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English, News media, 1 season, 134 episodes, 2 days, 14 hours, 56 minutes
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It seems like we hear about new cyberattacks almost every day.  The targets used to be just big companies and government agencies. Now they are focused on you.  Every Tuesday, former NPR investigations correspondent Dina Temple-Raston dives deep into the world of cyber and intelligence.  You’ll hear stories about everything from ransomware to misinformation to the people shaping the cyber world, from hacking masterminds to the people who try to stop them.  If you want more news like this delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Cyber Daily newsletter here: https://go.recordedfuture.com/cyber-daily
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133. Mic Drop: A surprising thing about war games and cyber attacks and why the military can’t trust AI

When the Hoover Institution’s director of war gaming, Jackie Schneider, started organizing war simulations more than a decade ago, she assumed that participants would respond to cyber attacks the same way they responded to traditional weapons of war – but it turns out that couldn’t be farther from the truth.
5/24/202418 minutes, 24 seconds
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132. Meet the guy who single-handedly took down North Korea’s Internet.

When North Korea hacked Alejandro Caceres, he expected the U.S. government to rush to his defense. When they just shrugged, he took matters into his own hands.
5/21/202431 minutes, 1 second
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131. Mic Drop: Could spoofing satellites become Russia’s new jam?

On the battlefields of Ukraine, Russia has become very adapt at electronic warfare — both jamming GPS satellites and spoofing satellite signals. We explain how it works and its ripple effects beyond the front lines.
5/17/202411 minutes, 33 seconds
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130. A wrinkle in time: GPS jamming in Ukraine and its ripple effects

A story about satellites, electronic warfare, and a team of American techies who MacGyver-ed a way to keep the power flowing in Ukraine.
5/14/202426 minutes, 57 seconds
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129. LockbitSupp tells us: UK and US have got the wrong guy

In an interview, LockbitSupp, head of the Lockbit cybercrime operation, told us that the U.S., U.K. and Australia have the wrong guy — he’s not Dmitry Khoroshev, the 31-year-old Russian national they’ve charged with hacking. What’s more, he says more attacks are coming.
5/10/202413 minutes, 30 seconds
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128. Taking aim at Democracy: Russia’s Doppelgänger gang isn’t just targeting elections anymore

In a year that could bring a perfect storm of disinformation, meet Doppelgänger, a Russian-backed group seeking not just to shake up the world’s elections, but its institutions too.
5/7/202429 minutes, 22 seconds
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127. Mic Drop: NSC’s Neuberger on mitigating cyber attacks: ‘We should be using an operational approach’

The White House’s top cyber official is keen to set minimum cybersecurity standards for industry, put contingencies in place in case cyberattacks are successful, and start looping ordinary people into an effort to make products secure by design.
5/3/202413 minutes, 42 seconds
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126. The future of robotics from MIT’s "Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Labs Alliances" podcast

An episode from the ‘CSAIL Alliances Podcast’ from MIT CSAIL Alliances. Host Kara Miller talks with MIT robotics researcher and professor Daniela Rus about how we can use a new generation of robots to help humankind. Rus is the co-author of the new book, "The Heart and the Chip: Our Bright Future with Robots."
4/30/202428 minutes, 17 seconds
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125. Mic Drop: The problem with the Nigerian economy has nothing to do with crypto

Before Nigerian authorities detained two mid-level Binance executives back in February, they were telling anyone who would listen that the cryptocurrency platform was manipulating the value of its currency, the naira. It turns out the more likely culprit is more than a decade of economic mismanagement. We explain.
4/26/202413 minutes, 32 seconds
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124. The company man: US response to Nigeria’s detention of former IRS crypto investigator rankles federal agents

A former American IRS investigator responsible for some of the earliest dark market takedowns has been in Nigerian custody since February. Neither Nigerian nor the US authorities seem to be distinguishing Tigran Gambaryan from Binance, the company where he works.
4/23/202433 minutes, 47 seconds
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123. Mic Drop: China seeks a Great Leap Forward in cyber

Chinese hackers are stepping up their game, according to Nigel Inkster, the former director of operations for Britain’s MI6. He says they are taking on a new swagger in cyberspace and borrowing things from a familiar playbook: a Russian one.,
4/19/202413 minutes, 45 seconds
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122. The UK-US unmasked a giant Chinese cyber operation but forgot one thing: to tell many of its victims

The US and UK made a splashy coordinated announcement last month about a years-long cyber espionage campaign by Chinese state-backed hackers. The US indicted seven, the UK leveled sanctions. They just neglected to do one thing --- let some of the victims know.
4/16/202425 minutes, 53 seconds
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121. Mic Drop: A unusual peek inside a North Korean malware lab

North Korea has a unique way of testing malware — they are less concerned about getting it right than getting it out… a kind of “smash-and-grab” approach to cyber attacks. Sentinel One’s Tom Hegel explains.
4/12/202410 minutes, 43 seconds
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120. North Korea’s ScarCruft gang is behind some very crafty phishin’ campaigns

North Korea may be best known for the Lazarus group’s epic cryptocurrency heists. But there’s another special unit of state-backed hackers who have a different specialty: spying on journalists, dissidents, and cybersecurity experts. We look at the ScarCruft gang and their very crafty phishing campaigns.
4/9/202428 minutes
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119. Mic Drop: Could an analysis of sound help save the jaguar in Costa Rica?

Everyone is talking about the power of AI in conservation, but a professor at Arizona State University has found an even simpler, more elegant solution – and all you have to do is listen.
4/5/202413 minutes, 24 seconds
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118. AI and the Holy Grail of conservation: Real-time monitoring

Cornell University’s Elephant Listening Project has been trying to get real-time monitoring of the Central African Republic’s forest elephants for years. FruitPunch AI and a roster of other AI researchers are closer than ever to making that a reality.
4/2/202431 minutes, 26 seconds
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117. Mic Drop: The Big Chill: Nigeria, Binance battle likely to add to economic crisis

Matthew Page from the London-based think tank Chatham House pulls back to look at the potential economic fallout between Nigerian government and Binance, the world’s largest cryptocurrency exchange.
3/29/202411 minutes, 4 seconds
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116. Detained execs, a bold escape, and tax evasion charges: Nigeria takes aim at Binance

This week, Nigeria charged Binance and two of its executives with tax evasion in the latest twist in a month-long dispute between the cryptocurrency giant and the Nigerian government. Nigeria detained Binance’s regional manager and a former US federal agent for nearly a month after they flew to Abuja at the end of February to meet with officials there. Now one executive has slipped away and the other has become a pawn.
3/26/202432 minutes, 34 seconds
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115. Mic Drop: Hear ye, Hear ye, the Hacker’s Court is in session

We talk to Analyst1 senior researcher Jon DiMaggio about how hackers settle their disputes – think People’s Court without all the robes.
3/22/202414 minutes, 11 seconds
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114. Exclusive: LockBit ransomware leader says, ‘I felt like I was being hunted’ but they ‘can’t stop me’

We speak with the leader of one of the most prolific ransomware-as-a-service gangs the world has ever known — LockBit. Just weeks after Operation Cronos, a global police action against the group, LockBitSupp tells us about the takedown, his attempt to rebuild, and his plans for the future.
3/19/202427 minutes, 47 seconds
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113. Exclusive: Embattled LockBit leader: ‘Now I want to create even more noise’

Our interview of the week: LockBit Supp says his ransomware platform isn’t dead yet.
3/15/20248 minutes, 36 seconds
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112. Inside the i-Soon papers and China’s secret world of hackers-for-hire

Newly leaked files from a private Chinese hackers-for-hire company provide a fresh look into China’s “cyber industrial complex” – and it appears to be bigger and more mature than observers had previously imagined.
3/12/202427 minutes, 50 seconds
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111. Mic Drop: Arms control expert Jeffrey Lewis on North Korea’s new BFF in Moscow

Our interview of the week — a one-on-one with arms control policy expert, Jeffrey Lewis.
3/8/202415 minutes, 49 seconds
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110. North Korean Missiles in Ukraine and Kim Jong-un’s new swagger

We talk to a team of open source analysts and weapons inspectors who have pieced together how Pyongyang avoided sanctions to get Russia missiles it needs for the battle in Ukraine and look at why Kim Jung-un is feeling he’s got his groove back.
3/5/202427 minutes, 47 seconds
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109. Mic Drop: FBI Director Wray on the latest wave of nation-state cyber threats

Our interview of the week — a rare one-on-one with FBI Director Christopher Wray. 
3/1/202414 minutes, 24 seconds
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108. Exclusive: FBI Director Wray talks takedown operations, nation-state hackers, and growing threats in cyberspace

FBI Director Chris Wray sat down for a rare interview with Click Here to talk about Operation Dying Ember, the uptick in nation-state hacking, and how just about everyone is now in hackers’ crosshairs.
2/27/202426 minutes, 56 seconds
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107. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘In the cockpit with AI’ from In Machines We Trust

An episode from ‘In Machines We Trust’ from MIT Technology Review.  How we train fighter pilots—both real and artificial—is undergoing a series of rapid changes. In order for these systems to be useful we need to trust them, but figuring out just how, when and why remains a massive challenge. Jennifer Strong reports on how AI is being used to teach human pilots to perform some of the most dangerous and difficult maneuvers in aerial combat.
2/20/202428 minutes, 35 seconds
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106. Facial recognition software could help solve America’s missing person problem. Why hasn’t it?

Some 600,000 people are reported missing in the U.S. every year. Thousands of bodies lie unclaimed and unidentified in American morgues. Facial recognition software could put a name to these faces, so why hasn’t it?
2/13/202432 minutes, 35 seconds
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105. Jordan’s wave of spyware infections

A report published last week by Access Now revealed that since 2019 nearly three dozen journalists, human rights officials and political activists in Jordan have had their phones infected with spyware. The documentation of the widespread use of NSO’s Pegasus spyware in the Kingdom isn’t just rattling civil society, but raising new questions about how to stop its proliferation.
2/6/202431 minutes, 9 seconds
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104. Generative AI: Is it creative or just copying the rest of us?

Today’s generative AI knows how to write, compose music, and even create works of art. But it learned to do all these things by training on data made by human creators, without asking their permission. Now independent artists and giant media companies are fighting back and -- if they prevail -- it could fundamentally change the human-AI relationship.
1/30/202430 minutes, 34 seconds
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103. Dr. Dolittle never spoke whale, AI just might

Some data scientists and acoustic biologists have joined forces to see if artificial intelligence can ferret meaning out of non-human language. And one of their early subjects is a perennial favorite: humpback whales.
1/23/202428 minutes, 11 seconds
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102. Cyber Av3ngers and their unlikely targets

We take a look at the part of the Israel-Hamas war that is harder to see – the battle raging in cyberspace. Hacktivists are joining forces with Iran-backed operators to target victims with gossamer connections to Israel.
1/16/202427 minutes, 27 seconds
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101. Bug bounties with Chinese characteristics

Vulnerabilities and exploits are the building blocks of hacking. We look at how China is flipping the script on how the world thinks about both.
1/9/202428 minutes, 7 seconds
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100. The 2023 cyber year in review

In a recent conversation on WAMU’s nationally syndicated.news show 1A, Click Here’s Dina Temple-Raston looks back on cyber in 2023 and discusses what we might expect in the year ahead.
1/2/202424 minutes, 38 seconds
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99. Meet the hackers

Hackers and cybercriminals may not be so different from the rest of us after all. We talk to three real life hackers from an early dark market entrepreneur to an accidental recruit to the latest addition to the FBI’s most wanted list.
12/26/202355 minutes, 15 seconds
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98. Lessons from the world's first hybrid war

Ukraine is the world’s first truly hybrid war, and the battle is raging on two fronts --- on the ground and in cyberspace. What does the conflict mean for the future of war?
12/19/202354 minutes, 40 seconds
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97. Policing Morality? There’s an app for that.

We look at the use of digital tools that have imposed an authoritarian version of morality on the masses, and the creative, inspiring way ordinary people have learned to respond.
12/12/202353 minutes, 20 seconds
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96. The art of decoding dictators

Dictators use bombast and bullying as a kind of malevolent calling card. Meet the people who have found surprising and creative ways around that.
12/5/202355 minutes, 15 seconds
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95. Reality Bytes: the URL-IRL crash

Three stories about technologies that started out doing one thing, and ended up doing quite another — from online tractors, to tasers in schools, to cellphone hackers who take their online battles into the real world.
11/28/202353 minutes, 57 seconds
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94. They’re just hackers, living off the land

There’s a specific kind of cyber attack targeting big industrial systems that is coming back into fashion: it’s called a ‘living off the land’ attack. What makes it particularly scary is that unlike traditional attacks in which bad actors break into a system and plant malicious code, in living off the land attacks, there’s nothing to find — bad actors leverage what’s already in the network.
11/21/202326 minutes, 22 seconds
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93. Tech that allows ordinary people to make peace with wartime

If you want to know how Ukrainians are coping with the war, look at the Ukraine apps in the app store. From an air raid alert built in the first week of the invasion to a map that helps work-from-homers find electricity, technology is helping Ukraine find some sense of normalcy in wartime.
11/14/202332 minutes, 29 seconds
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92. Israel, Gaza and all the light you cannot see

We talk to two ordinary people who decided to tackle two extraordinary problems: identifying the thousands who went missing in Israel in the days after the October 7th attacks, and one man’s leap of faith to get internet and cellphone service into Gaza.
11/7/202333 minutes, 14 seconds
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91. Bucha wants to be known for something else: Justice.

Bucha, a bedroom community just outside of Kyiv, is best known for enduring Russia’s atrocities during a month-long occupation in the Spring of 2022. Now the citizens of Bucha don’t want revenge, they want justice.
10/31/202333 minutes, 57 seconds
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90. Saving Ukraine’s cultural heritage with a click

When a Russian bomb damaged a beloved library in the Ukrainian town of Chernihiv, locals feared that it would be lost forever. Then a cutting-edge technology came to the rescue.
10/24/202334 minutes, 32 seconds
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89. Exclusive: Ukraine says joint mission with U.S. derailed Moscow’s cyber attacks

We traveled to Ukraine last month to learn more about a hunt forward operation Cybercom and cyber operators from Ukraine secretly launched before the war. This is the first time the Ukrainian side of the story has been revealed publicly.
10/17/202327 minutes, 29 seconds
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88. Exclusive: Inside Ukraine’s secret drone factories

We travel to Ukraine to look at its grassroots defense industry and take you into its secret drone factories where entrepreneurs are able to put innovative weapons into the hands of soldiers at the front in a matter of weeks, not months.
10/10/202330 minutes, 18 seconds
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87. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘How AI Will Turbocharge Misinformation’ from Humans vs. Machines

An episode from “Humans vs. Machines” from Aventine Research Institute and Pineapple Street Studios. Misinformation has influenced elections, ruined reputations and fundamentally changed society’s relationship with the truth. Now, large language models like ChatGPT have the potential to create and spread misinformation at a scale we’ve never seen before. As technology improves, the question won’t be, ‘What we can believe in?’ but whether we’ll be able to believe in anything at all.
10/3/202330 minutes, 21 seconds
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86. What will Moscow do with the Wagner Group now?

The Russian private army known as the Wagner Group has been tied not just to atrocities in Ukraine but to operations in Africa that helped Russia extend its reach. The looming question for Moscow: what do we do with Wagner now?
9/26/202330 minutes, 29 seconds
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85. What Wagner Group learned from ISIS

Back in August, the leader of the Wagner Group, Yevgeny Prigozhin, was killed in a fiery plane crash. So we decided to revisit an episode we did a few months ago about the Wagner group and how it recruits. It turns out they tore a page from the ISIS playbook.
9/19/202331 minutes, 35 seconds
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84. Dutch police, cyber booby traps and a dark market takedown for the ages

Led by a motley crew of old-school cops and cyber whiz-kids, a Dutch police unit takes control of one of the dark web's most notorious drug markets and make history.
9/12/202331 minutes, 58 seconds
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83. “Ding-dong ditch” on steroids

Remember ding-dong ditch? You and your friends rang a doorbell and then ran away? These days the prank of choice among the young cyber set is something called swatting: calling the police with a hoax report that sends them rushing – guns drawn – to some address and unsuspecting victim. After years of writing it off as childish mischief, legislators, law enforcement and tech companies are finally trying to address it.
9/5/202332 minutes, 13 seconds
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82. The Clop gang’s in love with a special kind of bug

Back in May, a Russian-speaking cyber gang named Clop broke into MOVEit, a little-known file transfer program. They managed to steal data from some 60 million people (and counting). While the scale of the attack was impressive, what really raised eyebrows was how they did it.
8/29/202327 minutes, 45 seconds
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81. Ilya Sachkov v. the Kremlin

Ilya Sachkov co-founded the cybersecurity company Group-IB to make the world safe from Russian-speaking cybercriminals. Then he asked Russian authorities to help round them up, and things went spectacularly wrong.
8/22/202332 minutes, 26 seconds
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80. Meet ChatGPT’s evil twin

Wave “goodbye” to those pesky emails from Nigerian princes and say “hello” to the latest generation of AI enabled email scamming. It’s smarter, faster and, by the way, looks like it’s coming from your boss. The only thing that might stop them? AI itself.
8/15/202327 minutes, 27 seconds
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79. One woman’s Orwellian experience with disinformation

We look at an American disinformation campaign that makes clear online abuse directed at women goes far beyond a couple of mean tweets. And, an update on a Syrian activist who was on the receiving end of a misinformation crisis of her own.
8/8/202329 minutes, 15 seconds
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78. Trouble in the cloud

Putting your data in the cloud used to be seen as the gold standard of information security. Why have your small IT team protect your data when the experts at Microsoft or Google or AWS can do it instead? And then in May, Chinese hackers broke into the Microsoft cloud, exposing not just a flaw in the code, but a glitch in company’s business model as well.
8/1/202321 minutes, 56 seconds
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77. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘The internet is at the bottom of the sea’ from Things That Go Boom

This week, we share an episode from PRX and Inkstick Media’s “Things that Go Boom” podcast about the thousands of miles of fiber optic cable lying at the bottom of the sea. Some 95 percent of the world’s electronic data is traveling through them and cables are taking centerstage in the high-stakes competition between the U.S. and China.
7/25/202343 minutes, 18 seconds
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76. The Mexican army’s love affair with spyware

Since our story on spyware in Mexico aired back in March, researchers have discovered a roster of Pegasus spyware infections on the phones of local journalists, activists, and even officials within the Mexican president’s inner circle. This week, we return to our deep dive on the use of spyware in Mexico and the revelation that the army created a secret military intelligence unit dedicated to its use.
7/18/202328 minutes, 43 seconds
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75. SPECIAL FEATURE: 'Life, death and AI' from Endless Thread

From WBUR's “Endless Thread" podcast, a story on a growing segment of artificial intelligence: immortalizing the dead through predictive AI text and how bots can help us understand grief.
7/11/202336 minutes, 5 seconds
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74. Reality Winner and the handling of secret documents

We revisit a sit-down interview we had with NSA contractor Reality Winner shortly after she spent 4 years in prison for passing a single classified document to a reporter. Given all the focus on classified documents and the way they’ve been handled in recent weeks, it seemed a good time to take another look at what happened to Reality.
7/4/202326 minutes, 7 seconds
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73. Can satellite surveillance save Sudan from itself?

Two decades after Arab militias first torched villages and killed hundreds of thousands of people in West Darfur, violence has returned to the region. We tell the story of one group of researchers who use open source intelligence, algorithms and satellite imagery in a bid to quell the violence in Sudan.
6/27/202332 minutes, 2 seconds
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72. Exclusive: Inside an American Hunt Forward Operation in Ukraine

We go behind the scenes of U.S. Cyber Command’s Hunt Forward Operation in Ukraine. We interviewed half a dozen American cyber warriors who were on the ground in Kyiv, and they provide new details about the effort to defend Ukrainian networks against Russian cyber attacks in the weeks before the war.
6/20/202332 minutes, 34 seconds
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71. A return to model drone pilots and Ukraine’s spring offensive

As Ukraine’s long-awaited counteroffensive begins, we revisit a story we did last winter about some unusual Ukrainian women training to become part of the nation’s Army of Drones.
6/13/202322 minutes, 53 seconds
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70. An unlikely teacher: What Wagner Group learned from ISIS

The Russian private army known as the Wagner Group is trying to persuade young men to join the fight in Ukraine. Their online recruitment efforts don’t just hint at the future of modern warfare: they’re a callback to an earlier time, when a group called ISIS lured young men to fight in Syria.
6/6/202329 minutes, 38 seconds
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69. Wazawaka: ‘Most Wanted’ and, he says, undeterred

This month, the FBI added Mikhail Pavlovich Matveev to their Most Wanted hacker list for his alleged role in a number of ransomware attacks against U.S. targets. In a rare interview shortly after the FBI announcement, he talked about the new designation and what he wants to do next.
5/30/202325 minutes, 25 seconds
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68. SPECIAL FEATURE: 'The Slave Armies Powering a New Kind of Golden Triangle Cybercrime' from The Underworld Podcast

From “The Underworld” podcast, a conversation about casino towns, gangster owners, and a new twist on scamming operations. Nathan Paul Southern and Lindsey Kennedy took a trip along the Mekong River and revealed new details about southeast Asia’s latest scourge: cyber slaves. ADDITIONAL READING: https://www.scmp.com/magazines/post-magazine/long-reads/article/3195932/laos-criminal-casino-empire-chinese-gangsters
5/23/202327 minutes, 9 seconds
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67. Hive’s WeWork experiment — and what went wrong

When the FBI and Justice Department took down a collective of cybercriminals known as Hive earlier this year, it targeted a group that made a name for itself, in part, by holding hospital and healthcare systems for ransom during the pandemic. What made the group so effective was its own twist on WeWork-style collaboratives… and it led to their demise.
5/16/202321 minutes, 34 seconds
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66. ‘Operation Cookie Monster' and the Genesis takedown

The Department of Justice says last month’s effort to bring down the Genesis Marketplace represents a departure from traditional law enforcement actions. ‘Operation Cookie Monster' wasn’t about nabbing masterminds. It was about making it harder for JV hackers to enter the world of cybercrime.
5/9/202324 minutes, 53 seconds
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65. Morality in Iraq: You should worry because there’s an app for that

The Iraqi government has unveiled an app that helps ordinary citizens report “indecent” content online. Since its introduction, the Ballegh app has received some 144,000 reports. And the Iraqi app isn’t the only one: A roster of similar morality apps have popped up across the region, raising new questions about the future of free speech in the Middle East.
5/2/202328 minutes, 46 seconds
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64. Portrait of Bassterlord as a young man

What makes a hacker tick? That’s what we wanted to find out when we reached out to Bassterlord, a 27-year-old hacker in Ukraine who joined some of the most infamous hacking crews of our time. Researcher Jon DiMaggio of Analyst1 has released a report about him, and he gave Click Here an exclusive first look. Then, we spoke to Bassterlord ourselves.
4/25/202327 minutes, 54 seconds
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63. Tracers on the stage: Andy Greenberg, Michael Gronager and Tigran Gambaryan talk cryptocurrency tracking

We go behind the scenes of the new book by WIRED’s Andy Greenberg, "Tracers in the Dark." It explains how a handful of entrepreneurs and investigators demystified cryptocurrency tracking. Recently, we spoke with Andy and some crypto tracers onstage at the Links 2023 conference in New York City. Plus, North Korea’s ingenious effort to launder its stolen crypto. 
4/18/202333 minutes, 4 seconds
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62. How a mathematician and an entrepreneur helped law enforcement take a bite out of crypto crime

When cryptocurrency burst on the scene in 2008, it was touted as anonymous — a boon to cyber criminals all over the world. Then a few mathematicians and some federal agents proved otherwise, in a way so big it birthed an industry. With a tip of the hat to Andy Greenberg’s new book “Tracers in the Dark,” we talk to them about how they did it.
4/11/202326 minutes, 52 seconds
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61. Snowmen in the park and Iran’s quiet viral dissent

Six months after demonstrators took to the streets of Iran hoping to end its draconian hijab laws and push for a change in the leadership, the protests have moved online — into a quiet civil disobedience campaign that leadership is finding hard to control.
4/4/202325 minutes, 30 seconds
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60. Clear the runway: Ukraine's model pilots

Drones of all shapes and sizes are part of the war effort in the skies above Ukraine. Some are helping kill the enemy; others spy on formations and guide bombs to their targets. We take you inside a school meant to boost that effort by training women to fly them. Plus, a leading dark web hacking forum meets its demise.
3/28/202324 minutes, 46 seconds
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59. What the cyber war in Ukraine is teaching us

In a recent conversation on WAMU’s nationally syndicated show 1A, we talked about lessons learned one year into the world’s first truly hybrid war. The conversation happened amid a report from Microsoft’s Threat Intelligence Center that found new worrying signs on the Russia-Ukraine cyber front. They believe Sandworm, a cyber military unit of Russia’s intelligence service, has been launching new phishing campaigns, cyber espionage operations, and is stepping up coordination with hacktivists groups.
3/21/202326 minutes, 36 seconds
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58. Enemy of the State (Part 2) : ¿Quién es Guacamaya? (Who is Guacamaya?)

We follow up last week’s episode on spyware and the Mexican military with a look at Guacamaya, the hacktivist collective that helped provide key documents that showed the army purchased Pegasus spyware used on human rights advocates and local journalists. Guacamaya isn’t just targeting Mexico, though. The group has been hacking into military servers all over Latin America, and its efforts have people asking: ¿Quién es Guacamaya? (Who is Guacamaya?)
3/14/202327 minutes, 58 seconds
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57. Enemy of the State (Part 1): Mexico, spyware, and a secret military intelligence unit

A new report has published classified documents and internal memos that make clear the Mexican Army bought Pegasus spyware and systematically deployed it against journalists and activists in Mexico. R3D, a Mexican digital rights group, and University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, also found evidence of a formerly unknown military intelligence unit whose sole focus appears to be secret surveillance and deployment of spyware. Some of the sensitive material published in the report came from a massive hack into the Ministry of Defense by the hacktivist group Guacamaya last year. Click Here was part of a small group of journalists given early access to their findings.
3/7/202325 minutes, 31 seconds
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56. Ukraine’s drone whisperers: What the weapons are telling us

Russia has deployed the Iranian-built Shahed drone to wreak havoc on Ukraine’s infrastructure. We speak to a man who is a kind of drone whisperer. After years of taking these Shahed drones apart, he says if you listen, they have amazing stories to tell.
2/28/202322 minutes, 35 seconds
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55. Oyez, Oyez, Oyez: Twenty-six words get their day in the High Court

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week in a case that will consider a 1995 law that shields social media companies from liability. Gonzalez v. Google could allow people to sue tech companies that use algorithms to sort through their content. Plus, we check in with Alexander Martin, The Record's UK editor, about his takeaways from the Munich Security Conference.
2/21/202325 minutes, 46 seconds
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54. Miss Lonelyhearts and the money mules

In a special Valentine’s Day episode, we look at the evolution of romance scams. They aren’t just about bilking lonely people out of their life savings anymore – scammers have diversified, and they’re making victims accomplices in a roster of cyber crimes from email scams and check fraud to money laundering.
2/14/202327 minutes, 20 seconds
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53. Xi's brave new world

At a time when an errant spy balloon has raised new questions about President Xi Jinping’s absolute control over all things Chinese, we take a look at how his regime quelled last year’s Covid protests and how an arsenal of digital weapons helped tighten his grip on power. Plus, facial recognition’s latest nemesis: knitwear.
2/7/202327 minutes, 31 seconds
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52. SPECIAL FEATURE: Shoot the Messenger: Espionage, Murder & Pegasus Spyware

“Shoot The Messenger” from Exile Content Studio and PRX looks at what happened to the murdered Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The first weapon used against him was digital - a sophisticated spyware called Pegasus.
1/31/202345 minutes, 39 seconds
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51. Exclusive: Axon still wants to put Taser drones in your kid’s school

This week, Axon, the company that developed the Taser, is hosting a conference in Las Vegas called TaserCon. The event is billed as an opportunity to talk about law enforcement and public safety. Axon is expected to use the occasion to reintroduce a controversial plan: to put the company’s gun-equipped drones in police departments and schools to prevent mass shootings. And, cybercriminals’ new best friend: ChatGPT.
1/24/202331 minutes, 35 seconds
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50. LockBit Diaries: A researcher's year undercover with the world’s most dangerous ransomware gang

After spending more than a year undercover with the notorious ransomware gang LockBit, one researcher explains how the group revolutionized the business of ransomware.
1/17/202326 minutes, 10 seconds
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49. Genshin Impact: trying to balance mass appeal with Beijing's blessing

Genshin Impact put the Chinese video gaming industry on the map. While the game has delighted players, it begs the question: Can China’s Communist Party and a massively popular video game peacefully co-exist?
1/10/202324 minutes, 41 seconds
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48. Call me crypto curious

We take a deep dive into a corner of the cryptocurrency economy that hasn’t (completely) tanked yet: Bitcoin mining. It is part cryptography, part math, and part luck.
1/3/202325 minutes, 12 seconds
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47. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘Summer in Caputh’ from Exile

An episode from “Exile” from the Leo Baeck Institute and Antica Productions. At the height of his fame, a shirtless, barefooted Albert Einstein escapes the bustle of Berlin for a simpler life. The best thinkers of the time gather at his beloved summer house in Caputh to laze by the water, swap ideas, and gossip. There, he can escape the pressures of global fame, but his summer haven can’t keep him safe from the growing Nazi threat rising in Germany.
12/27/202234 minutes, 5 seconds
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46. The musicians who came in from the cold

At a time when Vladimir Putin is attempting to redraw the Iron Curtain, we revisit an earlier episode in which we take a trip back to the Soviet Union circa 1985 when four American musicians smuggled messages in and out of the Soviet Union — with music.
12/20/202223 minutes, 39 seconds
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45. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘Saving Ukrainian Cultural History Online’ from The Last Archive

Sharing a special episode of another podcast, The Last Archive, a show about the history of truth -- or the lack thereof. Harvard historian Jill Lepore uncovers the secrets of the past the way a detective might. In this episode, Jill chats with Anna Kijas, a co-organizer of SUCHO: Saving Ukrainian Cultural History Online. Lepore and Kijas talk about her effort to preserve online resources that are at risk of disappearing because of the war in Ukraine. You can hear more episodes of The Last Archive at https://link.chtbl.com/clickherearchive 
12/13/202215 minutes, 4 seconds
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44. Throwing bricks for $$$: violence-as-a-service comes of age

We go back to an episode we did earlier this year about a gang of SIM swappers who are behind something called violence-as-a-service. Doxing or defacing websites, they told us, just doesn’t send enough of a message. So, they are throwing molotov cocktails or slashing tires of their rivals instead. Trouble is – it is getting more popular and commonplace and is bound to affect the rest of us.
12/6/202223 minutes, 9 seconds
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43. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘The Most Dangerous Game’ from Big Brother: North Korea's Forgotten Prince

“Big Brother: North Korea's Forgotten Prince” from School of Humans and iHeartPodcasts introduce you to the person who should have been North Korea’s leader – had he not been on the receiving end of what may be the 21st century’s most bizarre assassination plot.
11/29/202243 minutes, 34 seconds
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42. North Korea's monster fake out

North Korea has launched an unprecedented number of missiles this month. So we bring you an encore episode about a team of researchers using open-source intelligence to track the hermit kingdom's nuclear ambitions. Plus, the Yanluowang ransomware group finds itself the victim of a leak.
11/22/202235 minutes, 16 seconds
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41. Rounding up a cyber posse for Ukraine

Washington and the tech world have been talking about public private partnerships in cyberspace for decades. The NSA and Cyber Command have intelligence about attacks; cybersecurity companies have the means to block them. It looks like they are finally working together — not in the U.S, but in Ukraine.
11/15/202231 minutes, 9 seconds
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40. Selling Vice Society: old exploits, easy targets, and the illusion of greatness

Vice Society burst on the ransomware scene in early 2021, attacking a roster of government offices, hospitals and, notoriously, schools. But cybersecurity experts say the group isn't your typical ransomware operation: they're some of cyber crime's biggest posers, using old exploits on easy targets to give the illusion of greatness.
11/8/202222 minutes, 59 seconds
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39. Is open-source software the solution to our election woes?

Ben Adida is the executive director of a voting technology non-profit that provides software and operational support to states during elections. He’s embarked on an almost impossible missile: to restore faith in our election system. The way he proposes to do that? With open-source software that everyone can see.
11/1/202225 minutes, 49 seconds
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38. The Supreme Court case that could change the internet

Nohemi Gonzalez was killed in the 2015 ISIS attacks in Paris and now is at the heart of a Supreme Court case that will reconsider a 1995 law that shields social media companies from liability. Gonzalez v. Google could allow people to sue tech companies that use algorithms to sort through their content.
10/25/202224 minutes, 50 seconds
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37. ‘Presence Matters’: Nakasone and Easterly on Ukraine, collaboration and midterm elections

The head of NSA and Cybercom Gen. Paul Nakasone and CISA director Jen Easterly came to the Council on Foreign Relations last week for a rare sit-down interview. They talked about hunt teams in Ukraine, public-private partnerships and threats ahead of the midterms, with Click Here host Dina Temple-Raston presiding over the session. Plus, one researcher bests Charming Kitten.
10/18/202225 minutes, 23 seconds
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36. The hijab will never be the same

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Iran has ignited the most powerful protests the country has seen in years. In addition to violence, authorities have responded with a host of new tools to throttle mobile phone connections, block social media sites, and make it harder for people to organize. Plus, Iran's diplomatic kerfuffle over a cyber attack in Albania.
10/11/202229 minutes, 41 seconds
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35. Reality Winner and the handling of secret documents

As the wrangling continues over classified documents former President Trump took to his Florida home, we take a second look at the case of Reality Winner, the NSA contractor who served time in prison for passing a classified document to a reporter. We had a rare interview with her in February.
10/4/202225 minutes, 40 seconds
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34. Ukraine’s mass graves have stories to tell

The town whose name has become synonymous with Russian atrocities in Ukraine is rushing to digitize information about the dead --- not just to identify them and give families closure --- but to hold Russians accountable for the wanton brutality in Bucha. Plus, scandal in the elite chess world.
9/27/202231 minutes, 1 second
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33. Throwing bricks for $$$: violence-as-a-service comes of age

Young people who have been making millions hacking mobile phones — known as SIM swappers — have found a new way to intimidate and harass their rivals. They call it “violence-as-a-service” or “IRL jobs,” and it includes a Telegram channel where they can order brickings, firebombings, and even shootings in the real world.
9/20/202223 minutes, 22 seconds
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32. The great tractor jailbreak

The talk of DEF CON 2022 was the handiwork of a white hat hacker named Sick Codes. On stage, he demonstrated how he broke the digital locks of a John Deere tractor. He did it with such ease, it made people start to wonder: just how hack-able is the world’s agriculture sector?
9/13/202228 minutes, 19 seconds
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31. Seagulls in the park

Hydra was a darknet superstore. It started out as an online illegal drug site and morphed into a billion-dollar business with codes of conduct, customer support, and legal and medical services. It had started offering money laundering services when German authorities finally shut it down in April. Now people are asking: who or what will replace it?
9/6/202225 minutes, 5 seconds
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30. The scariest piece of malware since Stuxnet

Back in April, cybersecurity officials discovered the notorious “Industroyer” malware in the Ukrainian electrical grid. It might have been the scariest infrastructure hack since malware destroyed centrifuges at an Iranian uranium enrichment plant in 2010 – were it not for a TGIF miracle. Plus, a visit with the IT Army of Ukraine and a different kind of information operation.
8/30/202228 minutes, 25 seconds
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29. The musicians who came in from the cold

At a time when Vladimir Putin is attempting to redraw the Iron Curtain, we take a trip back to the Soviet Union circa 1985 when four American musicians smuggled messages in and out of the Soviet Union — with music. Plus, DefCon’s answer to those alien transmissions.
8/23/202235 minutes, 2 seconds
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28. A return to Stanislav

We first spoke with Russian business owner Stanislav back in early March, shortly after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Almost six months later, we check back in with him to see how he’s doing, and look at a new report that suggests the Russian economy is cratering. Plus, inside a massive breach affecting a police database in Shanghai. 
8/16/202228 minutes, 32 seconds
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27. Exclusive: North Korea’s monster fake out

Thousands of satellites watch the world from above. We offer a mystery story about an infamous North Korean video, a team of very observant researchers, and a search for the truth.
8/9/202228 minutes, 21 seconds
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26. Pegasus is listening

Carine Kanimba’s father may be one of the most famous Rwandans on earth – Paul Rusesabagina. He was the manager of the Hôtel des Mille Collines, and he sheltered more than 1,200 Rwandans during the 1994 genocide. Now his daughter is at the center of a Capitol Hill inquiry into the proliferation of commercial spyware, a particular program called Pegasus, and the future of the company that created it.
8/2/202225 minutes, 23 seconds
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25. Lapsus$ - The script kiddies are alright

An encore performance of one of our favorite episodes about LAPSUS$, a cyber extortion gang that convinced the world its low-tech hacking operations were really high-impact heists. Plus, we hear how two high school computer geeks almost brought down IBM’s computer center in Manhattan.
7/26/202227 minutes, 22 seconds
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24. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘El Salvador's Bitcoin Experiment’ from Nothing is Foreign

Earlier this year, the CBC's Nothing is Foreign podcast reported on how El Salvador's promise of a cryptocurrency paradise runs up against reality.
7/19/202229 minutes, 16 seconds
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23. The post-Roe digital world

An encore performance of one of our most popular episodes. Five years ago, a Mississippi woman named Latice Fisher was charged with murdering her stillborn child. The evidence against her: a controversial 400-year-old test and the search history on her cellphone.
7/12/202224 minutes, 12 seconds
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22. SPECIAL FEATURE: ‘NSO’ from Darknet Diaries

Last August, the Darknet Diaries host Jack Rhysider did a story about the NSO Group’s most famous product — Pegasus — a surveillance program which has the ability to turn just about anyone’s phone into a pocket spy.
7/5/20221 hour, 13 minutes, 13 seconds
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21. Son of Conti

The Conti ransomware group appeared to be on ropes earlier this year when its internal chat logs went public –revealing the inner workings of a hacking cartel. Then, the gang surprised everyone by launching a cyber attack against Costa Rica aimed at overthrowing its government. Plus, what happens when a company actually wants to talk about being the target of a ransomware attack - how much will they say?
6/28/202223 minutes, 48 seconds
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20. North Korea’s cryptocurrency obsession

For years, North Korea was known for making such a perfect counterfeit hundred-dollar note, the Treasury Department had to change how it printed them. Now, North Korea is all about crypto – and it has been cooking up all kinds of crazy schemes in order to get the Big Score. Plus, we hear from a two-time North Korean defector.
6/21/202226 minutes, 53 seconds
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19. Gilman Louie and the dance with wolf warriors

In a wide-ranging conversation on the fringes of this month’s RSA Conference, we sat down with Silicon Valley venture capitalist and Presidential Intelligence Advisory Board member Gilman Louie. We talked about the Chinese cyber threat, the growth of superpower competition, and the importance of bringing high-tech manufacturing back to America.
6/14/202232 minutes, 1 second
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18. The dog-eat-dragon world of Chinese gaming

Genshin Impact put the Chinese video gaming industry on the map. But while the game has delighted players, it begs the question: Can China’s Communist Party and a massively popular video game peacefully co-exist? Plus, we hit the ground at this year’s RSA Conference in San Francisco.
6/7/202227 minutes, 43 seconds
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17. REvil and the Texas hack that changed ransomware as we know it

An encore performance of the Click Here pilot episode on REvil and how it landed on a new business model. It happened in an unlikely place: Texas.
5/31/202229 minutes, 3 seconds
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16. Roe v. Wade in a world of digital dust

Five years ago, a Mississippi woman named Latice Fisher was charged with murdering her stillborn child. The evidence against her: a controversial 400-year-old test and the search history on her cellphone. We explain how in a post-Roe world, pattern data will be an even greater threat. Plus, the DOJ tweaks its use of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.
5/24/202226 minutes, 33 seconds
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15. At war with facial recognition: Clearview AI in Ukraine

Facial recognition technology is changing the war in Ukraine. It is finding infiltrators, providing evidence for war crimes and, more darkly, providing fodder for propaganda. We talk to Clearview AI’s CEO about its role in the conflict and what it means for the future.
5/17/202228 minutes, 22 seconds
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14. ‘Cream of the cream’: Russia’s high-tech brain drain

Tech entrepreneurs and developers are fleeing Putin’s Russia in droves. Meet three members of the exodus: a young successful entrepreneur… a corporate manager… and a high-school computer whiz who can’t wait to leave. Plus, DHS’ Rob Silvers on how ransomware ends.
5/10/202231 minutes, 4 seconds
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13. Spyware and ‘a world of Bond villains’

Ron Deibert founded The Citizen Lab, a high-tech human rights watchdog at the University of Toronto. He's concerned the Internet could unleash our darkest angels. Now, he has an even bigger worry: spyware. It's become so normalized even democratic nations are using it as high-tech oppo research. Plus, a pause in open source mapping in Ukraine.
5/3/202225 minutes, 13 seconds
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12. Lapsus$: The script kiddies are alright

How a new cyber extortion team called LAPSUS$ managed to convince the world that it had turned low-tech hacking operations into high impact heists. And two high-schoolers who tinkered with a punch card and almost brought down the IBM computer center in Manhattan.
4/26/202228 minutes, 36 seconds
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11. The entrepreneur and the Jihadist

A Los Angeles tech entrepreneur reveals for the first time the role he played in bringing one of the world’s deadliest hackers to justice. And the founder of Craigslist talks about his effort to build a cyber civil defense force.
4/19/202227 minutes, 17 seconds
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10. Are America’s nuclear systems so old they’re un-hackable?

In its latest defense budget, the Biden Administration has asked Congress to fund the modernization of America’s nuclear weapons systems.The current system – that until recently was still using eight inch floppies – is seen as so old that it’s virtually un-hackable. So if you modernize, now what? Plus, cyber hits from Nigeria’s music scene. SHOW NOTES: At The Brink podcast Herb Lin's book Cyber Threats and Nuclear Weapons How cybercrime remixed the Nigerian Music scene
4/12/202227 minutes, 40 seconds
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9. The rise of high-tech despotism

Noura Al-Jizawi thought she’d left the repression of the Assad regime behind her when she left Syria with her sister. Instead she became the target of an online subversion campaign. Plus, we meet the founder of a retro computer museum in Mariupol, Ukraine.
4/5/202230 minutes, 22 seconds
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8. War, sanctions and crypto’s big moment

As sanctions squeeze the Russian economy, ordinary Russians are having to navigate a financial system in mid-collapse. For some, the solution has been cryptocurrencies. We talk to a small businessman in St. Petersburg who explains. Plus, the hack heard ‘round the indie music world. SHOW NOTES: Grimes Admits to Blackmail, Extortion, and Hacking in Vanity Fair Video Interview
3/29/202224 minutes, 38 seconds
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7. Fighting Russia with computers, not rifles

A volunteer army made up of thousands of IT professionals from around the world is seeking to fight Russia in cyberspace. We talk to some of its members and discover new limits to Russia’s hacking efforts.
3/22/202222 minutes, 29 seconds
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6. 'Baggage from a severely harmed relationship'

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman explains how we – in a few short years – went from a controversial phone call between an American president and Ukrainian leader to the largest territorial aggression in Europe since WWII. Plus, Ukraine’s all volunteer IT Army. SHOW NOTES: Here, Right Matters The Day After Russia Attacks America Must Do More to Help Ukraine Fight Russia
3/15/202227 minutes, 8 seconds
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5. Conti leaks: the Panama Papers of ransomware

Not long after the Conti ransomware group threw its weight behind Vladimir Putin and the invasion of Ukraine someone leaked two years’ of its internal chat logs. What they’ve revealed has rocked the cyber world and made clear that running a world-class ransomware operation isn’t as easy as it used to be. Plus, a new look at information warfare with author Amy Zegart. SHOW NOTES: Conti ransomware gang chats leaked by pro-Ukraine member
3/8/202226 minutes, 30 seconds
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4. 'They are fighting like lions'

The most surprising thing about the Russian invasion of Ukraine – aside from the invasion itself – is how small a role cyber operations have played to this point. That’s likely to change. Plus the administration’s unusual weapon against misinformation campaigns: declassifying intelligence.  SHOW NOTES: Russia appears to deploy digital defenses after DDoS attacks Biden: U.S. ‘prepared to respond’ to Russian cyberattacks as invasion of Ukraine continues Russia or Ukraine: Hacking groups take sides NetBlocks tracking internet disruptions
3/1/202223 minutes, 7 seconds
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3. In touch with reality

In a rare interview, Click Here catches up with former NSA contractor Reality Winner. Back in 2017, she leaked a five-page classified document to journalists that showed how Russia tried to interfere in the 2016 elections. She went to prison for it and talks at length about why she did what she did and how it so spectacularly backfired. And a chat with the head of the internet watchdog, Netblocks.
2/22/202241 minutes, 18 seconds
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2. A place called darkode

Ryan Green helped start one of the largest English-language dark markets in the world: Darkode. He takes us behind-the-scenes of how it started, how it ended, and how it managed to come back again. Plus, we look at a Russian misinformation re-tread. SHOW NOTES: CBS NEWS: ​​How authorities infiltrate the Internet underworld Department of Justice announcement on Darkode’s takedown Russian 2014 fake news story
2/15/202228 minutes, 27 seconds
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1. A new franchising opportunity

Our first episode is an origin story. Ransomware-as-a-service got its start in an unlikely place: Texas. We tell the story of how a Russian cyber gang called REvil went toe-to-toe with a bunch of Texas towns and emerged with a new business model. SHOW NOTES: An interview with REvil’s Unknown Surveillance video of REvil's hacks
2/8/202227 minutes, 12 seconds
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Introducing Click Here

It seems like we hear about new cyberattacks almost every day.  The targets used to be just big companies and government agencies. Now they are focused on you.  Every Tuesday, former NPR investigations correspondent Dina Temple-Raston dives deep into the world of cyber and intelligence. You’ll hear stories about everything from ransomware to misinformation to the people shaping the cyber world, from hacking masterminds to the people who try to stop them.  Click Here. Produced by The Record Media
1/21/20221 minute, 46 seconds