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Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby Profile

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

English, Foreign/International, 1 season, 2472 episodes, 6 days, 2 hours
About
Don't risk not knowing what's going around New Zealand and the world - catch up with interviews from Early Edition, hosted by Kate Hawkesby on Newstalk ZB.
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John Battersby: Massey University Defence Expert on New Zealand's commitment to working closer with the United States

New Zealand is committing to working more closely with the United States.   The countries have agreed to work more closely with each other and common allies like Australia, in areas like defence and intelligence.   New Zealand's joining the US in financially supporting two initiatives in the Pacific to the tune of $16.4 million.   Massey University defence expert John Battersby told Mike Hosking that we're now in a more uncertain Pacific region and things are changing.   He says the one thing we don't want is a contest in our front patch between China and the US.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/11/20244 minutes, 8 seconds
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Judith Collins: Minister for Space on speaking at the Space Symposium in the US and putting NZ on the global map

The Minister for Space has been working on our space image over in the US.  Judith Collins spoke yesterday morning at the Space Symposium as New Zealand’s first Space Minister, putting us on the global stage.  She told Mike Hosking that Rocket Lab has done an incredible job at putting New Zealand on the American space map with the work Peter Beck has done with NASA.  In 2019 a survey was done on the NZ space sector, valuing it at $1.9 billion, but Collins thinks that by now it should be three or more times larger than that.  She said that this is a sector with enormous growth and an extraordinary level of competency.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/11/20244 minutes, 23 seconds
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Mike Atkinson: Aspire Property Management managing director on the bill that could bring back 90-day no-clause terminations for periodic tenancies

There’s concerns the Government's tenancy changes won't affect rent prices.  A Bill being introduced to Parliament will bring back 90-day no-cause terminations for periodic tenancies.  Labour removed them last term.  Housing Minister Chris Bishop believes it'll push down rents.  Aspire Property Management managing director Mike Atkinson told Mike Hosking that the Government skipped the removal of deductibility, which would've had more of an impact right now.  He says landlords haven't been talking about 90-day notices and believes it wasn't needed at the moment.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/11/20243 minutes, 58 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on Arizona deciding to enforce a strict abortion law from 1864

The US state of Arizona is close to joining Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas in imposing a strict abortion ban.   Arizona's conservative Supreme Court has decided an abortion law —first introduced 160 years ago— is now enforceable.  US correspondent Mitch McCann told Mike Hosking that abortions are currently legal until 15 weeks of pregnancy.   But he says this 1864 law —created before Arizona was even a proper state— would make abortions illegal except if the mother's life is in danger.  McCann says it could be enforceable within two months, with Joe Biden calling the law cruel and extreme.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/10/20243 minutes, 7 seconds
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Chris Wilkinson: First Retail Group managing director on Ikea's plans for expansion into New Zealand

Ikea seems to be looking "big picture" as it enters the New Zealand market.  The Swedish furniture giant is looking for a "people and culture manager", ahead of its opening at Auckland's Sylvia Park in late 2025.  The successful manager will first be tasked with recruiting 400 people.  First Retail Group managing director Chris Wilkinson told Mike Hosking that like other big retailers coming here, Ikea is playing the long game.  He says they know things will be different in the future, and they're craving global expansion.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/10/20243 minutes, 10 seconds
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Letitia Harding: Asthma Foundation CEO on the need for further penalties for those selling illegal vapes

Health advocates say enforcement officers are needed to clamp down on the illegal vape trade.  Reports suggest that the sale of vaping products that don't meet regulation is widespread.  Asthma Foundation Chief Executive Letitia Harding told Mike Hosking that retailers selling illegal vaping products need more than a slap on the wrist.  She says penalties like fines could help stamp out the dodgy market.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/10/20243 minutes, 35 seconds
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Bill Ralston: Former TVNZ news boss and TV3 political editor on the Government's response to Newshub's closure and TVNZ's cuts

The mainstream media industry is shrinking, and television is leading the way out.   Newshub has confirmed its closing on July 5th, while TVNZ is cutting four of major programmes.   Media and Communications Minister Melissa Lee says the global market is facing the same difficulties.  She's written a cabinet paper on the media sector but hasn't disclosed any details.   Former TVNZ news boss and TV3 political editor Bill Ralston told Mike Hosking that the Government could step in and do something about it.  He says Melissa Lee has no idea of what she's doing really and is basically saying her hands are tied.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/10/20242 minutes, 23 seconds
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Gavin Grey: UK and Europe Correspondent on the threats to and increased security at the UEFA Champions League quarterfinals

European football fans may be seeing increased security at this week’s Champions League games.  A pro-IS media channel has published several images calling for attacks at the stadiums hosting the quarterfinals.  UEFA said it was aware of the threats, but the London, Madrid, and Paris games would go ahead as planned, and Ministers in Spain and France have confirmed enhanced security measures.  UK and Europe Correspondent Gavin Grey told Mike Hosking that while the outlet who posted the images isn’t officially linked to the Islamic State group, it is thought that they liaise with them.  He said that security has been upped across the board, and the London Metropolitan Police Commissioner is confident they have a robust policing plan in place.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/9/20243 minutes, 22 seconds
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John Carran: Jarden Investment Strategist says the OCR is likely to remain at 5.5%

The Official Cash Rate is likely to remain unchanged for at least the next few months.  Most economists expect the Reserve bank to keep the Official Cash Rate unchanged at 5.5% when it comes up for review at 2pm.  It's remained unchanged since May last year.  Jarden Investment Strategist John Carran says it's 50-50 whether the Reserve Bank cuts the OCR in August or November.  The primary focus is on inflation, he said, so that is where they’re looking for the OCR rate.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/9/20243 minutes, 17 seconds
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Anita Rosentreter: First Union Strategic Project Coordinator on Ola ending services in New Zealand

Rideshare company Ola is hitting the brakes in New Zealand.  The Uber rival told Auckland customers they won't be able to book future rides from Friday but can still access their app until it shuts down next month.  But First Union is worried the loss will give Ola's main rival Uber more control of the gig economy.  Strategic project coordinator Anita Rosentreter told Mike Hosking that Ola played a key crossover role for those drivers.  She says drivers would go to Ola when they couldn't get work at Uber and it also created competition between the platforms to offer them incentives.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/9/20244 minutes, 38 seconds
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Robert Patman: Otago University international relations professor on Winston Peters' speech to the UN

Winston Peters has pulled no punches over the need for a two-state solution in Gaza.  The Foreign Affairs Minister has reiterated his calls for an immediate ceasefire at the UN General Assembly in New York.  He says the two-state solution is the only blueprint for peace, but Israel's seizing of Palestinian territory imperils that.  Otago University international relations professor Robert Patman told Mike Hosking that's probably the general feeling among the international community.  He says just because Israel is illegally taking territory doesn't mean that can't happen, and Israel has to consider its legal obligations.   Meanwhile, Israel's Benjamin Netanyahu says a date has been set for Israel to invade Rafah.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/8/20242 minutes, 52 seconds
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Adrian Macey: Victoria University Adjunct Professor on the financial challenge with NZ's climate change targets

A looming financial issue is being highlighted as the country works towards its next emissions budget. The Climate Commission is recommending greenhouse gas is limited by 134-million tonnes between 2036 and 2040.  But Victoria University Adjunct Professor Adrian Macey told Mike Hosking that there's still a massive issue if we are going to meet our Paris pledge.   He says a government between now and 2030 is going to have to find about $20-25 billion to buy carbon credits.  Macey doesn't see any government being able to feasibly do this.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/8/20244 minutes, 22 seconds
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Michael Johnston: NZ Initiative Education Research Fellow on the success of the Government's new education plan overseas

An education expert says the Government's plan to improve students' learning has been successful overseas.  Christopher Luxon's unveiled nine Government targets for delivery by 2030.  They include increasing student attendance and getting more students to the expected curriculum level.   New Zealand Initiative Education Research Fellow Michael Johnstone told Mike Hosking that getting them to turn up will be a challenge but overall, it's a sound plan.   He says focusing on things like the science of learning and structured literacy have worked well in places like England.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/8/20243 minutes, 33 seconds
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Katy Armstrong: Owner and Principal Consultant at Into NZ Immigration on changes to Accredited Employer Work Visa

The Government has brought in immediate changes to the Accredited Employer Work Visa.   There will now be an English language requirement for low skilled jobs, while fast-tracking will be removed for construction and the franchisee category will be disestablished.  Owner and Principal Consultant at Into NZ Katy Armstrong tells Mike Hosking the Government was left with no choice but to make the changes as the high trust model did not work.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/7/20243 minutes, 13 seconds
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Gavin Grey: Hate crime law in Scotland targeted by far right, support for Ukraine is diminishing in the EU

A new law in Scotland, designed to prevent hate crimes is being targeted by Neo-Nazi and far-right agitators. The groups are making vexatious complaints en masse in an attempt to overwhelm police systems.   UK & Europe correspondent Gavin Grey tells Mike Hosking the definition of a hate crime is wide ranging, and an inundated system makes policing the reports difficult for authorities.  Meanwhile, support for Ukraine is crumbling in the EU.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/7/20243 minutes, 32 seconds
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Andrew Alderson: The Warriors impressive win, Sevens in Hong Kong, 'hardest geezer' runs the length of South Africa

The Warriors showed their potential over the weekend, beating the Rabbitohs in an impressive 34-4 win. Andrew Alderson updates Mike Hosking on how the team looked.  Meanwhile, the Sevens held at Hong Kong stadium for the last time.   And, a man known as the ‘hardest geezer’ has run the length of Africa. Russ Cook covered 16,300km as the first person to run from the south to the northern tip of the continent.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/7/20244 minutes, 56 seconds
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Chris Cahill: Police Association President on 60 percent of cases reported to police abandoned in 2023

AN OIA has revealed police abandoned almost 60 percent of cases reported to them last year.  Of 962,521 emergency calls, 572,037 were abandoned. In 2023, reports were up 50 percent from 2019 and of cases reported, 179,957 were closed without any investigation at all.  Police Association President Chris Cahill tells Mike Hosking that online reporting has driven up numbers. The Auror retail crime reporting app enables small low-level crime to be reported to police. Less than half of reports made are actual offences.  Cahill says the app is fit for purpose.  LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/7/20244 minutes, 33 seconds
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Vincent McAviney: UK Correspondent on the British legal experts calling to end weapon sales to Israel

The deaths of UK aid workers from an Israeli air strike has reignited debate in the UK over the level of support, military aid, and weapons they’re providing Israel.   Over 600 legal experts, including three former Supreme Court Justices, have come forward in an open letter calling on the Government to end the sale of weapons to Israel.  They say that the UK are risking breaching international law over a “plausible risk of genocide in Gaza”.  UK Correspondent Vincent McAviney told Mike Hosking that the Conservative Party is currently have strong arguments over the letter, but Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is so far unwilling to heed the call.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/4/20242 minutes, 33 seconds
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Jon Duffy: Consumer NZ CEO on the banking sector's review into victim reimbursement for scams

There’s been a breakthrough in the rules governing whether people who've been scammed are eligible for compensation.   The banking sector has launched a review around victim reimbursement.  This comes after consumer protection criticism and the threat of regulatory intervention from the government.  Consumer NZ boss Jon Duffy told Mike Hosking that although there's a level of personal responsibility, people need to stay alert.  He says some of the scams are extremely sophisticated and those who are falling for them are everyday New Zealanders.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/4/20242 minutes, 58 seconds
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Craig Jepson: Kaipara Mayor on the new Māori ward law requiring they're put to referendum

A Northland mayor is hailing the new law that requires Māori wards to be put to referendum as a win for democracy.   The coalition Government is introducing a bill allowing communities to petition for binding polls on Māori ward decisions.   It reverses legislation from the previous Government that ensured councils would not have wards overturned through public referendum.   Kaipara mayor Craig Jepson told Mike Hosking he believes a lot of Māori would support the new bill.   He says the previous laws were condescending to Māori and don't acknowledge them as hard-working people.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/4/20243 minutes, 4 seconds
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Mark Smith: ASB Senior Economist on the funding of the trillion dollar infrastructure bill

ASB Bank is sending the message their predicted infrastructure bill isn't an impossible figure.   The bank's new research suggests a trillion dollars will be needed over 30 years.  ASB's Senior Economist Mark Smith says it's a huge number and we need to tap into as many funding sources as possible.   He says there needs to be greater alignment between providers and funders, the infrastructure has to be fit for purpose and deliver value for money, while meeting climate objectives.  Smith told Mike Hosking that the list is huge and the challenges are massive, but he believes it can be done.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/4/20243 minutes, 40 seconds
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Angela Lim: Clearhead CEO on why Generation Z is seen as difficult in the workplace

Bosses are finding Gen Z to be something of a nightmare.  They’ve found that they have poor work ethic, miss meetings, and even ditch the company on their first day of work.  In contrast, Gen Z workers say their employers don’t understand them.  Angela Lim, Clearhead CEO, told Mike Hosking that there’s been a distinct cultural shift, boundaries blurring between personal and work lives.   Another shift, she said, is in values. Lim said that young people want their employers to make a stand on social issues, to have more meaning or purpose in their jobs as opposed to just collecting a paycheck.  This can cause a lot of friction, she told Hosking, unless both parties are trained in having difficult conversations and know how to incorporate those different work styles.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/3/20243 minutes, 22 seconds
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Ruth Shinoda: Education Evaluation Centre Head says more off-the-shelf-content would support teaching the whole history curriculum

Students are learning more about our history but less about our place in the world.   An Education Review Office report finds schools have been working hard to implement the new Aotearoa Histories Curriculum.   It's being taught in three quarters of all schools up to and including Year 10, but to varying degrees.   Education Evaluation Centre Head Ruth Shinoda says it takes up a lot of teachers' time making their own teaching resources.   She told Mike Hosking that more off-the-shelf content would help support schools to teach the full range of the curriculum.   Shinoda says those resources could help teachers have more time to teach other social sciences too, like geography and economics.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/3/20243 minutes, 14 seconds
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Kirstin Corson: Drive Electric Chair on the number of electric vehicle sales dropping again

New Zealand's electric vehicle sales have taken another plunge. In March, just over 9% of new passenger cars were EVs, falling from about 27% for all of 2023. Drive Electric Chair Kirstin Corson told Mike Hosking she hasn't written it off, but the market has certainly stalled after losing the clean car discount. She says it's disappointing to see new light diesel vehicles outselling EVs 10 to one, adding this is a massive difference compared to 2023.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/3/20243 minutes, 55 seconds
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Gilli Sinclair: StarJam CEO on the charity's urgent appeal as it faces closure

A disability charity's launching an urgent appeal that it faces closure after more than 20 years. StarJam provides music and dance workshops for young people with disabilities, designed to foster inclusion and wellbeing. It's trying to raise $100,000 to keep the doors open to its 800 members. CEO Gilli Sinclair told Mike Hosking that they've been hit by the escalating cost of living and reduced funding streams. They put out the appeal yesterday and within the last 24 hours raised over $70,000. Sinclair said they're incredibly positive about the opportunity and have full faith in their ability to see their way through. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/2/20242 minutes, 54 seconds
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Gavin Grey: Europe Correspondent on the 12 year old boy responsible for a school shooting in Finland

Finland's gun policy is under scrutiny after a school shooting north of Helsinki. A 12-year-old boy has been detained after the shooting that left one dead and two others, all aged 12, seriously wounded. Finland's education minister says that once the government has a complete picture, they're considering if further measures are needed to protect schools. Europe correspondent Gavin Grey told Mike Hosking that it's believed the gun used was licensed to a close relative. He says in Finland, anyone over 18 can own a gun after passing checks, but a child over 15 can have licences to use other people's firearms. The 12-year-old thought to be responsible is in the care of social services. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/2/20243 minutes, 38 seconds
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Jason Krupp: Meat Industry Association Head of Strategy on the ripple effects of Covid-era policy on the meat industry

The ripple effect of Covid era policy choices are being highlighted as the country's meat industry takes a hit. Silver Fern Farms is reporting a $24 million plus loss for the 2023 financial year compared to it's $189 million profit the previous year. Meat Industry Association Head of Strategy Jason Krupp told Mike Hosking that it's very much an industry issue. He says we're seeing the effects of policy choices in Covid play out in our international markets, hitting us on prices. Krupp says other impacts include high domestic inflation and a weak Chinese market. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/2/20243 minutes, 34 seconds
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Sarah Dalton: Association of Salaried Medical Specialists Executive Director on the machete attack at Wairarapa Hospital

The attack at Wairarapa Hospital is being seen as an example of the increasing violence being seen around the country's Emergency Departments. A visitor was struck with a machete on Saturday night, suffering a fractured skull. An incident team's reviewing what happened as a 62-year-old faces charges. Association of Salaried Medical Specialists Executive Director Sarah Dalton told Mike Hosking that it's a real problem. She says it's usually more verbal violence than physical, but members are saying physical violence is on the increase. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/2/20243 minutes, 12 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australian Correspondent on the Australian Prime Minister and Energy Minister using two planes to get to a clean energy announcement

Why use one plane when two will do?  The Australian Energy Minister has defended the use of two separate Royal Australian Airforce jets to fly himself and Prime Minister Anthony Albanese to a clean energy announcement in NSW.  The announcement involved detailing a $1 billion programme to support solar panels, Albanese calling it one of the most significant announcements made during his term.  Australian Correspondent Donna Demaio told Mike Hosking the Air Force made the decision that the airport they were flying into was not strong enough for one large jet, and as such, had to take two.  She said the opposition has called it a scandal and is alleging that the PM and Minister were using taxpayer dollars to live the highlife.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/1/20242 minutes, 21 seconds
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Vaughn Davis: Social Media Commentator on the UK's Office of Communications' plans to unlock children's social media accounts if they're suspected of playing a role in their deaths

The UK is taking harsher measures to hold social media giants to account.  Media regulator ‘OFCOM’, the Office of Communications, plans to issue orders to social media firms that will unlock a child’s account if it’s suspected it played a role in their death or suicide.  Failure to comply could see the company fined up to 10% of its global revenue.   Social Media Commentator Vaughn Davis told Mike Hosking that there’s no doubt that social media plays a role in bullying and suicide, but it’s mostly the location that’s changing, not the behaviour.  Davis said that while firms like to be seen as though they’re working collaboratively to solve the issue, when it comes to digging into the data and using it to understand and prevent suicide, they’re not as interested.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/1/20243 minutes, 37 seconds
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Brigitte Morten: Political Commentator on the Government's new checklist of priorities

There’s a view that the Government's latest action plan is much more ambitious than the 100 Day Plan.   The Government's laid out its check list, to be completed before June 30th.   The plan features promises like restoring three strikes, creating an attendance plan, and implementing tax relief.   Political Commentator Brigitte Morten told Mike Hosking that they will have to dig deeper to achieve this one.   She says while the 100 Day Plan was a lot of repealing, the next step will involve making actual change.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
4/1/20242 minutes, 43 seconds
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Murray Edridge: Wellington City Missioner says more needs to be done to prevent another Loafers Lodge Tragedy

There are fears nothing has been done to prevent another Loafers Lodge tragedy.  An investigation into boarding house facilities was initiated after last year's fire killed five people.  It's found only half the 37 buildings inspected had adequate smoke detectors.  Wellington City Missioner Murray Edridge told Mike Hosking that more needs to be done.  He says they're just waiting for this to happen again but isn't hopeful anything will change.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/27/20243 minutes, 20 seconds
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Barbara Edmonds: Labour's Finance Spokesperson on Nicola Willis' Budget Policy Statement

National's promise to keep tax cuts is being criticised.   Finance Minister Nicola Willis has delivered the Budget Policy Statement and reaffirmed the party's commitment to tax relief.   Willis says she's been humbled by how much recent forecasts have deteriorated.   Labour Party Finance spokesperson Barbara Edmonds told Mike Hosking that instead of focusing on the previous Government, Willis should focus on the cards in front of her.   She says when the half year fiscal update was worse than expected, she should have revisited them.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/27/20243 minutes, 15 seconds
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Dr Nina Hood: Education Hub Founder on New Zealand school behaviours being the worst in the OECD

Challenging behaviours in New Zealand classrooms are at critical levels.  Over the last 20 years student behaviour has been among the worst in the OECD but new research shows it's worsened over the past two.  Education Review Office research has found a quarter of principals have seen students physically harm others and steal property at least every day.  Education Hub Founder Nina Hood told Mike Hosking that it's important to draw schools' attention to behaviour.  She says it's up to individual schools to create clear expectations, consistent rules, put structures in place, and uphold them.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/27/20243 minutes, 11 seconds
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Dr Ben Beaglehole: Otago Senior Lecturer for Psychological Medicine on New Zealand starting a trial using ketamine and psychotherapy to treat depression

A new trial to treat depression has been given the green light in New Zealand.  Ketamine has been used as a treatment around the world in recent years, the drug showing short-term benefits.  Otago University is running the trial, combining liquid, slower-release ketamine with psychotherapy in an effort to achieve long term results.   The trial is eight weeks long, half the group receiving both ketamine and psychotherapy and the other half only receiving the drug.  Senior Lecturer Dr Ben Beaglehole told Mike Hosking that this is a treatment, not a cure.  He said that depression is a long term problem with factors that they won't be able to reverse with medication or short-term psychotherapy, but they’re looking to see if the short-term benefits of the drug can be prolonged.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/26/20244 minutes, 36 seconds
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Nick Tuffley: ASB Chief Economist ahead of todays Budget Policy Statement

The Government will today unveil its economic plan for how its priorities will be delivered in the Budget Policy Statement.   Finance Minister Nicola Willis will give the speech at one this afternoon.  ASB’s Chief Economist Nick Tuffley told Mike Hosking that it’s a bit too early for them to have the hard and fast numbers, and today is more about setting our expectations.  We’re also likely to get a sense of how inflation is tracking in regard to the budget, though Treasury likely hasn’t finished their economic forecasts completely.   He said that it’s a pretty tough balancing act the Government has to walk with this budget.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/26/20243 minutes, 32 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on the continuing search and rescue efforts after the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore

A search and rescue effort continues after a bridge collapse in Baltimore.   A fully laden container ship rammed into one of the supports and the bridge crumpled into the water below.  Those on board the ship had time to raise the alarm and the bridge was closed.  At least six people remain unaccounted for.  Those missing are believed to be construction workers who were working on potholes on the bridge at the time.  US correspondent Mitch McCann told Mike Hosking that it could have a huge economic impact on the state.  He says it's one of the biggest ports in the US, specialising in shipping motor vehicles and farming equipment and bringing in over US $1 billion last year.  US President Joe Biden says around 850,000 ships go through the port a year and 15,000 jobs depend on it.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/26/20242 minutes, 38 seconds
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Geoffrey Miller: International Relations Expert on the allegations of Chinese cyber-attacks against world governments

An expert says allegations of Chinese cyber-attacks in New Zealand have been at a lower level than our allies.   Spy agency the GCSB has tied targeting of our Parliamentary entities in August 2021 to Chinese state-sponsored group APT40.   China's ambassador to New Zealand has labelled the accusations groundless and irresponsible.  International Relations Expert Geoffrey Miller told Mike Hosking that the UK and US accusations are on a different level.   He says the UK alleged China had gotten the information of 14 million voters.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/26/20243 minutes, 7 seconds
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Lesley Yeomans: Australian Correspondent on the increasing number of Australians looking for second jobs

Millions of Australians are looking for a second job as the cost of living continues to bite.  A survey by comparison website Finder has found that 32% of respondents, totalling approximately 6.7 million people, felt financially pressured to work more than one job.  Australian Correspondent Lesley Yeomans told Mike Hosking that there are jobs available in cafes and retail stores, but it's unknown whether this will bring down the unemployment rate.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/25/20243 minutes, 9 seconds
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Nikki Hart: Nutritionist on the study from Mondelez finding that Gen Z prefers snacks over meals

Kiwi’s eating habits seem to be changing.  New research from Mondelez shows that almost half of Gen Z prefer snacking over dinner, and 40% skip breakfast in favour of a snack.  On average 27% of people skip breakfast, 13% lower than the results in the study.  Nutritionist Nikki Hart told Mike Hosking that we’re definitely seeing a change in behaviour, and it’s not necessarily a good one.  She thinks that Covid changed how younger generations approached eating, as staying up later and online classes allow more opportunities to snack.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/25/20243 minutes, 48 seconds
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Ian Hutson: Salvation Army Social Policy Director has some concerns about the Family Boost Policy

The Salvation Army is welcoming the Government's childcare policy but has some concerns.   The Family Boost policy will see parents and caregivers able to claim back up to 25% of childcare costs from July, with a $75 a week limit.    Salvation Army Social Policy Director Ian Hutson says there seems to be some bureaucracy, with parents having to show three months of invoices to get the rebate.   He told Mike Hosking he's also wondering if it will help the poorest of parents.   Hutson says while $75 seems a lot, it won't be enough to cover some people's growing costs.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/25/20243 minutes, 4 seconds
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Alex Walker: Central Hawke's Bay District Mayor on the independent review into the emergency management response to Cyclone Gabrielle

Overwhelmed and under-resourced.  An independent review has found major failings in the emergency management response to Cyclone Gabrielle.  It finds the system not fit for purpose and "set up good people to fail", during the February 14 disaster.  Central Hawke's Bay District Mayor Alex Walker told Mike Hosking that local emergency management teams were under-resourced.  She says they needed big and fast mobilisation.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/25/20243 minutes, 35 seconds
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Colin Alder: Gisborne Councilor on the 100 person brawl that left two people dead and three seriously injured

Two people have been left dead and three injured after a 100-person brawl in Gisborne on Saturday night.  The victims were stabbed at a 21st birthday party. One person is due to appear in court as a homicide enquiry continues.  Gisborne Councilor Colin Alder tells Mike Hosking it was an tragic event fueled by alcohol and possible drugs. Alder says there continues to be a strong police presence in the community.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/24/20242 minutes, 26 seconds
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Gavin Grey: Messages of support for the Princess of Wales and Ireland set to appoint youngest PM ever

The Princess of Wales and her husband, Prince William, have been “enormously touched” by the messages of support received since she announced her cancer diagnosis.   Europe correspondent Gavin Grey tells Mike Hosking that the video announcement was written and approved by Kate Middelton herself and sparked a wave of apologies from those who published conspiracy theories around Kate’s absence from the public eye.  Meanwhile, Irish politician and higher education minister, Simon Harris is poised to take on the role of Ireland’s youngest prime minister as the leadership contest concluded with him emerging as the sole candidate.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/24/20243 minutes, 42 seconds
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Andrew Alderson: SailGP dolphin policy slammed by Sir Russell Coutts and the future of the race in New Zealand

SailGP was brought to a halt on Saturday after dolphin sightings in Lyttleton Harbour. Chief Executive of SailGP, Sir Russell Coutts slammed officials for their “extreme” dolphin policy.  Andrew Alderson speaks to Mike Hosking about the policy and considers the future of the race in New Zealand.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/24/20244 minutes, 44 seconds
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Jason Walls: ZB Political Editor on Chris Hipkins State of Nation speech and all tax policies being on the table again

Chris Hipkins State of Nation speech and all tax policies being on the table again  In his first major speech as opposition leader, Chris Hipkins gave a State of Nation speech on Sunday.   Tax was a big focus, as the way we live and work continues to change with a smaller proportion of the workforce earning taxable salary and wages.   ZB Political Editor Jason Walls tells Mike Hosking that the speech lacked detail on actual tax policy, being so early in the opposition campaign.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/24/20242 minutes, 56 seconds
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Miles Workman: ANZ senior economist says the GDP per capita is almost as bad as during the Global Financial Crisis

New Zealand's GDP per capita paints a worse picture than the headline figure.   Stats NZ data shows GDP dropped 0.1 percentage points in the final quarter of last year.   After negative growth in the previous quarter, it pushes New Zealand into a technical recession.   Per capita, there was a 0.7% drop in the quarter.   ANZ senior economist Miles Workman told Mike Hosking that taking immigration into account, it's almost as bad as during the Global Financial Crisis.   He says during the GFC per capita GDP growth fell 4.2% and as of yesterday, after five consecutive quarterly declines, it's down 3.9%.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/21/20243 minutes, 32 seconds
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Vincent McAviney: UK Correspondent on the good news regarding King Charles' health

There’s some good news regarding King Charles' health.  Queen Camilla has been carrying out public duties while the King undergoes treatment for an undisclosed form of cancer.  She told crowds in Northern Ireland that her husband is doing well in his recovery.  UK correspondent Vincent McAviney told Mike Hosking that a woman at a local business gave her a get well soon card for the King.  He says Camilla told her Charles was doing very well and he was disappointed he couldn't come.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/21/20243 minutes, 10 seconds
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Rosamund Hill: Neurologist on the new anti-migraine medication costing kiwis $300 a month

New and effective anti-migraine drugs aren't publicly funded in New Zealand, costing those with chronic migraine nearly $300 a month.  An Otago University survey suggests almost half of those with the disease meet the criteria for severe disability.   Some report paralysis on one side of the body and loss of coherent speech.  Neurologist Rosamund Hill told Mike Hosking that the medicine's publicly funded in Australia.  She says it's feasible for Pharmac to identify those at the worst end of the spectrum, and how these drugs would significantly change their lives.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/21/20244 minutes, 53 seconds
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Weston Kirton: Ruapehu Mayor on the massive costs of keeping the Chateau Tongariro Hotel empty and in disrepair

It’s a hefty price for taxpayers to keep the Chateau Tongariro Hotel empty and in disrepair.  The Department of Conservation, which owns the land, has confirmed through an Official Information Act request that it will cost $2.2 million this financial year.  The heritage-listed site has been shut since February last year.  Ruapehu mayor Weston Kirton told Mike Hosking that there are issues around resolving the seismic reports, which put the hotel at high risk.  He says there's a willingness from the Government to resolve them but a timeline is needed to do that.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/21/20243 minutes, 24 seconds
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Letitia Harding: Asthma and Respiratory Foundation CEO on the Government's vaping crackdown

Harsher penalties and restrictions are coming into force as the Government starts its crackdown on vaping.  The Coalition will ban single use vapes and increase fines for selling vapes to under-18s from $10,000 to $100,000.  It's aiming to have all changes in place by the end of the year.  Asthma and Respiratory Foundation CEO Letitia Harding told Mike Hosking that this should’ve been tackled by the previous government.  The reality is, she said, there are no FDA approved products for smoking cessation, and if it actually is for that purpose then it should be under some sort of medical regulatory control.  Harding said that when vaping was introduced in 2017, people were pushing it as the ‘Holy Grail’ to smoking cessation, but the evidence was never out there that it was.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/20/20243 minutes, 40 seconds
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Oliver Hartwich: NZ Initiative Executive Director on the possibility of New Zealand entering a technical recession

Economists are anticipating GDP growth close to zero for the last quarter.   The Reserve Bank's forecasting a flat zero percent, ANZ is expecting a 0.1 percentage point growth, while ASB anticipates a 0.2-point drop.  If today's economic growth figures are negative New Zealand will enter a technical recession after the last quarter also saw negative growth.   NZ Initiative executive director Oliver Hartwich told Mike Hosking that if it goes slightly up or down it doesn't matter as GDP per capita is what's important.   He says it plays out against a background of record immigration with a net intake of 140-thousand people, which means we're going backwards on a per capita basis.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/20/20243 minutes, 38 seconds
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Shane Jones: Associate Energy Minister on the investigation into the re-opening of the Marsden Point Oil Refinery

A re-opening of Northland's Marsden Point Oil Refinery could be on the cards.  The Government's investigating the feasibility of doing so as part of a study into New Zealand's fuel security requirements.  The privately-owned fuel refinery was decommissioned in 2022 to become an import-only fuel terminal.  Associate Energy Minister Shane Jones told Mike Hosking the Marsden Point investigation is a small part of the fuel resilience strategy he's drawing up.  He says in fairness to the last Government, they did put effort into resilience after the refinery closed.  Jones says it all's down to who will pay the $80 million a year to boost the amount of oil we have onshore.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/20/20244 minutes, 3 seconds
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Gavin Grey: UK Correspondent on the reveal that more images of the British Royal Family have been edited

Another photo of the Royal Family has been revealed to be edited.  Getty Images has revealed that a photo of the late Queen was “digitally enhanced at source”, adding an editor's note to the image.  The Palace shared the picture on the 21st of April last year on what would have been the Queen’s 97th birthday, saying it was taken by the Princess of Wales at Balmoral in the summer of 2022.   UK Correspondent Gavin Grey told Mike Hosking that while many people may have suspected images were being edited, it’s now been confirmed.  While these images are relatively benign in their edits, the lack of disclosure does set a precedent.  Grey said it may lead to things like war images being doctored to make it look better or worse than it actually is.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/19/20243 minutes, 13 seconds
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Terry Collins: AA spokesperson on the discount on road user charges for plug-in hybrids and the removal of the clean car discount

Road user charges are in for a shake-up after an accidental Government U-turn.  Owners of plug-in hybrids will pay $38 per thousand kilometres, a reduction from the planned $53.  The Government accidentally supported a Labour amendment on the matter.  AA spokesperson Terry Collins told Mike Hosking that the clean car discount was working last year so we'll have to wait and see what happens when it gets shut down.  He suspects there'll be a pause in the market.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/19/20244 minutes, 2 seconds
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Jithin Chittibomma: Sandringham Business Association Chair on the police data showing more than 400 retail crimes reported a day in 2023

A local business owner says there needs to be more action on retail crime.   Police data shows more than 400 retail crimes were reported a day last year, with six staff a day complaining to police they'd been assaulted.  Sandringham Business Association Chair Jithin Chittibomma told Mike Hosking the Government has changed, but there's still the same people in the public service they dealt with under the last Government.   He says they're still putting the data in front of ministers but they haven't seen any change on the ground yet.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/19/20242 minutes, 57 seconds
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Haydn Marriner: Backpacker Youth Adventure Tourism Association chair on the price increase for Great Walks

It's about to become more expensive to complete the country's Great Walks.  The Department of Conservation is increasing prices in July for the first time in four years.  Hut and campsite prices will rise by 18% for all walks except Paparoa.  Backpacker Youth Adventure Tourism Association chair Haydn Marriner told Mike Hosking that there's a two-year waiting period for businesses to change their costs.  He says it will be built into the costs and while the increase is quite high, crews and businesses do a heap of work to maintain the walks.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/19/20243 minutes, 48 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australian Correspondent on the settlement of the class action lawsuit against Uber

A five-year legal battle against Uber has come to an end.  Uber has been ordered to pay $272 million to Australian taxi operators, covering the loss of income and license values since the rideshare app entered the market.  The class action settlement was reached yesterday and is the fifth largest settlement in Australian history.  Australian Correspondent Donna Demaio told Mike Hosking that it works out to be about $33,800 per taxi driver.  She said that lawyers called it a “gruelling battle”, Uber fighting “tooth and nail” every day for those five years.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/18/20242 minutes, 37 seconds
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Bernie Smith: Former Monte Cecelia Housing Trust CEO on the crackdown on Kainga Ora tenant behaviour

The Government's crackdown on antisocial Kainga Ora tenant behaviour is being labelled a "move back to the real world".  It's instructed Kainga Ora to end the Sustaining Tenancies Framework and strengthen its management of disruptive tenants.  Former Monte Cecelia Housing Trust chief executive Bernie Smith says the issues it's having are generations in the making.   He told Mike Hosking that the previous government's soft approach created a lot of mayhem for tenants and homeowners trying to live in peace.   Smith says they allowed tenants to remain in homes no matter the illegal activity or issues they were creating for their neighbours.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/18/20244 minutes, 21 seconds
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Anabelle Creswell: Criminal Bar Association President on the issues faced by New Zealand Courts

Mouldy and flooding courtrooms, the district court backlog, and legal aid issues are among problems the country's courts are facing.   Chief Justice Dame Helen Winkelmann has released her latest briefing to Attorney-General Judith Collins.   It outlines the need to raise the cap on the number of senior court judges, and under-funding in courtroom maintenance.  Criminal Bar Association President Annabel Creswell told Mike Hosking the issue of the cap on judges has been raised for years.   She says everything the Chief Justice has outlined have been problems for a long time, but they're worse since Covid and since the population has increased.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/18/20244 minutes, 31 seconds
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Virginia Nicholls: Alcohol Beverage Council executive director on the wastewater study showing kiwis are drinking less alcohol than expected

New Zealanders are drinking less alcohol than previously thought.  Auckland University has carried out the country's first large-scale trial of testing wastewater to monitor alcohol consumption.  It found the average alcohol consumption to be 1.2 standard drinks per day for people over 15 years, lower than the World Health Organisation's 2018 estimate.  Alcohol Beverage Council executive director Virginia Nicholls told Mike Hosking that the report didn't factor in responsible drinking.  She says 86% of Kiwis are drinking responsibly, but it's a concern that 16% are drinking in a hazardous way.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/18/20243 minutes, 10 seconds
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Jason Walls: ZB Political Editor on Winston Peter's controversial State of Nation speech

Winston Peters delivered a State of Nation speech yesterday to a crowd of around 600 people.  The speech came following the first 100 days of Government and included controversial statements comparing co-governance to the Nazi regime.   ZB Political Editor Jason Walls tells Mike Hosking the New Zealand First leader was firmly back on campaign mode with cracks at the media and opposition, but the speech was mostly focused on going forward.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/17/20242 minutes, 42 seconds
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Gavin Grey: UK & Europe correspondent on UK Secretary of State for Defence Grant Shapps cancelled visit to Ukraine

UK Secretary of State for Defence Grant Shapps abandoned a Ukraine port visit in Odessa for security reasons.  UK & Europe correspondent Gavin Grey tells mike Hosking Shapps travelled with the intention to meet Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelenskyy and senior members of his wartime administration but Russian missile attacks on the city meant the trip was cancelled abruptly.  Meanwhile, friends of Princess Diana have reacted to an ad using her fatal crash to promote euthanasia in France. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/17/20243 minutes, 41 seconds
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Alistair Crozier: Executive Director of the NZ China Council on today's NZ visit from the Foreign Minister of China Wang Yi

In the first inwards visit from a Chinese leader for some time, China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi visits New Zealand today.  Executive Director of the NZ China Council Alistair Crozier describes the country’s relationship with China as positive but says NZ will be seeking re-assurances about China’s intentions in the Pacific.  Crozier tells Mike Hosking about what is on the agenda for the Foreign Minister’s visit.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/17/20244 minutes, 7 seconds
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Campbell Barry: Local Government NZ Vice President on the looming rate hikes to contend with rising construction costs

Colossal rate hikes are looming for homeowners as councils contend with rising construction and insurance costs.   Local Government New Zealand says rates around the country will rise by an average of 15%. It says the main factor contributing to the rates escalation is the costs of civil construction.   Vice President Campbell Barry told Mike Hosking that these costs are 20% higher now than predicted, and that’s on top of inflation.   He says bridges have gone up around 36% over the last three years, and similar increases are seen with roads and water networks.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/14/20244 minutes, 28 seconds
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Cath O'Brien: Board of Airline Representatives Executive Director disagrees with claims the NZ airfare market isn't set up to be competitive

The Airports Association is taking aim at the cost of Air New Zealand's domestic airfares.  It's calling on the Government to set up an independent airfare monitoring system.  But the Board of Airline Representatives disagrees with claims that the domestic market isn't set up to be competitive.  Executive Director, Cath O'Brien told Mike Hosking that policy settings allow any Australian airline to set-up shop tomorrow if they want to.  She says the reason they haven't, is because New Zealand's an expensive place to operate in and make a profit.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/14/20243 minutes, 59 seconds
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Helen Murray: Auckland University Neuroscientist on the Billy Guyton's post-death degenerative brain disease diagnosis

The first case of its kind in New Zealand, a former Super Rugby player has been diagnosed post-death with a degenerative brain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy.  Billy Guyton played for the Blues, Hurricanes, and Crusaders, but died in a suspected suicide aged 33.  An examination of his brain by the Neurological Foundation's Brain Bank has now identified he had stage 2 CTE.   Auckland University neuroscientist Helen Murray told Mike Hosking that CTE is caused by the repetitive accumulation of head impacts.   She says it's not necessarily the number of concussions but the number of impacts, and that might not have generated any symptoms.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/14/20243 minutes, 18 seconds
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Sian Taylor: Team Green Architects co-owner on the overheating problem in newly built townhouses

An unaccounted-for problem of overheating in some newly built townhouses is being seen as a country-wide problem.   Frustration is brewing among owners in Auckland who are paying two times more for cooling in the summer than they would for heating in the winter.   Some townhouses have just one heat pump to cool the three-storey home, which can leave rooms on higher floors unbearably hot.   But the building code has no requirement to address overheating.   Team Green Architects owner Sian Taylor told Mike Hosking that there's an issue with a lack of forethought for the longer-term implications of design.  She says one of the biggest problems is not shading the building properly from the start, which traps the heat inside.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/13/20244 minutes, 52 seconds
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Weston Kirton: Ruapehu District Mayor accepts that this is the last government bailout for the ski fields

Another bailout for Ruapehu Alpine Lifts as the Government pours $7 million into the ski field.  The operator has been running on a previous government bailout for over a year.  Regional Development Minister Shane Jones says it's their last chance after the Prime Minister previously said no more money would be poured into the ski field.  Ruapehu District Mayor Weston Kirton told Mike Hosking he welcomes the move.  He understands this is the last bailout and wants the operator to get its ducks in a row.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/13/20243 minutes, 4 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on the upcoming Senate vote on whether TikTok should be banned

United States lawmakers are concerned TikTok users' data is being accessed by China.   The House of Representatives has passed a bill that would ban the social media platform if Chinese tech giant Byte Dance doesn't sell its stake within six months.   It will now go to a vote in Senate.  US correspondent Mitch McCann told Mike Hosking that there's a lobbying campaign by TikTok underway.    He says they've hired influencers to talk about the success they've had with TikTok and the impact on small business in America.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/13/20242 minutes, 58 seconds
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Peter Dunne: Political Commentator on Labour's plans to rebuild at today's retreat

There’s a focus on rebuilding today for the Labour Party as MPs head to Wairarapa for their belated retreat.  The annual meeting is usually held in January.  Political commentator Peter Dunne told Mike Hosking that Labour has about a year to rebuild before being competitive for the 2026 election.  He says they're facing a big challenge from the Greens, so Labour needs to rebuild in a way which makes them the leading party on the left again.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/13/20243 minutes, 13 seconds
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Kathryn Dalziel: Privacy Lawyer on Airbnb introducing a worldwide ban on indoor security cameras

Online rental platform Airbnb is introducing a worldwide ban on indoor security cameras.   It says it's updating its policy after consultation with guests, hosts and privacy experts.  Outdoor security cameras and those in common areas, like on doorbells, are still permitted, but hosts will have to disclose their location on the property's listing.  Privacy lawyer Kathryn Dalziel told Mike Hosking that Airbnb has come under fire recently, with guests posting about finding cameras in their accommodation.   She thinks Airbnb's realising its brand is being affected by this negativity, particularly by people who aren't telling people they're recording or filming.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/12/20243 minutes, 41 seconds
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Alan McDonald: Employers and Manufacturers Association Head of Advocacy on businesses' responses to the proposed changes to the Holidays Act

Businesses hope the Government will bring change to the Holidays Act.   Brooke van Velden has laid out her agenda with a focus on regulations around contractors, public holidays, health and safety rules, and personal grievances.   Also a priority is sorting out the law around holidays.   Employers and Manufacturers Association Head of Advocacy Alan McDonald told Mike Hosking that there's no need for lengthy consultation as the Holidays Act has been talked about for some time.   He says most in the business community just want people to get on and make the changes.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/12/20244 minutes, 18 seconds
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Adrian Macey: Climate Change Research Institute Adjunct Professor says the Government's plans for NZ's climate goals are unclear

The Climate Change Commission is urging the Government to cut back the number of carbon credits available.  They say there are too many credits on offer and the problem is just getting worse.  The coalition Government promised to use emissions pricing to meet New Zealand's climate goals.  Climate Change Research Institute adjunct professor Adrian Macey told Mike Hosking that it's not clear what the Government is going to do yet.  He says they want to stick to the existing climate targets, but how they do that is not clear.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/12/20243 minutes
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Brad Olsen: Infometrics Senior Economist on the impact of the disruptions in the Red Sea to NZ's businesses

Are disruptions in the Red Sea hitting New Zealand as hard? Freedom Furniture has reported a $9 million loss in profit, saying that it’s partially due to the chaos in the Middle East.  Infometrics Principal Economist Brad Olsen told Mike Hosking that the disruptions are impacting businesses in quite different ways, depending on whether they’re using that route to ship to Europe.  The challenge for us, he said, is shipping delays.  A delay of 14-21 days will have spill over effects for businesses lasting a fair bit of time.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/11/20244 minutes, 12 seconds
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Nick Tuffley: ASB Chief Economist on the bank's reducing their fixed mortgage rates again

For the second time in as many weeks, Kiwibank and ASB have reduced their fixed mortgage rates.   It follows falls in wholesale rates on the expectation that central banks are getting closer to cutting their benchmark rates.  ASB’s Chief Economist, Nick Tuffley, told Mike Hosking what people are seeing is the settling of rates and the response to news over the last week.  The market is still reasonably patchy, but according to Tuffley its likely to even out slightly as interest rates come down.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/11/20243 minutes, 34 seconds
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Russell Myers: Daily Mirror Royal Editor on the edited photo released by the Royal Family for Mothers Day

The Princess of Wales has admitted to editing an image of her and her three children.   The first image since her abdominal surgery, it was posted to mark Mother's Day in the UK.   It was then pulled by numerous media photo agencies over concerns it'd been manipulated.   Catherine says like many amateur photographers, she occasionally experiments with editing.   Daily Mirror Royal Editor Russell Myers told Mike Hosking that he's not sure why they'd publish the photo themselves or send the photo to the world's media organisations.   He says there's still a litany of issues: how much it was edited, how many photos it was taken from, and when it was edited.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/11/20244 minutes, 19 seconds
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Sue Harrison: Pressure on rents is due to insufficient rental properties

The Property Investors' Federation says easing rents relies on many factors. The Government's re-introducing interest deductibility for landlords. They'll be able to claim 80 percent of interest expenses from April, and 100 percent from April 2025. The Government says it'll ease pressure on rents, also benefiting tenants. Property Investors' Federation President Sue Harrison told Mike Hosking that the pressure on rents, has come from insufficient rental properties. She says they've been put under high pressure from high interest rates, and the money has to come from somewhere.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/10/20243 minutes
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Gareth Hughes: Chloe Swarbrick can reach across and attract voters

The Green's new co-leadership could look different under Chloe Swarbrick. The Auckland Central MP has won the race to replace James Shaw, and will lead the party alongside Marama Davidson. Former Greens MP Gareth Hughes says Swarbrick's assertive approach to politics is a contrast from Shaw. But he told Mike Hosking that people are looking for passion and authenticity in politics - and some will be drawn to her values. Hughes says people wrote her off in Auckland Central but she won overwhelmingly - so she's someone who's able to reach across and attract voters.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/10/20243 minutes, 30 seconds
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Gavin Grey: US Ship on it's way to supply aid to Gaza

A US military ship is on its way to Gaza, carrying equipment to build a temporary pier off the coast. It comes after President Biden announced the US would build a floating harbour to help get aid into Gaza by sea. They had carried out an airdrop on Sunday, parachuting in more than 11-thousand meals. Europe correspondent Gavin Grey spoke to Mike Hosking about what it will contain.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/10/20243 minutes, 34 seconds
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David Seymour: We have restored integrity in the tax system

The Associate Finance Minister says the last Government removing landlords' interest deductibility was a tax grab. The current Government's re-introducing it. They'll be able to claim 80 percent of interest expenses from April, and 100 percent from next April. David Seymour told Mike Hosking that they've restored the integrity of the tax system. He says if you invest in any business or commercial property, you're allowed to deduct interest costs from taxable income.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/10/20243 minutes, 53 seconds
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Andrew Alderson: ZB Cricket Correspondent ahead of the Black Caps final test match against Australia

The Black Caps have one last shot against Australia.  Today the final test match against the Australian side takes place at Hagley Oval in Christchurch, kicking off at 11am.  Newstalk ZB’s Cricket Correspondent Andrew Alderson told Mike Hosking that last night was the 50th anniversary of New Zealand’s first taste of victory over Australia back in 1974.  So, if New Zealand needs any belief today, he said, the 50th anniversary might do it.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/7/20244 minutes, 27 seconds
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Maurice Williamson: Former National Minister on the Government ticking off its 100 day plan

A former National Minister says this Government's changes are a big turn-around from the last. The Government's first 100 days are virtually up, and it's ticked off almost all of its 49 items.   Many of the things on the list were to unpick the last government's changes or to begin work on their plans.   The last point to tick off is setting major targets for the health system, and that's expected to be crossed off today.   Former Cabinet Minister Maurice Williamson told Mike Hosking that it's a change from the last Government saying it'd do things and not doing them.   He says former MPs can be critical, thinking they were better, but he says this is the best he's ever seen.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/7/20243 minutes, 4 seconds
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Kim Mundy: ASB Senior Economist on the rising confidence in the housing market

There’s more belief in the housing market.  ASB's latest Housing Confidence survey shows net 51% of people expect house prices to rise.  It's the highest reading since October 2021, before the start of the most recent housing market downturn.  Senior Economist Kim Mundy says last time expectations were at this level, annual house price growth was at almost 30%  - this time it's at 2.2%.  So, she says, while it doesn't necessarily point to a degree of house price growth, it does suggest house prices can lift over the coming year.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/6/20243 minutes, 34 seconds
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Kate Gainsford: Secondary Principals' Council Chair on why the number of home schooled children is dropping

The number of students leaving home schooling increased last year.   Education Ministry figures show 2,286 children exited home education, the highest number on record.  More than half those leaving had been learning from home for less than a year.   Total home school numbers remain well above pre-pandemic levels.   Secondary Principals' Council Chair Kate Gainsford told Mike Hosking that there are many factors why people are going back to mainstream.  She says it could be that the realities, demands, and responsibilities of providing education at home are becoming real.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/6/20243 minutes, 58 seconds
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Tania Tapsell: Rotorua Mayor on the Government's new emergency housing laws

Rotorua's Mayor is feeling upbeat about the Government's new emergency housing laws.   Families with children living in emergency housing for more than 12 weeks will go to the top of the social housing waitlist.   The verification process, eligibility settings, and obligations will also be strengthened for those entering emergency housing.  Tania Tapsell told Mike Hosking that there's a lot of children in these environments, so it's great they're targeting those most in need.  She sees hope for a quicker end to what's been a shambles, not only in Rotorua but across the country.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/6/20242 minutes, 56 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on Nikki Haley withdrawing from the US Presidential race after Super Tuesday

Nikki Haley has withdrawn from the US presidential race meaning we're in for another Biden-Trump election.  The former South Carolina governor announced her decision to suspend her campaign this morning, a day after Super Tuesday.  Republican frontrunner Donald Trump beat her soundly in all but one of the 15 nominating contests.  US correspondent Mitch McCann told Mike Hosking that Haley has yet to endorse Trump.  He says it's possible she will in the future, but it's hard to see that happening given what she's been saying about him over the past few months.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/6/20243 minutes, 2 seconds
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Chris Cahill: Police Association President on the Government's plans for an Oranga Tamariki-run military academy for youth offenders

The Police Association President says military academies for youth offenders are worth a crack.   The Government plans to have an Oranga Tamariki-run pilot programme by the middle of this year.   Police Association President Chris Cahill told Mike Hosking that people who sponsored earlier models tell him they saw kids coming in with no self-esteem and leaving with their mana restored.   He says the challenge is when they left, they went back to dysfunctional families and places with gang influence.   Cahill says support at the end of the programmes is needed.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/5/20242 minutes, 46 seconds
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Marilyn Giroux: Auckland University marketing lecturer on the Prime Minister's plane woes making worldwide headlines

It’s a bad look for the country as the Prime Minister's plane woes make worldwide headlines.   The Air Force's Boeing 757 never left the ground yesterday due to a technical fault with the nose landing gear.  It meant Christopher Luxon had to fly commercially to Melbourne for ASEAN talks, missing a couple of meetings due to the delay.  Auckland University marketing lecturer Marilyn Giroux told Mike Hosking that the likes of international outlets Reuters and Australia's Sky News all reported on the troubles.  She says it's definitely not the best look we want for the country, as it's been picked up quite a lot.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/5/20242 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Country's Rowena Duncum wraps last night's P!nk concert in Dunedin

Dunedin's Forsyth Barr Stadium swapped its usual green field for two hours of acrobatic entertainment from pop star P!nk last night.  The three-time Grammy award winner drew 37-thousand people to the first New Zealand show of her Summer Carnival tour.  The Country's Rowena Duncum was there – and told Mike Hosking that P!nk's acrobatics were impressive.  She says it was phenomenal how she could fly through the air —sometimes upside down— and still be able to sing.  P!nk will play Auckland's Eden Park on Friday and Saturday nights.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/5/20244 minutes, 32 seconds
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Chris Jackson: Auckland University Spacecraft Mission Operations Director on the launch of the Methane SAT satellite

The first-ever government-funded space mission is scheduled for take-off this morning.  The American-New Zealand mission will see the MethaneSAT satellite launched into space to study global emissions from agriculture and measure methane leaks from oil and gas production.  Auckland University Spacecraft Mission Operations Director Chris Jackson says the ultimate goal is to drive down global warming effects from methane sources.  He says methane is a very potent greenhouse gas, more so than carbon dioxide, so stopping it leaking can have a reversing effect.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/4/20243 minutes, 44 seconds
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Demelza Jackson: Newstalk ZB Political Reporter on the itinerary for Christopher Luxon's ASEAN visit

What was already a busy day for Christopher Luxon has just become busier.  A fault with New Zealand’s Defence Force plane has forced the Prime Minister fly commercial to Melbourne for today's ASEAN summit.  He has a tight schedule to keep to, meeting with eight South-East Asian leaders on the sidelines of the special ASEAN-Australia summit.  Newstalk ZB Political Reporter Demelza Jackson told Mike Hosking that each meeting is only about ten minutes long, but its more about putting a face on the New Zealand name.  Tomorrow, she said, is all business, with ANZ’s business breakfast in the morning and a trip to a Fonterra factory in the afternoon.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/4/20243 minutes, 11 seconds
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Justin Tighe-Umbers: The National Road Carriers Association CEO on the Government's draft transport plan

The National Road Carriers Association says the Government's draft transport plan is a great step in the right direction.   It features a half billion-dollar pothole prevention fund and 15 Roads of National Significance.  It'll be funded in part by a $25 increase in vehicle registration fees in each of the next two years.  Chief Executive Justin Tighe-Umbers told Mike Hosking that the policy's focused on the right stuff.   He says it's a strong start, so they're pleased, and it's about getting back to basics.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/4/20243 minutes, 43 seconds
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Gavin Grey: Apparent Russian hack of German military meeting and Houthi rebels sink first ship in Yemen

Germany has admitted to an apparent hack by Russia of a military meeting where personnel discussed giving Ukraine long range missiles and possible targets.  Europe correspondent Gavin grey told Mike Hosking the hack is being investigated but it is being questioned why the video conference was held on the WebEx platform rather than a secret internal army network.  Meanwhile, the first vessel to be sunk by Houthi rebels in Yemen could cause a large environmental catastrophe.   The Houthi rebels are targeting boats connected to Israel, the UK and the US – hitting a British registered cargo ship carrying tonnes of ammonium nitrate fertiliser. Experts say the impact of this could decimate wildlife in the area of the Gulf of Aden.  Listen above. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/3/20243 minutes, 1 second
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Professor Boyd Swinburn have requested urgent meeting with David Seymour on long term plan with school lunches

A coalition of health charities has slammed the Government’s decision to give ministerial responsibility for free school lunches to David Seymour after the Act leader campaigned for the programme to be abolished.  Speaking to Mike Hosking on Early Edition, Co-chair of the Health Coalition Aotearoa Professor Boyd Swinburn says nobody wants to see kids trying to learn on empty stomachs.   Universality is what makes the programme efficient, Swinburn says, providing relief for families with food insecurity.  Listen above. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
3/3/20244 minutes, 23 seconds
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Vincent McAviney: Europe Correspondent on Putin's warning to NATO if they send troops into Ukraine

Vladimir Putin is warning NATO countries of tragic consequences if they were to send troops into Ukraine.  The Russian President is referring to comments made earlier in the week by his French counterpart.  Emmanuel Macron was speculating on opening the doors for European ground troops being sent to Ukraine.  Europe Correspondent Vincent McAviney told Mike Hosking that following Sweden and Finland joining NATO, Putin feels the need to strengthen his defences.  He says Russia would be ready to use their weapons offensively against other nations.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/29/20244 minutes, 24 seconds
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Paul Buchanan: Strategist Analyst on the Government's decision to designate Hamas' political wing a terrorist entity

The Government is making it illegal for New Zealanders to support Hamas.   It's designated Hamas' political wing a terrorist entity, the same as its military wing.  It will also ban from New Zealand several extremist Israeli settlers who have committed violent attacks against Palestinians in the West Bank.  Strategic analyst Paul Buchanan told Mike Hosking that it's about tightening relations with security partners and won't dismantle Hamas.   He says it also runs contrary to the majority of world opinion, which sees a distinction between the political and armed wings of Hamas.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/29/20243 minutes, 30 seconds
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Mark Bekhit: Radiology registrar on the Coroners Court's recommendation of mandatory safety helmets on e-scooters

The Coroners Court is recommending mandatory safety helmets on e-scooters after its report into an Auckland man's death.   The man crashed into a concrete power pole on a modified e-scooter while under the influence of methamphetamine.   Radiology registrar Mark Bekhit says a lot of the e-scooter injuries he's seen have been alcohol or drug-related.   He told Mike Hosking that he can't be sure people will wear helmets if they've taken substances.  Bekhit says it sounds like a simple recommendation that's easier than targeting methamphetamine abuse, but he doesn't know it will solve the problem.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/29/20244 minutes, 18 seconds
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Mitch McCann: Newshub US Correspondent says voters are unhappy with Biden's involvement in the conflict in Palestine

The US Presidential race is heating up as both Joe Biden and Donald Trump win the Michigan Primary votes for their respective parties.  But President Biden's victory in the Democratic race wasn't all smooth sailing, with a sizable contingent issuing a protest vote.  Thirteen percent of voters, which says they weren't uncommitted.  Newshub US Correspondent Mitch McCann told Mike Hosking that many are unhappy with Biden's involvement in the Israel Palestine war.  He says Michigan has the largest Arab community in the country.  Meanwhile, 82-year-old US Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell says he'll step aside in November to make way for a new generation of leadership.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/28/20242 minutes, 56 seconds
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Vaughan Davis: The Goat Farm Advertising agency owner on the closure of Newshub

Newshub's imminent closure has put the size of our population in the spotlight.  Advertising agency owner Vaughan Davis told Mike Hosking that New Zealand is like the Chatham Islands of the world.   He said that maybe we're just too small a country for two TV networks.  Davis said we try to have the big country stuff but it's just five million people on an island, far away from everywhere.  Up to 300 jobs are expected to be lost by the end of June.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/28/20243 minutes, 40 seconds
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Glen Sowry: Queenstown Airport CEO on the Tarras Airport project being put on hold

Christchurch Airport's Tarras project is slowing down.  The airport had been developing a Central Otago airport on 800 hectares of land in the small town of Tarras.  It's been put on hold due to the need of co-investment from both public and private sources.  Queenstown Airport chief executive Glen Sowry told Mike Hosking that the Tarras project hasn't met community demands and expectations as Queenstown Airport has.  He says they've been working hard on making sure their future plans are what the regional businesses and community wants.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/28/20244 minutes, 38 seconds
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Kelly Eckhold: Westpac Senior Economist on the OCR remaining at 5.5%

This year is set to be harder than the last for many New Zealanders.  The Reserve Bank has opted to keep the Official Cash Rate unchanged at 5.5%, in line with most economists' expectations.  It isn't expected to cut the OCR for a while, possibly not until the middle of next year.  Westpac Senior Economist Kelly Eckhold told Mike Hosking that some households will be finding it harder to pay their bills.  He says the unemployment rate is at 4%, which is not particularly high by New Zealand standards, but it will probably reach about five during the year.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/28/20244 minutes, 37 seconds
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International nurses being turned away due to skill issues

International nurses are flocking to our shores - but not with the skills required. Gore Hospital recently had 80 nurses apply for an emergency department role - but say only 98 percent of applicants had the relevant qualifications. It comes as the country is four and a half thousand nurses short. Gore Health chief executive Karl Metzler told Mike Hosking that they're being turned away due to a skill issue - not a lack of understanding in New Zealand culture. He says the hospital employs Russians, Germans, Filipinos and Indians - and prides themselves on being diverse.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/27/20245 minutes, 10 seconds
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Matt Doocey: Youth organisations are doing a great job

The Government is making decisions on how it carves up funding for our young people. It's allocating just under 10.7 million dollars of Ministry of Youth Development funds to 34 community youth organisations. The funding covers areas from education to mental health - as well as helping those living in regions affected by flooding in early 2023. Youth Minster Matt Doocey told Mike Hosking that he's been impressed by what he's seen of hardworking youth providers around the country. He says organisations at the community level are doing great work - we just need to make sure they're financially supported.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/27/20243 minutes, 23 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australian Correspondent on New South Wales police being uninvited from Sydney Mardi Gras due to the deaths of Jesse Baird and Luke Davis

New South Wales police have officially been uninvited from Mardi Gras, Sydney’s pride event.  Senior Constable Beaumont Lamarre-Condon has been accused of murdering Sydney gay couple Jesse Baird and Luke Davies, and as such, the precinct has been asked not to appear.   Debate over the police's involvement with the march began after Lamarre-Cordon allegedly shot his ex-boyfriend and his new partner with his service gun. Australian Correspondent Donna Demaio told Mike Hosking that police will comply.   She says Police have expressed disappointment in the decision, but will work to ensure a safe environment for all.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/26/20242 minutes, 55 seconds
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Brad Olsen: Infometrics Principal Economist on Restaurant Brands' major cost issues despite making record sales

Fast food operator Restaurant Brands says that despite making record sales, it still has major cost issues.  The operator of KFC, Pizza Hut, Carl's Junior, and Taco Bell has posted $1.3 billion in full-year sales.  Its net after-tax profit was $15.8 million, down half a million annually.  Brad Olsen, Infometrics Principal Economist, told Mike Hosking that while spending value was up 4.2% year on year, the volume purchased was down by 2.7%.  So, he said, you’re spending more, getting less bang for your buck.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/26/20242 minutes, 46 seconds
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Kyle Brewerton: Auckland Primary Principals' Association President on the lack of communication regarding the pausing of school building projects

Communication problems are running rampant between the Education Ministry and schools.  The Government's ordered a review of school building projects, saying they've inherited a school property system "bordering on crisis".   Already the ministry has put 20 projects on pause, with up to 350 in doubt.   Auckland Primary Principals' Association President Kyle Brewerton told Mike Hosking that the pauses have caught some schools by surprise, with shovels already in the ground.   He says there's confusion around the schools that have been tagged and what's happening now.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/26/20243 minutes, 44 seconds
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Ray Chung: Wellington City Councillor on Wellington Water's lack of transparency

A lack of transparency with Wellington Water is being blamed for the region's water woes.  The Capital's water provider yesterday admitted that it's failed to meet Ministry of Health fluoridation targets at least 95% of the time over recent months.  It comes as the region grapples with leaks and water shortages.  Wellington City Councillor Ray Chung told Mike Hosking that the water agency won't give the council adequate information as to what it's working on.  Wellington Water has also announced that it won't be exempt from new rules around chlorine compliance.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/26/20245 minutes, 4 seconds
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Grant McCallum: National Blue Green Forum 'couldn't have gone better'

Nationals Annual Blue Greens forum was held over the weekend. The prime minister and the party caucus members were all there to talk with the environmental leaders. Greens Forum chair Grant McCallum told Mike Hosking that the meeting was a 10/10 and it 'couldn't have gone better'. When asked how green the national party are he said 'we're very pragmatically green, We're not idealistically green.' LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/25/20243 minutes, 28 seconds
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Ginny Andersen apologises for 'absolutely unacceptable' comments to Mark Mitchell

Ginny Andersen says she'll apologise to Mark Mitchell, over comments she made on last week's Mike Hosking Breakfast. On last Wednesday's show, the Labour Police Spokesperson accused the Police Minister of being paid to kill people when he was a defence contractor in East Africa and the Middle East. Mitchell says he hasn't knowingly killed anyone. Andersen told Mike Hosking this morning, she shouldn't have made the comments, and will personally apologise to Mitchell when they reappear on the show this week.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/25/20243 minutes, 44 seconds
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John Tookey: AUT Professor of Construction Management on infrastructure maintenance needing more investment

A building expert says people tend to focus on the cost of building infrastructure and think they'll figure everything else out as they go along.  The Infrastructure Commission says we need to spend around 60% of our investment to look after what we already have, rather than building more.  AUT Professor of Construction Management John Tookey told Mike Hosking that people often focus on acquisition costs, rather than maintenance costs because it's easy.  He says that's because the sums get more complicated when you start considering the likes of depreciation and more over an extended period of time.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/22/20243 minutes, 10 seconds
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Louise Upston: Child Poverty Reduction Minister on the new approach to breaking the cycle of poverty

There’s “a new approach" from the Government on breaking the cycle of child poverty.  The percentage of children living in poverty has risen to 17.5, with the percentage of children facing material hardship rising to 12.5.  Child Poverty Reduction Minister Louise Upston says they'll have a target and will be held accountable for it.   She told Mike Hosking that it's not just a matter of addressing incomes.   Upston says those on welfare and the lowest incomes are hit the hardest in the cost-of-living crisis.   She says that's why they have to deal with the costs families face, and housing costs are a significant part of that.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/22/20245 minutes, 41 seconds
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Sandra Grey: Tertiary Education Union National Secretary on the Government's plan to make fees free the final year

There’s concerns the Government's plan to switch the first year of free tertiary study to the final year won't hit the mark.  The Tertiary Education Commission has told a select committee this week that there's no discernible evidence the first-year policy changed numbers of low decile school students attending university.  Tertiary Education Union National Secretary Sandra Grey says once students get past the first year, they usually stay until the end.  So, she told Mike Hosking, it doesn't make a lot of sense to make the final year free.  Grey says students need support when they're trying to transition either off the benefit and unemployment into study, or when they're going from school into study.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/22/20242 minutes, 45 seconds
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Cath O'Brien: Board of Airline Representatives of New Zealand Executive Director on the current conflict between Air NZ and Auckland Airport

Air New Zealand's turbulent relationship with Auckland Airport is taking another turn.  The national carrier is demanding an inquiry into the airport's spending, claiming it will push up airfares to five times the current rate by 2032.  Cath O’Brien, Executive Director on the Board of Airline Representatives, told Mike Hosking that the airport has a history of extremes, going from spending too little on their projects to a significantly higher amount, which its regulatory regime is not designed to handle.  She said the regime is only a five-year look, and so it can’t handle the ten-to-fifteen-year expense of the current plan.  While Auckland Airport denies any significant price changes, O’Brien said that due to the limitations on the current regime, prices will rise a lot more than they’re currently able to say.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/21/20244 minutes, 28 seconds
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Sir Colin Tukuitonga: Pasifika Medical Association Board Director on Efeso Collins' influence on the community

A tribute from one Pacific leader to another.  49 yearold Green Party MP and former Auckland Councillor Efeso Collins collapsed and died at a charity event yesterday morning.   Pasifika Medical Association Board Director Sir Colin Tukuitonga told Mike Hosking that he picked up the causes that other people perhaps wouldn't.  He says that includes young people and poor south Auckland communities, and his joining of the Green Party highlighted his concern for the environment.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/21/20242 minutes, 48 seconds
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Karen Chhour: Minister for Children on Peter Boshier's report into Oranga Tamariki

The Children's Minister says she's prioritising frontline staff investment in Oranga Tamariki.   Chief Ombudsman Peter Boshier has released a report detailing two thousand complaints and enquiries he's witnessed in the past four years.   He concluded work is inconsistent across the country, with some parts showing an alarming "absence of discipline"  Minister Karen Chhour told Mike Hosking that we can't keep having report after report saying the same things.   She says we're talking about children and young people with futures ahead of them and we need to do everything we can to ensure these futures are positive ones.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/21/20243 minutes, 51 seconds
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Tony Keddy: Number Eight Studios project leader on the film studio receiving consents to build in Hawke's Bay

It seems the path has been cleared for a multi-million-dollar film studio in Hawke's Bay.  Number Eight Studios has received resource consent from Hastings District Council for its 400-hectare facility in the coastal township of Te Awanga.  Despite having been five years since the first proposal, project leader Tony Keddy says it's been worth the wait.  The idea is for buildings to be built for the specific needs of the film industry, bringing a raft of international productions to Hawke's Bay home.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/20/20242 minutes, 38 seconds
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Brigitte Morten: Political Commentator on Grant Robertson's retirement from Politics

Labour's Grant Robertson is retiring from Parliament next month and will become Otago University's Vice-Chancellor in July.  The 15-year MP was Finance Minister and Deputy Prime Minister in the Labour Government.  He says the time is right for new challenges.   Political Commentator Brigitte Morten told Mike Hosking that the writing was on the wall when he decided not to run in Wellington Central again.  She said that making room for the new guard is a painful transition, but it's the right thing to do.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/20/20242 minutes, 54 seconds
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Richard Beddie: Exercise New Zealand CEO says NZ is one of the worst in the western world when it comes to being active

There's no silver bullet when it comes to improving our physical activity levels.  Health New Zealand's latest review of the state of our health has found one in three adults carries enough weight to affect their health.  Exercise New Zealand Chief Executive Richard Beddie says we're one of the worst in the western world when it comes to being active.  He told Mike Hosking that if information was key, we could solve it overnight.  Beddie says the answer is easy —move your body— but the behaviour is the complicated bit in terms of how they get people to do that.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/20/20244 minutes, 43 seconds
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Kelvin Davidson: CoreLogic Chief Property Economist on the housing market's slow start to the year

High mortgage rates are continuing to pressure the housing market as the year starts with slow January sales.   CoreLogic data shows there were more than 3,100 sales last month, up just 2% on the same time last year.  It's the slowest start to a year since 1983.  Chief Property Economist Kelvin Davidson says a slowdown in the Auckland market has also had a big impact.   He says mortgage rates have stopped increasing but aren't falling either, which is creating a bit of variability in the market, which he expects to continue for a while yet.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/19/20243 minutes, 13 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australian Correspondent on the proposed crackdown on drugs and alcohol in the Australian Parliament

A taskforce is proposing a crackdown on drugs and alcohol in the Australian parliament.  Australian Senator Perin Davey admitted to having a couple glasses of wine before a senate hearing, where she was seen slurring her words.  Australian Correspondent Donna Demaio told Mike Hosking that this isn't the first time an Aussie politician has been caught drinking on the job.  She says the image of former Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce lying and babbling on the street is still fresh in the minds of Australians.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/19/20243 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ian Powell: Health Commentator on St John pulling ambulances off the road and the underfunding of the health system

Lack of resources are being blamed for St John's move to pull some ambulances off the road.  The service is aiming to rein in costs for when a worker is sick or goes on leave.  Health commentator Ian Powell told Mike Hosking that it comes down to having enough staff, and funding isn't matching the increase in health demand.  He says this is not just a St John's problem there's a problem in the model, and there's a problem tangled up in the generalised under-funding of our health system.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/19/20243 minutes, 22 seconds
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Carmel Sepuloni: Labour's Social Development Spokesperson on the Government's plans to ramp up sanctions for those on the Jobseeker benefit

Labour's defending its work in the benefit space when in government, saying it takes time for change to occur.  Social Development Minister Louise Upston's announced a ramp up of work check-ins for jobseekers, with sanctions for those who don't meet obligations, starting in June.  Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni told Mike Hosking that when she was minister, there were record levels of people leaving benefits to get into employment.  But she says there were a lot of people coming onto the benefit who didn't necessarily have the skills to match the jobs that were out there, which is why they invested in upskilling and training.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/19/20243 minutes, 41 seconds
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Gavin Grey: UK and US Considering Seizing Russian Central Bank Assets

The British and American ambassadors to Russia have laid flowers at a memorial to Alexei Navalny in Moscow. The Russian opposition leader died after collapsing following a walk in his Arctic prison, over the weekend. Meanwhile, G-7 foreign ministers have met in Munich to discuss ideas to punish Russia for his death.Europe correspondent Gavin Grey told Mike Hosking that the UK and US have suggested seizing Russian central bank assets held abroad to pay for Ukraine. He says they believe the way to make Vladimir Putin uncomfortable is not demanding an explanation for Navalny's death, but to hit him in the pocket.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/18/20243 minutes, 16 seconds
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Clive Matthew-Wilson: Speed Camera Changes Won't Target Those Who Cause Most Accidents

Scepticism over whether handing over speed camera duties will reduce fatal speed-related crashes. NZTA is taking over the job from Police, with plans to increase the number from 150 to around 800, as part of a high-tech development of the network. It's estimated to process around three million infringements annually by 2030. But road safety campaigner Clive Matthew-Wilson told Mike Hosking it doesn't target those who cause most of those accidents. He says those who actually cause them are a very small group of poorly educated people, usually with substance abuse problems and an attitude.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/18/20244 minutes, 34 seconds
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Jason Walls: Plenty of People Still Back Luxon Despite Grim SOTN Speech

Prime Minister Chris Luxon gave a somewhat grim outlook of the economy during his State of the Nation speech in Auckland yesterday, but he still has support. Luxon says the state of the nation is fragile, and says the problems the country faces won't be fixed in 100 days .. or 100 days after that .. but his Government is getting to work. Newstalk ZB Political Editor Jason Walls told Mike Hosking a lot of polls show he still has plenty of people backing him. He says Luxon's having to cut through the noise to keep getting his message out there.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/18/20244 minutes, 13 seconds
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Michael Gordon: Westpac Senior Economist thinks we're reaching the peak of migration inflows

The migration boom is easing ever so slightly.  Latest Stats NZ figures show annual net migration reached just under 126,000 in the year to December.  That's down 6.3% on the record high for the year to November.  The net migration gain is still one of the largest recorded, equivalent to the population of Taranaki.  Westpac Senior Economist Michael Gordon told Mike Hosking that he thinks we’re beginning to reach our peak.  He said he’d be surprised if we continued to see these numbers this time next year.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/15/20244 minutes, 18 seconds
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Geoffrey Miller: International Relations Expert says the Israeli Prime Minister's expectation that the Palestinians sheltering in Rafah can all go to a small village on the coast is unrealistic

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been labelled "unrealistic" as concerns rise for Gazan city Rafah.  International relations expert Geoffrey Miller told Mike Hosking that Netanyahu seems to be in a fantasy land.  He says he seems to think the 1.5-million Palestinians sheltering in Rafah can all go to a small village on the coast seven kilometres away.  New Zealand, Australia, and Canada have issued a joint statement, warning that a humanitarian ceasefire is urgently needed.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/15/20242 minutes, 56 seconds
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Kerri Nuku: Nurses Organisation President on the deadlines for the payouts continuously getting pushed back

The nurses union wants the new Health Minister to intervene on delays to payouts.  Te Whatu Ora owes nearly two billion dollars to nurses after failing to meet Holiday Act requirements, and its only paid roughly $250,000 back.  The union says the rest of the money, owed from 2010 onwards, has been pushed back.  Nurses Organisation President Kerri Nuku told Mike Hosking that they'll be writing to the minister.  She says deadlines keep getting pushed back and they want clarity.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/15/20243 minutes, 49 seconds
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Chris Abercrombie: Post-Primary Teachers Association Acting President on David Seymour's plans to tackle absenteeism

David Seymour's preparing to take a harder line on the parents of chronically absent kids.   As the Associate Education Minister, Seymour's been tasked with tackling increasing levels of absenteeism in schools across the country.   Regular attendance is classed as being in school more than 90-percent of a term.  He says he's investigating whether the power to fine the parents of absent kids should be used more often.  Chris Abercrombie, Acting President of the Post-Primary Teachers Association, told Mike Hosking that he’s not sure if fining parents is the answer.  He thinks making sure that the needs of students are met would be more effective in getting students to school.  Abercrombie said it could be something as simple as making sure they have a uniform or sending around a van to pick up students.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/14/20243 minutes, 37 seconds
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Lynette Hutson: Salvation Army Head of Social Services says lifting people of the benefit is easier said than done

The Salvation Army says lifting people off benefits and into jobs is easier said than done.   The Government's looking to change benefit legislation that would see income support rise only with the rate of inflation.  Under Labour benefits rose with wage growth each year, which generally rises faster than inflation.  Salvation Army Head of Social Services, Lynette Hutson told Mike Hosking that many people receiving them are without any transport or education.  She says it's a very simple answer to say get everyone a job and it will be okay ... it doesn't work like that.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/14/20243 minutes, 27 seconds
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Carl Taylor: Combined Building Supplies Co-op Chair on what Fletcher Building's poor results mean for the wider industry

Fletcher Building's poor results are believed to be indicative of wider pain in the construction sector.  The company's half-year financial results painted a dire picture, with a $120-million net loss.  Chief Executive Ross Taylor announced his resignation yesterday alongside Chair Bruce Hassall.  Combined Building Supplies Co-op Chair Carl Taylor told Mike Hosking that the industry is hurting.  He says it is quiet out there, and their numbers are down too.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/14/20243 minutes, 8 seconds
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Michael Webster: Privacy Commissioner on the data collected by Woolworths as part of their Everyday Rewards program

More privacy concerns for supermarket customers.   It's been revealed that Woolworths will collect personal data like images, audio recordings, and license plate numbers when people sign up to their Everyday Reward cards.  Privacy Commissioner Michael Webster says businesses need to be transparent with what they're collecting from people and what's done with that data once it's been collected.   He says they need to make sure it isn't at risk of cyber-attacks and isn't accessible to those who shouldn't see it.   It follows an earlier controversy with competitor Foodstuffs trialling facial recognition software in North Island stores.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/13/20243 minutes, 27 seconds
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Linda Gradstein: CBS Correspondent on Israel facing pressures around their ground invasion in Rafah, Gaza

Israel is facing pressure from various countries around their ground offensive in the southern Gaza city of Rafah.  A raft of western allies, including New Zealand, is pleading with Israel not to escalate matters.  CBS correspondent Linda Gradstein told Mike Hosking that the United States has made it clear to Israel that their forces shouldn't go into Rafah without getting civilians out first.  She says there're about a million and a half Palestinians living in Rafah, many of whom have already been displaced twice.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/13/20243 minutes, 31 seconds
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Mark Thomas: Committee for Auckland Director says Aucklanders want a permanent fix for transport problems

The results of decades of under-investment in Auckland infrastructure are becoming clear. Auckland Mayor Wayne Brown's demanding Auckland Transport stop all projects that were funded by the Regional Fuel Tax.  The tax is being scrapped late June, and the mayor says it'll leave a $1.2-billion gap in transport funding over four years.  Trains were also cancelled this week due to heat speed restrictions on the tracks.  Committee for Auckland director Mark Thomas told Mike Hosking that their report found transport is almost the number one priority for the city.  He says they'll be arguing for much quicker and a larger solution to Auckland's problems, because it seems to be getting worse week by week.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/13/20243 minutes, 35 seconds
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Nick Tuffley: ASB Senior Economist on the possibility of future rate hikes

The possibility of future rate hikes remains uncertain.  Despite ANZ shifting its forecast to predict two more rate hikes, there are economists saying that the Reserve Bank has no need.  ASB Chief Economist Nick Tuffley told Mike Hosking that there is a growing chance that the Reserve Bank will get impatient and lift interest rates.  However, he said, they think that they can hold off since things are going in the right direction.  Tuffley said the question is whether they’re headed there fast enough.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/12/20243 minutes, 48 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australian Correspondent on the catastrophic bushfire risk in Victoria

Victorian fire authorities are that warning today may pose the greatest fire risk in four years.  Melbourne correspondent Donna Demaio told Mike Hosking that there’s a catastrophic bushfire danger rating for parts of the state, with high winds, heat, and the potential for dry lightning likely.   She says it's going to reach 40 degrees plus, and the fire experts say these forecast conditions haven't been seen since the Black Summer of 2019.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/12/20242 minutes, 48 seconds
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Alex Walker: Central Hawke's Bay Mayor says new water infrastructure legislation could help get things off the ground of a regional model

Councils may continue to join forces to tackle infrastructure around three waters.  The Government's confirmed its plan to repeal and replace the controversial legislation.  It will introduce bills that attempt to make it easier for councils to determine their own water strategy, including making it easier to set up council-controlled organisations.  Central Hawke's Bay Mayor Alex Walker told Mike Hosking that it makes sense for Hawke's Bay, as a region, to work together.  She says communities are socially and economically connected, and this legislation could help get things off the ground for a regional model.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/12/20244 minutes, 4 seconds
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Mark Knoff-Thomas: Newmarket Business Association CEO on the cancellation of Auckland Trains due to the heat

An Auckland business leader says nothing surprises him with the city's railway infrastructure, after trains were cancelled due to heat.   Some Auckland train services were cancelled through yesterday afternoon and evening, including at peak hour.   Kiwi Rail, which manages the tracks, blamed track temperatures, which reached 48 degrees in some places.   Newmarket Business Association chief executive Mark Knoff-Thomas told Mike Hosking that there are other countries hotter than ours with working rail.   He says southern Europe has an amazing railway network and is hotter than Auckland.   Knoff-Thomas wonders if Kiwi Rail bought the tracks of Facebook Marketplace.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/12/20244 minutes, 21 seconds
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Mark Mitchell: Additional Money Will Help With Cyclone Gabrielle Recovery

The Emergency Management Minister says additional money for Cyclone Gabrielle recovery will help Hawke's Bay reach silt removal targets. The Government's announced $63-million for sediment and debris removal. Hawke's Bay Regional Council will get 40-million, three million of that is for removing debris in Wairoa. Gisborne District Council will receive 23-million. Minister Mark Mitchell told Mike Hosking he hopes the money solves the problem. He says the additional $40-million will help Hawke's Bay get to its target of 20 percent of silt and debris removed.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/11/20243 minutes, 50 seconds
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Ben Harlum: Taylor Swift Brings Huge Crowds Ahead Of Las Vegas Superbowl

Las Vegas is in Super Bowl mode today as thousands are in town for the big game. The NFL match between the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers will kick off at 12:30 this afternoon. Sirius XM host Ben Harlum is there, and told Mike Hosking that the streets are packed, security's been increased and the Swifties are in full force. He says he's been to Vegas many times but has never seen it like this. Harlum says the noise is insane and he's had to leave the casino just to get some peace and quiet. Taylor Swift is seeing Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/11/20243 minutes, 41 seconds
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Israel Set To Proceed With Ground Offensive On Rafah

Israel looks set to proceed with its ground offensive on Rafah in southern Gaza, despite a lack of support from western allies. Correspondent Gavin Grey told Mike Hosking the US wants Israel to come up with a plan for protecting the safety of the civilian population, before the military advance begins. Foreign Minister Winston Peters says our government is "extremely concerned" about the potential humanitarian consequences.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/11/20243 minutes, 13 seconds
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Jordan Williams: Ratepayers Alliance Spokesperson on Wayne Brown's response to the scrapped Auckland Fuel Tax

The Government and Auckland Council are not in agreement over the scrapping of the Regional Fuel Tax.  It will be gone at the end of June, providing what the Government says is a cost-of-living relief.   Auckland mayor Wayne Brown has come out swinging, saying the decision will leave a $1.2 billion shortfall in transport funding over the next four years.  Ratepayers Alliance spokesperson Jordan Williams told Mike Hosking that last week, the mayor was saying Auckland Transport had lost the plot when it comes to value for money.  He says this week it's a bit rich for Brown to complain we need to keep piling money into AT, which just has a long history of wasting it.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/8/20243 minutes, 53 seconds
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Tony Gavigan: Former Ruapehu Snow Sports Secretary on Mount Ruapehu's uncertain future as a skiing destination

Uncertainty continues to plague Mount Ruapehu's future as a skiing destination.  Whakapapa Holdings has pulled its bid on the Whakapapa side of the mountain, claiming there's not enough Crown funding.  It's unclear how that part of the mountain will operate this winter.  It comes as a conditional agreement for Pure Turoa to run the Turoa ski field has been signed.  Former Ruapehu Snow Sports Secretary Tony Gavigan told Mike Hosking that the current-funding model needs to stay, with crown-funding.  He says nobody in the private sector is going to put in the sort of capital and annual commitment required unless they have tenure.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/8/20243 minutes, 48 seconds
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Angus Chambers: GenPro Chairman on government funding issues for general practices reaching crisis levels

GP advocacy groups say funding issues are approaching crisis levels.  Many GPs are hiking their prices as government funding fails to keep up with rising costs.  GenPro Chairman Angus Chambers told Mike Hosking that GP clinics receive different subsidies for different patients.  He says one of the issues is that it doesn't take into account complexity within age groups.  Chambers says he gets the same amount of money for a 65-year-old as he does a 95-year-old, and the latter requires more input.  Health Minister Shane Reti agrees the funding model is not fit for purpose, and he's looking forward to receiving advice on a sustainable solution.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/8/20243 minutes, 51 seconds
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Shirley Johnson: Youth advocate on the reasons behind the uptick in young people going on the benefit and remaining there

Young people are increasingly going on the benefit and staying on it for longer.  Reports released to Newstalk ZB suggest a sharp spike in the time beneficiaries will spend on income support, with a 23% jump in the number of people staying on job-seeker support until retirement age.  Youth advocate Shirley Johnson told Mike Hosking that the education system isn't adequately preparing young people for work.  She says schools haven't kept up with our changing world.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/7/20244 minutes, 26 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on Taylor Swift's cease and desist to try and stop her private jet being tracked

Taylor Swift's lawyers are trying to put an end to public tracking of her private jet, claiming it's 'a life or death matter'.  Student Jack Sweeney uses public data to track take-offs and landings of celebrity planes and posts them to Twitter.  US Correspondent Mitch McCann told Mike Hosking that the 21-year-old's been issued a cease-and-desist to stop sharing Swift's plane location.  He says Sweeney has responded that he believes in public transparency and hasn't promised he'll stop.  Swift's team claims the data gives her numerous stalkers "a roadmap to carry out their plans".  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/7/20242 minutes, 49 seconds
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Mark Smith: ASB Senior Economist says the latest unemployment figures may be reflective, and things may actually be worse

Our latest unemployment numbers have caught some by surprise.  Stats NZ figures show a 4% rise in the three months to December.  That's up from 3.9% in the preceding three months but below most economists' predictions, who'd been expecting between 4.2 and 4.3%.  ASB Senior Economist Mark Smith told Mike Hosking there's potential these figures are more reflective, and things may have actually worsened.  He says other indicators —like benefit numbers— having been rising steadily.    LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/7/20243 minutes, 52 seconds
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Tama Potaka: Māori Development Minister criticises Waitangi coverage for not being "comprehensive"

The Māori Development Minister has hit out at media coverage of events at Waitangi.  The Coalition came under fire from Māori leaders, with both ACT Leader David Seymour and NZ First Leader Winston Peters among those heckled during speeches.  Tama Potaka says he thinks most people came away feeling warm and excited for the future.  He told Mike Hosking that he thinks the coverage was not comprehensive and skewed towards describing angst.  Potaka says after the Government pōwhiri, it felt that while not everyone agreed with everything, everyone had the chance to present themselves.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/6/20243 minutes, 49 seconds
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Gavin Grey: UK Correspondent on Prince Harry's arrival in the UK after King Charles' cancer diagnosis

Prince Harry has arrived in the UK alone after his father's cancer diagnosis.  Buckingham Palace announced King Charles cancer yesterday, which was discovered during a separate procedure.  Harry was earlier photographed arriving at Clarence House.  The King's now been seen for the first time since the announcement - being driven with Queen Camilla from Clarence House to Buckingham Palace, where it's believed they flew to Sandringham. UK correspondent Gavin Grey told Mike Hosking that it's not known how long Harry will stay, or if he's going to Sandringham.  He says there's apparently no plan to meet with his brother, Prince William.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/6/20244 minutes, 2 seconds
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Henry Russell: ANZ Economist on the probably spike to the unemployment rate

A spike to New Zealand's unemployment rate may be on the cards later this morning.  Multiple bank economists estimate it to land at 4.3%, up from the September quarter's 3.9%.   ANZ Economist, Henry Russell told Mike Hosking that he agrees.  He says the key driver is the ongoing recovery in labour supply, reflecting the record net-migration we've seen.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/6/20243 minutes, 41 seconds
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Francesca Rudkin: We give in good faith- but we're not idiots

We’re a generous bunch us Kiwis. It never ceases to amaze me how New Zealander’s step up when tragedy or just bad luck strikes someone or a community. In May 2023 - when every second headline was about the cost-of-living crisis - it was announced we’d given $36.6 million to charities and causes over that last financial year. It was a 38% increase on the previous year. That’s a lot of money. We’re givers and we give in good faith, but we’re not idiots and we like to know where the money is going and what it’s going to be used for. This week, a mayor hit the headlines asking why a considerable amount of money raised through Lotto to help communities affected by Cyclone Gabrielle is still in a bank account almost a year after the disaster, with no thought given to how it may be allocated. It’s not a good look. It’s not a good look for Lotto who ran the appeal, or the Department of Internal Affairs who have banked the cash and are earning a bit of interest, or the Fund’s trustees responsible for allocations, to not have a plan yet. If we want people to give when the need arises, and we do in this little country of ours, then having faith in the system is important. We don’t give with the expectation of getting anything in return - but we do hope that if we were in strife one day the same generosity would be shown. Stories like this don’t encourage giving. Hastings Mayor Sandra Hazlehurst has expressed concern over the fund and its lack of action and is using the media to get things moving, but when you’re living in an area dealing with the fallout of a natural disaster, I say go for it. Especially when other cyclone-related relief funds have been effective. The Red Cross, who faced criticism last April for being too slow to release their 27.5m in donated funds have, as of November 13, committed $24m of their fund. The Hawke’s Bay Disaster Relief Fund and the Hastings Mayoral Fund have also been hard at work. It’s worth pointing out that because it’s gambling money there are some specific criteria regarding how the money is to be used. It must go to community minded projects like fixing facilities where people come together – sports clubs, playgrounds, marae or community halls – and the Trusts focus is on medium to long-term recovery projects. So, I understand the dust must settle before communities know what they need. It was never going to handed out immediately. But, if you want to rely on the goodwill of the people then it helps to be transparent about the process and the fund’s intentions. If you’re wondering where your donation will end up, answers are apparently coming this month, when the trustees will meet to consider and decide on a timeline. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/5/20243 minutes, 34 seconds
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David Seymour: Hope Of 'Peaceful Debate' To Come Out Of Waitangi

David Seymour hopes a 'peaceful debate' can come out of Waitangi - in the wake of backlash to his proposed Treaty Principles Bill. The ACT leader is being welcomed alongside the coalition at the Waitangi Treaty Grounds in the Bay of Islands today. He skipped both last month's Kingitanga's hui-a-motu and Ratana commemorations. Iwi representatives spoke at Waitangi yesterday, expressing criticism over various Government leaders, and stances, in relation to Māori. Seymour told Francesca Rudkin he hopes some of the rhetoric in recent days can be dialled down. He doesn't think it's such a bad thing to have a debate on treaty principles - saying it should be welcomed as it apparently highlights the importance of the treaty.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/4/20245 minutes, 57 seconds
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Boyd Swinburn: Health Coalition Aotearoa co-chair on the Government's plan to "optimise" the funded school lunch program

The Government is being warned that its attempts to streamline the costs of government-funded school lunches could backfire.   An MBIE briefing has revealed the lunches could end this year unless the Government finds $330 million.  Prime Minister Chris Luxon says his government will fund them beyond the end of the year, but he wants to optimise the programme.    Health Coalition Aotearoa co-chair Boyd Swinburn told Mike Hosking that a programme which only gives lunches to poorer kids has downsides.   He says having certain children line up for the lunches creates stigma for them, which can create so many issues that schools may decide not to bother.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/1/20243 minutes, 39 seconds
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Melissa Ansell-Bridges: Council of Trade Unions Secretary on Brooke van Velden's recommendation of a 1.3% increase to minimum wage

The Council of Trade Unions says it's heartless that the Workplace Relations and Safety Minister recommended a 1.3% minimum wage increase.   The Government's decided to increase minimum wage by 2% to $23.15 an hour from April.    Inflation is at 4.7%.   Council of Trade Unions Secretary Melissa Ansell-Bridges told Mike Hosking that all New Zealanders have a right to a liveable income.   She says the idea that people on low incomes should work harder, train more, and advance themselves is great, but there'll still be someone doing those jobs.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/1/20242 minutes, 36 seconds
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Chris Roberts: Former Tourism Industry Aotearoa CEO on the accommodation providers who are struggling to meet the GST change deadline

Airbnb and its rivals are warning their services may need to be suspended if the Government doesn't delay a GST law change. Accommodation providers and ride-share services such as Uber will become liable for ensuring GST is paid through services booked on their websites from April 1. Airbnb, Booking.com, Bookabach, and Bachcare wrote  to Finance Minister Nicola Willis in December requesting an urgent meeting. Former Tourism Industry Aotearoa CEO Chris Roberts told Mike Hosking that the companies haven't had enough time to prepare for the changes. He said that during the election campaign National was going to scrap the idea, but are now keeping it following coalition agreements. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
2/1/20244 minutes, 35 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on the decision Biden has made in how to respond to the drone strike in Jordan

The US has decided on their course of action when it comes to retaliating to the drone strike that killed and injured over forty US troops.  Their response is likely to come in the next couple of days, officials saying that they will respond at a time of their choosing.  US Correspondent Mitch McCann told Mike Hosking that while they have a couple of options, it’s likely that they will target the militia directly as opposed to launching a strike against Iran and potentially widening the war.  He said that the militia responsible announced this morning that they will be suspending their operations, though it may be too late to avoid repercussions from the US.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/31/20242 minutes, 38 seconds
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Greg Lowe: Australia New Zealand Leadership Forum Co-Chair on the AUKUS discussions set to occur at todays trans-Tasmin meeting

AUKUS is expected to be a topic at today's trans-Tasman meeting.   New Zealand and Australia's Foreign Ministers and Defence Ministers will meet for talks in Melbourne today.   Australia New Zealand Leadership Forum Co-Chair Greg Lowe says it's certainly worth having discussions about the second pillar of AUKUS.   That second pillar involves things like cyber security and AI, rather than military action  He told Mike Hosking that the meeting is happening at an important time.   Lowe says financial troubles following the pandemic have been followed by tough geopolitical circumstances.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/31/20243 minutes, 38 seconds
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Nikki Chamberlain: Auckland University Senior Law Lecturer on Green Bay High School placing CCTV cameras in bathrooms to stop vaping

An Auckland high school has placed CCTV cameras in its bathrooms in a bid to stop vaping.  Green Bay High School students have taken to social media to voice their concerns, saying it's a breach of privacy.  The school has also installed a glass door to a new bathroom.  Auckland University senior law lecturer Nikki Chamberlain told Mike Hosking that children are vulnerable when it comes to privacy.  She says schools are more likely to face scrutiny from courts for their actions because of that.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/31/20244 minutes, 56 seconds
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Sasha Lockley: Money Sweetspot CEO says the laws governing the lending process were too restrictive

Banking restrictions are on the chopping block, in the hope to make the lending process smoother.  Laws introduced by the previous government which aimed to prevent loan sharks are set to be scrapped.  Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Andrew Bayley says it had unintended consequences.  CEO of Money Sweetspot Sasha Lockley told Mike Hosking that it made lending too restrictive for both lenders and borrowers.  She says the prescriptive requirements took the human understanding out of lending.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/31/20242 minutes, 25 seconds
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Cheryl Adamson: Parnell Business Association General Manager on the uptick in disorderly behaviour linked to nearby Kainga Ora tenants

The Parnell Business Association wants more to be done to address what it says is a sharp rise in crime and disorderly behaviour, linked to nearby Kainga Ora tenants.  It's written to Housing Minister Chris Bishop and former Prime Minister Sir Bill English who's leading a review into the agency.  General Manager Cheryl Adamson says that in the last 6-8 months they’ve seen an uptick in the number of disruptive tenants in the area.  She told Mike Hosking unlike in the past, the facility doesn’t currently have full-time onsite security to help pinpoint tenants who would cause trouble.  Adamson said that while they do have their own security systems and hired guards, collaboration works best when they can liaise with onsite management.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/30/20243 minutes, 38 seconds
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Catherine Delahunty: Former Green MP on the Green's leadership in the wake of James Shaw's resignation

There’s potential for a more radical leadership of the Greens in the wake of co-leader James Shaw's resignation.  Shaw's announced he'll step down in March but will remain an MP for the time being to support his Sustainable Environment Bill.  Green Party rules state that a woman and a Māori person must be in leadership roles, but with Marama Davidson covering both criteria, the floor is wide open.  Former MP Catherine Delahunty says some members are looking for a genuinely radical approach from the Greens.  She says we could see a more authentically strong environmental position, which won't be so popular with the business sector, but at the end of the day that's not the Greens job.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/30/20243 minutes, 54 seconds
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Mike Hosking: James Shaw is a fish out of water when it comes to the Greens

I have never really been able to work James Shaw out.  As he quit his leadership yesterday, which made perfect sense, he waxed lyrical about the Green Party, and its achievements, and its place in the political landscape.   Which makes no sense because they are a mess and no longer remotely green, and he stands out like the dogs proverbials as the one remaining environmentalist.  Of course, you wouldn't expect him to bag them, but he speaks with such clarity and conviction about them. He is either a sensational performer, or he actually believes it.  He must know surely, he was the last one standing. The rest are just rabid extremists.  And therefore, the future of the Greens is anything but assured. And without his ballast and experience they open themselves to the ever-increasing reality of heading off down a track of performance art, complete with pro-Palestinianan flags and scarves.  Rod Donald and Jeanete Fitzsimons were at least green.  But your Sue Bradfords muddied the waters with their social engineering bent, which then led to your Marama Davidson years where chat about snails and national park walkways gave way to cis white males and anti-establishment fury.  Before Golriz caught the attention of the retail community she too added to the Davidson view of the world: Not a lot of climate change, an awful lot of protest and left leaning angst.  I suppose Julie Anne Genter had green credentials, with her Get Wellington Moving vision and her road to zero campaign, both of which you will note are the most abject of abject failures, but at least they had a tinge of the environment about them.  A lot of us when it came to James sort of felt bad for him. What on earth was he still doing there?  They tried to oust him as leader for goodness sake! He took no part in any of their mad cap protests, marching for causes that had nothing to do with being green.  He looked like a fish out of water, and yet still he stayed for 9 long years.  Until now.  I always had the impression he could have done so much more if only he hadn't been hanging with the crazies.  A decent bloke with his heart and intentions in the right place just hijacked by or held captive by people around him he thought were his mates.  Next stop surely the full-blown freedom of the outside world; run James, run.  There is a big bright world out there and you can do a lot of good in it See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/30/20242 minutes, 20 seconds
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Oliver Hartwich: New Zealand Initiative Economist Director says Reserve Bank policy needs to be in line with government policy to reduce inflation

High inflation in certain parts of the economy is dashing hopes of a cut in the OCR.   Reserve Bank Chief Executive Paul Conway says despite overall inflation being at 4.7 percent, non-tradable inflation is still high at 5.9 percent.   New Zealand Initiative Economist Director Oliver Hartwich says that non-tradable inflation is produced in New Zealand.   He told Mike Hosking that the Reserve Bank’s policy to reduce inflation needs to be in sync with government fiscal policy.   Hartwich says high government spending makes it harder for the Reserve Bank to do its job.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/30/20243 minutes, 26 seconds
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Jason Walls: Political Editor ahead of Parliament's first sitting of 2024

Parliament is officially back in business, with the first sitting of the year today.  The Government will resume its 100 Day Action Plan, which still includes scrapping the Māori Health Authority, Auckland Fuel Tax, and Three Waters reforms.   Parliament is still under urgency when it comes to the passing of legislation.  Political Editor Jason Walls told Mike Hosking this impacts things like passing the bill that scraps the Productivity Commission, which is slated to happen today.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20244 minutes, 6 seconds
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Karen Morrish: New Zealand Apples & Pears CEO on the export forecasts bouncing back to pre-cyclone levels

The annual apple and pear crop is forecast to pip last year's total.  New Zealand Apples & Pears estimates export volume at 21.2 million boxes, a rebound from the 2023 Cyclone Gabrielle-ravaged total.  It's also a return to pre-cyclone levels.  CEO Karen Morrish says there are several factors behind the recovery, including cyclone-damaged crops bouncing back.  She says it's also down to a lot of hard work from growers, coupled with favourable weather.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20242 minutes, 47 seconds
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Mike Hosking: Do we need to have more logical discussions around the Treaty?

I am assuming you got as bored as I did over the break with the obsession—or mania, as Shane Jones quite rightly called it— when it came to ACT's idea of having a chat about the way we view and interpret the Treaty.  The problem with David Seymour is he is too logical, especially for nutters and extremists.  He wants to debate, to toss ideas about, to —dare we suggest— act like an adult and have a discussion.  Hone Harawira, I noted, in one of the alarmist gatherings just referred to the others who don't agree with him as bastards. So, you can see what poor old David is up against.  In an adult world, minds can be changed through logic, and detail, and fact, and reason.  In Hone’s world... well, you are a bastard.  The media, I noted, started the new year as they left off: unable to comprehend the fact we’ve changed govts and therefore outlooks, and fully lined up alongside the Kīngitanga and espoused the alarm, outrage, and upset.  Seymour, if you think about it logically, is to be admired. All he is asking for is a discussion.  Even National who aren't supporting his plan past select committee are taking that position I suspect not because they don’t agree with him, but because its messy politics.  They have bigger fish to fry like the economy which has been sinking like a stone. A to be fair to them, I’d make it my number one job as well.  But it is a fair-weather approach that National has specialised in for many years; pick the stuff you can get votes on. The moment it looks a bit gnarly? Walk away.  Seymour to his credit, and the end-of-life choice work he did was an excellent example, picks issues and runs with them with no fear, no favour.  It is a laudable approach driven by principle, something more of us should aspire to.  There is no doubt the Treaty has been interpreted many a different way.  The document is not prescriptive, nor that descriptive. It is open to a multitude of reactions. That’s why we have seen the Māori Party formed and reformed, any number of court cases enacted, and lord knows how much activism from the Waitangi Tribunal.  Mostly its caused angst, if not upset. We are not a harmonious nation when it comes to race relations and ACT and Seymour want to talk about it.  If only more were mature enough to give that a crack. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20242 minutes, 15 seconds
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Michelle McCormick: Infrastructure NZ Policy Director says that decades of underinvestment are to blame for Wellington's water crisis

Decades of underinvestment are to blame for Wellington's water crisis, according to infrastructure experts.  Wellington is facing tightening water restrictions as more than 40% of treated water is lost due to leaks and burst pipes in the region.   Infrastructure New Zealand Policy Director Michelle McCormick told Mike Hosking that the whole country is facing water issues, and we need to better prioritise infrastructure spending.  She says the chickens are coming home to roost.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20242 minutes, 45 seconds
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Brigitte Morten: Former Senior Ministerial Advisor to National on David Seymour's plans for the Treaty Principles Bill

A political commentator says the Prime Minister is continuing to distance himself from ACT's Treaty Principles Bill. The bill featured heavily in ACT Party leader David Seymour's State of the Nation speech over the weekend. Brigitte Morten says the move to make Seymour Associate Justice Minister, reinforces that it's ACT Party, not National Party policy. She says the appointment has some practical aspects too. Morton says it will allow Seymour to talk more directly to officials on the bill, and will mean he gets to introduce the bill to parliament. LISTEN ABOVE  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20244 minutes
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Gavin Grey: UK correspondent on protestors throwing soup on the Mona Lisa painting

The famous Mona Lisa painting has fallen victim to yet another protest attack, with activists hurling pumpkin soup over the 16th century masterpiece. The protestors, who represent a French environmental protection group, took to the painting to raise awareness for the issue of sustainable food. Newstalk ZB Europe correspondent Gavin Grey says the group is calling on food to be more accessible. "Basically, what the want is a food card worth roughly $270 NZD to be given to citizens each month to be used on food." LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20243 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mark Potter: NZEI president says teachers struggling to retain student engagement as schools start up again

It's the first day schools can go back for term 1. The new Government's making compulsory an hour each of reading, writing and maths at primary school. Next term schools will be required to have cellphone policies in place, but it's expected most schools will implement them this term. NZEI president Mark Potter says there's a lot of things competing for children's attention these days. He says teachers have the added battle of making sure they stay engaging for children, which is one of the most important things for them. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20243 minutes, 53 seconds
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Roman Travers: New Zealand needs more funding to get tourism back on track

New Zealand needs a great deal in order to get back on track, printing money and once again becoming an almost first world nation that the rest of the world wants to come and see, travel and enjoy. The Tourism and Hospitality Minister is Matt Doocey and yesterday, he came out saying that nothing is off the table when it comes to helping fund the industry and the vital infrastructure it needs. Nothing? Really? That sounds like a giant blank cheque for the tourism industry to sink their teeth into right? Minister Matt Doocey has been touring the country, meeting with regional tourism operators in the past few weeks and listening to what they want, and their concerns. That’s great… I’m sure this is great news for anyone with a wale watching venture, a bungy jumping business or sight seeing bus for the vineyards of Martinborough. Minister Doocey says he wants to find out how his ministry can support the tourism sector grow and become a big part of the economic success of Aotearoa. Now doesn’t that sound like the ideal path forward for anyone looking to swing the spotlight upon this great nation? Some parts of the country are already seeing the numbers or tourists getting back to the numbers seen before the world screeched to a halt with the COVID pandemic. Queenstown is one center luxuriating in high numbers of tourists. Other areas that once enjoyed high numbers of sheepskin slipper and stuffed kiwi purchasing pundits – like Rotorua and Dunedin, are not faring so well. The key to getting tourism booming here once again, is funding. That was the key message that The Tourism Minister heard on his road trip around the county. Another aspect that he’s taken back to The Beehive is just how crucial it is for the regions to have the visitor infrastructure necessary to accommodate our overseas friends and to put less strain on communities. Minister Doocey is spot on. The infrastructure of the country is pretty good in some places and completely woeful in others. Anyone who’s had conversations with tourists over the past few months will know that one of the most common complaints they have, is the inability to get anywhere with public transport. We’ve been here a million times haven’t we? New Zealand can’t afford to run trains and busses to all points of the compass at all times. New Zealand doesn’t have the population to sustain the level of infrastructure required to keep you and me happy – let alone the swathe of tourists who arrive here expecting more. They expect more – because largely speaking, they come here from countries that are light years ahead of us. Here; we continue to be hamstrung by our inability to see the rails for the sleepers. I sincerely hope that The Minister for Tourism can convince this coalition government to find the money to build what we need in order to make New Zealand a first class, top-notch destination for all tourists. God knows we need them.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/29/20242 minutes, 47 seconds
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Vincent McAviney: UK Correspondent on the British and Victoria & Albert Museums returning artefacts to Ghana after 150 years

The UK is sending back Ghana's 'crown jewels'.  The long-term loan deal will see the artefacts returned 150 years after they were looted from the court of the Ashanti Empire.  UK Correspondent, Vincent McAviney, told Roman Travers that it consists of 32 pieces from the British and Victoria & Albert Museums.  He says Ghana's chief negotiator is hopeful for a 'new sense of cultural co-operation' after generations of anger.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/25/20243 minutes, 15 seconds
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Kelly Eckhold: Westpac Chief Economist on the possibility that more banks will lower their interest rates

Other banks might be following ASB in dropping interest rates.   ASB is dropping its rates on its three, four, and five-year home loan terms.   Westpac Chief Economist Kelly Eckhold says that last year the Reserve Bank warned interest rates may have to rise.   He told Roman Travers that recent developments have likely flipped that around.    Eckhold says low GDP figures signal further rates drops are likely this year.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/25/20244 minutes, 23 seconds
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Mary-Lynn Huxford: Voyce National Care Youth Participation Advisor on the data issues at Oranga Tamariki

An NGO is alarmed by data issues at Oranga Tamariki.   An Independent Children’s Monitor report has revealed gaps in information about whether children in state care are receiving medical and dental checkups.   Voyce National Care says it's state negligence, which can't be ignored.   Youth Participation Advisor Mary-Lynn Huxford told Roman Travers that this can have long term effects.   She says the group works with young people footing big medical bills because of earlier negligence.   LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/25/20245 minutes, 11 seconds
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Roman Travers: It seems the Associate Health Minister has lost the plot

For the record, New Zealand doesn’t have a minister for the tobacco industry. Or does it?  The Associate Health Minister, Casey Costello is being labelled by some as the Minister for the Tobacco Industry, based on a proposal that’s yet to be confirmed by Casey Costello, that she wants to see a 3-year freeze on the tobacco tax.  What this means is that cigarettes would be insulated from the full impact of inflation under a proposal from the New Zealand First Associate Health Minister.  At the moment, tobacco excise is increased each year in line with the Consumer Price Index. Apart from gathering a swag of tax, it’s a way to encourage smokers to give up.  Health Coalition Aotearoa co-chairperson, Boyd Swinburn has come out all gun’s firing and smoking, saying that Casey Costello needs to be stripped of her duties and that she’s lost all credibility as an Associate Minister of Health.  After all the work done over the decades to encourage smokers to give up the darts, after all the hard work by previous governments and former iterations of The Ministry of Health, why on earth would you give smokers a tax cut now?  This kind of idiotic, retrospective policy change, ties in quite nicely with this Governments position on ‘Smoke Free New Zealand’ by 2025. It’s all too hard, so why bother?  Governments have acknowledged that smoking is an important aspect of tax gathering. So where would this government look to recoup the loss on this proposed, preposterous policy?  The Director of Action on Smoking and Health, Ben Youden, also says that this proposal simply doesn’t make much sense.  There’s a problem here with addiction, I realise that; but it seems that under this proposal, we’re just aiding and abetting those on the fags, to keep incinerating precious money that’d be better spent elsewhere.  Smoking related experts say that prices on tobacco need to walk a fine line between deterring smokers and not financially hindering those addicted. Surely Casey Costello can see that all this does is incentivise more smokers to smoke more, for longer.  Costello has also proposed removing the excise tax from smokeless tobacco products, where the tobacco is heated to a vapour rather than burned.  It would appear to me that The Associate Health Minister has completely lost the plot.  If this policy goes ahead there’ll be more outrage from those healthcare professionals who deal with smoking related diseases each and every day. What a kick in the toolbox for all of them. What possible motivation could an Associate Health Minister have for such mindless proposal?  I also wonder just how many focus groups Casey Costello held with healthcare professions around the county to get their input on this proposal? I can almost certainly guarantee that the answer to that – will be absolutely none.  No one in their right mind would ever suggest that effectively encouraging more New Zealander’s to continue smoking, is ever going to be a good idea. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/25/20243 minutes
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Jason Walls: Political Editor wraps Rātana and the crowd's response

The Government faced some heat yesterday at Rātana.   NZ First’s Winston Peters and Shane Jones were both booed by some in the crowd, and the Prime Minister himself faced a frosty reception.  Christopher Luxon used his address at Rātana to assure he wants progress for Māori, promising the crowd his Government had no plans to meddle with the Treaty, and wants to partner with Māori to achieve better outcomes.   Political Editor Jason Walls told Roman Travers that the reception they received feels appropriate considering some of the rhetoric that had been seen prior to the event.   Rātana, he said, normally has a quieter, more respectful crowd, so this level of response was quite telling.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/24/20245 minutes, 43 seconds
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Ashley Church: Property Commentator on the average rent reaching an all-time high and the Bay of Plenty becoming the most expensive place to rent

New Zealand's average rent has gone through the roof and is sitting at an all-time high.    Latest Trade Me figures show the national median rent is $625 a week, about 7.8% percent higher than this time last year.  For the first time, the Bay of Plenty is the most expensive place to rent a home, at $670 a week.  Property Commentator Ashley Church told Roman Travers that when the cost of owning a property is weighed against the rent taken, most property investors have been running at a loss for about a decade.  He said that the market is rebalancing with the change in Government, and a dramatic rent reduction is expected over the next few years.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/24/20244 minutes, 34 seconds
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Roman Travers: What is achieved by Mitre 10 changing the names?

More so than ever, we live in a world where virtually everyone is outraged or offended more frequently.   There’s never been anything wrong with being outraged or offended – the difference in recent years is that we don’t only want to tell everyone who’ll listen about how we feel, we also want to shame the offender into stopping what they’re doing. We want to cancel them.   The offending now extends to products on the shelf at Mitre 10 stores. The offended took issue with the misuse of Te Reo Māori names being used on several of their products.   Mitre 10’s ‘Legacy Brand’ includes products like the ‘Te anau towel ring' which has quickly become the 'Ellesmere towel ring', while the 'Karapiro towel ring' is now the 'Clutha towel ring'.    Another offender was the 'Kaiiwi toilet roll holder' and is now listed as the 'Legacy toilet roll holder'.   Mitre 10 says that the changes they’ve quickly made intend to make the names more culturally sensitive.   They identified mid-last year that these longstanding product names needed to be changed out of respect for te reo Māori. This ‘identification’ presumably came following complaints from those outraged at the use of te reo Māori.   I admit that I don’t fully understand the misappropriation of Māori names aspect here. Would some Māori have been as offended if the products hadn’t been toilet and bathroom related? What if the products were new cars or bespoke frilly frocks for a flash night on the town?   What is it with this overzealous policing of the language of our indigenous people when all the time we hear the need for te reo Māori to be used more and in more everyday walks of life?    It’s not as though these products were spotted on the shelf in some village in the UK. If these were seen at ‘John Ramsbottom’s Hardware’ in Northumberland – then I’d agree that would be an issue worth pursuing.   Māori cultural and tikanga expert, Karaitiana Taiuru says that Mitre 10 is correct in thinking the original names were inappropriate. He also says that it’s a little bit surprising that someone like Mitre 10 didn't do cultural audits beforehand.   Cultural audits? Really? When was the last time you thought of conducting one at your workplace? When did cultural audits become a requirement?   Surely seeing the language used as a reminder of the rivers, lakes and mountains of New Zealand is just another way to encourage us all to respect te reo Māori?  This kind of highly offended, over the top cancel culture is not helping to keep the Māori language alive. This is an example of what puts some people off it.   What’s been achieved by this name changing in Mitre 10’s across the country?    Nothing. Although being in the news isn’t necessarily a bad thing for foot traffic through one of our biggest home renovation chains. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/24/20243 minutes, 1 second
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Christina Leung: New Zealand Institute of Economic Research Principal Economist on inflation rates dropping to 4.7%

New Zealand might not be entirely out of the woods with high inflation.   The Consumers Price Index rose 4.7% in the year to December, a two year low.   The New Zealand Institute of Economic Research says inflation is still above the 1-3% Reserve Bank target.   Principal Economist Christina Leung told Roman Travers that while she expects the figure to get under the target this year, some factors are putting that at risk.   She says things like the Red Sea attacks are driving up shipping costs.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/24/20243 minutes, 35 seconds
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Henry Russell: ANZ Economist ahead of Stats NZ releasing the quarterly inflation numbers

All signs are pointing to a much-needed easing in inflation.  Stats NZ will release its latest quarterly inflation numbers at 10.45 this morning.  They're expected to show the annual inflation rate has fallen below the 5% forecast of the Reserve Bank.  ANZ economist Henry Russell told Roman Travers that they expect most of this downward trend to come from the tradable side of the basket, which is the largely imported component.  The Reserve Bank will be focusing on the domestic driven or non-tradeable component of inflation today, which Russel expects to come in line with the Reserve Bank’s forecast.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/23/20244 minutes, 28 seconds
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Roman Travers: Seems like no one really knows how to run the Health Ministry

Yesterday we became aware of yet another giant leap backwards for the mankind of New Zealand, based upon an entirely retrospective move by this coalition Government.  Our health system is like one giant lab rat: constantly poked and prodded by each and every Minister of Health with every change of government. It’s no wonder so many of our healthcare professionals want out.  The Minister of Health Shane Reti says he'll shift more health decision-making back to the regions in a monumental change in direction from the previous Government.  You’ll recall that all 20 of the District Health Boards were scrapped 18 months ago to form Te Whatu Ora Health New Zealand and the Māori Health Authority, with the aim of ending geographical differences in the care people were receiving.  But Shane Reti now tells us that the reforms went too far. Do you get the feeling that no one really knows how to run a health ministry in New Zealand? Stand by patients, doctors, and nurses… here we go again.  Shane Reti says that “There are some parts that need to be owned by the centre, absolutely, but we need to be very careful because what’s happened here is we've lost local accountability. We've lost local decision making and it's all owned by the centre.”  What he doesn’t tell you is that we also lost all the Barbara’s and Johns across the country, who popped up on DHB’s year after year with their insatiable appetite for free sausage rolls and often absolutely no expertise in anything.  Any idiot can see that you don’t actually need to have a decision maker on the ground in a town or city in order to determine the best spend on health priorities.    We have a population and demographic similar to that of a Canadian province where they might also only have one health authority.    Some would say that reversing at high speed is both entertaining and skilful. Not when it comes to The Ministry of Health, who look to be heading backwards at high speed.  Minister Reti also says decisions are better in the hands of iwi and hapū. What on earth is he basing that assumption upon? He also plans to give decision making authority to Māori directorates within Health NZ and the Ministry of Health.  Minister Reti stopped short of saying he would reintroduce DHB’s, adding that the new IT systems, along with key services like radiotherapy machines being examples of what should remain centrally managed.    Clearly, he needs to pop down the corridors of power and see how many ministries are run out of Wellington without the need to have representation at a local level in every town or city.  About the only statement that Shane Reti made yesterday that I completely agree with is that ‘our health system is in crisis’.  Sadly, this is another example of how not to fix a crisis. Retrospective moves like this one will continue to be the catalyst for more of our highly undervalued doctors, nurses and health administrators leaving the service, if not the country.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/23/20242 minutes, 53 seconds
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Geoffrey Miller: Geopolitical Analyst says that New Zealand should focus on diplomatic endeavours instead of military involvement against Houthis

Fears that New Zealand's military involvement in the fight against Houthi rebels in Yemen could close diplomatic doors.   Six personnel are being deployed to the Red Sea to support coalition forces carrying out precision attacks on Iran-backed groups who have been attacking commercial shipping.  Geopolitical Analyst Geoffrey Miller says several US presidents have bombed Yemen and haven't solved the problem.   He told Roman Travers that the Houthi attacks are tied to the war in Gaza and that should be our focus.   Miller says New Zealand would be better served in assisting in diplomacy to get a ceasefire.   Prime Minister Christopher Luxon says the two issues shouldn't be conflated.    LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/23/20246 minutes, 21 seconds
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Dr Bryan Betty: General Practice NZ Chair on the Health Minister wanting to return decision making to the regions

Health Minister Dr Shane Reti wants to return more decision making to the regions.   The previous government scrapped district health boards, forming the central bodies of Te Whatu Ora Health New Zealand and the Māori Health Authority.   General Practice New Zealand chair Dr Bryan Betty told Roman Travers that in a lot of areas there's a breakdown between Wellington and what's needed in the regions.   He says this is a reaction to that. It's not going back to the way it was but is a halfway point.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/23/20244 minutes, 17 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australian Correspondent on the possibility that Anthony Albanese will break a tax cut election promise

The Australian Prime Minister looks to be breaking his election promises when it comes to tax cuts.  Amidst a cost-of-living crisis, Anthony Albanese looks set to adjust the Stage 3 tax legislation, scrapping the planned tax cuts for those earning over $180,000 a year to make room for an adjustment to the tax-free bracket.  Australian Correspondent Donna Demaio told Roman Travers that the potential changes have ruffled a lot of feathers.  She said that if it actually transpires, the Opposition is ready to pounce.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/22/20242 minutes, 35 seconds
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Roman Travers: Don't stop whingeing

It’s fair to say that we all love nothing better than to complain about what gets up our collective noses right?   Whether it’s the weather, a perennial go to over a cuppa with friends or the cost of living; we’ve all got something to say – and we love letting others know how we feel.   But there’s a big difference between whingeing to your mates and taking that step forward towards action that’ll make a difference. Although there’s not a great deal any of us can do about the weather; other issues that simmer close to the surface have got many of us taking photos and demanding action from our local councils.   Good luck getting any action out of Upper Hutt or Wellington City Councils. But there’s a massive difference around the country about what we complain about, and the timelines taken to get things sorted.   Some of the regular offenders on the list for councils to deal with are things like neighbour's trees impinging across boundaries, overflowing rubbish bins, and stuff mounting up around charity clothing bins.  The ‘Snap Send Solve’ app used by councils across the country received 106,979 reports over the course of last year. If you’re a photo snapper of offending situations, I’m sure you’ll know about this avenue for complaining.   Wellington features with 273 complaints relating to water leaks, along with the associated photo evidence. Northlanders sent in 383 snaps and complaints about their pothole collection.  You’d think Auckland would be up there with the biggest number of complaints to council, right? Wrong. Auckland sent in 10,198 complaints to council. The biggest city of whingers turns out to be… wait for it… this may shock the pearls of your necklace… Christchurch.   I was as shocked as you are! Yes indeed, Cantabrians sent in a whopping 10,833 complaints to their council. The stuff that got up the noses of the good people of Canterbury were broken water pipes, graffiti, tree issues, and potholes too.   Now of course, some councillors will say that some of these complaints were unnecessary, and some were genuinely useful; my message to you is simple: don’t stop whingeing!    When you see something that’s broken, overflowing, or graffiti where it shouldn’t be – which is anywhere you see it – get stuck in! Take those photos! Fire up your councils ‘Snap, Send, Solve’ app and lodge it all with them.   If we continue to slip into this insidious malaise of ‘she’ll be right’ lackadaisical stupidity, then things will only get worse. I’m sure there’s nothing more a council would like to see than having no complaints to deal with.   Pick your battles though. Don’t use this as a means to create your own version of war with your spiteful neighbour from hell… the one who always plays The Bee Gees at full volume when they’re on the gin and tonics, late into the night.   We shouldn’t tolerate graffiti. We definitely shouldn’t tolerate valuable clean water running down the road. We’ve been conditioned to accepting mediocrity over recent years. If we don’t complain, why should we expect anything get better? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/22/20242 minutes, 19 seconds
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Logan Church: 1News Correspondent on Ron DeSantis dropping out of the Republican nominee race and endorsing Donald Trump

How this year's US presidential election is shaping up may come as a surprise.  Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has dropped out of the race for Republican nominee and endorsed Donald Trump, despite the ex-president giving him the nickname 'Ron De-Sanctimonious.'  South Carolina's Nikki Haley remains in the running ahead of tonight's New Hampshire primary.  1News correspondent Logan Church said that it's going to be an uphill battle for Haley.  The former US ambassador to the UN is polling way behind Trump.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/22/20245 minutes, 7 seconds
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Bodo Lang: Massey University Marketing Professor on the Commerce Commission's investigation into supermarket pricing and promotional practices

The Commerce Commission's launched investigations into the two big supermarket chains' pricing and promotional practices.   It's looking into whether the practices of Woolworths, Foodstuffs North Island and Foodstuffs South Island, comply with the Fair Trading Act.   It comes following a Consumer NZ complaint to the commission, after it asked shoppers for examples of unclear or misleading prices.  They offered 600 responses.   Massey University marketing professor Bodo Lang told Roman Travers that the Commission's options range from a compliance letter to court proceedings with fines.   He says a charge is really just a signal but consumers would react negatively, leading to changes in practices.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/22/20244 minutes, 14 seconds
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Grant Duncan: Political Commentator on the potential benefits of the Treaty Principles Bill

There’s fears the Treaty Principles Bill could be a missed opportunity.   ACT is seeking to introduce legislation to redefine the Treaty principles by the end of May.   Political commentator Grant Duncan says National said it would support it to select committee, but that's where the party's support stops.  Duncan told Roman Travers that with proper long-term consultation, such a bill could be beneficial.   He says it could stop the issue festering away for the next generations.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1/22/20245 minutes, 31 seconds
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Richard Arnold: Biden Backs Supreme Court Ruling On Trump

President Biden is backing a Colorado Supreme Court ruling, which sees Donald Trump struck off the state's ballot papers. Colorado's highest court voted the former president, ineligible in the upcoming primary elections, for his involvement in the January 6 Capitol insurrection almost two years ago. Newstalk ZB US Correspondent Richard Arnold told Tim Dower that it's uncommon for Biden to even mention the name of his potential rival.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/21/20236 minutes, 27 seconds
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Gisborne Rebuild: Mayor Welcoming Visitors For Summer

As rebuilding efforts continue in Gisborne, the Mayor is welcoming visitors for summer. The city was hit hard by Cyclone Gabrielle with homes and infrastructure destroyed. But Gisborne Mayor Rehette Stoltz told Tim Dower that it is encouraging people to experience the white sand beaches and vineyards in the region. She says it's been tough, but they have so much to offer.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/21/20235 minutes, 7 seconds
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Logan Church: TVNZ US Correspondent on the Republicans voting to investigate impeaching President Joe Biden

Politics is heating up in Washington DC in the lead up to next year's presidential election, with Republicans voting to investigate impeaching President Biden.  But so far, no evidence has been produced by the 121 House of Representative Republicans, with some now questioning the merits of the investigation.  TVNZ US Correspondent Logan Church told Tim Dower that it seems like more of a stunt than a serious challenge.  He says things are bound to get very messy between now and next November.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/14/20233 minutes, 27 seconds
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Tim Dower: Only six cases of excessive force isn't so bad

Remember those protests at Parliament last year, and the incredible scenes at the end?  Once it was over and the fires were out, and the rocks and broken glass were cleared from the street, police received just over 1900 complaints.  1900. The largest number of complaints ever about a single policing operation. Sounds terrible, doesn't it? 1900 complaints... until you dig just a little deeper.  Most of the people who did complain were nowhere near the protest at the time.  They either saw it from the comfort of their couches as the whole thing unfolded live on TV or watched it on the news that night.  Or they read heavily tainted, or even completely made-up crap on social media, and followed the mob to lodge a complaint.  So out of your 1900-odd complaints just 1% turned out to be worthy of investigation.  Out of those, police were found to have used excessive force in six incidents.  Essentially they're about police actions trying to clear the grounds on March 2nd, or put up bollards, or clear streets in the days leading up to the big battle.  There's a detailed report on the IPCA's website that walks you through each of the clashes that were investigated, and there's a common theme to all of them.  The cops are either trying to hold back angry demonstrators, or make an arrest, or defend themselves after being thumped or kicked by people who later go on to complain.  Look, the use of reasonable force by the policed is permitted under the law.  And the fact of the matter is, if you comply rather than resist, no force is necessary.  And when you think of the appalling behaviour of that mob, tearing up paving stones, chucking rocks and lumps of wood and human faeces, starting fires... it was a full-blown, bloody, riot.  So, to come away from that with only six cases of excessive force? Not so bad really.  There's a lot you can criticise police managers and others for over what happened during the protest and how it got to what it did.  But the front line, the women and men who were sworn and spat at, and kicked and punched? No.  End of the day, if you got hurt in that protest, you asked for it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/14/20232 minutes, 29 seconds
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Michael Reddell: Former Reserve Bank Economist on the GDP falling by 0.3 percent in September

An economist says signs on inflation are finally looking more positive.   GDP fell 0.3% in the September quarter, a much worse result than most economists predicted.   The June quarter figures were also revised down from 0.9% to 0.5% growth.   Former Reserve Bank economist Michael Reddell told Tim Dower that the Finance Minister is right in saying New Zealand needs urgent economic repair, and she's inherited a large fiscal deficit.   He says a focus on expenditure restraint is important, and it's not the time for tax cuts.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/14/20233 minutes, 51 seconds
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Nick Hill: Tataki Auckland Unlimited Chief Executive on the FIFA Women's World Cup boosting Auckland's economy

Auckland continues to prove that it's the sporting capital of the country.  The city played a major role in this year's FIFA Women's World Cup - hosting nine matches.  As a result, more than $87 million in GDP was injected into the region's economy, and over 175,000 guest nights were recorded in the city.  Tataki Auckland Unlimited chief executive Nick Hill told Tim Dower that Auckland's hotels, restaurants, and tourist hot spots all bought in to the event.  He said Auckland hosting the United States team made a big difference.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/14/20233 minutes, 54 seconds
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Tim Dower: Backing out of the Interislander deal was a no-brainer

I think the new Government's actually done at least one thing right this week.  Backing out of the Interislander funding deal was a no-brainer really, if you have any doubt about that, have a look at the piece on the Herald site under the title ‘How to blow $15b.’  That digs into the Auditor-General's report on some of the previous government's insane spending.  Back when Grant was splashing money about like a drunken sailor, anybody with a half-baked plan to burn up a couple of billion was welcomed with open arms.  Cost no object, value for money? Doesn't matter. Possible overruns, blowouts if you like, worry about that later.  Just spend it.  The main reason these new guys don't want to pour buckets of your cash into the Cook Strait ferries is they don't trust the numbers.  Much of the money would have gone on terminal upgrades, and Nicola Willis said she reckoned the numbers were undercooked.  In other words, they think KiwiRail deliberately went in with a low-ball cost in an environment where they knew they could go back for more.  Look, there's no question the Interislanders are at the end of their useful lives and becoming increasingly unreliable, and maybe there's an argument for some level of public contribution. It is after all, a vital transportation link.  Some people see Cook Strait as part of State Highway One, and if you take that view then sure, it's public infrastructure.  And if you think it's right to publicly subsidise rail freight up and down the country, then you have to include crossing the Strait.  But there's also a private operator, BlueBridge, charging more or less the same to take people and cars.  Founded by a New Zealander who saw a need, took a risk, invested, and built a profitable business.  Now look, I'm not saying KiwiRail shouldn't have any state backing, but maybe it needs to try a bit harder making a business case to outside investors.  During the campaign, National talked about finding new ways to fund infrastructure projects.  If ever there was a project that could attract private investment, surely this is it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/13/20232 minutes, 22 seconds
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Nick Tuffley: ASB Chief Economist ahead of the release of the September GDP figures

New Zealand's GDP is predicted to see a minor pre-Christmas bump.  Stats NZ will release the September quarter figures later this morning.   Gross Domestic Product rose 0.9% in the June quarter.   ASB Chief Economist, Nick Tuffley, told Tim Dower that he's forecasting a 0.2% increase, as recent indicators point to flat growth.  He says while the economy's expanding, it still feels like a recession for a lot of people.  Tuffley says generally GDP has been edging backwards for the last year, so it's challenging.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/13/20235 minutes, 5 seconds
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Max Whitehead: Small Business Voice CEO on rising requests for redundancy and restructuring support

The economic climate has many small businesses making tough decisions to stay afloat.   Strong inflationary pressures and a drop in consumer demand has meant costs are sky high for many businesses.  Requests for redundancy and restructuring support has surged by 50% this year and liquidations are up 500%.  Small Business Voice CEO Max Whitehead told Tim Dower this just proves how hard it is for small businesses at the moment.   He says while economists are saying things are getting better that isn't what they're feeling on the bottom floor.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/13/20233 minutes, 6 seconds
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Jon Reeves: Public Transport Users Association spokesperson on the Government scrapping the Cook Strait mega-ferry upgrade

It's back to the drawing board for KiwiRail on the future of the Interislander as the government axes new upgrades. Contracts were signed to buy two new mega-ferries and upgrade portside infrastructure, but Finance Minister Nicola Willis says the cost has got too high. However, Jon Reeves of the Public Transport Users Association told Tim Dower that backtracking on contracts does reputational damage to the country. He claims this acts as a warning for international companies, that they can't trust New Zealand to honour contracts. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/13/20234 minutes, 43 seconds
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Tim Dower: RealMe wants too much

Look, thanks so much for taking part in this, just a little experiment on people's reaction to, response, and experience with this portal passport arrangement: RealMe. That kind of, well, it's been around for a little while, it's had a bit of a refresh, and now they're trying to push it and promote it. Here's, here's another one. Gary says ‘I've used RealMe for some years now at on a very regular basis and have no issues at all, generally. So, nine out of 10.’ Right at the other end of the scale, here's Warwick: ‘Score zero. It's a Nate National Animal Identification and tracking electronic ID tagging system for people. Orwell’s nightmare realized.’ Now, look, I'm kind of, I'm swaying towards your side of things Warwick, so I'm not gonna call you a conspiracy theorist or anything. It wants too damn much information for a start, far too much. I wanted to use it for the purposes of a small charity that I'm involved with and some paperwork that we need to do, okay? So, in order to get established you have to fill in all this business of the getting in, the identity, the password. And then you've got this very, very early internet security system, you know, where they used to ask you the question about your first animal or what school you went to, and you're supposed to remember what you said in response. Should you need to refresh it, you go through all that palaver. Now they've added a second layer, so you've got two tier authentication. So, you've got the phone text thing, you know, and it goes beep and there's your number and you gotta go through all that. When it got to the point where they're asking me what night of the week I cut my toenails, I thought, you know, I'm not into this! It's too much. So, it's clunky, it's clumsy, and it takes so long. It wants everything, it just wants too much of you. So, in the end I gave up, I got very cross. They sent me, they said, all right. Last thing now, you gotta go and get your photo taken at the AA. You gotta get your photo taken at the AA.   You tried to get anything done at an AA office recently? You're a more patient person than I am. So, I'm gonna give it a one. I didn't want to sort of taint things by giving you my score right at the outset, but good to hear that some people have persisted and managed to get somewhere with the whole thing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/12/20232 minutes, 36 seconds
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Adrian Macey: Climate Change Research Institute Adjunct Professor on the Climate Change Commission's advice to meet emissions reduction goals

The Climate Change Commission's released advice to the government to meet emissions reductions goals by 2030.   It makes 27 recommendations including building more renewable electricity, swapping from fossil fuels, and preparing for the rapid rollout of low emissions technologies and practices on farms.   Also included is directly resourcing iwi and Māori efforts to reduce climate pollution.  Climate Change Research Institute Adjunct Professor Adrian Macey told Tim Dower that there needs to be a more coherent policy around forestry.   He says it's been a real mess, and the government needs to get its act together.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/12/20235 minutes, 16 seconds
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Dom Kalasih: Transporting NZ Interim Chief Executive on the blanket speed limit reduction requirements being removed

The Transport Minister's hit the brakes on blanket speed limit reductions.  Simeon Brown's removed requirements for Road Controlling Authorities to implement speed management plans.  Work will begin to account for economic impacts, community views, and safety when setting speed limits.  Transporting NZ Interim Chief Executive, Dom Kalasih, told Tim Dower that some limits are simply too low, losing credibility among drivers.  He says the main issue with blanket reductions was that it wasn't risk-based.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/12/20233 minutes, 33 seconds
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Mike Atkinson: Aspire Property Management Managing Director on whether the rental market can meet the demand from migration

How long can the rental market meet demand for migrants?  Stats NZ data shows 245,600 migrants arrived here in the year to October; a new record.  Net migration is nearly 129,000.  Compared to Australia, we've taken in 30% more people when adjusted for inflation.  Aspire Property Management Managing Director, Mike Atkinson, told Tim Dower that it's an enormous amount of people, putting a strain on the system, and could push rents up even further.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/12/20233 minutes, 1 second
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Tim Dower: Bit of an about-turn on immigration from the PM

Bit of an about-turn on immigration from the Prime Minister.  Christopher Luxon now says the current numbers are unsustainable, and the Government expects it to slow down.  And you'd hope so! Nearly 119,000 have poured in over the past year, that's the net gain.  At the same time, we saw a record net loss of New Zealand citizens: 44,000 went.  So, overall, the number of people new to the country is actually more than 160,000.  Our total population has grown nearly 3% in a year, roughly one in every thirty people in the country now, has arrived in the past year. Wow.  Bear in mind we've had some very wonky years because of COVID.  That meant only a tiny number of reluctantly approved arrivals and thousands of our own people locked out or having to go through a lottery for a chance of coming home.  Net migration actually dropped to zero literally overnight in 2020, and stayed there or went negative for the next two years.  So, a bit of catch-up was only to be expected.  Needed even, when we heard constant cries for help from the health sector especially during the pandemic.  The most obvious question when we've got so many more people coming in than leaving is where are they all going to live?  We can't house the people we've already got, let alone more.  And the Reserve Bank is getting twitchy about it, citing the immigration numbers as the reason to potentially push interest rates even higher, worrying it'll push up rents and house prices.  So, credit to Luxon for recognising the issue.  But he's fallen into the trap of blaming the last lot. Saying the settings went from being way too restrictive to being way too loose. Okay. You got your shot in, but you're in charge now Mr Luxon. What are you gonna do about it?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/11/20232 minutes, 5 seconds
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John Carnegie: Energy Resources Aotearoa CEO on gas demand outstripping supply by 2025

Gas demand could outstrip supply by 2025, causing an energy shortfall.  The Gas Industry Company's latest research shows renewable supply options are on the horizon but will still take time and investment to develop.   Energy Resources Aotearoa Chief Executive, John Carnegie, told Tim Dower that the predictions are sad, but not unsurprising.  He says the previous Government's policies for the sector have damaged investment.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/11/20234 minutes, 34 seconds
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Michael Johnston: New Zealand Initiative research fellow on delaying the introduction of new maths and literacy tests as an NCEA requirement

The previous Government's plans to introduce new maths and literacy tests as an NCEA requirement from 2026 have been delayed.   Trial runs of those tests have had failure rates of more than 40%.   New Zealand Initiative research fellow Michael Johnston told Tim Dower that he understands kids will still be able to do the tests, but can also meet requirements through NCEA achievement standards, like in the past.   But, he says, he'd like to see a certification for students who do pass those tests and meet requirements that way because they are more rigorous.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/11/20233 minutes, 49 seconds
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Alan McDonald: The Employers and Manufacturers Association Head of Advocacy and Strategy on the expansion of 90 Day work trials

All employers will soon be able to use 90 Day Work Trials, which the previous Labour government restricted to small businesses.   The new Government is passing a bill to do so under urgency by Christmas.   The Employers and Manufacturers Association's Alan McDonald told Tim Dower that it'll mainly be used by smaller employers.   He says it might encourage them to take a chance on someone returning to the workplace after a long absence, or a school leaver looking for their first job.   Cabinet's also confirmed that it will repeal Fair Pay Agreements before Christmas, which made it easier for workers to band together to negotiate wages and working conditions.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/11/20234 minutes, 36 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australia Correspondent on the Australian Government looking to increase the difficulty of overseas migration to the country

Migrating to Australia is set to get more difficult.  The Australian Government is looking to halve overseas migration to 250,000 by 2025 after a record number of people arrived in the last financial year.  Australia correspondent Donna Demaio told Tim Dower that a number of the changes will impact international students and workers.  She says there will be more difficult English tests and visa requirements.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/11/20232 minutes, 32 seconds
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Chris Bullen: New Regulations May Make It Harder For Smokers To Switch To Vapes

Vape retailers are selling higher strength vapes at lower prices - before new rules kick in. From next Thursday, disposable vapes can't be sold, unless they have removable batteries, maximum nicotine limits, child safety features and follow new labelling requirements. All vapes will have to meet those requirements in March - and there'll be limits on flavours. Auckland University public health professor Chris Bullen told Tim Dower the new regulations may make it difficult for people who have been smoking heavily to switch to vapes. He personally thinks there's scope for higher nicotine concentration vapes to be available through prescription.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/10/20234 minutes, 35 seconds
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Tim Dower: We've Created A Whole New Class Of Addicts

There's a fire sale underway at the vape retailers, and some pretty arresting advertising lines are being used.  “Stock up while you still can” ... “Get them before they’re gone” ... “Don’t be left stranded without a vape”  By gone, they mean illegal...new laws from the 21st of this month put restrictions on disposable vapes...including maximum nicotine limits.  So, at some places it's basically a fire sale, devices going for a couple of bucks or even being given away free.  Fair enough I suppose if you've bought stock in good faith and then basically had the rug pulled from under you by a law change.  But there's also a whiff of the frenzy to dump synthetic cannabis products, when that particular experiment went so badly wrong.  And thinking about it...our experience with the whole vape thing has been uncannily similar to the synthetics.  Hailed as a legal...controlled...and therefore theoretically safe alternative to the real thing.  And with vaping pitched at us as a tool to help the sorry old smokers get off tobacco...it was pretty easy to get it on the market.  Reality...vapes hit the shops and people are out blowing vast clouds in the streets...and something quite different happens.  Before you know it...lolly flavoured vapes are pitched at the kids, and we've created a whole new class of addicts.  The number of 15- to 17-year-old New Zealanders who vape daily quadrupled in just a couple of years.  Only last week, front page stories about 8-year-olds caught vaping at school, it's out of control.  The thing is, there's a perception these products are completely harmless...that's what the kids taking it up think...but the fact is we just don't know that.  Less dangerous than tobacco...maybe...probably even...but the fact is we just don't know.  So, what we've been doing is running an experiment on a living population of people, just to see how things pan out.  In the end, if it all turns to the proverbial...well...we can always ban it outright...or just tax it, more and more every year.  That'll get them to quit. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/10/20232 minutes, 18 seconds
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Parliment Will Sit Under Urgency This Week As Govt Push Through First Changes

Parliament will sit under urgency this week - with the new government pushing through the first changes in its 100 day plan. Part of this is repealing Fair Pay Agreement legislation. Former National ministerial adviser Brigitte Morten told Tim Dower every opposition complains about the use of urgency - then use it themselves when in government. She says the last Labour government used it considerably more - and while it'd argue Covid meant it had to respond with emergency legislation, they were pushing a lot more through under urgency even in August.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/10/20233 minutes, 44 seconds
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Tim Dower: Mitchell's letter wasn't meddling, it was managing

 Now we've had a full day to digest Mark Mitchell's letter to the Police Commissioner, was he actually out of line to release that?  His Labour predecessor said on this show yesterday that Mark Mitchell was huffing and puffing, talking up a big game and chest beating.  To quote Ginny Andersen, “I think it's a demonstration of bravado”, and then saying, "He's getting dangerously close to telling the Commissioner how to do his job.”  Thing is, we all know there's a line between setting a strategic direction and meddling in day-to-day operational activities.  Mark Mitchell noted that, loud and clear, in his letter.  So, what the Minister was doing was not telling the Commissioner how to do the job, but outlining what the priorities of the job are.  That's not meddling, it's managing.  If you want an example of meddling, look no further than sacked Minister Stuart Nash on the phone to the Commissioner over a court case, hoping to persuade him to get prosecutors to appeal for a stiffer sentence.  So why was Ginny squealing so loudly over this? Well probably because she knows Labour hasn't got a leg to stand on when it comes to law and order.  Their priority was to slash the prison population, regardless of how much crime the rest of us had to endure.  That would have meant Andrew Little's letter to the Chief Justice when he took office in 2017 was saying ‘hey... dial it back a bit would you?’  ‘Let's not lock up all these bad people... surely, it's OK to stick ankle bracelets on them, even when they're convicted of violent sex crimes or on trial for murder.’  Didn't that work out well.  Point here is that Mitchell's letter to the Commissioner is entirely normal. It's the way things are done.  Issuing it publicly is called transparency. It puts pressure on Andrew Coster but it also sends a message to the front line.  We've heard you, it says, and things are going to change.  And now it's in the public domain, everyone knows what page we're on. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/7/20232 minutes, 7 seconds
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Sandra Grey: Tertiary Education Union National Secretary on the decision to disestablish Te Pukenga

Anger at the Government's decision to disestablish tertiary education programme Te Pukenga.  Tertiary Education and Skills Minister Penny Simmonds announced the move yesterday, following a Letter of Expectation saying they're not prioritising it.  But the Tertiary Education Union is worried Simmonds has no clear plan on what happens next, and no vision for the sector.   National Secretary Sandra Grey says their members won't have any job certainty until well into the new year.  She says they go into Christmas not knowing if they'll have a job, lose it, or have to apply for something entirely new.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/7/20234 minutes, 33 seconds
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Vincent McAviney: UK Correspondent on the second day of Boris Johnson's appearance before the UK's Covid-19 Inquiry

A grilling over Boris Johnson's decisions during the pandemic on the second day of his appearance before the UK's Covid-19 inquiry.   It's heard evidence from former advisers that the then-Prime Minister wanted to let the virus spread, rather than order another lockdown   Johnson's also accused of saying "let the bodies pile high", something he strongly denies.  UK correspondent Vincent McAviney told Tim Dower that he also faced criticism for a campaign encouraging people go to restaurants while the virus was still out there.   He says the campaign, called " Eat out to Help out" was derided by scientists as " Eat out to help out the virus".  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/7/20233 minutes, 27 seconds
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Katie Wesney: Enable Me Head Strategic Coach recommends thoroughly checking where your money is going to save money

Take stock of what you have and save a little where you can.   That's the advice of one financial coach to those feeling the squeeze.   ASB is predicting a $70 increase in weekly living costs for the average family in 2024, that's down from the $115 increase this year.   Enable Me's Katie Wesney told Tim Dower that people should thoroughly check all the places their money is going.    She says everything has to serve you in the current environment.  That way you get the little one percent gains that alleviate pressure and position you to grow your wealth.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/7/20233 minutes, 12 seconds
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Geoffrey Miller: Geopolitical Analyst on the wording in the Government's call for a ceasefire in Gaza

The Government's being told phrasing in its call for an end to violence in Gaza needs to pack a stronger punch.  All parties in the House have supported a motion urging those involved in the conflict to 'take urgent steps towards establishing a cease-fire.'  Geopolitical analyst Geoffrey Miller told Tim Dower that the wording is telling.  He says the Government clearly didn't want to call for an immediate cease-fire, so 'steps towards' was the compromise.  He says as the UN has called for an immediate end to fighting, we should follow suit.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/7/20234 minutes, 4 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on Taylor Swift being named Time Magazine's Person of the Year

Taylor Swift says being named Time Magazine's Person of the Year is the proudest and happiest she's ever felt.  The 33-year-old beat finalists including Barbie, King Charles and OpenAI chief executive Sam Altman.  It caps off Swift's stellar year, which includes her record-breaking 'Eras Tour', two album re-recordings, and becoming Spotify's most most-played artist.  US Correspondent Mitch McCann told Tim Dower that Swift has become even more of a cultural icon in the last year.  He said that her tours both provoked an inquiry into Ticketmaster’s sales practices, and her concert in Seattle reportedly generated seismic activity equivalent to a 2.3 magnitude earthquake.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/6/20231 minute, 48 seconds
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Tim Dower: Where was their parental instinct?

True story, abbreviated for time.  San Francisco, about 15 years back now, coming out of the subway following my two teenage daughters.  A group of tatty half-drunk, half-baked beggars hanging around with their paws out for money.  And I hear some leering, grubby, smutty comments being directed at my children.  I sense danger, move a little closer to them.  And the leerers embolden one another. It gets a bit grubbier, I feel the anger boiling up inside me.  Then out of nowhere comes this guttural, aggressive, very loud, and very threatening voice.  It sounds like a lion, and it roars, it truly roars: BACK OFF.  Everyone jumps. The leerers, the girls, myself, other people passing by turn to see where it came from.  It's not until this point, as we quicken our step and move up the stairs into the street, that I realise that powerful, guttural, threatening roar came out of me.  There was no thought behind it, and believe me, I'm not a confrontational or threatening person at all.  I'm a weed. I'm not brave, and I don't think of myself as anything special on the parenting front.  It was simple, basic, human instinct, a pre-programmed, primal urge to protect my offspring.  Any Dad would have done the same.  So why mention this today?  It came to mind when I read the mother of Baby Ru now remembers the blow that killed her child.  She seems to be seeking some kind of credit that she's now ready to tell police the truth, six weeks after the fact.  And it made me ask: where was your pre-programmed urge to protect your child when it mattered?  And if it failed you, why not come forward sooner, to seek justice for your child?  The bottom line all of this makes me ask, where was your parental instinct? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/6/20232 minutes, 4 seconds
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John Tookey: AUT Professor of Construction on the need to strengthen earthquake-prone buildings in Wellington

There’s a pressing need to strengthen hundreds of Wellington buildings that are quake-prone.  Experts are warning deadlines are closing in for the work, with more than 500 buildings needing strengthening, including residential apartments.  AUT Professor of construction, John Tookey, told Tim Dower that building owners need to start, or hundreds could be left homeless.  He says it's a public safety issue, and councils should consider incentivising the work.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/6/20234 minutes, 18 seconds
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Terry Collins: AA Principal Policy Advisor on fuel prices dropping before Christmas

Good news for kiwis as the price at the pump is dropping just in time for Christmas.   Oil prices have dropped four cents since Friday and now sit at $77 USD, almost 30 cents down from September.   AA Principal Policy Advisor Terry Collins told Tim Dower that the recession may be acting in our favour, combined with a lack of demand coming out of China and Europe.   He was predicting fuel prices would be closer to $3.50 than $3 three months ago, and he's glad he's wrong.   Terry Collins says he was starting to feel like the Christmas Grinch, but now he's feeling things are much better.   He predicts we'll probably see the prices drop a little further over the summer period.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/6/20234 minutes, 41 seconds
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Ginny Andersen: Former Police Minister on Mark Mitchell's letter to Andrew Coster

Police Minister Mark Mitchell's predecessor says his letter to the Police Commissioner seems a bit redundant.   He's made his letter to Andrew Coster public.  It focuses on things like tackling youth and gang offending, supporting frontline officers, and strengthening policing in communities.   Ginny Andersen told Tim Dower that it's important that police have operational independence.   She says the letter doesn't cover much new ground.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/6/20234 minutes, 55 seconds
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Tim Dower: Would you pay for private schools?

$27-28,000 a year. That's about the going rate for private secondary education in New Zealand right now.  And you'd pay it gladly wouldn't you, if you could afford it.  I hope the kids whose parents are working or on their way at five in the morning to help pay for it recognise what a privilege it is.  I referred to that St Andrew College prizegiving a little earlier, and the takeaway for me is the value of a good education.  The basics? Yep, obviously, but opportunities too for kids to explore what they're really interested in, and seek the passions that'll give them exciting, rewarding, and worthwhile lives.  And you know what? You don't need, actually, to fork out for private to get that. We've got some great state schools in New Zealand too.  My kids went to cracking state primaries in Auckland: Botany Downs, Mellons Bay, Farm Cove Intermediate, then onto MacLeans.  I think they know they were lucky. Like in health, our education system is a bit of a postcode lottery.  Would I have pushed for private if we'd had the money? It's hypothetical, but probably, yes.  Rough calculations: taxpayers are currently spending well north of 10 grand a head teaching secondary students.  We do it more cheaply than the OECD average, except, and who knows why this is, in tertiary education.  How much of the overall $21 billion that goes on education gets soaked up by ideologues at the Ministry or wasted on endless reviews and rehashings of the system is a mystery.  But you get what you pay for in life and education is no exception.  Maybe this is another area like infrastructure, health, and immigration, where we need less political meddling and to-ing and fro-ing with each change of government, and more of a long term, locked in plan.  Just think what we could achieve in productivity, creativity and quality of life, if every kid had the chance those at our best schools do now. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/5/20232 minutes, 20 seconds
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Jason Walls: Political Editor says Te Pati Māori's protest sets the stage for their party's role over the next three years

Te Pati Māori's challenge to the incoming Government has been heard loud and clear, likely foreshadowing what is to come.    Thousands answered the party's call to protest the Government's incoming Treaty and Te Reo reforms yesterday, while MPs swore allegiance to both their mokopuna and Te Tiriti, as well as King Charles III.  ZB Political Editor Jason Walls told Tim Dower that it sets the stage for the sort of party Te Pati Māori is going to be for the next three years.  Walls says the party's positioning themselves as a thorn in the Governments side on all Māori issues.  But he says it's fair of Prime Minister Chris Luxon to question why there are protests only a week into their first term.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/5/20235 minutes, 13 seconds
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Chris Abercrombie: PPTA Acting President on the declining PISA scores

More stability in education is being floated as an idea to reverse declining test scores.   New Zealand's 2022 PISA reading, maths, and science scores have all dipped since 2018, and they show longer term decline.   New Zealand is still above the OECD average in all three standards.   PPTA Acting President Chris Abercrombie says all countries have seen a decline.   He told Tim Dower that constant curriculum changes between different governments have contributed. Abercrombie says curriculums need time to develop and if they're changed too often it disrupts children and teachers.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/5/20234 minutes, 27 seconds
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Ernie Newman: Business Consultant on Woolworths' $76 million gain despite profits falling by 52%

Where shoppers are seeing food prices rise, Woolworths New Zealand is seeing profits fall, but is still walking away with $76 million in its pockets.   The latest annual figures show a 52% drop from last year, the source of which one business consultant says is ‘very opaque.’   Ernie Newman told Tim Dower that he believes the recent $400 million rebranding and transfer pricing has something to do with it.   Transfer pricing is when multi-nationals adjust their books and take their profits in whatever country they want to, usually to a country with the lowest tax rate.  He says there's no sign of any benefit in this for consumers.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/5/20233 minutes, 6 seconds
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Tim Dower: Te Pati Māori are shooting themselves in the foot

So, a Day of Action called by Te Pati Māori. Organisers promise they'll target busy roads and even try to jam the motorways.  They're talking about gridlock on roads into central Auckland, and gleefully suggesting this will cause millions in lost productivity.  Wow. What a useful and worthwhile objective that is.  Now, this is supposedly about an assault by the new Government on tangata whenua and the Treaty.  That assault as they see it comes in the form of dialling back the extensions to smokefree laws, scrapping the Māori Health Authority, and repealing Three Waters.  It's probably worth mentioning that those changes —with the exception of smokefree— were well flagged up during the election campaign.  And if there hadn't been broad support across the voting spectrum then we'd have ended up with another three years of a rotten Labour government, and its rotten policies.  The people have spoken, and the people want the country back on track.  The people, as I read it, wanted less divisive policy and a focus on reducing crime and tackling the cost of living.  Unravelling some of the smokefree changes was a surprise, but how can you interpret that as an attack on anyone?  Smoking is, after all, a personal choice. Nobody apart from those who sell tobacco is actually encouraging anyone to take it up, are they?  Look, it's a Tuesday, less than three weeks out from Christmas.  The Māori Party perhaps doesn't realise most people just want to get on with things, and can't afford a day off for a protest, especially when they don't really know what it's about.  Stopping regular working people from getting in and earning a crust could be seen as an attack on them. You're shooting yourselves in the foot guys.  Look, I don't expect big crowds out there protesting today, but as we've seen in Wellington, all it takes is half a dozen tossers with super glue to bring a major artery to a standstill.  Work from home anyone? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/4/20232 minutes, 17 seconds
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Nathan Wallis: Neuroscience Educator and Child Development Expert on the study linking screen time to mental health in children

Screen time may be making young children more prone to mental health problems.  A new study measured the link between screen time and mental health in 16,000 children in China, across the ages of three to six.   Neuroscience educator and child development expert Nathan Wallis told Tim Dower that flashing lights from screens affect the part of the brain associated with emotions and empathy.  The World Health Organisation says the appropriate number of minutes per day a child under two can look at a screen is zero.   Wallis says that has nothing to do with the content, it's completely to do with the flashing lights.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/4/20233 minutes, 33 seconds
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Miles Workman: ANZ Senior Economist said further spending cuts could be in line

The new government's increasing the Working for Families rates.   The tax credits will rise $8 to $144 after tax for their first child, and by $6 for subsequent children.   Finance Minister Nicola Willis says there'll be a mini budget December 20th.   ANZ senior economist Miles Workman told Tim Dower that further spending cuts could be in line to maintain a fiscal balance and eventual surplus.   He says the previous government increased spending by a very significant amount during Covid-19, and never unwound it despite the economy becoming overheated.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/4/20234 minutes, 35 seconds
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Grant Duncan: Political Commentator on today's Te Pati Māori-organised protests and the Government's response

A prediction that this morning's Te Pati Māori-organised protests could be just the beginning.   They're rallying people from one end of the North Island to the other, against policies perceived to negatively affect Māori.   Political Commentator Grant Duncan says the Prime Minister will have to make a decision on how to handle them.   He told Tim Dower that he hopes Chris Luxon offers an olive branch, wanting to see him listen and be conciliatory.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/4/20233 minutes, 41 seconds
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Tim Dower: Are Our Borrowing Trends Getting Out Of Hand?

Couple of canaries going off in the coal mines over the past few days. Ominous warnings actually, of how tight things are getting out there in the real world. First off...the Centrix figures showing how many people are doing Christmas on credit this year. It is normal for people to borrow a bit here and there to...smooth out if you like...the household budget over the heavy spending period. Credit cards were up nearly 12 percent...Buy now pay later jumped 7...personal loans are up 3 percent. This is a seasonal thing...quite normal for a November month. But Centric said this...and I precis...“there will be a segment stretching beyond their means". More of a tell-tale sign though...the growing number of people falling behind with their debt. That's mortgages in arrears or car loans or credit card debt that's not getting paid down. The monthly count of people behind on their payments is up...not a lot...I don't want to over-egg this...but year-on-year arrears have increased 6.1%. Mortgage arrears are up by a quarter year-on-year...25 percent...and that is bad. Higher interest rates are obviously driving that, and there are still more people yet to roll off those cheapo post-covid deals. Now we learn that people are increasingly turning to their KiwiSaver money...the retirement nest-egg. Hardship withdrawals have almost doubled in the past year. And that's crap, because it's borrowing from your own future...the Retirement Commission reckons more than half of retirees now say they're in financial difficulty. Conclusions? It's tough, and getting tougher...these figures are the beginning of the trend, the bottom of the curve. As the PM said on Hosking the other day, it's likely the new Government has inherited a recession. Solutions...Christ, don't ask me, I'm not a politician.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/3/20232 minutes, 7 seconds
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John Carnegie: "Better ways" to spend $16B than Onslow Pumped Hydro Scheme

The energy sector is pointing to international evidence to back axing the Lake Onslow pumped hydro scheme. Energy Minister Simeon Brown says the 16-billion-dollar project, was pouring money down the drain, at a time when we need to be reining in spending. He says axing the scheme will increase confidence to invest in more energy production. Energy Resources Aotearoa John Carnegie told Tim Dower that Australia's Snowy 2.0 is enough evidence to show it wouldn't have delivered for Kiwis.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/3/20233 minutes, 29 seconds
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Robert Patman: "No Prospect Of Further Ceasefire" In Gaza

Another ceasefire in Gaza seems unlikely - as fighting resumes on both sides. It comes after a pause in fighting, which saw the release of some hostages kidnapped by Hamas, in exchange for scores of Palestinian prisoners. Otago University international relations professor Robert Patman told Tim Dower both Hamas and Israel are saying there's no prospect of further ceasefire negotiations. He says Israel's withdrawn its negotiations and Hamas is saying it won't resume negotiation's, until the current Israeli military campaign ceases. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12/3/20235 minutes, 35 seconds
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Tim Dower: Do we need more A&Es?

Really interested in this Medical Journal piece about emergency departments.  The impression we often get is they're horribly overcrowded, patients lying in corridors for hours in agony, constant panic stations.  Friday and Saturday nights are bedlam, we're told: drunks staggering around the place, people unleashing their stress and anger at the staff.  And in the winter, people with coughs and colds packing out the waiting area.  Hospitals are begging us to go to our GPs, even giving out vouchers to take the pressure off, because a lot of people can't afford to pay for a doctor's visit.  What the Medical Journal piece says is that actually, New Zealanders overall make fewer calls to A&E than people in other countries.  So, what does that tell us?  Do we need more A&Es? Or would it be better to spend a greater chunk of the health budget in primary care?  Have we fallen victim to a perceived need for the glamour projects like new hospitals?  Would more GPs on the ground, especially in rural New Zealand, improve our overall health?  And where do the privately run A&E centres fit in?  Free healthcare at the point of delivery —in other words you pay for it in your taxes— is on the face of it simpler and more cost-effective.  But the reality is that some GP surgeries are technically insolvent. Half our existing doctors are planning their retirement, and there's nowhere near enough new ones on the way to replace them.  I'm hoping we'll shed more light on this before six, but it's obviously a complex situation.  Dr Reti was making all the right noises when he was on with Mike this week.  He's repeatedly said the system is in crisis, and now's the time for him to show that a crisis can sometimes be an opportunity for real, radical change. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/30/20231 minute, 58 seconds
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Vincent McAviney: UK Correspondent on the UK sending a second warship to the Middle East as the truce in Gaza enters a seventh day

Tensions are heightened in the Middle East as the truce in Gaza enters a seventh day.  The UK is sending a second warship —the destroyer ship HMS Diamond— to the Gulf to join the frigate HMS Lancaster.  It comes after Israel and Hamas reached a final-hour agreement last night to extend the ceasefire to the end of today.  Correspondent Vincent McAviney told Tim Dower that the UK Defence Force is describing its latest deployment as critical to bolstering its presence in the region.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/30/20232 minutes, 21 seconds
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Owen Vaughan: OneRoof Editor on Wellington's house prices increasing by 2%

Wellington's housing market is ending the year on an upwards trajectory.  Latest One Roof-Valocity figures show the nationwide average property value has jumped 2% in the past three months, to reach $968 thousand.  Wellington prices are up 2%, while Auckland's are up 2.5% and Canterbury's are up 1.7%.  OneRoof Editor Owen Vaughan says interest rates are still inhibiting price growth.  He says while we've dusted ourselves off and we're getting back on our feet, we're not seeing the rampant growth we saw during the boom time.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/30/20233 minutes, 52 seconds
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Clint Smith: Former Senior Labour Staffer on the party's front bench line up

Some former ministers have taken top positions in Labour's front bench while others have lost out. Carmel Sepuloni has social development, Grant Robertson has finance, Ayesha Verrall has health, and Ginny Andersen keeps police. Damien O'Connor's been taken off agriculture, with Jo Luxton taking up the spokesperson role. Former senior Labour staffer Clint Smith told Tim Dower that Luxton's one of the more rurally based Labour MPs. He says Damien O'Connor has been around a while and Chris Hipkins probably wanted to give important roles to some younger MPs.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/30/20234 minutes, 28 seconds
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Peter Boot: Northcare A&E Medical Director on the need to invest in primary care to ease pressure on hospital emergency departments

A fresh plea for a helping hand for primary care, to ease the pressure on hospital emergency departments.  An opinion piece in today's New Zealand Medical Journal suggests ED overcrowding may not be caused by unnecessary visits, but an increase in more urgent cases.  But Northcare Accident and Medical's Peter Boot says primary care is more efficient at dealing with small issues filing EDs, and it needs investment.  He told Tim Dower that 30% of General Practices are technically insolvent.  Boot says doctors are leaving, and about half of the workforce are older or planning to retire in the short term so there's a crisis in primary care.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/30/20234 minutes, 33 seconds
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Tim Dower: Jeez do dogs get to you

Dogs eh... jeez do they get to you.  It's 12 years this Christmas, Luka and me. 12 brilliant years for me, and what a mate he's been. A great, great mate.  We had a long talk last night, cos I wanted say things while he's still with me.  Kinda with a warm heart and not a broken one, cos I know the day will come.  He truly scared me last night; I thought it was the end for a little while.  All stretched out on the grass in the sun... I know your leg hurts mate. Doctor again today, but the panting and the restlessness had me going.  And he was all cuddly, and licking me, and big deep sighs.  Anyway, after a little nap he's up on his feet again —bit wobbly— and soon after that the honking starts.  And he brings it all up. Two, three massive blobs of... just mess. Oh wait, there's a bit more. Here we go.  Now I don't know how many times over the years I've tried to stop him eating disgusting decomposing crap on the beach, or in the bush, or something stinky in the park.  He hears me, but he ignores me until he can't pretend any more. Freakin' Labrador.  Incorrigible Labrador. Totally loyal, but an absolute rogue and definitely his own man.  And the other day on the grass out the front: a sheep's head. A sheep's head! For God's sake dog.  Last night? Totally self-inflicted, and he knows it.  Right after his dinner he'd sneaked out and cleaned up the crap I put out for the chooks. Stuff he knew wasn't his, but heck, it's there.  Bloody Labrador.  And while I'm mopping his chunder off the floor, he's fine again, sitting on the couch licking his paws.  Did you puke on your shoes mate? Well... serves you right.  But you're forgiven. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/29/20232 minutes, 2 seconds
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Roger Young: Cawthron Institute scientist on New Zealand's freshwater quality report

It's thought New Zealand's achievement of water quality targets hinges on every Kiwi getting behind efforts.  A new report has evaluated four contaminants —nitrogen, phosphorus, E. coli, and sediment— in rivers, lakes, and estuaries nationwide.  Every region needs a substantial reduction in at least one to meet freshwater standards.  75% of land is contributing more E. coli to water than is allowed.  Cawthron Institute scientist, Roger Young, told Tim Dower that achieving targets could require land-use changes in some areas and mitigation work in others.  He says in those cases, fencing and wetlands enhancements and protections could be enough.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/29/20233 minutes, 30 seconds
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Brad Olsen: Infometrics Principal Economist on the Reserve Bank keeping the Official Cash Rate at 5.5%

A push back from the Reserve Bank against the financial markets. The central bank kept the Official Cash Rate at 5.5% and signalled that no cuts are on the immediate horizon. It's also kept the door open for another rise if inflation pressures are stronger than anticipated. Infometrics Principal Economist Brad Olsen told Tim Dower that markets had been getting excited in recent weeks, wondering how quickly they could cut rates. He says the Reserve Bank doesn't meet for another three months, so leaving that sort of view unchecked and allowed to come through would have been dangerous for them. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/29/20234 minutes, 52 seconds
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Jason Walls: Political Editor says that many laws are likely to be changed by early next year

The incoming Government isn't wasting any time in getting down to business.  Chris Luxon has unveiled a 100-day plan that will include scrapping Auckland's fuel tax and the clean car discount, repealing Three Waters, and passing new RMA laws.  Political Editor Jason Walls told Tim Dower that many laws will be changed by early next year.  He says it sounds like a lot of the legislation will be passed under urgency, starting in the next few weeks.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/29/20235 minutes, 52 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on the search and rescue operation for the crashed US Airforce osprey

Search and rescue operations are underway after a US Air Force osprey crashed while performing a routine training mission off the coast of Yakushima Island.  US correspondent Mitch McCann told Tim Dower that this is not the first time this type of aircraft has fatally crashed.  He says that so far, one crew member is confirmed dead while the other five are still unaccounted for.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/29/20231 minute, 55 seconds
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Tim Dower: The low-down on the Public Interest Journalism Fund

So here's the low-down on the Public Interest Journalism Fund.  55 million bucks dished out over a series of funding rounds, and all gone now. The fund's been wound up.  The company that owns this station won nearly $7 million in round one, another $3 million in round two, and a couple of top-ups after that.  In fact, all the major players, including the already publicly funded broadcasters, everyone, every outfit including some you've never heard was in the trough.  Let's remember the context —Covid— and the wave of redundancies that caused right through the commercial media.  Advertising revenue evaporated and some media companies were on the brink of failure.  Now, to get your hands on the money you had to agree to this:  "A clear and obvious commitment or intent for commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi, including a commitment to te reo Māori."  On top of that, we had to commit to public interest journalism, data provision, New Zealand content, freely available online distribution, media standards and so on.  Overall, it funded 219 jobs and 22 development projects.  NZME used it on Journalism Cadetships for Māori and Pasifika, covering court proceedings and community journalists in provincial papers.  Jobs that most likely wouldn't have been there without the money.  But was it a bribe?  Well... I'd ask you how any media company could function in New Zealand without a commitment to the Treaty. It's a part of our lives, like it or not.  A commitment to te reo... well I think we've been involved in Māori Language Week since it began back in the 1970s. Is it enough? I think it's enough for our audience.  And was there ever any public money to cover it? Actually no.  And while we're at it, there's never been public funding to my knowledge for coverage of Waitangi Day, the Tribunal, or other matters Māori.  On the subject of, let's not say bribery, let's say incentive, what was the billion-dollar Provincial Growth Fund?  And what's the unwinding of smokefree changes or more money for the racing industry? Obviously, most definitely, not a bribe. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/28/20232 minutes, 29 seconds
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Christina Leung: NZIER Principal Economist expects the OCR to hold steady at 5.5%

Don't expect any major change to interest rates before Christmas.  The Reserve Bank is tipped to keep the Official Cash Rate unchanged at 5.5% at its next review at 2pm today.  Economists and commentators remain divided on whether there will be further hikes in the current cycle.  NZIER's Christina Leung told Tim Dower that, for now, previous hikes appear to be having the desired effect.  However, she says there is still work to be done yet to ease inflation.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/28/20233 minutes, 25 seconds
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Gavin Grey: UK Correspondent on the first transatlantic flight powered by alternative fuels taking off from Heathrow airport

A big step for sustainability within the aviation sector   The first transatlantic flight by a large passenger plane powered only by alternative fuels has taken off, flying from London's Heathrow to New York's JFK airport.  The Virgin Atlantic flight is a one-off flight at this stage and isn't carrying passengers.  UK Correspondent Gavin Grey told Tim Dower that the industry's acknowledging they can be more environmentally friendly.  He says sustainable aviation fuels can be made from things like crops, household waste, and cooking oils.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/28/20233 minutes, 15 seconds
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Wayne Walker: Auckland Councillor on Wayne Brown's plans to sell the long-term lease of the Ports of Auckland

It’s believed that more thought needs to go into the Auckland Mayor's plans to sell the long-term lease of the Ports of Auckland.  Wayne Brown is putting forward two options for the port in his proposed 10-year budget, which also includes a rates rise of 7.5%.   He proposes either keeping the business and gradually releasing land for public use or selling the lease to raise up to $3 billion.   Auckland Councillor Wayne Walker told Tim Dower that the port does bring in a good amount of income.   He says they've been told it could be returning $2 million a week, which it's on track to do, as it's returning a million a week now.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/28/20234 minutes, 48 seconds
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Vaughan Davis: Media Commentator on Christopher Luxon's handling of Winston Peters' comments about the Public Interest Journalism fund

Prime Minister Chris Luxon has headache to deal with after his Government's first Cabinet meeting.  Winston Peters called a $55 million Public Interest Journalism Fund provided during Covid a "bribe".   He told reporters to "tell the public what they had to sign to get the money".  Media commentator Vaughan Davis told Tim Dower that Luxon handled the situation poorly.  He says avoiding the comment didn't help the PM, and it left Peters squarely in the spotlight.   Funding applicants were asked —when appropriate— to produce content supporting our public interest.  NZME's funding agreement included acknowledgement of absolute editorial independence.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/28/20234 minutes, 38 seconds
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Tim Dower: Auckland Council isn't great at leading by example

I'm wondering if people in Auckland will, in a few years, look more kindly on their current Mayor.  Fair to say that Wayne Brown didn't exactly get off to a flying start, especially with the media, and let's face it, no one's happy when the rates go up.  On that score, you've seen nothing yet.  I've been reading Mr Brown's proposals to build long-term financial and physical resilience.  It's a dose of reality and long overdue, and, boiled down to a few simple bullets, here we go:  Fix the infrastructure.    Stop wasting money.    Get Auckland moving.    Make the most of the harbours and environment.    Take back control of the CCOs.  And running through the document, a recurring theme: the message being that Auckland can't continue living beyond its means.  The chickens are coming home to roost to quote the Mayor, and he's flagged up that losing the Regional Fuel Tax and scrapping Three Waters will only make things worse.  Brown talks about, and I'm quoting here, “significant financial restraint and efficiencies".  "Auckland Council has to stop wasting money,” he says, “and start getting things done faster, better, and cheaper.”  Even achieving all of that, the rates are going to have to go up.  There isn't time to go through the whole document but it's online, and if you're invested in the region one way or another, it’s worth reading.  Look, sometimes we feel we need to apologise on a national station for talking about Auckland, but the reality is it is our economic engine room.  It's the first place most visitors see, and we all know how powerful first impressions are.  And as the largest and arguably most complex, if Auckland can do things well, so too can every other local body across the country.  But unless the Council can get to grips with this stuff the Mayor's talking about, Auckland is stuffed.  New Zealand's Queen city, currently looking well... not so regal. And without some serious work, it's on its way to being a hobo town. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/27/20232 minutes, 2 seconds
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Dougal Sutherland: Clinical Psychologist on lockdowns potentially causing an increase in learning and behavioural issues in children

Covid lockdowns may have played a part in the increase in learning and behavioural issues being picked up at early childhood education.   The Educational Institute says the increase has meant waiting lists for specialist support are far too long.   Clinical psychologist Dougal Sutherland told Tim Dower that the main thing kids that age do is play and interact with other kids, which provides social and cognitive development and learning.   He says that while teenagers could jump online to socialise with their friends, that play and interaction can't be replaced, so young kids missed out during isolation.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/27/20234 minutes, 31 seconds
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Brigitte Morten: Former Senior Ministerial Advisor to National on the Government's first meetings

It's thought the new Government will start with some of the 'easy wins' in its 100-day plan.  Ministers from our first three-party coalition of National, ACT, and New Zealand First meet for their first Cabinet meeting today.  Prime Minister Chris Luxon says today's meeting will lay out expectations, and at tomorrow's meeting they'll discuss items like agreeing to a plan.  Former Senior Ministerial Adviser to National, Brigitte Morten, told Tim Dower that there's only about nine sitting days left for the year, so they'll move quickly.  She believes they'll be looking to introduce legislation to get rid of Fair Pay Agreements, and repeal Three Waters and RMA.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/27/20234 minutes, 54 seconds
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Michael Brooks: Egg Producers' Federation Executive Director on the egg shortage potentially being over

New Zealand's egg shortage may be over, according to producers who say prices have levelled out.  Shelves were left bare at times last summer after supermarkets pledged to only sell cage-free eggs.  Egg Producers' Federation executive director Michael Brooks told Tim Dower that the new restrictions have been difficult for the industry, but prices are finally coming down.  He says free range eggs will always be a more expensive option because of the land required to farm the hens.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/27/20233 minutes, 34 seconds
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Gavin Grey: Officials Are Blaming Far-Right For Dublin Crashes

Calm's been restored in Ireland's capital after a stabbing last week led to unrest. Three young children were among five people taken to hospital after a knife attack in Dublin, which sparked riots in the city centre. Thirty-four people have been arrested. Europe correspondent Gavin Grey told Tim Dower that officials are blaming far-right agitators for the clashes. He says it's thought an Irish citizen, originally from North Africa, might be the person in connection with the stabbing - but that's not yet confirmed.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/26/20233 minutes, 45 seconds
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Judith Collins: Thrilled and Humbled By New Roles In Government

The incoming Attorney-General says it's a big job but she thinks she has the experience for it. Judith Collins has picked up the portfolio alongside seven others including Minister Responsible for responding to the Christchurch mosque inquiry. She says it will be a challenge, but the roles are quite closely aligned. Collins says told Tim Dower that her background as a lawyer, holding a practicing certificate for 40 years, makes her well qualified. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/26/20234 minutes, 39 seconds
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Action For Smokefree Director Ben Youdan: Scrapping Smokefree Laws "Disappointing"

Backlash to the incoming government scrapping smokefree laws to fund tax cuts. Advocacy groups say removing regulations on levels of nicotine and the age of who can buy cigarettes is irresponsible. Action for Smokefree Director Ben Youdan told Tim Dower that the Government is putting the interests of the cigarette industry before the health of the nation. He says more people will die if these laws change.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/26/20234 minutes, 49 seconds
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Tim Dower: Tax Cuts Or A Tobacco Free New Zealand?

Nicola Willis is blaming ACT and NZ First for the momentous dismantling of Smokefree laws. That's what she said over the weekend, telling Newshub the minor parties were insistent on reversing the amendments, not even a year after they were passed.  ACT says tobacco taxes bring in about 1.8 billion all up, and we're given to believe taking those new restrictions away will be worth about a billion.  So, handy money...especially when you've just had to sacrifice a different cash raising scheme which you'd hoped would help fund tax cuts.  But what do we read from this? Isn't this a matter of principle, a moral issue even, and where was this in the manifestos?  Are we to infer that delivering tax cuts is now more important than saving thousands from the misery of being addicted to tobacco? And if you haven't been there...believe me...it's a miserable addiction.  Are we to infer that it's really Act and New Zealand First in the driving seat...and if so...what further horrors are to come?  There'll be a lot of dairy owners heaving a heavy cough of relief...they'll still be able to stock tobacco and some will tell you it's a vital part of their revenue...it keeps a lot of them going. It also makes them a target for ram-raiders and the like. Look...smoking is a personal choice, and I'm all for personal choice.  And is it the job of governments to protect people from themselves...of course not. But honestly...if you think of the time most smokers get started...in their teens...are we equipped at that time to make a wise and informed adult decision? Of course not.  But it took legislation to achieve seat belts...helmets for motorbike riders and cyclists...an inconvenience if you want...imposed on us all to save lives.  Bottom line...if it's a choice between a tax cut...and us maybe being one of the first countries in the world to shake the tobacco monkey off our back...you can keep your tax cut.  I don't want it, if this is how you're paying for it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/26/20232 minutes, 20 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: It's time to turn off the early alarm

So, this is my last day – not just for the year but for good. It’s time for me to turn off the early alarm.   I’ve been so conflicted about making this decision, purely because I love the job so much, it’s the most fun and best time I’ve ever had in my broadcasting career. Radio is addictive. It’s dynamic and instant and an intimate connection with your audience. I’ve felt privileged to be in your cars, your kitchens, your headphones, an earpiece while you’re still in bed... the fact you choose to tune in here as you start your day, is something I never take for granted.   We’re a small team – my producer Hannah and I, but I’m really proud of how hard she works. It’s not easy getting up in the dark and putting out a radio show, but I’ve been lucky to have had awesome producers alongside me over the years. Mike’s team of Sam and Glenn have also been amazingly helpful, and I’ve been blessed with the best in newsreader and all-time fun zone Niva, and the statesman of sport Andrew Alderson. The pre-dawn camaraderie is part of what makes this job so awesome... we’re all tired, we’re all trying to do our best and put out the best product we can for our audience.   I’ve been doing this show for 6 years, but my career in radio actually began 16 years ago. I was on maternity leave after the birth of my daughter, at home with two small children and a baby when the then boss of ZB called me up and asked if I’d ever thought about trying some radio. Only knowing TV my whole life, I found the prospect of it daunting. He said they could work around family commitments, juggle shifts around the kids, he said - give it a go. I’m glad I accepted the challenge.   I began filling in on news reading shifts, did the odd stint filling in on Drive and some weekend shows. I found radio instantly addictive. One, they back their people, they were encouraging, and two, they pushed me. There was this constant striving for excellence, something I’d argue is lost in mainstream journalism these days. I joined the Paul Holmes Breakfast (pre–Mike Hosking Breakfast) as newsreader, and I just found radio so much fun.  Six years ago, when the opportunity came up to host my own show I was terrified, I didn’t think I could do that either. But again, ZB encouraged me, pushed me, made me feel like I could do it. The magic of our boss Jason Winstanley —who is hands down the best boss I’ve ever had— is that he manages to make every host on this station feel like they’re the most important person on the network, which is no mean feat. Especially when we all know that’s Mike….   Who, speaking of which, has been my constant biggest cheerleader, listener, and fan, closely followed by my dad, who wakes every morning at 5am to listen in via an earpiece in bed. I am forever grateful to these two incredible men in my life – both great broadcasters of their own, for being so lovingly supportive of me.   But that early alarm takes a toll. Shift work is tough on families and our kids have two parents who do brutal hours, obsessively follow news, go to bed early, and are often tired and grumpy (trust me, having to absorb as much news as we do – which is largely negative – makes most people grumpy before you even add in the lack of sleep!). It’s my daughter’s final year at High school next year and all she’s known is Mum shift working weird hours and turning news bulletins up loud in the car all the time. I’m keen to enjoy her last year with her and be a bit more present at home, instead of side tracked by politics and inflation and editorial deadlines.   I’m actually looking forward to not following so much news. I will however be up at 5 and listening to this show. I’ll have to check the new guy isn’t stuffing it up. My boss Jason says I’ll be bored witless in 3 months and I’ll be back. He may well be right. In the meantime, thank you for being here, for all your support, all your feedback, it’s honestly been the best fun I’ve had in broadcasting. You’re an awesome audience and I’ve loved our early morning chats.  Thank you for the privilege. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/23/20234 minutes, 41 seconds
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Simon Arcus: Wellington Chamber of Commerce CEO on Black Friday Sales

Shoppers hunting for a bargain will be hitting the malls over the weekend for Black Friday sales.  Tens of thousands of shoppers are expected to swarm the shops.  But Wellington Chamber of Commerce Chief Executive Simon Arcus told Kate Hawkesby that consumers should be careful to ensure they are getting a fair deal.  He says shoppers should look online to see if the same product can be bought cheaper elsewhere.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/23/20232 minutes, 37 seconds
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Adam Pearse: NZ Herald Political Reporter on the coalition agreement being signed today

More details on the incoming governing trio are expected to come soon.  National, ACT, and New Zealand First have agreed on a deal which will be signed in Parliament today.  It'll have the parties' policy agendas, details on who's in and who's out of Cabinet, and who's becoming the Deputy Prime Minister.  Herald political reporter Adam Pearse told Kate Hawkesby that we've apparently been in the final stages for more than a week now.  He says they're expecting statements of support from the three parties throughout this morning.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/23/20233 minutes, 25 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Nicola Willis looks like the most mature of them all

So has the anticipation of this government been greater than the event itself?   Will it be under whelming when we finally see the state of it?   Did we just build it up as this huge thing full of controversy and twists and turns, when in fact it was just a boring longer than expected meeting of negotiating endless minutiae?   I actually felt sorry for them yesterday – especially the ones who are parents to young kids, like Nicola Willis. She was desperate to get back to Wellington and see her 4 young children, Chris Bishop was wearing a borrowed shirt because he'd run out of clothes... I mean all of that just reeks of a thing that went on longer than anyone expected. Longer than perhaps it needed to. I know even David Seymour was saying that.   But how will we remember all this and Luxon’s abilities around it? Well, that’s the thing, possibly not at all. The news cycle moves fast, a week’s a long time in politics, this will all be ancient history before long. I don’t know that people will care in three years' time whether he spent two or three weeks negotiating a coalition deal, I think they’ll care more about how he’s run the country and a three headed government.   That’s surely the true test.   And if we do get it all revealed today, how much notice are you taking? How much do you care whose inside Cabinet and who isn’t? I mean I know political tragics like me will be fascinated, but can you really name all the Ministers of the previous government? Short of the ones who are terrible, or got in trouble, or said and did really stupid things that blew up in the news, we probably don’t really care who's in charge of what. Unless it affects you directly of course. Willie Jackson in charge of Broadcasting was always a bitter pill to swallow for many in the media myself included, but as long as they’re competent and don’t do anything stupid, we tend to forget about them don’t we?   The coolest person in the room now though is Nicola Willis, isn't she? Not interested in the baubles, more interested in the business of governing, she says she never wanted to be deputy PM, Seymour and Peters can scrap it out between them, she's back to home to Wellington to see her 4 young kids who’re missing their Mum. I mean she’s all class and so far, looks like the most mature of the lot of them. I think in her saying what she said, she clearly showed the others up for what they are and removed herself from the fray. Good on her.   She's keen to get on with governing, showing she’s truly about the good of the country, not the good of her ego. And I do think that's the risk being run here by Seymour and Peters. They start to look petulant and like they're holding the country to ransom, delaying the formation of a new government. Which look, I understand if you've had to swallow a lot of dead rats and you're going for broke on the final curtain, but if Peters wants Foreign Minister and Deputy PM I think that's a stretch. The Deputy PM can't be off travelling all the time, because what if they're needed at home to step up for the PM?  Luxon's argument is best person for the job and spreading the talent... we get that, but as their wage payers we want to see value for money too. These guys are on the big bucks, they need to be competent and efficient.   So far the most efficient one appears to be Nicola Willis, seeing the spectacle unfolding for what it is and saying ‘see ya guys, I'm back home to Welly.’ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/22/20233 minutes, 7 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Nicola Willis looks like the most mature of them all (1)

So has the anticipation of this government been greater than the event itself?   Will it be under whelming when we finally see the state of it?   Did we just build it up as this huge thing full of controversy and twists and turns, when in fact it was just a boring longer than expected meeting of negotiating endless minutiae?   I actually felt sorry for them yesterday – especially the ones who are parents to young kids, like Nicola Willis. She was desperate to get back to Wellington and see her 4 young children, Chris Bishop was wearing a borrowed shirt because he'd run out of clothes... I mean all of that just reeks of a thing that went on longer than anyone expected. Longer than perhaps it needed to. I know even David Seymour was saying that.   But how will we remember all this and Luxon’s abilities around it? Well, that’s the thing, possibly not at all. The news cycle moves fast, a week’s a long time in politics, this will all be ancient history before long. I don’t know that people will care in three years' time whether he spent two or three weeks negotiating a coalition deal, I think they’ll care more about how he’s run the country and a three headed government.   That’s surely the true test.   And if we do get it all revealed today, how much notice are you taking? How much do you care whose inside Cabinet and who isn’t? I mean I know political tragics like me will be fascinated, but can you really name all the Ministers of the previous government? Short of the ones who are terrible, or got in trouble, or said and did really stupid things that blew up in the news, we probably don’t really care who's in charge of what. Unless it affects you directly of course. Willie Jackson in charge of Broadcasting was always a bitter pill to swallow for many in the media myself included, but as long as they’re competent and don’t do anything stupid, we tend to forget about them don’t we?   The coolest person in the room now though is Nicola Willis, isn't she? Not interested in the baubles, more interested in the business of governing, she says she never wanted to be deputy PM, Seymour and Peters can scrap it out between them, she's back to home to Wellington to see her 4 young kids who’re missing their Mum. I mean she’s all class and so far, looks like the most mature of the lot of them. I think in her saying what she said, she clearly showed the others up for what they are and removed herself from the fray. Good on her.   She's keen to get on with governing, showing she’s truly about the good of the country, not the good of her ego. And I do think that's the risk being run here by Seymour and Peters. They start to look petulant and like they're holding the country to ransom, delaying the formation of a new government. Which look, I understand if you've had to swallow a lot of dead rats and you're going for broke on the final curtain, but if Peters wants Foreign Minister and Deputy PM I think that's a stretch. The Deputy PM can't be off travelling all the time, because what if they're needed at home to step up for the PM?  Luxon's argument is best person for the job and spreading the talent... we get that, but as their wage payers we want to see value for money too. These guys are on the big bucks, they need to be competent and efficient.   So far the most efficient one appears to be Nicola Willis, seeing the spectacle unfolding for what it is and saying ‘see ya guys, I'm back home to Welly.’ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/22/20233 minutes, 7 seconds
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Joanna Pidgeon: Pidgeon Judd Law Director on the emerging trend of seniors dishing out inheritance before they die

A trend is emerging of older New Zealanders opting to dish out inheritance to their family before they die.  NZ Seniors data shows more than a third are doing just that.  More than half worry over what they'll be able to leave their kids because of current economic challenges.  Pidgeon Judd Law Director, Joanna Pidgeon, told Kate Hawkesby that people are living longer, and don't want to see their kids struggling with renting into their 50s.  She says with prices increasing, help upfront can get them onto a more stable home-owning road.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/22/20234 minutes, 47 seconds
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Geoffrey Miller: International Geopolitical Analyst on domestic pressure driving the hostage release agreement

Domestic pressure in Israel is said to be the driving factor behind the hostage deal.  Israel's cabinet has agreed to a four day pause in fighting in exchange for the release of 50 women and child hostages taken by Hamas on October 7th.  It's believed there are around 200 Israeli hostages.   The agreement also includes Israel releasing 150 Palestinian prisoners.   International geopolitical analyst Geoffrey Miller told Kate Hawkesby that hostage families have mounted a high profile "bring them home" campaign.  He says Israeli public opinion has turned, with 54% in favour of some sort of prisoner swap deal.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/22/20234 minutes, 54 seconds
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Mike Atkinson: Aspire Managing Director on rental growth running at historically high levels

An influx of migration and lack of property investors is thought to be driving up rental prices around the country. Rental growth is running at historically high levels, hitting 6.1% in the year to October, with Auckland skyrocketing by 8.5% over the past year. Aspire Managing Director Mike Atkinson told Kate Hawkesby that he's warning the incoming Government that prices need to be reined in. He says if prices continue to rise renters will fall out of the market, putting more pressure on social housing wait-lists. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/22/20233 minutes, 6 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Seymour for Deputy PM?

I don’t begrudge David Seymour tipping his hat into the ring for Deputy PM.   Many would argue it’s a relatively inconsequential role - it doesn’t mean much. I mean most of last term we couldn’t remember who was deputy leader or deputy PM: Kelvin Davis or Carmel Sepuloni. It didn’t really matter, no one really cared.   But it does carry gravitas. There is something about the title which carries weight – and of course the obvious additional bonus of stepping into the PM’s shoes when they're out of the country. So you can’t argue it doesn’t carry some responsibility too. And Seymour’s argument is fair I reckon. Proportionality. He’s arguing that the role makes sense for him given they’ve got the second-largest government party, so he says, the second-biggest role makes sense. He thinks that’s the clear case for him to be Deputy PM.   However, he’s also saying he doesn’t know if he’ll get it – he said outside Luxon’s house yesterday that, “a negotiation's a negotiation, and you never know your luck ... so I'm not going to try and predetermine it one way or another.” But in saying that, he's also making a public bid for it which is an interesting tack, and may be nothing more than a power play. Which again is a bit odd given he's also always said he’ll serve in any role and he’s not into the baubles.  We know for sure who is into the baubles, so whoever gets this bauble will be interesting. In general Seymour believes ACT should get more ministerial roles than NZ First based on the party vote, and that’s not a bad point. Surely that’s the fairest way to do it? Seymour argues ‘proportionality's important to democracy’, and if we subscribe to the philosophy that every vote deserves its weight in representation then he’s right, isn’t he?   But if we take that at face value, then Deputy should really be Nicola Willis. Why isn't it her? I don’t know where Luxon’s head will be at with this stuff, I don’t know how much he’ll have had to give away, how much of a tanty Winston may throw if he doesn’t get all his baubles. I mean I wouldn’t want to be Luxon juggling all this, and God only knows how he’s dishing it out.   But I feel like Seymour worked really hard during the campaign, he got the party vote for Act up to an historic high, and they won a record result at the election. He worked his butt off; he deserves some plaudits for that. And he’s right, they are the second biggest party in government now. That’s a huge achievement. But if you argue his proportionality argument, then it still leaves the obvious Deputy PM as Nicola Willis.   If Luxon is prepared to trade this away from National though and he has to pick between Winston Peters and David Seymour, then I'd pick Seymour. Hard working, always available, enthusiastic, and a good communicator. I am impressed at how much Seymour's fronted and tried to keep everyone in the loop throughout this; he’s a big believer in transparency and accountability. I know it's appreciated by the media but I’m just not sure how much that’ll be being appreciated by the other party leaders.   It’s a fine line he’s dancing. And whether he’s twerking his way into being Deputy PM or not... we’ll have to wait and see. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/21/20233 minutes, 2 seconds
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Irene King: Aviation Commentator on Air New Zealand's sinking demand and lower pre-tax profit

Questions are arising over whether Air New Zealand will have to continue to discount domestic flights in coming months as it grapples with sinking demand.  October passenger data highlights the slow down, alongside lower-margin leisure travel and lower capacity.  The airline's forecast a pre-tax profit of up to $230 million for the second half of 2023, down from nearly $300 million last year.  Aviation commentator Irene King told Kate Hawkesby that the data was taken before its capacity problems in which aircrafts were taken out of the system.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/21/20232 minutes, 38 seconds
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Brad Olsen: Infometrics Chief Economist on the import and export stats for October

We’re heading in the right direction, but they’re still not great numbers on the trade deficit.  Stats NZ data for October shows exports fell to $5.4 billion annually, with imports down to just over $7 billion on last year.  The annual trade deficit is $14.8 billion, slightly better than September's $15.41 billion.  Infometrics chief economist Brad Olsen told Kate Hawkesby that it's an improvement, but it remains a concern.  He says we're still importing more than we're exporting.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/21/20233 minutes, 52 seconds
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Brigitte Morten: Former Senior Ministerial advisor for National on the allocation of cabinet portfolios

Wrangling continues in Auckland today between National, ACT, and New Zealand First, of the allocation of Cabinet portfolios in the new government.  David Seymour, Winston Peters, and Nicola Willis are all in the running to be Deputy Prime Minister.  But Brigitte Morten —a former senior ministerial advisor for National— told Kate Hawkesby that the allocation of other roles will be more crucial.  She says finance positions are likely to be given to both parties, and the allocation of justice, police, and Attorney-General portfolios will also be important.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/21/20233 minutes, 54 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: I think we've reached peak woke

I think we’ve reached peak woke, or at least I hope we have... who would know? But I think we’ve reached it when I see that in China now, they’re looking at banning clothes that hurt people’s feelings. You heard that right. CNN reported that, ‘China’s legislature has proposed changes to a law that if approved would allow authorities to fine and detain people who wear clothes that “hurt the nation’s feelings”.’  This to be honest is probably less about wokeism and more about patriotism and control, and it did of course set off a chain of concerns over freedom of expression. But how on earth do you define clothes that hurt people’s feelings? I mean I find Crocs offensive, should they ban those? The mom jean I’m not a big fan of, they’re everywhere. Jorts... horrific, yet back in fashion. As are wedge jandal heels. I mean it’s a minefield of offensive clothing out there already as far as I’m concerned.  But who are the arbiters of this offensive fashion? Well turns out China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee, wants to ban any garment that is ‘detrimental to the spirit of the Chinese nation.’ It’s a draft amendment proposed for consideration. The proposed amendment's rules would alter the Public Security Administration Punishment Law, ‘which gives Police power to detain suspects for weeks’, or fine them the equivalent of about a thousand NZ dollars. It’s been up for consultation, and you can just imagine the push back. CNN reported that, ‘several legal scholars questioned the implicit vagaries of the proposed amendment, and absence of specific guidelines.’ Many called it an overreach. I would have thought the key thing would be a definition of what is construed offensive, and the fact this was missing gives me pause that it will go anywhere. But these days you never know. China’s also cracked down on tattoos and ‘artists with effeminate styles’... whatever that means. But you surely can’t enforce a law as vague as ‘offensive clothing’ without being specific about what that is. One social media user questioned whether suits would be deemed offensive, given they’re ‘the embodiment of Western Capitalism’ as he put it. So, the proposed law, which many have described as ‘excessive and absurd’ could lead to abuse by officials in terms of what constitutes offence. Hence, it’s problematic. So a lot of this is obviously about control but the bit that leads me back to whether it’s wokeism is the fact that it’s about ‘hurt feelings’. Hurting feelings —or not as the case may be— has become such an acceptable catch phrase it’s now getting used as an excuse to enforce laws.A couple of months ago people who wore ‘rainbow print clothing were denied entry to a Taiwanese concert in Beijing..’ leading one social commentator to ask: ‘When did the feelings and spirit of the Chinese nation become so fragile?’ And it’s not just China, everywhere seems fragile these days. I’m with Ricky Gervais, look, when times are weird, we have to turn to the great oracle Ricky Gervais. He famously said, ‘how arrogant are you, to think you can go through life without anyone ever saying anything you don’t agree with or like? Just because you’re offended, doesn’t mean you’re right.’ He’s bang on. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/20/20232 minutes, 23 seconds
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Dennis Maga: First Union General Secretary on Woolworths' new security measures

Questions over how fog cannons and body cameras in Woolworths stores will mitigate the rising abuse of staff.  The supermarket giant is reporting a 131% rise in physical assaults on staff in the past six months, compared to the same time last year.  It's also launching an in-store campaign to encourage customers to respect workers as they head into the busiest time of year.  First Union General Secretary Dennis Maga told Kate Hawkesby that those security measures could work short-term.  He says intervention is needed in the long run, particularly as the rate of unruly behaviour increases.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/20/20234 minutes, 17 seconds
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John O'Connell: Life Education Trust CEO on teenager's increasing use of online gambling

High school students are increasingly visiting online gambling sites.  An investigation by Newstalk ZB has found that sports betting and online casino games are increasingly popular with teenagers, who even access the sites during the school day.  Life Education Trust Chief Executive John O'Connell told Kate Hawkesby that phones among young people have caused a number of challenges.  He says schools should be aware that students with mobile phones have gambling in their pocket.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/20/20233 minutes, 9 seconds
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Ben Thomas: Political Commentator on the length of time it's taking to form Government

A political commentator is suggesting that we should relax a little about how long it's taking to form a government.  There's been much commentary on the fact it's been 18 days since the release of the official election results, and we still don't have a government.  Former National party staffer and now political commentator Ben Thomas told Kate Hawkesby that this time will be quickly forgotten.  He says in six months time —whether the Government is flourishing or floundering— no one is going to be remember the difference between two weeks and three weeks of negotiations.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/20/20233 minutes, 31 seconds
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Adam Pearse: Herld Political Reporter Talks Ongoing Coalition Talks

The weekend has come and gone, but coalition negotiations continue into another week. Incoming Prime Minister Chris Luxon says about three issues to settle remain between National, Act and New Zealand First. The trio's been meeting in Auckland since Wednesday, where Luxon now believes they'll stay for the next few days. Herald Political Reporter Adam Pearse told Kate Hawkesby that Luxon described his meeting with Peters yesterday, as 'helpful'. He says it was a departure from previous conversations in which he described talks as 'positive' and 'good' and cast a better light on things.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/19/20234 minutes, 11 seconds
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Vincent Macaviney: David Cameron visits Ukraine as UK Foreign Secretary (1)

Former UK Prime Minister David Cameron had his first outing as Foreign Secretary yesterday as he made his way to Ukraine to meet President Zelensky.   UK Correspondent Vincent McAviney told Tim Dower that when they saw a Range Rover coming up Downing Street on Monday and David Cameron climbed out “mouths were literally a gog.”  He added that Cameron doesn’t have the best reputation across the continent given his mishandling of the Brexit referendum and then bouncing as soon as he lost it.   “we'll see how he fares in the rest of Europe in the coming months to get that support going again.”   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/16/20233 minutes, 45 seconds
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Vincent Macaviney: David Cameron visits Ukraine as UK Foreign Secretary

Former UK Prime Minister David Cameron had his first outing as Foreign Secretary yesterday as he made his way to Ukraine to meet President Zelensky.   UK Correspondent Vincent McAviney told Tim Dower that when they saw a Range Rover coming up Downing Street on Monday and David Cameron climbed out “mouths were literally a gog.”  He added that Cameron doesn’t have the best reputation across the continent given his mishandling of the Brexit referendum and then bouncing as soon as he lost it.   “we'll see how he fares in the rest of Europe in the coming months to get that support going again.”   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/16/20233 minutes, 45 seconds
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Kelly Eckhold: Westpac Chief Economist on the Reserve Bank's decision to build up its foreign currency assets

Economists are praising the Reserve Bank's decision to build up its foreign currency assets.   It's bought and borrowed to drive its total foreign currency holdings up by a third, to a total of almost $18 billion.   Westpac Chief Economist, Kelly Eckhold, says it will give a signal the central bank is willing to step in if there's a shock to the economy.   He told Tim Dower that the move should reassure people.   Eckhold says it would be worrying if the bank didn't have the capacity.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/16/20233 minutes, 48 seconds
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Tim Dower: The talks are dragging on too long now

Last time I had the privilege of hosting this show I said I had confidence in Chris Luxon's approach to these coalition talks.  I said it seemed businesslike, and I sensed he was out to cut a good deal that'll stick.  I hope I’m not proved wrong on that.  One thing you have to say about the way it's being handled is that all three of the key figures involved have been disciplined and kept things quiet.  Political editors and reporters are coming up against a brick wall when they seek comment.  Not so much as a sneaky hint has leaked out, and to me that speaks to good faith. The horse trading and hard talking is being done between these three and their teams, not in the media.  But still, it's dragging on too long now. Christmas is coming and I for one want to see Parliament sitting again, a clear direction set, and some action.  It's not about who does what job really, I didn't vote with that uppermost in my mind.  Like more than half of the people who did vote, I wanted shot of the last awful crowd and a change of direction.  I want action on crime, education, the health system, the cost of living, on social cohesion.  Was that a hint from Winston about some dude from Rarotonga being in town, the fact he had to see that guy indicate he might lining up another stint as Foreign Minister?  I'd be OK with that if it's the only bauble Winston First gets.  The blunt truth is without Mister 6 percent, this could have been cleaned up three weeks ago.  And we'd have a start on the real stuff, the change I mentioned before.  Everyone assumes it's Mister Peters dragging the chain, and history would support that theory, but it could be Seymour, or it could be Luxon himself playing hardball.  Thing is, the people either getting ready for work at 5:30 in the morning or are on their way, or already there —the people who pay the taxes and send their kids to school because they want to play their part and get ahead— I don't think they care too much who does what job.  What we want is good government with a good plan it can see through.  Every day without a deal that produces that is a day wasted.  But it's a far smaller waste than what we had, or what we might’ve ended up with if this had been rushed. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/16/20232 minutes, 30 seconds
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Elias Kanaris: Customer Contact Network CEO on the unprecedented levels of abuse call centre workers are facing

Call centre staff are facing unprecedented levels of abuse, with industry experts warning of a future dominated by customer service bots.  Customer Contact Network CEO, Elias Kanaris, told Tim Dower that he's pleading with the public to be civil when dealing with contact centre staff.  He says customers need to remember staff are real people who are simply trying their best to resolve your issue.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/16/20235 minutes, 47 seconds
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Grant Duncan: Political Commentator on how close we are to Government being formed

Could we have a new government by Sunday?  Talks continued late into the night and are set to resume in central Auckland this morning, with Chris Luxon, David Seymour, and Winston Peters all pointing to a deal being close.  Political commentator Grant Duncan told Tim Dower that there will be final issues all three parties want to resolve.  He says it has to take as long as it takes, because it's important all three parties are on the same page about what the plan will be for the next three years.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/16/20232 minutes, 59 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Finnish study finds Early Birds get the worm

I’ve got some good news for you. Every one of you up now listening, is a go getter. Early birds are into it as we know, but not only that, research tell us they also earn more.   A recent study showed night owls earn 4 percent less than early risers ..and it’s all down to circadian rhythms apparently. Scientists discovered in a Finnish study of more than 12 thousand people, that those who are more active at night, tend to earn less than early risers. That’s  because they’re more likely to make poor lifestyle choices.. like drinking more alcohol, smoking, not exercising as much, and having an unhealthy diet.   Night owls are also more likely to have more screen time, affecting their melatonin production and ability to sleep.. therefore they sleep worse and wake later, feeling less energized. Many according to the study, also had higher BMI’s.   Scientists discovered that on average, night owls accumulate less human, social and health capital. This is because they apparently acquire less work experience, make those poorer health and lifestyle choices, and end up with sleep problems. Which, let’s face it, is one of the key components of good health… a decent night’s sleep. So that part makes sense.   Early birds, on the other hand, are the first awake, they’re more likely to have slept better and earlier, in those crucial pre midnight hours of sleep, and they’re starting fresher and more ready. They’re more work ready.   But this all comes down to chronotype according to the researchers. You may not be able to help it that you’re a night owl or an early bird, it’s just the way your body is wired. Your body may not be able to function or be active at the set time of day you might want it to.   I know people who, try as they might, just cannot get their bodies to function early in the morning, but they feel their peak activity and fitness comes in the middle of the day. Likewise there are early birds like me who literally can’t stay up past 10pm without feeling like they’re on the verge of collapse.   But being a Nana at night time serves us well if it means you can be more productive in the morning. And as this study shows, it can also make you a stronger income earner.   Not all is lost for night owls though. According to scientists, ‘evening type individuals could likely earn higher wages through better lifestyle choices.’ Which seems obvious given everything is a domino effect isn’t it? Stay up later, you get hungrier, you eat more crap, you drink more, you’re less tired, you look at screens for longer, then you’re too wired, so you sleep poorly.   They actually got some hard data on the numbers in terms of income, men who were night owls had ‘a four percent average lower income.’ Which is food for thought next time you’re staying up late binge watching Netflix with the choccky biscuits. Not all night owls are staying up late just to eat rubbish and watch TV though, some are genuinely just more productive at night because that’s when their body clock is more alert. The nub of it is what you do with that alert time.   The study concluded that ‘evening type people could earn higher wages if they made better lifestyle choices.’ So that part’s in their hands. But for us early birds it’s validation here surely, that being up at the crack of dawn, is actually not only smart, it’s lucrative. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/15/20232 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mike Jones: BNZ Chief Economist says 'internal migration showing various trends'

Some markets are feeling economic pain more than others. Infometrics latest economic monitor suggests a primary sector slowdown as annual average growth has slowed to 1.7 percent. BNZ Chief Economist Mike Jones told Kate Hawkesby internal migration numbers are showing various trends. He notes that when people move around the country, employment and construction often follow.Jones thinks cheaper house prices are attracting more people to the South Island.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/15/20234 minutes, 1 second
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Jacqui Southey: Save the Children Advocacy Director says trauma injury deaths have reached 'unacceptable rate'

New research has found children in New Zealand are dying from serious trauma injuries at twice the rate of those in the Australian state of Victoria. The study examined cases of more than 13 hundred children seriously injured between mid-2017 and mid-2022. It focused on injuries usually caused by cars, motorbikes, bicycle accidents and serious burns. Save the Children Advocacy Director Jacqui Southey told Kate Hawkesby the results are unacceptable. She say officials need to focus on raising the level of health care for children across the country.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/15/20233 minutes, 58 seconds
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Jason Walls: Political Editor Says Coalition Negotiation Talks Are Preliminary

A month on from the general election, and the leaders of National, Act and New Zealand First have met together for the first time.  Chris Luxon, David Seymour and Winston Peters caught up face-to-face at an Auckland hotel yesterday. Peters briefly returned last night, seemingly for further talks.  Seymour says they haven't yet dealt with major substantive discussions, in a potential coalition deal.   Political Editor, Jason Walls told Kate Hawkesby more meetings are pencilled in for this week.  He says the first meeting was preliminary to discuss timelines and they'll hopefully get into the meat and potatoes shortly.    LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/15/20233 minutes, 54 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on the upcoming meeting between US President Joe Biden and China's President Xi Jinping

Joe Biden will be hoping to ease geopolitical tensions in today's meeting with counterpart Xi Jinping.  The two leaders will meet at 8am NZST in San Francisco at the APEC summit, marking Xi's first visit to the US in six years.  They're expected to discuss resuming military communications, the climate, and control of a fentanyl pipeline.  US correspondent Mitch McCann told Kate Hawkesby that US-China relations have been frosty in recent times.  He says tensions have been heightened over Taiwan and the South China Sea, as well as a claimed spy balloon being shot down earlier this year.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/15/20231 minute, 56 seconds
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John Morrison: Former Black Cap and Commentator ahead of the semifinals match against India

Tonight will reveal if the Black Caps have what it takes to make it to the World Cup Final.  They’re playing India in the semifinals at 9:30pm NZDT.  Former Black Cap and Cricket Commentator, John Morrison, told Kate Hawkesby that while the team has been written off by many critics, he thinks they’re capable of an upset.  He said the team has a pretty good line up that is capable of knocking India over.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/14/20233 minutes, 25 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Public services workers are doing what they can

When you think about all the sectors and industries in this country which have gone to the dogs lately —much of the public service, (electoral commission anyone?), the media, airlines, airports (namely Auckland), Hospitals— there’s an underlying common denominator.   Within all these sectors there are still amazing people doing amazing things. I hear so often for example from people who, despite all the doom and gloom and horrible news about our Hospitals, have the best experiences with considerate, hardworking, and dedicated nurses. People who say they could not fault the care and attention they received.   Likewise for every horror story about bus drivers and public transport, you’ll hear from someone who says they’ve only ever had a positive experience. I think a lot of the baggage and toxicity from these industries is at the top, amidst the bureaucracy and the layers of BS. Whereas often at the coal face, people are doing incredible things.   I experienced this myself the other day at a medical appointment for an echo cardiogram. That’s done by a specialist cardio sonographer, trained specifically in that area given the heart is so complex. And as she scanned the four chambers of my heart looking at blood flow, she had fascinating insights into the prevalence of heart disease, especially in women, and how preventable it is. Great tips about how diet is more important than exercise: as long as you’re moving each day it doesn’t need to be aerobic and hardcore, just walking or moving, and as women get older, strength training is great too. But what you put in your mouth counts. Hearts like healthy body weights.   But she had some good insights into the state of the health sector at the moment. How much bottom of the cliff healthcare we’re dishing out, instead of having people proactively take care of their health.   It’s funny because I thought the same thing during Covid. We heard a lot about masks and hand washing but we didn’t hear about nutrition, exercise, and vitamins or taking good care of ourselves to proactively improve our own health outcomes.   But we were talking about the sad demise of primary care in this country – the lack of GP’s, the lack of interest in new Med students to be GP’s, how we’re now having to outsource most of our healthcare workforce to other countries. Which if you think about it, means we lose the nuance of the Kiwi experience and what’s unique to us. But GPs are so stretched and so time poor these days.   She was saying she has a lot of GPs as clients, and the lament how little time they have for patients these days, how in a 15-minute window you can’t get to know people or get an insight into how they really are. You have just enough time to check, diagnose, maybe write a script, and that’s it. I know from personal experience that if you try to raise more than one issue too, you’ll likely get told they don’t have time for that, or they have to charge you for a second appointment. That’s if you can get into your GP in the first place.   But it made me think about mental health in this country, and what a difference we could make at the primary care level if we had more GPs who had more time to really gauge where their patients were at, and maybe intervene earlier.   Maybe just like heart disease, we wouldn’t have the crisis we do if we just got to people sooner.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/14/20233 minutes, 4 seconds
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John Tookey: AUT Professor of Construction on Wayne Brown wanting to stop spending on seismic strengthening

Auckland’s Mayor wants the new Government to review earthquake-strengthening rules.  The region hasn’t shown signs of earthquake activity for 100,000 years, Wayne Brown said, and instead they should focus on the risk of volcanic eruption.  He’s keen to stop spending on seismic strengthening unless a building is likely to fall down.  John Tookey, Professor of Construction at AUT, told Kate Hawkesby that it’s a matter of public safety.   He said that no one thought that Christchurch was going to be a major problem until it became a major problem.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/14/20233 minutes, 57 seconds
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Peter Dunne: Former United Future Leader on the current coalition negotiations

The soon-to-be coalition partners are meeting for the first time today, but there's no end in sight to negotiations.   New Zealand First leader Winston Peters didn't show up for an anticipated meeting with National and ACT in Wellington yesterday.   ACT's David Seymour confirms he flew back to Auckland last night, reportedly also with National leader Christopher Luxon.  Former United Future Leader Peter Dunne told Kate Hawkesby that their rapid return to Auckland suggests negotiations are very much being done on Peters’ terms.  He that there's a perception growing that Christopher Luxon's earlier confidence may have been misplaced.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/14/20233 minutes, 22 seconds
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Philip Gregan: NZ Winegrowers CEO on the decrease in global wine production but the increase in domestic production

Despite a decrease in global wine production New Zealand winemakers feel optimistic.   The International Organisation of Vine and Wine says international wine production's expected to be about 7% lower this year than last.   Statistics from New Zealand Winegrowers show the total production in 2023 is about 360-million litres, down from 383-million last year, but higher than the eight years prior.   CEO Philip Gregan says that over time, wine production in Europe has declined, while in New Zealand, it's grown.   He says our markets are now global rather than just supplying wine domestically, and those markets continue to be strong.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/13/20233 minutes, 33 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Australian Correspondent on the DP World Australia cyberattack

Australian port operating systems are getting back online, after a major cyberattack halted imports and exports.   DP World Australia —which moves about 40% of items coming into Australia— stopped on Friday after the breach.   It created a backlog of 30,000 containers.  Australian Correspondent, Donna Demaio, told Kate Hawkesby that about 4000 containers started moving again yesterday.  She said that the ripple effect they were concerned about is now unlikely, but they still don’t know what happened.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/13/20232 minutes, 11 seconds
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Lynda Grant: Mercury Bay Business Association Chair on the reopening of State Highway 25A 3 months earlier than planned

Coromandel businesses are popping the champagne in anticipation of State Highway 25A reopening three months earlier than planned.  The route between Kōpū and Hikuai —badly damaged during Cyclone Gabrielle— will be in business by December 20.  The tourism-reliant area suffered a severe economic downturn following the route's closure.  Mercury Bay Business Association Chair, Lynda Grant, told Kate Hawkesby that while there was a little bit of hope, nobody really thought it would reopen before Christmas.   She said that it’s a win-win for everyone.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/13/20234 minutes, 36 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Alarming new data on vaping

So we got new data yesterday on vaping, and it's nothing short of alarming.   We here in NZ are among the biggest vapers in the developed world. The OECD found 8.2% of people aged 15 or older regularly vape in New Zealand, which puts us in second place, just behind Estonia.   I was speaking to a specialist cardio sonographer the other day, and she was telling me that she thinks we’re going to find out down the track that vaping is worse than smoking. We just don't have enough research on it yet, but the toxins you're inhaling when you're vaping... no good can come of that.   The worst part of course is all the young kids taking it up and how many of them are addicted to nicotine now and can't give it up. I was reading about some schools where kids are having withdrawals during exams and running out in breaks to vape; school kids, that addicted.   To have the highest vape rates in the world —just behind Estonia— is a travesty and it's something we should be leaping up and down about to fix. Because not only are we inheriting a population full of nicotine addicted kids, but all the knock-on negative health side effects that are going to clog our health system down the track too. The stats are woeful and the evidence coming in on vaping is shocking.   According to one Australasian health educator, vaping is too hazardous health wise, even as a means of quitting tobacco. And yet we still have large groups of our population thinking it's not that harmful. This health educator says the online government material is misleading, in her view, because it provides such a bald description of vaping - 'vaping does not have the toxins in tobacco smoking', it says, and yet vapes have to contain propylene glycol to make an aerosol, and chemicals for the smell.   So, is that implying to vapers that it’s safe? At the very least it’s underestimating the potential harm. What about warnings or plain packaging? Why is there none of that? And why aren’t they regulated better? There are concerns the public are not informed enough about a product that is engulfing our youth. The real worry is the health and social impacts already manifesting, and the costly 'tsunami' of problems in the respiratory and cardiovascular sectors, as many commentators and health researchers have already pointed out.    Those jumping up and down about it include clinical specialists, GPs, school principals, parents... they all petitioned the previous government to act. But I really think the last government dropped the ball on this and never took it seriously enough. We should be deeply worried about the pace of uptake in vaping amongst our young people, the lack of widespread research into its side effects, and the lack of detailed information on the risks.   There’s a lot this new government needs to crack on with, and I hope dealing properly with vaping is on the list. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/13/20233 minutes, 10 seconds
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Robyn Walker: Deloitte Tax Partner on tax policy being the main point of disagreement in National, ACT, and NZ first forming a coalition

Tax policy is set to remain the main point of disagreement as coalition talks continue this morning between National, ACT, and New Zealand First.  Newstalk ZB understands that New Zealand First is taking issue with some elements of National's tax plan.  That includes the proposal to redirect money from the Climate Emergency Response Fund to tax cuts, and the proposed tax on foreign home buyers.  Deloitte tax partner Robyn Walker told Kate Hawkesby that National is committed to some form of tax cuts, but the specifics of those tax cuts may have to change.  She says National is proposing quite extensive tax cuts, but they may have to scale those back and make them more targeted.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/13/20233 minutes, 21 seconds
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Andrew Alderson: Ben Campbell wins Hong Kong Open to upstage Cam Smith

World No 635 Kiwi Ben Campbell birdied the final two holes to edge major winner Cam Smith and claim the US$2 million ($1.7m) Hong Kong Open overnight. Campbell drained a 15ft birdie putt on the 18th hole to top playing partners Smith and Thailand’s Phachara Khongwatmai who earlier caused a bizarre 20-minute delay. Campbell had not led at any stage of the tournament until his last putt to finish at 19 under par and beat Smith by one and Phacahara by two. For Campbell, who also birdied the 17th, it was his maiden win on the Asian Tour with his only other win in the professional game coming at the New Zealand PGA Championship in 2018. He won US$360,000. “It’s good to finally get the monkey off the back and yeah, sort of just battling away all day,” said Campbell. “Sort of didn’t get off to the greatest of starts and swing wasn’t feeling that great. Sort of went back to a few close losses and wrote a few notes down in my yardage book last night, and really used them on those last four or five holes. “It was getting a bit tight in the swing and just from those past experiences managed to, I think, you know, put a couple of nice swings coming down the stretch which really helped.” The victory is also just reward for a player who has struggled with injuries and missed six months last year due to a back issue that required surgery. “Even probably four months ago I was sort of battling with the body. I’ve had quite a few operations, and bulged discs in the back and things like that, so had to change the swing quite a bit, especially in the last two or three years. So yeah, great to put that behind me now and the monkey’s off the back which is good.” The most recent Kiwi winner of the Hong Kong Open was Frank Nobilo in 1997, while the only other was Walter Godfrey in 1972. Smith and Phachara had started the day sharing the lead with Campbell one back. Phachara looked to be heading for the win when he birdied three in a row from 11 and led by one from Smith and two from Campbell with three to go. However, drama unfolded on the par-four 16th when he hooked his tee into the trees. He chose to try to hit his ball back into play from a treacherous lie but failed to get it out before just being able to advance his ball to the edge of the fairway with the next. Smith and Campbell appeared visibly irritated by Khongwatmai’s actions, which led to a 20-minute delay. “He can’t stand all over this, can he?” Campbell was heard saying to officials. Phachara ended up making a costly double. He also birdied the next hole before his disappointing finish on 18. “Today my putting was not so good like the last three days, but I played well since the beginning until the 16th hole,” said Phachara. “I was in a very difficult situation at that moment that I couldn’t do anything. Also, there were broken trees, which was an obstacle, so I couldn’t step backwards to drop the ball. I had to keep trying to hit it. However, I’m satisfied with my overall performance that I can make under par for today.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/12/20232 minutes, 27 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: I'm not sure Kiwis are really willing to potentially mask up for another Christmas

I thought I was in a bad dream at the weekend when I saw the headline ‘Health experts recommend people wear masks and celebrate Christmas outdoors amid another Covid-19 wave.’  So, my first thought is – what ‘experts’ said this, and what wave? And how big is the wave? And when will we stop reporting waves?   Turns out it was Australia’s New South Wales Health Ministry who were saying there’d been a ‘moderate’ rise in Covid cases, and they’d asked people to consider wearing a mask inside crowded indoor spaces.   It didn’t take much scrolling further down the story to find the name Michael Baker though. He was recommending for Kiwis, booster jabs, masks, and staying home if you were sick.   Now here’s the thing about these guys, had we not been bashed everyday nonstop for two years by them in the media telling us what to do and how to do it, we may take it more seriously.   But the hysteria drummed up over a two-year period of lockdowns and social distancing has left us all with a bit of collective PTSD.   We don’t want to hear from them anymore, we associate them with misery and bad times, it was overkill at the time, and now we are turned off whenever their heads pop up above the parapet again.   It’s the same for many people with Jacinda, it’s an instant reaction – I mean she got so toxic she had to step away from the Labour Party, she was that triggering for people.   So, I’m just not sure after all this time, and after all we’ve gone through, that we want to go into yet another Christmas with being told to mask up and keep our distance.   I mean the obvious one about if you’re sick stay home, we probably could work that out for ourselves, couldn’t we?   So how big is this new wave? Well, the key word was ‘moderate’ rise. That was for Australia, what about here? Baker says we’re in our 5th wave. I missed the last few, so I’m paying attention now for the 5th.   Apparently, our immunity is waning, hence his call for boosters. I’m not sure how many are adhering to these calls, that would be a more interesting story I reckon, what are the booster numbers? I’d hazard a guess very little.   As for the size of our wave, the last update on Covid numbers was 5 people in ICU, 212 in hospital with Covid. Remember the ‘with’ is important, they may well be in hospital with other things, and they happen to have Covid as well.   I personally know of two people recently who went to hospital with other things and picked up Covid while in there. Getting Covid in hospital makes you a statistic of someone in hospital - with Covid. So bear that in mind.   I don’t know who's in charge of marking the waves, I’m not sure how helpful it is to keep reminding us of them, or who wants to still hear about them, I mean will we still be reporting 6th, 7th, 8th, 25th waves? Or will we at some point accept that Covid is around now just like the flu and colds are around?   I’m just not sure about the merits of making people fearful about how they spend their Christmas Day and telling them they may need to spend it with a mask on.   I mean I’m prepared to be wrong, but how many people, who aren’t immune deficient or vulnerable in any way, do you reckon are spending Christmas Day with a mask on? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/12/20233 minutes, 27 seconds
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Gavin Grey: UK correspondent says southwest Iceland has seen around 20,000 earthquakes since late October

Long-dormant Icelandic volcanoes are waking up and threatening to erupt.   The country declared a state of emergency and evacuated thousands from the southwestern town of Grindavik.   There are more than 30 active volcano sites in Iceland and there's currently a 15-kilometre river of magma underneath the surface.   UK correspondent Gavin Grey told Kate Hawkesby the likely eruptions follow intense seismic activity.  “20,000 tremors have been recorded in southwest Iceland since late October.” LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/12/20232 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ian Caplin: Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment spokesperson says they want to make people more aware of authorised scams

New Zealanders lost just under $200 million to scams over the past year.   That's according to 11 of the country's largest financial institutions.   The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment has released the figure for Fraud Awareness Week.   Spokesperson Ian Caplin told Kate Hawkesby they want to make people more aware of authorised scams – where people agree to a payment.  “The scammers are getting very sophisticated and they are making things like sort of hoax sites.”  LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/12/20234 minutes, 34 seconds
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Jason Walls: Newstalk ZB Political Editor says race relation policies could be holding up National-ACT-NZ First coalition talks

Certain policies could be sticking points in holding up negotiations between National, Act and New Zealand First.   National will need both parties to make a government after they lost two seats following special votes.   Newstalk ZB Political Editor Jason Walls says it's hard to figure out how much progress was made over the weekend.   He told Kate Hawkesby while there seems to be agreement on infrastructure issues, race relations policy could be causing tension.  “Christopher Luxon – he hasn’t ruled out, say for example, the Treaty referendum, but it sounds like he very, very, very much doesn’t want that to be a thing because of how divisive he envisions that being.”  LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/12/20234 minutes, 8 seconds
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Claire Matthews: Massey Business School Associate Professor on BNZ's profits continuing to rise

BNZ’s profits are continuing to rise despite the economy slowing.  The bank’s net profit after tax rose by 6.7% in the year to September to a total of $1.5 billion.  BNZ’s net interest margin —a key measure of profitability— jumped 25 basis points to 2.4%.  Claire Matthews, Massey Business School Associate Professor, told Roman Travers that while they made a substantial profit, things did slow in the second half of the year.  She said that they hadn’t done as well in the last six months as they did in the first, reflecting the slowing economy.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/9/20234 minutes, 18 seconds
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Pat Newman: Te Tai Tokerau Principals Association President on attendance rates slipping again

Regular attendance is still at lower rates than in 2019, before Covid-19.   Education Ministry data shows just 47% of students were regularly at school in term two.   That's down from 59.5% in term one, but an increase on 40% in term two last year.   Te Tai Tokerau Principals Association President Pat Newman told Roman Travers that it's about illness.   Attending school 90% of the time is considered regular attendance.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/9/20234 minutes, 24 seconds
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Jacqueline Rowarth: Lincoln University Adjunct Professor on the Fonterra's sustainability goals possibly pushing farmers away

A warning that Fonterra's new sustainability goals could push farmers away.  The dairy giant is planning to cut 30% of emissions by 2030 via new technology, carbon removal through vegetation, and on farm practises.  Lincoln University Adjunct Professor Jacqueline Rowarth says farmers will look to other companies if they can't cope.   She says this could all come back to bite Fonterra if other countries don't do what we're doing.  Rowarth adds it's hard for farmers to do better when our farming emissions are already low.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/9/20235 minutes, 20 seconds
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Roman Travers: How NZ sits on the global financial stage

It's been 27 days since New Zealand general election.  27 days of relative peace, calm, and tranquillity, even though our GDP resembles a 737; out of gas and plummeting to earth at less than 1% growth.  Isn't it luxurious to live in a country where perhaps our biggest problem is wondering if the pre-election promises will be fulfilled to turn everything around?  Talks between the three political parties continue as we wait to see who gets what and undoubtedly the compromises that'll be made.  Forming a coalition with friends and foe can't be all beer and skittles. Given what was said prior to the election, some almost certainly will reluctantly capitulate on their promises, having their arms shoved up their backs or biting their tongues.  To get a coalition government formed and working at the mammoth job of turning around our floundering economy, will only be hindered by the demonstrable egos at the table.  When asked yesterday if there was a deadline for the coalition talks to conclude, Winston Peters told us that speed is of the essence. There's a refreshing change from someone who's been at times, the personification of a handbrake.  It's gutting to know that our gross domestic product is currently at less than 0.1%, when so many of us are doing everything we can to ensure that work gets done.  We are now working the second longest hours within the OECD nations. So much for a work life balance.  Our proud reputation of being a leader in so many measurable economic facets, is now something muttered about with a sense of shame, as people try to change the topic, looking for a positive distraction.  We're now looking at a ranking of 159th in the world according to the international monetary fund.  That's not a number anyone wants to have when trying to sell New Zealand to the world.  But what've we got left to sell? Which primary sector is still unique to New Zealand? What aspect of our primary produce have we not taught other countries to grow and manufacture as well - if not better than us?  Is the future of our economy to simply provide highly skilled labour to international markets who will always outbid those same employers in New Zealand?  In fairness to the three political parties working hard to come to consensus, it didn't help that so many people rocked up to the polling booth on election day looking to enrol and to vote. The whole process has been slowed down by a large chunk of apathy.  Here's hoping that next week we have something solid to talk about.  Here's hoping that when the clock starts ticking on that first 100 days with so many promises made, we get to see those promises put into positive action. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/9/20232 minutes, 35 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: When do we give up on public transport?

I am just wondering at what point we give up on trying to get anywhere by ferry in this country? If you’re an Aucklander, or a visitor to Auckland, you know the Waiheke Island Fullers ferry service is unreliable, often fraught with maintenance, or staffing or scheduling issues. Locals who regularly commute on and off the island by and large hate it – but they’re trapped as Fuller’s has had a monopoly and been their only means to get across the Gulf... up until now, with a new player in town. And God speed to Island Direct that they can make a go of it, get well patronized, and give Fullers a run for their money. But for years now, Fullers has been it and it's been a rubbish service. Then we have the Cook Strait ferries. I mean, where do we start? Who would take the gamble of getting on board one of those ferries and expecting that you’d actually get to your destination?  The interislander ferries are notorious, and then just yesterday, we see the reports that “a Bluebridge Cook Strait ferry had to turn back after it hit a wharf as it was leaving Wellington.”   How does a professional operation whose job is solely to get passengers from wharf to wharf, actually smack into the wharf? So that whacked the wharf and now has a dent in the hull and a hole. A tired and old fleet of ferries doesn’t help, but as reported back in April this year, under the headline, ‘Chaos on the Cook Strait’, “there’s been a decades long history of things going wrong here.  So how is our infrastructure and maintenance so dire? Why has not enough proactive investment been done? It feels like our approach in this country is wait until stuff breaks, and people are leaping up and down, until you do something about it. That’s certainly how it’s been with the roads too.   But if you look at public transport in general in this country, we’ve got buses that are unreliable, have a lack of patronage, routes being cut, delays, driver shortages.. all of that only serves to put people off. Then we’ve got violence at bus stops, vandalism, that’s before we get to the trains. They’re in the same category as the buses, often whole routes cancelled, trains not showing up, unsavoury behaviour on trains, a lack of any general kind of professional service.   Just yesterday somebody texted me about their experience on a bus where the driver was asked to concentrate on the road instead of looking in a bag taking their eyes off their driving, and the driver took umbrage and stopped the bus and started yelling at the passenger to get off. When the passenger refused to, the driver then sped up, driving recklessly trying to intimidate the passenger. They said why would anyone put their life in the hands of a lunatic like that?   Now I’m sure for every lunatic bus driver there’s a great one too, but the point is we need consistency. We need buses, trains, and ferries to work, be on time, run to schedule, not crash, for there to be consistency among drivers and for passengers to want to use public transport. Otherwise, we’re never getting out of our cars are we. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/8/20232 minutes, 46 seconds
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Sally McKay: Auckland University Nutritionist on the study finding children who drink fizzy drinks try alcohol earlier

A study's found that kids who drink fizzy drinks try alcohol earlier.   The study from Seoul National University found children aged 9 to 10 who drink caffeinated soft drinks daily were twice as likely to try alcohol within a year.   The researchers say the study can't show if the soft drinks are causing differences in behaviour and brain activity.   Auckland University nutritionist Dr Sally McKay told Kate Hawkesby that many RTDs look and taste like fizzy drinks.   She says it can be a natural change, given they're already quite familiar.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/8/20234 minutes, 17 seconds
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Geoffrey Miller: International geopolitical analyst on Israel's plans to occupy Gaza after the war ends

The United States is cautioning Israel against occupying Gaza.   It comes after Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says the country will have overall security responsibility for an indefinite period after the war ends.   International geopolitical analyst Geoffrey Miller told Kate Hawkesby that Israel doesn't want a power vacuum in Gaza or Hamas to rebuild, so their only option is occupation.   He says that will be disastrous, and a bit like when the US occupied Iraq after the Iraq war.  However, Miller concedes it'll probably be the only option.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/8/20233 minutes, 40 seconds
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Shannon Barlow: Frog Recruitment Managing Director on the survey that found unpaid overtime increased

Employees are going above and beyond, often without compensation for it.  A Hays Recruitment survey's found overtime increased in more than a third of organisations last year.  It also found overtime was unpaid in 30% of organisations.  Frog Recruitment Managing Director Shannon Barlow told Kate Hawkesby that often people do what's needed to get the job done.  She says there's also been a shift for employees wanting to protect their roles and making a personal decision to work more than they're required to.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/8/20233 minutes, 48 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Will Labour's decisions sway voters next time?

I’m not surprised Chris Hipkins is staying on as leader. I mean let’s face it, one, who else have they got? And two, when you’re a career politician, what else is it you’re going to do at this point? But it’s the best possible option for Labour I reckon. He’s adept at politics and playing the media – and those two things go hand in hand these days. He’s quick on his feet, he’s an attack dog – which is what opposition is all about. But how attack-y is the potential problem for him... as in, is he too much attack dog? I think he will have to tone it down. I think voters have had a gutsful of mudslinging and negativity and scrapping in the gutter. The Willie Jackson style of politics of flinging grenades everywhere and not caring where they land... it’s reckless and we tolerate it less and less nowadays. There seems, as the election result would indicate, to be an appetite to get some adults back in the room. And more important than snapping at the government in these next few months, is going to be getting his own party back on track. Rebuilding it won’t be easy given there are factions there now that seem obviously divided: the hard-core lefties wanting to move further left, and the retail middle of the roaders who want to remain more centrist. Although, throwing a wealth and capital gains tax back on the table so soon would indicate the lefties have gotten to him (that's a sop to them). Key question is whether it entices disgruntled Labour voters back to the fold. It seems a bit quick and flip floppy to have reversed that decision so quickly. But they’ll be having a good hard look at themselves in terms of what the bulk of their support base wants. They've got to think about how much they hand out and to who though, I mean look at the Māori caucus, look at how much they lost there, despite all the compensations made to Māori by the Labour Government. The Maorification of pretty much everything did not see the party get thanked or rewarded by Māori, who abandoned Labour in their droves. So who is the Labour party going forward? I heard one commentator say that in voting to keep everyone who lost on the party list, essentially, the people who lost them the election are still there. Many would also argue the future leader of the Labour party is not among them. So you’ve got a lot of potentially jaded talent hanging around, with the electorate jaded by them too. So how do you refresh with all the old dead wood? I think Grant Robertson will go, David Parker probably too, and that may be no bad thing. In fact a clear out is probably just what the party needs. It also needs a fresh approach to leadership. If it’s still Chippy, who says he wants to see it through to 2026, then he needs to work out who he is and how he's doing it. And it’s got to be a step up from just zinger slinging. It’s got to sound more calm and professional. I’m hoping the shouty yelly election style bickering we saw will be put to one side. So how the Labour party gathers itself together and rebuilds from here will be critical. And I think they’ll really want to make a good go of it, because if I was Labour looking at this three headed monster Luxon’s trying to put together, I’d be thinking odds are on that the Nats, ACT, NZ First trifecta may only be a one term government. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/7/20232 minutes, 58 seconds
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Cathy Wilson: Montessori NZ CEO on the early childhood teacher strike and the government funding model

Teachers from about 100 early childhood centres will strike today.   They're part of the Early Childhood Education Collective Agreement and say negotiations have reached an impasse.   NZEI says the government funding model isn't fit for purpose.   Montessori New Zealand chief executive Cathy Wilson told Kate Hawkesby that the incoming National government has said they'll initiate a funding model review.  She says the funding model is challenging, the funding is inadequate, and it's easy to get into trouble because you've done something wrong.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/7/20233 minutes, 27 seconds
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Peter Dunne: Political commentator and former United Future Leader on the discrepancies found at polling places

The Electoral Commission is looking to see whether discrepancies at three polling places are isolated or more widespread.  It's launched a check of all voting place results after our newsroom picked up errors at two polling places at Port Waikato, and one polling place in Ilam.  More than 500 votes at one polling place were wrongly assigned to the Leighton Baker Party, rather than National.  Political commentator and former United Future Leader Peter Dunne told Kate Hawkesby that it's one of several issues that will need to be addressed when the electoral process is reviewed at select committee.  He says the commission also needs to answer questions about the time it took to count the votes, and whether there were enough polling places on election day.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/7/20234 minutes, 9 seconds
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Nick Leggett: Infrastructure NZ CEO on the removal of parking and restrictions on loading zones on Karangahape Road to make way for a new bus service

Businesses being left frustrated about transport changes in Auckland's city centre is being put down to poor communication.  Auckland Transport has decided to remove all car parking on Karangahape Road and restrict the times on loading zones to allow room for a new bus service.   Businesses say they've been given very little notice.  Infrastructure New Zealand Chief Executive Nick Leggett told Kate Hawkesby that no shop owner should wake up and find their loading bays are all but gone.  He says these things always become a problem because we don't engage properly in discussions right at the start  AT has apologised to businesses for the communication around the change.   It says there will be a grace period until December 11 for vehicles caught using the bus lanes at the wrong time.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/7/20234 minutes, 59 seconds
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Grant Duncan: Political Commentator ahead of Labour's Caucus meeting in Wellington after the release of the final election results

Labour's caucus will this morning begin picking up the pieces of its election loss at a special caucus meeting in Wellington.   As well as the party's direction and the election of whips, MPs will participate in a leadership confidence vote.  Political Commentator Grant Duncan told Kate Hawkesby that while there are some great people on that team, there’s no obvious rising star to take Hipkins’ place as leader.  He said that in order for Labour to succeed, they need to think about how they’re going to restore themselves and voters’ faith in them.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/6/20233 minutes, 35 seconds
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Haydn Marriner: Backpacker Youth Adventure Tourism Association Chairman on Queenstown hostels reaching capacity ahead of summer

Ninety percent of Queenstown hostels and backpackers are at capacity ahead of summer.  It comes as a third of hostels have shut down post pandemic, and many tourism operators are expecting a surge in visitors over the next few months.  Backpacker Youth Adventure Tourism Association Chairman Haydn Marriner told Kate Hawkesby that he's putting it down to a lack of available housing in Queenstown.  He says the massive oversupply of Airbnbs is causing huge problems for the region's rental market.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/6/20233 minutes, 48 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Disruptions make a tough time for NCEA students

So, exams are now underway for NCEA for High Schoolers who‘ve had —to be frank— a pretty crappy couple of years post Covid at school.   Disruptions due to strikes, floods, weather... and that was all after they were just getting their feet back under the desks post lockdowns. So not a great few years for those trying to head to Uni in a couple of years time.   But I know that in my many cases, teachers have worked really hard to get everybody up to speed and make up for lost time. It’s tough though because the stats aren’t great when it comes to where our kids are at educationally. It’s one of the key planks of the new government’s focus —to turn those stats around— and rightly so.   The less we educate our kids and the less time they spend in school – the worse the outcomes are for them. We as a country then suffer too with low productivity, a low skills economy, young people disengaged, and a general dumbing down of society.   Actually, I wonder if that’s already happened.  But there are still far too many young people not attending school or dropping out early. What I’ve found from our experience, with kids who leave school early versus those who see High School through to the end, is that the ones who dropped out early in a rush to get out into the world regret it later down the track. There is something about finishing something you started. Even though these days to be honest many of them have already passed their grades for that year before they even sit the exams.   So you can see how it’s tempting, if you’ve already passed the year in July, then there seems no point in staying on grades-wise. But there’s something collegial and lovely about friendships at school and going through stages with your peers.   I’ll be fascinated to see what happens to Uni stats in the next couple of years, having had a big decline in on campus attendance, whether that pings back up or not. But how ready these kids coming through High School at the moment will actually be for Uni remains to be seen. Given all the disruptions, all the curriculum issues, all the poor test results and high failure rates, how will they actually fare in a tertiary environment? Are our High Schools who’ve been hit with so much chaos due to Covid, weather, strikes and so on churning out students good enough to go forward and do well?   Because if they’re not, then we as a country are inheriting a way bigger problem than just bored kids. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/6/20232 minutes, 7 seconds
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Donna Demaio: Melbourne Cup Correspondent on in the lead up to the 163rd running of the Cup

Cloudy conditions are forecast for today's 163rd running of the Melbourne Cup.  The TAB is expecting New Zealanders to put more than $12 million on the big five o'clock race.  Several horses have New Zealand connections, including Kiwi jockey James McDonald and Sydney-based Kiwi trainer Chris Waller.  Melbourne Cup correspondent Donna Demaio told Kate Hawkesby that there'll be an electric atmosphere.  She says 24 local and international horses will be racing around the track at Flemington, with $9 million in prize money.  Off the track, Christchurch's Lily Simons is set to represent New Zealand at the Fashion on the Fields competition.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/6/20232 minutes, 22 seconds
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Anna Martin: Parenting Expert on parents becoming more relaxed about device usage and screen time

New Zealand parents are becoming more relaxed about device use and safety.   A survey by NIB has found device use and screentime is still a concern for 73% of surveyed parents, but only 46% are limiting screentime.   That's down from 51% in 2021.  Parenting expert Anna Martin told Kate Hawkesby that the pandemic has had an impact.   She says research suggests that parents relaxed their attitude to online use during Covid, as it was helpful in allowing them to have some personal time.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/6/20234 minutes, 45 seconds
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Andrew Alderson: ZB Sports Reporter wraps up this weekend's sporting events

The NZ Kiwis won the Pacific Nations Cup on Saturday with an emphatic victory over Australia in Hamilton. While India continue to cement themselves as favourite for the Cricket World Cup. And the build up for the 2023 Melbourne Cup continues. ZB Sport's Andrew Alderson wrapped up the weekend's sports with Kate Hawkesby on Early Edition. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/5/20232 minutes, 36 seconds
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Nicola Willis: National Deputy Leader says coalition talks are complex

No guarantees from National on when it will have a government in place.  New Zealand First leader Winston Peters isn't answering questions about negotiations and he and Act's David Seymour aren't talking.  National doesn't know whether deals will be done in time for incoming Prime Minister Chris Luxon to attend the Apec Leaders' Summit in San Francisco on Sunday.  Deputy Leader Nicola Willis told Kate Hawkesby the coalition negotiations are a complex process.    LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/5/20233 minutes, 52 seconds
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Jason Walls: ZB Political Editor says don't expect coalition talks to end just yet

Political pundits wouldn't be surprised if coalition talks go on for some time yet.  New Zealand First leader Winston Peters isn't answering questions about negotiations and he and Act's David Seymour aren't talking.  National doesn't know whether deals will be done in time for incoming Prime Minister Chris Luxon to attend the Apec Leaders' Summit in San Francisco on Sunday.  Newstalk ZB Political Editor Jason Walls told Kate Hawkesby Luxon has said, if need be, he will can that trip.  He says it could drag out for a while or be done quickly, but Luxon has been doing some work in the lead up to the specials.    LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/5/20234 minutes, 35 seconds
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Gavin Grey: Drama at Hamburg Airport as man drives on Hamburg Airport tarmac, causing hundreds of delayed flights

Questions raised after an 18-hour long hostage situation at Germany's Hamburg Airport.   A 35-year-old man, with his four-year-old daughter, drove through airport security and onto the tarmac - before parking his car underneath an aeroplane.  The chaos, that suspended almost 290 flights involving more than 34-thousand passengers, was revealed to be over custody arrangements.   Europe Correspondent Gavin Grey told Kate Hawkesby the man eventually gave himself up, with the girl unharmed.   He says questions are being asked around how it was so easy for the man to drive through airport security.    LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/5/20231 minute, 52 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Maybe Winston's experience will be a good thing

So, we now know Winston’s in the mix in a real and tangible way. He’s needed.   We can thank special votes for that.   So, I’m trying to look for positives, and trust me, it’s not easy - but I found one.   He at least has institutional knowledge of how parliament works, what being a politician means, and how the place functions.   That’s a benefit to Luxon because that’s more than he’s got.   Being a newbie, it’s all new to Luxon.   So, you add one old dog and one newbie - and maybe there in the middle lies some kind of middle ground where they can connect.   What wisdom about how the place works can Winston pass on to Luxon? How can Luxon learn from Winston’s years and years in this environment?   No Winston’s not a shining light or a good example of a model politician by any stretch, but he’s at least got runs on the board.   He knows the place. He knows the rules. He’s seen it all before.   He knows the inner workings of government’s better than Luxon would. So that’s the potential plus.   The other positive? We are not having a second general election.   Remember that threat?   During the campaign Chris Bishop didn’t rule out having to go to the polls again, remember?   Well thank God we are not doing that.   I think our appetite for another election is zero, we could barely summon up enough enthusiasm for this one, so if not working with Winston would have meant having to have another election then I guess we should be grateful they’re going to work with Winston.   But look that’s about where the positives end for me.   I don’t see this trifecta of parties being anything short of prickly and problematic.   If it is - they’ll get tetchy, it will get messy, and eventually they will get turfed out as an unsuccessful one term government.   Given that’s not what any of them want, given how much they’ve talked about strong stable government, given how much they all want to turn around New Zealand then I’d like to think they work hard at making it work.   So far so good in terms of tight lipped.   No one’s getting sucked into a demanding media vortex hungry for 24/7 information, they’re holding their tongues.   Luxon for his part has managed to keep his caucus together, leak free, and on message, long may that continue.   Seymour has not gone too rogue yet.   Even Winston appears to be playing ball. Could we be seeing a new dawn? Could this finally be the adults taking charge and determined to act like grown-ups?   Can they stay above the fray and get this country back to some kind of order and productivity?   Time will tell but I think we have high hopes that after such a scarring six years of shambles, unproductivity and angst, that we can get some runs on the board finally.   Our expectations are high.   And re the timeframe, how much longer will we have to wait for it?   Well personally I’d rather wait and have them sort it out properly and in a robust manner that can go the distance, than have them cobble together a rushed job which potentially implodes down the track.   I mean nothing will necessarily be perfect, but I hope enough goodwill and good faith is at play, that it’s the best possible shot.    LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/5/20233 minutes, 17 seconds
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Max Whitehead: Whitehead Group Employment Relations Expert on the research finding kiwis still experience barriers when finding work

New research finds 46% of kiwi jobseekers still experience barriers when finding work.  The 2023 Randstad Employer Brand Research Survey found factors such as sexual orientation, disability, language, gender identity, and ethnicity to be a barrier when applying for and securing a job.  It found that 28% of male candidates believed these factors resulted in them missing out on the role, and 22% of women refused to work for a company whose values don’t align with their own.  Employment Relations Expert, Max Whitehead, told Tim Dower that he’s a bit suspicious of these results.  He said that employers are absolutely desperate for workers, and if someone doesn’t fit the mould but has the skills necessary, they would bend over backwards to hire them.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/2/20234 minutes, 56 seconds
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Tim Dower: These past few weeks were a demonstration

Special votes, as I'm sure you know, are usually good for the left and National has said it expects to lose one or two seats from the election night count.  If it was two, and even if the overhang goes, the maths is undeniable. It's a 120 seat Parliament, but that one-seat majority for the Nats and ACT is gone.  And we all know what that means.  I think Winston's petulant display in Wellington right after the election told us a lot about the way the new coalition is being drawn together.  My read of it, is that Mr Peters had been well and truly put in his place over the weekend.  I suspect the rules of engagement were spelled out very clearly, and he knows he's not going to be wearing the pants in any future relationship.  Not to start with, anyway.  The other thing to bear in mind, and unless you're actually doing the counting there's no way of telling, is whether the specials will favour the left as much as some people think.  There's a school of thought that says people outside the country, and in particular people who were locked out of the country during COVID, might have been less inclined to continue their support for the previous administration.  Maybe there'll be further punishment to come.  Maybe the Nats and ACT will have the numbers and the confidence to press on without New Zealand First.  What a relief that would be.  So, why have a got a good feeling about this?  Luxon. That's why.  He's used to being in charge, and maybe that's why it took him time to find his feet as a political leader, where your authority and decision-making are questioned day after day, and even the people who pretend to be your mates are carrying sharp knives around.  I believe what we've seen —and what haven't seen— in the past couple of weeks are a demonstration of how things are going to be done.  It's going to be business-like and people who want to be on board are going to have to respect who's boss.  Bring it on. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/2/20232 minutes, 5 seconds
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Lesley Yeomans: Australian Correspondent on the arrest and trial of alleged mushroom murderer Erin Patterson

The Australian woman who cooked and served a lunch that killed three will appear in court today.  Erin Patterson faces three murder charges and five attempted murder charges.   Her former in-laws Gail and Don Patterson as well as Gail's sister Heather all died from suspected toxic mushroom poisoning in July, and Gail's husband Ian was hospitalised.   Three other charges relate to incidents in 2021 and 2022, as police allege a 48-year-old man became ill after meals.   Australian correspondent Lesley Yeomans told Tim Dower that Police spent yesterday searching her home.   She says they also sent in technology detector dogs, trained to hunt down things like SIM cards, phones, and USB sticks.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/2/20233 minutes, 41 seconds
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Jason Walls: Political Editor ahead of the final vote count releasing today

The future shape of our next government all comes out today.   While the preliminary votes for the election were all counted up, the results of the around 570 thousand left over special votes will be released at two this afternoon.   It will likely decide whether National and ACT will need New Zealand First to get into power.   Political Editor Jason Walls told Tim Dower that the majority of special votes do tend to favour the left.  He says people like John Key and Chris Bishop both expect to see National lose at least one seat today.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/2/20233 minutes, 54 seconds
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Nikki Hart: Nutritionist on Countdown's plan to move confectionary out of checkout isles

A nutritionist would love to see confectionary moved away from the checkouts.  Countdown's aiming to make healthier choices easier for customers, and combat checkout 'pester power'.  The supermarket chain —soon to be Woolworths— has committed to 80% of foods at checkouts carrying a Health Star Rating of 3.5 or more.  It's also moving "kids confectionary" elsewhere.  Nutritionist Nikki Hart told Kate Hawkesby that it’s got to be better than the current trend.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/1/20234 minutes, 43 seconds
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Mitch McCann: US Correspondent on the opening of the Rafah crossing from Gaza to Egypt

The Rafah crossing from Gaza to Egypt has opened for the first time since Israel's siege began more than three weeks ago.  Palestinian officials say 335 foreign passport holders and 76 injured Gazans have been able to leave so far.  It's thought 88 injured Palestinians and around 500 foreign nationals will be allowed out in the first phase.  US Correspondent, Mitch McCann, told Kate Hawkesby that the exits are due to a deal brokered by Qatar between Israel, Hamas, and Egypt, coordinating with the US.  He said that US passport holders are not expected to be among the first nationals to be released.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/1/20232 minutes, 23 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Special votes are finally out tomorrow

So tomorrow we finally —after such a ridiculously long wait— get the final vote count. Specials will be done, duplicates checked, ballots finalized, we will know where we’re at, and more importantly, what form the new government might take. The fact we’ve had three weeks in limbo is completely ludicrous and at least the incoming PM has acknowledged that and claims he’ll do something about changing it. Which as far as I understand involves changing the law and the way the electoral commission operates, and I hope they do that. The electoral commission did not cover itself in glory: botching some people’s booth experiences by not having enough forms, closing early or opening late, not getting easy vote packs out in good enough time for early voting, and generally operating like it’s 1953. Even Luxon said that three weeks is too long, that they should be working 24/7 to count votes. He also reckons they should do a daily release of votes counted and take over local government elections so they’re up to speed a year before general elections. The main thing is he wants the vote counting sped up, so let’s hope he makes that happen. As for the new government and how that looks... he seems confident they’re on track for a swift and seamless transition with good faith and goodwill from all parties. Actually, someone —who will remain nameless— in this newsroom had a bet that a new coalition government would be announced and formed all set to go Friday arvo. That overly ambitious idea was smacked down by Luxon himself who said that there’ll be no government announced Friday arvo. Good news – they’re closer to an actual government than they were a week ago. Bad news – not so close that it’ll be wrapped up by tomorrow afternoon. Luxon said they still have issues they’re working through and things to be agreed on, but they’ve been working diligently in good faith for a strong stable government, and he says progress is being made. So how long? Luxon says no timeframe exactly – but there are good intentions not to draw it out. Maybe next week? Who knows. Even Winston though, claims it’ll be quick. Can we trust anything Winston says? Having said that, you have to hand it to them all, not a peep out of them. No one’s broken ranks, no one’s leaked, no one’s spilled the beans. Luxon has to be congratulated for consolidating everyone together in a way that seems clean and tight. Winston hasn’t been playing it out in public, Seymour has kept his cool, it all seems, so far, tickety boo. If they can keep it that way, they’ll manage to prove all the naysayers wrong. Every person who said it would implode and that it'd be a cluster and they’d all be at war with each other... so far, so good. None of that. The true test is if Luxon can keep it that way – if he can, he’ll be seen as a genius. I mean who’d want to wrangle Winston and David Seymour on a daily basis? Not me. Best case scenario, they don’t need Winston, and NZ First can just stay out of the fray altogether. Worst case, he’s in and he goes nuts wreaking havoc and making it all about himself and the whole thing implodes. That would be disastrous not just for Luxon, but also for our country. So fingers crossed tomorrow goes their way and it’s a clean two party Nats/ACT deal and they can get on with some governing. If not, get out the popcorn. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/1/20233 minutes, 4 seconds
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Henry Russell: ANZ Economist on the impact of increased mortgage interest rates

It’s being predicted that the household budgets for mortgage holders will be squeezed further in 2024.  Those on extremely low interest rates in 2019 are turning over to new rates now.  A Reserve Bank report says the average household will spend about 18% of their income on interest payments alone by mid-next year.  ANZ economist, Henry Russell, told Kate Hawkesby that it's not unexpected, and the Reserve Bank needs to see demand in the economy slow to get on top of inflation.  He says there's still many households with 2% or 3% interest rates who'll face a tough adjustment when they rollover to six or seven percent.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/1/20233 minutes, 21 seconds
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Jane Searle: Child Matters CEO on the revelations in the Ruthless-Empire case and Oranga Tamariki needing a shake up

More calls for Oranga Tamariki to be shaken up following new details about a toddler that was killed in Lower Hutt.   A homicide investigation has been launched into the death of almost two-year-old Ruthless-Empire Wall. Newstalk ZB understands his uncle contacted Oranga Tamariki wanting the child to be uplifted. It comes after it was recently revealed 57 children have died since the agency was established.  Child Matters Chief Executive Jane Searle told Kate Hawkesby that it reflects the need for change.  She says they've known for a long time Oranga Tamariki's not fit for purpose, with this being just another example.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
11/1/20234 minutes, 32 seconds
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Ian Powell: Health Commentator on how the next government should tackle problems in the health sector

A health commentator has given his thoughts on how the next Government should tackle problems in our hospitals.  Te Whatu Ora metrics show the national rate of preventable hospital admissions for 0–4-year-olds has increased by 35% in the last year.  It also shows the number of patients waiting more than four months to see a specialist has increased by 46% over the same period.   Ian Powell told Kate Hawkesby that there's one change the new Government shouldn't make, and that's restructure the whole system again.  He says it sounds as though the new government is not going to do that, which is a plus.  LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
10/31/20234 minutes, 59 seconds
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Kate Hawkesby: Rugby Union has to evolve

Well, three days on from our loss at the Rugby World Cup and we’re still not over it... clearly.  It’s still front-page news, the dissertations and opinions continue, disputes over how it was reffed, anger over the TMO and officiating of the game continue. But let’s face the hard facts: the best team won on the day.   Painful as it is, relitigating red cards versus yellow ones as we might, hating the TMO as we all do... it doesn’t change the facts. The best team won on the day.  We couldn’t get our act together in a sloppy first half, we couldn’t pull it off in the second, we didn’t win.   Sad but true.   Death threats to Wayne Barnes and all the other nonsense which has come out of the loss is futile and detracts from the reality. Which is that beyond the nitpicking over all the minutiae of that one game, a broader conversation needs to be had around what’s happening to rugby.   The Herald’s Luke Kirkness said, “Rugby union is facing a looming crisis. The game is losing its appeal with many turning to alternative sports like basketball due to perceived complexities and a lack of engagement.” And he’s dead right. A slow game, as I said after our loss, is a boring game and a switch off. Israel Dagg said it best – he didn’t mince his words about the final at half time. He said, “I’m honestly just fed up. And I know I’m gonna sound like a sore loser here, but …. we’re seeing a snore-fest out there.” And again, that was down to the slowness in general of the game now.   Kirkness pointed out that while there’s “plenty of suggestion that New Zealand has fallen out of love with rugby, one of the sticking points is... how hard it is to understand and follow the game.”   So is that it? We just need to simplify it again and just let the players play? Is it TMO changes? Changes to the card system? The points system? The rules themselves? The culture? Maybe a combination of all of those things.   Whatever it is, we do need to look at it, and seriously. You can’t lose all those eyeballs and have large numbers of people switching off, and just disregard it. That’s an arrogance that takes you nowhere. The game has to evolve and change with its audience. It is, at the end of the day, entertainment after all.   But here’s what we know is already changing: they’ve appointed a new coach —scandalously while the old one was still in the job— and there’s new coaching staff so arguably new direction already.   All the calls for heads to roll, most of those have now been rolled. Then there’s the team, many departing and going different directions so changes afoot there too. But it doesn’t change the fact that the rules are now so cumbersome, it’s a turn off. That’s the real challenge ahead of the rugby union, that’s the real worry.   I’m sure they’re hoping that a charismatic character like Razor is going to bring some zing and give the game a bit of an image makeover – you know, much beloved coach, in his long awaited and aspired-to hot seat with all this new energy and new focus. The Rugby Union will be hoping he attracts a certain amount of buzz and new eyeballs.   But that sizzle will only last so long... at the end of the day the game itself has to change and grow and evolve with the fans or it’s going to leave them all behind. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.