the Brooklyn Public Library Book Prize in Fiction and the New York City Book Award, it was named a best book of 2022 by The Washington Post, NPR, The New York Times, and TIME magazine. Gonzalez's nonfiction has appeared in Vogue, Allure, The Cut, and other periodicals, and her commentary writing for The Atlantic was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A tale of legacy, class, and art, Anita De Monte Laughs Last follows a first-generation Ivy League art student's quest to uncover the work of a brilliant but largely forgotten 1980s-era painter. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/11/2024)
3/15/202458 minutes, 36 seconds
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Tommy Orange | Wandering Stars: A Novel

In conversation with Tailinh Agoyo Tommy Orange is the author of There There, a novel of ''pure soaring beauty'' (The New York Times) that tells the story of 12 interconnected Native Americans living in Oakland, California. A national bestseller and lauded by scores of publications as one of the best books of 2018, it was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and won the PEN/Hemingway Award, the John Leonard Prize, and the American Book Award. There There was also the 2020 One Book One Philadelphia selection. An enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma, Orange teaches in the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts. In Wandering Stars, he revisits some of the characters from There There and paints new protagonists in America's past as he examines the tragic legacies of the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, and the country's contemporary war on its indigenous peoples. Tailinh Agoyo is co-founder and director of We Are the Seeds of Culture Trust, a non-profit organization committed to amplifying Indigenous voices through the arts. She also hosts From Here, With a View, a podcast that honors the voices of Indigenous artists and educators, and is a co-founder of Project Antelope, an online marketplace platform developed by Indigenous business leaders for Indigenous artists. Her other work includes the children's book I Will Carry You and the photo collection The Warrior Project. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/7/2024)
3/8/202452 minutes, 30 seconds
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Marie Arana | Latinoland: A Portrait of America's Largest and Least Understood Minority

In conversation with Elisabeth Perez-Luna, contributor to The Philadelphia Inquirer and former Executive Producer of Audio Content at WHYY   The inaugural Literary Director of the Library of Congress, Marie Arana is the author of the National Book Award finalist American Chica, a memoir about her childhood in Peru and the United States that was praised for its ''spareness, clarity, and passion for allegory'' (The New York Times Book Review). Her other work includes the novels Cellophane and Lima Nights; a biography of Simon Bolivar that won the 2014 Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Silver, Sword, and Stone, a narrative history of Latin America; and The Writing Life, a collection of her articles for The Washington Post. In Latinoland, Arana employs hundreds of interviews, a prolific body of research, and her own experiences as a Latina to present an encompassing portrait of America's fastest-growing minority group. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 3/4/2024)
3/5/20241 hour, 34 seconds
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Barbara McQuade | Attack from Within: How Disinformation Is Sabotaging America

In conversation with Ali Velshi Barbara McQuade is a legal expert for MSNBC and NBC News, and a co-host of the podcast #SistersInLaw. She teaches courses in criminal law, criminal procedure, national security, and data privacy at the University of Michigan Law School. The first woman to serve in her position, from 2010 to 2017 she was the U.S Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan. Her early career included work as a sportswriter and copy editor, a judicial law clerk, an associate in private practice, and an assistant U.S. attorney. In Attack from Within, McQuade presents an encompassing examination of the ways in which mass disinformation is damaging democracy, while also offering a practical guide to shoring up the institutions, technology, and policies beset by those with an interest in dividing us. Ali Velshi is an award winning journalist, host of "Velshi" and Chief Correspondent for MSNBC, and a weekly economics contributor to NPR's "Here And Now." He has covered multiple U.S. Midterm and Presidential elections and significant news stories around the globe, including extensive reporting from Israel during the war with Israel and Hamas, Ukraine and across Central and Eastern Europe during the Russian invasion, the Syrian refugee crisis from Turkey and Jordan, and the Iran Nuclear Deal in Tehran. He hosts the "Velshi Banned Book Club on MSNBC, and the "Velshi Banned Book Club" podcast. Velshi is known for his immersive on-the-ground reporting and his interactive discussions with small groups, which form part of his ongoing series, Velshi Across America. He previously worked as an anchor and correspondent for Al Jazeera America and CNN. He has been nominated for multiple Emmy Awards, and is the recipient of two National Headliner Awards and a Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi Award.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/29/2024)
3/1/202459 minutes, 49 seconds
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Laurence Ralph | Sito: An American Teenager and the City That Failed Him

In conversation with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor In Sito, Laurence Ralph explores the murder of San Francisco teen Sito Quiñonez and his family's long-reverberating grief and grace. Ralph, the stepfather of Sito's half-brother, tells this story both as an academic who has studied violence and class, as well as someone enmeshed within this family. His other books include of Renegade Dreams: Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago and The Torture Letters: Reckoning with Police Violence. The Director for the Center on Transnational Policing and a professor at Princeton University, Ralph is a former tenured professor at Harvard University, a Guggenheim Fellow, a fellow of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and a member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. He has also earned fellowships from the Guggenheim National Science Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation, and the Ford Foundation. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is the Leon Forrest Professor of African American Studies at Northwestern University. Formerly a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University for eight years, her books include From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, How We Get Free, and Race for Profit, a finalist for the 2020 Pulitzer Prize in history. Taylor has been named one of the hundred most influential African Americans in the United States by The Root and Essence Magazine named her among the top one hundred ''change makers'' in the county. She has been appointed as a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians by the Organization of American Historians. A guest on such outlets as Democracy Now!, The Intercept, and All Things Considered, she has contributed opinion pieces to The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Paris Review, among many other periodicals. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/27/2024)
2/28/202435 minutes, 38 seconds
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Marcus Anthony Hunter | Radical Reparations: Healing the Soul of a Nation

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition. Co-promoted by the American Constitution Society The Scott Waugh Endowed Chair in the Social Sciences Division, Professor of Sociology & African American Studies at UCLA, Dr. Marcus Anthony Hunter coined the term ''Black Lives Matter.'' His books include Black Citymakers: How The Philadelphia Negro Changed Urban America, The New Black Sociologists, and Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life, coauthored with Zandria F. Robinson. He formerly served as the Inaugural Chair of UCLA's African American Studies Department and President of the Association of Black Sociologists, his research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and Social Science Research Council, and he has appeared across a wide array of print and broadcast media. In Radical Reparations, Hunter ventures beyond the contentious current debate about the country's responsibility for atoning for its earlier sins to lay out an ambitious but practical seven-point compensation plan for Black Americans. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/22/2024)
2/23/202455 minutes, 51 seconds
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Maura Cheeks | Acts of Forgiveness: A Novel

In conversation with Zoe Sivak Maura Cheeks is the author of Acts of Forgiveness, a debut novel that imagines a contemporary moment in which our government has approved reparations for Black Americans-but only if they can prove they are the descendants of enslaved people. Based on a feature-length article she produced during a masthead reporting residency at The Atlantic, R. Eric Thomas calls the book a ''generous and empathetic study of burden and inheritance, consequence and regret.'' Cheeks has contributed other writing to a variety of publications, including the Paris Review, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Harvard Business Review, Tin House, and Lenny Letter. Zoe Sivak is the author of Mademoiselle Revolution, an NPR Best Book of 2022. Zoe advocates for diverse stories and characters in historical fiction, where she strives to explore famous male figures through the lenses of the women beside them--women who could have existed, even if history left them behind. Zoe received her Juris Doctor and masters in public health in Philadelphia, where she continues her work in healthcare and shares a home with her partner, Adam, and two cats. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/21/2024)
2/22/202439 minutes, 40 seconds
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Phillip B. Williams | Ours: A Novel

In conversation with Airea D. Matthews Phillip B. Williams is the author of two acclaimed poetry collections, Thief in the Interior, which won the Kate Tufts Discovery Award and a Lambda Literary Award; and Mutiny, which was a finalist for the PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry Collection and the winner of a 2022 American Book Award. A creative writing professor in New York University's MFA creative writing program, he is the recipient of a Whiting Award and fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and the National Endowment for the Arts. A surrealistic epic about the complexities of freedom and the boundaries of love, Ours tells the story of an 1830s-era conjuror who destroys plantations and spirits enslaved people away to a magically concealed community. Airea D. Matthews is the 2022–23 Philadelphia Poet Laureate and directs the poetry program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulacra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Best American Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, and VQR, among other journals. Matthews' other honors include a 2022 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, a 2020 Pew Fellowship, and the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award. Addressing themes of income inequality, commodification, and conventional economic theories, her most recent book Bread and Circus combines poetry, prose, and imagery to tell an intimate story about the author and her family. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/20/2024)
2/21/202455 minutes, 40 seconds
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Billy Dee Williams | What Have We Here?: Portraits of a Life

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak Screen icon Billy Dee Williams is perhaps best known for his role as Lando Calrissian in the Star Wars movies The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi, and The Rise of Skywalker. His dozens of other film appearances, which date back to the 1950s, include roles in Lady Sings the Blues, Brian's Song, Mahogany, Nighthawks, and too many others to list; his similarly prolific television career includes starring turns, appearances, and cameos in more than 40 dramas, sitcoms, and TV movies; and he has acted in seven acclaimed Broadway plays. His many honors include induction into the Black Filmmaker's Hall of Fame, two NAACP Image Awards, a primetime Emmy nomination, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and recognition from the African-American Film Critics Association. Also a prolific and prize-winning painter, Williams has seen his work displayed in museums and galleries around the world. In What Have We Here, he tells the story of his childhood in 1930s Harlem, his remarkable career, and his triumph over Hollywood racism and typecasting. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/17/2024)
2/20/202452 minutes, 48 seconds
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Calvin Trillin | The Lede: Dispatches from a Life in the Press

In conversation with Bill Marimow ''Perhaps the finest reporter in America'' (The Miami Herald), Calvin Trillin has written more than 400 nonfiction and comic articles for The New Yorker since 1963. His book include U.S. Journal and Killings, collections of his columns from between 1967 and 1982. A former Time columnist and syndicated columnist at The Nation, Trillin wrote and performed two one-man shows, wrote a play that was staged at the American Place Theatre, and has appeared across a wide variety of media outlets. He has also published two comic novels, four books of political verse, and three memoirs, and his humor collection Quite Enough of Calvin Trillin won the Thurber Prize for American Humor in 2012. Replete with his signature empathy and wit, The Lede is a portrait of journalists and their craft constructed through curated articles from his six-decade career. As a reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Bill Marimow twice won the Pulitzer Prize for public service. The editor in chief of the Inquirer from 2006 to 2017 and formerly its vice president of strategic development, he also served as vice president of news at National Public Radio and editor in chief of The Baltimore Sun. His other honors include two Silver Gavel Awards from the American Bar Association and two Robert F. Kennedy awards. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/15/2024)
2/16/202452 minutes, 41 seconds
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Paul Alexander | Bitter Crop: The Heartache and Triumph of Billie Holiday's Last Year

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster, Tracey Matisak Paul Alexander's bestselling and acclaimed biographies include portraits of James Dean, Sylvia Plath, John McCain, and J. D. Salinger, the last of which served as the basis of a documentary that appeared on HBO, PBS, and Netflix. Alexander's nonfiction has appeared in a wide variety of publications, including the Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, The Nation, The Washington Post, and Rolling Stone, as well as numerous literary journals. He is also the author of several stage plays and screenplays. A writing teacher at Hunter College in New York City and a former fellow at the Hoover Institution, he holds memberships at the PEN American Center, the Dramatists Guild, and the Academy of American Poets. In Bitter Crop, the first new biography of Billie Holiday in more than 20 years, Alexander presents a transcendently soaring look at the legendary jazz singer's last year of life.   Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/13/2024)
2/14/202452 minutes, 20 seconds
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Grace Lin | Chinese Menu: The History, Myths, and Legends Behind Your Favorite American Chinese Foods

In conversation with Ellen Yin A New York Times bestselling children's author and illustrator, Grace Lin earned the Newbery Honor for Where the Mountain Meets the Moon, the Theodor Geisel Honor for Ling and Ting, and the Caldecott Honor for A Big Mooncake for Little Star. Her novel When the Sea Turned to Silver was a National Book Award Finalist. Recognized by former President Obama's administration as a Champion of Change for Asian American and Pacific Islander Art and Storytelling, Lin was awarded the Children's Literature Legacy Award from the American Library Association. She also provides commentary for New England Public Radio, book reviews for The New York Times, and she hosts the podcasts kidlitwomen* and Kids Ask Authors. In Chinese Menu, she serves up insights on the history, legends, and myths behind favorite American Chinese dishes. High Street Hospitality Group founder and co-owner Ellen Yin operates some of the country's most acclaimed eateries, including a.kitchen + bar, Fork, High Street Restaurant & Bakery, The Wonton Project, and High Street Hoagies. In 2023 she was named ''Outstanding Restaurateur'' by the James Beard Foundation Awards. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, she is involved with several community-centric organizations, including the Sisterly Love Collective and the Independent Restaurant Coalition, and she sits on the Board of ''The Philadelphia Award.'' Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/12/2024)
2/13/202452 minutes, 28 seconds
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Paul Lynch | Prophet Song: A Novel

In conversation with novelist and musician Wesley Stace  Paul Lynch won the 2023 Booker Prize for Prophet Song, a ''brilliant, haunting'' and ''crucial book for our current times (The Guardian) that tells the dystopian but plausible tale of a family caught in the clutches of an increasingly authoritarian Ireland. His other novels include Red Sky in Morning, featured on NPR and named a best book of the year by The Irish Times, The Toronto Star, and the Irish Independent; The Black Snow, winner of France's Prix Libr'à Nous for Best Foreign Novel; Grace, winner of the 2018 Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year; and Beyond the Sea, published to international acclaim and winner of France's 2022 Prix Gen de Mers. Lynch previously served as chief film critic for Ireland's Sunday Tribune newspaper and regularly contributed film articles to The Sunday Times. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/9/2024)
2/12/202457 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ruha Benjamin | Imagination: A Manifesto

In conversation with Shantrelle Lewis Ruha Benjamin is the author of Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code, a ''galvanizing'' and ''inventive and wide-ranging'' (The Nation) look at how new technologies reinforce social inequities; and Viral Justice: How We Grow the World We Want, a pragmatic yet poetic vision of the ways in which our minor everyday choices can add up to larger societal growth. Also the author of many scholarly publications, she is a professor of African American studies at Princeton University, where she is the founding director of the Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab. Benjamin's writing has been featured in The New York Times, The Guardian, CNN, The Root, and Vox, among numerous other media outlets. A revelatory call to action, Imagination calls for readers to consider the arena of the mind as a very real space for struggle, interconnectedness, and societal change. Shantrelle P. Lewis is a multi-hyphen creative and scholar who accesses multiple disciplines to help elucidate African Diasporic history, aesthetics, culture and spirituality. After premiering at BlackStar Film Festival, her critically acclaimed directorial debut, In Our Mothers' Gardens, was released on Netflix via Ava Duvernay's Array. Her book, Dandy Lion: The Black Dandy and Street Style, was published by Aperture in 2017. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, LA Times, Variety, Hollywood Reporter, NPR, BBC, Washington Post, Slate, The New Yorker and the Philadelphia Inquirer. She co-founded Shoppe Black with her husband and fellow Howard alum, Tony Oluwatoyin Lawson. As an initiated Lukumi Sango Priest, hoodooist and New Orleans native, Shantrelle can be found waxing poetic about all things African spirituality online and in person at the Beaucoup Hoodoo Shop, the annual Beaucoup Hoodoo Fest this October and within her community, ATRS Book Club. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/7/2024)
2/9/202455 minutes, 10 seconds
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Shayla Lawson | How to Live Free in a Dangerous World: A Decolonial Memoir

In conversation with Jeannine Cook, owner of Harriett's Bookshop and Ida's Books Shayla Lawson is the author of This Is Major: Notes on Diana Ross, Dark Girls, and Being Dope, a ''whip-smart'' (People) essay collection about politics, pop culture, politics, and history. Named one of the most anticipated books of 2020 by numerous periodicals, it was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award for autobiography and a LAMBDA Literary Award. Also the author of two poetry collections, Lawson has contributed writing to Salon, New York magazine, and ESPN, among other places. They have also earned fellowships from Yaddo and MacDowell. In How to Live Free in a Dangerous World, they present a globetrotting essay collection about the need for beauty during tough times, the unexpected wisdom we find when we fall in and out of love, and the transformative power of freedom. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/8/2024)
2/9/202451 minutes, 8 seconds
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Kiley Reid | Come and Get It

In conversation with Niela Orr A ''hilarious, uncomfortable and compulsively readable story about race and class'' (TIME), Kiley Reid's novel Such a Fun Age tells the story of a young Black babysitter and her well-intentioned but misguided employer. A New York Times bestseller, a Reese's Book Club Pick, and named one of the best books of the year by a slew of publications, it was longlisted for the 2020 Booker Prize. Reid's other writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Playboy, and The Guardian, among other places. She teaches writing at the University of Michigan. A novel about wealth, bad behavior, and indelicacy, Come and Get It tells the story of an ambitious University of Arkansas resident assistant and her tangled relationships with a professor and three boisterous students. Niela Orr is a critic whose work has appeared in The London Review of Books, The Paris Review, and The Believer, among other places. She is a story editor for the New York Times Magazine. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 1/31/2024)
2/2/202451 minutes, 53 seconds
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Emily Nagoski | Come Together: The Science (and Art!) of Creating Lasting Sexual Connections

Emily Nagoski is the author of the New York Times bestseller Come as You Are, a self-help manual lauded by critics and readers for its ability to ''offer up hard facts on the science of arousal and desire in a friendly and accessible way'' (The Guardian). With her sister, Amelia Nagoski, she is also the co-author of Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle. She earned an MS in counseling and a PhD in health behavior from Indiana University, where she has conducted clinical and research training at the renowned Kinsey Institute. She now teaches sex education and stress education to women across the country. In Come Together, Nagoski employs scientific rigor, compassion, and humor to create a pragmatic and specific guide for maintaining a fulfilling sex life while in a long-term relationship. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 2/1/2024)
2/2/202456 minutes, 6 seconds
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Susan Muaddi Darraj | Behind You Is the Sea: A Novel

Susan Muaddi Darraj won the 2016 American Book Award, the 2016 Arab American Book Award, and was a finalist for the Palestine Book Award for A Curious Land, a collection of linked stories that follows the denizens of a Palestinian West Bank village. She is also the author of a story collection titled The Inheritance of Exile, and Farah Rocks, the first children's book series to feature a Palestinian-American character. A former Ford Fellow and winner of the Maryland State Art Council's Independent Artist Award, she teaches creative writing at Johns Hopkins University. In Behind You Is the Sea, Muaddi Darraj tells the story of three immigrant Palestinian families who experience very disparate versions of contemporary American life. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 1/25/2024)
1/26/202454 minutes, 23 seconds
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Benjamin Herold | Disillusioned: Five Families and the Unraveling of America's Suburbs

In conversation with Kristen Graham, education reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer Public education reporter Benjamin Herold's stories, features, and investigative exposés have appeared in Education Week, PBS NewsHour, The Hechinger Report, NPR, and the Public School Notebook, among other publications. The recipient of a master's degree in urban education from Temple University and first place awards from the Education Writers Association, Herold formerly worked as a researcher, documentary filmmaker, and training specialist for rape-crisis and domestic-violence prevention organizations. In Disillusioned, he offers a timely examination of the hope and hazards suburban public schools and school boards offer in the fight to renew the promise of historical American middle class ideals. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 1/23/2024)
1/24/202453 minutes, 33 seconds
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Annie Liontas | Sex with a Brain Injury: On Concussion and Recovery

In conversation with CJ Hauser Featured as an Editor's Choice in The New York Times Book Review, Annie Liontas' debut novel, Let Me Explain You, follows the bridge-burning patriarch of a Greek American family who believes he has only days to live. Liontas is the co-editor of the anthology A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors, and has contributed writing to The New York Times Book Review, NPR, Gay Magazine, Guernica, and McSweeney's, among other places. The Gloss, her interview series with women and genderqueer writers, appears in BOMB, The Believer, and Electric Literature. A personal memoir in essays, Sex with a Brain Injury details the multiple concussions Liontas suffered in her 30s and their lasting effects, while offering a larger account of the roles brain injuries have played in historical and contemporary culture-particularly in relation to women and the LGBT community. CJ Hauser is the author of The Crane Wife, a popular memoir in essays that explores the many definitions of love. Also the author of the novels Family of Origin and The From-Aways, they have contributed writing to a wide array of periodicals, including The Paris Review, Tin House, The Guardian, Bon Appetit, Esquire, The New York Times, and Vogue UK. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! The views expressed by the authors and moderators are strictly their own and do not represent the opinions of the Free Library of Philadelphia or its employees. (recorded 1/18/2024)
1/19/202454 minutes, 8 seconds
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Dannagal Goldthwaite Young | Wrong: How Media, Politics, and Identity Drive Our Appetite for Misinformation

Co-sponsored by Committee of Seventy In conversation with Cherri Gregg, host/news anchor for WHYY radio Dannagal Goldthwaite Young is the author of Irony and Outrage: The Polarized Landscape of Rage, Fear, and Laughter in the United States. A professor of communication and political science at the University of Delaware and a former Distinguished Research Fellow with the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, she is also a TED speaker and a member of the National Institute for Civil Discourse Research Network. Her writing about the effects of political entertainment has been published in a variety of media, including The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Columbia Journalism Review. In Wrong, Young explains how American politics and media reinforce our partisan views and offers a map out of this feedback loop. Cherri Gregg is an afternoon drive host/news anchor for WHYY radio. Prior to her current position, the award-winning journalist covered civil rights, social justice, race, and public affairs issues impacting marginalized communities in the Philadelphia region, spending nearly a decade on air at KYW Newsradio. She served as the station's community affairs reporter and was the creator, host, and executive producer of the weekly syndicated radio show and podcast ''Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg.'' Under her leadership, the show earned two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards in 2021. Cherri is also a past president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 12/6/2023)
12/8/20231 hour, 7 minutes, 46 seconds
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Sohla El-Waylly | Start Here: Instructions for Becoming a Better Cook: A Cookbook

In conversation with Reem Kassis A chef, writer, video producer, and community advocate, Sohla El-Waylly hosts Mystery Menu for The New York Times Cooking YouTube channel and The History Channel's Ancient Recipes with Sohla, and serves as a judge on HBO Max's The Big Brunch. She formerly worked as an assistant food editor at Bon Appétit, where she frequently appeared in the magazine's cooking videos, and she has also been featured on Food52, Serious Eats, and on the popular Babish Culinary Universe YouTube channel. A graduate of the prestigious Culinary Institute of America, El-Waylly trained at various New York City restaurants, including Del Posto, Atera, and Battersby, before opening a restaurant in Brooklyn with her husband. In Start Here, the recipe developer serves up a transformative guide to the fundamentals of good cooking alongside a mix-and-match batch of recipe variations. Reem Kassis is a Palestinian writer and author of the award winning cookbooks The Palestinian Table (2017) and The Arabesque Table (2021) and the children's book We Are Palestinian (2023). Her writing regularly appears in The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. She grew up in Jerusalem, then obtained her undergraduate and MBA degrees from UPenn and Wharton and her MSc in social psychology from the London School of Economics. She now lives in Philadelphia with her husband and three daughters. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 12/5/2023)
12/7/202355 minutes, 13 seconds
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Raquel Willis | The Risk It Takes to Bloom: On Life and Liberation

In conversation with Ernest Owens A writer, activist, and media strategist dedicated to Black transgender liberation, Raquel Willis has served as director of communications for Ms. Foundation for Women, a national organizer for the Transgender Law Center, and executive editor of Out magazine. In 2017, she spoke at the National Women's March that took place just after the presidential election of Donald Trump. She has contributed articles to Essence, VICE, The Cut, and Vogue, and her writing has been anthologized in Black Futures and Four Hundred Souls. Referred to by Elliot Page as ''deeply engaging with searing honesty and compassion,'' The Risk It Takes to Bloom recounts Willis' childhood in Georgia in a Black Catholic family, how her career in journalism and community organizing showed her the courage to come out, and how this particular moment can propel us all to collective liberation. Ernest Owens is editor-at-large for Philadelphia Magazine and editor for Eater Philly, host of the podcast Ernestly Speaking!, and president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. His book The Case for Cancel Culture was published in February, and his other work has been featured in a number of media outlets, including The New York Times, CNN, The Washington Post, and NPR. He teaches media and journalism at Cheyney University. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/29/2023)
12/6/20231 hour, 4 minutes, 51 seconds
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Beth Kephart | My Life in Paper: Adventures in Ephemera

Renowned for her ability ''to generalize from her personal experience to the greater human one'' (The Washington Post), Beth Kephart is the author of more than 30 books across a wide range of genres, including poetry, young adult fiction, and, most notably, the memoir. These works include the award-winning how-to-guide Handling the Truth; A Slant of Sun, a National Book Award finalist; Love, an ode to all things Philly; and Wife | Daughter | Self, an interlocking essay collection about her various identities. A writing professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the co-founder of Junction workshops, she is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Grant, a Pew Fellowship, and the Speakeasy Poetry Prize, among other honors. Exploring how various forms of paper tie to our memories, legacies, and inner archives, Kephart's new illustrated memoir My Life In Paper was born from the aftermath of her father's passing. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/28/2023)
12/4/202352 minutes, 32 seconds
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Kimberlé Crenshaw | #SayHerName: Black Women's Stories of Police Violence and Public Silence

In conversation with Dorothy Roberts One of the country's foremost authorities in civil rights, Black feminist legal theory, race, and the law, Kimberlé Crenshaw is a law professor at UCLA and Columbia Law School, where in 1996 she founded the African American Policy Forum. She is the co-author of Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women and Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced, and Underprotected, and her articles have appeared in Harvard Law Review, the National Black Law Journal, the Stanford Law Review, The New Republic, and The Nation. The coiner of the terms ''critical race theory'' and ''intersectionality,'' Crenshaw served on the legal team of Anita Hill during the confirmation hearing of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and wrote the background paper on race and gender discrimination for the United Nations' World Conference on Racism in 2001. Including a forward by Janelle Monáe, #SayHerName explains how Black women are especially susceptible to police violence and the ways in which various communities can help empower them. Addressing social justice issues of policing, state surveillance of families, and science, Dorothy Roberts's books include Killing the Black Body, Shattered Bonds, and Fatal Invention. She has also authored more than 100 scholarly articles and has co-edited six books on various legal issues. The George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology and the Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights at the University of Pennsylvania, Roberts is the director of the Penn Program on Race, Science, and Society. In her latest book Torn Apart she explains that the abolition of the U.S. child welfare system-which is designed to punish Black families-will liberate Black communities. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/14/2023)
11/22/20231 hour, 41 minutes, 50 seconds
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Tariq ''Black Thought'' Trotter | The Upcycled Self: A Memoir on the Art of Becoming Who We Are

In conversation with Airea D. Matthews The winner of three Grammy Awards and three NAACP Image Awards, Tariq Trotter, aka Black Thought, is the MC and co-founder of The Roots. The Philly-based hip-hop group has produced 11 albums and is the house band for The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. Trotter's solo work includes three volumes of Streams of Thought, collaborative albums with Danger Mouse and El Michels Affair, and guest appearances on dozens of other artists' tracks. He also co-wrote, co-composed, and starred in the off-Broadway play Black No More; acted in other such varied projects as The Deuce; Tick, Tick . . . Boom!; and Brooklyn Babylon; and, with Roots partner Questlove, founded the production company Two One Five Entertainment. ''Refined literary fire from the soulful furnace of pain and suffering'' (The New York Times), The Upcycled Self tells the story of Trotter's difficult early life, his redemptive steps toward success and happiness, and the lessons he gleaned that readers can use to move forward on their own paths. Airea D. Matthews is the 2022–23 Philadelphia Poet Laureate and directs the poetry program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulacra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Best American Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, and VQR, among other journals. Matthews' other honors include a 2022 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, a 2020 Pew Fellowship, and the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award. Her latest work, Bread and Circus, addresses themes of income inequality, commodification, and conventional economic theories through poetry, prose, and imagery. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/18/2023)
11/22/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 15 seconds
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Sigrid Nunez | The Vulnerables: A Novel with Henry Hoke | Open Throat: A Novel

Sigrid Nunez won the 2018 National Book Award for The Friend, a ''beautiful'' novel ''crammed with a world of insight into death, grief, art, and love'' (The Wall Street Journal) in which a woman is forced to adopt her deceased best friend's Great Dane. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Berlin Prize, the Rome Prize in Literature, and a Whiting Award, she is also the author of What Are You Going Through, Salvation City, The Last of Her Kind, A Feather on the Breath of God, and Sempre Susan, a memoir about her friend and mentor Susan Sontag. In The Vulnerables, Nunez offers a comic and elegiac study of a solitary female narrator who ponders questions of connection in our time of collective angst. A ''slim jewel of a novel'' that is ''what fiction should be'' (The New York Times Book Review), Henry Hoke's Open Throat follows the surreal Hollywood Hills wanderings of a lonely and inadvertently wise mountain lion grappling with desperate hunger, the intricacies of gender, and the challenges of urban living. Hoke is also the author of four other books, including a memoir titled Sticker, and his play At Sundown premiered at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. His other work has appeared in No Tokens, Triangle House, Electric Literature, Carve, and the flash noir anthology Tiny Crimes. Co-creator of the Los Angeles-based Enter>text performance series and the humor editor at The Offing, he has taught at CalArts and the UVA Young Writers Workshop. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/16/2023)
11/17/202356 minutes, 40 seconds
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Jonathan Karl | Tired of Winning: Donald Trump and the End of the Grand Old Party

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition Jonathan Karl is the author of the instant New York Times bestsellers Front Row at the Trump Show and Betrayal, behind-the-scenes accounts of Donald Trump and his allies' unprecedented actions while in office and the chaotic events that followed the 2020 presidential election. The co-anchor of This Week with George Stephanopolous and chief Washington correspondent for ABC News, he has also covered some of D.C.'s most important beats, including four presidential administrations, Capitol Hill, the Pentagon, and the State Department. Karl was the president of the White House Correspondents' Association from 2019 to 2020 and has earned the Walter Cronkite Award for National Individual Achievement, an Emmy Award, and the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award, the highest honor for Congressional reporting. Replete with all new reportage, Tired of Winning examines the ways in which Trump has remolded the Republican Party in his own image, the damage he's left in his wake, and his improbable resurgence. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/15/2023)
11/16/202357 minutes, 2 seconds
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Stephanie Land | Class: A Memoir of Motherhood, Hunger and Higher Education

In conversation with Errin Haines Stephanie Land is the author of the bestseller Maid, a memoir that ''nails the sheer terror that comes with being poor, the exhausting vigilance of knowing that any misstep or twist of fate will push you deeper into the hole'' (The Boston Globe). The inspiration for a popular and critically acclaimed Netflix series of the same name, Barack Obama picked it as one of the best books of 2019. Focusing on social and economic justice and parenting under the poverty line, Land's writing has been featured in numerous media outlets, including The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Washington Post. Picking up where Maid left off, Class follows Land's journey through college and into her writing career as she addresses the intricacies of the student loan system, financial burdens, and the judgments of her professors and peers. Errin Haines is a Founding Mother and Editor at Large for The 19th, a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom covering the intersection of women, politics and policy, and an MSNBC Contributor. An award-winning political journalist focused on issues of race, gender and politics, Errin was previously the Associated Press' National Writer on Race and Ethnicity. She has also worked at The Washington Post, The Orlando Sentinel and The Los Angeles Times. Errin was a Fall 2019 Ferris Professor at Princeton University, teaching a class on black women and the 2020 election. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/9/2023)
11/14/202350 minutes, 56 seconds
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Tanisha Ford | Our Secret Society: Mollie Moon and the Glamour, Money, and Power Behind the Civil Rights Movement

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill Tanisha Ford's Our Secret Society is a biography of Mollie Moon, the socialite, powerbroker, and founder of the National Urban League Guild, who was a key fundraiser for the Civil Rights Movement. It also serves as a social history and who's who of Black Americans from the 1930s through the 1960s, as Moon moved in New York and Harlem society circles that included the likes of Lorraine Hansberry and Langston Hughes. A history professor at The Graduate Center, CUNY and a former Smithsonian research associate at the National Museum of American History, Ford was named to The Root's 2019 list of the ''100 Most Influential African Americans.'' Her other books include Dressed in Dreams, Kwame Brathwaite, and Liberated Threads, which was awarded the 2016 Organization of American Historians' Liberty Legacy Foundation Award. The Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions at Temple University, Marc Lamont Hill is the host of BET News and the Coffee and Books podcast. The recipient of honors from the National Association of Black Journalists, GLAAD, and the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, he is the author of six books, including Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life; Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond; and Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/8/2023)
11/13/202357 minutes, 49 seconds
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Alice McDermott | Absolution

In conversation with Nomi Eve ''Filled with so much universal experience, such haunting imagery, such urgent matters of life and death'' (The New York Times), Alice McDermott's bestselling novels include Someone; Charming Billy, winner of the 1998 National Book Award; That Night; At Weddings and Wakes; and After This, all of which were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. She is also the author of What About the Baby? Some Thoughts on the Art of Fiction, a collection of essays inspired from a lifetime of reading, writing, and teaching literature. For more than 20 years, McDermott was the Richard A. Macksey Professor of the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University and on the Sewanee Writers Conference faculty. She has contributed writing to The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, and The New York Times, among many other periodicals. A meditative novel about grace, sacrifice, and forgiveness, Absolution is a decades-spanning account of two women's peripheral experience with the Vietnam War and its permanent consequences. The director of the creative writing MFA program at Drexel University, Nomi Eve is the author of the novels Henna House and the National Jewish Book Award-nominated The Family Orchard. Her stories and essays have appeared in The New York Times, Conjunctions, and Glimmer Train, and she has published book reviews in The Village Voice and Newsday.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/7/2023)
11/10/202350 minutes, 42 seconds
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Joseph Sassoon | The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants and the Making of an Empire

Watch the video here. ''A marvelous epitaph to a monumental family, makers of several worlds and keepers of none'' (The Wall Street Journal), Joseph Sassoon's eponymous historical volume The Sassoons charts the remarkable 19th-century rise and 20th-century fall of his illustrious ancestors. During the 19th century, the Sassoon family, once known as ''the Rothschilds of the East,'' built a global empire based on shipping, opium, and banking, but experienced the loss of its dynastic fortunes during the 20th century. A professor of history and politics at Georgetown University, Sassoon is also a senior associate member at St. Antony's College, Oxford and a trustee of the Bodleian Library. His other books include the prize-winning Saddam Hussein's Ba'th Party, The Iraqi Refugees, and The Anatomy of Authoritarianism in the Arab Republics. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/2/2023)
11/6/202356 minutes, 2 seconds
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David Brooks | How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen

Acclaimed for his ability to ''elevate the unseen aspects of private experience into a vigorous and challenging conversation about what we all share'' (San Francisco Chronicle), David Brooks has written an op-ed column for The New York Times since 2003. Also a writer for The Atlantic, he formerly served as an editor and columnist at The Weekly Standard and The Wall Street Journal. He frequently appears on PBS NewsHour, Meet the Press, and NPR's All Things Considered. His books include the bestselling Bobos in Paradise, The Social Animal, The Road to Character, and The Second Mountain, which posits that those who embrace lives of deeper commitment and service to others find greater fulfillment. In How to Know a Person, Brooks offers a creative guide for truly looking another person in the eyes and, through them, understanding something deeper about ourselves. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 11/1/2023)
11/3/202358 minutes, 1 second
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Cristina García | Vanishing Maps: A Novel

In conversation with Rebeca L. Hey-Colón, Professor of Latinx Studies, Temple University Cristina García is the author of eight ''languid and sensual, curt and surprising'' (The New York Times Book Review) novels, including The Lady Matador's Hotel, The Agüero Sisters, and Dreaming in Cuban, which was a finalist for the National Book Award.  She has also written three books for young readers and a collection of poetry, edited two Latinx literary anthologies, and her work has been translated into 15 languages. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writer's Award, and an NEA grant, García is currently the playwright-in-residence at Central Works Theater in Berkeley, and has previously taught at universities across the country. A follow-up novel set 20 years after Dreaming in Cuban, Vanishing Maps tracks the diasporic generations of a Cuban family as they grapple with the pull of home and each other. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/26/2023)
11/2/202354 minutes, 43 seconds
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Roz Chast | I Must be Dreaming

Watch the video here. Renowned for her ''extraordinarily honest, searing and hilarious'' (San Francisco Chronicle) takes on modern life, Roz Chast has published more than 1,000 cartoons in The New Yorker since 1978. She has written or illustrated more than a dozen books, including Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, a bestselling multi-genre narrative about her aging parents that won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was a National Book Award Finalist; Going into Town: A Love Letter to New York, an illustrated paean/guide/thank-you note to New York City; and several collected volumes of her published cartoons. Most recently, she illustrated New Yorker writer Patricia Marx's Why Don't You Write My Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It?: A Mother's Suggestions. In I Must Be Dreaming, Chast takes an illustrated journey to the enduring and elusive land of Nod to explore the secrets of the sleeping yet active mind. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/30/2023)
10/31/202352 minutes, 21 seconds
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Melissa Broder | Death Valley: A Novel with Hilary Leichter | Terrace Story: A Novel

Melissa Broder is the author of Milk Fed, the ''sensuous and delightfully delirious tale'' (O, The Oprah Magazine) of a calorie-obsessed lapsed Jewish woman who falls under the spell of a zaftig Orthodox frozen yogurt store employee. Her other work includes the novel The Pisces, an essay collection titled So Sad Today, and four collections of poetry. Her poems have appeared in a multitude of publications, including Tin House and Guernica, and she is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize. In Death Valley, Broder weaves the tale of a woman who finds refuge from her sorrows through a mystical cactus in the high California desert. Hilary Leichter's novel Temporary, longlisted for the PEN/Hemingway Award and a finalist for The Center for Fiction First Novel Prize and the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Prize, tells the tale of a young woman who fills increasingly bizarre temp job positions. It was named one of 2020's best books by NPR, Vulture, and Elle, and was a New York Times Editors' Choice. A creative writing professor at Columbia University, Leichter has earned fellowships from Yaddo, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, n+1, The New York Times, and Harper's Magazine, among other places. Her latest novel, Terrace Story, tells the story of a family living in a cramped apartment who finds a miraculous and inexplicable terrace in their closet. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/25/2023)
10/30/202346 minutes, 4 seconds
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Rachel Maddow | Prequel: An American Fight Against Fascism

In conversation with Julian E. Zelizer Rachel Maddow is host of the Emmy Award–winning The Rachel Maddow Show on MSNBC, as well as the #1 New York Times best­selling author of Drift and Blowout, and the New York Times bestselling co-author of Bag Man. She has also written, produced, and hosted three original podcasts for MSNBC-Rachel Maddow Presents: Bag Man, Rachel Maddow Presents: Ultra, and most recently the six-episode series Rachel Maddow Presents: Deja News, which debuted in June at #1 on Apple Podcasts. In Prequel, Maddow traces the century-long proliferation of authoritarianism in America-often by shockingly well-financed and powerful groups----and the lessons history offers as we navigate our own disquieting times. Political historian Julian E. Zelizer is the author and editor of 25 award-winning and bestselling books, including The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great Society; Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974; and The Presidency of Donald J. Trump: A First Historical Assessment. A professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University, a CNN political analyst, a regular guest on NPR's Here and Now, and the writer of more than 1300 op-eds, he has received fellowships from the Brookings Institution, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the New York Historical Society, among others.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/15/2023)
10/29/20231 hour, 7 minutes, 14 seconds
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David Zucker | Surely You Can't Be Serious: The True Story of Airplane

In conversation with comedian and author James "Murr" Murray Surely You Can't Be Serious is a behind-the-scenes making-of oral history of the 1980 comedy classic Airplane!, as told by its equally legendary writers and directors David Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and Jerry Zucker. Featuring anecdotes by the film's stars, it also delves into the making of fan-favorite scenes and the organic (read: pre-Internet) evolution toward its place in the pop culture pantheon. Zucker and company, also the auteurs of the cultishly adored Kentucky Fried Movie and Top Secret!, each branched out into further film success. Zucker himself went on to direct a plethora of film comedies, including The Naked Gun franchise, BASEketball, Scary Movie 3 & 4, and many others, as well as writing and producing Scary Movie 5. He is also the author of the memoir Before the Invention of Smiling, an unconventional version of his family history. What can we make out of his books? Well, we can make a hat, or a brooch, or a pterodactyl.... James Murray is one of the hosts of the long-running and popular TruTV improv program Impractical Jokers. Also the co-author of the Awakened and Area 51 Interns series of sci-fi novels, he has toured solo as a standup comedian, starred in TBS's The Misery Index, and appeared in numerous other television shows and films.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/23/2023)
10/27/202355 minutes, 28 seconds
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Tim O'Brien | America Fantastica: A Novel

In conversation with Andy Kahan Meelya Gordon Memorial Lecture ''As good as any piece of literature can get'' (Chicago Sun Times), Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Critics Circle Award, and is one of the most acclaimed books about the Vietnam War. His other books include If I Die in a Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home; In the Lake of the Woods; and Going After Cacciato, winner of the 1979 National Book Award. O'Brien is also the author of Dad's Maybe Book, a collection of advice for his two young sons. His first novel in more than 20 years, America Fantastica follows a disgraced online disinformation troll turned bank robber and his irrepressible bank teller kidnappee on their cross-country flight from a motley cast of uniquely American pursuers. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/24/2023)
10/26/202353 minutes, 25 seconds
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Nikhil Goyal | Live to See the Day: Coming of Age in American Poverty

In conversation with author and Pennsylvania State Senator, Nikil Saval In Live to See the Day, Nikhil Goyal offers a searing portrait of three Puerto Rican children struggling to survive in Philadelphia's impoverished Kensington neighborhood. Drawing on nearly a decade of reportage, he follows the youths' personal-but not unique-journeys through violence, homelessness, incarceration, and substance abuse as they strive to defy their designated fate in the modern U.S.' socioeconomic system. A sociologist and policymaker, Goyal served as senior policy advisor on education and children for Chairman Senator Bernie Sanders on the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions and Committee on the Budget, among other policy roles. He has contributed articles to such publications as The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Nation, and he has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News.  Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/19/2023)
10/20/202350 minutes, 37 seconds
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Martin Baron | Collision of Power: Trump, Bezos, and The Washington Post

Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Endowed Lecture In conversation with David Boardman In Collision of Power, Martin Baron tells the inside story of the monumental power struggle between the venerable newspaper The Washington Post, its demanding and ultra-wealthy owner Jeff Bezos, and the ceaselessly attacking President Donald Trump. The former editor of The Miami Herald and The Boston Globe, Baron became executive editor of The Washington Post in 2013 and remained in his post until 2021. During this time, he presided over such events as the paper's shift in ownership from the family that had owned it for 80 years, the former president referring to the press as ''the lowest form of humanity,'' and groundbreaking coverage, including the Spotlight investigation of Catholic priest child sexual abuse that would earn the publication awards and acclaim. David Boardman is the dean of the Klein College of Media and Communication at Temple University. A former executive editor and senior vice president of The Seattle Times, he is founding chair of the Lenfest Institute for Journalism, the nonprofit that owns The Philadelphia Inquirer. He sits on the advisory boards of ProPublica and the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, and he has served six times as a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes. His many honors include the National Ethics Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Associated Press Managing Editors Public Service Award. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/17/2023)
10/18/202356 minutes, 19 seconds
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Angus Deaton | Economics in America: An Immigrant Economist Explores the Land of Inequality

In conversation with Binyamin Appelbaum Angus Deaton won the 2015 Nobel Prize in economics for his study of poverty, consumption, and welfare. The Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs Emeritus and Senior Scholar at Princeton University, he is a fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, the British Academy, and the Econometric Society. He is the co-author of The New York Times bestseller Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, and he is the author of The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality and Understanding Consumption, among other books. Inspired by the shocking gaps in wealth Deaton witnessed when he immigrated from Britain in the early 1980s, Economics in America offers a frank critique of how his field has failed to properly address such issues as income inequality, the U.S.' broken healthcare system, and minimum wage. A business and economics editorialist for The New York Times, Binyamin Appelbaum previously served as that newspaper's Washington correspondent. His writing on subprime lending for The Charlotte Observer won a George Polk Award and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. He is also the author of The Economists' Hour. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/12/2023)
10/16/202357 minutes, 14 seconds
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Drew Gilpin Faust | Necessary Trouble: Growing Up at Midcentury

In conversation with Rev. Dr. Jonathan Lee Walton A postwar coming-of-age memoir about life in a conservative family in segregated Virginia, Drew Gilpin Faust's Necessary Trouble recounts her break from the racial and gender norms of the era and the means by which her involvement in the civil rights and antiwar movements led to her career as a historian of those very fights. The Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University and its president from 2007 to 2018, Faust formerly served as dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and taught at the University of Pennsylvania for 25 years. Her many books include This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, winner of the Bancroft Prize and a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; and Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War, winner of the Francis Parkman Prize. Rev. Dr. Jonathan Lee Walton is the president of the Princeton Theological Seminary. He is the author of Watch This! The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Telelevangelism and A Lens of Love: Reading the Bible in Its World for Our World. His other work has appeared across a range of media, including The New York Times, CNN, Time magazine, and PBS. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/11/2023)
10/13/202356 minutes, 25 seconds
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Ayana Mathis | The Unsettled: A Novel

In conversation with Asali Solomon Ayana Mathis is the author of The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, ''a remarkable page-turner of a novel'' (Chicago Tribune) that follows the harrowing fortunes of a 15-year-old from Georgia to Philadelphia during the Great Migration. A New York Times bestseller, an NPR Best Book of 2013, and a selection for Oprah's Book Club 2.0, it has been translated into 16 languages. Mathis is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and has published fiction in The Atlantic, The New York Times, Guernica, and Rolling Stone, among other places. She teaches writing in Hunter College's MFA program. Set in turbulent 1980s Philadelphia and the small town of Bonaparte, Alabama, The Unsettled tells the tale of a mother, grandmother, and son struggling to save their identities, birthright, and future. Asali Solomon's latest novel, The Days of Afrekete has been called ''a feat of engineering'' by the New York Times. She is also the author of Disgruntled and Get Down: stories. Her previous novel, Disgruntled, was named a best book of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle and The Denver Post. She is the recipient of a Pew Fellowship, a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award, and the National Book Foundation's ''5 Under 35'' honor. Her work has appeared in O, The Oprah Magazine, Vibe, Essence, The Paris Review Daily, McSweeney's, on NPR, and in several anthologies including The Best Short Stories of 2021: The O. Henry Prize Collection. Solomon is the Bertrand K. Wilbur Chair in the Humanities at Haverford, where she is a Professor of English and director of Creative Writing. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/10/2023)
10/12/202348 minutes, 31 seconds
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Siddhartha Mukherjee | The Song of the Cell: An Exploration of Medicine and the New Human

In conversation with Carl H. June, MD, Director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, University of Pennsylvania Siddhartha Mukherjee won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction for The Emperor of All Maladies, a ''meticulously researched, panoramic history'' (The Boston Globe) of humankind's fight against cancer. It was awarded the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award, was named to numerous media outlets' ''Best of the Year'' lists, and was adapted by Ken Burns into a PBS documentary. Mukherjee is also the author of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller The Gene: An Intimate History. An assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a staff cancer physician at the New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center, he is a physician and researcher whose laboratory focuses on discovering new cancer drugs. His articles and commentary have been published in such places as Nature, New England Journal of Medicine, The New York Times, and The New Republic. In The Song of the Cell, Mukherjee takes readers through the centuries-spanning quest to understand cells, the tiny self-contained units that make up all life. Carl June is the Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also the director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies at the Perelman School of Medicine and director of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at the University of Pennsylvania. Acclaimed for his research into the treatment of leukemia, he has published more than 350 medical papers and has received numerous awards and honors. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/5/2023)
10/11/202355 minutes, 56 seconds
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Safiya Sinclair | How to Say Babylon: A Memoir

In conversation with Philadelphia Poet Laureate Airea D Matthews Hailed by Tara Westover as ''Dazzling. Potent Vital. A light shining on the path of self-deliverance,'' Safiya Sinclair's memoir How to Say Babylon recounts her struggle to break free from her rigid Rastafarian upbringing and her father's repressive control, set against the backdrop of a larger story of colonialism in Jamaica. Sinclair is also the author of the acclaimed poetry collection Cannibal, winner of a Whiting Writers' Award, the American Academy of Arts and Letters' Metcalf Award in Literature, and the Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Poetry, among other honors. The recipient of a Pushcart Prize and fellowships from the Poetry Foundation, MacDowell, Yaddo, and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, she teaches creative writing at the University of Arizona. Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Granta, The Nation, and Kenyon Review. Airea D. Matthews is the 2022–23 Philadelphia Poet Laureate and directs the poetry program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulacra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Best American Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, and VQR, among other journals. Matthews' other honors include a 2022 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, a 2020 Pew Fellowship, and the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award. Addressing themes of income inequality, commodification, and conventional economic theories, Bread and Circus combines poetry, prose, and imagery to tell an intimate story about the author and her family. : Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/5/2023)
10/5/202350 minutes, 32 seconds
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Sarah Cooper | Foolish: Tales of Assimilation, Determination, and Humiliation

In conversation with comedian Chanel Ali Referred to by Amy Schumer as ''the funniest, smartest person I know,'' Sarah Cooper is best known for her hilarious lip-syncing videos of Donald Trump sound bites. The author of 100 Tricks to Appear Smart in Meetings and How to Be Successful without Hurting Men's Feelings, she is the star of the Netflix comedy special, Sarah Cooper: Everything's Fine; has appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live, The Tonight Show, and Ellen; and is currently working on an upcoming Netflix comedy, titled Unfrosted, written and directed by Jerry Seinfeld. Named one of Variety's 10 Comics to Watch, she has more than 3.3 million followers across social media. In Foolish, Cooper brings a lifetime of obsessive perfectionism to bear in a starkly revealing and humorous memoir about such varied topics as her upbringing in a tight-knit Jamaican family, divorce, and career pivots. Chanel Ali is a standup comedian who blossomed on the Philadelphia circuit before taking her commanding stage presence to NYC. She has two Comedy Central specials, she was featured on MTVs Girl Code, and she can drink more than you. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/4/2023)
10/5/20231 hour, 9 seconds
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Malcolm Jenkins | What Winners Won't Tell You: Lessons from a Legendary Defender

In conversation with Michael Eric Dyson One of pro football's all-time defensive greats, Malcolm Jenkins won Super Bowls with the Philadelphia Eagles and New Orleans Saints, and appeared in three Pro Bowls. He won the prestigious Jim Thorpe Award as a senior at the Ohio State University before entering the NFL as a first-round draft pick, where he would ultimately play for an impressive 13 seasons. The now-retired Jenkins has since become a media personality, executive producer, writer, racial justice advocate, and entrepreneur whose business ventures include the Listen Up Media conglomerate and an eponymous company called Malcolm Inc. His philanthropic organization, The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation, assists young people in underserved communities. A memoir about life on the playing field, advocating for Black Americans, and the highs and lows of his personal life, What Winners Won't Tell You is a meditation on what it means to find balance in that thin space between victory and defeat. Michael Eric Dyson is the author of the acclaimed and bestselling books Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America, Unequal: A Story of America, and Long Time Coming: Reckoning with Race in America. His many other works address Barack Obama's presidency, Hurricane Katrina, Jay-Z, and the effects of MLK's assassination, among other wide-ranging topics. A frequent New York Times opinion writer, MSNBC political analyst, and a professor at Vanderbilt University, his many honors include an American Book Award and two NAACP Image Awards. Dyson has also been an ordained pastor for the last 40 years and has preached, spoken, and lectured at religious and secular institutions around the world. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 10/3/2023)
10/4/20231 hour, 1 minute, 45 seconds
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Lidia Matticchio Bastianich | Lidia's From Our Family Table to Yours: More Than 100 Recipes Made with Love for All Occasions

In conversation with Heather Marold Thomason, Butcher & Founder of Primal Supply ''The cookbook author who changed the way Americans cook Italian food'' (The New York Times), Lidia Matticchio Bastianich is the author of 15 beloved culinary guides, as well a 2019 memoir, titled My American Dream. She is also the owner and co-owner of celebrated Italian restaurants in Manhattan, Pittsburgh, and Kansas City, and she hosts the Emmy-winning Lidia's Kitchen on PBS and co-hosts Nonna Senti Che Fame...Pensaci Tu, which airs on Discovery+ in Italy. Her honors include recognition from the National Italian American Foundation, several James Beard Awards, induction into the Culinary Hall of Fame, and the American Public Television Silver Award. In Lidia's From Our Family Table to Yours, Bastianich serves up traditional recipes from her childhood alongside new favorites she makes for her children and grandchildren. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 9/28/2023)
9/29/202359 minutes, 50 seconds
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Michael E. Mann | Our Fragile Moment: How Lessons from Earth's Past Can Help Us Survive the Climate Crisis

The Presidential Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Science, Sustainability, and the Media at the University of Pennsylvania, climatologist and geophysicist Michael E. Mann has greatly contributed to science's understanding of humanity's 1,000-year role in global warming. His many honors include the Award for Public Engagement with Science from the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Climate Communication Prize from the American Geophysical Union, and in 2002 he was named by Scientific American as one of the 50 leading visionaries in science and technology. He is the author of the acclaimed books Dire Predictions, The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars, and The Madhouse Effect. In Our Fragile Moment, Mann seeks to inform readers of the historically unique ecological conditions that have allowed humans to thrive and to embolden them to stave off the threat the climate crisis poses to human existence. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 9/27/2023)
9/29/202356 minutes, 20 seconds
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Emily Wilson | The Iliad

In conversation with Sheila Murnaghan, chair of the classics department at the University of Pennsylvania ''A cultural landmark'' (The Guardian), Emily Wilson's 2017 translation of The Odyssey was hailed for its fresh and unpretentious rendition of the classical poem in modern parlance. A professor of classical studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Wilson has also published translations of the works of Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca, and is the author of books on the death of Socrates and the life of Seneca. She is the recipient of fellowships from the American Academy in Rome, the MacArthur Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. In her latest work, Wilson presents a grounded yet galloping translation of The Iliad, Homer's other epic work and one of history's most revered war poems. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 9/26/2023)
9/28/202355 minutes, 49 seconds
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Bettina L. Love | Punished for Dreaming: How School Reform Harms Black Children and How We Heal

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill Bettina L. Love is the author of the bestseller We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom, winner of the 2020 Society of Professors of Education Outstanding Book Award. The William F. Russell Professor at Columbia University's Teachers College, she is a co-founder of the Abolitionist Teaching Network and a founding member of the task force that launched the program In Her Hands, an initiative that has distributed funds to Black women in Georgia and abolitionists across the country. She is one of the Kennedy Center's 2022 Next 50 Leaders and is a sought-after public speaker on such varied topics as anti-racism, queer youth, and educational reparations. In Punished for Dreaming, Love presents an unflinching account of the result of 40 years of racist public school policy on Black lives. The Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions at Temple University, Marc Lamont Hill is the host of BET News and the Coffee and Books podcast. The recipient of honors from the National Association of Black Journalists, GLAAD, and the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, he is the author of six books, including Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life; Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond; and Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 9/25/2023)
9/27/202358 minutes, 56 seconds
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Simon Schama | Foreign Bodies: Pandemics, Vaccines, and the Health of Nations

Pine Tree Foundation Endowed Lecture In conversation with Maiken Scott ''A historian of prodigious and varied gifts'' (San Francisco Chronicle), Simon Schama is the author of 20 books, including The Embarrassment of Riches; Scribble, Scribble, Scribble; and the National Book Critics Circle Award winner Rough Crossings, an account of the enslaved people who escaped to fight for the British during the American Revolutionary War. A professor of art history and history at Columbia University, he has written and presented more than 40 documentaries for the BBC, PBS, and The History Channel, including the seminal 15-part series A History of Britain, the Emmy-winning Power of Art, and The Story of the Jews, based on his two-volume millennia-spanning work. Schama is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and in 2018, he was knighted for his contributions to historical scholarship. In Foreign Bodies, he offers a vigorous cultural history of the complex relationship between pandemics and the crusaders who battle them. Maiken Scott is the host and executive producer of WHYY's The Pulse - a weekly, national health and science radio show and podcast that explores the people and places at the heart of health and science. Since its launch in December 2013, The Pulse has crafted a unique, ''ground-level'' approach to telling compelling stories and breaking down complicated issues. The show airs on more than 100 public radio stations across the country and its podcast is presented by NPR Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 9/20/2023)
9/22/202354 minutes, 36 seconds
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Bernie Taupin | Scattershot: Life, Music, Elton and Me

In conversation with novelist and musician Wesley Stace Legendary English song lyricist Bernie Taupin has worked with Elton John since 1967 and has written the lyrics for most of the iconic performer's hits, including ''Rocket Man,'' ''Bennie and the Jets,'' ''Tiny Dancer,'' ''Your Song,'' ''I'm Still Standing,'' and far too many others to list. One of the most popular, long-lasting, and critically acclaimed partnerships in music history, Taupin and John are the recipients of a lifetime achievement Grammy, an Academy Award, and the Johnny Mercer Award from the Songwriters Hall of Fame, among many other accolades. Taupin has also written songs for a wide variety of other artists, including Rod Stewart, Alice Cooper, and Heart. In 2022 he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for services to music, and this year he was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. A memoir about life, rock 'n' roll, and collaboration, Scattershot tells the inside story of the famously private writer's art, struggles, and friendships.   Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 9/14/2023)
9/15/20231 hour, 1 minute, 25 seconds
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Jennifer Weiner | The Breakaway

Jennifer Weiner is the no. 1 New York Times bestselling author of more than a dozen ''funny, fanciful, extremely poignant'' (The Boston Globe) novels, including That Summer, Mrs. Everything, Who Do You Love, All Fall Down, In Her Shoes, and Good in Bed. She is also the writer of two young adult books about a tiny Bigfoot and an essay collection titled Hungry Heart, an intimate and honest meditation on yearning, fulfillment, and her many identities. Her other work has been published in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications. In The Breakaway, Weiner tells the story of Abby Stern, a woman who finds empowerment during a group bike trip from New York City to Niagara Falls. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 8/30/2023)
9/1/202357 minutes, 45 seconds
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Jonathan Eig | King: A Life

Named one of the most anticipated books of the year by The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Newsweek, Jonathan Eig's King, an ''intimate, multidimensional biography'' (The Boston Globe) of Martin Luther King Jr., offers a fresh and sweeping portrait of the civil rights icon. Eig's other acclaimed biographies include Ali: A Life, winner of the PEN America Literary Award; the bestseller Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig, winner of the Casey Award; and Opening Day: The Story of Jackie Robinson's First Season. His book The Birth of the Pill will soon be staged as a play by Chicago's Timeline Theatre. A former senior writer for The Wall Street Journal, he has appeared on the Today show, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and NPR's Fresh Air. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 8/29/2023)
8/30/202354 minutes, 29 seconds
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Sheryl Lee Ralph | Diva 2.0: 12 Life Lessons From Me For You

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak A celebrated veteran of film, television, and the Broadway stage, Sheryl Lee Ralph won an Emmy Award, a Critic's Choice Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award for her comedic supporting role on ABC's Abbott Elementary. In a career that spans almost 45 years, she also originated the role of Deena Jones in Dreamgirls, for which she earned a Tony Award; starred in the shows It's a Living, New Attitude, and Moesha, for which she was voted one of TV's Favorite Moms; and starred in dramatic and comedic films with some of Hollywood's biggest stars, including Eddie Murphy, Whoopie Goldberg, Danny Glover, and Robert De Niro. In Diva 2.0, Ralph offers a guide to elevating your journey to new heights through her personal recollections of the highs and lows of stardom, and she reveals the lessons of family love that have helped her soar. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 8/22/2023)
8/24/202357 minutes, 27 seconds
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James McBride | The Heaven & Earth Grocery Store

James McBride is the author of the National Book Award-winning The Good Lord Bird, ''a brilliant romp of a novel'' (The New York Times Book Review) in which a young boy born into slavery joins abolitionist John Brown's doomed crusade. He is also the author of the bestselling memoir The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother and the biography Kill 'Em and Leave: Searching for James Brown and the American Soul. His other fiction includes the novels Miracle at St. Anna, Song Yet Sung, and Deacon King Kong, which was an Oprah's Book Club pick. Also an award-winning composer, screenwriter, journalist, and saxophonist, he is a distinguished writer in residence at New York University and received the National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama in 2016. In The Heaven & Earth Grocery Store, McBride tells a story of small town secrets, cultural collisions, and the sustaining love of community-in Pottstown, Pennsylvania. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 8/10/2023)
8/11/202354 minutes, 35 seconds
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R. Eric Thomas | Congratulations, the Best Is Over!: Essays

R. Eric Thomas is the author of the Lambda Literary Award finalist Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul America, a bestselling essay collection that tackles just what it means to be an ''other'' in the maelstrom of modern America. For four years he wrote Elle's ''Eric Reads the News,'' a daily humor column that lambasted pop culture, celebrity, and politics. Also a renowned television writer and playwright, he has garnered many awards, including the Barrymore Award and the Dramatists Guild Lanford Wilson Award. Thomas is the longtime host of The Moth StorySlams in Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia, and his writing has been published in The New York Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer, among other periodicals. In his latest essay collection, he reflects on whether or not we really can go home again as he makes a new life in his hometown of Baltimore. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 8/8/2023)
8/9/202355 minutes, 2 seconds
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Wesley Lowery | American Whitelash: A Changing Nation and the Cost of Progress

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak In American Whitelash, Wesley Lowery examines the cyclical pattern of violence that marks each watershed moment of racial progress in this country, most recently evidenced by the resurgence of white supremacist movements during and following Barack Obama's 2008 presidential election. Formerly The Washington Post's lead journalist in Ferguson, Missouri, during the aftermath of the murder of African American teenager Michael Brown, Lowery, together with his team, won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting for the paper's coverage of police shootings. He was a 2019 Pulitzer Prize finalist for his project ''Murder with Impunity,'' and he is currently a contributing editor at The Marshall Project and a journalist-in-residence at the CUNY Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. His New York Times bestseller, They Can't Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America's Racial Justice Movement won the Christopher Isherwood Prize for autobiographical prose by the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 7/20/2023)
7/21/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 11 seconds
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Barbara Butcher | What the Dead Know: Learning About Life as a New York City Death Investigator with Kate White | Between Two Strangers

Barbara Butcher is the former chief of staff and director of the Forensic Sciences Training Program at the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME). Only the second woman hired as a death investigator in Manhattan (and the first to last more than three months), during her 23 years there she investigated more than 5,500 death scenes. She also created and directed the federally funded Forensic Sciences Training Program at OCME, taught at the New York University School of Medicine and New York Medical College, consulted for governmental agencies around the world, and spoken at disaster planning conferences across the United States. In What the Dead Know, Butcher delves into the journey that led to her unlikely career, revealing some surprisingly useful life lessons and stories about some of New York's most notorious crime scenes. ''Impossible to outwit'' (Entertainment Weekly), Kate White is the New York Times bestselling author of the psychological thrillers The Second Husband, The Fiancée, and The Secrets You Keep. Her other works include the Bailey Weggins mystery series and numerous popular career advice books for women. White formerly served as editor-in-chief of five major magazines, including a 14-year stint at Cosmopolitan. In Between Two Strangers, she tells the twisting tale of a woman who receives a large inheritance from a man she'd only met once before. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 7/18/2023)
7/19/20231 hour, 36 seconds
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One Book One Philadelphia Finale: Author Conversation with Charles Yu

Join us at the Community College of Philadelphia for a celebration to conclude the One Book, One Philadelphia 2023 season. This event will feature an in-person conversation between Charles Yu and Dr. Michelle Myers, associate professor of English at the Community College of Philadelphia and one half of the poetry duo Yellow Rage. Note: portions of the introduction and the Q&A were deleted due to challenges with the recording. (recorded 6/22/2023)
7/13/202356 minutes, 12 seconds
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Jake Tapper | All the Demons Are Here: A Thriller

In conversation with Jim Gardner Jake Tapper is the Washington, D.C., anchor and chief Washington correspondent for CNN, where he hosts the weekday program The Lead with Jake Tapper and the Sunday morning show State of the Union. He is the former White House correspondent for ABC News and contributor to Good Morning America, Nightline, and World News with Diane Sawyer. His many honors include an unprecedented three Merriman Smith Awards for presidential coverage. Tapper is the author of The Outpost, the tragic but inspiring true story of a small U.S. military group besieged by the Taliban. Tapper is also the author of The Hellfire Club and The Devil May Dance, political thrillers in which Charlie and Margaret Marder, a husband-and-wife team of unlikely political stars, unravel conspiracies in the halls of power of a bygone Washington, D.C. The third installment in this series, All the Demons Are Here finds Charlie and Margaret navigating some of the wildest and most dangerous events of the 1970s United States. Jim Gardner served for 45 years as the weekday news anchor for Philadelphia's 6ABC Action News. He covered every presidential convention since 1980 and reported from the scene of breaking news around the globe. A member of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia Hall of Fame, he is the recipient of the John Cardinal Foley Award for Excellence in Communication. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 7/11/2023)
7/12/202353 minutes, 13 seconds
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Christian Cooper | Better Living Through Birding: Notes from a Black Man in the Natural World

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition Central Park birder Christian Cooper is the host and consulting producer on the National Geographic channel's Extraordinary Birder and is on the board of directors of the New York City Audubon Society. Also a groundbreaking comics writer, he introduced the first openly lesbian character for Marvel, conceived the first gay male character in the Star Trek universe via the Starfleet Academy comics series, and created Queer Nation: The Online Gay Comic. In Better Living Through Birding, Cooper tells the story of his life leading up to the morning in May 2020 when he was engaged in the birdwatching ritual that had been a part of his life since he was a child-and what might have been a routine encounter with a dog walker exploded age-old racial tensions. Cooper's viral video of the incident would shock the nation. Also part travelogue and primer on the art of birding, the book follows his worldwide avian adventures, explores his unique career, and offers insights into the ways his long history of looking up have prepared him to be a gay, Black man in contemporary America. Because you love Author Events, please make a donation to keep our podcasts free for everyone. THANK YOU! (recorded 6/27/2023)
6/29/202355 minutes
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Blair LM Kelley | Black Folk: The Roots of the Black Working Class

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill Referred to by acclaimed author and academic Michael Eric Dyson as ''one of the most important works of history to come across my desk in a long time,'' Blair LM Kelley's Black Folk: The Roots of the Black Working Class is an exhaustive coast-to-coast narrative that seeks to reclaim Black workers' central contribution to workers' rights throughout U.S. history. Kelley is also the author of Right to Ride: Streetcar Boycotts and African American Citizenship, winner of the Letitia Woods Brown Best Book Award from the Association of Black Women Historians. The director of the Center for the Study of the American South and co-director of the Southern Futures initiative at the University of North Carolina, she has contributed work to such publications as The New York Times and The Washington Post, and she has appeared on MSNBC's All In and NPR's Here and Now, among other media outlets. The Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions at Temple University, Marc Lamont Hill is the host of BET News and the Coffee and Books podcast. The recipient of honors from the National Association of Black Journalists, GLAAD, and the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, he is the author of six books, including Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life; Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond; and Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics. (recorded 6/26/2023)
6/28/202357 minutes, 4 seconds
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David E. Guggenheim | The Remarkable Reefs Of Cuba: Hopeful Stories From the Ocean Doctor

A marine scientist, ocean explorer, conservation policy specialist, and submarine pilot, David E. Guggenheim, Ph.D. is the founder and president of Ocean Doctor, a nonprofit organization committed to advancing the conservation of the world's oceans. He also teaches ocean stewardship and sustainability at Johns Hopkins University; has spoken at an array of conferences, schools, and government hearings; and has appeared on numerous media outlets, including 60 Minutes, CNN, MSNBC, PBS Newshour, and NPR. Also an award-winning photographer, Guggenheim was inducted into the Explorer's Club as a national fellow, sat as board chair of the Great Whale Conservancy, and served as vice president at The Ocean Conservancy. Though the last 60 years have witnessed the worst decline in ocean health in human history, The Remarkable Reefs of Cuba offers a surprisingly optimistic vision for marine recovery by exploring the resilience of Cuba's coral reefs. (recorded 6/20/2023)
6/22/202355 minutes, 20 seconds
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Christine Pride and Jo Piazza | You Were Always Mine

In conversation with Alexandra Auder, author of Don't Call Me Home: A Memoir Publishing industry veteran Christine Pride has held a variety of editorial positions at Doubleday, Simon & Schuster, and Crown, among other publishing companies. In this capacity she has championed and edited numerous New York Times bestselling memoirs and inspirational stories. Also a freelance editorial consultant, teacher, and coach, Pride writes the ''Race Matters'' column for the popular blog Cup of Jo. A journalist, editor, and podcast host, Jo Piazza is also the author of seven novels, including Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win, If Nuns Ruled the World, and Fitness Junkie. Her other writing has been widely published in a variety of places, including The Wall Street Journal, Marie Claire, and Slate. She formerly served as a managing editor for Yahoo! Travel, the executive news director for the print and digital editions of In Touch Weekly, and the senior digital editor at Current TV. Pride and Piazza's first collaborative novel and a Good Morning America Book Club pick, We Are Not Like Them told the dual-perspective story of two lifelong friends, one Black and one white, whose bond is forever changed when the latter's police officer husband is involved in the shooting of an unarmed Black teenager. In their follow-up novel, a Black woman, finds an abandoned white baby, setting up collisions with her own past and the child's mother. Alexandra Auder is a writer and actor and the author of Don't Call Me Home: A Memoir. Born in New York City to mother Viva, a Warhol superstar, and father Michel Auder, an award-winning filmmaker who directed Chelsea Girls with Andy Warhol. Alexandra  has been a featured character in HBO's High Maintenance and has acted in the films of Wim Wenders and Jodie Foster, among others. She resides in Philadelphia with her two children and husband, filmmaker Nick Nehez, with whom she co-produces and collaborates. (recorded 6/15/2023)
6/21/20231 hour, 5 minutes, 37 seconds
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Geraldine Brooks | Horse

Geraldine Brooks won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for her novel March, an ''honorable, elegant, and true'' (The Wall Street Journal) retelling of Louisa May Alcott's Little Women from the point of view of the titular family's absent patriarch. Her other internationally bestselling works of fiction and nonfiction include Nine Parts of Desire: The Hidden World of Islamic Women, Caleb's Crossing, Foreign Correspondence, The Secret Chord, and People of the Book. A former war correspondent for The Wall Street Journal who was stationed in the Middle East, Africa, and the Balkans, Brooks was awarded the 2010 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement and in 2016 she was named an Officer of the Order of Australia. Based on the incredible true story of a champion thoroughbred horse named Lexington, her latest novel finds three disparate generations of people tied together through both the horse and United States' ongoing reckoning with racism. (recorded 6/14/2023)
6/21/202345 minutes, 38 seconds
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David Maraniss | Path Lit by Lightning: The Life of Jim Thorpe

In conversation with Paul Hendrickson ''One of our most talented biographers and historians'' (The New York Times), David Maraniss is the author of bestselling portraits of some of America's most consequential figures, including Bill Clinton, Vince Lombardi, Barack Obama, and Roberto Clemente, as well as an acclaimed trilogy of books about the 1960s. An associate editor at The Washington Post, he has twice won the Pulitzer Prize for journalism. His other honors include three additional Pulitzer Prize nominations, The Robert F. Kennedy Book Prize, and the George Polk Award. Maraniss is currently a distinguished visiting professor at Vanderbilt University. In his latest bestseller Path Lit by Lightning, he offers a nuanced analysis of the life of Jim Thorpe, the man known as ''the world's greatest athlete,'' who, as a member of the Sac and Fox Nation in the early 20th century, faced some of his greatest challenges off the field of competition. Paul Hendrickson's seven acclaimed books include Hemingway's Boat: Everything He Loved in Life, and Lost, 1934–1961, a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist; Sons of Mississippi, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; and The Living and the Dead: Robert McNamara and Five Lives of a Lost War, a National Book Award finalist. A creative writing teacher at the University of Pennsylvania for more than 20 years and a feature writer at The Washington Post for the two decades before that, he has been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize six times. (recorded 6/7/2023)
6/8/202353 minutes, 41 seconds
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Kwame Alexander | Why Fathers Cry at Night: A Memoir in Love Poems, Recipes, Letters, and Remembrances

In conversation with Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts  Kwame Alexander is the author of The Crossover, a ''beautifully measured novel'' (The New York Times Book Review) that follows twin brother basketball stars coming to terms with the world. Winner of the 2015 Newbery Medal and the 2015 Coretta Scott King Honor Award, it was recently adapted for Disney+ into a television series. Also a poet, educator, and activist, Alexander is the author of 36 other bestselling books, including Rebound, The Undefeated, and The Door of No Return. He is also a regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition, co-founder of a health clinic and literacy program in Ghana, and is the founding editor of Versify, a publishing imprint focused on changing the world through words. Both a memoir and collection of love poems, Why Fathers Cry at Night brings together the various parts of Alexander's past and present relationships to offer a larger narrative of his family's love. The author and co-author of 15 books that explore topics such as faith, race, social justice, and motherhood, Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts is a professor of English and Black Studies at the Community College of Philadelphia, hosts the podcast HeARTtalk with Tracey Michae'l, and is the founder of HeARTspace, a healing community for those who have experienced trauma. Her writing has been published in The Washington Post, Essence, The Guardian, and Ebony, among other publications. In her recent essay collection, Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration, Lewis-Giggetts celebrates the reaffirming power of Black joy. (recorded 6/6/2023)
6/8/202357 minutes, 21 seconds
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Airea D. Matthews | Bread and Circus

In conversation with poet Phillip B. Williams Airea D. Matthews is the 2022–23 Philadelphia Poet Laureate and directs the poetry program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulacra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Best American Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, and VQR, among other journals. Matthews' other honors include a 2022 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, a 2020 Pew Fellowship, and the 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award. Addressing themes of income inequality, commodification, and conventional economic theories, Bread and Circus combines poetry, prose, and imagery to tell an intimate story about the author and her family. Phillip B. Williams is the Whiting Award-winning author of Thief in the Interior and Mutiny. A recipient of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, Lambda Literary Award, and Whiting Award, he has also received fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and the National Endowment for the Arts. He currently teaches at Bennington College and the Randolph College low-residency MFA. (recorded 6/1/2023)
6/2/202356 minutes, 1 second
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James Comey | Central Park West: A Crime Novel

In conversation with George Anastasia The director of the FBI from 2013 to 2017, James Comey captured international attention for his investigations into Hillary Clinton's emails, Russian interference into the 2016 presidential election, and Donald Trump, the last of which ultimately led to his dismissal. He is a former prosecutor, defense lawyer, general counsel, law teacher, and the author of two bestselling books, Saving Justice: Truth, Transparency, and Trust and A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership, which was adapted into a popular Showtime series. Central Park West, Comey's first work of fiction, draws upon the author's many decades in federal law enforcement as it follows a federal prosecutor's efforts to solve a disgraced former New York governor's murder amidst shocking revelations of high-powered politicians' ties to the mob. ''One of the most respected crime reporters in the country'' (60 Minutes), George Anastasia was a long-time writer for The Inquirer, where he earned two Pulitzer Prize nominations (and a hit contract from then-Philly crime boss John Stanfa) for his searing mafia exposés. He is the author of six crime books, including The Last Gangster, Blood and Honor, The Summer Wind, and Gotti's Rules. Anastasia's work has appeared in Playboy and The Village Voice, and he has been an organized crime consultant on projects for ABC and the History Channel, among others. (recorded 5/31/2023)
6/1/20231 hour, 21 seconds
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Kristen R. Ghodsee | Everyday Utopia: What 2,000 Years of Wild Experiments Can Teach Us

In conversation with Arwa Mahdawi Referred to by bestsstelling author Rebecca Traister as ''exhilarating, good humored, and forward looking,'' Kristen R. Ghodsee's Everyday Utopia is a two-millennia examination of diverse civilizations' boldest dreams of and experiments in ideal societies. Ghodsee is also the author of six other books, including the acclaimed and bestselling Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism: And Other Arguments for Economic Independence, which has been translated into 14 languages. A professor of Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, she has contributed articles to numerous publications, including The New Republic, The New York Times, and Le Monde Diplomatique; and she has appeared on dozens of television shows, radio programs, and podcasts. Arwa Mahdawi is a London-born, Philadelphia-based writer, speaker, and business consultant. Arwa is the author of Strong Female Lead, a book urging us to reconsider our preconceptions about leadership and laying out a blueprint for the types of leaders we need in a time of permacrisis. She writes a weekly column for The Guardian covering everything from politics to pop culture. She is also the creator of the viral website Rent-A-Minority, which is an ‘Uber for diversity.' (Yes, before you ask, it's satire.)  (recorded 5/18/2023)
5/22/202359 minutes, 22 seconds
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Samantha Irby | Quietly Hostile: Essays

In conversation with podcaster and author Kelsey McKinney ''America's most talented comic writer'' (The New Republic), Samantha Irby is the author of four essay collections, including Wow, No Thank you.; Meaty; New Year, Same Trash: Resolutions I Absolutely Did Not Keep; and the New York Times bestseller We Are Never Meeting in Real Life. In her celebrated long-running blog, bitches gotta eat, she offers hot takes on her sometimes messy personal life, pop culture, and, of course, food. Named one of the most anticipated books of 2023 by TIME magazine, Oprah Daily, and numerous other media outlets, Irby's latest essay collection delves into, among other issues, the minutiae of restaurant dress codes, speaking with teenagers, and the shifting moods of the insane dog she adopted during the pandemic. Kelsey McKinney is the host and writer of the podcast Normal Gossip, a features writer at defector.com, and a widely published freelance writer. She is also the author of God Spare the Girls, a 2021 debut novel that was recommended by Elle, Refinery29, and Oprah Daily, among many other media outlets. (recorded 5/16/2023)
5/17/202356 minutes, 12 seconds
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Linda Villarosa | Under the Skin: The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and on the Health of Our Nation

A contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and The 1619 Project, Linda Villarosa has won numerous awards for articles concerning issues of Black mother and infant health, medical myths, America's hidden HIV epidemic, environmental justice, and COVID-19's toll on Black American communities. She is the author of Body & Soul: The Black Women's Guide to Physical Health and the novel Passing for Black, which was nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. The director of the undergraduate journalism program at City College of New York, Villarosa formerly worked as executive editor at Essence magazine and as a science editor for The New York Times, and her articles have been published in numerous periodicals, including The Root, O Magazine, and Glamour. Relying on human stories and exhaustive research, Under the Skin exposes the powerful forces within healthcare and society itself that cause Black Americans to ''live sicker and die quicker'' than their white peers. (recorded 5/15/2023)
5/16/202355 minutes, 13 seconds
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Brett H. Mandel | Philadelphia, Corrupt and Consenting: A City's Struggle against an Epithet

In conversation with Ernest Owens A consultant and writer in the fields of civic activism and government reform, Brett H. Mandel served as director of Philadelphia's Financial & Policy Analysis Unit in the city controller's office, was a member of the Tax Reform Commission, and was assistant policy director of the Philadelphia Independent Charter Commission. Co-authored during his stint in the city controller's office, his book Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction won the 1999 Association of Government Auditors Special Project Award. Mandel was also executive director of the National Education Technology Funding Corporation and executive director of the citizens' organization Philadelphia Forward. Told through the story of the corruption case of John Dougherty and the machine politics that foster corruption, his new book illustrates the ways our inattention gives way to corrosive politicians and policies, the effects this blight has on the soul of Philadelphia, and how collective action can lead to a better city for all.   Ernest Owens is editor-at-large for Philadelphia Magazine, host of the podcast Ernestly Speaking!, and president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. His book The Case for Cancel Culture was published in February, and his other work has been featured in a number of media outlets, including The New York Times, CNN, The Washington Post, and NPR. He teaches media and journalism at Cheyney University. (recorded 5/11/2023)
5/12/202357 minutes, 51 seconds
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Hernan Diaz | Trust

Hernan Diaz's bestselling and Pulitzer Prize winning novel Trust, "a genre-bending, time-skipping story about New York City's elite in the roaring '20s and Great Depression'' (Vanity Fair), presents a literary puzzle about the reality warping power of money. Named one of the top ten books of 2022 by The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vogue, Esquire, and Barack Obama, it won the Kirkus Prize and was longlisted for the Booker Prize. Diaz is also the author of the 2017 novel In the Distance, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award. A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Award, and the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing, his writing has appeared in The Paris Review, Granta, The Yale Review, and McSweeney's, among numerous other periodicals. (recorded 5/9/2023)
5/10/202352 minutes, 23 seconds
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Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah | Chain Gang All-Stars with Daniel Torday | The 12th Commandment

With characters situated in surreal, Twilight Zone-esque, yet all-too-familiar positions of oppression within our most venerable institutions, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's 2018 debut fiction collection, Friday Black, was praised as a "vivid, original'' portrait of ''America in all its racism, weirdness and abject consumerism'' (People). The winner of the PEN/Jean Stein Book Award and the Saroyan Prize and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle's John Leonard Award for Best First Book, Adjei-Brenyah has contributed work to some of the country's most prestigious publications, including Guernica, Esquire, The New York Times Book Review, and The Paris Review. In Chain Gang All-Stars, his debut novel, he follows the gladiatorial fortunes of two women inmates who compete for their freedom in highly profitable and popular officially sanctioned prison death matches. Praised by George Saunders as ''a prodigiously talented writer, with a huge heart,'' Daniel Torday won the National Jewish Book Award for both his debut novel The Sensualist and his follow-up, The Last Flight of Poxl West. His other work includes the novel Boomer1 as well as articles and essays published in Esquire, n+1, Tin House, and The New York Times, among other publications. A professor of creative writing at Bryn Mawr College, Torday is also the winner of the Sami Rohr Choice Prize. The 12th Commandment delves into the sins, redemptions, and secrets of an Ohio-based Jewish-Islamic religious sect grappling with the murder of its prophet's son. (recorded 5/8/2023)
5/9/20231 hour, 2 minutes, 3 seconds
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Dave Barry | Swamp Story: A Novel

A ''genuine genius'' (The New York Times Book Review), Dave Barry won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1988. He wrote for the Miami Herald for 30 years, where his column was syndicated in more than 500 newspapers. His dozens of bestselling works of fiction, nonfiction, and essay collections include I'll Mature When I'm Dead; Dave Barry Slept Here: A Sort of History of the United States; Lessons from Lucy: The Simple Joys of an Old, Happy Dog; and Best. State. Ever.: A Florida Man Defends His Homeland. Two of Barry's books were used as the basis for the CBS TV sitcom Dave's World. Mapping the intersecting fates of a young mother who stumbles upon treasure, a debauched newspaper man, a wannabe reality star, and other oddballs, Swamp Story is a quintessentially Floridian caper story. (recorded 5/3/2023)
5/4/202357 minutes, 41 seconds
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Sarah Bakewell | Humanly Possible: Seven Hundred Years of Humanist Freethinking, Inquiry, and Hope

In conversation with Eric Banks Acclaimed for ''wonderfully readable'' fusions of ''biography, philosophy, history, cultural analysis and personal reflection'' (The Independent), Sarah Bakewell is the author of At the Existentialist Café, a rousing and comprehensive account of the 20th century intellectual movement, which was named one of 2016's best books by The New York Times. She is also the author of How to Live: A Life of Montaigne, a National Book Critics Circle Award–winning biography of the 16th century essayist. She formerly worked as a curator of early printed books at the esteemed Wellcome Library for the History of Medicine, earned a postgraduate degree in artificial intelligence, and taught creative writing at London's City University. In her latest book, she delves into the vast history of humanist thought in order to illuminate its contributions to art, scientific inquiry, and the very nature of our individual spirits. Eric Banks is a writer and editor based in New York. He is director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at the New York Public Library and consulting editor of the forthcoming Robert Rauschenberg Catalogue Raisonné, the first volume of which is scheduled to appear in 2025. Banks is a former senior editor of Artforum, and from 2003 to 2008 he served as editor in chief of Bookforum.  (recorded 5/2/2023)
5/3/202359 minutes, 31 seconds
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Camille Dungy | Soil: The Story of a Black Mother's Garden

In conversation with Abra Lee Camille T. Dungy is the author of Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History, a debut personal essay collection that was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She is also the author of four collections of poetry, What to Eat, What to Drink, What to Leave for Poison; Suck on the Marrow; Smith Blue; and Trophic Cascade, winner of the Colorado Book Award. The editor of three poetry anthologies, Dungy is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, and an American Book Award. She is an English professor at Colorado State University and hosts the podcast Immaterial, a podcast from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Magnificent Noise. In Soil, she delves into her seven-year quest to diversify her garden in spite of her community's strict horticultural rules, exposing larger truths about the danger homogeneity poses to our planet. Abra Lee is a storyteller, horticulturist, and author of the forthcoming book Conquer The Soil: Black America and the Untold Stories of Our Country's Gardeners, Farmers, and Growers. She has spent a whole lotta time in the dirt as a municipal arborist and airport landscape manager. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, Fine Gardening, Veranda Magazine, and NPR. Lee is a graduate of Auburn University College of Agriculture and an alumna of the Longwood Gardens Society of Fellows, a global network of public horticulture professionals. (recorded 5/1/2023)
5/3/202358 minutes, 3 seconds
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Chad L. Williams | The Wounded World: W. E. B. Du Bois and the First World War

In conversation with Mia Bay Chad L. Williams is the author of Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I Era, winner of the Liberty Legacy Foundation Award from the Organization of American Historians. The Samuel J. and Augusta Spector Professor of History and African and African American Studies at Brandeis University, he has earned fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, the Ford Foundation, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. He is the co-editor of Charleston Syllabus: Readings on Race, Racism and Racial Violence, and has contributed articles and opinion pieces to a variety of publications, including The Washington Post, Time, and The Atlantic. In The Wounded World, Williams draws from a deep pool of source material to recount the story of W. E. B. Du Bois' disillusionment with his country for its betrayal of Black American veterans of World War I. A scholar of American and African American intellectual, cultural and social history, Mia Bay is the Roy F. and Jeanette P. Nichols Professor of American History at University of Pennsylvania. Her books include The White Image in the Black Mind: African-American Ideas about White People, 1830-1925; To Tell the Truth Freely: The Life of Ida B. Wells; and Traveling Black: A Story of Race and Resistance, winner of the Bancroft Prize. She is currently finishing a book on the history of African American ideas about Thomas Jefferson. (recorded 4/27/2023)
4/28/202343 minutes, 41 seconds
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Simon Winchester | Knowing What We Know: The Transmission of Knowledge: From Ancient Wisdom to Modern Magic

Pine Tree Foundation Endowed Lecture Exuding ''the comfort and charm of a beloved encyclopedia come to life'' (The New Yorker), Simon Winchester is the bestselling author of nearly 30 nonfiction books that explore some of the world's most consequential people, places, and historical events, including The Professor and the Madman, Krakatoa, The Men Who United the States, Atlantic, Pacific, The Perfectionists, and Land. An Oxford-trained former field geologist in Uganda and a war correspondent for The Guardian and The Sunday Times, he was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 2006. Spanning in time from the creation of ancient Babylonian cuneiform tablets to the advent (recorded 4/26/2023)
4/27/20231 hour, 1 minute, 9 seconds
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Eileen Myles | a ''Working Life''

''Unflinching but also irrepressibly humorous'' (The New York Times Book Review), Eileen Myles is the celebrated author of nearly two dozen books of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, plays, and performance pieces, including Pathetic Literature, For Now, Chelsea Girls, I Must Be Living Twice, The Irony of the Leash, and Afterglow (a dog memoir). Their lengthy list of honors includes a Guggenheim Fellowship in nonfiction, election to the American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Clark Prize for Excellence in Art Writing, and an Andy Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers Grant. Peering into the miracles hidden in our daily ablutions, a ''Working Life'' is a poetry collection that seeks to engage with our often-subsumed senses of mortality, fear, and wonder. (recorded 4/25/2023)
4/26/202358 minutes, 39 seconds
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One Book One Philadelphia Kickoff: Community Fair and Author Conversation

Charles Yu is the author of four books, including Interior Chinatown (the winner of the 2020 National Book Award for fiction), and the novel How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe (a New York Times Notable Book and a Time magazine best book of the year). He received the National Book Foundation's 5 Under 35 Award and was nominated for two Writers Guild of America Awards for his work on the HBO series, Westworld. He has also written for shows on FX, AMC, and HBO. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Wired, among other publications. Together with TaiwaneseAmerican.org, he established the Betty L. Yu and Jin C. Yu Writing Prizes, in honor of his parents. Terence Washington is the Manager of Civic Engagement and Programs for the Free Library of Philadelphia. After leaving the Air Force, he got a master's in art history at Williams College before working as an arts administrator, curator, and educator. He has done full-time and freelance work with the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the NXTHVN residency, the Readying the Museum initiative, DC Arts Center, The Phillips Collection, Mass MoCA, and elsewhere. He thinks everyone should read Thick by Tressie McMillan Cottom. (recorded 4/20/2023)
4/24/202342 minutes, 49 seconds
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David Grann | The Wager: A Tale of Shipwreck, Mutiny and Murder

David Grann is the No. 1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, an account of the chilling true-life story of one of the most sinister conspiracies in U.S. history. A finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the Edgar Allan Poe Award, it has been adapted into an upcoming film directed by Martin Scorcese. His other bestsellers include The Lost City of Z, the nonfiction tale of the deadly search for a fabled Amazonian civilization; and The Devil and Sherlock Holmes, named by Men's Journal as one of the best true crime books ever written. An award-winning staff writer at The New Yorker, Grann has previously contributed to The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and The New Republic, among other periodicals. In The Wager, he details the wildly differing narratives offered by two groups of 18th century British naval castaways. (recorded 4/19/2023)
4/20/202358 minutes, 22 seconds
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Neil King Jr. | American Ramble: A Walk of Memory and Renewal

In conversation with Signe Wilkinson A Wall Street Journal correspondent for two decades, Neil King Jr. reported from more than 50 countries, served as the newspaper's chief diplomatic correspondent, national political reporter, and global economics editor in Washington, D.C., and was part of a Wall Street Journal team that earned a Pulitzer Prize for its 9/11 coverage. He formerly wrote for the Tampa Tribune and the Prague Post, and he is the founder and editor of Gotham Canoe, an online journal dedicated to exploring nature and nearby wildernesses. Inspired by his search for meaning amidst the nation's increasing political and social divides as well as by his own long battle with cancer, American Ramble follows King's revelatory 26-day walk from Washington, D.C., through Philadelphia and its surrounding environment, to New York's Central Park.  Signe Wilkinson is a widely syndicated cartoonist and the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. Formerly based at The Philadelphia Inquirer, she is the recipient of three Overseas Press Club Awards. With Jonathan Zimmerman, she co-authored the book Free Speech: And Why You Should Give a Damn. (recorded 4/18/2023)
4/20/202358 minutes, 29 seconds
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Michelle Zauner | Crying in H Mart

In conversation with Homay King The lead vocalist, songwriter, and guitarist of the indie rock outfit Japanese Breakfast, Michelle Zauner has garnered wide acclaim for her shoegaze-inspired pop earworms. These works include Psychopomp, Soft Sounds from Another Planet, and her 2021 breakthrough album Jubilee, for which she received Grammy Award nominations for Best Alternative Music Album and Best New Artist. Zauner is also the author of Crying in H Mart, a memoir based on her viral 2018 New Yorker essay of the same name. A New York Times bestseller and selected as one of 2021's best books by a wide range of periodicals, it offers an honest perspective on her identity as a Korean American, the death of her mother, and the struggles of her early musical career. She is currently adapting this memoir into a screenplay for MGM Studios. Homay King is Professor of History of Art at Bryn Mawr College. She is the author of Lost in Translation: Orientalism, Cinema, and the Enigmatic Signifier and Virtual Memory: Time-based Art and the Dream of Digitality, both from Duke University Press. Her essays have appeared in Afterall, Discourse, Film Quarterly, October, and elsewhere, including the catalogue for the Metropolitan Museum of Art's China: Through the Looking Glass. She is a member of the Camera Obscura editorial collective. Currently, she is working on a book project entitled Go West: A Mythology of California's Silicon Valley, for which she was awarded an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellowship at the National Gallery of Art. (recorded 4/14/2023)
4/17/202351 minutes, 7 seconds
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Mary Louise Kelly | It. Goes. So. Fast.: The Year of No Do-Overs

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak Barbara Gohn Day Memorial Lecture An NPR reporter for more than two decades, Mary Louise Kelly currently co-hosts the network's flagship program All Things Considered, the most listened-to radio news show in the United States. Also the author of two popular suspense novels, she has contributed articles and essays to a variety of publications, including The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Atlantic. Kelly created and taught a graduate course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University, served as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, and has moderated high-profile interviews at venues around the globe. In It. Goes. So. Fast., she reflects on life's joys, sorrows, and pivotal changes in the year leading up to her son's departure to college. (recorded 4/13/2023)
4/14/20231 hour, 57 seconds
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Mark Bowden | Life Sentence: The Brief and Tragic Career of Baltimore's Deadliest Gang Leader

In conversation with Bill Marimow Renowned for his ''signature blend of deep reportage and character-driven storytelling (The New York Times Book Review),'' Mark Bowden is a former national correspondent for The Atlantic and a former longtime reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer. He is the author of 16 bestselling books of investigative journalism, including Black Hawk Down, adapted by Ridley Scott into a popular film; Guests of the Ayatollah: The Iran Hostage Crisis: The First Battle in America's War with Militant Islam; Hue 1968, the story of the Vietnam War's bloodiest battle as told by U.S. and Vietnamese soldiers; and The Steal, an account of former President Donald Trump and his allies' attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election that he co-authored with Matthew Teague. In Life Sentence, Bowden writes about the inner workings of one of Baltimore's deadliest gangs and details the painstaking FBI investigation that brought it down. As a reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Bill Marimow twice won the Pulitzer Prize for public service. The editor in chief of the Inquirer from 2006 to 2017 and formerly its vice president of strategic development, he also served as vice president of news at National Public Radio and editor in chief of The Baltimore Sun. His other honors include two Silver Gavel Awards from the American Bar Association and two Robert F. Kennedy awards. (recorded 4/11/2023)
4/12/202357 minutes, 25 seconds
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Jennifer Senior | On Grief: Love, Loss, Memory

In conversation with Mike Sielski A staff writer at The Atlantic, Jennifer Senior won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for ''Twenty Years Gone,'' an account of a family still reeling from the loss of a loved one on 9/11. Her critically acclaimed 2015 book All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood spent eight weeks on The New York Times bestseller list, and in 2014 she delivered a popular TED Talk on happiness and child rearing. A frequent guest on numerous news programs, Senior formerly worked as a book critic and columnist at The New York Times and was a staff writer at New York Magazine for 18 years. On Grief is an Atlantic Edition volume of her Pulitzer-winning essay. A sports columnist at The Philadelphia Inquirer since 2013, Mike Sielski is the author of Fading Echoes, the true story of two Pennsylvania high school football rivals who later found brotherhood while in the U.S. military in in the battlefields of the Middle East, and is the co-author of How to Be Like Jackie Robinson, a collection of life lessons taken from the trailblazing baseball legend. In 2015 he was voted the best sports columnist in the U.S. by The Associated Press Sports Editors. His most recent book The Rise is about the life of Kobe Bryant and offers a thorough account of Bryant's identity as a sports and cultural figure and an assessment of his impact on our society. Bob Costas described the books as a ''story informed by meticulous research and rendered with clear-eyed insights.'' (recorded 4/10/2023)
4/11/202336 minutes, 42 seconds
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Vanessa Hua | Forbidden City

In conversation with Pia Sarkar A former longtime columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, Vanessa Hua has written about Asia and the diaspora from countries such as China, Burma, and South Korea, and has contributed articles to The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Atlantic. She is the author of the bestselling novel A River of Stars, the award-winning story collection Deceit and Other Possibilities, and fiction that has been published in numerous literary journals. Hua's honors include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Steinbeck Fellowship in Creative Writing, awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, and the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature. A national bestseller, longlisted for the Joyce Carol Oates Prize, and named one of the best novels of the year by several publications, Forbidden City tells the story of a teenage girl in 1960s China who becomes a heroine of the Cultural Revolution and Mao Zedong's lover. Pia Sarkar is a longtime journalist with more than two decades of experience. She currently serves as deputy business editor for enterprise at The Associated Press, based in Philadelphia. She is also a board member of the South Asian Journalists Association and an executive committee member of the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. She previously worked as an editor and reporter for such media outlets as The American Lawyer, the San Francisco Chronicle and The Bergen Record. Sarkar received her bachelor's degree in English and communication from SUNY-Buffalo and her master's degree in journalism from Columbia University. (recorded 4/3/2023)
4/4/202341 minutes, 16 seconds
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Alex Mar | Seventy Times Seven: A True Story of Murder and Mercy

In conversation with Shane Claiborne Alex Mar is the author of Seventy Times Seven, a chronicle of the brutal 1985 Indiana murder of an elderly white woman by a fifteen-year-old Black girl.  ''A probing examination of the intersection of race, crime, and punishment (Kirkus), it delves into the crime's reverberating effects across the world and the victim's grandson's campaign to spare the perpetrator from execution. Mar's other work includes Witches of America, ''a genuine and touching'' (Los Angeles Times) five-year journalistic foray into modern day occult belief and her own relationship to mysticism. American Mystic, her feature-length documentary feature film about members of fringe religious sects, premiered to wide acclaim at the 2010 Tribeca Film Festival. Her essays have appeared The New York Times Book Review, The Believer, The Guardian, and Wired, among many other outlets.  Shane Claiborne is a cofounder of The Simple Way, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that works in the New Monastic tradition to live, minister, and improve its Kensington community. Also an activist, prominent public speaker, and author, he is the author of many books, including The Irresistible Revolution: Living as an Ordinary Radical; Beating Guns: Hope for People Who Are Weary of Violence; and Executing Grace: How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why It's Killing Us. (recorded 3/30/2023)
3/31/202350 minutes, 57 seconds
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Angela Saini | The Patriarchs: The Origins of Inequality

Angela Saini is the author of Superior, an ''easy-to-read blend of science reporting, cultural criticism, and personal reflection'' (Slate) that explores the resurgence of the harmful and faulty study of race science. She is also the author of the critically acclaimed Inferior, a new portrait of women's minds, bodies, and evolutionary roles gained through an investigation of how science has failed to accurately understand them. Her print and television science journalism have appeared on the BBC, The Guardian, New Scientist, and Wired, among other places. In The Patriarchs, Saini investigates the surprising origins and history of gendered oppression, offers a historical examination of the brittle and constantly reasserted nature of patriarchy, and analyzes contemporary research and revolutionary efforts to combat these systems of control. (recorded 3/29/2023)
3/30/202354 minutes, 41 seconds
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Emily St. John Mandel | Sea of Tranquility

In conversation with Laura McGrath, Assistant Professor of English at Temple University A ''soul-quaking'' (Los Angeles Review of Books) meditation on the everyday miracles we take for granted set amongst the travels and travails of a Shakespearean acting troupe in the years following a global plague, Emily St. John Mandel's bestselling Station 11 was a finalist for the National Book Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award. Her other novels include Last Night in Montreal, The Singer's Gun, and The Glass Hotel, included by Barack Obama on his 2022 summer reading list. Mandel is also a staff writer for art and culture magazine The Millions. Peripherally set in the same universe as Station 11 and The Glass Hotel, Sea of Tranquility follows interconnected time-hopping characters seeking love and metaphysical truth in such far-flung locales as the wilderness of 19th century British Columbia and the domed cities of the 25th century lunar surface. (recorded 3/28/2023)
3/29/202355 minutes, 26 seconds
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Ari Shapiro | The Best Strangers in the World: Stories from a Life Spent Listening

In conversation with award-winning chef and restauranteur Michael Solomonov Ari Shapiro is the cohost of NPR's All Things Considered, the most listened-to radio news program in the country. Formerly NPR's White House correspondent and international correspondent based in London, he has earned two Edward R. Murrow awards, the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize, and recognition from the American Bar Association and the Columbia Journalism Review. Also an accomplished stage performer, Shapiro is the creator of the one-man show Homeward and the co-creator of the show Och and Oy, which he performs nationwide alongside collaborator Alan Cumming. A memoir in the form of an essay collection, The Best Strangers in the World reveals the deeper stories behind some of the globe-hopping journalist's most poignant reportage. (recorded 3/23/2023)
3/24/202351 minutes, 5 seconds
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Judith Lewis Herman, M.D. | Truth and Repair: How Trauma Survivors Envision Justice

In conversation with Bessel van der Kolk, M.D.  Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Endowed Lecture A professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School for more than 40 years, Judith Lewis Herman, M.D., is one of the United States' foremost experts on the treatment of post-traumatic stress and incest. ''One of the most important psychiatry works to be published since Freud'' (The New York Times), her groundbreaking 1992 book Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence-From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror redefined medicine's understanding of trauma survivors. Herman is the director of training at the Victims of Violence Program at The Cambridge Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts and a founding member of the Women's Mental Health Collective. Her many honors include the 1996 Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, the 2000 American Medical Women's Association Award, and in 2003 the American Psychiatric Association bestowed upon her the title of Distinguished Life Fellow. A manifesto for a new framework of justice, Truth and Repair argues that survivors' voices should be central elements in our criminal justice system.  Bessel van der Kolk, M.D., is the author of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller The Body Keeps the Score, a watershed examination of the ways traumatic stress affects the physical health of human beings. The founder and medical director of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts, he is a professor of psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine and is the director of the National Complex Trauma Treatment Network. (recorded 3/22/2023)
3/23/202353 minutes, 6 seconds
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Adam Gopnik | The Real Work: On the Mystery of Mastery

Featuring magician, Justin Gilmore A staff writer at The New Yorker for more than three decades, Adam Gopnik is the author of Paris to the Moon, The Table Comes First, At the Strangers' Gate, and A Thousand Small Sanities, a ''witty, humane, learned'' (The New York Times) defense of liberalism amidst the dogmatic divisions of our time. He is also a sought-after public speaker, widely anthologized essayist, and has collaborated as both a librettist and lyric writer on several musical projects. A three-time recipient of the National Magazine Award and a winner of the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting, Gopnik was decorated with the French Republic's medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. An examination of the fundamental question of just how it is that we acquire skills, The Real Work delves into the processes used by a variety of master artists, professionals, and instructors.  (recorded 3/21/2023)
3/22/202357 minutes, 30 seconds
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Debra Lee | I Am Debra Lee: A Memoir

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition The former longtime CEO of Black Entertainment Television (BET), Debra Lee currently serves on the boards of several of the world's leading corporations, including Proctor & Gamble, Warner Bros. Discovery, Revlon, Burberry Group Plc, and Marriott International. She is the founder and chairwoman of Leading Women Defined Foundation, an organization of Black female thought leaders, and is the co-founder of Monarchs Collective, a group that empowers men and women of color to sit on corporate boards. One of the Hollywood Reporter's 100 Most Powerful Women in Entertainment and Billboard's Power 100, Lee is an inductee into the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame. I Am Debra Lee charts her journey from girlhood in the segregated South to heading the first Black company traded on the New York Stock Exchange, along the way offering personal anecdotes, celebrity stories, and lessons about motherhood while trying to make a career. (recorded 3/9/2023)
3/13/20231 hour, 19 seconds
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Heather McGhee | The Sum of Us (Adapted for Young Readers): How Racism Hurts Everyone

Sandra Shaber Memorial Lecture In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak The Sum of Us, Heather McGhee's 2021 odyssey across the American landscape of inequality, won wide acclaim for its empathetic and incisive imagining of a future that could offer more than our current racial paradigm. A New York Times bestseller, longlisted for the National Book Award, and named one of the best books of the year by numerous media outlets, it was recently adapted as a podcast on the Obama's Higher Ground network. One of the nation's foremost experts in economic and social policy, McGhee is the chair of the board of directors at Color of Change, the United States' largest online racial justice group. She is also the former president of the inequality-focused think tank Demos, where she currently serves as a distinguished senior fellow. (recorded 3/7/2023)
3/8/202356 minutes, 8 seconds
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Mehdi Hasan | Win Every Argument: The Art of Debating, Persuading, and Public Speaking

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill British American journalist Mehdi Hasan hosts the eponymously titled The Mehdi Hasan Show, a news and politics program that airs on MSNBC and NBC's streaming channel Peacock. He is also the fill-in host for The Rachel Maddow Show, All in with Chris Hayes, and The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell, among other programs. A former presenter on Al Jazeera English, a former columnist and podcaster for The Intercept, and former political director of the UK edition of The Huffington Post, he has published opinion pieces in a variety of publications, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. In Win Every Argument, Hasan not only presents a practical guide to the art of rhetoric, he shares a philosophical claim for good-faith argument's value to democracy and truth. The Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions at Temple University, Marc Lamont Hill is the host of BET News and the Coffee and Books podcast. The recipient of honors from the National Association of Black Journalists, GLAAD, and the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, he is the author of six books, including Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life; Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond; and Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics. (recorded 3/2/2023)
3/3/20231 hour, 12 seconds
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Camonghne Felix | Dyscalculia: A Love Story of Epic Miscalculation

In conversation with Sharon G. Flake Camonghne Felix is the author of Build Yourself a Boat, ''an exquisite and thoughtful'' (Bustle) poetry collection that was longlisted for the National Book Award in poetry and shortlisted for the Lambda Literary Award, among other honors. A contributing writer at The Cut, her poetry has appeared in or is forthcoming in numerous places, including The New Yorker, Poetry Magazine, and Harvard Review. In Dyscalculia, Felix uses her childhood learning disorder that caused difficulties with math to explore the trauma of a monumental breakup, past troubles, and the concepts of self-love and acceptance. Acclaimed as a modern classic for middle and high school students, Sharon G. Flake's 1998 debut novel The Skin I'm In depicts the travails of a seventh grader dealing with self-esteem issues connected with race, economics, and academic success. It has been translated into several languages and has sold more than one million copies worldwide. Flake is also the author of a dozen other books of fiction, short stories, and poems, including Money Hungry, You Don't Even Know Me, and The Life I'm In, a companion piece to The Skin I'm In published in 2021. Her many honors include two Coretta Scott King Awards, the John Steptoe Award for New Talent, and the YWCA Racial Justice Award. (recorded 3/1/2023)
3/2/202359 minutes, 36 seconds
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Leth Oun and Joe Samuel Starnes | A Refugee's American Dream: From the Killing Fields of Cambodia to the U.S. Secret Service

Veteran United States Secret Service Officer Leth Oun has protected presidents and vice presidents in four administrations in almost every state and more than a dozen countries. A political refugee who survived the genocidal Killing Fields of Cambodia, he arrived in America in 1983, became a citizen in 1990, earned a college degree from Widener University in 1998, and went to work for the federal government in 2000.  Joe Samuel Starnes three celebrated novels include Calling, Red Dirt, and Fall Line, which was named to The Atlanta Journal Constitution's 2011 ''Best of the South'' list. All of these works are featured in an essay in Twenty-First-Century Southern Writers: New Voices, New Perspectives. His articles have appeared in several periodicals, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe, and his essays, short stories, and poems have been published in numerous literary journals. A Refugee's American Dream recounts Oun's father's execution by the brutal Khmer Rouge, his almost four years of enslavement in the Killing Fields followed by more than three years in refugee camps, his arrival in America as a penniless 17-year-old, and his transcendent journey to the Secret Service that culminates with his return to Cambodia as part of President Obama's protection detail.  (recorded 2/28/2023)
3/1/202357 minutes, 33 seconds
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Reginald Dwayne Betts | Redaction

In conversation with Airea D. Matthews A ''powerful work of lyric art'' and ''tour de force indictment of the carceral industrial state'' (The New York Times Book Review), Reginald Dwayne Betts' poetry collection Felon won the NAACP Image Award, the American Book Award, and was a finalist for the 2019 Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Also the author of two other poetry collections and a memoir, he received the 2019 National Magazine Award for his New York Times Magazine essay about his journey from prison inmate to Yale Law School. His other honors include a Guggenheim fellowship, a 2021 MacArthur ''genius grant'', and a Radcliffe fellowship from Harvard. Betts is the founder and executive director of Freedom Reads, a not-for-profit institution devoted to providing greater access to literature in prisons. Created in collaboration with visual artist Titus Kaphar, Redaction is a multimedia examination of the relationship between race and incarceration in America.  Airea D. Matthews is the 2022-2023 Philadelphia Poet Laureate and directs the poetry program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulacra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Best American Poets, Gulf Coast, Harvard Review, and VQR, among other journals. Her autobiographical poetry collection Bread and Circus will be published this spring. (recorded 2/27/2023)
2/28/20231 hour
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Paul Harding | This Other Eden with Hanna Pylväinen | The End of Drum-Time

Paul Harding won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for Tinkers, ''an astringent meditation on loss, family ties, and the presence of the past'' (The Guardian) in which a dying elderly man wanders through the rooms of his life's large and quiet moments. He is also the author of the novel Enon and is an accomplished musician. The director of the MFA in Creative Writing & Literature at Stony Brook University, Harding is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. Based on the true story of one of the first integrated towns in the Northeast, This Other Eden tells the multigenerational story of an isolated island community off the coast of Maine. Referred to by Yiyun Li as ''one of the most unique voices in American literature,'' Hanna Pylväinen is the author of the Whiting Award-winning debut novel We Sinners, the story of a devout but fragmented Midwestern family. A faculty member of Warren Wilson College's MFA writing program, she has earned fellowships from Princeton University's Lewis Center for the Arts and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, among others. Her work has been published in numerous periodicals, including Harper's Magazine, The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, and The Wall Street Journal. In The End of Drum-Time, Pylväinen weaves the love story of a reindeer herder and a minister's daughter on the remote 19th century Scandinavian tundra. (recorded 2/23/2023)
2/24/202358 minutes, 26 seconds
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Jamila Minnicks | Moonrise Over New Jessup

Jamila Minnicks' debut novel Moonrise Over New Jessup tells the story of a 1950s-era, all-Black Alabama town that is resistant to desegregation and the opposing political viewpoints that threaten a young couple's burgeoning romance. Praised by Barbara Kingsolver for its dive into the ''deep complexity of the American Civil Rights movement'' by way of ''compelling characters and a heart-pounding plot,'' it won the 2021 PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction. Minnicks has published work in the literary journals CRAFT, The Write Launch, and The Silent World in Her Vase, and her short story ''Politics of Distraction'' was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. (recorded 2/22/2023)
2/23/202357 minutes, 15 seconds
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Joseph Earl Thomas | Sink: A Memoir

In conversation with Elias Rodriques Referred to by Carmen Maria Machado as ''all blood and nerve and near-unbearable beauty,'' Joseph Earl Thomas' Sink is a coming-of-age memoir that chronicles the author's escape from an upbringing of deprivation and abuse to a geek culture in which he could build a family and community on his own terms. An excerpt of this work won the 2020 Chautauqua Janus Prize. His other writing has appeared or is forthcoming in n+1, The Kenyon Review, and Gulf Coast, among other literary journals, and he has received writing fellowships from the Fulbright program, Bread Loaf, and Tin House. A doctoral candidate in English at the University of Pennsylvania, Thomas is the Director of Programs at Blue Stoop in Philadelphia and an associate faculty member at the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research.  Elias Rodriques is an assistant editor of n+1 and author of the novel All the Water I've Seen is Running. His work has been published or anthologized in The Guardian, The Nation, and Best American Essays. (recorded 2/21/2023)
2/22/202354 minutes, 43 seconds
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Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr. | Who Hears Here: On Black Music, Pasts, & Present

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill Professor emeritus of Music at the University of Pennsylvania, Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr. is a celebrated musicologist, composer, pianist, and music historian. He is the author of Race Music: Black Cultures from Bebop to Hip-Hop and The Amazing Bud Powell: Black Genius, Jazz History and the Challenge of Bebop, the founder of the music blog Musiquology.com, and the former editor of the Music of the African Diaspora series at the University of California Press. Also a producer and bandleader, he has released numerous recordings, performed at venues around the world, written musical scores for various multimedia projects, and collaborated with museums and galleries such as The Whitney, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. In Who Hears Here?, Ramsey brings 25 years of his art, commentary, and scholarship to a collection of essays that explore the unique history of Black musical expression. (recorded 2/15/2023)
2/22/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 58 seconds
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Sadeqa Johnson | The House of Eve

In conversation with Jennifer Weiner Acclaimed for their explorations of marital fidelity, friendship, and the difficulties of connecting in modern life, Sadeqa Johnson's novels include And Then There Was Me, Second House from the Corner, and Yellow Wife, the harrowing tale of an enslaved woman forced to barter love and freedom while living in one of the Antebellum South's most infamous slave jails. A Kimbilio Fellow, former board member of the James River Writers, and a Tall Poppy Writer, she is the recipient of the National Book Club Award, the Phillis Wheatley Award, and the USA Best Book Award for best fiction, among other honors. In The House of Eve, Johnson follows two 1950s-era young Black women whose lives collide amidst taboo love affairs, ambition, and pregnancy. ''One of the biggest names in popular fiction'' (USA Today), Jennifer Weiner is the beloved number-one New York Times bestselling author of more than a dozen novels-including Good in Bed, All Fall Down, Mrs. Everything, and In Her Shoes. She is also the writer of two YA books about a diminutive Bigfoot and an essay collection titled Hungry Heart, an intimate and honest meditation on yearning, fulfillment, and her many identities.  (recorded 2/9/2023)
2/13/202354 minutes, 31 seconds
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Steve Lopez | Independence Day: What I Learned about Retirement from Some Who've Done it and Some Who Never Will

In conversation with Mark Bowden A Los Angeles Times columnist for the past 22 years and former columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Steve Lopez is a four-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for commentary, and is the winner of the H.L. Mencken, the Ernie Pyle, and Mike Royko Awards for his contributions to journalism. He is also the author of the One Book, One Philadelphia selection The Soloist, a national bestseller which was awarded the PEN USA Literary Award for Nonfiction for its tender portrayal of a former music prodigy who struggled with mental illness. The book was later made into a feature film starring Robert Downey, Jr. Lopez's other work includes the novels Third and Indiana, The Sunday Macaroni Club, and In the Clear, two collections of columns, and on-air reporting for KCET-TV in Los Angeles, which garnered him three local Emmys. Framed through the author's own ambivalence about retirement, Independence Day follows people across a wide spectrum of jobs, backgrounds, and identities to help provide insight into one of life's pivotal moments.   Mark Bowden is the author of 15 bestselling books of investigative journalism, including Blackhawk Down, adapted by Ridley Scott into a popular film; Killing Pablo, winner of the Overseas Press Club's Cornelius Ryan Award for book of the year; The Three Battles of Wanat, a collection of his best long-form essays; and Hue 1968, the story of the Vietnam War's bloodiest battle as told by participants from both sides. His forthcoming book Life Sentence: The Brief and Tragic Career of Baltimore's Deadliest Gang Leader will be published in April. (recorded 2/8/2023)
2/10/202355 minutes, 41 seconds
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Dan Berger | Stayed on Freedom: The Long History of Black Power through One Family's Journey

In conversation with Michael Simmons and Robert Saleem Holbrook Dan Berger is the author of the James A. Rawley Prize winning Captive Nation: Black Prison Organizing in the Civil Rights Era, an ''illuminating'' (The Nation) reevaluation of 20th century African American activism through the prism of mass incarceration. A professor of comparative ethnic studies and associate dean for faculty development and scholarship in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell, he has published op-eds and other work about critical race theory and social justice in a variety of newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals. In Stayed on Freedom, Berger tells the story of the until-now unheralded Black Power activists Zoharah Simmons and Michael Simmons.  Alongside Zoharah and countless other organizers and activists, Philadelphia-raised Michael Simmons has fought for social justice and human rights for more than 55 years. His work includes time with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, imprisonment for draft resistance during the Vietnam War, assistance in the fair housing movement, and participation in the anti-Apartheid Movement. He spent more than two decades as a human rights organizer in Central Europe, both with the American Friends Service Committee and independently. Robert Saleem Holbrook is the executive director of the Abolitionist Law Center. (recorded 2/7/2023)
2/8/20231 hour
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Sigal R. Ben-Porath | Cancel Wars: How Universities Can Foster Free Speech, Promote Inclusion, and Renew Democracy

A professor of education, philosophy, and political science at the University of Pennsylvania, Sigal R. Ben-Porath is the co-author of Making Up Our Mind: What School Choice Is Really About, and is the author of Free Speech on Campus and Citizenship Under Fire: Democratic Education in Times of Conflict, among other works. She is an executive committee member of the Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy and is a former fellow-in- residence at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. In Cancel Wars, Ben-Porath offers a balanced examination of the polarized condition of campus politics, explains how these formerly neutral spaces became battlegrounds in our current culture wars, and shares a guide for opposing sides to bridge their differences and encourage civic trust even beyond the boundaries of academia. (recorded 1/25/2023)
2/6/202353 minutes, 30 seconds
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Clint Smith | How the Word Is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak ''A public intellectual with much to offer about teaching (and unlearning) history'' (The Washington Post), Clint Smith, in his bestselling book How the Word Is Passed, takes the reader on a tour of monuments and landmarks that tell an intergenerational story about the continuing legacy of slavery in the United States. A staff writer at The Atlantic, he is also the author of the poetry collection Counting Descent, which was a finalist for the NAACP Image Award. Smith has earned fellowships from a variety of institutions, including the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Art for Justice Fund, and the National Science Foundation, and his essays, poems, and scholarly work have been published in The Paris Review, The New Yorker, and The New Republic, among other publications. A former National Poetry Slam champion, his poetry collection, Above Ground, will be published in March 2023. (recorded 1/26/2023)
2/3/20231 hour, 3 minutes, 12 seconds
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Ibram X. Kendi and Nic Stone | How to Be a (Young) Antiracist

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and five #1 New York Times bestsellers including How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky. His latest books are How to Raise an Antiracist and Goodnight Racism, illustrated by Cbabi Bayoc. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world. He was awarded a 2021 MacArthur Fellowship, popularly known as the ''Genius Grant.''  Nic Stone is an Atlanta native and a Spelman College graduate. Her debut novel for young adults, Dear Martin, and her debut middle-grade novel, Clean Getaway, were both New York Times bestsellers. She is also the author of Odd One Out, which was an NPR Best Book of the Year and a Rainbow Book List Top Ten selection, Jackpot, and Shuri: A Black Panther Novel. Dear Justyce, the sequel to Dear Martin, recently published. She is one of the authors in the New York Times bestselling book Black Out, recently optioned for as a new anthology program for Netflix by Barack and Michelle Obama's production company, Higher Ground. Find her online at nicstone.info or @nicstone  Based on Kendi's internationally acclaimed book and co-authored by bestselling author Stone, How to Be a (Young) Antiracist is a dynamic reframing of the concepts shared in How to Be an Antiracist, with young adulthood front and center. (recorded 1/31/2023)
2/1/202359 minutes, 50 seconds
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John Hendrickson | Life on Delay: Making Peace with a Stutter

In conversation with Robert Kolker John Hendrickson is the author of a 2019 Atlantic article titled ''What Joe Biden Can't Bring Himself to Say.'' An account of the President's-and his own-lifelong experience with stuttering, it was read by more than two million people, including multitudes of stutterers who responded with stories of their own journeys. Life on Delay is a memoir born from that article and the deeper questions it raised for Hendrickson, as well as an exploration of the wider personal, societal, and professional issues that can affect stutterers and their families. A senior editor at The Atlantic, he wrote and edited for Rolling Stone, Esquire, and The Denver Post, and has spoken about stuttering, politics, and journalism on a variety of media platforms and at universities across the United States.  Robert Kolker's Hidden Valley Road, the nonfiction account of a family's experience with schizophrenia, was an instant No. 1 New York Times bestseller, an Oprah's Book Club selection, and was named a best book of the year by scores of media outlets. He is also the author of Lost Girls, one of Slate's best nonfiction books of the quarter century. A National Magazine Award finalist, his articles have appeared in Wired, The New York Times Magazine, and Bloomberg Businessweek, among many other periodicals. (recorded 1/24/2023)
1/25/20231 hour, 31 seconds
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Ilyon Woo | Master Slave Husband Wife: An Epic Journey from Slavery to Freedom

In conversation with Imani Perry Ilyon Woo is the author of The Great Divorce, the ''lively, well-written, and engrossing tale'' (The New York Times Book Review) of a young mother's five-year fight against her husband, the Shakers religious sect, and the norms of 19th century United States for her and her children's freedom. The recipient of a Whiting Creative Nonfiction Writing Grant and of fellowships from the American Antiquarian Society and the National Endowment for the Humanities, Woo has contributed writing to The Wall Street Journal and The Boston Globe. Her latest book recounts the remarkable true story of an enslaved husband and wife who posed as master and slave while trekking more than a 1,000 miles to freedom in mid-19th century United States. Imani Perry won the 2022 National Book Award for nonfiction for South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation. Her other books include, Vexy Thing: On Gender and Liberation, Breathe: A Letter to My Sons, and Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry. Perry is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies and faculty associate in the Program in Law and Public Affairs and Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University. (recorded 1/19/2023)
1/23/202357 minutes, 33 seconds
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Stephen A. Smith | Straight Shooter: A Memoir of Second Chances and First Takes

In conversation with Mike Sielski The star of ESPN's No. 1 morning talk show First Take, Stephen A. Smith is one of the U.S. sporting press's most popular and outspoken personalities. He is also the host of NBA in Stephen A's World on ESPN2 and ESPN+, the host and producer of the podcast K[no]w Mercy with Stephen A. Smith, and an NBA analyst on ABC's NBA Countdown and ESPN's Sportscenter. From his upbringing as the youngest son in an immigrant family in Queens, NY to the successes and challenges in his professional career, Smith is characteristically candid in Straight Shooter and offers hot takes on sports, politics, and his personal life.  A sports columnist at The Philadelphia Inquirer since 2013, Mike Sielski is the author of The Rise, an account of Kobe Bryant's life and impact as a sports and cultural figure. He is also the author of Fading Echoes: A True Story of Rivalry and Brotherhood from the Football Field to the Fields of Honor and is the co-author of How to Be Like Jackie Robinson: Life Lessons from Baseball's Greatest Hero. In 2015 he was voted the best sports columnist in the U.S. by the Associated Press Sports Editors.  (recorded 1/19/2023)
1/20/202356 minutes, 12 seconds
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Jerry Blavat | You Only Rock Once: My Life in Music

He started as Jerry Blavat, a half-Jewish, half-Italian kid from South Philadelphia. These days, he's better known as The Geator with the Heater, The Boss with the Hot Sauce.  After 50 years in the music business, the man former Governor Ed Rendell declared ''as Philadelphia as the cheesesteak'' is still going strong.  His life in show business began at the age of 13 as a dancer on Bandstand.  He brought rock n' roll to Philadelphia in the 1960s and keeps it here to this day.  His new biography details his life rubbing elbows with stars and mobsters and bringing The Music to the people.   Interviewed by Tom Moon, former music critic for The Inquirer and author of 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die. (recorded 8/1/2011)
1/20/202354 minutes, 53 seconds
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Aidan Levy | Saxophone Colossus: The Life and Music of Sonny Rollins

In conversation with Nate Chinen The author of Dirty Blvd.: The Life and Music of Lou Reed and editor of Patti Smith on Patti Smith: Interviews and Encounters, Aiden Levy played the baritone saxophone in the Stan Rubin Orchestra for 10 years. His writing has been published in The New York Times, The Village Voice, and JazzTimes, among other publications. Formerly a fellow at the Leon Levy Center for Biography, he is a doctoral candidate at Columbia University in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, works with the Center for Jazz Studies, and was a co-convener of the African American Studies Colloquium. In Saxophone Colossus, Levy offers the first full-length biography of Sonny Rollins, one of jazz's most celebrated but enigmatic musicians and composers.  WRTI jazz radio's editorial director, a regular contributor to NPR Music, and a consulting producer with Jazz Night in America, Nate Chinen formerly worked as a critic for The New York Times and wrote a long-running column for JazzTimes. He is the author of Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century, named one of the best books of 2018 by NPR, GQ, and Billboard. A 13-time winner of the Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Excellence in Writing, Chinen has also had his work widely anthologized. (recorded 1/17/2023)
1/18/202355 minutes, 13 seconds
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Deb Perelman | Smitten Kitchen Keepers: New Classics for Your Forever Files: A Cookbook

Julie Dannenbaum Memorial Culinary Arts Lecture In conversation with Dena Heilik, head of Philbrick Hall, the Fiction and Movie department at Parkway Central. She also cohosts a monthly library Cookbook Club that has been running continuously for six years. Receiving praise from outlets like The New York Times and NPR, and counting Martha Stewart and Rachael Ray among her many fans, self-taught home chef Deb Perelman is the creator of smittenkitchen.com, a candid, can-do, go-to blog for those who want to make and eat good food without using complicated methods or expensive ingredients. Adapted from the website, her bestselling The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook won the IACP Julia Child Award and was a Cooking Light Top 100 Cookbook of the Last 25 Years recipient. Perelman followed up this success with Smitten Kitchen Every Day, a 100-recipe guide for delicious and easy-to-make food. In her long-awaited, follow-up cookbook to these two bestsellers, Perelman serves up recipes for cakes, quiches, pastas, and dozens of other dishes intended to become a part of the readers' every day cooking. (recorded 12/6/2022)
12/8/202256 minutes, 30 seconds
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Tyler Kepner | The Grandest Stage: A History of the World Series

The national baseball writer for The New York Times since 2010, Tyler Kepner began his career as a teenager, interviewing players for a homemade magazine that garnered him national attention. His national bestseller K: A History of Baseball in Ten Pitches earned praise from fans, fellow sportswriters, and Hall of Fame pitchers alike. Also the author of The Phillies Experience: A Year-by-Year Chronicle of the Philadelphia Phillies, Kepner formerly covered the Angels for the Riverside Press-Enterprise, the Mariners for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, and the Mets for the Times. In The Grandest Stage, Kepner uses analysis, lore, humor, and behind-the-scoreboards anecdotes to offer a vivid 117-year history of the World Series. (recorded 12/1/2022)
12/2/202259 minutes, 36 seconds
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Misty Copeland | The Wind at My Back: Resilience, Grace, and Other Gifts from My Mentor, Raven Wilkinson

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6abc Action News morning edition The first African American principal dancer in the history of the elite American Ballet Theatre, Misty Copeland is one of the world's most accomplished and recognizable artists. She is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Life in Motion, Ballerina Body, Black Ballerinas, and the children's books Bunheads and Firebird. A recipient of the Spingarn Medal from the NAACP, an inductee in the Boys and Girls Club Alumni Hall of Fame, one of TIME magazine's 100 most influential people, and one of Glamour's Women of the Year, Copeland also made her critically acclaimed Broadway debut in 2015 in On the Town. In The Wind at My Back, Copeland offers a memoir about her formative and enduring relationship with friend, mentor, and trailblazing ballet dancer Raven Wilkinson. (recorded 11/29/2022)
11/30/202253 minutes, 28 seconds
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David M. Rubenstein | How to Invest: Masters on the Craft

Pine Tree Foundation Endowed Lecture In conversation with Richard Vague David Rubenstein is the co-founder and co-chairman of The Carlyle Group, one of the world's most successful private equity firms. The host of The David Rubinstein Show and Bloomberg Wealth with David Rubenstein on Bloomberg TV, he is the author of the New York Times bestsellers The American Story, How to Lead, and The American Experiment. He is chairman of the boards of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the National Gallery of Art, and as a leader in patriotic philanthropy, he has provided long-term loans of his rare copies of the Magna Carta, the Declaration of Independence, the Emancipation Proclamation, and other historical documents to the U.S. Government. Utilizing his own three decades' experience and conversations with some of the biggest names in finance, his new book is a master class in investing. Venture capitalist and longtime Philadelphia-area philanthropist Richard Vague serves on the Penn Medicine board, is Chairman of the University of Pennsylvania Press, and is the president of the Philadelphia Live Arts and Fringe Festival. He is the author of The Next Economic Disaster: Why It's Coming and How to Avoid It and A Brief History of Doom: Two Hundred Years of Financial Crises. (recorded 11/28/2022)
11/30/202259 minutes, 4 seconds
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Patti Smith | A Book of Days

A couple of songs and stories from a memorable evening with Patti Smith and Tony Shanahan--and a great audience--at the library. (recorded 11/22/2022)
11/29/202217 minutes, 12 seconds
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Neal Gabler | Against The Wind: Edward Kennedy and the Rise of Conservatism, 1976-2009 with Patrick Kennedy

In conversation with former congressman Patrick Kennedy Neal Gabler is the author of Catching the Wind: Edward Kennedy and the Liberal Hour, a ''rich and insightful'' (The New York Times) account of the figure known as the most complex of the Kennedys. His other work includes An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood, Life the Movie: How Entertainment Conquered Reality, and award-winning biographies of Walt Disney and Walter Winchell. The former chief nonfiction judge for the National Book Awards, Gabler has earned a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Shorenstein Fellowship, and a Woodrow Wilson Public Policy Scholarship, among other honors. The second volume in his acclaimed biography of Ted Kennedy, Against the Wind follows the ''lion of the Senate'' as he works to safeguard progressive ideals and legislation during an era of conservative dominance. For 16 years Patrick J. Kennedy served Rhode Island's First Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he was the lead sponsor of the landmark Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. He also authored and co-sponsored dozens of bills aimed at treating neurological and psychiatric disorders and served on numerous committees and subcommittees, including the House Appropriations Committee, the Subcommittee on Labor, and the Subcommittee on Veterans Affairs. The founder of The Kennedy Forum, a nonprofit dedicated to transforming mental health and addiction care, Kennedy is also the founder of the parity rights advocacy group Don't Deny Me, the co-founder of the online learning platform Psych Hub, and is the co-chair of the Action Alliance's National Response to COVID-19, among many other public health groups. In 2015 he co-authored with Stephen Fried the New York Times bestseller A Common Struggle, a roadmap to health equity in the United States based on his personal and professional experiences. (recorded 11/21/2022)
11/23/20221 hour, 7 minutes, 19 seconds
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Kerri K. Greenidge | The Grimkes: The Legacy of Slavery in an American Family

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Historian Kerri K. Greenidge is the author of Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter, a portrait of the post-Reconstruction civil rights activist. A New York Times Critics Top Books of 2019, it won the 2020 Mark Lynton History Prize. Greenidge is a professor at Tufts University, where she is co-director of the African American Trail Project and the interim director of the American Studies program. Formerly a teacher at Boston University and the University of Massachusetts, she has conducted historical research for PBS, the Wiley-Blackwell Anthology of African American Literature, and the Oxford African American Studies Center. In her latest book, she offers a revealing counternarrative to the story of the famed abolitionist Grimke sisters that accounts for their long-ignored Black relatives. (recorded 11/16/2022)
11/18/202255 minutes, 52 seconds
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George Lakey | Dancing With History: A Life for Peace and Justice

In conversation with Varshini Prakash Active in grassroot campaigns for social change for more than seven decades, sociologist and Quaker organizer George Lakey was first arrested at a civil rights demonstration in 1963 and most recently arrested just last year during a march for climate justice. At 84, he only recently retired from Swarthmore College, where he was the Eugene M. Lang Visiting Professor for Issues of Social Change. He is the author of several books, including Viking Economics: How the Scandinavians Got It Right-and How We Can, Too; How We Win: A Guide to Nonviolent Direct Action Campaigning; and Are We Done Fighting?: Building Understanding in a World of Hate and Division, which he co-wrote with Matthew Legge. His many honors include the Peace Educator of the Year Award, the Paul Robeson Social Justice Award, and the Martin Luther King Peace Award. A memoir about the struggles and triumphs of a life spent on the front lines of social movements, Dancing with History tells the story of Lakey's singular life. Varshini Prakash is the executive director and co-founder of Sunrise, a youth-led political nonprofit dedicated to stopping climate change and electing leaders who promote environmental health for future generations. Named to the 2019 TIME 100 list and a co-winner of the 2019 Sierra Club John Muir Award, she is co-editor of the book Winning the Green New Deal: Why We Must, How We Can. Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Democracy Now, and The Washington Post, among other places. (recorded 11/15/2022)
11/16/202256 minutes, 46 seconds
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Ralph Macchio | Waxing On: The Karate Kid and Me

In conversation with Jason Freeman, author events producer and editor Ralph Macchio is best known for his portrayal of Daniel LaRusso in the 1984 film The Karate Kid. This iconic piece of pop culture has spawned a slew of sequels and the No. 1 ranked Netflix show Cobra Kai, and has entered such phrases as ''wax on, wax off'' and ''sweep the leg, Johnny'' into the cultural lexicon. Also acclaimed for his performances in Francis Ford Coppola's The Outsiders and the classic My Cousin Vinny, Macchio is a director and producer with a diverse list of credits. In his new memoir, he tells the stories of his relationships with beloved co-stars such as Noriyuki ''Pat'' Morita and William Zabka, the creation and enduring power of The Karate Kid, and how he keeps a Daniel-esque crane-kick balance in his personal life.  (recorded 11/10/2022)
11/15/202258 minutes, 49 seconds
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Rabia Chaudry | Fatty Fatty Boom Boom: A Memoir of Food, Fat, and Family

Attorney, advocate, and podcaster Rabia Chaudry is the author of the New York Times bestseller Adnan's Story, a true-crime analysis into the 2000 conviction of a young Baltimorean for the murder of his ex-girlfriend. Also the executive producer of The Case Against Adnan Syed, the HBO documentary series based on the book, Chaudry is the co-host and co-producer of the popular podcasts Undisclosed, The 45th, and The Hidden Djinn. In addition to earning fellowships from the Aspen Institute, the Truman National Security Project, and the Shalom Hartman Institute, she is the founder and president of the Safe Nation Collaborative, an organization that promotes education about the Islamic faith. In her new memoir, Chaudry tells an intimate story of body positivity, societal expectations, and growing up in a loving but overly concerned Pakistani immigrant family. (recorded 11/9/2022)
11/10/202248 minutes, 14 seconds
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John Banville | The Singularities

In conversation with Colum McCann ''The heir to Nabokov'' (The Sunday Telegraph), Irish novelist John Banville won the Man Booker Prize for The Sea, a story of loss and the fickle nature of memory. His many other novels include The Book of Evidence, Mrs. Osmond, The Untouchable, and April in Spain. He has earned the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the Irish PEN Award, the Franz Kafka Prize, and the Prince of Asturias Award, Spain's most prestigious literary honor. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, Banville is also an acclaimed playwright, nonfiction writer, screenwriter, and crime novelist. In The Singularities, a mysterious man with a borrowed name returns to the estate of his youth to find it occupied by the descendants of a famous but controversial scientist. Colum McCann won the 2009 National Book Award for Let the Great World Spin. His other novels include Song Dogs, This Side of Brightness, and the Man Booker Prize-shortlisted TransAtlantic . His most recent novel, Apeirogon, was a New York Times bestseller and won the Prix Montluc, the Elle Prize, and the Jewish National Book Award.The Thomas Hunter Writer in Residence at Hunter College in New York and the co-founder of the non-profit global story exchange organization Narrative 4, McCann has written for The New Yorker, Esquire, and the Paris Review, among other publications. (recorded 11/4/2022)
11/8/202251 minutes, 56 seconds
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Andrew K. Diemer | Vigilance: The Life of William Still, Father of the Underground Railroad

Andrew K. Diemer is the author of The Politics of Black Citizenship: Free African Americans in the Mid-Atlantic Borderland, 1817–1863, an examination of the ways in which free Black Philadelphians and Baltimoreans fought to defend their liberty before and during the Civil War. A history professor at Towson University, his articles and reviews have been published in the Journal of Military History, Slavery and Abolition, The Journal of the Civil War, and the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, among other publications. Diemer's latest book recounts the extraordinary life of William Still, a monumental but until-now relatively obscure Black abolitionist who devoted his life to conducting the crucial Philadelphia section of the Underground Railroad.    (recorded 11/3/2022)
11/7/202254 minutes, 6 seconds
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Anand Giridharadas | The Persuaders: At the Front Lines of the Fight for Hearts, Minds, and Democracy

Ellis Wachs Endowed Lecture In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition A former longtime columnist and foreign correspondent for The New York Times, Anand Giridharadas is the bestselling author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World, which was selected to numerous publications' ''best books of the year'' lists. His other books include The True American: Murder and Mercy in Texas, winner of the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism; and India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation's Remaking. A regular on-air analyst for MSNBC, he has taught journalism at New York University and contributed articles to The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and TIME magazine. In The Persuaders, Giridharadas offers insider accounts of the dissenting politicians, activists, and everyday citizens working to heal and safeguard U.S. democracy. (recorded 11/2/2022)
11/4/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 40 seconds
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Kardea Brown | The Way Home: A Celebration of Sea Islands Food and Family with over 100 Recipes

In conversation with Valerie Erwin Charleston, South Carolina–based Kardea Brown hosts the Food Network's Delicious Miss Brown and OWN's The Great Soul Food Cookoff. She also is the creator of the pop-up New Gullah Supper Club, where her cuisine pays homage to her grandmother's cooking and her Gullah/Geechee heritage, which describes a distinct African American group that has preserved much of its West African culture in the coastal areas of South Carolina and Georgia. She has also appeared on Beat Bobby Flay, Chopped Junior, and Family Food Showdown, among other culinary programs. In her first ever cookbook, Brown shares her multi-generational recipes for Low Country favorites, accentuated with helpful tips, family anecdotes, and beautiful photos. The longtime owner of the Low Country-inspired restaurant Geechee Girl, longtime Philly chef Valerie Erwin was also the general manager of the innovative EAT Café. These ventures have been featured in The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Magazine, and on The Food Network and NPR. She currently managers Farm to Families, a produce access program for children; serves on the board of C-CAP, a culinary scholarship program for high school students; and is a member of the board of the anti-homelessness organization Philadelphia Interfaith Hospitality Network. (recorded 11/1/2022)
11/2/202250 minutes
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Ross Gay | Inciting Joy: Essays with Major Jackson | A Beat Beyond: Selected Prose of Major Jackson

Ross Gay is the author of The Book of Delights, a life-affirming collection of short lyric essays that reminds readers to appreciate so-called ordinary wonders, even during turbulent times. His several volumes of poetry include Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; Be Holding, winner of the 2021 PEN America Jean Stein Book Award; and Bringing the Shovel Down. A writing professor at Indiana University, Gay has earned fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Bread Loaf Writer's Conference, and Cave Canem. Inciting Joy explores the ways that people can inspire love and compassion by recognizing that which unites us. Major Jackson is the Richard Dennis Green and Gold Professor at the University of Vermont, a core faculty member of the Bennington Writing Seminars, and the poetry editor of the Harvard Review. He is the author of five books of poetry, including The Absurd Man, Holding Company, and Leaving Saturn, and his work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Ploughshares, among numerous other periodicals and journals. Jackson's many honors include the Cave Canem Poetry Prize, a Whiting Writers' Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. A Beat Beyond is a collection of essays, interviews, and notes that delve into the intellectual and spiritual aspects of poetry in order to understand its political, social, and emotional functions. (recorded 10/27/2022)
10/31/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 32 seconds
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Stacy Schiff | The Revolutionary: Samuel Adams

In conversation with award-winning journalist and broadcaster Tracey Matisak Acclaimed for her ''balanced, perceptive, thoroughly researched and exceptionally well written'' (The New Yorker) nonfiction portraits of historical figures, Stacy Schiff won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for her biography Vera (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov), a narrative of the 52-year marriage of the legendary writer and his even more vivid wife. She is also the author of A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America; the Pulitzer Prize finalist Saint-Exupéry; Cleopatra: A Life; and The Witches: Salem, 1692. Her other honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Schiff's latest book examines Samuel Adams' transformation from the idle son of a wealthy U.S. colonial family to one of the Revolutionary War's significant firebrands. (recorded 10/26/2022)
10/28/202258 minutes, 9 seconds
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Maggie Haberman | Confidence Man: The Making of Donald Trump and the Breaking of America

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Maggie Haberman was part of a team that won a 2018 Pulitzer Prize for its reportage of the investigations into then-President Donald Trump's, and his advisers', connections to Russia. She has also twice been part of a Pulitzer Prize finalist team: in 2021 for reporting on the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus pandemic and in 2022 for reporting on the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. A former political reporter for Politico, The New York Post, and The New York Daily News, she became a CNN political analyst in 2014. In Confidence Man, Haberman uses hundreds of sources and interviews-including many with Trump himself-to offer a definitive account of the former Oval Office occupant's chaotic campaigns, tumultuous term in office, and tortured post-presidency. (recorded 10/25/2022)
10/27/202252 minutes, 24 seconds
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Charlayne Hunter-Gault | My People: Five Decades of Writing about Black Lives

In conversation with Dorothy Roberts Referred to by Jelani Cobb as ''a Dean of American journalism,'' Charlayne Hunter-Gault has chronicled some of the past half-century's most important moments in Black life, culture, and politics. Often the only Black woman in the newsroom, she wrote for The New Yorker and The New York Times, where in 1968 she established the paper's Harlem bureau. Also a broadcast journalist, Hunter-Gault served as a reporter and anchor for PBS's McNeil-Lehrer Newshour, NPR's chief Africa correspondent, and the South Africa bureau chief for CNN. Her many honors include two Emmy Awards, two Peabody Awards, and honors from the National Urban coalition and the National Association of Black Journalists. Ranging from the Civil Rights Movement to Barack Obama's presidential election, My People is a definitive compilation of reportage and commentary that explores the Black American experience.  Dorothy Roberts is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School. She is also founding director of the Penn Program on Race, Science & Society in the Center for Africana Studies and the author of several books that focus on health, social justice, and bioethics. Her most recent book is Torn Apart: How the Child Welfare System Destroys Black Families-and How Abolition Can Build a Safer World. (recorded 10/24/2022)
10/26/202255 minutes, 21 seconds
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Orhan Pamuk | Nights of Plague

In conversation with Laura McGrath, Assistant Professor of English at Temple University The winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature, Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk ''is one of the great novelists of his generation'' (The Washington Post). Characterized by examinations of identity, tensions between the East and West, modernism's clash with tradition, and a fascination with the creative arts, his novels-translated into more than 60 languages-include The New Life, Snow, The Museum of Innocence, A Strangeness in My Mind, and My Name is Red, winner of the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Pamuk is also the author of several works of nonfiction, essays, memoirs, and screenplays. Part detective story, part historical epic, part contemporary political parable, Nights of Plague follows the efforts of the residents of a fictional island belonging to the Ottoman Empire to halt the spread of a deadly illness. (recorded 10/20/2022)
10/25/202258 minutes, 24 seconds
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Tom Felton | Beyond the Wand: The Magic and Mayhem of Growing Up a Wizard

Tom Felton became internationally famous for his role as the bleach-blond bad guy Draco Malfoy in the Harry Potter movie series. More than a decade after the premiere of the last film in the series, he and the other performers continue to cast a spell over fans around the world as an enduring pop culture phenomenon. Before his villainous turn at Hogwarts, he acted in such beloved films as The Borrowers and Anna and the King, and has followed up on his success in the wizarding world with roles in Rise of the Planet of the Apes, Belle, The Flash, and The Forgotten Battle, among many other film and television projects. This year he made his West End theater debut in 2:22 A Ghost Story. In Beyond the Wand, Felton reflects on the highs and lows of navigating fame at a young age, living as a normal teenager through it all, and the lasting friendships he enjoys with his Harry Potter co-stars. (recorded 10/19/2022)
10/21/202259 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ada Limón | The Hurting Kind

The 24th United States Poet Laureate, Ada Limón is acclaimed for her explorations of the ''frightening mysteries and hopeful uncertainties of the everyday'' (The New York Times Book Review). Her many poetry collections include the National Book Critics Circle Award winner The Carrying; Bright Dead Things, a finalist for the National Book Award; and Big Fake World, winner of the Pearl Poetry Prize. The host of American Public Media's podcast The Slowdown, Limón has contributed poems to The New Yorker, American Poetry Review, and the Harvard Review, among many other publications. The Hurting Kind is a collection of verse that ponders the filaments of joy, loss, and hope that connect us all. (recorded 10/17/2022)
10/20/202257 minutes, 16 seconds
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Anna Badkhen | Bright Unbearable Reality: Essays

In conversation with Airea D. Matthews, Philadelphia Poet Laureate and Co-Director of the Creative Writing Program at Bryn Mawr With an artist's perspective and a ground-level view of people in extremis across the world, writer Anna Badkhen offers ''rich and lucid prose [that] illustrates her journey as vividly as might a series of photographs'' (Christian Science Monitor). Her immersive investigations of the world's inequities have yielded seven books of nonfiction, including The World Is a Carpet: Four Seasons in an Afghan Village; Walking with Abel: Journeys with the Nomads of the African Savannah; and Fisherman's Blues: A West African Community at Sea. A contributor to Foreign Policy, The New York Times, and The New Republic, she has earned a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Barry Lopez Visiting Writer in Ethics and Community Fellowship, and the Joel R. Seldin Award for documenting the lives of civilians in warzones. In Bright Unbearable Reality, Badkhen offers 11 essays set across four continents that explore the human need for communion amidst the world's current emotional and political disruptions.  Airea D. Matthews is the Philadelphia Poet Laureate and Co-Director of the Creative Writing Program at Bryn Mawr College. Her collection Simulacra won the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and her work has appeared in Callaloo, Harvard Review, and American Poets, among other journals. The recipient of a 2022 Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship, her latest collection, Bread and Circus, comes out next year. (recorded 10/18/2022)
10/20/202256 minutes, 30 seconds
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Reza Aslan | An American Martyr in Persia: The Epic Life and Tragic Death of Howard Baskerville

Religion scholar Reza Aslan is the author of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller Zealot, ''a lucid, intelligent page-turner'' (Los Angeles Times) that sifts through centuries of mythmaking to present a clear account of the life and times of Jesus of Nazareth. His other books include No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam, a finalist for the Guardian First Book Award and selected as the best book of the year by the Financial Times and the Los Angeles Times; How to Win a Cosmic War: Confronting Radical Religions; and Beyond Fundamentalism: Confronting Religious Extremism in a Globalized Age. His new book recounts the story of a U.S. missionary who fought for democracy in early 20th century Iran. (recorded 10/13/2022)
10/18/202259 minutes, 29 seconds
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Saidiya Hartman and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor| Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America

One of academia's leading authorities on African American literature, enslavement, gender studies, and the ways in which marginalized people are excluded in historical narratives, Saidiya Hartman is a University Professor at Columbia University. Her works include Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Riotous Black Girls, Troublesome Women, and Queer Radicals; Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route; and numerous essays on feminism, film, and photography. Currently a member of the editorial board at Callaloo and a MacArthur fellow, Hartman has earned Fulbright, Rockefeller, and Guggenheim fellowships. A revised and updated edition of her ''audacious'' and ''provocative'' (The Nation) 1997 historical exploration of the lives of several Black women in Harlem and Philadelphia in the 1890s, Scenes of Subjection seeks to turn away from the ''terrible spectacle'' and toward the forms of routine terror and quotidian violence characteristic of slavery, illuminating the intertwining of injury, subjugation, and selfhood even in abolitionist depictions of enslavement. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is the Leon Forrest Professor of African American Studies at Northwestern University. Formerly a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University for eight years, her books include From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, How We Get Free, and Race for Profit, a finalist for the 2020 Pulitzer Prize in history. Taylor has been named one of the hundred most influential African Americans in the United States by The Root and Essence Magazine named her among the top one hundred ''change makers'' in the county. She has been appointed as a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians by the Organization of American Historians.A guest on such outlets as Democracy Now!, The Intercept, and All Things Considered, she has contributed opinion pieces to The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Paris Review, among many other periodicals. (recorded 10/12/2022)
10/17/202251 minutes, 24 seconds
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Yiyun Li | The Book of Goose with Elizabeth McCracken | The Hero of this Book

Yiyun Li's ''remarkable'' (The Washington Post) debut fiction collection, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, won the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the Guardian First Book Award. Her other work includes the novel The Vagrants, the story collection Gold Boy, Emerald Girl, and the memoir Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Windham-Campbell Prize, Li teaches writing at Princeton University and is a contributing editor for A Public Space. A story of obsession and friendship, her new novel follows a woman's mental journey back to the war-ravaged French village of her youth. Acclaimed for their ''moments of joy and pure magic'' (Los Angeles Times), Elizabeth McCracken's seven books include Bowlaway, The Giant's House, Thunderstruck & Other Stories, and The Souvenir Museum, a story collection that was longlisted for the National Book Award. A former faculty member at the Iowa Writers' Workshop and currently the James Michener Chair for Fiction at the University of Texas at Austin, McCracken has earned the PEN New England Award, three Pushcart Prizes, and an O. Henry Prize, among other honors. Her latest novel finds a woman wrestling with grief, history, and her craft as she takes a trip to her recently departed mother's favorite city. (recorded 10/6/2022)
10/11/202253 minutes, 58 seconds
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Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan | Mad Honey

In conversation with Jo Piazza A ''quite prescient and worthwhile'' writer who ''understands her characters inside and out'' (The New York Times Book Review), Jodi Picoult has authored many No. 1 bestsellers that are renowned for combining controversial topics with nuanced characters and precise descriptions of suburbia's fraught reality. Her 28 novels include House Rules, Handle with Care, Wish You Were Here, Nineteen Minutes, My Sister's Keeper, and Small Great Things, as well as the young adult novel Between the Lines, co-written with her daughter, Samantha van Leer. The author of more than a dozen books, Jennifer Finney Boylan achieved great literary success in 2003 with her critically acclaimed memoir She's Not There, the first bestselling book by a transgender American. Her other works include You Are You, Long Black Veil, and I'm Looking Through You, a memoir about her upbringing in a dilapidated mansion on Philadelphia's Main Line. Currently the inaugural Anna Quindlen Writer-in-Residence at Barnard College of Columbia University, a fellow at Harvard University's Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and a trustee of PEN America, Boylan is a former longtime national co-chair of GLAAD. In their first collaborative novel, Picoult and Boylan tell the story of a woman who flees with her son to her sleepy New Hampshire hometown only to face the possibility that the teenager shares his father's explosive tendencies. (recorded 10/5/2022)
10/7/20221 hour, 1 minute, 33 seconds
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Vladimir Sorokin and Max Lawton | Telluria and Their Four Hearts

In conversation with Mark Krotov, publisher and editor of n+1  Vladimir Sorokin is one of contemporary Russian literature's most popular writers. Banned by the Soviet Union, his numerous novels include The Queue, The Blizzard, Day of the Oprichnik, and the controversial Blue Lard. His work also includes several screenplays, plays, short story collections, art exhibitions, and an opera libretto, and his writing has been translated into more than 30 languages. The subject of a 2019 documentary and famed for his outspoken criticism of Vladimir Putin's government, Sorokin has earned an O. Henry Award, the Andrei Bely Award for outstanding contributions to Russian literature, and a nomination for the Russian Booker Prize. His latest novel, Telluria, imagines a fractured future in which a holy war between Europe and Islam has sent the world spiraling into a state of feudalism and disarray. Max Lawton has translated eight of Sorokin's novels and has translated his stories for n+1 and The New Yorker. The recipient of the prestigious Clarendon Scholarship for the University of Oxford, he is also a novelist and musician. (recorded 10/3/2022)
10/4/202248 minutes, 34 seconds
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Margaret A. Burnham | By Hands Now Known: Jim Crow's Legal Executioners

In conversation with Tracey Matisak Margaret A. Burnham is the founding director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project, an initiative to document every racially motivated killing in the South between 1930 and 1970. Also a law professor at Northeastern University and confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve on the Civil Rights Cold Case Records Review Board, she formerly worked as a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, as a staffer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and as a judge in the Boston Municipal Court. In By Hands Now Known, Burnham expands her analysis of the astonishing violence of the Jim Crow era to investigate the legal apparatus that held up this infamously cruel system and its still-reverberating legacy. (recorded 9/29/2022)
10/3/202256 minutes, 33 seconds
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Camika Royal | Not Paved For Us: Black Educators and Public School Reform in Philadelphia

In conversation with Edwin Mayorga and Sharif El-Mekki  For 20 years Camika Royal was a middle and high school teacher and a teaching coach for her fellow educators in Baltimore, Washington, DC, and her hometown of Philadelphia. Currently an associate professor of urban education at Loyola University Maryland, she examines the racial, historical, and sociopolitical contexts of school reform ideologies, policies, and practices. A sought-after speaker and education consultant, she taught at Lincoln University of Pennsylvania and other colleges and universities in the Philadelphia and Baltimore areas.    Associate Professor in Swarthmore College's Department of Educational Studies and the Program in Latin American and Latino Studies, Edwin Mayorga is the founder of the Education in Our Barrios Project (BarrioEdProject) research study and after school club, and the Philadelphia Community, School and College Partnership Research Project. The co-editor of What's Race Got to do With It?: How Current School Reform Policy Maintains Racial and Economic Equality, he is the recipient of several research grants and fellowships.   The Director of the Center for Black Educator Development, Sharif El-Mekki has served as an administrator and teacher in Philadelphia schools for nearly three decades. The co-creator of The Fellowship-Black Male Educators for Social Justice, he was a 2013 U.S. Department of Education Principal Fellow Ambassador and an America Achieves Fellow. His other projects include Philly's 7th Ward blog and the 8 Black Hands podcast. (recorded 9/28/2022)
9/30/202253 minutes, 23 seconds
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Ben Macintyre | Prisoners of the Castle: An Epic Story of Survival and Escape from Colditz, the Nazis' Fortress Prison

Meelya Gordon Memorial Lecture ''John le Carré's nonfiction counterpart'' (The New York Times), Ben Macintyre is the bestselling author of A Spy Among Friends, Agent Zigzag, Operation Mincemeat, and The Spy and the Traitor, among other books. He has adapted several of these stories into popular documentaries for the BBC. Writer-at-large for The Times of London, Macintyre is the recipient of the Spears Book Award, has twice been nominated for the Edgar Award in best fact crime, and was shortlisted for Baillie Gifford Prize. Prisoners of the Castle recounts the harrowing story of the infamous Colditz Castle prison, wherein the Nazi's held some of WWII's most diverse, defiant, and resourceful Allied soldiers. (recorded 9/27/2022)
9/29/202259 minutes, 19 seconds
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Tommie Smith, Derrick Barnes, Dawud Anyabwile | Victory. Stand! Raising My Fist for Justice

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning broadcaster and journalist Tommie Smith and John Carlos made history at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics when they stood at the winners' podium and raised their black-gloved fists to protest racial injustice in the United States. Smith, gold medalist in the 200-meter sprint, and Carlos, the bronze medal winner, were forced to leave the games and faced a swift and brutal backlash at home. In his illustrated memoir for young readers, Smith tells the story of his rural Texas childhood, early career, Olympic victory, and internationally famous protest. In addition to his Olympic gold medal, Tommie Smith held the record for the 200-meter sprint for more than 44 years, held an additional six running world records, won the 1966 NCAA Men's Outdoor Track and Field Championship, and was drafted into the NFL. The author of the memoir Silent Gesture, he coached track and taught sociology at Oberlin College. Smith is an inductee to the United States National Track and Field Hall of Fame and the California Black Sports Hall of Fame. Derrick Barnes is the author of more than a dozen bestselling children's books that celebrate African American culture, including The Making of Dr. Truelove, Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut, and the Ruby and the Booker Boys series. He has been honored with a Newbery Award and a Coretta Scott King Award Emmy Award–-winning illustrator Dawud Anyabwile designed storyboards for Cartoon Network, TBS, TNT, and Boomerang. He illustrated the graphic novel adaptation of Walter Dean Myers' book Monster and is the illustrator of the Brotherman: Dictator of Discipline comic series, among numerous other projects. His many other honors include an Eisner Award and a Glyph Comics Award. (recorded 9/23/2022)
9/28/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ruth Wilson Gilmore | Abolition Geography: Essays Towards Liberation

In conversation with Chenjerai Kumanyika Ruth Wilson Gilmore is largely credited with creating carceral geography, the study of how the interplay between space, institutions, and political economies shape modern incarceration. The author of Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California and several often-anthologized essays, she is the co-founder of several social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project and Critical Resistance. She is a professor of earth and environmental sciences and American studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where she is also director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics. Gilmore's many honors include the Angela Y. Davis Prize for Public Scholarship from the American Studies Association and the Association of American Geographers' Harold Rose Award for Anti-Racist Research. A collection of Gilmore's work from the last three decades, Abolition Geography offers scholars, activists, and all interested people a new way of reacting to the incarceration crisis. (recorded 9/22/2022)
9/27/20221 hour, 6 minutes, 20 seconds
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Ian McEwan | Lessons

In conversation with Wesley Stace ''The most psychologically astute writer working today, our era's Jane Austen'' (Esquire), Ian McEwan won the Booker Prize for his novel Amsterdam. His 16 other novels include Atonement, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and later adapted into an acclaimed Oscar-nominated film; The Comfort of Strangers and Black Dogs, both Booker Prize finalists; and Nutshell. McEwan's other work includes two children's books, a work of nonfiction, two plays, five screenplays, and four short story collections, including First Love, Last Rites, winner of the Somerset Maugham Award. His new novel tells the story of a man careening through some of the 20th century's most turbulent events as he searches for answers about his family history. (recorded 9/21/2022)
9/26/202258 minutes, 28 seconds
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Douglas Rushkoff | Survival of the Richest: Escape Fantasies of the Tech Billionaires

In conversation with Kevin Werbach Acclaimed for their intersectional explorations of cyberculture, religion, currency, and politics, Douglas Rushkoff's 20 bestselling books include Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus, Program or Be Programmed, Present Shock, and Media Virus. He also is the host of the Team Human podcast, writes a column for Medium, and created the PBS Frontline documentaries Generation Like, The Persuaders, and Merchants of Cool. A professor of media theory and digital economics at City University of New York, Queens College, he was selected as one of the world's 10 most influential intellectuals by MIT, was the first winner of the Neil Postman Award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity, is a recipient of the Marshall McLuhan Award, and has received many other accolades. In Survival of the Richest, Rushkoff reveals the flawed mindset that has led out-of-touch tech titans to prepare for a societal catastrophe they could simply avert through practical measures. Chair of the Department of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, Ken Werbach is the author of For the Win: How Game Thinking Can Revolutionize Your Business and The Blockchain and the New Architecture of Trust. He served on the Obama administration's presidential transition team and helped develop the Federal Communications Commission's approach to internet policy. (recorded 9/20/2022)
9/26/202258 minutes, 26 seconds
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Jann Wenner | Like a Rolling Stone: A Memoir

In conversation with David Fricke, senior editor for Rolling Stone and SiriusXM host The co-founder, co-editor, and publisher of Rolling Stone, Jann Wenner has influenced the ways in which the world perceives music, politics, and pop culture for nearly 50 years. Also the founder and publisher of Outside, US Weekly, Family Life, and Men's Journal, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the American Society of Magazine Editor's Hall of Fame. Praised by Bruce Springsteen as ''a touchingly honest memoir from a man who recorded and shaped our times and of a grand life well lived,'' Like A Rolling Stone tells the story of Wenner's life and generation as it charts his association with rock stars, journalists, artists, politicians, and thought leaders. (recorded 9/15/2022)
9/21/202259 minutes, 31 seconds
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Gary Shteyngart | Our Country Friends

In conversation with Laura McGrath, Assistant Professor of English at Temple University ''Quirky and often darkly hilarious'' (Mother Jones), Gary Shteyngart is the author of the culturally reflective novels The Russian Debutante's Handbook, winner of the Stephen Crane Award for First Fiction; Absurdistan, named a ''best book of the year'' by slews of periodicals; the New York Times bestseller Super Sad True Love Story; and Lake Success, a critically acclaimed satire of the emptiness of materialism. His other work includes the National Book Critics Award finalist Little Failure, a memoir of his experiences in the dramatically dissimilar worlds of uber-consumerist America and the perpetually deprived Soviet Union of his youth. Shteyngart has contributed articles and essays to Esquire, GQ, and The New Yorker, and his work has been translated into more than 20 languages. In his latest novel, a group of friends navigates the rocky shoals of love, betrayal, and K-pop while in pandemic lockdown. (recorded 9/13/2022)
9/20/202257 minutes, 14 seconds
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Buzz Bissinger | The Mosquito Bowl: A Game of Life and Death in World War II

In conversation with Mark Bowden A Pulitzer Prize–-winning journalist and author of four books, Buzz Bissinger is perhaps best known for the New York Times bestseller Friday Night Lights, the 1990 nonfiction chronicle of a Texas high school football team that has since been adapted into a successful film and a long-running television series. His other popular books include 3 Nights in August, A Prayer for the City, and Father's Day, a memoir about his cross-country journey with his extraordinary son. A contributing editor for Vanity Fair and a sports columnist for The Daily Beast, Bissinger is a longtime contributor to The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and The Philadelphia Inquirer, among other periodicals. The Mosquito Bowl tells the story of two United States Marine regiments that play a bloody game of football on the eve of the WWII invasion of Okinawa, a battle from which many of the players would not return. Renowned for his ''signature blend of deep reportage and character-driven storytelling (The New York Times Book Review),'' Mark Bowden is the author of 15 bestselling books of investigative journalism, including Blackhawk Down, adapted by Ridley Scott into a popular film; Killing Pablo, winner of the Overseas Press Club's Cornelius Ryan Award for book of the year; The Three Battles of Wanat, a collection of his best long-form essays; and Hue 1968, the story of the Vietnam War's bloodiest battle as told by participants from both sides.  (recorded 9/14/2022)
9/20/20221 hour, 5 seconds
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Jenifer Lewis | Walking in My Joy: In these Streets

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award-winning journalist and interviewer Co-star of the ABC mega-hit show Black-ish, Jenifer Lewis' nearly 35-year career has featured roles in some of Hollywood's most beloved films and television shows. These include such diverse projects as What's Love Got to Do With It, Pixar's Cars series, and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, among dozens of others. Titled after her unofficial nickname, her memoir The Mother of Black Hollywood charts her journey from a childhood of poverty in the Midwest to the acting roles that have made her an icon. Lewis earned two Critics' Choice Television Award nominations for her work on Black-ish and her previous work has garnered an NAACP Image Award. Walking in My Joy is an essay collection that celebrates the importance of perseverance in the face of adversity and our need for self-love. (recorded 9/12/2022)
9/19/20221 hour, 6 minutes, 10 seconds
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Adam Schiff | Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost Our Democracy and Still Could

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning journalist and broadcaster The United States Representative for California's 28th Congressional District and the Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Adam Schiff was the lead manager for the first impeachment proceedings against former President Donald Trump. He is a former member of the House Appropriations Committee and the Foreign Affairs Committee, and served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in Los Angeles from 1987 to 1993 and a California State Senator from 1996 to 2000. In Midnight in Washington, Schiff reveals an inside look at American democracy's darkest moment, his own path to becoming one of the former president's most prominent antagonists, and the principles we need to renew and reinvigorate in the struggle against autocracy. (recorded 8/29/2022)
8/30/202258 minutes, 10 seconds
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W. Kamau Bell with Kate Schatz | Do the Work!: An Antiracist Activity Book

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill W. Kamau Bell is the host and executive producer of the Emmy Award–winning CNN docuseries United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell, and also directed and executive produced the recent four-part Showtime documentary We Need To Talk About Cosby. He has appeared as a guest and comedian on many television shows, has two comedy specials, hosts the radio show Kamau Right Now, co-hosts two podcasts, and hosted the FXX series Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell. The author of the memoir The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell, he has contributed writing to The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The Hollywood Reporter, and The LA Review of Books, among other places. Kate Schatz is the author of The New York Times bestselling Rad Women book series. Her other books include the work of fiction Rid of Me, articles and essays in an array of publications, and ''Folsom, Survivor,'' which was anthologized in The Best American Short Stories 2011. A political organizer and frequent public speaker, she is the co-founder of Solidarity Sundays, a nationwide network of more than 200 feminist activist groups. Schatz is the former chair of the School of Literary Arts at the Oakland School for the Arts, and she taught women's studies, literature, and creative writing at University of California, Santa Cruz; San Jose State; Rhode Island College; and Brown University. Filled with activities, ideas, games, illustrations, resources, comics, and prompts for conversations, Do the Work! challenges readers and the people in their lives to better understand systemic racism in order to dismantle it. (recorded 8/3/2022)
8/10/202256 minutes, 43 seconds
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Brian Westbrook Sr. and Lesley Van Arsdall | The Mouse Who Played Football

In their illustrated children's book, Brian Westbrook Sr. and Lesley Van Arsdall tell the story of a determined little critter named Brian who overcomes his small size to become a star in the Mouse Football League. Brian Westbrook, Sr. played nine seasons in the NFL, including eight seasons with the Philadelphia Eagles. He was a two-time Pro-Bowl running back and was named first team All-Pro after the 2007 season, in which he led the league with over 2,000 yards from scrimmage. He now makes regular broadcast appearances in addition to his charity work with the Brian Westbrook Foundation and speaking engagements. Lesley Van Arsdall is a seasoned TV news veteran who has covered Philadelphia sports, local and headline news as both an anchor and a reporter. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, she lives outside Philadelphia with her husband and two sons. This is her first children's book. (recorded 8/4/2022)
8/4/202236 minutes, 3 seconds
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Michael Pollan | This is Your Mind on Plants

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition One of the world's foremost chroniclers of the intersection of the human and natural worlds, Michael Pollan is a No. 1 New York Times bestselling author of eight books. These works include How to Change Your Mind, an examination of the science of psychedelics; Cooked, which was adapted into a Netflix series; Food Rules: An Eater's Manual; and A Natural History of Four Meals, which won the James Beard Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. A contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine for 35 years, Pollan has earned two James Beard Awards, the Reuters-I.U.C.N. 2000 Global Award for Environmental Journalism, and the Genesis Award from the Humane Society of the United States, among numerous other honors. He is the co-founder of the UC Berkeley Center for the Science of Psychedelics and is the Knight Professor of Science and Journalism at UC Berkeley. A challenge to rethink traditional notions of drugs, This Is Your Mind on Plants explores the allure, taboos, and effects of three very different psychoactive plants. (recorded 7/18/2022)
7/31/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 35 seconds
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Mark Leibovich | Thank You for Your Servitude: Donald Trump's Washington and the Price of Submission

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning broadcaster and journalist Mark Leibovich's books include the No. 1 bestseller This Town, a ''vastly entertaining and deeply troubling'' (The New York Times Book Review) exploration of the political culture in Washington, D.C.; and Big Game, a beyond-the-playing-field analysis of professional football at its precarious economic and social peak. Former chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and a former correspondent for The Washington Post, Leibovich recently joined The Atlantic as a staff writer and is a contributing political analyst for NBC and MSNBC. He won the 2011 National Magazine Award for his profile of journalist Mike Allen. A sequel to This Town, Thank You for Your Servitude is a no-holds-barred account of Donald Trump's collaboration with the Republican Party to transform the once-proud party into a cult of personality mired in corruption and anti-democratic values. (recorded 7/26/2022)
7/29/202259 minutes, 29 seconds
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Patience Marime-Ball and Ruth Shaber | The XX Edge: Unlocking Higher Returns and Lower Risk

In conversation with Renée Chenault Fattah In The XX Edge, Patience Marime-Ball and Ruth Shaber envision a new paradigm of gender-focused investing where more women are placed in decision-making roles and able to optimize their skills across all capital markets-leading to higher returns for individual investors and greater economic growth. Patience Marime-Ball is the founder and CEO of Women of the World Endowment, an investment nonprofit focused on centralizing women changemakers as economic, environmental, and social changemakers while delivering market-rate, risk adjusted returns and impact at scale. She has more than two and half decades of investment experience across capital markets – including debt and equity financing, large scale infrastructure, distressed assets, as well as venture stage opportunities. Patience has led many ''firsts'' in the investing space; she developed the Banking on Women platform at the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and was responsible for co-designing IFC's multi-billion dollar Global Trade Liquidity Program, as well as the first-ever gender bond issued on the Uridashi market. Ruth Shaber is the founder and president of the Tara Health Foundation, a nonprofit organization that promotes and invests in programs aimed at health, well-being, and opportunities for women and girls. She is also the co-founder and board chair of Rhia Ventures, a group of foundations and investors devoted to reproductive health in the United States, and was a gynecologist and obstetrician at Kaiser Permanente for 22 years. Selected as a Forbes 2020 Impact 50: Investors Seeking Profit-and Pushing for Change for her work in impact investing, Shaber, is also the founder of the Women's Health Research Institute. A former longtime co-anchor of the WCAU NBC 10 News, Renée Chenault Fattah also worked at several other stations across the country and as a lawyer at the New York firm of Hughes Hubbard & Reed. She serves on the board of directors of Philadelphia Lawyers for Social Equity and on the board of trustees of Johns Hopkins University, and in 2020 was inducted into the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia Hall of Fame. (recorded 7/20/2022)
7/21/20221 hour, 35 seconds
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Diane McKinney-Whetstone | Our Gen

Acclaimed for crafting ''sharply drawn characters, exuberant prose,'' and ''plenty of period detail'' (Los Angeles Times Book Review), Diane McKinney-Whetstone is the author of six novels, including Tumbling, Tempest Rising, Trading Dreams at Midnight, and Lazaretto, a historical novel set in a legendary 19th-century Philadelphia quarantine hospital. A two-time recipient of the American Library Association Black Caucus Literary Award for fiction and winner of a Zora Neale Hurston Society Award, she taught creative writing at the University of Pennsylvania for 12 years and has contributed writing to The Atlantic, Essence, and Philadelphia Magazine. In Our Gen, McKinney-Whetstone follows the residents of a Philadelphia-area active-living retirement community who revert to the passions and excesses of their youth. (recorded 7/19/2022)
7/20/202246 minutes, 18 seconds
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Malcolm Nance | They Want to Kill Americans: The Militias, Terrorists, and Deranged Ideology of the Trump Insurgency

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill A world-renowned counterterrorism expert and former career intelligence officer who has deployed in the Balkans, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa, Malcolm Nance is a longtime consultant for the U.S. government's Special Operations and Homeland Security agencies. His New York Times bestselling books include The Plot to Hack America, Hacking Isis, The Plot to Betray America, and Defeating ISIS. The founder and executive director of the think tank Terror Asymmetrics Project on Strategy, Tactics and Radical Ideologies, he is a frequent commentator on MSNBC. In They Want to Kill Americans, Nance describes the existential threat to democracy posed by Donald Trump, his collaborators, and their followers. The Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions at Temple University, Marc Lamont Hill is the host of BET News and the Coffee and Books podcast. The recipient of honors from the National Association of Black Journalists, GLAAD, and the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, he is the author of six books, including Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life; Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond; and Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics. (recorded 7/14/2022)
7/15/20221 hour, 5 minutes, 31 seconds
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Alice Elliott Dark | Fellowship Point

In conversation with Beth Kephart Alice Elliott Dark is the author of the critically acclaimed novel Think of England and the short story collections In the Gloaming and Naked to the Waist. Her stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in The New York Times, Ploughshares, and The New Yorker, and her story ''In the Gloaming'' has twice been adapted into feature films. A writing professor in Rutgers University-Newark's MFA program, Dark has earned a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, an O. Henry Award, and inclusion in several literary anthologies. A novel about friendship, class differences, and societal expectations for women, Fellowship Point tells the story of a a delicate but devastating rift between two lifelong friends. Beth Kephart is the author of more than 30 books across a wide range of genres, including Going Over, Handling the Truth: On the Writing of Memoir, and most recently Wife | Daughter | Self. A writing professor at the University of Pennsylvania, she is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant, a Pew Fellowship, and the Speakeasy Poetry Prize, among other honors. (recorded 7/13/2022)
7/14/202251 minutes, 23 seconds
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Chinelo Okparanta | Harry Sylvester Bird

In conversation with Asali Solomon Nigerian American author Chinelo Okparanta's acclaimed debut novel Under the Udala Trees celebrates the act of loving fearlessly, even amidst the strife of prejudice and civil war. Selected for more than a dozen periodicals' 2015 ''best of'' lists, it won a Lambda Literary Award, was a finalist for the International Dublin Literary Award, and was nominated for an NAACP Image Award in fiction. Okparanta is also the author of the short story collection Happiness, Like Water, winner of an O. Henry Prize, and a finalist for the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award and the Etisalat Prize for Literature. The director of the creative writing program at Swarthmore College, she has published fiction in various publications, including The New Yorker, Granta, and Tin House. Her latest novel delves into a young white man's journey from his prejudiced smalltown to a life of freedom in New York City. Asali Solomon is the author of the novels The Days of Afrekete and Disgruntled, the short story collection Get Down, and stories published in a wide array of periodicals, including McSweeney's, Essence, and O, The Oprah Magazine. A professor of fiction writing and literature of the African diaspora at Haverford College, she is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award and the National Book Foundation's ''5 Under 35'' honor.  (recorded 7/12/2022)
7/13/202250 minutes, 51 seconds
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Patrick Radden Keefe | Rogues: True Stories of Grifters, Killers, Rebels and Crooks

In conversation with Karen Heller, national features writer for The Washington Post, formerly a metro and features columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, and a finalist for the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in commentary. ''A master of narrative nonfiction'' (Rolling Stone), Patrick Radden Keefe is the author of the New York Times bestseller Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty. A critical history of the family responsible for making and marketing painkillers that led to the opioid crisis, it won the 2021 Baillie Gifford Prize and was a National Book Critics Circle nominee. Keefe is also an award-winning staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of three other books, including the National Book Critics Circle Award winner Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland. His other honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship and the National Magazine Award for feature writing. He wrote and hosted the podcast Wind of Change, selected as the No. 1 podcast of 2020 by The Guardian. Writing about disreputable figures such as wine counterfeiters, arms dealers selling weapons illegally, and Swiss money launderers, Rogues is a collection of 12 of Keefe's New Yorker articles about corruption, fraud, and power. (recorded 6/29/2022)
7/1/202259 minutes
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Valerie Biden Owens | Growing Up Biden: A Memoir

Meelya Gordon Memorial Lecture In conversation with Marjorie Margolies, President, Women's Campaign International and author of And How Are the Children?: Timeless Lessons from the Frontlines of Motherhood The younger sister of President Joe Biden, Valerie Biden Owens led his seven consecutive successful campaigns for the U.S. Senate, was campaign manager for his presidential bids in 1988 and 2008, and was his principal campaign trail representative and a senior advisor for his 2020 bid for the White House. She is the chair of the Biden Institute at the University of Delaware, a partner at Owens Patrick Leadership Seminars, a board member of The Ministry of Caring, and formerly served on the national board of the Women's Leadership Forum of the Democratic National Committee. In her new memoir, Biden Owens shares stories of growing up in a close-knit Irish Catholic family, being a confidante and advocate in her brother's life and career, and learning lessons about overcoming gender barriers and achieving professional goals while raising children. (recorded 6/28/2022)
6/29/202250 minutes, 34 seconds
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Hugh Ryan | The Women's House of Detention: A Queer History of a Forgotten Prison

In conversation with Sayeeda Rashid, Director of the Center for Gender Resources and Sexual Education at Haverford College Hugh Ryan is the author of When Brooklyn Was Queer, a ''boisterous, motley ... entertaining and insightful'' (The New York Times Book Review) analysis of the famous borough's LGBTQ+ history from the 1850s to present. Winner of a New York City Book Award and a New York Times Editors' Choice, it was a finalist for the Randy Shilts and Lambda Literary Awards. Ryan earned the 2020 Allan Berube Prize from the American Historical Association and residencies or fellowships from Yaddo, The Watermill Center, the New York Public Library, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. In The Women's House of Detention, he examines the history of the United States's current crisis of incarcerating queer and transgender people through the story of the notorious mid-20th century Manhattan prison that held tens of thousands of women, transgender men, and gender-nonconforming people. (recorded 6/23/2022)
6/24/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Lisa Taddeo | The Ghost Lover: Stories

In conversation with Hayden Dunbar, assistant editor, The Sewanee Review Lisa Taddeo is the author of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller Three Women, the ''staggeringly intimate'' (Entertainment Weekly) and extensively researched true story of the sex lives of three unconnected women in the U.S. Winner of the best narrative nonfiction book of the year at the British Book Awards, it was chosen as the best book of the year by numerous media outlets and was adapted into a television series by Showtime. Taddeo is also the author of the acclaimed novel Animal, worked as an associate editor at Golf Magazine, and has contributed work to The New York Times, Esquire, Elle, and Glamour, among several other publications. A collection of nine stories-two of which were awarded Pushcart Prizes-Ghost Lover is about the obsessions, manias, and fevered desires inherent to love and sex in the digital age. (recorded 6/21/2022)
6/22/202245 minutes, 51 seconds
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Gene Andrew Jarrett | Paul Laurence Dunbar: The Life and Times of a Caged Bird

In conversation with Herman Beavers Gene Andrew Jarrett is the author of Representing the Race: A New Political History of African American Literature and Deans and Truants: Race and Realism in African American Literature. He is the editor of an additional eight books of African American literary studies, including two about 19th century U.S. poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. Dean of the faculty and William S. Tod Professor of English at Princeton University, last year he was appointed to the Association of American Universities' Advisory Board for Racial Equity in Higher Education. On the 150th anniversary of Dunbar's birth, Jarrett's latest book is a nuanced biography of Dunbar as the Gilded Age celebrity, acclaimed as the ''poet laureate of his race,'' whose improbable success hid profound private struggles. A professor of English and Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Herman Beavers teaches 20th Century and Contemporary African American literature and poetry writing. He is the author of the scholarly monograph Geography and the Political Imaginary in the Novels of Toni Morrison, the poetry chapbook Obsidian Blues, and his poems have appeared in Cleaver Magazine, Versadelphia, and The American Arts Quarterly, among other publications.  (recorded 6/16/2022)
6/17/202255 minutes, 45 seconds
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Kali Fajardo-Anstine | Woman of Light

In conversation with Melinna Bobadilla A story collection featuring Latinas of Indigenous heritage experiencing the challenges of friendship and family in the American West, Kali Fajardo-Anstine's Sabrina & Corina won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award, the PEN/Bingham Prize, and The Story Prize, among other honors. Fajardo-Anstine has contributed writing to an eclectic array of periodicals and journals, including The New York Times, Harper's Bazaar, O the Oprah Magazine, and Boston Review. The 2022/2023 endowed chair of Creative Writing at Texas State University, she has earned fellowships from MacDowell, Yaddo, and Tin House. Her debut novel Woman of Light is a Western saga that spans five generations of Chicana women. Melinna Bobadilla is an actor & activist  best known for roles like ‘Santos' on Orange is The New Black and fierce immigration attorney ‘Melinna Barragan' on the Peabody nominated series Gentefied, both on Netflix . Melinna is a multi-hyphenate culture maker and critic, as her work aside from acting includes being an educator, public speaker, VO artist and host/co-producer with Futuro Media's Latino Rebels Live. Melinna is an alumni of UC Berkeley & NYU and is a proud 1st gen daughter of parents born in Mexico. You can find her work on Netflix, Apple TV Plus (Little America), HBO Max (For Rosa), and coming up on Showtime & Amazon Freevee. IG @MelinnaBobadilla (recorded 6/15/2022)
6/16/202258 minutes, 12 seconds
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Bo Seo | Good Arguments: How Debate Teaches Us to Listen and Be Heard

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning broadcaster and journalist A two-time world champion debater and a former coach of the Harvard College Debating Union and the Australian national debating team, Bo Seo has won the World Schools Debating Championship and the World Universities Debating Championship. He formerly served as a national reporter for the Australian Financial Review and has contributed writing to The New York Times, The Atlantic, and CNN, among other media outlets. Currently a law school student at Harvard, he has a master's degree in public policy from Tsinghua University. In Good Arguments, Seo describes how debate empowered him to find his voice amidst his family's emigration from Korea to Australia when he was only 8, the ways in which many other people have utilized spoken rhetoric on their paths to success, and the specific debate strategies anyone can use to improve their lives.  Books will be mailed after the event. Please allow up to three weeks for delivery. U.S. orders only. Books provided by Uncle Bobbie's Coffee and Books (recorded 6/14/2022)
6/16/202256 minutes, 9 seconds
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Rebecca Rukeyser | The Seaplane on Final Approach

In conversation with Annie Liontas, author of Let Me Explain You and co-editor of the anthology A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors Praised by Carmen Maria Machado as ''a sharp, flawless ... sexy and dark and strange and absolutely perfect'' debut novel, Rebecca Rukeyser's The Seaplane on Final Approach is about the increasingly elaborate erotic desires of a young woman working on a remote and chaotic Alaskan tourist island. A professor of fiction writing at Bard College Berlin and the recipient of the inaugural Berlin Senate Endowment for non-German literature, Rukeyser has published stories in a variety of publications, including ZYZZYVA, The Massachusetts Review, and The Best American Nonrequired Reading. Annie Liontas' debut novel, Let Me Explain You (Scribner), was featured in The New York Times Book Review as Editor's Choice and was selected by the ABA as an Indies Introduce Debut and Indies Next title.  She is the co-editor of the anthology A Manner of Being: Writers on their Mentors.  Annie's work has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, NPR, Gay Magazine, BOMB, Guernica, McSweeney's, and elsewhere.  The Gloss, her interview series with women and genderqueer writers, is running at BOMB, The Believer, and Electric Literature.  Her informed memoir, Sex with a Brain Injury will be published in January 2024.  Annie is a member of The Claw, a Philadelphia salon for women and genderqueer writers. (recorded 6/9/2022)
6/10/202255 minutes, 58 seconds
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Maxine Hong Kingston | The Fifth Book of Peace

Maxine Hong Kingston is the distinguished author of The Woman Warrior (winner of the 1976 Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction), Tripmaster Monkey and China Men. The Fifth Book of Peace is Kingston's own creation, based on the three "books of peace" that were lost to a fire in Chinese legend. In it, she combines her own narratives with those drawn from writing workshops with Vietnam veterans. The result is "a powerfully emotional book that moves through tragedy to peace of both mind and heart." (recorded 10/8/2003)
6/10/20221 hour, 15 minutes, 24 seconds
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Maxine Hong Kingston | The Woman Warrior, China Men, Tripmaster Monkey, Other Writings

In conversation with volume editor, Viet Thanh Nguyen Acclaimed for her contributions to feminism and Chinese American literature, Maxine Hong Kingston won the 1976 National Book Critics Circle General Nonfiction Award for her first book, The Woman Warrior, and the 1981 National Book Award for general nonfiction for China Men. Her many other books of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and essays include Tripmaster Monkey, The Fifth Book of Peace, and I Love a Broad Margin to My Life. A professor emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, Kingston is a recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, the National Humanities Medal, and a lifetime achievement award from the Asian American Literary Awards. Her latest work collects three of her classic books, a collection of essays about her time living in Hawaiʻi, and difficult-to-find writings in which she examines her creative process. Viet Thanh Nguyen won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in fiction, the Dayton Literary Prize, and the Edgar Award for best first novel for The Sympathizer. His other work includes the novel The Committed, the story collection The Refugees, two books of nonfiction, and a children's book. The Aerol Arnold Chair of English and professor of English and American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California, he has earned fellowships from the Guggenheim and MacArthur Foundations. (recorded 6/8/2022)
6/9/202252 minutes, 4 seconds
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Zakiya Dalila Harris | The Other Black Girl

In conversation with Liz Moore Zakiya Dalila Harris is the author of the instant New York Times bestseller The Other Black Girl, a thriller in which a young Black editorial assistant slowly realizes there are more sinister forces in her publishing house than the microaggressions that hurt her career. It was chosen as Good Morning America and Read with Marie Claire book club picks, and was selected as one of the best books of 2021 by TIME, The Washington Post, Vogue, People, and NPR, among other media outlets. A former editorial assistant and assistant editor at Knopf and Doubleday, Harris has contributed essays and book reviews to Guernica and The Rumpus. The Other Black Girl is currently being adapted into a Hulu series. Liz Moore is the bestselling author of Long Bright River, The Words of Every Song, Heft, and The Unseen World. A creative writing professor in the M.F.A. program at Temple University, her fiction and nonfiction have been published in Tin House and The New York Times, among other publications. (recorded 6/6/2022)
6/7/202256 minutes, 29 seconds
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Bill McKibben | The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at His Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened

''The world's best green journalist'' (TIME), Bill McKibben gave one of the earliest cautions about climate change with his 1989 book The End of Nature. His many other bestselling books about the environment include Falter, Deep Economy, Eaarth, and Oil and Honey; as well as a novel, Radio Free Vermont, which imagines a group of Vermont patriots who decide to secede from the United States. Recipient of the Gandhi Prize, the Thomas Merton Prize, and the Right Livelihood Prize, McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the founder of the global grassroots climate campaign 350.org. Part memoir of an upbringing during which the promise of the U.S. seemed limitless to him, part history of the racial, economic, and environmental failings that have led to our current crises, his latest book bluntly asks, ''What happened?'' (recorded 6/2/2022)
6/3/202250 minutes, 59 seconds
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Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa | His Name Is George Floyd: One Man's Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice

In conversation with Benjamin Todd Jealous A political enterprise and investigations reporter for The Washington Post since 2011, Robert Samuels has chronicled the impact of national policies and controversies from across the United States. He formerly worked at the Miami Herald, where he reported on politics, poverty, and crime. His work has earned the 2020 George Polk Award in Justice Reporting and a 2020 Peabody Award, among other honors. Toluse Olorunnipa has been a political enterprise and investigations reporter for The Washington Post since 2019. He previously reported on the White House, the first correspondent of native African and Nigerian descent to do so. A former political and policy reporter at Bloomberg News and crime, real estate, and natural disasters reporter at the Miami Herald, he is also currently an on-air contributor for CNN. In His Name Is George Floyd, Samuels and Olorunnipa reveal how systemic racism led to tragic murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis and inspired worldwide protests and policy changes. Referred to by Henry Louis Gates Jr. as ''an essential work of history,'' it uses hundreds of interviews and original research to tell George Floyd's story as a father, partner, friend, and man constantly in search of a better life. The current president of the People for the American Way, Benjamin Todd Jealous teaches social innovation at The University of Pennsylvania's School of Social Policy and Practice. He is the former national president and CEO of the NAACP, the former executive director of the National Newspaper Publisher's Association, and was a visiting professor at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. The coeditor of the national bestseller Reach: 40 Black Men Speak of Living, Leading and Succeeding, he is an investor in social impact startups and advises Citizen, an app that provides real-time 911 alerts. (recorded 5/24/2022)
5/25/202254 minutes, 56 seconds
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Haroon Moghul | Two Billion Caliphs: A Vision of a Muslim Future

In conversation with Adnan A. Zulfiqar Haroon Moghul's many books include My First Police State, The Order of Light, and How to Be Muslim: An American Story, a ''profound and intimate'' (The Washington Post) memoir about life in the United States during the immediate aftermath of 9/11. A former member of the cohort of the Muslim Leadership Initiative, a fellow in Jewish-Muslim Relations at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America, a Friday preacher, and public speaker, Moghul's writing investigates the topics of pop culture, faith, futurism, and philosophy. He has contributed essays to The New York Times, The Guardian, CNN, Foreign Policy, and NPR's Fresh Air, among several other media outlets. In Two Billion Caliphs, Moghul uses his Muslim perspective to answer some of life's biggest questions and to address Islam's misunderstood past, its present challenges, and the hope it can offer for the future. Adnan A. Zulfiqar is a legal historian working on Islamic law, criminal law and law in the Global South, with specific interests in legal obligation, jihad & revolution, policing and criminal codes. He previously helped draft and implement criminal codes in the Maldives and Somalia. He regularly provides expert media commentary for various outlets, is proficient in multiple languages and has spent over a decade in the Middle East, South Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. (recorded 5/19/2022)
5/20/20221 hour, 45 seconds
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Jason Rekulak | Hidden Pictures

In conversation with Liz Moore Jason Rekulak's Edgar Award–nominated debut novel The Impossible Fortress tells a coming-of-age story of first love, old school computer programming, and the heist of a Playboy magazine that features Vanna White. Rekulak is the former publisher of Philadelphia-based Quirk Books, where he managed the acquisition of a number of, well, very quirky books, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, the Edgar Award–winning novel The Last Policeman, and the literary mashup Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, among many others. A spin on the supernatural thriller, Hidden Pictures follows a nanny who becomes increasingly disturbed by the drawings created by her five-year-old charge. Liz Moore is the bestselling author of Long Bright River, The Words of Every Song, Heft, and The Unseen World. A creative writing professor in the M.F.A. program at Temple University, her fiction and nonfiction have been published in Tin House and The New York Times, among other publications. (recorded 5/18/2022)
5/19/202256 minutes, 34 seconds
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Matthew Continetti | The Right: The Hundred-Year War for American Conservatism

In conversation with Ramesh Ponnuru, editor of National Review A senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, Matthew Continetti works in the field of American political thought and history, with an emphasis on the Republican Party and the history of 20th-century conservatism. His books include The Persecution of Sarah Palin: How the Media Elite Tried to Bring Down a Rising Star and The K Street Gang: The Rise and Fall of the Republican Machine. The founding editor of The Washington Free Beacon, the former opinion editor at The Weekly Standard, and currently a contributing editor at National Review and a columnist for Commentary Magazine, his writing has been published in The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times, among other places. In The Right, Continetti provides a survey of the U.S. conservative movement's evolution and intellectual history. Ramesh Ponnuru is the editor of National Review, a columnist for Bloomberg View, and a contributing editor to National Affairs. A visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute since 2012, he has been a commentator on a wide array of media outlets, including Meet the Press, Face the Nation, and PBS NewsHour, among many others. He is the author of The Party of Death and his articles have been published in numerous newspapers and magazines.  (recorded 5/17/2022)
5/18/20221 hour, 7 seconds
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Eric Holder | Our Unfinished March: The Violent Past and Imperiled Future of the Vote-A History, a Crisis, a Plan

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning broadcaster and journalist The United States attorney general from 2009 to 2015, Eric Holder is the first African American to hold that position. In his 30-year career in government he also served in the Department of Justice's Public Integrity Section and as an associate judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. Currently the chairman of the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, he also works as senior counsel at the law firm of Covington & Burling. He was named to Time magazine's list of most influential people, referred to by Legal Times as one of the greatest Washington, D.C. lawyers of the past 30 years, and honored by Columbia University, his alma mater, with an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. In Our Unfinished March, Holder presents a history of the struggle for voting rights in the U.S. and offers an actionable plan to safeguard our most essential right in the midst of unprecedented attacks on U.S. democracy. (recorded 5/13/2022)
5/16/202256 minutes, 48 seconds
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Chloé Cooper Jones | Easy Beauty: A Memoir

In conversation with Isaac Fitzgerald Freelance journalist Chloé Cooper Jones was a 2020 Pulitzer Prize finalist in feature writing for ''Fearing for His Life,'' a profile of the man who filmed NYPD officers killing Eric Garner. Also a philosophy professor, she has published articles in a wide array of periodicals, including The Believer, GQ, Vice, and New York magazine. She is the recipient of the 2020 Whiting Creative Nonfiction Grant and the 2021 Howard Foundation Grant from Brown University, and her work has been anthologized in The Best American Travel Writing and The Best American Sports Writing. A memoir about motherhood, disability, and underlying societal expectations, Easy Beauty follows Jones's painful literal and figurative worldwide journeys to reclaim spaces she'd been denied. Isaac Fitzgerald appears frequently on The Today Show and is the author of the bestselling children's book How to Be a Pirate as well as the co-author of Pen & Ink: Tattoos and the Stories Behind Them and Knives & Ink: Chefs and the Stories Behind Their Tattoos (winner of an IACP Award). His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Best American Nonrequired Reading, The Boston Globe and numerous other publications. His debut memoir, Dirtbag, Massachusetts, is forthcoming in July, 2022. He lives in Brooklyn. (recorded 5/12/2022)
5/13/202259 minutes, 54 seconds
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Ken Kalfus | 2 A.M. in Little America

In conversation with Nathaniel Popkin The ''rare writer who can combine keen, grounded, psychological observation with visionary headiness'' (Salon), Ken Kalfus is the author of the novels The Commissariat of Enlightenment, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year; A Disorder Peculiar to the Country, a National Book Award finalist; and Equilateral. His short story collections include Coup de Foudre, Thirst, and PU-239 and Other Russian Fantasies. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Pew Fellowship for the Arts, Kalfus's works have been translated into more than 10 languages. In 2 A.M. in Little America, Kalfus imagines a plausibly dystopian future in which young people from the United States are forced to emigrate to other countries because of large-scale civil unrest. Nathaniel Popkin's many books of fiction and nonfiction include Everything is Borrowed, The Year of the Return, and To Reach the Spring: From Complicity to Consciousness in the Age of Eco-Crisis. He is co-editor of the literary anthology Who Will Speak for America?, was the fiction editor of Cleaver Magazine, and the writer/editor of the Emmy-winning documentary film series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment.  (recorded 5/11/2022)
5/12/202252 minutes, 46 seconds
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Rebecca Roanhorse | Fevered Star

One of the ''Indigenous novelists reshaping North American science fiction, horror, and fantasy'' (The New York Times), Rebecca Roanhorse is the bestselling author of the fantasy books Storm of Locusts, Trail of Lightning, and Race to the Sun. Inspired by pre-Columbian American cultures, her fantasy novel Black Sun was nominated for the 2021 Locus Award, 2021 Nebula Award, and the 2021 Hugo Award. Roanhorse's other work includes the Star Wars novel Resistance Reborn, contributions to Marvel Comics, and numerous short stories that have won Nebula, Hugo, and Locus Awards. Fevered Star is a sequel to Black Sun in the Between Earth and Sky series. (recorded 5/10/2022)
5/11/202253 minutes, 50 seconds
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Adriana Trigiani | The Good Left Undone

In conversation with Pam Jenoff ''A comedy writer with a heart of gold'' (The New York Times), Adriana Trigiani is the bestselling author of 20 books of fiction and nonfiction that have been published in 38 countries. These works include The Shoemaker's Wife; Very Valentine; Cooking with My Sisters; and Lucia, Lucia. Also an award-winning filmmaker, playwright, and television writer and producer, she directed the documentary Queens of the Big Time and wrote and directed the film adaptation of her debut novel, Big Stone Gap. Trigiani serves on the New York State Council on the Arts and is the founder of The Origin project, an in-school writing program in her home state of Virginia. Her latest novel, The Good Left Undone, follows three generations of Tuscan artisans struggling with a long-held family secret that emerges as the aged matriarch reflects on her family at the end of her life. Pam Jenoff's New York Times bestselling novels include The Woman wth the Blue Star, The Lost Girls of Paris, The Orphan's Tale, and The Diplomat's Wife. A law professor at Rutgers University, she formerly served as special assistant to the Secretary of the Army, a diplomat for the State Department, and as a labor and employment attorney. (recorded 5/9/2022)
5/10/20221 hour, 6 minutes, 16 seconds
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Don Winslow | City on Fire

''One of the best thriller writers on the planet'' (Esquire), Don Winslow is the author of 22 bestselling crime novels that explore such broad-ranging topics as the socio-political underpinnings of the war on drugs, law enforcement, criminal hierarchies, and international politics. These books include  the Cartel Trilogy, (The Power of the Dog, The Cartel, and The Border), The Force, and Savages for which he wrote the screenplay for the Oliver Stone-directed film adaptation of the same name. Winslow formerly worked as a private investigator, antiterrorist trainer, arson trial consultant, and safari guide. In City on Fire, this ''master of thrills shows his range, and his bite'' (The New York Times) with a fictionalized account of the real-life warring Irish and Italian criminal organizations that have controlled the New England region for generations. (recorded 5/5/2022)
5/6/202244 minutes, 4 seconds
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Lawrence Jackson | Shelter: A Black Tale of Homeland, Baltimore

In conversation with Solomon Jones. Lawrence Jackson's award-winning books include The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, biographies of Chester Himes and Ralph Ellison, and a memoir about his family history, titled My Father's Name: A Black Virginia Family after the Civil War. A Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of English and history at Johns Hopkins University, he is also the founder of the Billie Holiday Center for Liberation Arts and a recipient of a 2019 Guggenheim Fellowship. Shelter is an essay collection that begins with Jackson's initial struggle to make Baltimore his home and how his later adoption of the Charm City became a means to reexamine his personal history. An award-winning Philadelphia Daily News columnist and morning host for 900 am WURD radio in Philadelphia, Solomon Jones is the author of the Essence bestselling novel The Bridge, as well as the critically acclaimed books Pipe Dream, Ride or Die, Payback, and Ten Lives, Ten Demands: Life and Death Stories, and a Black Activist's Blueprint for Racial Justice. He is also a blogger and frequent on-air commentator for NPR-affiliate WHYY and is the founder of Words on the Street Literacy Program and the Rally for Justice Coalition. (recorded 5/4/2022)
5/5/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 25 seconds
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Margo Jefferson | Constructing A Nervous System: A Memoir

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition ''A national treasure'' (Vanity Fair), Margo Jefferson won the National Book Critics Circle Award for her memoir Negroland, an examination of her upbringing and education amongst a small segment of privileged Black society in the United States. She is also the author of On Michael Jackson, an analysis of Jackson's cultural legacy as a pop star and celebrity. A former longtime theater and book reviewer for Newsweek and The New York Times, she won the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for her cultural criticism. Her essays and reviews have been published in a variety of other periodicals, including Vogue, Harper's Magazine, and New York Magazine, among many others. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Rockefeller Foundation grant, Jefferson currently teaches writing at Columbia University. In Constructing a Nervous System, she brings to life the family members, artists, athletes, intellectuals, and activists who have influenced her the most.  (recorded 5/4/2022)
5/4/202252 minutes, 39 seconds
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Marc Lamont Hill and Todd Brewster | Seen and Unseen: Technology, Social Media, and the Fight for Racial Justice

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning broadcaster and journalist The host of BET News, Black News Tonight, and UpFront, Marc Lamont Hill is the Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities, and Solutions at Temple University. His books include Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond and Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics. Hill is the owner of Philadelphia's Uncle Bobbie's Coffee & Books and is the founder and director of the People's Education Center, a Germantown-based nonprofit organization devoted to community education. Todd Brewster is the co-author, with Peter Jennings, of the #1 New York Times bestseller The Century. His other work includes the books Lincoln's Gamble and In Search of America, and articles published in Vanity Fair, Time, and Life, where he served as a senior editor. Currently the senior visiting lecturer in journalism at Mount Holyoke College, he taught journalism at Temple University, was a Knight fellow at Yale Law School, and was the founding director of the Center for Oral History at West Point. Brewster is also the executive producer of the awardwinning documentary Into Harm's Way. In Seen and Unseen, Hill and Brewster analyze the role of visual media in the ongoing struggle for racial justice while examining what makes this moment unique in the overall history of civil rights movements in the United States.  (recorded 5/2/2022)
5/3/20221 hour, 55 seconds
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Marie Yovanovitch | Lessons From the Edge: A Memoir

In conversation with Mitchell Orenstein, Department Chair and Professor of Russian and East European Studies, University of Pennsylvania In 2019, U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch was the focus of international interest when then-President Donald Trump and his allies targeted Yovanovitch amidst their efforts to pressure Ukrainian officials to investigate Joe Biden's family. This scandal led to the first impeachment proceedings against Trump, a major aspect of which was Yovanovitch's impassioned and steadfast congressional testimony. The child of parents who fled Nazi and Soviet atrocities, she has served in numerous senior State Department positions, including U.S. ambassador to Armenia, U.S. ambassador to Kyrgyzstan, under secretary of state for political affairs, and principal deputy assistant secretary for the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs. Yovanovitch retired from the U.S. Foreign Service in 2020 and is currently a diplomat in residence at Georgetown University's Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. Lessons from the Edge uses experiences from her life and career to offer lessons about the ways in which corruption can endanger democracy. (recorded 4/28/2022)
4/29/20221 hour, 2 minutes, 38 seconds
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One Book, One Philadelphia 2022 Kickoff Celebration

To launch the 20th annual program season of One Book, One Philadelphia, join us for a conversation with Quiara Alegría Hudes, author of My Broken Language--the 2022 One Book featured title--and Lilliam Rivera, author of Never Look Back, the 2022 One Book youth companion title. After their discussion, students from the Curtis Institute of Music will perform an original work of music inspired by My Broken Language. (recorded 4/27/2022)
4/28/20221 hour, 8 minutes, 36 seconds
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Dorothy Roberts | Torn Apart: How the Child Welfare System Destroys Black Families-and How Abolition Can Build a Safer World

In conversation with Marc Lamont Hill Addressing social justice issues of policing, state surveillance of families, and science, Dorothy Roberts's books include Killing the Black Body, Shattered Bonds, and Fatal Invention. She has also authored more than 100 scholarly articles and has co-edited six books on various legal issues. The George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology and the Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights at the University of Pennsylvania, Roberts is the director of the Penn Program on Race, Science, and Society. In Torn Apart she explains that the abolition of the U.S. child welfare system-which is designed to punish Black families-will liberate Black communities. The Steve Charles Chair in Media, Cities and Solutions at Temple University, Marc Lamont Hill is the host of BET News and the Coffee and Books podcast. The recipient of honors from the National Association of Black Journalists, GLAAD, and the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, he is the author of six books, including Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life; Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond; and Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics. (recorded 4/26/2022)
4/27/202254 minutes, 36 seconds
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M. Chris Fabricant | Junk Science and the American Criminal Justice System

Meelya Gordon Memorial Lecture In conversation with John Holloway One of the United States's foremost experts on forensic sciences and the criminal justice system, M. Chris Fabricant is the director of strategic litigation at the Innocence Project, a nonprofit organization that uses DNA testing to release wrongly convicted individuals from prison. He is a former longtime public defender and law professor, frequently serves as a public speaker on legal reform and social justice, is featured in the Netflix documentary series The Innocence Files, and has published numerous articles in journals such as Fordham Law Review and New York University Law Review. In his new book, Fabricant examines the role that faulty scientific evidence has in continuing and strengthening an unjust and racist criminal justice system. John Holloway is the associate dean and executive director of the Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. (recorded 4/21/2022)
4/22/20221 hour, 34 seconds
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Dolen Perkins-Valdez | Take My Hand

In conversation with Asali Solomon, author of the novels Disgruntled and Days of Afrekete Using ''gorgeous, compassionate prose'' to continue ''our national conversation about people working together to heal our communities'' (The Washington Post), Dolen Perkins-Valdez is the author of The New York Times bestselling novels Wench and Balm. She has been a finalist for two NAACP Image Awards, the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award, and the Robert Olen Butler Fiction Award, and she won the 2011 First Novelist Award from Black Caucus of the American Library Association. The current chair of the board of the PEN/Faulkner Foundation, she teaches creative writing at American University in Washington, D.C. In Take My Hand, inspired by shocking real-life events, Perkins-Valdez tells the story of Civil Townsend, a Black doctor who seeks justice for wrongs done to her patients decades before in 1970s Alabama. (recorded 4/20/2022)
4/21/202250 minutes, 41 seconds
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Frans de Waal | Different: Gender Through the Eyes of a Primatologist

''A pioneer in primate studies'' (The Wall Street Journal), Dr. Frans de Waal is the author of The Bonobo and the Atheist, an exploration of the biological roots of human morality found in primate social interaction. His other 16 books include Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?, and The Age of Empathy: Nature's Lessons for a Kinder Society. De Waal is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences, the C. H. Candler Professor in Emory University's psychology department, and the former director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. Based on decades of human and animal research, Different argues that biology doesn't necessarily support traditional gender roles in human communities. (recorded 4/14/2022)
4/18/20221 hour, 1 minute, 9 seconds
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Maggie Shipstead | Great Circle

Carole Phillips Memorial Lecture Maggie Shipstead is the bestselling author of the novels Astonish Me and Seating Arrangements, the latter of which won the Dylan Thomas Prize and the L.A. Times Book Prize for First Fiction. A former Wallace Stegner fellow at Stanford University and the recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, she is a longtime travel writer and has frequently contributed articles to Condé Nast Traveler and Departures. Shipstead's latest bestseller, Great Circle, tells the parallel stories of a bold woman aviator and the actor who portrays her on film almost a century later. ''A fat, juicy peach of a novel ... epic in spirit and scope'' (The Telegraph UK), it was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and chosen as one of 2021's best books by NPR, The Washington Post, and Time, among others. (recorded 4/12/2022)
4/13/202249 minutes, 43 seconds
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Bryant Terry | Black Food: Stories, Art, and Recipes from Across the African Diaspora

In conversation with Jamila Robinson Chef and educator Bryant Terry is the author of four vegan cookbooks, including Grub, Afro-Vegan, and Vegetable Kingdom, winner of an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work. In 2015 he earned a James Beard Foundation Leadership Award for his food justice activism. The chef-in-residence at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco, his writing and recipes have been published in periodicals such as Gourmet, Food and Wine, and The New York Times Magazine, among many other places. San Francisco Magazine selected him as one of the 11 smartest people in the Bay Area food scene and Fast Company referred to him as one of 9 People Who Are Changing the Future of Food. In Black Food, Terry offers a tribute to Black culinary creativity with more than 100 esteemed contributors from around the globe. The assistant managing food editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer, Jamila Robinson is the chair of the James Beard Foundation Journalism Committee, where she is also a coach and mentor for the JBF fellowship program. She formerly worked as an editorial director for Atlantic Media, as a senior content strategist for the USA Today Network, and as a senior editor for features at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. (recorded 4/12/2022)
4/13/202253 minutes, 25 seconds
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Raquel Salas Rivera | antes que isla es volcán / before island is volcano

Introduced by Denice Frohman In conversation with Cynthia Dewi Oka The 2018–19 Poet Laureate of Philadelphia, Raquel Salas Rivera is the author of five full-length books of poetry. These poetry collections include lo terciario/the tertiary, longlisted for the 2019 National Book Award for Poetry and winner of the 2018 Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Poetry; while they sleep (under the bed is another country), longlisted for the 2020 Pen America Open Book Award; and x/ex/exis, winner of the inaugural Ambroggio Prize. The recipient of a 2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a grant from the Mellon Foundation, he serves as the principal translator for El proyecto de la literatura puertorriqueña/ The Puerto Rican Literature Project. In his latest poetry collection, Salas Rivera imagines a future decolonialized Puerto Rico. Originally from Bali, Indonesia, Cynthia Dewi Oka is the author of Fire Is Not a Country (2021) and Salvage (2017) from Northwestern University Press, and Nomad of Salt and Hard Water (2016) from Thread Makes Blanket Press. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, POETRY, Academy of American Poets, Hyperallergic, Guernica, The Rumpus, ESPNW, and elsewhere. A recipient of the Leeway Foundation's Transformation Award and the Tupelo Quarterly Poetry Prize, she is currently Poet in Residence at the Amy Clampitt House. (recorded 4/11/2022)
4/12/202259 minutes, 14 seconds
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Jennifer Egan | The Candy House

In conversation with Ariel Delgado Dixon Jennifer Egan won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award for the novel A Visit from the Goon Squad, ''a new classic of American fiction'' (Time) that follows an aging punk rocker and his young employee. Her other books of fiction include the National Book Award Finalist Look at Me, the bestselling The Keep, The Invisible Circus, and the historical novel Manhattan Beach, winner of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. Her work has been published in The New York Times Magazine, Harper's, and The New Yorker, among many other publications. Imagined as a ''sibling novel'' to A Visit From the Goon Squad, Egan's new novel conjurs a reality only a few advancements away from our own in which technology will allow users to download and share all their memories. In Ariel Delgado Dixon's debut novel Don't Say We Didn't Warn You, two sisters endure a childhood of deprivation in a decaying warehouse and in a wilderness camp where troubled teenage girls are sent as a last resort. Referred to by author Joy Williams as ''eventful, complex, admirably structured, relentless, and spooky'', this novel tells a story of trauma and the struggles of family relationships. Delgado Dixon has published writing in Kenyon Review, O: The Oprah Magazine, The Mississippi Review, and The Greensboro Review, among other periodicals. (recorded 4/7/2022)
4/8/20221 hour, 42 seconds
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Jennifer Lin | Beethoven in Beijing: Stories from the Philadelphia Orchestra's Historic Journey to China

In conversation with Nydia Han, Consumer Investigative Reporter and co-anchor of 6ABC Action News Sunday mornings A reporter at The Philadelphia Inquirer for 31 years, Jennifer Lin worked as an international correspondent in China, a national correspondent in Washington, D.C., and a financial correspondent on Wall Street. She is the author of the family memoir Shanghai Faithful: Betrayal and Forgiveness in a Chinese Christian Family. Her documentary Beethoven in Beijing, co-directed with Sharon Mullally, recently premiered on PBS's Great Performances. In her companion book of the same name, Lin uses interviews and news stories to recount the Philadelphia Orchestra's 1973 historic tour of China, which at that time still banned Western music. (recorded 4/5/2022)
4/6/202258 minutes, 21 seconds
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Neil Lanctot | The Approaching Storm: Roosevelt, Wilson, Addams, and Their Clash Over America's Future

In conversation with John M. Cooper Historian Neil Lanctot is the author of Campy: The Two Lives of Roy Campanella and Negro League Baseball: The Rise and Ruin of a Black Institution, a ''prodigiously researched'' and ''enormously important historical corrective to feel-good versions of baseball integration'' (The New York Times). The recipient of the Seymour Medal from the Society for American Baseball Research, he has published articles in Smithsonian magazine, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and The Baltimore Sun, among other periodicals. In The Approaching Storm, Lanctot details the early-20th century rift between three of the U.S.'s most important progressives as the country struggled to respond to the global consequences to World War I.    John M. Cooper's many historical works include Pivotal Decades: The United States, 1900-1920; The Vanity of Power: American Isolationism and the First World War, 1914-1917; and Woodrow Wilson: A Biography, which was a finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship and a Fulbright professorship in Moscow, Russia, he is professor-emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (recorded 3/29/2022)
3/30/202256 minutes, 41 seconds
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Jeremy Denk | Every Good Boy Does Fine: A Love Story, in Music Lessons

In conversation with Peter Dobrin, classical music critic and culture writer, The Philadelphia Inquirer One of classical music's most celebrated pianists, Jeremy Denk has performed with ensembles such as the National Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and he has frequently appeared at Carnegie Hall. His recordings have been number one on Billboard's Classical Chart and have been selected in best-of-the-year lists for several media outlets, including The Washington Post, BBC, The New Yorker, and NPR. A member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences, Denk is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, Musical America's Instrumentalist of the Year Award, and the Avery Fisher Prize. His writing on music has been published in The New York Times Book Review, The Guardian, and The New Republic, among other periodicals. In Every Good Boy Does Fine, Denk explores the composers, teachers, and professional struggles that have most influenced not only his career, but also his larger concept of what music means to us.  (recorded 3/28/2022)
3/29/202255 minutes, 11 seconds
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Hannah Tinti, Mira Jacob, Jai Chakrabarti, and Marie-Helene Bertino | Small Odysseys: Selected Shorts Presents 35 New Stories

Hannah Tinti is the author of the bestselling novels The Good Thief and The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley and the short story collection Animal Crackers. A creative writing professor in New York University's M.F.A. program, she is the co-founder of the Sirenland Writers Conference and the co-founder and executive editor of One Story magazine. Jai Chakrabarti's debut novel A Play for the End of the World was selected as one of 2021's best books by numerous periodicals. Formerly an emerging writer fellow with A Public Space, he has had his Pushcart Prize–winning short fiction anthologized in The O. Henry Prize Stories and The Best American Short Stories. Marie-Helene Bertino is the author of the novels Parakeet and 2 A.M. at the Cat's Pajamas, and the story collection Safe as Houses. A creative writing teacher at NYU and The New School, she has earned The O. Henry Prize, The Pushcart Prize, and fellowships from MacDowell, Sewanee, and The Center for Fiction. Mira Jacob is the author of the celebrated novel The Sleepwalker's Guide to Dancing and Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations. A fiction teacher at NYU, The New School, and Randolph College, her articles, drawings, and short fiction have been published in The New York Times Book Review, Tin House, and Literary Hub. Edited by Tinti and published in partnership with the Selected Shorts literary radio program and live show, Small Odysseys presents never-before-published short stories by some of contemporary fiction's most acclaimed authors. (recorded 3/24/2022)
3/25/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 19 seconds
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Fintan O'Toole | We Don't Know Ourselves: A Personal History of Modern Ireland

A Dublin native and a 34-year columnist and drama critic for The Irish Times, Fintan O'Toole is the author of nearly two dozen books, including A History of Ireland in 100 Objects, Enough is Enough: How to Build a Republic, and Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain. He is also a professor at Princeton University, a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian, and formerly worked as the drama critic for the New York Daily News, The Sunday Tribune, and In Dublin magazine. Named to The Observer's list of ''Britain's top 300 intellectuals'', O'Toole is the recipient of the 2017 Orwell Prize for Journalism, the 2017 European Press Prize, and three Irish Book Awards. Combining memoir and national history, We Don't Know Ourselves documents the turbulence that has transformed Ireland over the past half century. (recorded 3/23/2022)
3/24/20221 hour, 4 minutes, 40 seconds
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Donna Leon | Give Unto Others

Donna Leon is the author of the internationally bestselling Commissario Guido Brunetti mystery novels, the ''endlessly enjoyable'' long-established series of books that combines ''deep thoughts about justice and vengeance and charming classical allusions'' (The New York Times Book Review). Born and raised in New Jersey, Leon is a 30-year resident of Italy and current resident of a small Swiss village. She worked as a copywriter in London, and taught literature in universities in Iran, China, and Saudi Arabia. In the series' 31st installment, Leon's dapper Venetian detective questions the bounds of loyalty as an innocent request reveals corruption and financial wrongdoing. (recorded 3/21/2022)
3/21/202259 minutes, 39 seconds
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Mary Beard | Twelve Caesars: Images of Power from the Ancient World to the Modern

In conversation with Michael Kulikowski ''A national treasure, and easily the world's most famous classicist'' (The Guardian), Mary Beard ''radiates authority and expertise'' in guiding her readers through the world of Ancient Roman civilization. She is a professor at the University of Cambridge, a fellow of Newnham College, and a Royal Academy of the Arts professor of ancient literature. Some of her seminal works include Rome in the Late Republic, The Parthenon, The Fires of Vesuvius, and S.P.Q.R.: A History of Ancient Rome. Beard is also the classics editor of the Times Literary Supplement, where her column ''A Don's Life'' is regularly published. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she has written and presented several BBC historical documentaries. Twelve Caesars explores the ways in which images of Roman emperors have influenced artists and thinkers for more than 2,000 years. The head of the history department and the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Classics at Pennsylvania State University, Michael Kulikowski is the author of Rome's Gothic Wars, Late Roman Spain and Its Cities, The Triumph of Empire, and The Tragedy of Empire. He has appeared in several History Channel documentaries, has published numerous academic articles, and is a regular contributor to the London Review of Books and The Wall Street Journal. (recorded 3/17/2022)
3/18/20221 hour, 5 minutes
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Elie Mystal | Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy's Guide to the Constitution

In conversation with Danielle M. Conway The Nation's legal analyst and justice correspondent, Elie Mystal is an Alfred Knobler fellow at the Type Media Center and is the legal editor of More Perfect, Radiolab's podcast about the U.S. Supreme Court. A Harvard Law School graduate and former litigator at Debevoise & Plimpton, he was the executive editor of Above the Law, a news site sharing details and original commentary about the legal profession. Mystal is a frequent guest on MSNBC and Sirius XM. Referred to by Don Winslow as ''a powerful and important book of brightly alive ideas,'' Allow Me to Retort is a guidebook for how the U.S. Constitution should accurately be interpreted in opposition to Republican claims. Dean and Donald J. Farage Professor of Law at Penn State Dickinson Law, Danielle M. Conway is an expert in procurement law, entrepreneurship, intellectual property law, and licensing intellectual property. She formerly was the dean of the University of Maine Law and served on the faculties at several other law schools. The author of numerous books, articles, and essays, Conway is the co-recipient of the Association of American Law Schools' Impact Award, and in 2016 she retired from the U.S. Army as a lieutenant colonel after 27 years of service. (recorded 3/15/2022)
3/18/20221 hour, 3 minutes, 6 seconds
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Howard Gardner and Wendy Fischman | The Real World of College: What Higher Education Is and What It Can Be

The Hobbs Research Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Howard Gardner is the author of 30 books, including A Synthesizing Mind, The App Generation, and Responsibility at Work. He is the recipient of MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowships, honorary degrees from 31 colleges and universities, and the Brock International Prize in Education. A project director at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Wendy Fischman has written about development and learning for several scholarly and popular periodicals. She is the lead author of Making Good: How Young People Cope with Moral Dilemmas at Work, co-developed a classroom curriculum for teachers and students, and has consulted on school reforms. In The Real World of College, Gardner and Fischman utilize more than 2,000 interviews with students, faculty, parents, alumni, and administrators from a variety of colleges and universities to examine why students consider learning secondary to their résumés, job prospects, and earning potential. (recorded 3/16/2022)
3/17/202259 minutes, 58 seconds
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Lee Kravetz | The Last Confessions of Sylvia P.

In conversation with Jason Freeman, editor and producer, author events Lee Kravetz's acclaimed nonfiction books include Supersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering and Success and Strange Contagion: Inside the Surprising Science of Infectious Behaviors and Viral Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves. He has contributed writing to a wide array of publications, including The New York Times, Psychology Today, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Daily Beast. In the debut novel The Last Confessions of Sylvia P., Kravetz creates three interwoven narratives to reimagine the time in which poet Sylvia Plath wrote her renowned semi-autobiographical novel The Bell Jar. (recorded 3/14/2022)
3/15/202259 minutes, 3 seconds
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Harvey Fierstein | I Was Better Last Night: A Memoir

In conversation with comedienne, actor, and author Catherine "Cat" Cohen An acclaimed playwright, screenwriter, and actor, Harvey Fierstein is the Tony Award–winning author of Torch Song Trilogy and La Cage aux Folles. His play A Catered Affair was nominated for 12 Drama Desk Awards and he received Tony nominations for Kinky Boots, Newsies, and Casa Valentina. He also won Tonys for his performance in the Torch Song Trilogy and as Edna Turnblad in Hairspray. Fierstein has appeared in dozens of films and television shows, including Mrs. Doubtfire, Independence Day, Cheers, and The Good Wife, and he has voiced animated characters in Mulan, The Dark Crystal, and Big Mouth, among many others. In I Was Better Last Night, he reveals details of his personal trials and triumphs, explores his status as a cultural icon and gay rights activist, and reflects on his best-loved roles and writings. Catherine "Cat" Cohen hosts the weekly cabaret show at Alan Cumming's East Village venue, Club Cumming, and co-hosts the popular weekly podcast Seek Treatment with Pat Regan. Her Netflix comedy special The Twist...? She's Gorgeous will hit screens on March 15, and last year she joined the cast of the FX series What We Do in the Shadows. Winner of the best newcomer title at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, she recently published her first book with Knopf, titled God I Feel Modern Tonight, a collection of comedic poetry. (recorded 3/13/2022)
3/14/202255 minutes, 33 seconds
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Michael Kazin | What It Took to Win: A History of the Democratic Party

Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Endowed Lecture In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Michael Kazin's many critically acclaimed books include War Against War: The American Fight for Peace, 1914–1918, selected as an editor's choice by The New York Times Book Review; American Dreamers: How the Left Changed a Nation, chosen as a best book of 2011 by The New Republic, Newsweek, and The Progressive; A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings Bryan; and The Populist Persuasion. A history professor at Georgetown University, Kazin is editor emeritus of Dissent magazine, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and editor of The Princeton Encyclopedia of American Political History. In What It Took to Win he offers a thorough history of the Democratic Party and its historically imperfect but recently reinvigorated journey towards making genuine progress for U.S. society. (recorded 3/8/2022)
3/9/202252 minutes, 3 seconds
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Garrett Hongo | The Perfect Sound: A Memoir in Stereo

In conversation with Major Jackson Garrett Hongo was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize for the poetry collection The River of Heaven. His other books of poetry include Yellow Light and Coral Road. The distinguished professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Oregon and a regular contributor to SoundStage! Ultra, Hongo also authored Volcano: A Memoir of Hawaiʻi and The Mirror Diary: Selected Essays. Writing about his lifelong passion for sound reproduction equipment, music in many formats, and the poetic voices that influenced him most, The Perfect Sound is a celebration of all things audio. The Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in the Humanities at Vanderbilt University and the poetry editor of The Harvard Review, Major Jackson is the author of five books of poetry, including The Absurd Man and Leaving Saturn. His many honors include the Cave Canem Poetry Prize, a Whiting Writers' Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. He has published poems and essays in a wide variety of periodicals, including The New Yorker, Paris Review, and Ploughshares. (recorded 3/2/2022)
3/3/202257 minutes, 47 seconds
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Ben Okri | Every Leaf a Hallelujah and Astonishing the Gods

In conversation with Cajetan Iheka, Associate Professor of Literature, Yale University, and author of African Ecomedia: Network Forms, Planetary Politics One of Nigeria's most celebrated authors, Ben Okri is the author of many post-colonial novels, poetry, short story collections, and essays. He rose to international fame in 1980 upon the publication of his first novel, Flowers and Shadows, and is perhaps best known for The Famished Road, winner of the 1991 Booker Prize. A fable about the realities we create for ourselves, Astonishing the Gods was included, almost 25 years after its publication, in the BBC's ''100 Novels That Shaped Our World'' list. Every Leaf a Hallelujah, the tale of a young girl searching for a special flower that can cure her ill mother, is a modern-day fairytale written to be read by adults and children alike. Cajetan Iheka is Associate Professor of English at Yale University, author of Naturalizing Africa: Ecological Violence, Agency, and Postcolonial Resistance in African Literature, editor of Teaching Postcolonial Environmental Literature and Media, and coeditor of African Migration Narratives: Politics, Race, and Space. (recorded 2/28/2022)
2/28/202253 minutes, 55 seconds
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Erika M. Kitzmiller | The Roots of Educational Inequality: Philadelphia's Germantown High School, 1907–2014

Education historian Erika M. Kitzmiller has conducted research in the city of Philadelphia, its public schools, and the Free Library for nearly two decades. The result of her investigation is The Roots of Educational Inequality, a decades-spanning report of the factors contributing to one school's path from first-rate institution to its 2014 closure. An assistant professor of education at Columbia University's Barnard College, her writing has appeared in the Harvard Educational Review, Dissent, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and Reuters, among other places. Her work has received funding from the National Academy of Education, the National Science Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation. In conversation with: Ted Domers, School District of Philadelphia, Assistant Superintendent, Germantown High School Teacher Janel Moore-Almond, School District of Philadelphia Graduate and Teacher, Carver High School Akira Drake Rodriguez, Assistant Professor, Weitzman School of Design, University of Pennsylvania (recorded 2/24/2022)
2/25/202255 minutes, 6 seconds
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Mary Ann Sieghart | The Authority Gap: Why Women Are Still Taken Less Seriously Than Men, and What We Can Do About It

Barbara Gohn Day Memorial Lecture In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning broadcaster and journalist In her 20 years as a columnist and assistant editor at The Times of London, Mary Ann Sieghart won a popular following for her pieces on politics, feminism, economics, and parenthood. Also a frequent broadcaster, she has presented several programs on BBC Radio 4 and hosted Newshour on the BBC World Service. Sieghart is chair of the judges for the 2022 Women's Prize for Fiction, recently served as a visiting professor at King's College London, chaired the Social Market Foundation think tank, and sat on several corporate, arts, and public policy boards. The Authority Gap uses data, analysis, and interviews with important women leaders, thinkers, and artists to uncover and fight the unconscious biases that continue systemic sexism. Books will be mailed after the event. Please allow up to three weeks for delivery. U.S. orders only. Books provided by Uncle Bobbie's Coffee and Books (recorded 2/23/2022)
2/24/202253 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ariel Delgado Dixon | Don't Say We Didn't Warn You

In conversation with Sara Nović  In Ariel Delgado Dixon's debut novel Don't Say We Didn't Warn You, two sisters endure a childhood of deprivation in a decaying warehouse and in a wilderness camp where troubled teenage girls are sent as a last resort. Referred to by author Joy Williams as ''eventful, complex, admirably structured, relentless, and spooky'', this novel tells a story of trauma and the struggles of family relationships. A 2017 nominee for the PEN/Robert J. Dau Short Story Award for Emerging Writers and shortlisted for the Masters Review Anthology Prize, Delgado Dixon has published writing in Kenyon Review, O: The Oprah Magazine, The Mississippi Review, and The Greensboro Review, among other periodicals. Sara Nović teaches in the Popular Fiction MFA program at Emerson College, and is an instructor of Deaf studies at Stockton University. Her first novel, Girl at War, won the American Library Association's Alex Award, and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Nović has an MFA in fiction and literary translation from Columbia University, and lives with her family in Philadelphia. (recorded 2/22/2022)
2/23/202230 minutes, 52 seconds
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Jabari Asim | Yonder

In conversation with Lise Funderburg The director of the M.F.A. Creative Writing program at Emerson College, Jabari Asim is the author of the novel Only the Strong, the story collection A Taste of Honey, and several works of nonfiction, including We Can't Breathe, The Art of Survival, and What Obama Means...For Our Culture, Our Politics, Our Future. Also a Guggenheim fellowship-winning poet, playwright, and children's book author, he formerly served as the editor-in-chief of the NAACP's official publication The Crisis, and was an editor and syndicated columnist at The Washington Post. In his new novel, Asim tells the story of a group of enslaved Black people seeking love, friendship, and independence in the 19th century United States South. Lise Funderburg is the author of Black, White, Other: Biracial Americans Talk about Race and Identity and Pig Candy: Taking My Father South, Taking My Father Home. A lecturer in creative writing at the University of Pennsylvania and a teacher at the Paris Writers' Workshop, her achievements include a Nonfiction Fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Her work has been published in The New York Times, The Nation, Salon, and The Washington Post, among many other periodicals. Her most recent book is Apple, Tree: Writers on Their Parents. (recorded 2/17/2022)
2/18/202255 minutes, 30 seconds
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Tessa Hadley | Free Love

In conversation with Geoffrey Dyer Tessa Hadley's many ''strange, unsettling-eerily beautiful, discomfiting, stay-up-late-addictive, sometimes hair-raising'' (San Francisco Chronicle) novels about the complexities of family relationships include Clever Girl, Accidents in the Home, The Past, and Everything Will be All Right. Two of her short story collections, Sunstroke and Married Love, were New York Times Notable Books and her fiction regularly appears in The New Yorker. A creative writing professor at England's Bath Spa University and a regular reviewer for the London Review of Books, Hadley has twice been longlisted for the Orange Prize and the Wales Book of the Year. Free Love tells the story of a compliant homemaker's intellectual and sexual awakening in a vibrant 1960s London. Geoffrey Dyer is the author of four novels and numerous works of nonfiction. Writer-in-residence at the University of Southern California, a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, his honors include the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism, the Somerset Maugham Award, and a Lannan Literary Fellowship. (recorded 2/16/2022)
2/17/202254 minutes, 36 seconds
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Barbara Chase-Riboud | The Great Mrs. Elias: A Novel Based on a True Story

In conversation with Nell Irvin Painter Barbara Chase-Riboud's watershed 1979 novel Sally Hemings told a fictionalized story based on the true account of the life of Sally Hemings, an enslaved woman with whom Thomas Jefferson had children. It was the winner of the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for best novel by an woman writer in the United States and through DNA evidence, the novel's premise about Heming and Jefferson's relationship has since been proven true. Chase-Riboud's other novels include Echo of Lions, The President's Daughter, and Hottentot Venus. She is also a celebrated poet and widely exhibited sculptor and visual artist. In the spirit of Sally Hemings, her new novel breathes life into the previously enigmatic Hannah Elias, one of early 1900s America's richest black women, and the murder that precipitated her rapid downfall. Historian Nell Irvin Painter's books include Sojourner Truth, Creating Black Americans, and the bestseller The History of White People. The Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, at Princeton University, Painter directed that institution's Program in African American Studies from 1997 to 2000. She has also published numerous essays, reviews, and articles, and is the author of the memoir Old in Art School. (recorded 2/15/2022)
2/16/202258 minutes, 5 seconds
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Catherine Price | The Power of Fun: How to Feel Alive Again with Gretchen Rubin | Better Than Before

Catherine Price discusses her new book with #1 best selling author, Gretchen Rubin Catherine Price is the author of How to Break Up with Your Phone, a book that ''gives practical advice on how to forge a healthier relationship with technology-without the fear mongering." (Refinery29). Her other books include the parody travel guide 101 Places Not to See Before You Die, Vitamania, The Big Sur Bakery Cookbook, and Mindfulness: A Journal. A public speaker, teacher, and consultant, Price has contributed work to The Best American Science Writing, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Outside, and Men's Journal, among many other periodicals. A mix of science and personal experience, The Power of Fun argues that having fun is crucial to our mental and physical health and presents a practical guide for having more of it. Gretchen Rubin is one of today's most influential and thought-provoking observers of happiness and human nature. She's known for her ability to distill and convey complex ideas with humor and clarity in a way that's accessible to a wide audience. She's been interviewed by Oprah, eaten dinner with Daniel Kahneman, walked arm-in-arm with the Dalai Lama, had her work written up in a medical journal, been the subject of a ''The Talk of the Town'' piece in The New Yorker magazine, and been an answer on the game show Jeopardy! She's the author of many books, including the blockbuster New York Times bestsellers, The Four Tendencies and Better Than Before. Her book The Happiness Project has sold more than one million copies, been published in more than thirty languages, and spent more than two years on the New York Times bestseller list, including at #1. (recorded 2/10/2022)
2/11/202257 minutes, 52 seconds
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Lan Samantha Chang | The Family Chao with Elizabeth McCracken |The Souvenir Museum

Co-promoted with Asian Arts Initiative and Blue Stoop In conversation with Elizabeth McCracken A debut ''work of gorgeous, enduring prose'' (The Washington Post), Lan Samantha Chang's Hunger explored the lives of immigrant families haunted by the past. Her other writing includes the novels Inheritance and All Is Forgotten, Nothing Is Lost, as well as several other works of short fiction and nonfiction. The first Asian American and the first woman director of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Chang was a Berlin Prize fellow, won the PEN Open Book Award, and earned grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. In The Family Chao, a Chinese American family's long-simmering resentments bubble to the surface amidst the mystery of its stern patriarch's murder. Evoking ''moving depictions of marriage and parenthood, and love, betrayal, and loneliness'' (The Boston Globe), Elizabeth McCracken's seven books include Bowlaway, The Giant's House, and Thunderstruck & Other Stories. A former faculty member at the Iowa Writers' Workshop and currently the James Michener Chair for Fiction at the University of Texas at Austin, McCracken has earned the PEN New England Award, three Pushcart Prizes, and an O. Henry Prize, among other honors. Longlisted for the National Book Award, The Souvenir Museum is a story collection in which characters begin transformative journeys that test the strange relationships that bind families together. (recorded 2/9/2022)
2/10/20221 hour, 7 seconds
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Bernardine Evaristo | Manifesto: On Never Giving Up

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Bernardine Evaristo won the 2019 Man Booker Prize and the Dublin Literary Award for Girl, Woman, Other, ''a breathtaking symphony of Black women's voices'' that explores the merging of identity and Britain's African and Caribbean colonial history. Her other novels include The Emperor's Babe and Hello Mum, both of which were adapted into BBC radio programs, in addition to her short fiction, poetry, literary criticism, and drama. A longtime advocate for greater inclusion of artists of color, she co-founded Britain's first Black women's theater company, first major Black theater conference, and first major conference on Black writing. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts and was awarded an MBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for services to literature. An exploration of identity, race, class, aging, and the power of persistence, Manifesto is a memoir of Evaristo's intertwined life and multi-decade effort to share her work with the world. (recorded 1/20/2022)
2/9/20221 hour, 7 minutes, 39 seconds
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Amartya Sen | Home in the World: A Memoir

In conversation with Priya Joshi, Professor of English at Temple University in Philadelphia  Economist Amartya Sen received the Nobel Prize for his ''fascinating ... eloquent, and probing'' (The New York Times) work on social choice theory, welfare economics, development economics, and economics during peacetime and war. Advocating for ethical economies that prioritize tolerance, pluralism, and harmony, his many books include An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions, Development as Freedom, and Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny. The Lamont University Professor at Harvard University, Sen is the recipient of many honors, including the Bharat Ratna, which is the most distinguished honor awarded by the president of India, the Eisenhower Medal, the French Legion of Honor, and the National Humanities Medal. ''A portrait of a citizen of the world'' (The Spectator), Home in the World recounts how his experiences in Asia, Europe, and the United States continue to shape his moral vision for the future. Priya Joshi is a scholar of narrative who studies the social work of popular culture from the nineteenth- to twenty-first centuries. Priya's books include In Another Country:  Colonialism, Culture, and the English Novel in India which won the Modern Language Association's First Book Prize, and Bollywood's India:  A Public Fantasy, both published by Columbia University Press.   She's currently completing a study called Good Bad Books about the titles that everybody loved to read but hated to admit that they did.   (recorded 2/7/2022)
2/8/20221 hour
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Brendan Slocumb | The Violin Conspiracy

In conversation with Stanford Thompson, founder and executive director of Play On Philly A public and private school music educator for more than 20 years, Brendan Slocumb has performed on violin with the Washington Metropolitan Symphony, the Prince George's Philharmonic, and the Alexandria Symphony. He is the concertmaster for the NOVA-Annandale Symphony Orchestra, has frequently served as guest conductor for orchestras throughout Virginia and North Carolina, and is the founder of the Philippines-based nonprofit organization Hands Across the Sea, which has the mission to provide instruments, lessons, and financial support to young music students. The Violin Conspiracy, Slocumb's debut novel, follows a Black musician as he confronts the injustices of U.S. history, racism in the profession of classical music, and the theft of his great-great-grandfather's priceless Stradivarius violin. (recorded 2/3/2022)
2/4/202257 minutes, 2 seconds
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Ro Khanna | Dignity in a Digital Age: Making Tech Work for All of Us

In conversation with Jonathan Tamari Born in Philadelphia to an immigrant family, Democrat Ro Khanna has served as the U.S. representative for California's 17th congressional district-better known as Silicon Valley- since 2017. The deputy assistant secretary of commerce during the Obama administration and a national co-chair for Bernie Sanders's 2020 presidential campaign, he was an economics professor at Stanford University and worked in private practice as a lawyer for technology companies. In Congress, Khanna has championed environmental causes, jobs programs, campaign finance reform, and anti-monopoly economic reforms, among other progressive issues. Dignity in a Digital Age presents Rep. Khanna's objective to achieve opportunity and access for people in the parts of the United States whose lives have been shaped by the growth of 21st technology while not necessarily experiencing the industry's economic benefits. Jonathan Tamari is the national political reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer. Based in Washington, D.C., he writes about policy and politics on Capitol Hill and helped lead the Inquirer's coverage of Pennsylvania's critical role in the 2020 presidential election. A North Jersey native, he previously reported on New Jersey state politics and the Philadelphia Eagles. When he can disconnect, you'll find him running or walking his dog. (recorded 2/2/2022)
2/3/202252 minutes, 8 seconds
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Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts | Black Joy: Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Restoration

In conversation with Bernice McFadden The author and co-author of 15 books that explore topics such as faith, race, social justice, and motherhood, Tracey Michae'l Lewis-Giggetts is a professor of English and Black Studies at the Community College of Philadelphia, hosts the podcast HeARTtalk with Tracey Michae'l, and is the founder of HeARTspace, a healing community for those who have experienced trauma. Her writing has appeared in The Washington Post, Essence, The Guardian, and Ebony, among other publications. In her new essay collection, Lewis-Giggetts celebrates the reaffirming power of Black joy as a means of restoration, resilience, and resistance. Bernice McFadden won the 2017 American Book Award and the 2017 NAACP Image Award for outstanding literary work for The Book of Harlan. Her other novels include Praise Song for the Butterflies, Sugar, and Gathering of Waters. She was a finalist for the NAACP Image Award and a four-time finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. (recorded 2/1/2022)
2/2/202257 minutes, 16 seconds
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Barbara F. Walter | How Civil Wars Start: And How to Stop Them

In conversation with Jacob S. Hacker Political scientist Barbara F. Walter is the author of Reputation and Civil War: Why Separatists Conflicts are So Violent; Globalization, Territoriality, and Conflict; and Civil Wars, Insecurity, and Intervention. The Rohr Chair in Pacific International Relations at the School of Global Policy & Strategy, she is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is on the editorial boards of the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, and International Studies Quarterly, among other academic journals. Walter has received grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the United States Institute of Peace. How Civil Wars Start examines the substantial increase in violent extremism around the globe in order to explore the rising possibility of a second U.S. civil war. The Stanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science and the director of the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University, Jacob S. Hacker is the author of The Great Risk Shift and The Divided Welfare State, and the co-author of Let Them Eat Tweets and American Amnesia, among several other books. He is a board member of The American Prospect, the Economic Policy Institute, and The Century Foundation.  (recorded 1/31/2022)
2/1/202258 minutes, 22 seconds
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Jessamine Chan | The School for Good Mothers

In conversation with Liz Moore Co-sponsored by Blue Stoop A former reviews editor at Publishers Weekly, Jessamine Chan has published short stories in Tin House and Epoch. She has received residencies and fellowships from various organizations, including the Elizabeth George Foundation, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the Ragdale Foundation. In The School for Good Mothers, praised by Carmen Maria Machado as ''a timely and remarkable debut'' novel, Chan tells the story of an otherwise dedicated mother who, due to a single lapse in judgment, finds herself pitted against the government and in danger of losing custody of her child. Liz Moore is the bestselling author of Long Bright River, The Words of Every Song, Heft, and The Unseen World. A creative writing professor in the M.F.A. program at Temple University, her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House and The New York Times, among other places. (recorded 1/27/2022)
1/28/202252 minutes, 18 seconds
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Nechama Tec | Defiance: The Bielski Partisans

Holocaust survivor Nechama Tec is professor emerita of sociology at the University of Connecticut and the author of six books, including In the Lion's Den and Dry Tears, her memoir of growing up during the Nazi occupation of Poland. Recently adapted into an acclaimed film directed by Edward Zwick and starring Daniel Craig and Liev Schreiber, Defiance tells the story of a forest community in western Belorussia that numbered more than 1,200 Jews by 1944: the largest armed rescue operation of Jews by Jews in World War II. Tec illuminates group commander Tuvia Bielski's struggle as a partisan who lost his family to the Nazis, yet never wavered in his conviction that it was more important to save Jews than to kill Germans. Interviewed by Philadelphia Inquirer film critic, Carrie Rickey. (recorded 3/5/2009)
1/27/20221 hour, 38 seconds
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Solomon Jones | Ten Lives, Ten Demands: Life and Death Stories, and a Black Activist's Blueprint for Racial Justice

An award-winning Philadelphia Daily News columnist and morning host for 900 am WURD radio in Philadelphia, Solomon Jones is the author of the Essence bestselling novel The Bridge, as well as the critically acclaimed books Pipe Dream, Ride or Die, Payback, and The Dead Man's Wife. He is also a blogger and frequent on-air commentator for NPR-affiliate WHYY and is the founder of Words on the Street Literacy Program and the Rally for Justice Coalition. Jones previously taught creative writing at Temple University, worked as a columnist for the Philadelphia Weekly, and served on the boards of several committees to end homelessness. Presented through the profound stories of ten contemporary victims of criminal justice racism, his new book presents an actionable guide for social justice advocates to reform racist institutions and policies. (recorded 1/19/2022)
1/20/202257 minutes, 22 seconds
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Hanya Yanagihara | To Paradise

In conversation with Andy Kahan, Ruth W. and A. Morris Williams, Jr. director of author events ''A wrenching portrait of the enduring grace of friendship'' (NPR), Hanya Yanagihara's bestselling novel A Little Life is a story of tragedy and transcendent praise to brotherly love and an unsettling meditation on sexual abuse, suffering, and the difficulties of recovery. A National Book Award Finalist and short-listed for the Man Booker Prize, it was named to dozens of publications' ''best books of the year'' lists. Yanagihara is also the author of The People in the Trees, shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. She is editor-in-chief at T Magazine: The New York Times Style Magazine. A story about the deep recesses of the human heart, To Paradise, her new centuries-spanning novel, follows three sets of characters navigating alternate realities that reveal frightening implications for our own lives. (recorded 1/18/2022)
1/20/20221 hour, 6 minutes, 30 seconds
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Larry Miller and Laila Lacy | Jump: My Secret Journey from the Streets to the Boardroom

In conversation with Fat Joe, rapper, producer, platinum recording artist, and host of the Fat Joe Show Named the first chairman of the Jordan Brand Advisory Board in January 2019, Larry Miller led Michael Jordan's $200-million basketball shoe company to become a $4-billion athletic apparel global powerhouse. After helping found the Jordan Brand at Nike in 1999, he was president of the Portland Trailblazers from 2007 to 2012 and has served in leadership and advocacy roles for the Urban League, Junior Achievement, and Self Enhancement, Inc. In Jump, Miller begins his story with the violence of his 1960s West Philadelphia upbringing and incarceration and shares his later opportunities of education, redemption, and success. Laila Lacy, a native of Philadelphia, graduated from Central High School. She earned a degree from Howard University in Washington, DC, where she studied Psychology and Human Communications and has studied at New York's Bank Street Graduate School of Education. Lacy taught middle school for the New York Board of Education and later served as a business development manager for several mortgage banking firms in California. In addition to collaborating on her father's memoir, she has written op-eds and product reviews that have been featured in the several online magazines. Masks are required at all times while in the building. Due to the changing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and local health and safety regulations, please visit our website before all events to get the latest information on vaccine and masking guidance. Books will be available for purchase at the library on event night. A book signing will follow the presentation. Books provided by Uncle Bobbie's Coffee and Books. (recorded 1/17/2022)
1/19/20221 hour, 25 seconds
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Mike Sielski | The Rise: Kobe Bryant and the Pursuit of Immortality

In conversation with Michael Days A sports columnist at The Philadelphia Inquirer since 2013, Mike Sielski is the author of Fading Echoes, the true story of two Pennsylvania high school football rivals who later found brotherhood while in the U.S. military in in the battlefields of the Middle East, and is the co-author of How to Be Like Jackie Robinson, a collection of life lessons taken from the trailblazing baseball legend. In 2015 he was voted the best sports columnist in the U.S. by The Associated Press Sports Editors. The Rise, referred to by Bob Costas as a ''story informed by meticulous research and rendered with clear-eyed insights,'' is about more than the tragedy that took Kobe Bryant's life and offers a thorough account of his identity as a sports and cultural figure and an assessment of his impact on our society. Formerly The Philadelphia Inquirer's managing editor, vice president for diversity and inclusion, and editor for reader engagement, Michael Days serves on the Board of Visitors at Temple University's Klein College of Media and Communication. (recorded 1/13/2022)
1/14/202257 minutes, 9 seconds
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Mark Bowden and Matthew Teague | The Steal: The Attempt to Overturn the 2020 Election and the People Who Stopped It

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award-winning journalist and broadcaster Renowned for his ''signature blend of deep reportage and character-driven storytelling (The New York Times Book Review),'' Mark Bowden is a national correspondent for The Atlantic. He is the author of 15 bestselling books of investigative journalism, including Blackhawk Down, adapted by Ridley Scott into a popular film; Killing Pablo, winner of the Overseas Press Club's Cornelius Ryan Award for book of the year; The Three Battles of Wanat, a collection of his best long-form essays; and Hue 1968, the story of the Vietnam War's bloodiest battle as told by participants from both sides.  A contributor to National Geographic, The Atlantic, Esquire, and other periodicals, Matthew Teague is a former international and national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times. He is executive producer of the 2021 feature film Our Friend, and his writing has appeared in numerous anthologies, including Best American Travel Writing, Best American Crime Writing, and Best American Sports Writing.  In The Steal, Bowden and Teague detail the 64 days in which Donald Trump and his allies attempted to invalidate the results of the 2020 presidential election. Employing detailed research, never-before-shared first-person accounts, and reports from all over the country, it offers a thorough account of this unprecedented attack on U.S. democracy. (recorded 1/12/2022)
1/13/202248 minutes, 39 seconds
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Rumaan Alam | Leave the World Behind

In conversation with Carmen Maria Machado Rumaan Alam is the author of the New York Times instant bestseller Leave the World Behind,  ''a genuine thriller, a brilliant distillation of our anxious age, and a work of high literary merit'' (The Washington Post) that follows two families who meet at an isolated vacation during a possible cataclysm. The book was a finalist for the 2020 National Book Award and named to nearly two dozen ''best of the year'' lists, and a film adaptation starring Julia Roberts and Mahershala Ali is in production. Alam's other novels include Rich and Pretty and That Kind of Mother, and his other writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and The Wall Street Journal, among other periodicals.  Carmen Maria Machado is the author of the memoir In the Dream House and the short story collection Her Body and Other Parties. She is the Abrams Artist in Residence at the University of Pennsylvania and a Guggenheim fellow. (recorded 12/2/2021)
1/5/202257 minutes, 14 seconds
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Nadifa Mohamed | The Fortune Men

In conversation with Rabih Alameddine, National Book Award nominated author of An Unnecessary Woman, The Angel of History, The Hakawati, and most recently, The Wrong End of the Telescope. Somali-British author Nadifa Mohamed is the writer of the renowned novels Black Mamba Boy and The Orchard of Lost Souls. A regular contributor to The Guardian and the BBC, she is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and is a lecturer in creative writing at Royal Holloway, University of London. Mohamed is the recipient of the Somerset Maugham Award, and was named one of Granta's best young British novelists of 2013, and was a part of the 2014 Africa39 list of the most promising writers under the age of 40 from sub-Saharan Africa. A finalist for the 2021 Booker Prize, The Fortune Men is a novel about Mahmood Mattan, a young Somali sailor falsely accused of a violent crime in 1950s Cardiff, Wales. ''Nadifa Mohamed's The Fortune Men is a blues song cut straight from the heart. It tells about the unjust death of an innocent Black man caught up in a corrupt system. Nadifa's masterful evocation of the full life of Mahmood Mattan, the last man executed in Cardiff for a crime he was exonerated for forty years later, is brought alive with subtle artistry and heartbreaking humanity. In one man's life Mohamed captures the multitudes of homelands, dialects, hopes, and prayers of Somalis, Jews, Maltese and West Indians drawn in by the ships that filled Wales' Tiger Bay in the 1950's, all hoping for a future that eludes Mattan.''-Walter Mosley, author of Devil in a Blue Dress (recorded 12/15/2021)
12/16/202156 minutes, 46 seconds
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Kathryn Kolbert and Julie F. Kay | Controlling Women: What We Must Do Now to Save Reproductive Freedom

Watch the eventhere. In conversation with Dorothy Roberts Sandra Shaber Memorial Lecture Recognized by the National Law Journal as one of the ''100 Most Influential Lawyers in America,'' Kathryn Kolbert made history in 1992 when she argued the case Planned Parenthood v. Casey before the U.S. Supreme Court, a case widely recognized as protecting the right to an abortion guaranteed by Roe v. Wade. The founder of the Athena Center for Leadership at Barnard College and the cofounder of the Center for Reproductive Rights, she created and was the executive producer of NPR's Justice Talking series. Julie F. Kay has spent decades on the front lines of the legal fight to advance gender equality and religious freedom in the U.S. and internationally. After starting her career in law as a staff attorney at the Center for Reproductive Rights , she has since helped pave the way for the legalization of abortion in Ireland, fought to protect the parenting rights of people leaving ultra-religious communities, and served as a founding president of Women's Link Worldwide.  In Controlling Women, Kolbert and Kay offer a comprehensive account of the struggle to safeguard the protections of Roe v. Wade and preserve women's fundamental reproductive rights in the face of nearly 50 years of legal battles. Dorothy Roberts is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School. She is also founding director of the Penn Program on Race, Science & Society in the Center for Africana Studies and the author of several books that focus on health, social justice, and bioethics. (recorded 12/14/2021)
12/15/20211 hour, 1 minute, 11 seconds
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Edward Sorel | Profusely Illustrated

Watch the video on our youtube channel. In conversation with Signe Wilkinson ''One of America's foremost political satirists'' (The New York Times), illustrator, caricaturist, and cartoonist Edward Sorel has illustrated 41 covers for The New Yorker and has published pictorial essays and features in The Nation, Vanity Fair, Esquire, and The Atlantic, among many other publications. His many pictorial books include Literary Lives, Unauthorized Portraits, and Mary Astor's Purple Diary. The recipient of the George Polk Award for Satiric Drawing and the Best in Illustration Award from the National Cartoonists Society, Sorel's work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and museums. His new memoir combines 172 of his drawings, cartoons, and caricatures with lively prose to tell the story of his Depression-era Bronx upbringing, the adventures in his rich personal life, and extraordinary 70-year career.    Signe Wilkinson is a widely syndicated cartoonist and the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning. Formerly based at The Philadelphia Inquirer, she is the recipient of three Overseas Press Club Awards. With Jonathan Zimmerman she co-authored the book Free Speech: And Why You Should Give a Damn. (recorded 12/9/2021)
12/10/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 3 seconds
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Elif Shafak | The Island of Missing Trees with Siri Hustvedt | Mothers, Fathers, and Others

The most widely read woman female writer in Turkey and acclaimed worldwide for her work's ''vision, bravery and compassion'' (The New York Times Book Review), Elif Shafak is the author of 12 bestselling novels, including The Bastard of Istanbul, The Architect's Apprentice, Three Daughters of Eve, and 10 Minutes 28 Seconds in This Strange World, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. She is also the author of the memoir Black Milk and has written articles for periodicals around the world. A fellow and a vice president of the Royal Society of Literature, Shafak has taught at numerous universities in Turkey, the U.K., and the U.S. The Island of Missing Trees explores love, trauma, and ecological renewal through the bittersweet love story of two Cypriot teens on opposing sides of war.  A ''21st-century Virginia Woolf'' (Literary Review UK), Siri Hustvedt is the author of the internationally bestselling novels The Blazing World, What I Loved, and The Summer Without Men, among others. She is also the author of A Woman Looking at Men Looking at Women, a three-part essay collection that employs feminism, psychology, neuroscience, and a host of other frameworks that connect pursuits to bridge the gaps between the sciences and humanities, a topic upon which she has also published numerous academic essays and papers. Her many honors include the International Gabarron Prize for Thought and Humanities and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Fiction. In Mothers, Fathers, and Others, Hustvedt examines familial love and hate, feminism, and the power of art in a series of interdisciplinary essays. (recorded 12/7/2021)
12/8/202157 minutes, 53 seconds
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Kevin Birmingham | The Sinner and the Saint: Dostoevsky and the Gentleman Murderer Who Inspired a Masterpiece

In conversation with Michael Gorra, the Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of English Language and Literature at Smith College and the editor of the Norton Critical Editions of As I Lay Dying, and The Sound and the Fury, and most recently The Saddest Words: William Faulkner's Civil War. Kevin Birmingham is the author of The Most Dangerous Book, a ''lively'' and ''impressively researched'' (The Washington Post) history of James Joyce's controversial Ulysses. A New York Times bestseller, it won the PEN New England Award and the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism. Birmingham's other writing has appeared in such periodicals as The New York Times Book Review and Harper's, and he was named a public scholar by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Sinner and the Saint reveals the incredible true story of the notorious 1830s Parisian murderer who inspired Fyodor Dostevsky's magnum opus Crime and Punishment. (recorded 11/30/2021)
12/1/202157 minutes, 1 second
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Rabih Alameddine | The Wrong End of the Telescope with Claire Vaye Watkins | I Love You but I've Chosen Darkness

Rabih Alameddine was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Book Award for An Unnecessary Woman, a ''paean to the transformative power of reading'' (LA Review of Books). His many other works include the novels The Angel of History, The Hakawati, and the short story collection The Perv. The winner of the 2019 Dos Passos Prize, Alameddine was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and has had solo gallery exhibitions of his paintings on three continents. In The Wrong End of the Telescope, a steadfast Arab American trans woman aids Syrian refugees on the island of Lesbos, and forms a close bond with a Syrian matriarch who is determined to protect her children and husband. Claire Vaye Watkins' debut story collection Battleborn was named a best book of 2012 by numerous periodicals. Her other work includes Gold Fame Citrus, a novel in which two young lovers squatting in an abandoned mansion find hope in a drought-wracked future Los Angeles. Watkins is a writing professor at the University of California, Irvine, and her stories and essays have appeared in Granta, One Story, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, and Glimmer Train. I Love You but I've Chosen Darkness is the ''trippy and beautiful, slippery and seductive'' (Vogue) story of a new mother who leaves for a speaking engagement in Reno, Nevada and ends up on a transformative journey through the Mojave Desert of her youth. (recorded 11/23/2021)
11/24/20211 hour, 3 minutes, 9 seconds
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Nikole Hannah-Jones | The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition, and Dr. Anthea Butler, Geraldine R. Segal Professor in American Social Thought and Chair of Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania Introduced by legendary poet, Sonia Sanchez Nikole Hannah-Jones won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for her work on The 1619 Project, a continuing initiative started byThe New York Times Magazine to reexamine United States history through the consequences of slavery and the contributions of Black Americans. The co-founder of the Ida B. Wells Society for Investigative Reporting, Hannah-Jones has earned, among many other honors, a Peabody Award, two George Polk Awards, three National Magazine Awards, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship. She was recently was named the Knight Chair in Race and Journalism at Howard University. Interweaving 18 essays with 36 works of fiction and nonfiction by a group of writers of diverse backgrounds, skills, and experiences, The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story is a greatly expanded exploration of the continuing legacy of slavery in our cultural, political, and legal institutions. (recorded 11/17/2021)
11/23/20211 hour, 6 minutes, 58 seconds
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Jorge L. Contreras | The Genome Defense: Inside the Epic Legal Battle to Determine Who Owns Your DNA

In conversation with Orly Lobel, author of You Don't Own Me: The Court Battles that Exposed Barbie's Dark Side Specializing in intellectual property and science policy, Jorge L. Contreras is a professor of law and ethics of human genetics at the University of Utah. His more than 100 scholarly articles have appeared in publications such as Science, Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, and Nature, and he has been featured on BBC Radio, NPR, and PRI, among other media outlets. A member of the Advisory Board of the American Antitrust Institute, Contreras has served on several other high-level governmental, research, and legal boards. The Genome Defense follows the intense high-stakes courtroom fight undertaken by ACLU lawyers, activists, and scientists against biotech companies seeking to patent the very material that makes us who we are. Orly Lobel is the award-winning author of several books and numerous articles. She is the Warren Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of San Diego and received her doctoral and law degrees from Harvard University. She is a prolific speaker, commentator, and scholar who travels the world lecturing about policy and industry. (recorded 11/18/2021)
11/22/20211 hour, 1 minute, 45 seconds
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Jonathan Karl | Betrayal: The Final Act of the Trump Show

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Jonathan Karl is the author of Front Row at the Trump Show, an instant New York Times bestseller that peered behind the scenes into President Trump and his allies' unprecedented actions. The chief White House correspondent and chief Washington correspondent for ABC News, Karl has written extensively about Trump's presidency., Karl has also covered some of D.C.'s most important beats, including four presidential administrations, Capitol Hill, the Pentagon, and the State Department. He was the president of the White House Correspondents' Association from 2019 to 2020 and has earned the Walter Cronkite Award for National Individual Achievement, an Emmy Award, and the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award, the highest honor for Congressional reporting. In Betrayal, Karl recounts the chaotic events that followed the 2020 presidential election and the former president's stunning downfall. (recorded 11/22/2021)
11/22/20211 hour, 6 minutes, 39 seconds
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Tracy K. Smith | Lucille Clifton's Generations: A Memoir

In conversation with Trapeta B. Mayson Chronicling African American family life and women through 14 celebrated poetry collections, Lucille Clifton won the National Book Award and the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, and is the only author ever to have two books of poetry nominated in the same year for the Pulitzer Prize. She also authored scores of children's books, served as the Poet Laureate of Maryland, and earned fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Academy of American Poets. Originally published 34 years before her 2010 death, Generations is a memoir that traces Clifton's family's history from Buffalo, New York back to the Jim Crow South and the slave trade, all the way to the women of the Dahomey people of West Africa. Generations is prefaced by an all-new forward from Tracey K. Smith. A former two-term United States Poet Laureate, she is currently the chair of Princeton University's Lewis Center for the Arts and a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. She is the author of four books of verse, including the Pulitzer Prize–winning Life on Mars, as well as the memoir Ordinary Light. In conversation with Trapeta B. Mayson, Philadelphia Poet Laureate and the author of She Was Once Herself and Mocha Melodies. (recorded 11/16/2021)
11/17/202159 minutes, 19 seconds
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Kristin Henning | The Rage of Innocence: How America Criminalizes Black Youth

In conversation with Marsha Levick, cofounder, deputy director, and chief counsel of the Juvenile Law Center The Blume Professor of Law and director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative at the Georgetown University Law Center, Kristin Henning represents young people in Washington, D.C.'s Superior Court and conducts nationwide training of criminal justice institutions across the U.S. on the intersection of race, adolescence, and policing. She is the former lead attorney of the Juvenile Unit at the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia and serves on the board of directors for the Center for Children's Law and Policy. In The Rage of Innocence, Henning exposes the day-to-day but widely hidden ways in which discriminatory and aggressive policing traumatizes Black children and leads them to fear, resist, and resent the police. Marsha Levick is the cofounder, deputy director, and chief counsel of the Juvenile Law Center, the oldest public interest law firm for children in the United States. For more than 35 years, Ms. Levick has been an advocate for children's and women's rights, earning recognition as a national leader in juvenile law. Ms. Levick has authored or co-authored numerous briefs before the U.S. Supreme Court and many federal and state courts, contributing to cases including Roper v. Simmons, striking the juvenile death penalty; Graham v. Florida, striking juvenile life without parole sentences for non-homicide crimes; JDB v. North Carolina, requiring consideration of youth status in the Miranda custody determination; and Miller v. Alabama, striking mandatory juvenile life without parole sentences in homicide cases. (recorded 11/15/2021)
11/16/202159 minutes, 41 seconds
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Robert Costa | Peril

Ellis Wachs Endowed Lecture In conversation with Michael Smerconish A national political reporter at The Washington Post, Bucks County's own Robert Costa has earned a wide readership and praise from fellow journalists for his deeply sourced and well-founded reporting. He previously wrote for National Review, was the moderator and managing editor for PBS's Washington Week, and served as a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. Co-authored with investigative journalist and bestselling writer Bob Woodward, Peril utilizes hundreds of interviews and thousands of documents to delve into the difficult transfer of power from the Trump administration to the Biden presidency and the resulting crisis for U.S. democracy. Michael A. Smerconish is the host of The Michael Smerconish Program on SiriusXM POTUS Channel 124, the host of CNN's Smerconish on Saturday mornings, a Sunday Philadelphia Inquirer columnist, and a New York Times bestselling author. (recorded 11/12/2021)
11/15/20211 hour, 14 seconds
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Uwem Akpan | New York, My Village with Kirstin Valdez Quade | Five Wounds

Uwem Akpan's Say You're One of Them, ''a startling debut collection'' (The New York Times) of short stories was a Wall Street Journal #1 bestseller, the 2009 Oprah Book Club Selection, and was translated in to 12 languages. It was named to several publications' ''best of the year'' lists and earned the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the Open Book Award, among other honors. A professor in the University of Florida's MFA writing program and the recipient of many literary fellowships, Akpan has published stories and autobiographical work in The New Yorker, the Nigerian edition of The Guardian, and the Hekima Review, among other places. His debut novel tells the satirical story of a Nigerian editor who experiences racism and feelings of white cultural superiority underneath the façade of the Manhattan publishing industry.  Kirstin Valdez Quade is the author of the ''quirky, compelling'' and ''polished debut'' (Dallas Morning News) story collection Night at the Fiestas, winner of the National Book Critics Circle's John Leonard Prize. A professor of creative writing at Princeton University, she has earned the ''5 Under 35'' award from the National Book Foundation, the Rome Prize, and a Stegner Fellowship. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and The O. Henry Prize Stories anthology, among other places. The Five Wounds, Quade's debut novel, finds five generations of a New Mexican family converging in the year following an unexpected birth. (recorded 11/10/2021)
11/11/20211 hour, 1 minute, 47 seconds
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Linda Greenhouse | Justice on the Brink: The Death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Rise of Amy Coney Barrett, and Twelve Months That Transformed the Supreme Court

In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Pine Tree Foundation Endowed Lecture The New York Times's Supreme Court correspondent for nearly three decades, Linda Greenhouse won the Pulitzer Prize for her coverage of the United States's highest judicial branch. She is the author of Becoming Justice Blackmun and The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction, and the co-author of The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right. In addition to the Pulitzer Prize, her other journalistic honors include the John Chancellor Award, the Goldsmith Career Award, and the Radcliffe Institute Medal. In Justice on the Brink, Greenhouse offers a sobering account and inside analysis of the year in which the sitting membership of the Supreme Court transitioned into a rightwing super-majority. (recorded 11/9/2021)
11/10/202157 minutes, 22 seconds
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Robby Krieger: | Set the Night on Fire: Living, Dying, and Playing Guitar With the Doors

In conversation with David Fricke, senior editor for Rolling Stone and SiriusXM host One of Rolling Stone's ''100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time'', Robby Krieger is best known as a member of the legendary rock band The Doors. He wrote or co-wrote some of the group's biggest commercial hits, including ''Light My Fire,'' ''Touch Me,'' ''Love Me Two Times,'' and ''Love Her Madly.'' While The Doors have sold over one hundred million albums worldwide, inspired Oliver Stone's popular biopic feature film, and have received a Lifetime Achievement Grammy, Krieger has also become a Grammy-nominated solo artist, an accomplished painter, and he is the co-founder of the annual Medlock-Krieger Rock & Roll Golf Classic & All-Star Concert. In Set the Night on Fire, Krieger, the notoriously reserved musician describes his childhood, The Doors' triumphs and tragedies, and the frank details of his personal struggles. (recorded 11/8/2021)
11/9/202155 minutes, 13 seconds
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Huma Abedin | Both/And: A Life in Many Worlds

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award-winning journalist and broadcaster Currently Hillary Clinton's chief of staff, Huma Abedin began as an intern for the former first lady in 1996. In the interim she has served in the U.S. Senate as senior advisor to Senator Clinton, worked as traveling chief of staff for Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign, was the deputy chief of staff at the U.S. Department of State, and was vice chair of Hillary for America in 2016. In her candid new memoir, Abedin tells the story of her upbringing in the United States and Saudi Arabia by Indian and Pakistani parents, her heartbreaking marriage to Anthony Weiner and their shared love for their son, and some of her most extraordinary career experiences. (recorded 11/5/2021)
11/8/202148 minutes, 10 seconds
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Antonio Damasio | Feeling & Knowing: Making Minds Conscious

Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Endowed Lecture One of the world's leading neuroscientists, Dr. Antonio Damasio has made watershed contributions to the understanding of how our brains process emotions, decisions, and conscious. He is the David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Philosophy, and director of the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. His prolific body of work includes scores of scientific articles and several books, including Decartes' Error, The Feeling of What Happens, and The Strange Order of Things. A member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Damasio is the recipient of some of the scientific community's most prestigious awards. Feeling & Knowing is a guide to understanding the phenomenon of consciousness and how it relates to the physical brain. (recorded 11/4/2021)
11/5/202159 minutes, 8 seconds
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Glory Edim | On Girlhood: 15 Stories from the Well-Read Black Girl Library

In conversation with Christine Kendall, author of Riding Chance, nominated for a NAACP Image Award, and The True Definition of Neva Beane Glory Edim is the creator of Well-Read Black Girl, a book club, book, and online community that showcases the universality of Black women's stories and experiences in and through literature. She also edited the 2018 NAACP Image Award-nominated anthology of the same name that featured a wide array of essays by Black women. A recipient of the 2017 Innovator's Award from the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, Edim serves on the board of New York City's Housing Works Bookstore. She is the curator of the new story collection On Girlhood, referred to by Jacqueline Woodson as ''a loving family of writers who came before me,'' that includes such towering voices as Toni Morrison, Paule Marshall, Toni Cade Bambara, and Alice Walker--among many others. (recorded 11/3/2021)
11/4/202147 minutes, 33 seconds
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George F. Will | American Happiness and Discontents: The Unruly Torrent, 2008–-2020

Meelya Gordon Memorial Lecture Renowned for his ''ability to combine high thinking with a shrewd capacity to understand day-to-day American politics,'' (The Economist) Pulitzer Prize winner George Will has written a nationally syndicated column at The Washington Post for the past 45 years. His many books include The Conservative Sensibility, Men at Work: The Craft of Baseball, and One Man's America: The Pleasures and Provocations of Our Singular Nation. Will is the winner of the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism, two Silurian Awards for editorial writing, and the Order of Lincoln award from his home state of Illinois. In American Happiness and Discontents, Will addresses such varied topics as American socialists, anti-capitalist conservatives, drug policy, the criminal justice system, climatology, the Coronavirus, the First Amendment, the composition of the federal judiciary, the morality of watching football, and so much more. (recorded 11/1/2021)
11/3/202159 minutes, 54 seconds
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Woody Holton | Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution

In conversation with Adam McNeil, host of the New Books in African American Studies podcast The McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, Woody Holton teaches early U.S. history, specializing in economics, African American history, Indigenous history, and women's history. His many books include the Bancroft Prize–winning biography Abigail Adams; Forced Founders, winner of the Merle Curti Award from the Organization of American Historians; and Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution, a National Book Award finalist. He is also the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation. In Liberty Is Sweet, Holton uses more than a thousand primary accounts to offer a wide-ranging reassessment of marginalized peoples' contributions to U.S. independence and their conflicts with the values, decisions, and agendas of the Founding Fathers. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at Rutgers University, where he writes about Black Women from the Chesapeake Bay during the Revolutionary and Founding eras. Adam's research has been supported by fellowships from the University of Michigan's Clements Library, the David Center for the American Revolution at the American Philosophical Society, and the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. In addition to academic writing, Adam regularly contributes to academic blogs Black Perspectives and The Junto, and regularly interviews scholars on the New Books in African American Studies podcast, where he has interviewed nearly one hundred scholars about their works in African American Studies and African American History.  (recorded 10/28/2021)
10/29/20211 hour, 11 minutes, 22 seconds
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Joshua Ferris | A Calling for Charlie Barnes with Dana Spiotta | Wayward

Joshua Ferris's ''brash, extravagant, and chillingly beautiful'' (The New Yorker) novels include Then We Came to the End, winner of the 2008 PEN/Hemingway Award for best first novel and a finalist for the National Book Award; To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, which was shortlisted for the 2014 Man Booker Prize; and The Unnamed, the story of a lawyer who has the uncontrollable urge to walk and keep walking. One of The New Yorker's ''20 Under 40'' writers and winner of the International Dylan Thomas Prize, Ferris is also the author of the short story collection The Dinner Party and has published fiction in Granta, Prairie Schooner, and Best American Voices, among other places. In A Calling for Charlie Barnes, a scheming malcontent finds redemption on an unlikely path.    Dana Spiotta is the author of five novels, including Wayward, which the New York Times called a "virtuosic, singular and very funny portrait of a woman seeking sanity and purpose in a world gone mad." Spiotta has been a finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.  She was a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Rome Prize, the St. Francis College Literary Prize, and the John Updike Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. (recorded 10/26/2021)
10/27/20211 hour, 2 minutes, 16 seconds
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Donald Antrim | One Friday in April: A Story of Suicide and Survival

In conversation with Jonathan Franzen, bestselling author of Crossroads, Freedom, Purity, and The Corrections among other works of fiction and non-fiction. ''A fiercely intelligent writer'' (The New York Times), Donald Antrim is the author of three critically acclaimed novels, Elect Mr. Robinson for a Better World, The Hundred Brothers, and The Verificationist. His other work includes Afterlife, a memoir about his mother; The Emerald Light in the Air, a story collection compiled from his published work's frequent appearances in The New Yorker; and essays and articles  published in a variety of periodicals. He has received grants and awards from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the MacArthur Foundation, among others. In One Friday in April, Antrim uses the harrowing circumstances surrounding his 2006 suicidal thoughts and actions to reframe this misunderstood illness as something other than the choice of a depressed person.     (recorded 10/21/2021)
10/21/202157 minutes, 26 seconds
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Asali Solomon | The Days of Afrekete

In conversation with Nicole Dennis-Benn Asali Solomon is the author of Disgruntled, ''a smart, philosophical, coming-of-age'' (San Francisco Chronicle) novel about the double-binds of race in late 1980s Philadelphia. Her other work includes the short story collection Get Down, as well as stories published in a wide array of periodicals, including McSweeney's, Essence, and O, The Oprah Magazine. A professor of fiction writing and literature of the African diaspora at Haverford College, Solomon is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Award and the National Book Foundation's ''5 Under 35'' honor. The Days of Afrekete follows two women who reconnect years after their college days and rediscover themselves amidst the questions asked at middle age. Nicole Dennis-Benn is the author of Patsy and Here Comes the Sun, a New York Times Notable Book and winner of the Lambda Literary Award. Born and raised in Kingston, Jamaica, she teaches at Princeton and lives with her wife in Brooklyn, New York. (recorded 10/20/2021)
10/21/20211 hour, 1 minute, 52 seconds
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Anthony Doerr | Cloud Cuckoo Land

In conversation with John Freeman Anthony Doerr won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for All the Light We Cannot See, ''a beautiful, daring, heartbreaking, oddly joyous novel'' (Seattle Times) about a blind French girl and a German boy navigating the carnage of World War II. Also the winner of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction and a National Book Award finalist, it spent more than two years on the New York Times bestseller list. Doerr's other work includes the novel About Grace, two story collections, and a memoir, for which he has earned five O. Henry Prizes, the Story Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship, among other honors. A novel of the interconnected tapestry of human experience, Cloud Cuckoo Land weaves together the lives of a fifteenth century orphan, an octogenarian in present-day Idaho, and a girl on an interstellar spacecraft decades from today. John Freeman was the editor of Granta until 2013. His books include Dictionary of the Undoing, How to Read a Novelist, Tales of Two Americas, and Tales of Two Planets. His poetry includes the collections Maps, The Park, and the forthcoming Wind, Trees. In 2021, he edited the anthologies There's a Revolution Outside, My Love with Tracy K. Smith, and The Penguin Book of the Modern American Short Story. An Executive Editor at Knopf, he teaches writing and literature classes at NYU. (recorded 10/19/2021)
10/20/202159 minutes, 11 seconds
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Honorée Fanonne Jeffers | The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois with Kevin Young | Stones

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers is the author of five poetry collections, including The Gospel of Barbecue, Red Clay Suite, and The Age of Phillis, which was longlisted for the 2020 National Book Award for Poetry and won a 2021 NAACP Image Award. Critic at Large for The Kenyon Review and a professor of English at the University of Oklahoma, Jeffers has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the American Antiquarian Society. Additionally, Jeffers has been honored with the Harper Lee Award for Literary Distinction and with induction into the Alabama Writers Hall of Fame. An instant New York Times bestseller and an Oprah Book Club selection, her debut novel The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois chronicles the centuries-spanning journey of a Black American family from the days of the colonial slave trade to our own unsteady era. The director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, Kevin Young is also the poetry editor for The New Yorker, where he hosts the Poetry Podcast. He is the author of the poetry collections Brown, Blue Laws, Book of Hours, and Jelly Roll, a finalist for the National Book Award. His nonfiction books include Bunk and The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. The former director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library, Young has been honored with the Lenore Marshall Prize for Poetry, an American Book Award, and the Paterson Poetry Prize. Stones is the newest collection from Young, ''one of the poetry stars of his generation'' (Los Angeles Times). (recorded 10/18/2021)
10/19/202155 minutes, 27 seconds
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Adam Schiff | Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost Our Democracy and Still Could

In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award-winning journalist and broadcaster The United States representative for California's 28th congressional district and the chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Adam Schiff was the lead manager for the first impeachment proceedings against former President Donald Trump. He is a former member of the House Appropriations Committee and the Foreign Affairs Committee, and served as an assistant U.S. attorney in Los Angeles from 1987 to 1993 and a California state senator from 1996 to 2000. In Midnight in Washington, Schiff reveals an inside look at one of U.S. democracy's most challenging moments, his own path to becoming one of the former president's most prominent critics, and the principles we need in the struggle against autocracy. (recorded 10/18/2021)
10/18/202156 minutes, 35 seconds
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Todd Doughty | Little Pieces of Hope: Happy-Making Things in a Difficult World

In conversation with Adriana Trigiani  The senior vice president and deputy publisher of Doubleday, Todd Doughty has worked for Penguin Random House publishing for more than 20 years. When the World Health Organization named COVID-19 a global pandemic, he decided that he had to find a way to recognize the commonplace joys many of us take for granted. As a result, Doughty wrote Little Pieces of Hope, a combination of thoughts, lists, illustrations, playlists, and exercises to remind readers of life's mundane and remarkable beauty. ''A comedy writer with a heart of gold'' (The New York Times), Adriana Trigiani is the bestselling author of 20 fiction and nonfiction books that have been published in 38 countries. She is also an award-winning filmmaker, playwright, and television writer and producer. Her forthcoming novel The Good Left Undone will be released in April 2022. (recorded 10/14/2021)