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CoastLine

English, Cultural, 1 season, 99 episodes, 3 days, 9 hours, 15 minutes
About
CoastLine is a variety interview, arts, and occasional news show, hosted by Rachel Lewis Hilburn.Each week on CoastLine, we meet extraordinary humans -- scholars, writers, dancers, artists, comedians, scientists -- and we take a deep dive into their extraordinary ideas and lives.Subscribe to the CoastLine podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. To find the podcast, search WHQR CoastLine. Contact us at [email protected] airs on WHQR 91.3 FM each Wednesday at noon and each Sunday from 2 to 3 PM.
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CoastLine: David Gessner and daughter Hadley on what climate science reveals about the earth in 2063 and why it's personal (rebroadcast from January 16, 2024)

A Traveler’s Guide to the End of the World: Tales of Fire, Wind, and Water, is the newest book from nature writer and New York Times bestselling author David Gessner. His daughter, Hadley, is an undergraduate at New York University. They join us to explore what climate science tells us about the prospect of a hotter, drier, more storm-prone, less livable planet by 2063, the year she turns 60.
3/18/202449 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Orrin Pilkey on surviving climate change catastrophes

Climate change is coming for life on earth – in the form of floods, more severe and destructive storms, drought, ocean acidification, marine and terrestrial heat waves, water supply problems, air pollution. The list goes on, but humans can adapt, mitigate, and maybe even survive.That's the focus of Dr. Orrin Pilkey's newest book, Escaping Nature: How to Survive Global Climate Change.
3/15/202448 minutes, 29 seconds
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CoastLine: Remembering Lenny Simpson (1948-2024) and his "pay it forward" credo

When Lenny Simpson was just 5 years old, tennis great Althea Gibson handed him a tennis racket and called him "champ". That moment changed his life. He went on at age 15 to play his mentor Arthur Ashe in the U.S. Open. Lenny Simpson returned to Wilmington in 2013 and launched One Love Tennis in honor of the mentors who did so much to help him live into his potential.
3/12/202449 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: Artist Thomas Sayre, musician Tift Merritt explore sacred space in Four Walls at the CAM

Singer / songwriter Tift Merritt and visual artist Thomas Sayre explore the unorthodox making of an upcoming show at the Cameron Art Museum called Four Walls.In this episode, Sayre raises questions about the sacred structures that undergird society, Tift Merritt interrogates the form of concert, and CAM Executive Director Heather Wilson explains why the ongoing challenge to previously-accepted concepts is part of her job.
3/6/202450 minutes
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CoastLine: How Peace Corps service influenced four volunteers who worked in Ukraine, Namibia, Armenia, and Tonga

Since 1961, the Peace Corps, envisioned and created by President John F. Kennedy, has sent volunteers around the globe to help developing countries. The obvious aim is to meet the goals identified by the host country – not the Americans. But just as important are the relationships that develop from this work, promoting world peace and friendship.
2/26/202450 minutes
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CoastLine: Palestinian-American on his culture and why he started rescuing animals in the West Bank (Rebroadcast from December 19, 2023)

"Mahatma Gandi said the way you measure a society is how they treat the weakest in the society."Maad Abu-Ghazalah says this is why he started rescuing abused and abandoned dogs and donkeys in the West Bank. As a Palestinian-American with family still there, he explores his culture and his hopes for peace.
2/20/202450 minutes
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CoastLine: Appearing on The Voice transformed the way musician Carlos Rising saw his "weaknesses"

He won a spot on Blake Shelton's last team in 2023, after caving to family pressure to audition for the NBC show. And that's when the way Carlos Rising thought about his musical talent began to shift.
2/12/202449 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Breaking the News is a study on inclusivity for both film team and the news team at The 19th*

Breaking The News was supposed to be a documentary about a new nonpartisan, nonprofit newsroom called The 19th*, started by two women who wanted to cover news at the intersection of gender, politics, and policy. But when The 19th* launched in early 2020, so did an international pandemic. The way the filmmakers had to film changed. And the story they thought they were telling also changed.
2/7/202449 minutes, 34 seconds
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CoastLine: Disappearing grasslands major threat to biodiversity in coastal plain of SE NC

UNCW restoration ecologist Amy Long is rehabilitating local tidal marshes, grasslands, and savannahs. Strategic restoration can bring back biodiversity that was nearly lost, as evidenced by the New Hanover County Landfill property. Two dramatic examples: diverse butterfly populations and regular sightings of bald eagles.
1/30/202449 minutes, 57 seconds
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CoastLine: UNCW Study raises questions about mental health and disconnect from nature

Research clearly shows that spending time in nature is critical for mental, physical, even cognitive health. Can our mental health crises make a stronger case for conservation?
1/23/202449 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: David Gessner and daughter Hadley on what climate science reveals about the earth in 2063 and why it's personal

A Traveler’s Guide to the End of the World: Tales of Fire, Wind, and Water, is the newest book from nature writer and New York Times bestselling author David Gessner. His daughter, Hadley, is an undergraduate at New York University. They join us to explore what climate science tells us about the prospect of a hotter, drier, more storm-prone, less livable planet by 2063, the year she turns 60.
1/16/202449 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Invasive plants are changing NC wetlands; soundscapes are helping scientists figure out how

Evolutionary Ecologist Stacy Endriss of UNCW’s Environmental Sciences Department is exploring how invasive plants are affecting North Carolina wetlands. She’s also looking at creative approaches – including biocontrol – for dealing with the impacts.
1/9/202449 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: Racial healing activists of all races need to interrogate themselves first, says Dr. Catherine Meeks (rebroadcast from August 30, 2023)

“A fundamental question that each of us must answer is: Who are the victims of racism? Upon careful investigation, it seems quite clear that the answer is ‘everyone’.” Dr. Catherine Meeks, Exec. Director, Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing
1/2/202450 minutes, 5 seconds
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In the Wild Coastal Plain with surprisingly wild suburban ponds, amid pervasive pollution (rebroadcast from Oct. 17, 2023)

Andy Wood: Bullfrog tadpoles have an alkaloid in their skin. It’s a chemical compound that tastes a little bit like rotten lemon and Ajax. It’s a horrible taste, so very few things eat them.RLH: Have you tried this? It’s a very, um, specific description.AW: I would never admit that.In the wild coastal plain of southeastern NC, Andy Wood and I explore the wildness of suburban stormwater management ponds. What we find is, no surprise, quite a surprise.
12/27/202349 minutes, 58 seconds
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CoastLine: Palestinian-American on his culture and why he started rescuing animals in the West Bank

"Mahatma Gandi said the way you measure a society is how they treat the weakest in the society."Maad Abu-Ghazalah says this is why he started rescuing abused and abandoned dogs and donkeys in the West Bank. As a Palestinian-American with family still there, he explores his culture and his hopes for peace.
12/19/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Needs of vulnerable people, animals, and plants escalated in 2023, say advocates

The most vulnerable populations around the region struggled during 2023 – including humans, animals, and even native plants. What does the state of these groups say about us?
12/12/202349 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Justin Catanoso on Enviva crisis, wood pellet industry, why environmental reporting doesn't always have two equal sides

Enviva company officials assured critics that wood pellets are mostly made of waste: treetops, limbs, even sawdust. Not true, according to reporting from environmental journalist and WFU Professor Justin Catanoso, who also says the science shows wood pellet burning contributes more to the climate crisis than burning coal.
12/5/202349 minutes, 58 seconds
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CoastLine: Darien Brooks says treatment changed profound autism to high-functioning (Rebroadcast from July 25, 2023)

Alice Brooks says when she learned that her son, Darien, had profound autism spectrum disorder, she cried on the front porch all night. Today, she says Darien and his diagnosis are the greatest blessings of her life.
11/28/202350 minutes, 1 second
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CoastLine: Female military veterans on standing up for their own rights while serving

Cooking food, working as nurses, working in maintenance and repair units, dressing as men: for millennia, women have worked near and actually on the battlefield. But they still make up less than a quarter of the active U.S. military force, and they still face career barriers.Despite fear of retaliation in the face of misogyny, three local female veterans, Deborah Dicks Maxwell, Marcia Morgan, and Veronica Carter, say they're proud of the times they spoke up for their rights and dignity.
11/24/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Black Barbie, the film, celebrates Black women, reveals deep cultural influence (Rebroadcast from August 22, 2023)

Black Barbie, the documentary film by Lagueria Davis, explores the way the doll shapes culture, and ultimately the way people think about themselves. It’s a close look at representation, starting with the filmmaker's aunt, Beulah Mae Mitchell, who was on the original Barbie manufacturing line with Mattel and played a key role in bringing Black Barbie to life.
11/14/202350 minutes, 1 second
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CoastLine: Military veterans on life in the service and why it's strange to talk about it

"Everybody that goes to combat, it touches them in a certain way. It's hard to talk about some of those things."Marine Corps veteran Steven Shortt says so many like him want to connect with civilians, especially given the growing divide between the military and civilian communities. But when one of your core values is serving a mission larger than yourself, it gets weird.
11/7/202349 minutes, 57 seconds
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CoastLine: Fear-based political agenda led to 1898 Wilmington massacre, says LeRae Umfleet

What makes history come alive? When you can see repercussions, for good or for ill, in the present day. It’s why North Carolina state historian LeRae Umfleet, the author of the state’s official report on Wilmington’s 1898 massacre and coup d'état, keeps talking about it.
10/31/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Who are the OGs of standup comedy? It's complicated.

The history of standup comedy is so difficult to separate according to culture, that it becomes surprisingly transcendent of race, ethnicity, and cultural background. But does that equate to being a model of diversity, equity, and inclusion? That’s a work in progress and one of the questions we explore.
10/24/202349 minutes, 59 seconds
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In the Wild Coastal Plain with surprisingly wild suburban ponds, amid pervasive pollution

Andy Wood: Bullfrog tadpoles have an alkaloid in their skin. It’s a chemical compound that tastes a little bit like rotten lemon and Ajax. It’s a horrible taste, so very few things eat them.RLH: Have you tried this? It’s a very, um, specific description.AW: I would never admit that.In the wild coastal plain of southeastern NC, Andy Wood and I explore the wildness of suburban stormwater management ponds. What we find is, no surprise, quite a surprise.
10/17/202349 minutes, 58 seconds
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CoastLine: Blues musician Robert Lighthouse says tour of war-torn Ukraine fundamentally changed him (Rebroadcast from May 2, 2023)

Blues musician Robert Lighthouse may have grown up in Sweden, but as soon as he turned 18 he came to the United States to live with a native American family on a Hopi reservation and learn about his beloved Mississippi Delta Blues. He had no idea that decades later, he'd travel to a war zone to make music for people living with daily terror. He also had no idea how profoundly that trip would affect him.
10/10/202349 minutes, 58 seconds
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CoastLine: Michelin star chef Iliana Regan on gender, fear, and foraging (Rebroadcast from April 11, 2023)

Iliana Regan is owner and chef of The Milkweed Inn – a rustic, woodsy, and hard-to-reach getaway in the Hiawatha National Forest on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. She’s also a Michelin starred chef and the author of two books. On this episode, how she thinks about gender – especially her own, how she deals with fear and why people are scary, and what she found on a foraging trip through the saltwater marshes of southeastern North Carolina.
10/6/202349 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Comedians Cliff Cash and Nancy Witter on touring and finding the funny

Both Cliff Cash and Nancy Witter are professional comedians, have played to sold-out houses across these United States, and call the Cape Fear region home. On this episode they explore the craft of comedy and how it's evolved for them.
9/26/202351 minutes, 2 seconds
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In the Wild Coastal Plain with carnivorous plants

In each episode of In The Wild Coastal Plain, we meet a plant or an animal endemic to the southeastern North Carolina biodiversity hotspot – so we can better understand our coastal plain ecosystem and who lives here with us.Today, we’re exploring Holly Shelter, a nature preserve and game land in Pender County that boasts tens of thousands of acres -- one of the last great pieces of connected natural area in southeastern North Carolina. That’s because humans are rapidly building all around it.
9/12/202324 minutes, 10 seconds
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CoastLine: Soil scientist Britt Moore: Environmental Justice should guide culturally-responsive science

Environmental justice can be complicated. The way studies are set up, the way the researchers communicate with the subjects of the study, and what the scientists do with the results – all those protocols are part of what Dr. Britt Moore calls “culturally-responsive science”.
9/5/202350 minutes, 2 seconds
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CoastLine: Soil scientist Britt Moore: Environmental Justice should guide culturally-responsive science

Environmental justice can be complicated. The way studies are set up, the way the researchers communicate with the subjects of the study, and what the scientists do with the results – all those protocols are part of what Dr. Britt Moore calls “culturally-responsive science”.
9/5/202350 minutes, 2 seconds
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CoastLine: Racial healing activists of all races need to interrogate themselves first, says Dr. Catherine Meeks

“A fundamental question that each of us must answer is: Who are the victims of racism? Upon careful investigation, it seems quite clear that the answer is ‘everyone’.” Dr. Catherine Meeks, Exec. Director, Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing
8/29/202350 minutes, 5 seconds
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CoastLine: Black Barbie, the film, celebrates Black women, reveals deep cultural influence

Black Barbie, the documentary film by Lagueria Davis, explores the way the doll shapes culture, and ultimately the way people think about themselves. It’s a close look at representation, starting with the filmmaker's aunt, Beulah Mae Mitchell, who was on the original Barbie manufacturing line with Mattel and played a key role in bringing Black Barbie to life.
8/22/202350 minutes, 1 second
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CoastLine: How retired Marine Grady Kurpasi landed in a Ukraine war zone and the long journey home

Kevin Maurer, an award-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author has written extensively about and inside war zones. When he heard of the mysterious disappearance of retired Marine and Wilmington resident Grady Kurpasi during a Russian ambush in Ukraine, he started investigating. That led to an article about the extraordinary life and death of Grady Kurpasi in Rolling Stone Magazine. Former Marine and close friend Don Turner also joins us to shed light on Grady's disappearance and the efforts to bring him home.
8/15/202350 minutes, 4 seconds
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CoastLine: Sara Johnson Allen on writing her first novel and how place shapes us

Down Here We Come Up, which took more than fifteen years to write, started as an exploration of the jarring class differences between the northern and southern United States. But the novel Sara Johnson Allen actually completed, set just outside of Wilmington, NC, raises even deeper questions about what defines family and a home place, and whether ancestral ties are enough.
8/7/202350 minutes, 1 second
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In the Wild Coastal Plain of SE NC with the red-cockaded woodpecker and longleaf pine

As natural areas disappear, we’re taking a closer look at what we’re losing, species by species, in a new series called In The Wild Coastal Plain. In this second episode, we explore the intertwined fates of the red-cockaded woodpecker and longleaf pine.
7/31/202328 minutes, 12 seconds
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CoastLine: In The Wild Coastal Plain with Andy Wood, the red-cockaded woodpecker, and longleaf pine

As natural areas disappear, we’re taking a closer look at what we’re losing, species by species, in a new CoastLine series called In The Wild Coastal Plain. On this edition of CoastLine, we explore why the intertwined fates of the red-cockaded woodpecker and longleaf pine are important harbingers of the area's fate.
7/31/202349 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Darien Brooks says treatment changed profound autism to high-functioning

Alice Brooks says when she learned that her son, Darien, had profound autism spectrum disorder, she cried on the front porch all night. Today, she says Darien and his diagnosis are the greatest blessings of her life.
7/25/202350 minutes, 1 second
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CoastLine: Wildlife rehabilitators on caring for animals and how to avoid doing harm

Summer is a busy time in southeastern North Carolina for wildlife rehabilitators. It is against the law to take a wild animal into captivity unless you have a license from the state. But well-meaning people do this, often without understanding how they're probably doing more harm than good.
7/18/202350 minutes
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In the Wild Coastal Plain of SE NC with the American Beaver

Andy Wood: "Beavers are an ally for maintaining water quality, air quality, biodiversity, and flood protection. One beaver pond can retain millions of gallons of stormwater, slowly releasing it into the stream so that downstream homes aren't suddenly flooded with a rush of water."There's so much to learn about this animal that many developers consider a pest.
7/3/202326 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: In the Wild Coastal Plain SE NC with the American Beaver

As natural areas disappear in southeastern North Carolina, we’re taking a closer look at what we’re losing, species by species, in a new series called In The Wild Coastal Plain. Andy Wood is our guide, and in this edition of CoastLine, we explore how it came to be and why the American Beaver is a keystone species (not a pest).
7/3/202350 minutes, 1 second
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CoastLine: Filmmaker Montana Cypress on growing up in the Florida Everglades and Miccosukee alligator "wrestling"

When most Americans see a large alligator, they see a menace. When filmmaker Montana Cypress sees one, he respects the potential danger. But he grew up seeing his fellow Miccosukee Tribe members work with alligators in front of audiences in the Florida Everglades. Tourists call it wrestling, but Montana sees a profound connection between human and animal.
6/27/202349 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Birding ethics and helping backyard birds thrive

When birds started dying from known and mysterious diseases, biologists told us backyard bird feeders pose risks to birds that include disease, collision, and predation. Jill Peleuses of Wild Bird & Garden and Cape Fear Bird Observatory explains how to mitigate those risks and actually help our local and visiting birds.
6/20/202349 minutes, 53 seconds
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CoastLine: Jamir Jumoke on surviving recidivism

What does it mean to get sucked into the school-to-prison pipeline? Jamir Jumoke describes traumatic early years and what it took to break the cycle.
6/13/202349 minutes, 57 seconds
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CoastLine: NPR Founding Mother Susan Stamberg on the changing rules of journalism, understanding modern art, and Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish

NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg visited Wilmington, NC in late May 2023. Two interviews, one in front of several hundred people, one in WHQR's CoastLine studio, reveal the origins of the NPR sound, a fiercely rigorous journalist, and a voraciously curious woman who injects humor into almost anything.
6/6/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Photojournalist Alexander Rivera, Jr., descendant of 1898 victim, influenced U.S. civil rights

One photojournalist from North Carolina influenced the civil rights struggle in the United States, enjoyed a friendship with President Richard Nixon, was a member of the first African American press delegation on an official U.S. diplomatic trip overseas, and descended from one of the victims of the Wilmington 1898 coup d’etat. Alexander Rivera, Jr. also lit a fire in the imagination of UNCW History Professor Glen Harris, who wrote his biography: Social Justice and Liberation Struggles: The photojournalistic and public relations career of Alexander McAllister Rivera Junior
5/23/202349 minutes, 54 seconds
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CoastLine: Dana Sachs on joining the volunteer effort to help migrants suffering in Greek refugee camps

So many who brave dangerous treks across unfriendly terrain and tumultuous oceans to escape war, violence, and poverty find themselves stuck in camps that do not satisfy the most basic human needs: sanitation, enough food, dry clothes. Author Dana Sachs explains how a grassroots volunteer effort has sprung up where governments and NGOs have failed.
5/9/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Blues musician Robert Lighthouse says tour of war-torn Ukraine fundamentally changed him

Blues musician Robert Lighthouse may have grown up in Sweden, but as soon as he turned 18 he came to the United States to live with a native American family on a Hopi reservation and learn about his beloved Mississippi Delta Blues. He had no idea that decades later, he'd travel to a war zone to make music for people living with daily terror. He also had no idea how profoundly that trip would affect him.
5/2/202349 minutes, 58 seconds
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CoastLine: Roger Shew on the Seven Natural Wonders of SE NC

He calls them the Seven Natural Wonders of southeastern North Carolina. Can you guess what they are? We live in a biodiversity hotspot – for now, anyway — and environmental scientist Roger Shew is hoping that the more people learn about these natural wonders, the more they’ll care about saving them.
4/18/202349 minutes, 53 seconds
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CoastLine: Michelin star chef Iliana Regan on gender, fear, and foraging

Iliana Regan is owner and chef of The Milkweed Inn – a rustic, woodsy, and hard-to-reach getaway in the Hiawatha National Forest on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. She’s also a Michelin starred chef and the author of two books. On this episode, how she thinks about gender – especially her own, how she deals with fear and why people are scary, and what she found on a foraging trip through the saltwater marshes of southeastern North Carolina.
4/11/202349 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Ellie Foumbi explores trauma and forgiveness in Our Father, the Devil

Our Father, the Devil is Ellie Foumbi's first feature film, and she has a distribution deal. The Tribeca Film Festival calls the lead performances "Oscar-worthy" — in a story that explores trauma, what forgiveness means, and whether anything is unforgiveable.
4/4/202349 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: Cape Fear Chorale turns 25; Founder Jerry Cribbs passes baton to Dr. Aaron Peisner

In 1998, Jerry Cribbs took a risk and started a choral group that performs two free, high-quality concerts a year. 25 years later, a new artistic director takes the helm, Dr. Aaron Peisner, as Cape Fear Chorale – Jerry’s original vision – is going strong.
3/28/202349 minutes, 53 seconds
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CoastLine: Brave Conversations on Race explores cultural gaps, fosters unlikely friendships

Legions of people have tried to bridge gaps – gaps between political opposites, between the genders, between generations, and among races. Some have varying levels of success, for a time. But what happens when the structured conversations go away? Do people continue their connections? One local effort seems to be fostering real friendships among people of different backgrounds and races.
3/21/202349 minutes, 54 seconds
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CoastLine: Mama Bears doc explores how a group of Christian women support their LGBTQ kids despite church condemnation

Gay or trans kids are at infinitely higher risk of harm if rejected by the adults around them. In ultra-conservative churches that condemn LGBTQ+ identities, parents often have to decide between their child and their church community. But a group of women that call themselves the Mama Bears is seeking to change that. Filmmaker Daresha Kyi joined us to talk about the power of Mama Bear love.
3/15/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Frying Pan Shoals study to document fish behavior and shoals makeup -- possibly for beach sand

Finding sand for beach renourishment is a never-ending quest for beach towns. Could Frying Pan Shoals be the answer? BOEM is paying for a study of the shoals as the National Marine Fisheries Service worries dredging could harm this essential fish habitat.
3/7/202349 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: Social entrepreneur Richard Johnson on why he wants to revitalize Burgaw, grow NC live oaks, and give away a restaurant

Why is Burgaw likely to get a hot new restaurant in the near future? How do you learn to be a tree farmer in a few short years? And how much money is enough? These are some of the questions we explore with social entrepreneur Richard Johnson, who made his fortune in the dot-com era, retired to Wilmington, NC, and has his revitalization sights set on a tiny town in Pender County, population about 3000.
2/28/202349 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: White people on the work of antiracism

Black History Month brings a raised awareness of people left out of America’s mainstream historical narrative. It can generate much-needed discussion of current areas of inequality among the races. But so often the burden for leading these explorations lands on the shoulders of our Black teachers, historians, and leaders. Not on this episode. Listen to two white people, Professor Kim Cook and Jim Downey, undertake the work with humility and some inevitable awkwardness.
2/21/202349 minutes, 49 seconds
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CoastLine: Home From School: The Children of Carlisle film explores intergenerational Native American trauma

The mission of the Carlisle Industrial School: “Kill the Indian” and “Save the Man.” We're learning more about so-called boarding schools from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, engineered by white men to educate Native American children. While the stories are a new component of American history for white people, the trauma they perpetrated spans generations. Geoff O'Gara made a film about one of the affected tribes.
2/14/202349 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Deforestation, wetlands destruction, ghost forests, all forms of land degradation in the Cape Fear region

Land degradation is a serious problem in Africa as fertile grasslands get drier and thorny vegetation with deeper roots takes over. Wildlife and domesticated livestock alike have fewer places to graze – which, of course affects humans. But desertification is not the only form of land degradation. Deforestation and destroying wetlands are other forms. And that’s happening right here in the Cape Fear region.
2/7/202349 minutes, 54 seconds
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CoastLine: Winter garden to-do list and what to plant with Tom Ericson

Tom Ericson closed his well-loved garden supply store, The Transplanted Garden, in 2022 for personal reasons. But he's sharing his expertise on what to plant in the (slightly!) colder winter months, what your winter garden to-do list should look like, and why pruning hydrangeas can remove the coming blooms.
1/31/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Human trafficking is on the rise in NC but public education helps

The Cape Fear region sees its share of human trafficking thanks, in part, to the tourism economy. And as reports of cases rise in NC, local nonprofit leaders hope to educate the public about the signs.
1/24/202349 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Ana Shellem on harvesting shellfish for star chefs, healing from trauma, and the secrets of the marsh

"Healing is hard. But you're not alone anymore. Keep going." It's a note that Ana Shellem wrote to herself about healing from serious childhood trauma that included sexual abuse, eating disorders, and psychological abuse and neglect. She's now a sought-after commercial fisherman supplying oysters, clams, mussels, stone crabs and the occasional whelk to superstar chefs in NC. She's also a Marine Fisheries Commissioner, appointed by Governor Roy Cooper.
1/17/202350 minutes
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CoastLine: Punk music videographers Emily Armstrong and Pat Ivers on recording early legends and the impact of AIDS

Emily Armstrong and Pat Ivers were in their 20s but had the audacity to lug around heavy video cameras and lighting equipment. Through their relentless embrace of their passion for punk, these two women wound up creating a comprehensive video catalog of important punk icons. They accomplished all this in a male-dominated, aggressive, and sometimes violent milieu.
1/10/202349 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: The best ideas for a home cook's holiday table from Chefs Keith Rhodes & Dean Neff

Why are so many holiday traditions, religious and secular, celebrated during the darkest time of the year? Religious Scholar Dr. Herbert Berg explains. And two local chefs — Dean Neff of Seabird and Keith Rhodes of Catch offer simple holiday menu ideas for home cooks.
12/21/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Wilmington is on fire with new Black power, prosperity, and self-reliance, says documentarian Christopher Everett

Most of us know the story – or at least the basics – of the only successful coup d'état in American history. The 1898 Wilmington, NC massacre perpetrated by white supremacists which killed citizens, forced elected officials from office, and drove successful Black professionals out of the city. But documentary filmmaker Christopher Everett, who produced Wilmington On Fire in 2015, is working on Wilmington On Fire Part II. He's telling a new story of Black power, prosperity, and self-reliance fueling a resurgence of a thriving African American population in the port city.
12/13/202249 minutes, 54 seconds
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CoastLine: Vanishing Sands: Losing Beaches to Mining with Duke Professor Orrin Pilkey

Sea levels are rising. Storms are intensifying. And the world’s sandy beaches and dunes are more important than ever for the protection of coastal environments. And yet sand mining is on the increase — much of it for beach nourishment. But is beach nourishment doing what we want it do? And is the public money used for beach protection actually preserving a public resource for the public good?
12/6/202249 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Legions of local efforts target hunger and food insecurity, but the causes run deep

There's a food security plan in development through NC State's Cooperative Extension in New Hanover County. There's a grass-roots volunteer project that collects food from neighbors for monthly porch drops. Mike Claxton offers observations from one of the larger food pantries in Brunswick County. Cierra Washington of the Northside Food Cooperative talks about a deeper approach to feeding people. These efforts are all making a real difference in peoples' lives in the Cape Fear region. And, yes, hunger persists in one of the wealthiest parts of North Carolina.
11/30/202249 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: Philip Gerard, 1955-2022: "My defining identity has always been American."

Philip Gerard contended that the unhealed wounds and unresolved issues from the Civil War were a major driver of today’s Great American Divide. His next book idea, Toward a More Perfect Union: Why America Lost the Civil War and How to Win It Now, will remain unwritten. But he offers some of the ideas that would have gone into that book in other places. We take a closer look at his consistency and courage in this remembrance of a rich, well-lived, albeit abbreviated life.
11/15/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Ricky & Cherie Kelly of Black Beach, White Beach on making films and keeping your day job

After the NAACP filed at least two lawsuits over discriminatory practices, Ricky Kelly knew the story of Black Bike Week in Atlantic Beach, SC had to be told. But how do you make a documentary film when you've never made a film before and you don't even own a camera? Ricky bought a camera, and he and his wife, Cherie embarked upon what would become a new filmmaking career.
11/7/202249 minutes, 54 seconds
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CoastLine: Alicia Inshiradu on her twenty-plus-year passion project about 1898 and why Wilmington needs a catharsis to heal

What The River Knows opens on Thalian Hall’s mainstage on November 10th, the 124th anniversary of the 1898 white supremacist massacre. Playwright Alicia Inshiradu has worked on what she calls a "passion project" for more than two decades.
11/1/202249 minutes, 37 seconds
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CoastLine: Alfred Schnog on his childhood escape from Nazi Germany with his family

As a 7-year-old, Alfred Schnog watched through hotel room curtains as the Nazis gleefully destroyed Jewish-owned businesses. His parents had encouraged their young boys to watch and told them to never forget what they were seeing. He never did forget. And he told us the story 2018. He passed away the very next year, in 2019, three days after the 81st anniversary of Kristallnacht – that Night of Broken Glass.
10/25/202250 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Mallory Cash on letting motherhood and curiosity lead from lawyer to editorial photographer

When Mallory Cash started her professional life as a lawyer, she never imagined she'd let that career go in just a few short years. When she had her first child, she wanted to document how her daughter made her feel, and photographing the baby was the best way to do that. She also never dreamed her desire to chronicle her child's development would lead to an impressive and growing portfolio of southeastern luminaries — or a journalistic collaboration with Pulitzer Grantee Melba Newsome.
10/17/202249 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Hazing, intractable and entrenched, with grieving parent Jack Abele and filmmaker Byron Hurt

Despite the fact that school administrators across the U.S. say they won’t tolerate hazing, they’ve launched outreach efforts to educate students and parents, and they’ve suspended Greek organizations that violate school policy, the practice of hazing and the resulting long-term injuries and deaths continue.That’s the focus of award-winning filmmaker Byron Hurt’s most recent documentary, called Hazing, and it’s what we explore on this episode of CoastLine.
10/10/202249 minutes, 49 seconds
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CoastLine: Climate-friendly yards can evolve in stages, forgo raking leaves, and more gardening wisdom with Barbara J. Sullivan

Sure, you have a non-native invasive species, a beautiful plant, by the way, in a container on your back patio. There's no way it will wind up in a wild space, choking out native plants, depleting the local ecosystem, starving the pollinators. No way. Right? Wrong. Barbara J. Sullivan, who once was a traditional, English garden enthusiast, keeping things clipped, raked, and tucked, took her time accepting some of these ideas. She also implemented them in stages. As she explains, once you understand your private green space as part of an inseparable whole, you will never see it the same way again.
10/4/202249 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: Gender expansiveness in kids, how it's different from transgender, and why that matters

Research confirms that it’s not only trans kids, but also gender-expansive kids, at increased risk of suicidal behavior and other risk factors for suicide. So why has this part of the rainbow become an argument to either prove transgender doesn't exist or that gender-expansive must be trans? It's an closer look of the meaning of gender-expansive with UNCW Professor Julie-Ann Scott Pollock.
9/29/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Scholar and Performer John-Paul Zaccarini on why artists need space devoid of the "white gaze" and what it means to be "produced as Black"

Imagine a space for artists in which the "white gaze" is not allowed. Professor John-Paul Zaccarini is creating FutureBlackSpace with just such protections. In this episode, we explore why. We also learn about intersectionality and what it means for him as a man who is reminded of his multiple marginalized identities each time he walks into white spaces.
9/19/202250 minutes, 5 seconds
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CoastLine: Damon Wayans on why there's a laugh on the other side of every groan in stand-up comedy

The breakout moment for Damon Wayans came on the show, In Living Color, which ran for four years in the early 1990s. It was the first Black sketch comedy show on network television. And while he’d already enjoyed a season on Saturday Night Live, In Living Color gave him the chance to showcase not only his comedic performing chops – but also his ability to write sketches and create characters.
9/13/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Melodie Homer on how losing her pilot husband on 9/11 shaped her life's work

First Officer LeRoy Homer fought terrorists on United Airlines Flight 93 after they stormed the cockpit. While the hijackers intended to direct the plane towards Washington, D.C., they could not disable the autopilot function. So they sent the plane plunging into a Pennsylvania field, killing everyone on board. LeRoy Homer's widow, Melodie Homer, has allowed her grief to shape her life's work, which includes improving aviation safety and helping underrepresented young people fulfill their dreams of flying.
9/6/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Elaine Brown on her ancestors, victims of Wilmington's 1898 coup d'état, and reclaiming her power through poetry

Joshua Halsey, Elaine’s great-great-grandfather, was shot 14 times and killed by white supremacists on November 10, 1898, leaving his wife, Sallie, a widow.Elaine Brown, born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, along with her siblings, are putting together the fragmented stories of their family and learning about how the massacre shaped their lives. In her personal and artistic life, she tells her stories as Poet E Spoken.
8/26/202249 minutes, 56 seconds
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CoastLine: Native plants in urban and suburban landscapes boost ecosystem, support human life

The suburban monoculture dominated largely by traditional lawns could be accelerating climate change and species extinction. Supporting biodiversity by installing native trees, shrubs, and other plants means you are directly supporting the systems on which human life depends. Yes, human life.On this edition of CoastLine, we explore native plants – what they are in southeastern North Carolina, the impact they have on climate change and biodiversity, and how to put more of them in your environment.
8/16/202249 minutes, 58 seconds
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CoastLine: Nina Repeta on landing her role in Dawson's Creek and the magic of letting go

Nina Repeta is forever recognizable as Bessie Potter, the older sister of Katie Holmes’ character on the iconic TV show, Dawson’s Creek, which continues to find new generations of fans. She's also appeared in several episodes of Matlock (and died several times), Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood (NOT Fried Green Tomatoes), and Radioland Murders.
8/9/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Tony Rivenbark, 1948-2022: "All I've done is theater my whole life."

Tony Rivenbark grew up in Duplin County and wanted to go to college at the smallest branch in the University of North Carolina system. So he came to Wilmington. He walked into Thalian Hall in 1966, which, as he says, for good or ill, set the course for the rest of his life. In this episode, we hear him talk about local history, Shakespeare, historic Thalian Hall, and the importance of story.
8/2/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Queer in the Cape Fear 2 - is "don't ask, don't tell" enough?

We meet a man who leads a local church and who volunteers on two foundations that support LGBTQ+ people and educational efforts. Rev. John McLaughlin talks about his work in the community, but he also shares his own story, which includes deep personal trauma. It’s that trauma that led him back to church and launched his search for a spiritual sanctuary where he could be gay and Christian.
7/27/202249 minutes, 57 seconds
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CoastLine: Micky Dolenz, the last surviving member of The Monkees, on music and why he performs (oh - and quantum physics)

Micky Dolenz, lead singer and drummer for The Monkees, agrees his most recognizable artistic achievement is his time on the TV show and with the band, but it hardly captures the breadth of his show-business career. Starting in the 1950s on the TV show Circus Boy, he played Corky, the waterboy for the elephants. He went on to perform in and direct musical theater in the West End, direct and produce TV shows for the BBC, and he continued touring as a musician. But his first loves remain architecture and science.
7/19/202250 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Micky Dolenz, the last surviving member of The Monkees, on music and why he performs (oh - and quantum physics)

Micky Dolenz, lead singer and drummer for The Monkees, agrees his most recognizable artistic achievement is his time on the TV show and with the band, but it hardly captures the breadth of his show-business career. Starting in the 1950s on the TV show Circus Boy, he played Corky, the waterboy for the elephants. He went on to perform in and direct musical theater in the West End, direct and produce TV shows for the BBC, and he continued touring as a musician. But his first loves remain architecture and science.
7/19/202250 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: Wiley Cash on the mysteries of creativity, surrendering, and making bad art

Wiley Cash is working to demystify the creative process for himself and his online community. Creativity, he says, comes through engagement with the world — observing it, surrendering to it. It’s his fascination with his own creative process and pointing others in the direction of their own creative flow, whether writing or some other art form, that we explore on this edition of CoastLine.
7/12/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Matt Sullivan on making The Hudsucker Proxy, One Tree Hill, and film jobs that can only be called weird

Matt Sullivan's film production responsibilities have ranged from puppeteering baby bats to icing a female actor's nipples to brushing out the nap on carpet to hide tracks. While he's moved up through the ranks from a nonunion jack-of-all-trades employee to a union department head as Set Decorator, he still sees the precision, discipline, clarity, and intelligence of a Coen Brothers' film as the most rewarding of his career.
7/5/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Philip Gerard on why Civil War issues on race and civil rights are the seat of today's Great National Divide

Author Philip Gerard contends the incorrect and incomplete narrative surrounding the Civil War perpetuates the great partisan divide. Once the gunfire ended and North Carolina rejoined the Union, questions about civil rights and race should have been settled. But they weren’t. The battle still rages. How to move towards a more perfect union? Education, he says, is key.
6/21/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: The women of Alpha Kappa Alpha on the commitment to service and what that looks like in Wilmington, NC

The women who join Alpha Kappa Alpha make a commitment to a lifetime of service. How that service is delivered and what the areas of focus are might differ from generation to generation and from city to city, but the end goal is the same: empowerment and expanded possibility for underserved people. Chrystal Fray and Jhaniqua Palmer are members of AKA's Wilmington chapter.
6/14/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Scott Davis on Wilmington Theater and a film career from Firestarter to Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Scott Davis started his professional film career as a set painter on Firestarter in the early 1980s. He also landed a small part in that project, and for almost four more decades, he continued what he calls his gypsy life as professional film crew member. He picked up a StarNews lifetime achievement award in 2019 for enduring contribution to Wilmington theater, which he shares with his brother-from-another-mother, Jeff Loy.
6/7/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Honey Head Filmmakers on flipping the script, making space for women in film

The Honey Head filmmakers describe what they do as putting a narrative spin on the creative world. The company is run and staffed by women. They say they’re breaking down barriers not only as female filmmakers — but as full-time working artists in Wilmington, North Carolina.
5/17/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Key Grip Bobby Huber on leaving the circus to join the film world and why "it was a cold, dark, rainy night" in a script is very bad news

After working on the movie, Firestarter, in Wilmington in the early 1980s, Bobby Huber rose through the ranks, his circus rigging experience preparing him well for the job of key grip. His work helped earn Oscars in cinematography for two films: Braveheart and Legends of the Fall.
5/10/202249 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: Key Grip Bobby Huber on leaving the circus to join the film world and why "it was a cold, dark, rainy night" in a script is very bad news

After working on the movie, Firestarter, in Wilmington in the early 1980s, Bobby Huber rose through the ranks, his circus rigging experience preparing him well for the job of key grip. His work helped earn Oscars in cinematography for two films: Braveheart and Legends of the Fall.
5/10/202249 minutes, 55 seconds
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CoastLine: How learning about deep-sea animals, including (and especially!) the eyeballs of shrimp, changes how we think about life in the deepest parts of the ocean

Researchers were shocked to find that the eyeballs of shrimp develop, not based on how deep they live in the ocean, but by the animal's ability to emit light through bioluminescence and the need they have to see the signals from other deep sea animals. In other words, the need to communicate could be a key factor. Dr. Lorian Schweikert also details how their underwater camera captured the first video ever of a giant squid in the Gulf of Mexico.
4/26/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: Stunt Coordinator Peter King talks filming Words on Bathroom Walls and his unexpected journey into stunt performing

The film Words on Bathroom Walls is hailed by some critics as a worthy step away from the stigma surrounding mental illness. Adapted from the Julia Walton novel, the film tells the story of Adam, who suffers from schizophrenia. He sees people who aren’t there, he hears voices, he witnesses phenomena not actually happening, and he feels the social isolation deeply. Hallucinations can be dramatic, when people or rooms suddenly go up in flames, physical fights break out, inky black swirls form. And for a film these effects require, yes, special effects, but also stunt performers. And that's where Peter King comes in.
4/20/202250 minutes
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CoastLine: "The time for talking is over." Great-great-grandchildren of The Daily Record's Alex Manly on white consumption of Black pain and why it's time for white people to do their own work towards racial reconciliation

Kieran Haile is the great-great-grandson of Alexander Manly, owner and publisher of The Daily Record, which was burned down in Wilmington, North Carolina by a white supremacist mob in 1898. Kieran and his wife, Priscilla, are uncovering their family’s past: both the triumphs and the pain, the wrongs done to them and the gifts the Manly line has given to the world. And in the process they are learning about themselves, introducing us to another great-great-grandchild of Alex Manly, Leila Haile, and insisting white people start doing their own work towards racial reconciliation.
4/12/202249 minutes, 59 seconds
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CoastLine: "It broke my hip." Kieran Haile, Alex Manly's great-great-grandson, on the "dark and terrible" intergenerational trauma of slavery

It wasn’t until Kieran Haile broke his hip at age 29 that he began to learn about how traumas from America’s early years are more than a dissociated story from the past. His brittle bone disease, he learned, is a consequence of slavery in the American south, when white slaveowners would rape Black women – eventually, perhaps, raping their own daughters. Kieran Haile, the great-great-grandson of Alexander Manly, and his wife, Priscilla Haile, visited Wilmington for the first time in September of 2021.
4/6/202248 minutes, 30 seconds
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CoastLine: Ship of Blood - Mutiny and Murder Aboard the Harry A. Berwind off the NC Coast

The story begins when officers from a neighboring ship climb aboard to investigate a cargo ship’s distress signal. They find bloodied decks, one crew member tied up, one crew member dead, and reports that all four of the ship’s officers had been murdered and tossed overboard.The three men still alive were Black. The four dead officers were white.Would it be possible for the accused to get a fair trial in Wilmington, North Carolina in 1905?
3/30/202249 minutes, 40 seconds
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CoastLine: Duke University study shows fish in the Lower Cape Fear River are more contaminated than we thought -- and people are eating those fish

ICYMI: Scientists out of Duke University say fish in the Lower Cape Fear River are more contaminated than previously thought, and fish consumption advisories have been dangerously outdated. They've also learned that the people who fish from the river are not necessarily doing it for sport. People are eating the fish and sharing it with others, and in this episode of CoastLine, we'll learn which fish are safer and how to cook them to minimize contaminants
3/22/202248 minutes, 58 seconds
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CoastLine: Allie McCulloch and Nick Basta on The Glorias and artistic passion (aka "The Disease")

On this episode of CoastLine, as part of the North Carolina Filmmakers Series, we meet two people who make their living in front of the camera. Allie McCulloch and Nick Basta are professional actors based in Wilmington, are both raising children in the Cape Fear region, and they both landed roles in the 2020 film, The Glorias, starring Julianne Moore and Alicia Vikander. (They also happen to be friends.)
3/15/202250 minutes