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Dementia Matters Profile

Dementia Matters

English, Health / Medicine, 1 season, 127 episodes, 2 days, 5 hours, 55 minutes
About
Our podcast is here to help humanize Alzheimer’s disease, by speaking with the experts in our community to keep you informed on the latest headlines, research studies, and caregiver resources.
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Living with Lewy Body: A Neurologist’s Journey Through Research and Dementia Care

What do you do if you have a family history of dementia and are experiencing symptoms, but can’t get a diagnosis? Dr. Sara Langer has dealt with just that. In the latest episode of our Voices of Research Participants series, Dr. Langer shares the obstacles she endured to receive her diagnosis of Lewy body dementia (LBD), how her background as a neurologist influenced her search for clinical care and how she turned to dementia research to find answers. She also discusses ways that the field of dementia research could improve to support those with other forms of dementia outside of Alzheimer’s disease. Guest: Sara Langer, MD, neurologist Co-host: Sarah Walter, MSc, program administrator, Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium (ACTC) and Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI) Show Notes Learn more about Sarah Walter at her bio on the Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium website. Listen to the first episode of the Voices of Research Participants series, “From Caregiver to Research Participant: How One Woman’s Experience as a Dementia Caregiver Drew Her to Alzheimer’s Research,” on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts and all podcast platforms. Learn more about Lewy body dementia by watching the 2021 Dr. Daniel I. Kaufer Lecture, “Diagnosis and Management of Dementia with Lewy Bodies,” on our YouTube page. Learn more about how to get a dementia diagnosis on our website. Connect with Us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter. Enjoy Dementia Matters? Consider making a gift to the Dementia Matters fund through the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward outreach and production.
4/11/202426 minutes, 42 seconds
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The Fundamentals of Neuropsychology: Breaking Down Cognition, Memory and More

The brain is the most complex part of the human body, controlling thought, memory, emotion, motor skills, sensory input and all the processes that regulate our bodies. How exactly does it work, and how are clinicians able to determine whether brain changes are a result of normal aging, Alzheimer’s disease, or something else? Dr. Victoria Williams joins the podcast to explain important concepts in neuropsychology, from the difference between cognition and intelligence to how memories are made, and discuss how cognitive tests work in memory clinics. Guest: Victoria Williams, PhD, neuropsychologist, UW Health, assistant professor, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Show Notes Are you a clinician interested in receiving continuing education (CE) credits for listening to this episode? Find credit designation information, disclosures and evaluation information on our website and on the UW–Madison Interprofessional Continuing Education Partnership (ICEP) website. The accreditation for this course expires 3/25/2025. After this date, you will no longer be able to access the course or claim credit. Learn more about the domains and structure of the brain through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) website. Learn more about Dr. Williams at her bio on the University of Wisconsin Department of Medicine website. Connect with Us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter. Enjoy Dementia Matters? Consider making a gift to the Dementia Matters fund through the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward outreach and production.
3/26/202441 minutes, 52 seconds
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Long Covid and Its Effect on Cognition

Since the COVID-19 pandemic was declared by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2020, there have been many concerns about how cases of COVID-19 and Long COVID or Post-COVID Conditions (PCC) affect not just a person’s physical health, but their cognition as well. In this episode, Dr. Jim Jackson talks about his path into critical illness research and his dedicated focus on unraveling the impact of Long COVID on cognition. Throughout the discussion, he talks about the parallels between Long COVID and other chronic illnesses, the effects of Long COVID across different demographics, the concurrent challenges faced by older adults and more.  Guest: James “Jim” Jackson, PsyD, director of long-term outcomes, Critical Illness, Brain Dysfunction, and Survivorship (CIBS) Center, research associate professor of medicine director of behavioral health, ICU Recovery Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center   Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Jackson’s book, Clearing the Fog: From Surviving to Thriving with Long Covid―A Practical Guide, on Goodreads. Listen to Dr. Jackson’s interview on NPR’s Fresh Air podcast, “Millions of people have long COVID brain fog — and there's a shortage of answers.” Learn more about Dr. Jackson at his bio on the Vanderbilt University website. Learn more about Long COVID or Post-COVID Conditions on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.   Connect with Us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter. Enjoy Dementia Matters? Consider making a gift to the Dementia Matters fund through the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward outreach and production.
3/12/202428 minutes, 53 seconds
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Listen Up! The Connections Between Hearing Loss, Hearing Interventions and Cognitive Decline

Hearing loss affects roughly 15.5% of Americans 20 years and older. While the majority of these individuals experience mild hearing loss, the prevalence and severity of hearing loss increases with age. What does this sensory change mean for dementia risk, and can this risk be prevented through interventions like hearing aids? Dr. Frank Lin joins the podcast to discuss the relationship between hearing loss and dementia and share findings from the Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders, or ACHIEVE, study. Guest: Frank Lin, MD, PhD, director, Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Professor of Otolaryngology, Medicine, Mental Health, and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Show Notes Read more about Dr. Lin’s study, “Hearing intervention versus health education control to reduce cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss in the USA (ACHIEVE): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial,”  in The Lancet. Learn more about the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, mentioned at 20:01, through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s websites. Read more about U.S. regulations surrounding over-the-counter hearing aids, mentioned at 34:00, in “‘A New Frontier’ for Hearing Aids,” by The New York Times. Learn more about Dr. Lin at his bio on the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health website. Learn more about the ACHIEVE study on their webpage. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter. Enjoy Dementia Matters? Consider making a gift to the Dementia Matters fund through the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward outreach and production.
2/28/202438 minutes, 52 seconds
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From Caregiver to Research Participant: How One Woman’s Experience as a Dementia Caregiver Drew Her to Alzheimer’s Research

Caring for a loved one with cognitive decline can be challenging. While it is a labor of love, burnout is all but inevitable. In this episode kicking off our Voices of Research Participants series with co-host Sarah Walter, Cynthia Sierra touches on her personal experience with caregiver burnout as both a caregiver and research study partner for her mother, who has early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. She also shares her unique perspective on Alzheimer’s disease research as someone who started as a family caregiver.   Guest: Cynthia Sierra, MS, LPC, senior project manager, UT Health San Antonio Co-host: Sarah Walter, MSc, program administrator, Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium (ACTC) and Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI)   Show Notes Learn more about Cynthia Sierra’s research at her ResearchGate profile. Learn more about Sarah Walter at her bio on the Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium website. Find resources for people with dementia and their care partners on our website.   Connect with Us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter. Enjoy Dementia Matters? Consider making a gift to the Dementia Matters fund through the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward outreach and production.
2/13/202435 minutes, 20 seconds
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Looking at Lecanemab’s Eligibility Guidelines and Prescription Process

In the past few years, new therapies shown to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease in people in the early stages of the disease have been making their way through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval process. With these treatments now available, there are a growing number of questions surrounding who is eligible to take these medications and what processes are needed to ensure they are prescribed safely and effectively. Host Dr. Nathaniel Chin examines the guidelines for geriatricians and clinicians prescribing lecanemab and breaks down the eligibility requirements necessary to receive this treatment. Show Notes Read Eisai/Biogen’s “Prescribing Information” for Leqembi online. Read “Lecanemab: Appropriate Use Recommendations” on the National Library of Medicine website. Read the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) guidelines for prescribing lecanemab, “Lecanemab-irmb (LEQEMBI) Criteria for Use August 2023,'' online. Listen to previous Dementia Matters episodes on lecanemab, including “Putting Lecanemab into Practice: A Clinician’s Perspective on the New Alzheimer’s Treatment,” “A Closer Look at the Lecanemab Clinical Trials,” and “Introducing Lecanemab, The Latest Alzheimer’s Disease Drug to Receive FDA Accelerated Approval,” on our website and all major podcast platforms. Connect with Us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter. Enjoy Dementia Matters? Consider making a gift to the Dementia Matters fund through the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward outreach and production.
1/23/202435 minutes, 57 seconds
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Do Non-Medicinal Interventions Reduce Dementia Risk? Studies are Inconclusive, Here’s Why

In 2017, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine published a report showing promising but inconclusive evidence suggesting that interventions like cognitive training, blood pressure control and increased physical activity reduce a person’s risk for dementia, but what does the research show now? Dr. Luke Stoeckel from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) joins the podcast to share where the research on lifestyle interventions is at, why studies on these interventions are difficult to complete and more. Guest: Luke Stoeckel, PhD, program director, Mechanistic and Translational Decision Science Program, Division of Behavioral and Social Research (DBSR), NIA Show Notes Learn about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on their website. Read the 2017 National Academies’ report, “Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia,” for free on their website. Learn about the National Academies’ Research Priorities for Preventing and Treating Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias and find upcoming workshops on their website. Find information on the 2021 National Academies workshop mentioned by Dr. Chin at 1:36 on the National Academies website. Learn more about Dr. Stoeckel in his bio on the National Institute on Aging website. Connect with Us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter. Enjoy Dementia Matters? Consider making a gift to the Dementia Matters fund through the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward outreach and production.
1/9/202434 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Road to Hope: Philanthropy’s Impact on Alzheimer’s Research

In this year-end episode of Dementia Matters, we explore the vital role of philanthropy in advancing Alzheimer's disease research and care. Mr. Dave Adam serves on the board of visitors for the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s (IEA) and is an avid long-distance biker. In this episode, Adam shares his journey of combining his passions for biking and Alzheimer's advocacy. With personal experiences touched by dementia, Dave discusses how he used his solo biking expeditions across Canada and Australia to raise awareness and funds to support prevention and treatment strategies, improve care and benefit researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison seeking a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Guest: Dave Adam, board of visitors, UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s (IEA)  Show Notes Do you like what you are hearing and learning? Make an impact when you make a tax-deductible gift to the Dementia Matters fund of the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s. All donations go toward staffing, outreach and production. Learn more about UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s (IEA) on its website. Read more about Mr. Adam’s travel and biking stories on his website. Learn more about Mr. Adam on the UW Initiative to End Alzheimer’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
12/26/202324 minutes, 53 seconds
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Could Green Tea Hold the Key to New Alzheimer’s Treatments?

Dr. Paul Seidler joins the podcast to discuss his recent study looking at the connection between molecules in green tea and tau proteins. He also discusses the impact those molecules have on preventing cognitive decline and how these findings could lead to new strategies for treating Alzheimer’s disease. Guest: Paul Seidler, PhD, assistant professor, University of Southern California Mann School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Show Notes Read more about Dr. Seidler’s study, “Structure-based discovery of small molecules that disaggregate Alzheimer's disease tissue derived tau fibrils in vitro,” on the National Library of Medicine website. Read the article on the research from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), “Study of green tea and other molecules uncovers new therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s,” on their website. Learn more about Dr. Seidler on the University of Southern California’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
12/13/202321 minutes, 49 seconds
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The Impact of Social Isolation on Dementia Risk in Older Adults

In May 2023, the U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Vivek Murthy, released an advisory calling attention to the public health crisis of loneliness and social isolation in the U.S. With this widespread issue affecting such a broad population, how does social isolation impact older adults? Dr. Alison Huang joins the podcast to share insights from her study on the relationship between social isolation and the risk of dementia in older adults. Using data from a nine-year National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), she discusses how factors like living alone, limited social networks and reduced activity participation contribute to increased dementia risk. Guest: Alison Huang, PhD, MPH, senior research associate, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Show Notes Learn more about the U.S. Surgeon General’s 2023 advisory, Our Epidemic of Loneliness and Isolation, on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) website. Read Dr. Huang’s study, “Social isolation and 9-year dementia risk in community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries in the United States,” on the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society website. Learn more about the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) on their website. Learn more about Dr. Alison Huang on Johns Hopkins Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health’s website. Learn more about Alzheimer's disease prevention on our website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
11/28/202324 minutes, 55 seconds
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Memories and Milestones: Celebrating Six Years of ‘Dementia Matters’

Six years following the start of Dementia Matters in October 2017, the podcast team turns the tables on our host, Dr. Nathaniel Chin. Producers Amy Lambright Murphy and Caoilfhinn Rauwerdink talk with Dr. Chin about how the podcast got started, the brain health tips he incorporates into his own life, how he envisions the field of Alzheimer’s disease research advancing in the next five years and other personal insights from the person behind the podcast. Guest: Nathaniel Chin, MD, geriatrician, medical director, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention, host, Dementia Matters Show Notes Visit our “Prevention” webpage for more on the brain health tips mentioned at 7:07. Listen to our episode, “Highlights from the 2023 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference,” referenced at 10:49, on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about the importance of a healthy diet, mentioned at 8:25, by watching, “Take Care of Your MIND: Reviewing the MIND Diet for Healthy Brain Aging,” on our YouTube channel. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
11/14/202322 minutes, 21 seconds
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Crosswords or Computers: Which is Better for Cognitive Engagement?

Cognitive engagement is vital to keeping your brain healthy since it can slow shrinkage and induce neuroplasticity.. While modern technology offers many new tools and games to keep your brain active, are they better than traditional puzzles like crosswords? Dr. Murali Doraiswamy of Duke University joins the podcast to talk about his recent study on the effects of daily crossword puzzles on the brain health of older adults in comparison to daily computerized games.  Guest: P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, FRCP, director, Neurocognitive Disorders Program, physician scientist, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, professor of medicine and psychiatry, Duke University School of Medicine, Co-Author, The Alzheimer’s Action Plan Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Doraiswamy on Duke University Department of Medicine’s website. Read Dr. Doraiwamy’s study, “Computerized Games versus Crosswords Training in Mild Cognitive Impairment,”through the New England Journal of Medicine Evidence. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
10/25/202326 minutes, 27 seconds
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RAISE(ing) Support for Caregivers: State and National Resources for Family Care Partners

Dementia caregiving is a multifaceted domain, deeply influenced by research, strategy and personal experiences. How are these elements shaping the current and future landscape of care? Dr. Beth Fields joins the podcast to discuss strategies and resources for caregivers from both national, state and personal perspectives, including the CHAT tool, the CAPABLE program and the National Strategy to Support Family Caregivers. Guest: Beth Fields, PhD, board-certified occupational therapist, assistant professor, Department of Kinesiology, affiliate faculty member, Center for Aging Research and Education and Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison Show Notes Are you a clinician interested in receiving continuing education (CE) credits for listening to this episode? Find credit designation information, disclosures and evaluation information on our website and on the UW–Madison Interprofessional Continuing Education Partnership (ICEP) website. The accreditation for this course expires 10/9/2024. After this date, you will no longer be able to access the course or claim credit. Learn more about the RAISE 2022 National Strategy to Support Family Caregivers on the Administration for Community Living’s website. Read Dr. Fields’ studies on the CHAT tool and CAPABLE program. Learn more about family caregiver support resources on Trualta’s website. Visit Wisconsin’s Family Caregiver Support Programs at wisconsincaregiver.org. Listen to our episode with Dr. Arthur Kleinman, “Exploring the Lessons Learned as a New Caregiver” mentioned at 24:48, on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Podbean, or wherever you listen. Learn more about Dr. Fields on the UW Department of Kinesiology’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
10/10/202328 minutes, 16 seconds
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Mental Health and Memory: The Connections between Chronic Mental Illness and Dementia

Like cognition, mental health is a key component of the brain — and overall — health. In what ways can mental health and chronic mental illness impact a person’s cognition and risk for dementia? Dr. Art Walaszek joins the podcast to discuss the relationships between dementia and chronic mental illnesses, including major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in older adults. Guest: Art Walaszek, MD, geriatric psychiatrist, professor, vice chair for education and faculty development, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Show Notes Are you a clinician who’s interested in receiving continuing education (CE) credit for listening to this episode? Find credit designation information, disclosures, and evaluation information on our website and on the UW-Madison Interprofessional Continuing Education Partnership (ICEP) website. The accreditation for this course expires 9/18/2024. After this date, you will no longer be able to access the course or claim credit. If you or a loved one are struggling with mental health or are experiencing a mental health crisis, please reach out to the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline by calling or texting 988. Learn more about Dr. Walaszek on the UW Department of Psychiatry’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
9/19/202340 minutes, 35 seconds
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Highlights from the 2023 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference

The 2023 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Amsterdam brought together the world's leading scientists, clinical researchers, early career investigators, caregiving researchers and more to discuss the latest findings and advancements in dementia science. Dr. Percy Griffin joins the podcast to share key highlights from the conference. He discusses the use of CRISPR technology in Alzheimer's research, the significance of defining Alzheimer's by its biology rather than its symptoms and how the field is moving toward a precision medicine approach.  Guest: Percy Griffin, PhD, director of scientific engagement, Alzheimer’s Association Show Notes Learn more about the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s Fall Community Conversation on our website, and watch the livestream on our YouTube page. AAIC is the world’s largest forum dedicated to advancing dementia research. Find more highlights from the conference, including on-demand content that is available to watch through September 20, 2023, at 11:59 p.m. CT, on the AAIC website. Find news highlights on CRISPR technology, county-level prevalence data on Alzheimer's, the ACHIEVE study and more mentioned by Dr. Griffin on the AAIC website. Listen to our AAIC 2022 highlights episode with Dr. Griffin, mentioned at 1:15, on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, YouTube, or wherever you listen. Learn more about Dr. Griffin in his bio on the Alzheimer’s Association’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
9/5/202321 minutes, 24 seconds
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A Fair Fight Against Alzheimer’s: The Need for Equity in Dementia Research and Care

How can we ensure that all communities are represented in Alzheimer’s and related dementias research and have access to the latest treatments and interventions? Dr. Carl Hill, the chief diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) officer for the Alzheimer's Association, joins the podcast to delve into the significance of representation, diversity, equity, equality and inclusion within Alzheimer's disease research. He discusses the challenges of underrepresentation in clinical trials, the importance of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and the social determinants of health that influence Alzheimer's risk. Guest: Carl V. Hill, PhD, MPH, chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer, Alzheimer's Association Show Notes Learn more about the Alzheimer’s Association’s effort in DEI from their inaugural DEI report. Learn more about race-related topics in Alzheimer’s disease from the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2022 here, including a study on the impact of racism on the brain and findings on racial disparities in health equity and resources in Black and Brown communities. Listen to Dr. Hill’s past episodes of Dementia Matters, “Scientific Importance Of Diversity In Alzheimer’s Disease Research,” and, “Battling Health Disparities In Aging Research And Care,” on our website. Learn more about Dr. Hill in his bio on the Alzheimer’s Association’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
8/23/202332 minutes, 29 seconds
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Agitation and Alzheimer’s: Strategies for Managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

Many people living with dementia experience behavioral symptoms alongside changes in their cognition. What can care partners and healthcare providers do to manage these behavioral changes? After leading the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s (ADRC) annual Dr. Daniel I. Kaufer Lecture, Dr. Helen Kales joins the podcast to discuss agitation and other behavioral symptoms of dementia, the use of medications to manage these symptoms, and different caregiving approaches for addressing these behavioral changes in people living with dementia. Guest: Helen Kales, MD, geriatric psychiatrist, Joe P. Tupin Endowed Professor of Psychiatry, Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Davis Show Notes Watch the recording of Dr. Kales’ lecture, "Agitation is not a disease: How can we better manage the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia?,” on YouTube. Learn more about the DICE approach, discussed at 21:01, on The DICE Approach website. Learn more about the annual Dr. Daniel I. Kaufer Lecture on our website. Learn more about Dr. Kales at her bio on the University of California, Davis website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
8/8/202340 minutes, 15 seconds
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Promises to Practice: Creating Sustainable Community Partnerships to Support Alzheimer’s Research

Gina Green-Harris joins the podcast to discuss the importance of collaborating with communities in Alzheimer’s research. Sharing her experience as a researcher with the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute (WAI) and the All of Us research program, she describes the key tenets of community engagement and explains ways researchers can build intentional, sustainable partnerships with communities throughout the research process This episode is part of a series featuring speakers from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s (NACC) Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting, where the overarching theme was Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in ADRC research and operations. Guest: Gina Green-Harris, MBA, director, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute Regional Milwaukee Office, co-primary investigator, co-director, University of Wisconsin–Madison’s All of Us research program Show Notes Learn more about Gina Green-Harris on the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute’s website and on the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research’s website. Learn more about the All of Us Research Program. Watch a recording of Gina Green-Harris’s talk at NACC’s Fall 2022 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. Learn more about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center at their website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/26/202345 minutes, 28 seconds
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Study Shows APOE Gene Affects Hispanic Populations’ Risk of Cognitive Decline Differently to Non-Hispanic Populations

The APOE gene is recognized as a significant genetic risk factor for cognitive decline, with different alleles, like APOE e2, being seen as protective against decline and others, like APOE e4, indicating an increased risk for cognitive decline. However, new studies are looking at whether these trends are universal across different racial and ethnic groups. Dr. Cally Xiao joins the podcast to discuss her study, which focuses on how different APOE alleles affect risk for Alzheimer’s disease within Hispanic populations compared to non-Hispanic populations. Guest: Cally Xiao, PhD, Project Specialist, Global Alzheimer’s Association Interactive Network, Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, University of Southern California Show Notes Follow Dr. Xiao on Twitter.  Learn more about GAAIN on their website or on Twitter.  Read more about the study, “Comparison of genetic and health risk factors for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white participants,” online through the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Listen to Sarah Biber’s episode, “The Future Of Sharing And Accessing Alzheimer’s Disease Data,” on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Podbean, and all major podcast platforms. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/12/202322 minutes, 27 seconds
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Putting Lecanemab into Practice: A Clinician’s Perspective on the New Alzheimer’s Treatment

On July 6, 2023, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted full approval for the Alzheimer’s disease drug Leqembi (lecanemab-irmb), the first medicine shown to delay the course of the disease. Having gone through a rigorous approval process, the medication exemplifies a critical advancement in the ongoing battle to treat Alzheimer’s disease. Having already prescribed the treatment to real-life patients, Dr. Robert Pryzbelski joins the podcast to discuss his experience prescribing and administering lecanemab, what clinicians and patients should discuss when considering these treatments, and what is needed to integrate these treatments into the healthcare system. Guest: Robert Pryzbelski, MD, MS, director, Geriatric Memory Clinics, UW Health, professor, Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Show Notes Read more about Lecanemab’s Appropriate Use Guidelines on our website. Read the FDA’s press release, “FDA Converts Novel Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment to Traditional Approval.” Listen to previous Dementia Matters episodes on lecanemab, “Introducing Lecanemab, The Latest Alzheimer’s Disease Drug to Receive FDA Accelerated Approval,” and “A Closer Look at the Lecanemab Clinical Trials,” on our website and all major podcast platforms. Listen to Dr. Pryzbelski’s previous episode of Dementia Matters, “Vitamin Deficiency And Its Impact On Brain Health,” on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Podbean, and all major podcast platforms. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/7/202333 minutes, 11 seconds
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Deciding to Donate: Barriers and Benefits of Brain Donations for Diverse Populations

Dr. Crystal Glover, health equity in aging researcher at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, joins the podcast to discuss the importance of increasing brain donations and tissue samples from older adults of underrepresented backgrounds. Dr. Glover talks about the reasons why participants may be interested in brain donations, the barriers that they may face, and the benefits of combining both qualitative and quantitative data within her research. This episode is part of a series featuring speakers from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s (NACC) Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting, where the overarching theme was Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in ADRC research and operations.  Guest: Crystal Glover, PhD, leader, Outreach, Recruitment, and Engagement Core, Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College Show Notes Follow Dr. Glover on Twitter.  Learn more about Dr. Glover on Rush University’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
6/28/202336 minutes, 30 seconds
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Lecanemab, Clinical Trials, and the Importance of Clinical Meaningfulness

On June 9, 2023, the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) advisory committee unanimously voted to approve lecanemab, moving the treatment one step closer to full FDA approval. In the lead up to the FDA’s official announcement expected in early July, Dr. Paul Aisen joins the podcast to discuss Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials. Aisen,  the founding director of the Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI) and a leading figure in Alzheimer’s disease research for over three decades, talks about the Phase 3 clinical trials for lecanemab and gantenerumab and shares highlights from the 2022 Clinical Trials on Alzheimer’s Disease (CTAD) conference. Guest: Paul Aisen, MD, professor of neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Director, Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute  Show Notes Find out more about Dr. Aisen on Keck School of Medicine’s website. Follow the Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute on Facebook andTwitter. Listen to the episode with Dr. Roderick Corriveau, “Mixed Dementia, Explained” on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Podbean, and all major podcast platforms. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
6/14/202329 minutes, 50 seconds
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Understanding the Social Determinants of Health and Disparities in Alzheimer’s Research

Dr. Lisa Barnes joins the podcast to discuss her research focusing on how social determinants of health, specifically racial differences, affect chronic diseases of aging.She explains the difference between equality, equity and justice, and the different drivers of disparities within the medical field. This episode is part of a series featuring speakers from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s (NACC) Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting, where the overarching theme was Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in ADRC research and operations.  Guest: Lisa Barnes, PhD, Alla V. and Solomon Jesmer Professor of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, neuropsychologist, Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Show Notes Learn more information about the NACC and watch the presentation recordings from the Spring 2023 ADRC Meeting on their website. Watch Dr. Barnes’ presentation at the Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting, “Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity.” Read more about the study Dr. Barnes mentions at 16:36, “Gender, Racial, and Ethnic Inequities in Receipt of Multiple National Institutes of Health Research Project Grants,” for free through JAMA Network and through the article, “Scientists with multiple NIH grants are overwhelmingly male and white,” published by Science. Read more about the study Dr. Barnes mentions at 16:40, “Systemic racial disparities in funding rates at the National Science Foundation,” for free through the National Library of Medicine.  Learn more about Dr. Barnes on Rush University’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
6/1/202329 minutes, 21 seconds
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Take Care of Your MIND: Reviewing the MIND Diet for Healthy Brain Aging

To mark National Mediterranean Diet Month, Dr. Nathaniel Chin discusses a recent National Institute on Aging-funded study that suggests the MIND and Mediterranean diets — both rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, olive oil, beans and fish — are associated with fewer signs of Alzheimer’s disease in the brains of older adults. In this special episode of Dementia Matters, Chin also revisits his interview with the creator of the MIND diet, Dr. Martha Clare Morris, shares recommendations for ten things to incorporate into your diet and five things to limit, and touches on the benefits of intermittent fasting. Show Notes This episode was uploaded as an exclusive video episode on the Wisconsin ADRC YouTube page on May 16, 2023. Watch the recording. Learn more about National Mediterranean Diet Month on our website. Read the National Institute on Aging’s press release, “MIND and Mediterranean diets linked to fewer signs of Alzheimer’s brain pathology,” published May 4, 2023. Listen to Dr. Martha Clare Morris’s episode of Dementia Matters, “MIND Diet for Healthy Brain Aging,” on our website. Listen to Dr. Remi Daviet’s episode of Dementia Matters, “Alcohol And The Brain: One Drink A Day Associated With Brain Shrinkage,” on our website. Listen to Dr. Mark Mattson’s episode of Dementia Matters, “Intermittent Fasting And Its Effects On The Brain,” on our website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
5/16/20237 minutes, 24 seconds
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The National Strategy for Diversifying Alzheimer’s Research

Dr. Sarah Biber, the program director for the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center (NACC), joins the podcast to discuss efforts to increase representation and equitable practices across the 37 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers (ADRCs). She discusses key disparities in Alzheimer’s disease research, why diversity and inclusion are imperative in research, and what is being done to address these disparities with the data collected from research participants. This episode is the first of an upcoming series featuring speakers from the Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting, where the overarching theme was Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in ADRC research and operations.    Guest: Sarah Biber, PhD, program director, National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center Show Notes Learn more information about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center and watch the presentation recordings from the Spring ADRC Meeting on their website Watch Dr. Biber’s presentation at the Fall ADRC Meeting, “Delivering on NACC’s Mission Through Modernization,” on YouTube. Watch Dr. Biber’s presentation at the Fall ADRC Meeting, “Amplifying the Scan Initiative,” on YouTube. Listen to Dr. Biber’s previous episode, “The Future Of Sharing And Accessing Alzheimer’s Disease Data,” on our website, or wherever you get your podcasts. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
5/2/202319 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Future of Neuroscience: Early-Career Researchers Named ’One to Watch’ by the Alzheimer’s Association

Recorded live from the Wisconsin ADRC’s Alzheimer’s Disease & Related Dementias Research Day, Dr. Nathaniel Chin discusses the importance of mentorship and the future of neuroscience and Alzheimer’s disease research with the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® (AAIC) Neuroscience Next 'One to Watch' award recipients and the event’s organizers. Guests: Barbara Bendlin, PhD, director, UW-Madison Neuroscience and Public Policy Program, leader, Research Education Component (REC), Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center; Claire Sexton, DPhil, senior director of scientific programs and outreach, Alzheimer’s Association; Nadia Dehghani, BS, co-chair, Neuroscience Next Scientific Program Committee; Claire André, PhD, postdoctoral fellow, Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Université de Montréal; Chinmayi Balusu, founder, CEO, Simply Neuroscience; Kacie Deters, PhD, assistant professor, University of California Los Angeles; Kao Lee Yang, MPA/PhD candidate in the Neuroscience and Public Policy Program, University of Wisconsin–Madison Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Barbara Bendlin at her bio on our website. Learn more about Dr. Claire Sexton at her bio on the Alzheimer’s Association website. Learn more about Nadia Dehghani at her bio on the Van Andel Institute website. Learn more about Dr. Claire André, Chinmayi Balusu, Dr. Kacie Deters, and Kao Lee Yang at the press release, “Up-And-Coming Neuroscientists and Mentors Honored at Alzheimer’s Association International Conference Neuroscience Next,” on the Alzheimer’s Association website. Learn more about Chinmayi Balusu’s company, Simply Neuroscience, on their website. Learn more about AAIC Neuroscience Next at the Alzheimer’s Association website. Learn more about Alzheimer’s Disease & Related Dementias Research Day on the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
4/25/202334 minutes, 20 seconds
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Studies Look at Generational Differences and Associations between Cognition, Sensory Changes and Blood Biomarkers

Dr. Natascha Merten joins the podcast to discuss her study focused on trends in cognitive function across generations. Merten also explains her research on the associations between sensory and motor functions and blood-based biomarkers for neurodegeneration and dementia. Guest: Natascha Merten, PhD, MS, director, Beaver Dam Offspring Study-Neurocognitive Aging Study, assistant professor, Departments of Population Health Sciences and Medicine, University of Wisconsin–Madison Show Notes Read Dr. Merten’s studies, “Better cognitive function in younger generations - Insights from two cohort studies of middle-aged to older adults in Wisconsin,” and “Associations of sensory and motor function with blood-based biomarkers of neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease in midlife,” through ScienceDirect. Read Dr. Merten’s abstract from the 2022 Alzheimer’s Association’s International Conference through the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia. Read about Dr. Merten’s R01 grant, “Dr. Natascha Merten Awarded NIA Funding To Study Sensory Changes Associated With Cognitive Change” on our website. Learn more about Dr. Merten in her bio on the University of Wisconsin Population Health Sciences website and on her Twitter @NataschaMerten. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
4/20/202323 minutes, 21 seconds
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Disclosing Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarker Results in Diverse Populations

Dr. Annalise Rahman-Filipiak joins the podcast to discuss her research focused on disclosing neuroimaging biomarkers across diverse populations. She addresses why some people might want to know their biomarker results, while others might not, and how careful disclosure of these results to at-risk individuals may help prepare them and their families for the future through personalized treatment, research engagement, advanced planning and emotional support. Guest: Annalise Rahman-Filipiak, PhD, assistant professor, neuropsychologist, department of psychiatry, University of Michigan Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Rahman-Filipiak on the University of Michigan’s website. Read Dr. Rahman-Filipiak’s article, “Interest in and perceived benefits and risks of Alzheimer’s disease clinical and biomarker results disclosure among diverse participants and care partners,” at the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia website. Follow Dr. Rahman-Filipiak on Twitter @RahFlipPhD. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
4/4/202321 minutes, 26 seconds
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Difficult but Beneficial Conversations about End-of-Life Care

For families and dementia care partners, palliative care can help improve the quality of life for their loved ones and themselves by addressing physical and emotional needs. However, starting conversations around end-of-life care and planning can be difficult. Dr. Elizabeth Bukowy joins the podcast to explain the difference between palliative and hospice care, share how families and care partners can start these challenging conversations, and discuss why these discussions are essential for quality of life. Guest: Elizabeth Bukowy, DO, CMD, assistant professor, Medical College of Wisconsin Division of Geriatrics; medical director, Lutheran Home and Congregational Home Show Notes Learn more about the 20th Annual Update in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias on the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute’s website. Watch the full keynotes of the event on our YouTube channel. Watch the pre-conference workshop for new dementia care professionals on our YouTube channel. Dr. Bukowy’s keynote starts at 1:46:46 in the recording. Learn more about Dr. Bukowy in her bio on Froedtert Hospital’s  website. Learn more about palliative care from our past episode, “Palliative Care And Hospice Conversations For Dementia Patients, Families And Caregivers.” Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
3/21/202327 minutes, 11 seconds
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Caregiving While Black: Dementia Care for Different Racial and Ethnic Groups

When seeking medical information and treatment, different racial and ethnic groups may require specially tailored information to relate to, understand and apply to their own experiences. In this episode, Dr. Fayron Epps joins the podcast to talk about the unique experiences of African American caregivers and her lab's work to provide education and assistance to their needs. Epps seeks to promote quality of life for families affected by dementia through research, education and service. This episode is part of a special three-part series highlighting speakers from the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute’s 20th Annual Update in Alzheimer’s Research and Related Dementias. Guest: Fayron Epps, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, assistant professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, principal investigator, Faith Village Research Lab, founder, Alter Show Notes Learn more about the 20th Annual Update in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias on the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute’s website. Watch the full keynotes of the event on our YouTube channel. Dr. Epps’ keynote starts at 1:13:37 in the recording. Learn more about Dr. Epps on Alter’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
3/8/202335 minutes, 33 seconds
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Our Evolving Understanding of Mild Cognitive Impairment

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an emerging term in the field of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, characterized as the stage between the expected decline in memory and thinking that happens with age and the more severe decline of dementia. In this episode, Dr. Ronald Petersen joins the podcast to talk about how MCI compares to dementia, its many causes, and the impact of new lifestyle and drug interventions on its progression, as well as how his career led him to study Alzheimer's disease and MCI. This episode is part of a special three-part series highlighting speakers from the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute’s 20th Annual Update in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias. Guest: Ronald C. Petersen, MD, PhD, director, Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, director, Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine Show notes Learn more about the 20th Annual Update in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias on the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute’s website. Watch the full keynotes of the event on our YouTube channel. Dr. Petersen’s keynote starts at 22:12 in the recording. Learn more about Dr. Petersen in his bio on his website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
2/21/202331 minutes, 22 seconds
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A Closer Look at the Lecanemab Clinical Trials

In a special episode of Dementia Matters, Drs. Cynthia Carlsson and Sterling Johnson join the podcast to discuss what they know from lecanemab’s clinical trials following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) accelerated approval, granted on January 6, 2023. Guests: Cynthia Carlsson, MD, MS, director, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute, and Sterling Johnson, PhD, leader, Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention (WRAP), associate director, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute Show Notes This episode was uploaded as an exclusive video episode on the Wisconsin ADRC YouTube page on February 13, 2023. Watch the video interview with Drs. Carlsson and Johnson here. In a previous episode of Dementia Matters, Dr. Chin gave a brief overview of lecanemab’s clinical trials. Listen to it on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, our website, or wherever you listen. Read more about the AHEAD study and A4 study at their respective websites. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
2/16/202336 minutes, 21 seconds
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Therapeutic Fibbing: Mastering the Art of Communicating with a Loved One with Dementia

Former Governor of Wisconsin, Martin Schreiber, returns to Dementia Matters to discuss different methods for communicating with a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, including therapeutic fibbing. Governor Schreiber has been a widely outspoken advocate for Alzheimer’s disease while caring for his late wife Elaine, who passed away from the disease in April of 2022. In this episode, he also talks about his book, My Two Elaines, where he opens up about his experience as a caregiver. Guest: Martin Schreiber, Former Governor of Wisconsin (1977-1979), Former Lt. Governor of Wisconsin (1971-1977) Show Notes Learn more about Martin Schreiber and his book, My Two Elaines, at his website, or follow him on Facebook. Listen to Governor Schreiber’s previous appearance on our website or wherever you get your podcasts.  Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
2/7/202326 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Future of the Alzheimer’s Association: Interview with Dr. Joanne Pike and Harry Johns

In October 2022, the Alzheimer's Association named Dr. Joanne Pike, the current president of the Association, as the next CEO, succeeding Harry Johns who has served as CEO since 2005. In this episode, Pike and Johns join the podcast to share their insights on how the Alzheimer's Association has grown over the past few decades and the future plans of the association, as well as the next steps in Alzheimer's treatment from both community and medication perspectives. Guests: Joanne Pike, DrPH, president and CEO, Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s Impact Movement, and Harry Johns, former CEO, Alzheimer's Association, former CEO and president, Alzheimer's Impact Movement (AIM), trustee and former chair, World Dementia Council Show Notes Learn more about CMS's updated coverage on monoclonal antibody treatment and the Alzheimer's Association’s response at their website. Learn more about Part the Cloud at their website. Learn more about the Alzheimer's Association at their website. Learn more about Dr. Pike in her bio on her website. Learn more about Mr. Johns in his bio on his website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
1/24/202332 minutes, 20 seconds
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Introducing Lecanemab, the Latest Alzheimer’s Disease Drug to Receive FDA Accelerated Approval

Host Nathaniel Chin, MD, gives an overview of the new Alzheimer’s treatment Leqembi (lecanemab), and highlights results from the second and third phases of its clinical trials. On January 6, 2023, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Leqembi (lecanemab-irmb) via the Accelerated Approval pathway for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Show Notes In the coming weeks, host Nathaniel Chin will be joined by Cynthia Carlsson, MD, MS, and Sterling Johnson, PhD, to further discuss lecanemab and the clinical trials’ results. A link to that episode will be added here following its release. Read the FDA’s news release regarding lecanemab’s accelerated approval on their website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
1/17/202320 minutes, 48 seconds
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Healthy Habits for the New Year and Modifiable Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s Disease

Host Nathaniel Chin, MD, starts the new year by discussing modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, commenting on building healthy lifestyle habits for the new year, and reflecting as Dementia Matters celebrates five years of production. Show Notes “Dementia prevention, intervention, and care: 2020 report of the Lancet Commission” is mentioned at the 4:16 mark. Read the full report on The Lancet’s website. Our past episode, “Alcohol and the Brain: One Drink a Day Associated with Brain Shrinkage,” is mentioned at the 5:05 mark. Listen on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen.  Our past episode, “Study Finds Air Pollution a Risk Factor For Alzheimer’s Disease,” is mentioned at the 5:07 mark. Listen on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen. Our past episode, “AARP Study Show Stigma Surrounding Dementia Among Healthcare Professionals And General Public,” is mentioned at the 5:28 mark. Listen on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen. As mentioned at the 7:40 mark, learn more about the books The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg and Atomic Habits by James Clear, on the authors’ respective websites. Listen to our past episode, “Impacts of Exercise on Brain Health,” mentioned at the 9:37 mark. Learn about the book, Why Sleep Matters by Matthew Walker, mentioned at the 11:14 mark. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
1/10/202314 minutes, 36 seconds
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Bioenergetics: How Mitochondria Affects Alzheimer’s Disease and Aging

It’s generally known that mitochondria are the powerhouse of cells, but did you know they can play a significant role in aging processes? Through the field of bioenergetics, scientists are looking to study how changes in mitochondria affect us as we age and their connection to Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Russell Swerdlow joins the podcast to discuss the field of bioenergetics and how mitochondria can impact Alzheimer’s disease and other aspects of aging. Guest: Russell Swerdlow, MD, director, Kansas Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, director, Heartland Center for Mitochondrial Medicine, professor of neurology, University of Kansas Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Russell Swerdlow at his bio on the University of Kansas Medical Center’s website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
12/29/202225 minutes, 50 seconds
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Looking Toward the Future: How Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarker Disclosures Impact Society

The field of biomarkers is advancing quickly, allowing preclinical Alzheimer’s disease to be identified earlier and earlier in a person’s life. As individuals learn they are at risk for Alzheimer’s years or even decades before experiencing cognitive decline, what does this mean for them and for society as a whole? Drs. Emily Largent and Claire Erickson join the podcast to discuss ten key areas, such as healthcare, insurance, and direct-to-consumer testing, that should be addressed to support those at risk for cognitive decline and broader U.S. society as biomarker testing and disclosures become more prominent. Guests: Emily Largent, PhD, RN, Emanuel and Robert Hart Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, and Claire Erickson, PhD, MPA, postdoctoral fellow, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine Show Notes Read Drs. Emily Largent and Claire Erickson’s paper, “Implications of preclinical Alzheimer's disease biomarker disclosure for US policy and society,” on PubMed Central.  Learn more about Dr. Largent at her bio on the Penn Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics website. Learn more about Dr. Erickson at her bio on the Penn Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
12/13/202237 minutes, 24 seconds
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Mixed Dementia, Explained

Though brain and cognitive changes are typically diagnosed as one form of dementia, recent studies have shown that mixed dementia is more common than previously thought. Mixed dementia, also known as Multiple-etiology dementia, is a condition where brain changes are caused by more than one neurological disease, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia (LBD), or frontotemporal dementia. Dr. Roderick Corriveau joins the podcast to discuss what is known about mixed dementia and how the field of studying neurological diseases is advancing to diagnose and treat this condition. Guest: Roderick Corriveau, PhD, program director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), NIH Lead, Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Dementias (ADRD) Summits Show Notes Read more about the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) campaign, “Mind Your Risks,” at the Mind Your Risks website. Learn more about mixed dementia on the Alzheimer’s Association website. Learn more about Dr. Corriveau at his bio on the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Learn more about NINDS on their website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
11/29/202228 minutes, 6 seconds
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The Case for Disclosing Biomarker Results to Alzheimer’s Research Participants

Though several validated biomarkers are studied and used in Alzheimer’s disease research, most research participants don’t have the opportunity to learn their biomarker results afterward, even if they have cognitive impairment. Drs. Jason Karlawish and Josh Grill join the podcast to discuss the debate over sharing biomarker results with research participants, how these powerful disclosures can be made ethically, and why it's as important for the field to study biomarker disclosures as it is to study the biomarkers themselves. Guests: Josh Grill, PhD, director, Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, associate professor, University of California, Irvine, and Jason Karlawish, MD, co-director, Penn Memory Center, professor of medicine, medical ethics and health policy, and neurology, University of Pennsylvania Show Notes Read Dr. Jason Karlawish and Dr. Josh Grill’s viewpoint piece, “Disclosing Alzheimer Disease Biomarker Results to Research Participants,” from JAMA Neurology’s June 2022 issue. Listen to our episode with Dr. Daniel Gibbs about his book (mentioned by Dr. Karlawish at 34:21) on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen. Listen to our past episode on amyloid disclosures with research participants on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen. Learn more about Dr. Josh Grill at his bio on the University of California - Irvine website. Learn more about Dr. Jason Karlawish’s work at his website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
11/15/202239 minutes, 28 seconds
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Promoting Open Science and Community Engagement with the National Institute on Aging

Dementia Matters Special Series: The National Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease Data and Research Part 6 Concluding our special series on the 2022 Spring ADRC Meeting, Dr. Cerise Elliott joins the podcast to discuss the NIA’s work within the field of Alzheimer’s disease research, how the NIA promotes open science to advance research across the ADRC program, and other key takeaways from the spring meeting. Guest: Cerise Elliott, PhD, program director for clinical interventions and diagnostics, division of neuroscience, National Institute on Aging Show Notes Watch Dr. Cerise Elliott’s session from the Spring ADRC Meeting, “Q&A with Program,” on NACC’s YouTube channel. Listen to our previous episode with Dr. Elliott, "National Priorities for Dementia and Health Disparities Research," on our website. Learn more about Dr. Elliott at her bio on the National Institute on Aging website. Learn more about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center at their website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
11/1/202210 minutes, 28 seconds
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Moving into the Digital Era of Alzheimer’s Disease Research

Dementia Matters Special Series: The National Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease Data and Research Part 5 Whether it be due to new research findings, innovative approaches and ideas, or technological advancements, Alzheimer’s disease research is constantly evolving. Now, dementia research is headed into the digital frontier. Dr. Rhoda Au joins the podcast to discuss digital biomarkers, gamifying cognitive testing, and how the field of Alzheimer’s disease research is entering its digital age. Guest: Rhoda Au, PhD, digital technology leader, Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, co-principal investigator, director of neuropsychology, Framingham Heart Study, professor, Boston University School of Medicine Show Notes Watch Dr. Rhoda Au’s presentation from NACC’s Spring ADRC Meeting on NACC’s YouTube channel. Learn more about Dr. Au at her bio on the Boston University Chobanian & Avedisian School of Medicine website. Learn more about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center at their website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
10/25/202218 minutes, 34 seconds
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National Efforts to Standardize Brain Scan Data for More Accurate Alzheimer’s Risk Predictions

Dementia Matters Special Series: The National Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease Data and Research Part 4 Brain imaging is a key tool in Alzheimer’s disease research and diagnoses, allowing scientists to see changes in the brain years, even decades, before an individual experiences symptoms of dementia. The data these images provide researchers with is incredibly useful, leading the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center to take up numerous efforts to standardize, unify and share this type of data across the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers. Dr. Beth Mormino joins the podcast to discuss the NIA’s SCAN initiative, the new “legacy” data set, and the importance of standardizing MRI and PET scan procedures to predict brain trajectories better. Guest: Beth Mormino, PhD, assistant professor, Stanford University Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Mormino’s presentation on the SCAN Legacy project by reading her presentation slides on NACC’s website. Listen to Dr. Mormino’s last episode on Dementia Matters, “The Science of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk,” on our website. Learn more about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center at their website.  Register for NACC’s Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting on their website. Registration is free and open to the public. The fall meeting, which will focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion in Alzheimer’s research, will take place on Thursday, October 20, and Friday, October 21, virtually and in person in Chicago, IL. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
10/18/202215 minutes, 22 seconds
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Protecting Participant Privacy and Making Predictions Using Alzheimer’s Data

Dementia Matters Special Series: The National Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease Data and Research Part 3 With big data comes big responsibility. Dr. Sean Mooney joins the podcast to discuss his work with NACC, the precautions NACC takes to keep participant data secure, and how this data can be used to better predict Alzheimer’s disease risk to allow for earlier interventions. Guest: Sean Mooney, PhD, associate director of technology, National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center, Chief Research Information Officer, UW Medicine, professor, University of Washington Show Notes Watch Dr. Mooney’s talk from NACC’s Spring 2022 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Meeting on NACC's YouTube page. Learn more about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center at their website.  Register for NACC’s Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting on their website. Registration is free and open to the public. The fall meeting, which will focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion in Alzheimer’s research, will take place Thursday, October 20th to Friday, October 21st both virtually and in-person in Chicago, IL. Learn more about Dr. Mooney through his bio on the UW Medicine Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
10/11/202218 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Future of Sharing and Accessing Alzheimer’s Disease Data

Dementia Matters Special Series: The National Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease Data and Research Part 2 Dr. Sarah Biber, the program director for NACC, joins the podcast to discuss building a one-stop shop for Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) data and what it means for the future of collaborative Alzheimer’s disease research. Guest: Sarah Biber, PhD, program director, National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Biber’s talk at NACC’s Spring 2022 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Meeting by reading her presentation slides on NACC’s website. Learn more about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center at their website. Register for NACC’s Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting on their website. Registration is free and open to the public. The fall meeting, which will focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion in Alzheimer’s research, will take place Thursday, October 20th to Friday, October 21st both virtually and in-person in Chicago, IL. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
10/4/202214 minutes, 44 seconds
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Introducing the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center

Dementia Matters Special Series: The National Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease Data and Research Part 1: Kicking off our six-episode series on the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center and their Spring 2022 ADRC meeting, Dr. Walter Kukull joins the podcast. He explains what NACC is, what they do with the data they collect from the 42+ Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers, the center’s biannual ADRC meetings and what he’s most excited about for the next five years of Alzheimer’s disease research. Guest: Walter Kukull, PhD, director, National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center, professor, University of Washington department of epidemiology Show Notes Learn more about the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center at their website.  View slides and video recordings of NACC’s Spring 2022 ADRC Meeting on the NACC website. Register for NACC’s Fall 2022 ADRC Meeting on their website. Registration is free and open to the public. The fall meeting, which will focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion in Alzheimer’s research, will take place Thursday, October 20, and Friday, October 21, both virtually and in person in Chicago, IL. Learn more about Dr. Kukull in his bio on the University of Washington’s Memory and Brain Wellness Center website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
9/27/202222 minutes, 16 seconds
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Study Shows APOE e4 Not Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease in American Indian Populations

Researchers typically recognize the APOE e4 gene as a significant genetic risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. However, a new study has found that the allele is not linked to neurodegeneration for all races and ethnic groups, specifically for American Indian populations. Dr. Astrid Suchy-Dicey joins the podcast to discuss her study, the importance of representation in Alzheimer’s disease research, hypotheses for why this allele isn’t a risk factor for all populations and what it means for research going forward. Guest: Astrid Suchy-Dicey, PhD, epidemiologist, assistant research professor, Washington State University, Institute for Research and Education to Advance Community Health (IREACH) Show Notes Read the research highlights of Dr. Suchy-Dicey’s study on the National Institute of Aging website. Read Dr. Suchy-Dicey’s study, “APOE genotype, hippocampus, and cognitive markers of Alzheimer's disease in American Indians: Data from the Strong Heart Study,” through the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia’s website. Learn more about the Strong Heart Study on their website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
9/13/202226 minutes, 31 seconds
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Improving Registries and Representation in Alzheimer’s Disease Research

Research participants are recruited through a variety of practices. One of the most popular tools are registries, but how can registries affect diversity and representation within research? Josh Grill joins the podcast to discuss his work studying research registries, their effects on representation for disadvantaged communities, and how research recruitment and outreach can be improved going forward. Guest: Josh Grill, PhD, director, Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, associate professor, University of California, Irvine Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Grill at his bio on the University of California - Irvine website. Read Dr. Grill’s study, “Diversifying recruitment registries: Considering neighborhood health metrics,” through the National Library of Medicine website. Learn more about University of California - Irvine's Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders (UCI-MIND) on their website. Listen to our episode with Dr. Amy Kind about the link between neighborhood disadvantage and health outcomes on our website or wherever you listen. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
8/26/202234 minutes, 8 seconds
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Highlights from the 2022 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference

AAIC Special Series Part 8: Closing out our special series spotlighting the 2022 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, Dr. Percy Griffin joins the podcast to discuss highlights from this year’s event. Guest: Percy Griffin, PhD, director, scientific engagement, Alzheimer’s Association Show Notes Find more highlights from the conference, including on-demand content that is available to watch through September 1, 2022 at 11:59p.m. PT , at the AAIC website. Learn more about Dr. Percy Griffin at his bio on the Alzheimer’s Association website. Listen to our AAIC special series episode with Dr. Carl Hill, mentioned by Dr. Chin at 3:41, on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, YouTube, or wherever you listen. Listen to our AAIC special series episode with Dr. Heather Snyder, mentioned by Dr. Chin at 18:22, on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, YouTube, or wherever you listen Find the news highlights on diet, racism, preeclampsia, COVID-19, and more mentioned by Dr. Chin at the AAIC website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
8/10/202227 minutes, 42 seconds
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COVID-19 and Its Effects on the Brain

AAIC Special Series Part 7: Recent studies have shown that 1 in 5 U.S. adults who were diagnosed with COVID-19 now deal with Long COVID, a condition where individuals report fatigue, cognitive issues, difficulty breathing, and other symptoms lasting at least three months after infection. With these reported effects on cognition and brain health, what else do we know about COVID’s impact on the brain? Dr. Heather Snyder joins us to talk about what we know about COVID-19’s effects on the brain and her upcoming scientific session at AAIC 2022. Guest: Heather Snyder, PhD, vice president, medical & scientific relations, Alzheimer’s Association Show Notes AAIC is the world’s largest forum for the dementia research community. Register for the plenary events, which are free to the public with registration, at the AAIC website. Read more about Dr. Snyder at her bio on the Alzheimer’s Association website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/28/202217 minutes, 53 seconds
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Apathy and Alzheimer’s Disease: Plenary Preview with Dr. Krista Lanctôt

AAIC Special Series Part 6: Dr. Krista Lanctôt joins the podcast to discuss apathy, how it develops in people with Alzheimer’s disease, and her upcoming AAIC 2022 plenary talk. Guest: Krista Lanctôt, PhD, senior scientist, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, full professor, University of Toronto Show Notes AAIC is the world’s largest forum for the dementia research community. Register for the plenary events, which are free to the public with registration, at the AAIC website. Learn more about Dr. Lanctot at her bio on the University of Toronto website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/26/202210 minutes, 11 seconds
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Scientific Importance of Diversity in Alzheimer’s Disease Research

AAIC Special Series Part 5: Bringing together scientists, clinicians, and research participants from all over the world, AAIC 2022 showcases the work and experiences of people from unique backgrounds and perspectives and highlights the importance of diversity in Alzheimer’s disease research. Dr. Carl Hill joins the podcast to discuss why diversity is important in scientific research and how AAIC 2022 supports efforts to make Alzheimer’s disease research more equitable and inclusive. Guest: Carl Hill, PhD, MPH, chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer, Alzheimer’s Association Show Notes AAIC is the world’s largest forum for the dementia research community. Register for the plenary events, which are free to the public with registration, at the AAIC website. Listen to our past episode of Dementia Matters with Dr. Carl Hill on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, YouTube, or wherever you get your podcasts.  Learn more about Dr. Carl Hill on the Alzheimer’s Association website. Learn more about Henrietta Lacks’ story (mentioned by Dr. Hill at 8:53) by checking out the Mind Readers Book Club discussion about the book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, on our YouTube page. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/19/202215 minutes, 54 seconds
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Delirium and Dementia: Plenary Preview with Dr. Sharon Inouye

AAIC Special Series Part 4: Research into delirium, a condition where older adults experience acute confusional states during hospitalizations, and its connections to dementia have led to  numerous advancements in hospital care and treatments. Dr. Sharon Inouye joins the podcast to discuss how our understanding of delirium has changed over the past 30 years and previews her upcoming AAIC plenary talk about the intersection of delirium and dementia. Guest: Sharon Inouye, PhD, director, Aging Brain Center, Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, professor, Harvard Medical School Show Notes AAIC is the world’s largest forum for the dementia research community. Register for the plenary events, which are free to the public with registration, at the AAIC website. Learn more about Dr. Inouye at her bio on the Marcus Institute for Aging Research website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/14/202223 minutes, 52 seconds
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Non-Pharmacological Care for People with MCI and Dementia: Plenary Preview with Dr. Linda Lam

AAIC Special Series Part 3: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an early stage of memory loss and cognitive impairment that can develop into dementia. While physicians have medications they can prescribe to manage the condition, many researchers and doctors are focusing on lifestyle interventions that could support a person’s cognition and address behavioral changes. Dr. Linda Lam joins the podcast to discuss her work studying mild cognitive impairment and preview her upcoming AAIC plenary talk on non-pharmacological treatments for MCI and dementia. Guest: Linda Lam, MBChB, MD, professor, Chinese University of Hong Kong Show Notes AAIC is the world’s largest forum for the dementia research community. Register for the plenary events, which are free to the public with registration, at the AAIC website. Learn more about Dr. Linda Lam on the Chinese University of Hong Kong website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/12/202217 minutes, 57 seconds
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Opening Doors to Research Participants: Making Scientific Conferences Accessible to the Public

AAIC Special Series Part 2: Attending scientific conferences is usually a major commitment, often requiring attendees to travel, pay attendance fees, and take time out during the day to learn about groundbreaking research. Recent conferences like the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) are opening their doors virtually to make the events more accessible to research participants, care partners, and the general public. Sarah Walter joins the podcast as part of our special series previewing AAIC 2022 to discuss her article on how virtual scientific conferences impact research participant engagement and why it’s important for participants to hear about the research they’re involved in. Guest: Sarah Walter, MSc, program administrator, Alzheimer's Clinical Trials Consortium, Alzheimer's Therapeutic Research Institute, University of Southern California Show Notes AAIC is the world’s largest forum for the dementia research community. Register for the plenary events, which are free to the public with registration, at the AAIC website. Read Walter’s article, “Can Virtual Scientific Conferences Facilitate Two-Way Learning between Dementia Researchers and Participants?” through the National Library of Medicine. Learn more about Sarah Walter on the Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium website. Connect with us   Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters: [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/7/202218 minutes, 47 seconds
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The World’s Largest Forum for Alzheimer’s Research: Introducing the AAIC 2022 Special Series

AAIC Special Series Part 1: To kick off our month-long special series previewing the 2022 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, or AAIC, we’ve invited  Claire Sexton, senior director of the Alzheimer’s Association’s scientific programs, to join us to discuss the goals of AAIC, how the pandemic impacted the influential conference, and what she’s looking forward to at this year’s event. Guest: Claire Sexton, DPhil, senior director of scientific programs and outreach, Alzheimer’s Association Show Notes The AAIC is the world’s largest forum for the dementia research community. Register for the plenary events, which are free to the public with registration, at the AAIC website. Learn more about Dr. Claire Sexton on the Alzheimer’s Association website. Connect with us Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters at [email protected] Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
7/5/202216 minutes, 16 seconds
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Study Shows Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders Can Lead to Worse Care, Increase Death Rates

A do-not-resuscitate, or DNR, order is used to indicate when a patient chooses to forgo resuscitation, however recent analysis shows that multiple studies have connected the presence of DNR orders to elevated death rates, poorer medical care, and negative health outcomes. Dr. Jonathan Baktari joins the podcast to discuss the findings from this analysis, how it can impact individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, and how these concerns can be addressed. Guest: Jonathan Baktari, MD, CEO, chief medical officer, e7 Health Show Notes Read about Dr. Baktari’s analysis, “DNR Orders Can Lead to Worse Care & Increase Death Rates,” on the e7 Health website. Learn more about Dr. Baktari at his bio on his website. Connect with us: Find transcripts and more at our website. Email Dementia Matters. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s e-newsletter.
6/28/202227 minutes, 16 seconds
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‘Finding the Right Words’: Author Interview with Cindy Weinstein and Bruce Miller

American literature professor and author Cindy Weinstein and behavioral neurologist Bruce Miller join the podcast to discuss their latest book, "Finding the Right Words: A Story of Literature, Grief, and the Brain", a dual-memoir that alternates between Weinstein’s memories of her father who experienced early-onset Alzheimer’s disease and Miller’s scientific responses. They discuss their writing process, developments in Alzheimer's disease research, and their experiences as care partners and care providers to those experiencing dementia. Guests: Cindy Weinstein, PhD, Eli and Edythe Broad Professor of English, California Institute of Technology and Bruce Miller, MD, director, University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center Episode Topics 5:36 What brought the two of you together to write Finding the Right Words? 7:40 Cindy, how long have you thought about writing this book about your father, and how long did it take you to write this book? 14:36 What did you want the reader to take away from this construction and this layout of your novel? 18:52 How does early onset Alzheimer's disease progress differently than the more common late-onset Alzheimer's disease? 28:05 Bruce, you write a response in the book from a neurological scientific perspective on love later in the disease. Can you summarize your perspective on that? Show Notes Learn more about Mind Readers, the book club by the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, and their special events by signing up for their e-newsletter. Register for the virtual discussion with authors Professor Cindy Weinstein and Dr. Bruce Miller on July 13 at 6pm CST. Read more about Professor Weinstein and Dr. Miller’s book, Finding the Right Words: A Story of Literature, Grief, and the Brain. Learn more about Professor Cindy Weinstein, Dr. Bruce Miller, and their journey to writing Finding the Right Words at their website.
6/14/202233 minutes, 39 seconds
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Alcohol and the Brain: One Drink a Day Associated with Brain Shrinkage

There are many conflicting studies on how alcohol consumption can impact a person’s health, with some studies suggesting light drinking can protect against coronary heart disease and others concluding that drinking can increase your risk for cancer. What does research say about alcohol and the brain? Dr. Remi Daviet joins the podcast to discuss his latest study that found that just one alcoholic drink a day was associated with brain shrinkage, and drinking more could increase that rate exponentially over time. Guest: Remi Daviet, PhD, assistant professor, Wisconsin School of Business Episode Topics 3:40 How do you suggest people balance all of the conflicting messages surrounding research on alcohol consumption? 7:30 Is there an interaction between alcohol consumption and getting older? 8:10 What did your results show in this study? 13:45 How are you defining alcohol consumption? What is a unit of alcohol defined as for beer, wine, and hard alcohol? Show Notes Read Dr. Daviet’s study, Associations between alcohol consumption and gray and white matter volumes in the UK Biobank, through the online journal Nature. Read more about Dr. Daviet on his website and through his bio on the Wisconsin School of Business website.
6/2/202220 minutes, 25 seconds
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Women’s Health Month: Women and Alzheimer’s Disease

In honor of Women’s Health Month, Dr. Jessica Caldwell joins the podcast to discuss sex differences in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. She explains some of the ways women experience aging and Alzheimer’s disease differently than men and how she incorporates research findings into patient care.  Guest: Jessica Caldwell, PhD, director, Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement Prevention Center, Cleveland Clinic in Las Vegas, assistant professor, Case Western Reserve University Episode Topics 2:59 What are the sex differences in experiencing normal aging and in experiencing Alzheimer’s disease? 7:33 Why are women more affected by Alzheimer’s disease than men? 10:03 Are there other theories that have been speculated but aren’t true regarding the differences between men and women aging? 23:18 What type of prevention approaches do you discuss in your clinic? Show Notes The Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement Prevention Center at Cleveland Clinic in Las Vegas is the world’s first Alzheimer’s prevention center exclusively for women. Learn more at their website. Read the referenced studies by Dr. Caldwell on differences in brain health across sexes through the National Library of Medicine’s website, specifically the 2021 study on tau protein differences, the 2018 study on amyloid level differences, and the 2022 study on cortical thickness differences.  The Alzheimer’s Association has a women’s and Alzheimer’s webpage to learn more. The US Department of Health & Human Services Office on Women’s Health sponsors National Women’s Health Week.
5/25/202227 minutes, 17 seconds
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Disaggregating Racial Data: How Studying Ethnic Subgroups Can Improve Research

A graduate student from the University of Wisconsin–Madison is pushing for the disaggregation of data in research to better understand how individuals from different ethnic subgroups are represented as research participants and as researchers. Kao Lee Yang began writing and discussing the topic after the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Gilliam Fellowship for Advanced Study rejected her application for not meeting their racial and ethnic underrepresentation criteria, despite often being the only Hmong American scientist in many research spaces. Yang joins the podcast to discuss her opinion piece for STAT News, the problems with using aggregated data, and how the push to study individual ethnic groups could improve Alzheimer’s disease research. Guest: Kao Lee Yang, MPA/PhD candidate in the Neuroscience and Public Policy Program and Bendlin Laboratory, University of Wisconsin–Madison Episode Topics 6:12 Why is combining all Asian people into one category detrimental? What is improved when this population is broken down by specific heritages and ethnicities? 8:40 How did people respond to your initial article in STAT News? 9:30 Why do you think it’s important to look at the individual ethnic groups within research? 11:17 How does the problem of aggregating data on Asian Americans impact the field of Alzheimer’s disease research? Show Notes Read Yang’s opinion piece, “I’m almost always the only Hmong American scientist in the room. Yet I was told I come from a group overrepresented in STEM,” on STAT News’ website. Read Yang’s correspondence, “Disaggregate data on Asian Americans — for science and scientists,” on Nature’s website. To learn about more Hmong researchers and scientists like Kao Lee Yang, follow the Twitter account she recently launched, @HmongInBioSci. Read about Alzheimer’s disease research in the Bendlin Lab.
4/27/202216 minutes, 45 seconds
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Incorporating Cultural Knowledge: Improving Alzheimer’s Disease Research for Veterans and Native Americans

Dr. Cynthia Carlsson and Daniel A. King join the podcast to discuss some of the unique ways that Alzheimer’s disease affects Veterans and Native Americans. Their work at the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center allows them to connect with people who are at higher risk for Alzheimer’s disease and help educate them on how to maintain brain health, both through Dr. Carlsson’s research and clinical practice and Mr. King’s outreach to Veterans and Native Americans. Discussing the importance of current outreach and educational efforts as well as what they’ve learned from engaging with Veterans and Native Americans, Dr. Carlsson and Mr. King describes how understanding different cultures and community experiences can help Alzheimer’s disease research better support underserved populations. Guests: Cynthia Carlsson, MD, MS, professor of medicine and Alzheimer’s disease researcher, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, geriatrician, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, and Daniel A. King, member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, Veteran recruitment coordinator, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Episode Topics 1:47 Why do Veterans have a higher risk for Alzheimer’s disease? 2:52 What does this new program at the ADRC, focused on Veterans, look like, and why have it here? 5:19 How do your caregiving experiences influence the conversations you have educating others about Alzheimer’s disease? 20:25 What needs to change within research to do a better job serving veterans, Native Americans, and other underserved populations? Show Notes Read more about Dr. Cynthia Carlsson in her bio.  Read about Veterans and Alzheimer’s disease on our website. Read about Native Americans and Alzheimer’s disease on the Alzheimer’s Association website or the U.S. Centers for Disease Control website.
4/12/202224 minutes, 11 seconds
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Update on Blood Tests for Alzheimer’s Disease

Research in the field of fluid biomarkers is leading to new developments in Alzheimer’s disease identification, including new tests that can predict Alzheimer’s based on biomarkers in blood. Ahead of his keynote address as part of Alzheimer's Disease & Related Dementias Research Day on April 5, 2022, Dr. Thomas Karikari joins the podcast to discuss his work with these new blood tests, how accurate they are, and what research needs to be done before they are made available for clinical use. Guest: Thomas Karikari, PhD, assistant professor, University of Gothenburg, University of Pittsburgh Episode Topics 3:12 How close do you think we are to using these Alzheimer’s tests in doctor’s offices? 8:28 How accurate are the current available tests, such as spinal taps and these new blood tests, at identifying Alzheimer’s disease? 17:40 How early can these tests identify Alzheimer’s disease proteins before an individual shows symptoms? 21:41 How accurate can the risk calculators used with the blood tests be? Show Notes Learn about Dr. Thomas Karikari in his bio on the BrightFocus Foundation’s website. Register for the annual Alzheimer's Disease & Related Dementias Research Day at the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s website. The April 5 event is designed to encourage collaboration and promote scientific thought among faculty, students and researchers from a wide range of disciplines across the UW–Madison campus.
3/22/202232 minutes, 50 seconds
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Harnessing the Power of Autophagy to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

The Puglielli lab at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health has found a way to manipulate autophagy — a process where cells clean out damaged materials — to rid the brain of toxic proteins like amyloid and tau. Researchers hope to use the power of this process to develop future treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other diseases of aging. Luigi Puglielli joins the podcast to discuss his team’s research over the past 15 years, why the scientific process can take years to turn ideas into possible treatments, and how he hopes this research can be used in the future. Guest: Luigi Puglielli, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics 7:47 Tell us about how you manipulated this process of autophagy. Why is this discovery so important? 15:14 What role does acetyl-CoA play in the brain? 19:58 What does the future look like for this research? Show Notes Learn more about Luigi Puglielli, MD, PhD, and his work in his bio and on the Puglielli Lab website. Read Dr. Puglielli’s recent paper “ATase inhibition rescues age-associated proteotoxicity of the secretory pathway,” published online on February 25, 2022 in “Communications Biology.”
3/11/202224 minutes, 43 seconds
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Go with the (4D) Flow: Neuroimaging Technology Used to Study Overlap of Cerebrovascular Disease and Alzheimer’s

A recent study from Alzheimer’s disease researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison used neuroimaging technology called 4D Flow MRI to study the relationship between blood vessel disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Published in December 2021, the study found that people with Alzheimer’s disease symptoms had stiffer blood vessels in their brains, which could lead to inflammation and a buildup of Alzheimer’s biomarkers like amyloid and tau proteins. Lead researcher Leonardo Rivera-Rivera joins the podcast to discuss his findings, the developments made with new 4D Flow MRI scans, and how these developments could impact future Alzheimer’s disease research and clinical practices. Guest: Leonardo Rivera-Rivera, PhD, neuroimaging scientist, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Episode Topics 8:55 How does the 4D Flow MRI technology used in your study compare to MRIs used in clinics? 13:18 What did you look at in your study? What were your findings? 17:54 Did you see more pronounced findings in particular individuals with APOE4 or other chronic conditions like diabetes? 20:37 Why is this an important finding for Alzheimer’s disease research? Do you think 4D flow MRIs could be incorporated into clinical settings? Show Notes Read Leonardo Rivera-Rivera’s publication “Cerebrovascular stiffness and flow dynamics in the presence of amyloid and tau biomarkers,” published in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring.  Learn more about Leonardo Rivera-Rivera’s research at the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center website.
2/22/202228 minutes, 25 seconds
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Breaking Down Medicare’s Proposed Decision on Aducanumab and Monoclonal Antibody Treatments

On January 11, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced its much-anticipated coverage proposal for monoclonal antibody treatments that target amyloid for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. According to the proposed policy, this class of drugs, which includes aducanumab, also known by the brand name Aduhelm, would be covered for people with Medicare only if they are enrolled in qualifying clinical trials. Dr. Jason Karlawish joins the podcast to discuss the recent proposal, share his reaction to the decision, and tell us how this coverage policy could impact the development of other Alzheimer’s disease treatments in the future. Guest: Jason Karlawish, MD, co-director, Penn Memory Center, professor of medicine, medical ethics and health policy, and neurology, University of Pennsylvania Episode Topics 1:48 What’s the difference between the FDA and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services? 3:58 What is the purpose of sharing a proposal and allowing public comment after? Is it possible the proposal could change? 9:09 What are your key takeaways from the CMS proposal? 11:58 Who’s being charged the cost of the treatment if it is part of a clinical trial? 18:33 What does this decision, with its focus on research often occurring in major urban medical centers, mean for equity and access? 26:27 What is the future of Alzheimer’s disease research after the CMS decision? Show Notes Read the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s press release about the proposed coverage policy, view submitted public comments about the decision, and submit your own comment. Learn more about Dr. Jason Karlawish’s work and writing at his website. Listen to our four-part episode series with Dr. Jason Karlawish about his book, The Problem of Alzheimer’s, on our website (episode 1, episode 2, episode 3, episode 4).
1/29/202229 minutes, 40 seconds
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Nasal Vaccine for Alzheimer’s Disease Enters Clinical Trial

In November 2021, Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston launched the first human trial of a nasal vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease. Nearly 20 years of research went into developing the vaccine, which uses the immune system to clear Alzheimer’s disease-related proteins from the brain. Lead researcher Dr. Howard Weiner joins the podcast to discuss the science behind the vaccine and how it could introduce new ways of treating other neurodegenerative diseases in the future. Guest: Howard Weiner, MD, professor of neurology, Harvard Medical School, co-director, Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Episode Topics How does the vaccine work? Why would a vaccine be a potentially better approach to treatment than a monoclonal antibody? Do you think a vaccine could ever be used for prevention reasons instead of treatment? Why a nasal vaccine versus into the muscle, like the COVID vaccine or flu vaccine? Show Notes Learn more about Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s nasal vaccine trial at their press release. For those interested in participating in the study, you can call the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital at 617-723-5588 or email [email protected]. Watch Dr. Weiner’s film, What is Life?, The Movie, on YouTube. Learn more about Dr. Weiner’s film, Abe and Phil’s Last Poker Game, on IMDb.
1/20/202224 minutes, 51 seconds
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‘American Dementia’: Author Interview with Dr. Daniel George and Dr. Peter Whitehouse

Medical anthropologist and professor of humanities and public health sciences Daniel George, PhD, and professor of neurology and medicine Peter Whitehouse, MD, PhD, join the podcast to discuss their recent book, American Dementia: Brain Health in an Unhealthy Society. In it, they argue that 20th century policies focused on reducing inequality, increasing access to education and healthcare, and protecting the environment contributed to today’s declining dementia rates, but inequalities in the 21st century are reversing these trends. Discussing the pros and cons of current social and clinical approaches to Alzheimer’s disease, our guests challenge assumptions about dementia caregiving and show how we can work together to create a healthier society. Guests: Daniel George, PhD, medical anthropologist, associate professor of humanities and public health sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, and Peter Whitehouse, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, Case Western University, professor of medicine, University of Toronto Episode Topics 3:04 Why use the title American Dementia? What does that mean for you? 8:54 What do you think is wrong with our current societal, cultural and clinical approaches to Alzheimer’s disease? 16:10 What are the inequalities we’re facing in the 21st century compared to the 20th century? How are they affecting brain health? 19:04 How does climate change affect our cognition and brain health? 25:33 What would you want your reader to do next after finishing the book? Show Notes Read about American Dementia: Brain Health in an Unhealthy Society on Goodreads. Listen to our episode about creative care with TimeSlips founder Anne Basting, who Dr. George mentions at 23:00, on our website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and more. Find and follow Dementia Matters on Facebook, Twitter, or find us on our website.
1/6/202231 minutes, 12 seconds
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New Research Shifts Thinking on Metabolism and Aging

There are many common beliefs about metabolism. Perhaps you’ve heard that a person’s metabolism slows around middle age, or that a woman’s metabolism is slower than a man’s. However widespread these beliefs are, recent research from the journal Science has found that these conceptions of metabolism are wrong. In a groundbreaking study, researchers have found that metabolism goes through four key phases over our lives, only beginning to slow around age 60. This, among other findings, are now changing how we think about human physiology and how we think about aging. Breaking down this new research and his perspective article on the findings, Dr. Rhoads describes our shifting understandings of metabolism and how it impacts chronic diseases like Alzheimer’s disease as we age. Guest: Tim Rhoads, PhD, assistant scientist, Rozalyn Anderson laboratory, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics 2:30 - How is metabolism related to diseases of aging? 4:42 - What are the four distinct phases of metabolism and why are they important? 7:44 - What are other findings that change our understanding of metabolism? 12:00 - How does the decline in metabolism later in life affect chronic diseases like Alzheimer’s disease? Are there things we could do to prolong a high metabolism? 15:22 - How does caloric restriction affect the body and metabolism? Show Notes Read the perspective piece written by Dr. Rhoads and Dr. Rozalyn Anderson on the journal Science’s website. Read the original research report, “Daily energy expenditure through the human life course,” by Pontzer et al. on the journal Science’s website. Learn more about recent metabolism research in the article, “What We Think We Know About Metabolism May Be Wrong,” written for the New York Times. Learn more about the Rozalyn Anderson Lab and their research at their website.
12/9/202125 minutes, 6 seconds
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Aging Behind the Wheel: How Driving Behavior Can Identify Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease

Dementia impacts a person’s ability to complete day-to-day activities like familiar tasks at work or at home. What if we could identify these changes in everyday behaviors early enough to identify preclinical Alzheimer’s disease? That’s what Dr. Sayeh Bayat, an assistant professor at the University of Calgary, looked to find out. Dr. Bayat is the lead author of a recent paper highlighting how driving behaviors such as braking, following the speed limit and the number of trips taken could predict preclinical Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Bayat joined the podcast to share findings from the paper and discuss some of the ways engineering and machine learning can help us discover more about dementia and aging. Guest: Sayeh Bayat, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary Episode Topics 1:05 - What led you to study this intersection of engineering and aging? 3:23 - What inspired you to study the topic of driving and aging? 5:30 - Who was involved in the study, and how long were these participants monitored? 7:01 - What did you find? 7:50 - Can you explain machine learning? 11:10 - Different health and life factors can impact driving. Is that something you’re looking to control for in future studies? 14:59 - How do you account for people who are just bad drivers without any cognitive change? 15:48 - What is the direction for your research in the future? Show Notes Learn more about Dr. Sayeh Bayat’s study in the New York Times article, “Seeking Early Signals of Dementia in Driving and Credit Scores” and in the BBC article, “How your driving might reveal early signs of Alzheimer’s”. Find a free PDF of Dr. Bayat’s paper, “GPS driving: a digital biomarker for preclinical Alzheimer disease,” through the National Library of Medicine.
11/30/202118 minutes, 43 seconds
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Global Challenges in Dementia Diagnosis: A Deep Dive into ADI’s World Alzheimer’s Report 2021

Alzheimer’s Disease International’s World Alzheimer’s Report 2021 recently found that 75% of people with dementia are undiagnosed, equating to 41 million people across the globe. The report, subtitled “Journey through the diagnosis of dementia,” also found clinician stigma is still a major barrier to diagnosis, and one in three believe nothing can be done about dementia. Dr. Serge Gauthier, co-author of the report, joins the podcast to discuss these findings, recommendations for improving dementia diagnoses, and more from the report. Episode Topics 2:00 - How did you get into this field, and why did you choose to study dementia?  3:04 - What was the methodology behind this research? What was that process like to collect this data? 5:47 - What are some of the key findings that you took away from the report? 7:59 - What did you discover about stigma while conducting this report? Why is that important to this discussion about diagnosis and subsequent care? 9:47 - How can people encourage their healthcare systems to have better diagnoses practices in place? 12:04 - What role do PET scans and blood-based biomarkers play in this effort for more diagnoses? Should everyone get these tests done? 13:56 - How do you think new therapies like Aducanumab are going to change how we view diagnosis? 16:33 - What are some of the key recommendations for government agencies from the report? 18:33 - Most agencies in the United States do not recommend screening for cognitive impairment without symptoms. Is that a mistake, and if so, how do we change those policies? 19:31 - What role do specialists, memory centers, and community agencies play in improving diagnosis? Should we have a primary care focus or should we train more specialists and organizations to help with diagnosis? 21:59 - Do you think there needs to be a change in how we use terms like dementia and major neurocognitive disorder? Should we adopt a universal terminology surrounding cognitive impairment, and do you think dementia should be retired due to the stigma it carries? 22:57 - What are some of the easiest things we can do to help our system diagnose people with dementia? 24:42 - What gives you hope that things will get better in the diagnosis and care of people with dementia? Show Notes The World Alzheimer Report 2021 includes over 50 essays from leading experts from around the world and is supported by findings from 3 key global surveys, which received responses from 1,111 clinicians, 2,325 people with dementia and carers, and over 100 national Alzheimer and dementia associations. Find more information about the 2021 World Alzheimer’s Report from Alzheimer’s Disease International on their website. A PDF of the report, “Journey through the diagnosis of dementia,” is also available on their website to read. To learn more about Dr. Serge Gauthier, read his bio on the McGill University website.
11/11/202128 minutes, 14 seconds
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Accessibility and Community: Bringing Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resources to the Latinx Community

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s newly-released tool, BrainGuide, may seem like a simple questionnaire, but the project highlights a growing movement to make Alzheimer’s disease research and resources accessible to a broader range of communities. Released in 2021, BrainGuide is a one-of-a-kind resource that provides information about Alzheimer’s disease in English and Spanish through online and telephone questionnaires. Dr. Maria Mona Pinzon, a physician-scientist at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and a consultant on BrainGuide, joins the podcast to discuss the impacts this project has had on educating the Latinx community about Alzheimer’s disease. Discussing the barriers and risks that the Latinx community face surrounding brain health, the ways to connect with the community through research, and her experience working on BrainGuide, Dr. Pinzon highlights the importance and impacts of community-tailored research and resources.  Guest: Maria Mona Pinzon, MD, MS, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics 1:17 - How did you get into this field of an aging population and people living with dementia? 6:12 - Is the idea of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia discussed within the Latinx community in general? 7:38 - Latinx individuals are 1.5 times more likely to develop dementia. Is there research that can explain this higher risk? 9:53 Tell us about this tool, the Spanish-Language BrainGuide, some of the resources it offers, and why it is important to make it available to Spanish speakers. 12:47 - What’s something you learned from this experience that surprised you? 14:14 - What are the barriers Latinx people face in learning about brain health, dementia, and getting involved in research? 18:25 - What strategies do you suggest to improve the connection between researchers and the Latinx community as well as recruitment into research? 20:06 - When thinking about education and raising awareness, what topics are most important right now for the Latinx community? 21:58 - What do you do in your personal life to keep your brain healthy?  Show Notes Learn more about the Spanish-Language BrainGuide, its questionnaire, and other resources on their website. To fill out the questionnaire, you can find it digitally on their website (mybrainguide.org) or complete it over the phone by calling or texting 855-272-4641. Learn more about Dr. Mora Pinzon at her bio on the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute website.
10/28/202124 minutes, 50 seconds
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You Are What You Eat: Study of Diet and Brain Health Shows Cognitive Benefits from Cheese, Wine and Lamb

A recent study of nearly 1,800 participants from the UK Biobank found that three dietary elements — cheese, wine, and lamb — may improve long-term cognitive outcomes in aging adults. Dr. Auriel Willette, assistant professor of food science and human nutrition at Iowa State University, joins the podcast to discuss these new findings linking diet and cognitive changes. In November 2020, Willette published a study in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease titled “Genetic Factors of Alzheimer’s Disease Modulate How Diet is Associated with Long-Term Cognitive Trajectories: A UK Biobank Study,” where he and his team studied the effects of particular foods on a person’s brain health over time. As well as the findings surrounding cheese, wine, and lamb, they found that limiting salt intake was good for the brain, especially for those at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Discussing the field of nutritional research, his prior work studying diet and brain health, and how these findings impact other recommended diets, Willette provides insight into how our current diets can impact our health and cognitive abilities later in life, allowing us to make better choices for the future. Guest: Auriel Willette, PhD, associate professor of food science and human nutrition, Iowa State University. Episode topics 1:34 - What sparked your interest in studying the effects of nutrition on the brain and on cognition? 4:41 - What prompted you to broaden your study to focus on overall diet and whole foods? 8:29 - Can you tell us about your prior research? 12:46 - Can you tell us a bit about the study and what you discovered? 19:48 - What do you think the mechanism is that allows cheese and alcohol to be beneficial for people’s brain health? 24:28 - How do you reconcile these findings, especially those surrounding cheese, with diets like the MIND diet? 28:38 - What dietary changes have you made in your own life that you might recommend for protecting your brain health? Show Notes Find out more about Dr. Willette by reading his bio from Iowa State University. Learn more about Dr. Willette’s study at this article by Iowa State University. Read the full study, “Genetic Factors of Alzheimer’s Disease Modulate How Diet is Associated with Long-Term Cognitive Trajectories: A UK Biobank Study.” Find us Online - Dementia Matters Website | ADRC Facebook | ADRC Twitter
10/14/202132 minutes, 21 seconds
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AARP Study Shows Stigma Surrounding Dementia among Healthcare Professionals and General Public

With the numerous efforts currently focused on educating the public about dementia, from clinical programs to research to podcasts (like this one), how much is stigma surrounding cognitive decline affecting public understanding? On today’s podcast, Sarah Lock, Senior Vice President for Policy for AARP, discusses just that. This year, the AARP published a report on a survey focused on how the general American population and particular subgroups perceive dementia and dementia diagnoses. The survey found that the general public and health care professionals have many misperceptions about dementia, including overestimations about their likelihood to develop dementia and the shame they might feel about a diagnosis. Describing the contrasting perceptions between clinicians and the public and the impacts of stigma on dementia policy, Lock details the ways this survey will allow the AARP to build on their existing programs about brain health to better educate the public about dementia and the ways it affects a person’s life. Guest: Sarah Lenz Lock, Senior Vice President for Policy, AARP, Executive Director of the Global Council on Brain Health Episode Topics 1:48 - Can you share what went into making the survey and who completed them? 5:05 - What did the survey find? How do people think about their own risk? 7:14 - Can you speak about those key findings surrounding stigma and dementia? 9:43 - What do you make of the stigma's connection to the fear of not being able to drive anymore? 12:48 - What key findings did you find about the clinicians who completed the survey? 15:32 - One finding from the survey showed that healthcare providers overestimated the shame and embarrassment that a person would experience with a diagnosis. What were other perceptions that clinicians overestimated in the survey? 17:20 - From a policy perspective, does the United States need to change its recommendations surrounding dementia screenings? 20:01 - Could you share the true benefits of early diagnoses, based on the survey and what you see within the AARP? 21:21 - Did the survey find any differences in the perceptions among different racial groups? 23:28 - How do you define brain health? What is the AARP doing to spread information about brain health? Show Notes Learn more about Sarah Lock and her work at her bio on the AARP website. For a summary of the key findings of the AARP’s report, read this article by the AARP. To access the full report and its findings, find it here on the AARP website. Find us Online - Dementia Matters Website | ADRC Facebook | ADRC Twitter
9/30/202129 minutes, 11 seconds
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Caregivers, Care Partners and People with Dementia: Brainstorming New Interventions for Dementia Care

When talking about dementia caregiving, researchers are often working toward new treatments and strategies for supporting people with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. But how can we push the topic further and learn how we can better support dementia caregivers themselves? Dr. Eric Larson joins the podcast to discuss possible interventions to support patients with dementia and their caregivers and care partners. Dr. Larson chaired a National Academy of Medicine committee focused on researching dementia caregiving interventions. As part of their report titled “Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward,” the committee found that two models, the Collaborative Care Model and REACH (Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer’s Caregiving Health), had the most evidence of benefits for supporting people with dementia and their care partners and caregivers. Discussing this new report, the recent approval of aducanumab, and the field of geriatrics as a whole, Dr. Larson shines a light on the nuances of dementia research and dementia caregiving. Guest: Eric Larson, MD, MPH, Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute Questions 1:07 - What sparked your interest in becoming a geriatrician and Alzheimer’s disease/dementia researcher? 2:35 - What would you say to young medical students looking for a specialty, and even considering geriatrics? 3:33 - Why do you think the field fails to attract younger doctors? 5:13 - What is the role of the National Academy of Medicine, and why did it conduct and release this report on caregiving? 7:29 - Can you offer us a brief summary of the findings or the key things that you think our audience should know about? 10:48 - What are the current limitations of the existing research on dementia care interventions for patients and caregivers, and how can we overcome those limitations? 12:38 - What is the difference between a care partner and a caregiver as you note in the report? 14:03 - What are some community, policy, or societal interventions that really should be explored? 15:46 - Does this report mean that we stop programs with low-strength of benefits, and if not, how do we continue to evaluate these programs and expand on them? 17:12 - Given the FDA approval of aducanumab, do you worry that more attention and resources will be pulled away from care work and care partner/caregiving that’s needed in research and clinical care toward this medication? 19:42 - What would you say to someone about to become an Alzheimer’s disease caregiver or care partner? Show Notes Read Dr. Eric Larson’s bio on the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute’s website. Find a free download of the National Academies’ report, “Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward,” here. To learn more about the National Academies, find them on their website. For information about their research, publications, and events focused on dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, visit this page from their website. Find other resources related to this report by the National Academy of Medicine here: Report Highlights Press Release Recommendations Find us Online - Dementia Matters Website | ADRC Facebook | ADRC Twitter
9/16/202123 minutes, 16 seconds
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Tackling Stigma and Alzheimer’s Disease within the AAPI Community

Vince Tien and Dr. Dung Trinh join the podcast to discuss the many ways Alzheimer’s disease affects the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) community. Vince Tien and Dr. Trinh both work as part of 360 Clinic, a multi-specialty medical group focused on telehealth services. With their experience in healthcare and telehealth services amidst the pandemic, Tien and Dr. Trinh describe the barriers and stigma that discourage the AAPI community from seeking help for dementia and the ways that we can dismantle those barriers.  Guests: Vince Tien, co-founder, CEO, 360 Clinic, and Dung Trinh, MD, chief medical officer, 360 Clinic   Episode Topics: 1:13 Vince Tien, what is your background in healthcare? How did you get involved in Alzheimer's disease and dementia care? 3:43 Dr. Trinh, what is your experience in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia? 6:06 What are the health-related needs of AAPI communities? And, when it comes to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, what are these communities’ needs? 7:44 Is there a certain perception of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and cognition within the AAPI community?  9:22 How do you find common ground between accessibility issues of technology and the benefits of telehealth? 13:07 What role does stigma play in the Asian American or Vietnamese communities specifically when it comes to Alzheimer’s disease? How does it affect caregiving and family members? 14:18 How do we start destigmatizing Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and cognitive change within the Asian American community? 16:06 How does healthcare address the cultural, economical, linguistic barriers that Asian Americans experience regarding public health messages and care? 17:18 How can healthcare systems and organizations provide care for underresourced and underrepresented families who are suffering from dementia-related illnesses? 19:58 What would be the one thing you’d want the Asian American community to know about Alzheimer’s disease and dementia care?   Follow Dementia Matters: Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter   Show Notes: To learn more about 360 Clinic, find them at their website, Instagram, and Twitter. Learn more about Dr. Dung Trinh at his LinkedIn and his Facebook Page. Learn more about Vince Tien at his LinkedIn.
8/31/202125 minutes, 11 seconds
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Creative Care: The Power of Imagination in Dementia Caregiving

What would happen if caregiving strategies were inspired by wonder rather than memory? That’s what Dr. Anne Basting, founder and president of the nonprofit TimeSlips, asked when she began her research into how the arts could be integrated into dementia caregiving. Basting joins the podcast to discuss her caregiving approach rooted in creative engagement and imagination. From storytelling to beautiful questions to performance, Basting describes a new way of caregiving that helps caregivers and families meet patients and loved ones where they’re at to have meaningful connections and spark joy in the later years of life. Guest: Anne Basting, PhD, professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, founder and president of TimeSlips, author of Creative Care Episode Topics 1:31 - What inspired you to bring the arts and humanities to dementia care? 4:51 - Why did you write Creative Care, and what do you want readers to leave with? 7:49 - What are “beautiful questions” and can you offer a few examples? 14:32 - What is in the Creative Care Imagination Kit and why is each component important to the process? 15:49 - You’ve staged theater productions in care facilities as part of this process. How do performers in these plays respond to being a part of theater and how does the audience respond to the performances? 18:43 - How can people get involved in this organization and what do you recommend to people who would like something like this in a local care facility? 19:48 - What would you say to someone about to embark on the caregiving journey with someone with dementia? Follow Dementia Matters Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Show Notes Read Anne Basting’s biography on her website. Learn more about Anne Basting’s book, Creative Care: A Revolutionary Approach to Dementia and Elder Care, and her Creative Care Imagination Kit on her website here. Learn about Anne Basting’s nonprofit organization, TimeSlips, at its website for information on services, resources, and ways to get involved. Also find TimeSlips on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.
8/17/202123 minutes, 31 seconds
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Better Now than Never: Quit Smoking to Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers have produced many studies on how smoking affects parts of the body, such as the lungs or heart, but what about the brain? In today’s podcast, Adrienne Johnson, PhD, discusses her research on cigarette smoking and risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. As part of a 2021 study, she found a person’s risk for dementia and Alzheimer's disease can be affected by how recently they’ve smoked. Diving into her research, the effects of smoking on different communities, and resources to support current smokers as they quit, Dr. Johnson details the impact of smoking on the brain and her hopes to develop new interventions to motivate smokers to quit for good. Guest: Adrienne Johnson, PhD, assistant scientist at the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention Episode Topics 1:17 What sparked your interest in studying the effects of cigarette smoking and, particularly, how it affects cognitive decline? 3:47 What are the effects of smoking on Alzheimer’s disease risk and/or general cognitive decline? 5:28 Why do you think there’s a difference in risk levels for Alzheimer’s disease and then for dementia? 6:27 Are there other things you can share about what you have found with your preliminary studies on smoking as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease? 8:38 You haven’t found a quantity relationship between the amount a person smokes and their risk for Alzheimer’s disesase, but rather a relationship based on smoking recency. Could you describe that further? 11:12 You’ve also done work on how there’s more disadvantaged communities that might be suffering from tobacco use compared to others. Can you speak on that? 13:01 How can caregivers and/or family motivate or support current smokers so that they can quit? 14:25 Is there a difference in a population that already has cognitive impairment? Do you have different strategies that we might use to support those individuals? 18:16 What are you looking to study in the future? 19:21 Can you share some resources where listeners can get help to stop smoking or where they can find resources for a loved one? Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Show Notes Read Dr. Adrienne Johnson’s biography on the UW Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI) website. To learn more about the UW Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention (UW-CTRI) and the work they do, find them on their website, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Find resources on how to quit smoking here: Learn more information about smoking, vaping, and how to quit at https://ctri.wisc.edu 1-800-QUIT-NOW is a national smoking cessation quitline. Though it’s resources vary from state to state, in Wisconsin they can provide callers with free evidence-based evidence-based smoking cessation medications and a free coaching session to help you quit. Smokefree.gov is a website with a variety of resources, including texting programs, quit plans, mobile apps, and information on how to quit for specialty populations. Talk to primary care providers for prescribed medication and counseling for quitting smoking
8/3/202122 minutes, 40 seconds
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Dentistry and Dementia: The Importance of Caring for Oral Health

Elisa Ghezzi, DDS, PhD, joins the podcast to discuss the importance of maintaining oral health throughout one’s life, and especially as one grows older. Discussing the effects of oral health on our systemic health, oral health’s connection to dysphagia, and how caregivers can help dementia patients care for their teeth, Dr. Ghezzi provides insight on how vital it is to care for our oral health as we age. Guest: Elisa Ghezzi, DDS, PhD, adjunct clinical assistant professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, provider, Voiage Portable Dentistry Episode Topics 1:15 - How did you get interested in oral health in older adults? 3:28 - Why isn’t there more training or education in general dentistry for an older population? 4:34 - What are oral diseases, and what are their effects on systemic health? 6:00 - Is there an association between oral disease and cognition or cognitive impairment? 8:50 - IDoes inflammation affect oral health? 10:00 - What can be done to prevent oral conditions? 13:39 - What can we do to help protect our teeth? 16:38 - What should older adults and people who are experiencing dementia do about flossing? 19:05 - For our audience members who might be caring for someone who has dementia,, what recommendations would you offer when the person they are caring for is resistant to the act of having someone brush their teeth? 22:10 - What is the relationship between oral health, oral disease, and dysphagia? 28:20 - What is the most pressing issue facing older adults and their oral health care?   Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Vote for Dementia Matters in the 2021 Podcast Awards! Voting closes July 31st!
7/20/202132 minutes, 29 seconds
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Vote for Dementia Matters in the 2021 Podcast Awards!

Dementia Matters has entered into the 2021 People's Choice Podcast Awards! If you enjoy our show and want to support us, register and vote before July 31st at www.podcastawards.com, and vote for us under the Health and People's Choice categories. We, the Dementia Matters team, hope that by participating, we can continue spreading our message and educate new listeners about Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia, and brain health. Our background music is "Cases to Rest" by Blue Dot Sessions. Find Dementia Matters online - https://www.adrc.wisc.edu/dementia-ma... Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/wisconsinadrc Follow us on Twitter - https://twitter.com/WisconsinADRC Vote for Dementia Matters in the Podcast Awards - www.podcastawards.com
7/17/20211 minute, 39 seconds
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From Studying to Living with Alzheimer‘s Disease: A Conversation with Dr. Daniel Gibbs

Neurologist and author Daniel Gibbs, PhD, joins the podcast to discuss his recent book, “A Tattoo on My Brain,” which details his journey from treating Alzheimer’s disease clinically for 25 years to being diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer’s. Dr. Gibbs discusses early signs he experienced and daily life with the disease, as well as thoughts on the recent FDA-approved treatment aducanumab (marketed as Aduhelm). Guest: Daniel Gibbs, PhD, neurologist Episode Topics What inspired the title of your book, “A Tattoo on the Brain”? 1:01 What were these early signs of Alzheimer's disease that you recognized in yourself? 3:42 What were your impressions of the clinic process, and where is there room for improvement? 8:08 Can you share your view on family history? 9:17 What do you say to people about direct-to-consumer genetic testing, both as a recipient and as a clinician? 10:57 Did knowing your risk of Alzheimer's disease help or harm you? 12:42 Did you find any habit difficult to incorporate into your day? 13:17 How important was it for you to be involved in research and what did you gain from being a research participant? 17:15 How do you feel about the recent FDA approval of aducanumab for clinical use? 20:25 As a patient, would you sign up for this drug, and if you were still working as a neurologist, would you prescribe this drug? 22:59 How do you find the balance between enjoying daily life and engaging proactive activities meant to improve the future? 24:49 How can we reframe the way people understand Alzheimer's disease? 28:18 Was it difficult to publicly discuss your experience, and what have you learned from this process? 29:52 What do you hope the reader takes away from your book? 31:15 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
7/6/202134 minutes, 12 seconds
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How Close Are We to Curing Alzheimer’s Disease?

For our 100th episode of Dementia Matters, Nina Silverberg, PhD, director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers (ADRC) Program at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), joins the podcast to offer an overview of the ADRC Program as well as insight into the state of Alzheimer’s Disease research and its future. The NIA funds more than 30 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers across the country, including the Wisconsin ADRC. Guest: Nina Silverberg, PhD, National Institute on Aging Visit alzheimers.gov for information about Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, living with Alzheimer's disease, and caring for someone with the disease. The NIA's website provides helpful information about brain donation and offers a variety of publications on health topics related to dementia and aging. Episode Topics How did you get involved with Alzheimer's disease? 1:32 How has Alzheimer's disease research changed over the last 15 years? 3:22 Brief history of the NIA’s ADRC Program: 4:46 What role do the centers play in the field of Alzheimer's disease research and treatment? 6:24 How do the centers collaborate with one another? 7:48 What is your vision for the future of the ADRC Program? 9:47 How does the NIA report their process and findings to the public? 12:03 How does the NIA collaborate with other groups conducting research? 13:18 Are blood-based biomarkers the future of Alzheimer's disease research? 18:23 Do you think there will be more focus on other pathologies in the future? 20:09 How can Alzheimer's disease researchers help impact clinical care? 23:37 What area of Alzheimer's disease research fascinates you the most? 24:40 How close do you think we are to solving or curing Alzheimer's disease? 26:43 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
6/10/202131 minutes, 29 seconds
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How to Shape Your Brain Health and Reduce Your Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

Neuropsychologist and author Michelle Braun, PhD, joins the podcast to talk about lifestyle changes that can support brain health. “We have the ability to make our brain younger than our chronological age,” she says. Braun shares how and details strategies from her new book, “High-Octane Brain: 5 Science-Based Steps to Sharpen Your Memory and Reduce Your Risk of Alzheimer’s.” Hear about common misconceptions around aging, three possible brain health trajectories, and how to maximize your brain health. Guest: Michelle Braun, PhD, neuropsychologist and national leader in the field of brain health Episode Topics What are the most common complaints that can be attributed to normal aging? 1:29 What are the main misconceptions of aging? 3:25 What are the three possible brain health trajectories? 5:00 What does a high-octane brain trajectory look like? 6:55 What are the three navigational forces that influence brain health trajectories? 8:21 What is epigenetics? 10:35 What are the five lifestyle factors that make up EXCELS?  13:01 How did you come up with the order of these lifestyle changes? 14:18 What do you tell your patients about the benefits of exercise? How do you recommend they start? 16:20 What diet do you recommend to support brain health? 20:06 What have you found to be the biggest struggle in following the diet? 22:21 How should a person get started with the MIND diet and what should be avoided? 23:27 What is your response when patients ask about supplements? 24:46 What are your thoughts on alcohol consumption and brain health? 26:07 Show Notes Dr. Braun will be a guest speaker at the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center’s "Healthy Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Nutrition in Action" class on June 18, 2021. The class will be held virtually on Zoom and is free and open to the public. Register Here. Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
5/27/202129 minutes
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Study Finds Air Pollution a Risk Factor for Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco found that among older adults with cognitive impairment, the greater the air pollution in their neighborhood, the higher the likelihood of the presence of amyloid plaques in their brain. Lead researcher Leonardo Iaccarino, PhD, details his work examining air pollution and brain health outcomes and discusses possible ways individuals and society can lower the impact of air pollution on Alzheimer’s disease risk.  Guest: Leonardo Iaccarino, PhD, University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center Episode Topics What sparked your interest in neuroscience and Alzheimer's disease research? 1:06 Why is your research so pivotal? 2:21 What was the IDEAS Study? 4:12 What kinds of air pollution are you referring to? 6:09 What can generate PM2.5? 7:45 Are cars or factories potential sources? 8:50 How does air pollution increase risk for Alzheimer's disease? 9:15 Is there a further increased risk after long exposure? 11:00 Why is it important that there was no link to ground-level ozone? 12:04 Did you look into the APOE4 genetic risk from air pollution? 14:32 What should people do with this information? 16:19 Is there a way to find your own neighborhood value of PM2.5? 18:44 Do you see any policy or system changes in the future from your findings? 19:55 Do you believe there might be other environmental factors that increase risk? 21:03 What do you do in your life to decrease risk for neurodegeneration? 21:57 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
5/13/202124 minutes, 45 seconds
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Managing Inappropriate Sexual Behavior in Alzheimer’s Disease

Inappropriate sexual behavior is a common yet rarely discussed symptom in individuals with dementia. Author Elizabeth Marcus writes about her personal experience with her father’s behavioral changes in her new book, “Don’t Say a Word!: A Daughter’s Two Cents.” Elizabeth shares what she learned caring for her father, as well as advice for caregivers responding to the symptoms. Neurologist Dr. Martin Samuels offers background on changes in the brain that can cause inappropriate sexual behavior and other personality shifts that are common in people with dementia. Guest: Elizabeth Marcus, author; Martin Allen Samuels, MD, Brigham and Women's Hospital Episode Topics: What is your book about? 1:09 How did you react to your father’s request? 3:08 What did you learn about the experience? 4:04 What did you learn about the relationship between sex and dementia? 5:29 What is the key message of your book? 6:50 How common are these situations? 8:33 Are there physical changes in the brain that explain these symptoms? 9:10 Why do some individuals with memory loss develop these symptoms, while others don’t? 12:44 How can family members respond to the situation once it becomes uncomfortable? 14:51 What advice do you have for family member’s going through this experience? 17:27 What types of education or resources do you provide caregivers? 19:30 How do you respond to caregivers looking into medication for the symptoms? 21:55 What is your experience with the stigma around sex and individuals with memory loss? 23:44 Any suggestions for overcoming the discomfort and respectfully addressing these symptoms? 26:33 Visit Elizabeth Marcus’ author website to learn about her new book, “Don’t Say a Word! A Daughter’s Two Cents.” Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
5/3/202130 minutes, 4 seconds
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Being Patient Translates Alzheimer’s Disease Science for the General Public

Being Patient is an online news source dedicated to providing research news, caregiver information and resources related to Alzheimer's disease. Being Patient founder Deborah Kan discusses how her personal experiences led her to develop the website, as well as how online resources and communities can help empower individuals affected by memory loss. Guest: Deborah Kan, journalist, founder of beingpatient.com Episode Topics: What inspired you to leave a career in journalism and launch Being Patient? 0:58 How do you decide on the topics you cover? 4:18 How does social media help build a community through connection? 9:14 Have you found a certain communication platform that has better reach? 11:25 What have you learned from caregivers through your work? 13:49 Can you offer recommendations for finding reliable online sources for health information? 18:58 Why is it important for the scientific community to have a separate organization that discusses the research? 23:34 What topics in Alzheimer's disease research have been the most impactful? 27:35 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
4/19/202136 minutes, 36 seconds
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How Society Can Improve Care for People with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias

Dr. Jason Karlawish discusses society’s role in addressing care for individuals with memory loss, as well as current stigmas around Alzheimer’s disease, Wealthcare, and his cautious optimism for the future of Alzheimer’s disease research and care. This is the final episode in our four-part series with Dr. Karlawish on his new book, "The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It.” Guest: Jason Karlawish, MD, co-director, Penn Memory Center Episode Topics: How do you live a good life when you’re slowly losing your ability to live life? 0:56 How do home and work fit in your life after a mild cognitive impairment diagnosis? 2:21 What are your recommendations on home looseness and time slips? 4:34 How can we improve care facilities? 10:04 What is Wealthcare? 11:19 Why haven’t caregivers been given greater support in our system? 13:32 What do you mean by time, task and truth in caregiving? 15:13 What are steps we can take to improve the care for individuals with mild cognitive impairments? 17:34 What do you mean by stigma in Alzheimer's disease? 19:37 What worries you about the effects of this stigma? 22:00 With a new presidential administration, what should be the top priorities as a country for preparing for Alzheimer’s and improving the lives of individuals with memory loss? 24:21 Learn more about Jason Karlawish's book Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
3/31/202130 minutes, 43 seconds
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The Healthcare System’s Role in Alzheimer’s Disease

Dr. Jason Karlawish joins the podcast for the third installment in our series on his new book, "The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It". In this episode, Dr. Karlawish discusses the healthcare system’s role in Alzheimer’s disease and what it needs to do better to care for individuals with dementia and help them live well. Guest: Jason Karlawish, MD, co-director, Penn Memory Center Episode Topics: What did you learn about the healthcare system in your work with Beverly and Darren Johnson? 1:33 What do we need in healthcare to better care for individuals with cognitive impairment? 3:25 Do we need more memory care specialists in the field, or can primary care physicians do this work? 5:32 How do we encourage more individuals into enter the geriatric care medical field? 7:38 How do we increase the number of memory centers and how should they function within our current healthcare system? 9:22 Why is it important to discuss delirium? 11:14 What does a multidisciplinary team offer in dementia care? 13:03 What services and supports do you envision for the healthcare system? 14:57 The importance of being respectful in communication and interaction with older adults. 18:06 What did you learn from working with Dr. Jeffrey Kaye from the Oregon Center for Aging and Technology (ORCATECH)? 20:34 What role does our government have in addressing this humanitarian crisis? 23:13 Learn more about Jason Karlawish's book Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
3/24/202127 minutes, 34 seconds
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How Culture, Society and Politics Shaped Alzheimer’s Disease Research

Dr. Jason Karlawish returns to the podcast to continue our discussion on his new book, The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It. In this episode, Dr. Karlawish discusses pivotal cultural and political moments that influenced Alzheimer’s disease research, as well as the possibilities of drug treatments in the future. Guest: Jason Karlawish, MD, co-director, Penn Memory Center Episode Topics: Who is the unwitting revolutionary? 1:11 What happened to the early German scientists researching Alzheimer’s disease? 6:03 What essay was released in 1976 and why was it pivotal to Alzheimer’s research? 7:25  How did the changes in psychiatry, geriatric care and gender roles affect Alzheimer’s disease research? 10:42 What was the internal struggle over a name? 14:51 What were key moments in U.S. political history that influenced Alzheimer’s disease? 18:19 Where do you think the U.S. went wrong in approaching Alzheimer’s disease? 21:05 How is Alzheimer’s disease a humanitarian crisis? 22:43 What is your opinion on the drug approach for Alzheimer’s disease? 23:53  Do you have hope for a pill treatment in the future? 24:48   Learn more about Jason Karlawish's book Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
3/17/202129 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Past, Present and Future of Alzheimer’s Disease Research

Physician and author Dr. Jason Karlawish joins the podcast for the first installment of a four-part series centered around his new book, The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It. In the book, Karlawish blends history and science to detail the most important breakthroughs in diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease. He also offers an argument for how we can live with dementia and proposes reforms we can make as a society that would give caregivers and patients better quality of life. In this episode, Dr. Chin and Dr. Karlawish discuss Alzheimer’s disease in a historical context and the disease's changing meaning. Guest: Jason Karlawish, MD, co-director, Penn Memory Center Episode Topics: Why did you choose to focus on the history of Alzheimer’s disease? 1:37 Why is it so important to use correct terminology in the clinic? 2:40 What do you say to patients when you diagnose Alzheimer’s disease? 3:54 How do you help people understand the meaning of an Alzheimer’s diagnosis? 5:39 Are there any specific experiences you’ve had when diagnosing patients? 7:25 What was the first breakthrough in Alzheimer’s research? 9:21 What did you discover about the history of Mild Cognitive Impairment? 11:27 Why are Bill Klunk and Chester Mathis so important to Alzheimer’s research? 17:50 Would Klunk & Mathis’ methods be allowed in present-day research? 21:41 What happened at the 2013 MEDCAC meeting and why is it significant? 22:32 Learn more about Jason Karlawish's book Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
3/11/202129 minutes, 44 seconds
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Research Suggests Financial Problems an Early Sign of Alzheimer’s Disease

In a recent study, health economist Lauren Nicholas, PhD, found older adults who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a diagnosis. Dr. Nicholas joins the podcast to discuss her research findings, how financial symptoms could be used as early predictors of dementia, signs that may indicate financial trouble due to dementia, and resources for managing your own or a loved one’s finances early. Guest: Lauren Nicholas, PhD, associate professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Episode Topics: How was the study designed? 1:00 Who did you look at for in the study? 5:09 What are your findings? 6:12 Do you think the financial impact is different based on the amount of family members? 9:24 What types of resources are available? 11:01 What do you hope this research will lead to? 13:32 What are clues to watch for financial trouble due to cognitive decline? 15:47 How do you see financial information being useful for understanding dementia in the future? 17:33 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
2/24/202122 minutes, 51 seconds
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The Powerful Benefits of Music on Memory Loss

Growing research has shown that music can have a profound impact on individuals with memory loss. Right to Music is an organization dedicated to promoting use of personal music by families and professionals caring for people with dementia and other cognitive challenges. Founder Dan Cohen joins the podcast to discuss how music can affect memory loss and tips for starting music therapy. Guest: Dan Cohen, founder, Right to Music Episode Topics: What inspired you to introduce music to people with memory loss? 1:10 What brought you to music? 2:36 What has research found around music therapy? 4:56 What do you believe it is about music that is unique? 11:31 Does genre of music matter? 14:16 How can music help bring people together? 17:00 How do you recommend a person start? 18:52 Do you have any additional tips? 20:20 Which songs help you on your playlist? 21:51 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter  
2/11/202125 minutes, 46 seconds
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Emergency Care Tips for People with Dementia

Visiting the emergency department can be a challenging experience for individuals with memory loss and their caregivers. Dr. Manish Shah joins the podcast to discuss the difficulties people with dementia face in the emergency department and offers tips for making the most out of a visit. Guest: Manish Shah, MD, MPH, professor, BerbeeWalsh Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: How many older adults visit emergency departments annually? 1:00 Why are adults with dementia twice as likely to seek emergency care compared to older adults who don't have dementia? 2:19 What are some of the difficulties that people with dementia may experience when they're in the emergency department? 5:10 Is there training for emergency department physicians to modify how they approach people with dementia? 7:22 Do you have any recommendations to offer that would improve the visit in the emergency department for people with dementia? 9:02 What is your team of researchers studying? 13:42 What kind of resources do these types of centers bring to your research or research like this? 15:45 What do you hope to accomplish with the funding that you've now received? 17:42 Why is it important to study and create these resources in emergency departments across the country? 19:24 Is there a day or a time that would be better for a person to go in? 20:29 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter  
1/27/202124 minutes, 57 seconds
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Safely Disclosing Amyloid Results with Alzheimer’s Disease Research Participants

Dr. Lindsay Clark’s new study will evaluate the psychological consequences of disclosing amyloid test results to cognitively unimpaired adults. Dr. Clark joins the podcast to define amyloid accumulation and discuss how her study will examine the process of revealing amyloid results to research participants in Alzheimer’s disease research studies. Guest: Lindsay Clark, PhD, assistant professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: What is amyloid accumulation and its relationship to Alzheimer’s disease? 1:13 How are you measuring amyloid in living people? 3:14 Are newer methods like PET scans reliable? 5:56 Do patients learn the results of these scans? 6:20 Do research participants ever learn their results? 7:30 Who is the target population for studying amyloid scans? 8:44 Why does disclosing the results take so many careful considerations? 9:35 What do you think are the components of a good disclosure? 11:48 Are you disclosing specific numbers of the results? 14:16 Why does your study focus on amyloid PET scan results? 16:31 Do you believe the key concepts of disclosure can work with other biomarker studies? 18:33 Find Dementia Matters online Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
1/6/202121 minutes, 7 seconds
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Poetry and Memory: A Poem by Dr. Fabu Carter

In this special holiday bonus episode, we are joined by poet laureate, writer, and senior outreach specialist, Dr. Fabu Carter, to discuss the impact of poetry on memory loss and a reading of her poem “For Our Beloved Elders with Memory Loss." Guest: Fabu Carter, PhD, MA, Senior Outreach Specialist, University of Wisconsin of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: What is the importance of poetry on Alzheimer’s Disease? 1:20 Reading of "For Our Beloved Elders with Memory Loss" 4:51
12/25/20207 minutes, 28 seconds
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Update on Blood Tests for Predicting Alzheimer’s Disease

Recent developments have introduced a blood-based test that could predict Alzheimer’s disease, with more of these tests currently in development. Dr. Sterling Johnson joins the podcast to discuss the significance and accuracy of these blood tests, as well as the impact it will have on Alzheimer’s disease research and care. Guest: Sterling Johnson, PhD, professor of medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: What do biomarkers like brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid tell us about Alzheimer’s disease? 1:18 What is the significance of a blood-based biomarker test? 6:08 What does the blood test tell us about brain health? 8:14 How accurate are the tests? 9:02 How are proteins like amyloid or tau found in the bloodstream? 10:28 What kind of precautionary steps should be taken before these tests can become readily available? 12:23 When do you think these tests will become available? 15:30 What do you think is the timeline for the tau protein blood tests? 16:26
12/11/202019 minutes, 32 seconds
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Vitamin Deficiency and Its Impact on Brain Health

A study from the University of Wisconsin found 40% of geriatric memory patients were deficient in at least one vitamin linked to brain health. Vitamins tested in this study included B1, B6, B12, and D, all of which play an important role in brain health. Dr. Robert Przybelski joins the podcast to discuss his study, the influence of vitamin deficiency on brain health, and the potential consequences of vitamin deficiency when treating a patient for a memory condition. Guest: Robert Przybelski, MD, associate professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: Why is it important to look for vitamin deficiencies during a memory evaluation? 1:19 What were your research findings? 2:03 What do you focus on during a memory evaluation? 5:13 Is there a difference between normal vitamin levels and optimal levels? 6:40 What supplements do you take? 7:42 What diet do you think promotes brain health? 8:06 Why does your research look at general patients rather than participants? 8:41
11/19/202010 minutes, 44 seconds
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Benefits of an Early Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosis

For individuals concerned with memory loss, the first few steps for screening and diagnosis can be the most intimidating. Dr. Cynthia Carlsson discusses recent progress in Alzheimer’s disease research, health disparities some groups face with the disease, and advice for individuals and caregivers who have concerns about memory loss. Guest: Cynthia Carlsson, MD, MS, professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, and director, Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute  Episode Topics What is the current state of Alzheimer's disease research? 1:41 Is there more funding toward Alzheimer's disease research and care? 2:59 How has awareness of Alzheimer’s disease impacted diagnosis? 4:12 What are the health disparities we see in Alzheimer’s disease? 7:46 What are the benefits for early screening for Alzheimer’s disease? 11:07 How does an early diagnosis affect family members or caregivers?  13:36 Where should individuals concerned with memory loss look for resources? 15:06 Are there ramifications in research for early diagnosis? 16:08 What is your advice for individuals concerned with memory loss? 16:50
11/5/202020 minutes, 14 seconds
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Defining Mild Cognitive Impairment with Dr. Chin

On October 27th, the NBC drama series This Is Us will return for a fifth season. An integral storyline in the show is the diagnosis of one of the main characters, Rebecca Pearson, with Mild Cognitive impairment (MCI). In this bonus episode, our host Dr. Chin helps define MCI and its potential causes and misconceptions. Episode Topics: What is Mild Cognitive Impairment? 1:37 Difference between MCI and Dementia: 3:29 Potential causes for MCI: 4:40
10/22/20207 minutes, 23 seconds
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Intermittent Fasting and Its Effects on the Brain

As intermittent fasting has risen in popularity over the last decade, researchers have been exploring its long-term effects on physical health. Dr. Mark Mattson joins to discuss his research on metabolic switching, caloric restrictions, and the cognitive benefits from intermittent fasting. Guest: Mark P. Mattson, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology Episode Topics: Defining Intermittent fasting: 1:08 How long does it take for a metabolic switch? 2:02 How is this process different from normal dietary recommendations? 3:44 What did you find in your research on the effects of intermittent fasting on health? 5:36 Are there cognitive benefits to intermittent fasting? 8:12 Can intermittent fasting and caloric restrictions improve the brain’s health? 9:49 How does our modern lifestyles affect our brain and overall health? 16:07 Is there any evidence that one way of intermittent fasting is better?17:54 Are there any long-term consequences of intermittent fasting? 20:30 What do you do in your life to improve your brain health? 22:39
10/9/202026 minutes, 22 seconds
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Research Update: Aerobic Exercise and Brain Health

Aerobic exercise is often a recommendation for maintaining cognitive well-being, however its true connections to brain health are still being investigated to learn its effects on Alzheimer’s disease. Wisconsin ADRC exercise physiologist and researcher Max Gaitán joins the podcast to discuss the recent pilot study “Protocol of Aerobic Exercise and Cognitive Health (REACH)” and the study’s future research into the impact of aerobic exercise on brain health. Guest: Max Gaitán, MEd, Research Specialist, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Department of Medicine Episode topics: What were the goals for the REACH study? 1:56 Was it difficult to recruit participants for the study? 3:18 What else did you learn from your participants?  4:22 Did you see any issues with retention in participants? 5:06 What were the results of the study? 5:42 What does improved glucose metabolism in the brain mean? 6:57 Does exercise improve the health of the brain cells? 7:43 What are the goals of studying metabolomics? 8:55  What did you define as usual physical activity? 9:47 How were the exercise targets chosen? 10:38 Are there studies researching high intensity interval training? 12:39  
9/17/202015 minutes, 48 seconds
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Apps & Alzheimer’s: Supporting Informal Caregiving Through Mobile Technology

Human factors engineering is the study and design of interactive systems, tools and technologies to best assist individuals in need. We are joined by Nicole Werner, PhD, an engineer working on a mobile technology to serve the lives of informal caregivers. Guest: Nicole Werner, PhD, Harvey D. Spangler Assistant Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison Episode topics: Explanation of the field of human factors engineering: 1:05 The challenges of informal caregiving: 2:22 What are some useful user friendly features for the app? 5:32 How is the app being tested and improved? 11:38 How do you know when the app will be ready for launch? 14:15 Does your lab work with other technology tools for individuals with dementia and their caregivers? 15:55 As consumers, what are the essential features that we should look for in technology assistance?: 18:10 Have you encountered any tools you’ve found helpful? 20:07 What have you learned about caregiving in your work? 22:55
9/3/202026 minutes, 23 seconds
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Sex Differences in Alzheimer’s Disease

Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease are women. In the Alzheimer’s disease research field, there is an interest in understanding the sex-specific differences in the risk and development of this disease. Dr. Michelle Mielke joins to discuss some of these differences as well as how pregnancy and menopause might affect cognition. Guest: Michelle Mielke, PhD, Mayo Clinic Rochester Episode Topics: What are the sex differences in the development of dementia? 4:09 What are explanations for these differences? 7:57 What role does pregnancy and menopause play in the development of cognitive disorders? 10:09  Could menopausal hormone replacement therapy affect the cognitive development of dementia in individuals? 14:32 Are there sex differences in the genetic risk of APOE? 21:30 What do you do in your personal life to maintain brain health? 24:31
8/21/202028 minutes, 9 seconds
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Neighborhoods and Neurons: Study Finds Association between Neighborhood Disadvantage and Alzheimer’s Disease-related Brain Changes

A recent study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health found that people who lived in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods were about twice as likely to have Alzheimer’s disease-related brain changes at autopsy than people who lived in the wealthiest neighborhoods. One of the authors joins the podcast to discuss the research findings, the methodology behind the study, and future research directions. Guest: Ryan Powell, PhD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Department of Medicine   Episode Topics: What are social determinants of health? 1:30 What is the Area Deprivation Index? 3:28 What did your study investigate? 7:24 What did you learn from your study of brain autopsy results? 8:49 How do you think social factors interact with brain changes? 11:10 Why is access to Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers important? 13:35 What is the next step for your research? 16:44 As a society, how can we slow the development of Alzheimer’s disease? 20:33
8/6/202024 minutes, 43 seconds
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Exploring the Lessons Learned as a New Caregiver

After serving as the primary caregiver for his wife for 11 years, Dr. Arthur Kleinman shares the unexpected experiences, difficulties and lessons that he faced. His book, The Soul of Care: The Moral Education of a Husband and a Doctor, chronicles the emotional and physical journey as a caregiver for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease. Guest: Arthur Kleinman, MD, professor of medical anthropology and cross-cultural psychiatry, Harvard University   Episode Topics: Do you believe caregiving and empathy can be taught? 1:25 Unexpected experiences as a caregiver: 3:34 How do you communicate to your loved ones you need help with caregiving? 10:22 Differences between “illness” and “disease”: 20:38 Why is important for the community to welcome individuals with memory loss? 27:06
7/16/202037 minutes, 44 seconds
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Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative investigates genetic risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Research data collected from participants around the world has grown our understanding of genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Guest Jessica Langbaum, PhD, is the co-director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative at Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, which conducts clinical trials in people at high risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Langbaum discusses some recent findings in genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease, the psychological consequences of learning one’s risk, and testing interventions to delay or prevent the onset of symptoms. Guest: Jessica Langbaum, PhD, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute Episode Topics: What is the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative? 3:44 What is the difference between the APOE gene and the presenilin gene? 6:07 How are you approaching disclosure of genetic risk to participants? 12:15 What kind of responses have you received from participants who were told about their genetic risk? 15:32 What would you recommend to an individual interested in learning their genetic risk? 22:19 What are your recommendations for preventing dementia? 24:25 What is the GeneMatch program? 26:35  How can individuals find a study to volunteer for? 29:48 What is the most feasible form of therapy for dementia? 31:06
7/2/202037 minutes, 10 seconds
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Zip Codes Are More than a Number: Study Finds Link between Neighborhoods and Memory-related Brain Structures

A recent study showed that research participants in the most highly disadvantaged neighborhoods had smaller hippocampal areas compared to research participants in more advantaged neighborhoods. The study’s first author explains the results and the tools researchers used to measure neighborhood disadvantage. Guest: Jack Hunt, PhD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Medical Scientist Training Program Episode Topics: Association between neighborhood and brain structures: 1:52 Study findings: 4:01 Defining neighborhood disadvantage: 4:57 Who were the research participants involved in the study? 5:42 Why did you study the hippocampus in your research? 6:10 Related cardiovascular factors: 8:20 Using the Neighborhood Atlas to find neighborhood advantage by zip code: 10:22 Neighborhoods disadvantage and individual socioeconomic status: 13:17 Future research opportunities: 14:26 What can people in the community do with the results of this study? 17:36 Follow-up study: 18:23
6/18/202021 minutes, 13 seconds
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Caregiver Coping Skills and Communication Strategies for a Pandemic

COVID-19 Special Series The pandemic has placed a significant strain on the mental, social, and physical wellbeing of many caregivers, as well as individuals with cognitive decline. Our guest discusses COVID-19’s impact on underserved communities, offers communication tips, and reminds people to practice self-care. Guest: Andrea Gilmore-Bykovskyi, PhD, RN, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing  Episode Topics:  Caregiver considerations for a pandemic. 2:31 Self Care for caregivers. 6:05 How the pandemic is affecting caregivers from underserved communities. 10:55 Recommendations for caregivers when planning a trip to a medical facility. 13:51 Advice for families trying to communicate with loved ones who are hospitalized. 15:36 Tips for communicating with loved ones in a care facility. 17:43 What caregivers should know for the future. 21:05  Show Notes: All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.
6/3/202023 minutes, 47 seconds
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Mindfulness: What Is It, What Are the Benefits, Where to Begin

COVID-19 Special Series Stress, fear, and anxiety are common responses to the uncertainty during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, with the regular practice of mindfulness, the meditative process of bringing your attention to your body in the present moment, has been seen to help calm the worry. Our guest joins us to discuss using mindfulness methods to maintain and mange an overall wellbeing. Guest: Vincent Minichiello, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: How do you define mindfulness? 2:55 How does mindfulness affect our body? 5:15 Is it common to feel muscle relaxation while practicing mindfulness? 8:24 What are mindfulness-based interventions? 9:54   Can mindfulness be health focused? 13:36 Where do you see mindfulness fitting into healthcare, especially during the pandemic? 14:01 How can mindfulness be useful during the COVID-19 pandemic? 16:11 Can mindfulness be beneficial for individuals with cognitive impairments and caregivers? 18:21 Where should you begin with a mindfulness practice? 20:20 How helpful are online or phone apps for mindfulness practices? 22:50 What are you doing to maintain your wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic? 25:18 Show Notes: For listeners local to Madison, the UW Health Mindfulness Program offers in-person classes. They have also expanded to online classes due to the pandemic. Another great resource is The Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Apps our guest recommends are Mindfulness Coach, Calm, Buddhify and Headspace. A good starter book is Wherever You Go, There You Are by Jon Kabat-Zinn. All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.
5/28/202028 minutes, 43 seconds
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Long Distance Caregiving and Connecting: How to Remain in Close Contact with Your Loved Ones while Following Physical Distancing Recommendations

COVID-19 Special Series As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic visiting and communicating with people living with memory loss, whether at home or in a care facility, has become more difficult. Our guest joins us to outline the different ways to communicate remotely, how rural communities are adapting to this change and methods to help caregivers cope. Guest: Becky DeBuhr, MS, Program Director, Alzheimer’s & Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin. Episode Topics: Ways for caregivers to connect with loved one: o    Technology 3:02 o    Window visits 4:41 o    Mail 6:00 What can families reasonably ask of professional caregiving staff? 9:22 How can family members communicate their support remotely? 12:45 How are caregivers in rural communities being affected? Is there a difference in urban communities? 15:09 Methods to help caregivers cope now and post-pandemic. 17:40 Key tips for caregivers at home or in a facility. 20:21 Show Notes: To learn more about the Alzheimer’s & Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin call 888-308-6251 or email [email protected]. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services provides guidance for all long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities, and facilities serving people with developmental disabilities in Wisconsin caring for patients who are elderly and/or have chronic medical conditions that place them at higher risk of developing severe complications from COVID-19. All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.
5/20/202026 minutes
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The Ins & Outs of Telemedicine: Quick Tips for Patients

COVID-19 Special Series The field of telemedicine offers a diverse range of medical support services through telecommunication. Under the global pandemic, many providers have moved to telemedicine to assist their patients. Our guest discusses the advantages and disadvantages to using video and phone doctor visits and offers tips for best use of the services. Guest: Steve Barczi, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: What is telemedicine? 3:25 Benefits of telemedicine 8:04 Downside of telemedicine? 11:05 Is telemedicine covered by insurance? 13:30   How has COVID-19 changed the utilization of telemedicine? 18:27 Key takeaways 24:20 Telemedicine tips for people with cognitive impairments and older adults 25:05 How to prepare for a telemedicine visit 28:14 Best practices for a telemedicine visit 30:45 Show Notes: All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.
5/13/202034 minutes, 56 seconds
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Care & Support Services Offered by the Alzheimer’s Association

COVID-19 Special Series This episode discusses the work done by The Alzheimer’s Association, an organization focused on providing community education and assistance to all affected by Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. Our guest details how care and support services have quickly adapted to keep families and loved ones safe, healthy, and connected under quarantine. Guest: Kate Kahles, Program Manager, Alzheimer's Association Wisconsin Chapter Episode Topics: How have support groups changed under the pandemic? 2:53 Alzheimer’s Association Helpline 5:50 Types of support groups 7:15 Advice for coping with the anxiety from having a loved one in a facility 9:00 Outreach to rural communities 12:28  How has the stay-at-home order affected caregivers? 13:49 Activities for caregivers and persons living with dementia 16:59 Advance care planning 19:24 Key services 20:14 Show Notes: To learn more about the Alzheimer’s Association and support services near you go to the Community Resource Finder or call the helpline at 1(800)272-3900. All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.  
5/6/202023 minutes, 35 seconds
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A Glimpse into the National Family Caregiver Support Program

COVID-19 Special Series The National Family Caregiver Support Program (NFCSP) offers information, support, and resources to assist family caregivers (spouse, adult child, other relative, friend or neighbor) with their concerns related to caregiving. COVID-19 has impacted many resources and supports. Funding is available to help. This episode delves into what the program offers and ways to support caregivers and care recipients especially during the pandemic Guest: Jane DeBroux, Caregiver Program Coordinator, Dane County Area Agency on Aging Episode Topics: What is the National Family Caregiver Support Program? 2:55  How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed the program? 4:02 What does the program offer? 4:43 What are the eligibility requirements? 10:20 Show Notes: To learn more about the National Family Caregiver Support Program (NFCSP) program in your county reach out to your local Area Agency on Aging or Aging & Disability Resource Center. If in Dane County, Wisconsin, contact Jane DeBroux at (608) 261-5679. For all other Wisconsin counties go to wisconsincaregiver.org. All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website, and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, MA, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called The Frontlines of COVID.
4/29/202014 minutes, 51 seconds
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Maintaining Mental Health During a Pandemic Part 2: Anxiety, Depression, Stress Management & Coping

COVID-19 Special Series This episode continues our conversation with Art Walaszek, MD, focusing on the psychological and behavioral effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our guest helps us understand the fears and anxieties that are heightened during this time and recommendations to help best handle the increased stress. Guest: Art Walaszek, MD, Geriatric Psychiatrist, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: How do we handle our own fear during the pandemic? 6:00 What can you do to calm stress and anxiety before bed? 14:45 Do you have any specific recommendations for individuals with cognitive impairment or their caretakers facing increased anxiety? 23:51 Show Notes:  All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called "The Frontlines of COVID."
4/22/202026 minutes, 37 seconds
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Maintaining Mental Health During a Pandemic Part 1: Consequences of Isolation & Tips to Prevent Them

COVID-19 Special Series This episode begins our pivot to addressing the important issues facing individuals during the current COVID-19 pandemic. We will speak to researchers and doctors discussing the present and future impact of the pandemic on those with cognitive impairment and those without. We are starting with a two-part series on the psychological and behavioral consequences of the pandemic. Our guest, Art Walaszek, MD, speaks on the effects of social distancing and how individuals or caregivers can stay healthy during this time. Guest: Art Walaszek, MD, Geriatric Psychiatrist, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: Does social distancing negatively affect you? 5:00 How does this affect individuals with cognitive impairment or their caregivers? 11:00 What can we all do to prevent any negative effects from social distancing? 15:30 Show Notes:  All of the important issues happening right now cannot be fully covered, so we strongly encourage you to go to trusted sources for specific information, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, your state and local health department websites, and the Alzheimer's Association. You can also find resources on our website and that of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute. For other interesting and important stories on the COVID-19 pandemic, I would recommend my colleague at UW Health Jonathan Kohler, MD, of the Surgery Sett podcast who has a special series called "The Frontlines of COVID."
4/17/202024 minutes, 58 seconds
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Predicting Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease Today and Tomorrow

This episode offers an overview of the current tools doctors use to examine Alzheimer’s disease risk in their patients, as well as new techniques in development. Our guest discusses the science behind risk testing for dementia, as well as the potential for a low-cost risk test. Guest: Sanjay Asthana, MD, associate dean for gerontology at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and director at the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center  Episode Topics: What are the current tools that doctors have for understanding risk for dementia? 0:52 Memory clinic patient experience: 3:02 What is the difference between risk scores and calculators? 6:16 Genetic testing: 7:29 Risk and interventions for a diverse population: 13:17 How close is a low-cost risk test? 17:39 What do you do to reduce your risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease? 19:12
3/6/202021 minutes, 55 seconds
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DNA Is Not Your Destiny: Genetics and Alzheimer’s Disease Risk

This episode explores genetic risk factors for early- and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Host Nathaniel Chin and guest Corinne Engelman discuss the research looking into genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease and the uncertainty that comes with genetic testing. Guest: Corinne Engelman, MSHP, PhD, associate professor, Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Episode Topics: What are the genetic influences on a person’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease? 2:07 What genes affect individuals with early-onset dementia? 2:56 What is the impact of genes that counter one another? 5:34 How much can our lifestyle choices affect our genetic risk? 7:52 How is the genetic testing being analyzed? 9:03  What can at-home genetic testing tell us about Alzheimer’s disease? 10:06 How essential is the role of genetic counselor? 11:47 Have we found any genetic risks related to the aging process? 13:21 What advice do you have for people interested in maximizing their genetic outcome when it comes to Alzheimer's disease risk? 14:40 
2/18/202016 minutes, 56 seconds
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Exercise Your Mind: Cognitively Stimulating Activities and Social Engagement

Our guest, Dr. Kimberly Mueller, joins us to discuss cognitively stimulating activities and the impact of social engagement on brain health. Guest: Kimberly Mueller, PhD, CCC-SLP, Assistant Professor, Department of Communications Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison Episode Topics: What are cognitively stimulating activities? 1:25 Recent studies: 2:50 Are some activities better than others? 9:00 Are Jeopardy or other “active” television shows considered cognitively stimulating? 10:23 Are board games, crossword puzzles, and brain games considered cognitively stimulating activities? 11:22 Is there evidence showing the benefits of social engagement? 15:08 Advice for maintaining and strengthening brain health: 18:37
2/4/202021 minutes, 28 seconds
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Bonus Episode: Current Research into Frontotemporal Dementia

In this bonus episode, we continue our conversation with Dr. Howie Rosen on Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). On last week’s episode, Dr. Rosen spoke on the genetic risk factors, trajectories and family caregiving experiences of FTD. Now, our conversation turns to the research looking into how the disease affects self-awareness, biomarkers and early detection, as well as ways people can volunteer for a research study. Guest: Howard “Howie” Rosen, MD, behavioral neurologist at the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center Episode Topics:         FTD and self-awareness: 1:10         Research into biomarkers for Frontotemporal Dementia: 4:42         How can people help the research: 11:40
1/28/202014 minutes, 35 seconds
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Understanding and Managing Frontotemporal Dementia

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a type of dementia caused by degeneration in the temporal and frontal lobes of the brain. Our guest discusses the symptoms, risk factors, prevalence, and course of the disease, along with information on how a doctor diagnoses FTD and what families and caregivers can do after diagnosis. Guest: Howard “Howie” Rosen, MD, behavioral neurologist at the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center Episode Topics: A definition of Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) 1:02 How common is FTD? 3:53 Genetic risk factors of FTD: 4:30 Non-genetic risk factors of FTD: 6:40 Symptoms of FTD: 8:40 How a clinician diagnoses FTD: 14:03 What is the course of the disease? 16:20 What to do after a diagnosis: 18:51 Family and caregiver experience of FTD: 22:36 Community support and networking: 25:53
1/22/202028 minutes, 34 seconds
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It Takes Two to Tango: The Importance of Amyloid and Tau in Cognitive Decline

Our guests, Dr. Rebecca Koscik and Dr. Tobey Betthauser, are researchers investigating the trajectory of amyloid and tau proteins over time and the significance of amyloid chronicity. Koscik and Betthauser discuss their two recent publications on the topic and how amyloid PET scans have helped scientists better understand the early brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Guests: Rebecca Koscik, PhD, senior scientist, Tobey Betthauser, PhD, postdoctoral fellow, University of Wisconsin-Madison In this episode, we discuss ... How amyloid PET tracers work 7:17 Published research on amyloid duration 12:01 Research supporting amyloid chronicity 18:14
1/7/202025 minutes, 52 seconds
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What We Have Learned from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention Study

Our guest is Dr. Sterling Johnson, associate director of the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and principal investigator of the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The WRAP study is one of the largest and longest-running observational studies of Alzheimer's disease in the world. Dr. Johnson shares study findings, discusses advancements in brain imaging, and introduces the concept of amyloid chronicity. Guest: Sterling Johnson, PhD, professor of medicine (geriatrics), University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Show Notes: What is the WRAP study? 3:28 Findings from the study: 8:06 WRAP studies outside of Wisconsin: 10:59 What is amyloid chronicity? 15:19  
12/10/201922 minutes, 42 seconds
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Considerations for Caregivers in Indian Country

Dr. J. Neil Henderson is an expert on diabetes and dementia, as well as creating culturally specific caregiver training programs for people who care for American Indian elders. Dr. Henderson, who is Oklahoma Choctaw, discusses cultural influences on caregiving and his work in improving brain health among American Indians and rural populations. Guest: J. Neil Henderson, PhD, professor, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth campus; executive director, Memory Keepers Medical Discovery Team on Health Disparities Show Notes: Trainable caregiving skills: 1:07 Impact of culture on caregiving: 6:29 American Indian and rural health disparities in memory: 10:35  
11/26/201916 minutes, 39 seconds
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Early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease: What to Know and What to Expect

People diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease before the age of 65 are said to have early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. While this diagnosis is rare, the condition is very serious for the patient and their loved ones. Our guest helps define the disease and its symptoms, walks listeners through a diagnosis, and points to unique considerations for patients and their caregivers. Guest: Susanne Seeger, MD, associate professor (clinical) of neurology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health  Key Moments: Defining early-onset Alzheimer’s disease and its symptoms: 0:58 Differentiating vascular and frontotemporal dementia from early-onset Alzheimer’s disease: 7:19 Most common memory and thinking complaints: 9:27 Diagnosing early-onset Alzheimer’s disease: 11:15 Issues people face after an early-onset Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis: 12:50 Where to go for help after a diagnosis: 14:35 Genetic considerations for patients and family members: 19:36
11/14/201924 minutes, 47 seconds
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Palliative Care and Hospice Conversations for Dementia Patients, Families and Caregivers

A common concern for families and dementia caregivers is when to start talking about palliative care and hospice with and for their loved ones with dementia. Our guest, Dr. Kate Schueller, recommends these conversations happen soon after a diagnosis, when the dementia patient can still be involved in planning their care. This episode talks about the difference between palliative care and hospice, the right time to initiative services, and other considerations for patients, families, and caregivers. Guest: Dr. Kate Schueller, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Division of Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Key Moments: The difference between palliative care and hospice: 0:50 How palliative care helps dementia: 4:49 Further steps for families: 10:17 What palliative care and hospice offer for grief: 16:07
10/22/201918 minutes, 28 seconds
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Building the Brain: Finding the Cognitive Benefits of Physical Activity

To many people, exercise can seem like an uncertain and intimidating new world. The confusing marketing around it can make it hard to find a healthy, sustainable exercise plan. But it's important for people to fit movement into their lives because a growing body of research is showing the positive effects that physical activity can have on your brain. Our guests Sarah Lose and Max Gaitan, research specialists and exercise physiologists, discuss building cognitive resilience, defining physical activity, and researching exercise and its links with brain health. Guests: Sarah Lose, Max Gaitan, Research Specialists and Exercise Physiologists, Okonkwo Lab, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison “Overall, what our lab has found, is that physical activity and fitness can diminish or dampen both the effects of age and a genetic risk, or predisposition, to developing Alzheimer's disease." - Sarah Lose (9:57) Key Moments: Clarifying the terms in exercise research: 1:21 Defining and understanding cognitive resilience: 4:29 Can physical activity help memory? 7:20 The future for exercise research: 12:22 Tips on exercise and staying healthy: 15:54  
10/8/201919 minutes, 16 seconds
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When Good Becomes Bad: Researching the Impact of Neuroinflammation

Inflammation is a common response throughout the body that fights injury and infection and works to rebuild cells after damage. Inflammation works the same way in the brain, but sometimes the inflammatory response meets damage it can’t manage and becomes dysregulated. Our guest Dr. Linda Van Eldik discusses her research into the connections between neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases like dementia, and how this research can help inform the medical community about drug-based treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.  Guest: Dr. Linda Van Eldik, Director, Sanders-Brown Center on Aging
9/24/201918 minutes, 44 seconds