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CBC Newfoundland Morning Profile

CBC Newfoundland Morning

English, Political, 1 season, 1418 episodes, 23 hours, 44 minutes
About
Whether you live in Clarenville, Port Aux Basques, southern Labrador or any point in between...CBC Newfoundland Morning is for you. It's an upbeat, friendly start to your day. Bernice and Martin have the information you need, want and can't do without!
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Gathering in support of survivors, and spreading awareness about sexual violence. Status of Women Central in Grand Falls-Windsor is holding its annual Take Back The Night March

This is Sexual Violence Prevention Week in Newfoundland and Labrador, and organizations across the province are marking its importance. Status of Women Central in Grand Falls-Windsor has been holding its Take Back the Night March for over 20 years, to raise awareness and to support survivors of sexual, domestic, race- and gender-based violence. We spoke with board member Valetta Alcock and Executive Director Jackie Thompson.
1/1/111 minutes, 34 seconds
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Part 1/3 this week: Four companies have been picked to move forward with wind-to-hydrogen projects in NL. We heard from World Energy GH2 about its project in Western Newfoundland

Part 1/3 this week: Talk about getting your ducks in a row. And quickly...One of the companies proposing a wind energy project in this province is out ahead on a number of fronts. World Energy GH2 wants to build wind towers in several areas of southwestern Newfoundland, and to produce hydrogen for export. The plan is not yet approved, but in just the past few weeks, the company has submitted its environmental impact statement, and the provincial government has issued a recommendation letter that sets the stage for Crown land approval. Sean Leet is CEO of World Energy GH2. David Pinsent is the company's environmental assessment manager. This is the first of three parts, airing this week on Newfoundland Morning.
1/1/17 minutes, 20 seconds
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Having a ball, in the fall. We were joined by the new head baseball coach in Corner Brook, who is a former professional pitcher. We also spoke with the VP of the Corner Brook Baseball Association

There's a new baseball coach in Western Newfoundland, and he's got quite a bit of experience to pass on to young players. Enyelbert Soto, a former professional baseball pitcher, was born in Venezuela and played six years in Japan. Now, Solo is the new head coach at the Corner Brook Minor Baseball Association. Darren Hancock is the Vice-President of the Corner Brook Baseball Association, and the two joined us in the studio.
1/1/18 minutes, 9 seconds
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What's the rush? World Energy GH2 is one of the companies proposing wind-to-hydrogen projects in this province. We asked the company why it's moving so quickly to make its project a reality.

Part 2/3 this week: World Energy GH2 is one of the companies proposing to build a wind-to-hydrogen project in this province. World Energy GH2 has been out ahead of other companies on a number of fronts, including wind-testing towers and its environmental impact statement. World Energy GH2's plan is not yet approved, and the deadline for public comments on the EIS is October 11. Sean Leet is CEO of World Energy GH2, and David Pinsent is the company's environmental assessment manager.
1/1/16 minutes, 9 seconds
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The waves attacked their homes with fury during Fiona. But two Burnt Islands homeowners are still waiting on news about whether they can move or whether they have to stay

We're coming up on the one month anniversary of Hurricane Fiona - Post-tropical Storm Fiona, when it hit our shores. Some homeowners on the island's southwest coast are still waiting for answers after their homes were damaged by waves last September. Dozens of houses were destroyed by Fiona, and other homes in vulnerable areas were also later marked for demolition. Yet, two homeowners in Burnt Islands directly affected still don't know what's going to happen for them. Bernice spoke with them and looked into their situation. Afterward, she spoke with local MHA and cabinet minister Andrew Parsons.
1/1/121 minutes, 2 seconds
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"An old idea with a new vision and future." Minister Gerry Byrne spoke about the multi-million-dollar commitment from the provincial government to develop the Great Coastal Trail

Plans are in place for an almost 800-kilometre-long walking and bicycling trail on the Great Northern Peninsula. The province will spend seven-million dollars to build and market the Great Coastal Path as a top adventure tourist destination. Gerry Byrne is the MHA for the district of Corner Brook and the Minister of Immigration, Population Growth and Skills. He spoke with the CBC's Hillary Johnson.
1/1/15 minutes, 53 seconds
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Newfoundlanders in the north. We heard how firefighters from this province helped with the fire situation in the Northwest Territories

It's been a hot, dry summer across much of Canada, and the Northwest Territories have seen some of the worst of it. Wildfires have been raging across the territory since the spring. Tens of thousands of people have been displaced at various times, including the 20,000 residents of the capital city, Yellowknife. In the midst of it all, you will find firefighters from across the country helping out - including four firefighters from this province. Jason Glode of Newfoundland and Labrador has been incident commander, or I.C, overseeing the firefighting efforts.
1/1/17 minutes, 55 seconds
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"You could feel the grief in the air" - a Baie Verte Roman Catholic priest comforts parish members after the sinking of a boat off Fleur De Lys, NL, claims several lives

People on the Baie Verte Peninsula are in mourning today. A ship carrying four crew members sank off Fleur de Lys last night. The Canadian Coast Guard confirmed the sinking, but didn't provided further details about the type of vessel, what happened to it, or any information about crew members. But people in the community have confirmed to CBC that lives have been lost. Father Camillus Ekodobe was in Fleur de Lys last night to provide support. He's a Roman Catholic parish priest based in Baie Verte.
1/1/15 minutes, 56 seconds
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Supply and demand. World Energy GH2 wants to make hydrogen fuel using wind power in southwestern Newfoundland. But who's buying hydrogen, anyway? We asked what's happening on that end of the proposed project

Part 3/3 this week: Today, we wrap up our conversation with World Energy GH2. CEO Sean Leet and Environmental Assessment Manager David Pinsent have been telling us about the company's proposed wind-to-hydrogen project. The plan by World Energy GH2 to build wind turbines and a hydrogen plant in southwestern Newfoundland is not approved yet. The deadline for public comments on the environmental impact statement is October 11. World Energy GH2 wants to make and export hydrogen fuel - but who's buying? Bernice asked Sean Leet what's happening on the sales end of the company's proposed project.
1/1/16 minutes, 45 seconds
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The former Rambler gold mine on the Baie Verte Peninsula has new owners, but many investors in the original company have lost their money. We heard from one of them

The Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador has approved the sale of the Rambler gold mine on the Baie Verte Peninsula. The mine employed hundreds of people in the region, but its former owner entered bankruptcy protection last spring. Now, Australian junior mining company Auteco Minerals is taking over. Investors say, unfortunately for them, the sale price doesn't cover the losses shareholders sustained when Rambler went under. Martyn Lewis is one of those investors, and he spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 34 seconds
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Spreading positivity - and making you think. Two artists in Corner Brook have taken the theme of light and come up with thought-provoking presentations for the CB Nuit after dark arts festival

This Saturday night, West St. in Corner Brook will be closed to traffic and filled with people. The CB Nuit after dark arts festival is happening. This year's theme is "Illuminate." Layla Radwan is a 10-year-old presenter at CB Nuit and she's creating something called "The Tree of Light." Robin Peters is a theatre student at Grenfell Campus who's presenting "Everyday Beacons." They joined Bernice Hillier on West St. for a chat.
1/1/16 minutes, 16 seconds
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A human librarian talks with ... a robot librarian? We heard why a librarian at Grenfell Campus published a conversation with Chat GPT

We've heard a lot this year about artificial intelligence software - especially Open A-I's chat bot, Chat GPT. With another school year in full swing, there are a lot of questions about how these types of software will change how people learn and work. A librarian at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University decided to have a conversation with the chat bot -- and she published it, too. It's called: A Human Librarian Interviews Chat G-P-T. CBC's James Grudic went to the Ferriss Hodgett Library to find out why.
1/1/15 minutes, 3 seconds
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A Home for Respect. That's the motto of this year's Invictus Games, happening in Dusseldorf, Germany. We spoke with an athlete originally from Gander

The Invictus Games is an international, multi-sporting event that showcases the athletic abilities of wounded and ill military personnel. Athletes compete, and they find support for their recovery and rehabilitation. Events include athletics, swimming, powerlifting and cycling, wheelchair rugby and archery. Scott Snow is originally from Gander and is in Germany, competing at the Invictus Games.
1/1/18 minutes, 8 seconds
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Finding support to help explore gender identity and gender expression. The Gender Journeys Project aims to help

A new program that's about to launch in this province hopes to provide a safe space for people who are exploring gender identity and gender expression. Gender Journeys is a collaboration among NL Health Services, Quadrangle NL and Lifewise NL. Lee Kelly is a program facilitator with Quadrangle NL, and Angel Roberts is a certified peer supporter with Lifewise NL.
1/1/19 minutes, 48 seconds
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She's walking for a cure, for herself, and her five-year-old son. We heard from a mother and son who face the daily challenges that come with life as Type 1 diabetics

Chances are, unless you personally know a diabetic, you'll find it hard to believe how managing the disease affects every aspect of life. Mandi Buckle knows the reality of it all too well. She's been a Type 1 diabetic since the age of two. Her son, Oliver, was diagnosed in June of last year at the age of four. I invited them to our studio for a conversation. Mandi Buckle did most of the talking, but Bernice Hillier started by saying hello to Oliver and asking him to explain what diabetes is.
1/1/17 minutes, 35 seconds
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A former graduate of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College took his psychology degree and created a vision for his future. Opthalmology researcher Budd Tucker was in Corner Brook to help celebrate 30 years of the psychology degree program

Grenfell Campus, Memorial University has come a long way from its start as a junior college. It's now a degree-granting institution, with undergraduate and masters degrees, and students enrolled in PhD programs. Budd Tucker was a psychology graduate at Grenfell in 2001 and now holds a PhD in neuroscience. He completed post-doctoral work in ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School and is a professor with the Institute for Vision Research at the University of Iowa. Today, Tucker is the keynote speaker at a celebration of the 30th anniversary of psychology degrees at Grenfell Campus.
1/1/110 minutes, 18 seconds
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There's hopeful news for the Baie Verte Peninsula, with new owners of the former Rambler copper and gold mine. We spoke with the CEO of AuTECO

Last spring, people on the Baie Verte Peninsula were disappointed to learn that Rambler Metals and Mining was going into bankruptcy protection. The company ran the Ming copper and gold mine on the Peninsula and employed hundreds of people, both directly and indirectly. Now the property has a new owner. AuTECO is an Australian junior mining company with big plans for the region. CEO Darren Cooke spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 34 seconds
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It's the thrill of a lifetime. We heard what a successful moose hunting trip in NL means for a visitor from Ontario

This is one of the best times of the year for hunters in this province, as moose hunters are hoping for a successful season in the woods, Many have already been out a couple of times in pursuit of a trophy animal. But for one man visiting from Ontario, his hunting trip was over almost as soon as it began. Art Jameson spoke to the CBC's David Newell.
1/1/17 minutes, 7 seconds
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Making money less of a worry for people already facing health challenges: People in Labrador and part of the Northern Peninsula will now qualify for more help with the cost of medical travel

There was good news recently for some people who have to travel for medical reasons. People who live in all of the Labrador-Grenfell Health Zone can now benefit from a new Flight Voucher Program if they're flying for specialized medical help covered by MCP. Earlier this year, medical travel assistance was expanded for people on the northern tip of the Northern Peninsula. People there can now get the same reimbursement for medical travel as people in Labrador. Lisa Dempster is Minister of Labrador Affairs.
1/1/17 minutes, 59 seconds
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Ah, ah, ah: Save, don't squish. Sure, lots of insects look creepy, but an education project challenges people to learn how much good the creatures do for our ecosystem

Those poor insects. The creepy looks or menacing movements of many species can make humans spray, squish or run. But Memorial University and Nature NL are challenging people to get up-close and curious. The "Insect Apocalypse? Citizen Science Insect Monitoring and Outreach" is going on now. Catherine Scott is the project co-ordinator and an honorary post-doctoral scholar in MUN's Faculty of Science. She spoke with Hillary Johnson.
1/1/18 minutes, 41 seconds
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One year after Hurricane Fiona hit, we heard from a resident whose home was washed away by the storm

This coming Sunday marks one year since Hurricane Fiona hit Port aux Basques. The storm is still taking a toll on people there. You probably remember seeing pictures of a small blue house, teetering on the water's edge. The sea eventually claimed that house and swept it away. It was home to Peggy Savery and her family, and a year later, they're still living in town. They bought a house up the hill, further away from the water. Peggy Savery sat down with CBC reporter Malone Mullin to talk about the past year:
1/1/18 minutes
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As more people get priced out of the housing market, experts say there's a desperate need for new rental units. We asked how the federal removal of GST on new builds can help

Last week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the federal government would remove GST from the cost of building new rental units nationwide. The provincial government supported the decision by removing its share of tax as well, so new builders could save fifteen percent on materials. To find out whether the move will help ease pressure on the housing market, CBC's Leigh Anne Power spoke with Alexis Foster, CEO of the Canadian Homebuilders Association of Newfoundland and Labrador.
1/1/16 minutes, 37 seconds
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Newfoundland best-selling author Donna Morrissey has a new novel out, based on the 1914 Newfoundland sealing disaster -and finishing the writing was a struggle for her

If you checked the Globe and Mail bestseller list this week, you may have noticed a familiar name at Number Five. The new novel, Rage the Night by Newfoundland and Labrador's Donna Morrissey is flying off the shelves. The book centres on the 1914 Newfoundland sealing disaster, and a lost young man who's caught up in it all. Rage the Night almost didn't happen because Morrissey and her husband have been dealing with serious health problems. CBC's Leigh Anne Power spoke with her.
1/1/16 minutes, 38 seconds
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Julie Lodge fed up with AirBnB hosting

Taking the "air" out of AirBnB. We'll speak with a host in Catalina who says the company's service fees and bad communication are forcing her to go it on her own.
1/1/17 minutes, 25 seconds
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Beverly Parsons of Hampden wins the lottery!

Everything's coming up roses for a Hampden couple who bought tickets for Come From Away in Gander, but instead of seeing the show, they won a million dollars.
1/1/17 minutes, 11 seconds
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Single father, veteran, struggling to care for son with autism

A single father in Pasadena is struggling to give his son the care he needs - while also taking care of himself. Chris Brake has been the sole caregiver for his son for over a year. When he separated from his ex-wife, he thought he'd be able to care for his son with the help of some respite care. That never happened, and he has been struggling. CBC's James Grudic reports.
1/1/17 minutes, 26 seconds
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Locals chime in on World Energy GH2 proposed Port au Port megaproject

It's another mega-project, one that will transform the Port aux Port Peninsula and much of western Newfoundland. Three hundred or more wind turbines towering over the landscape, connected by roads and transmission lines. And 140 thousand tonnes of hydrogen produced for export every year. It's no surprise that many residents are worried about what this means for the natural beauty and ecology of the area. But the opposition runs much deeper than that single concern. Jamie Fitzpatrick spoke with several opponents of the World Energy GH2 wind-to-hydrogen proposal.
1/1/18 minutes, 40 seconds
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Paula Sheppard on the availibilty of sexual assault evidence kits

Kits used to collect evidence after a sexual assault aren't available at all health care facilities in the province, according to a women's group in Western Newfoundland. Find out why the Corner Brook Status of Women Council believes it's vital for that to change.
1/1/17 minutes, 41 seconds
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Becky O'Keefe: the first-ever Gros Morne Hiking Festival

Come hill or high water, their boots were made for hiking. Hear how a week-long hiking festival in Gros Morne became a point of summit and merrymaking.
1/1/110 minutes, 3 seconds
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MUN research on diabetes and aging

Managing diabetes as we age. Hear from two researchers from MUN who have found our ability to cope with life stress generally is a good indicator of how we cope with the disease. Dr. Sahar Iqbal is a researcher and associate professor with the Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University. Cindy Whitten is a clinical research scientist and manager of applied health research with NL Health Services.
1/1/19 minutes, 6 seconds
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Greg Noftall and Randy Lewis write a song for Baie Verte fisherman lost at sea

It's been a heartbreaking week on the Baie Verte Peninsula. A fishing vessel with four men aboard sank off Fleur de Lys on September 12th. One man managed to make it to shore, the bodies of two men were recovered, and one man is still lost at sea. People deal with their grief in a multitude of ways. For my next two guests, they poured their sense of loss and heartache into a song. We'll hear the song in just a moment. But first, let's hear from the songwriters. Greg Noftall penned the lyrics. Randy Lewis put the words to music.
1/1/115 minutes, 39 seconds
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We asked why outfitters in the province are handing over their own money to hunters and trappers

The province's outfitters association is putting its money where its mouth is. They're offering more cash on top of the government bounty already available to people who hunt coyotes and wolves. Coyotes and wolves are predators that are threatening woodland caribou on the island. The province keeps a close eye on the caribou population. As part of its wildlife research, the province offers a bounty of 25 dollars for every coyote or wolf carcass brought in by licensed hunters. Now the Newfoundland and Labrador Outfitters Association is stepping up to do its share as well. Brad LeDrew is president of the outfitters association.
1/1/16 minutes, 45 seconds
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Comedian Jonny Harris is 'Still Standing' after years of sharing stories - and some jokes - from resilient small towns across the country. The show is about to launch its ninth season and it promises to hit pretty close to home

Jonny Harris is up to 100 shows, and he's "Still Standing." Harris and the crew at the popular CBC show are about to kick off a brand new season, the show's ninth season. The show, of course, takes us to small towns across the country and highlights how diverse we are, while showing us how similar we can be, too. Jonny Harris spoke with Martin Jones.
1/1/17 minutes, 2 seconds
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Is there a way to introduce major industrial projects in this province without triggering anger, protests, and maybe a public inquiry? We sought out fresh ideas

As we've been hearing, not everyone wants to see hundreds of giant wind turbines in western Newfoundland. Objections to the World Energy GH2 proposal sound familiar, because we have heard them during other large-scale industrial projects. People worry about threats to the natural beauty and ecology of the area. They say it's being rushed through, without enough public consultation. And they don't trust government, or industry. Which raises the question: what would a just and equitable mega-project look like, to these critics? Jamie Fitzpatrick asked them.
1/1/18 minutes, 41 seconds
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Road to the Aisles: We met the man behind the Riff's Challenge, which encouraged people to visit every Riff's department store in NL (and how well did HE do?)

How's this for a throwdown? This year, Lee Stewart issued the Riff's Challenge, in which he challenged people to visit every location of the iconic NL department store Riff's - and there are LOTS of them, spread widely all over the province. Think of it as a bucket list item - and you could most likely buy an actual bucket at each stop.
1/1/17 minutes, 25 seconds
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An Environmental Impact Statement for a project such as World Energy’s wind-to-hydrogen proposal can be a slog to get through. We got some advice on how to get informed and have your say

Reading an Environmental Impact Statement, or EIS, sounds simple enough. At heart, it's a document that explains what a proposed project might mean for the environment. Government often requires an EIS to be filed and reviewed before a project can go ahead. But in reality, the document can be long, complex, and full of technical language. A deadline is coming up for public comment on World Energy GH2’s proposed wind project, but the company’s EIS is thousands of pages long. People in St. George’s and Corner Brook can get some advice on that at upcoming public presentations. Camille Ouellet-Dallaire is an assistant professor at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University.
1/1/19 minutes, 20 seconds
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We heard from the new commanding officer at 9 Wing Gander, who shared her plans for the time she'll spend therethere

For anyone who lives in Gander, it's not unusual to see people in uniform. Dozens of members of the Canadian Armed Forces live and work in town. This summer, the base at Nine Wing Gander got a new commanding officer. CBC producer David Newell met Lt. Col. Rhea MacLean last week.
1/1/16 minutes, 9 seconds
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A citizens’ advocacy group is questioning just how “green” wind-to-hydrogen projects really are - and how unbiased the provincial government can be when it’s heavily promoting wind energy. We heard from the Council of Canadians

The words "wind energy" seem to be on everyone’s lips these days. The province is promoting its potential, and the re-branded Energy NL is talking it up. Across Newfoundland, people either support, or oppose, or are just curious about wind energy. Now, citizens' advocacy group Council of Canadians is adding its voice. Helen Forsey is a member of the Newfoundland and Labrador chapter of the Council.
1/1/18 minutes, 54 seconds
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.If you think YOUR grocery bill is high, imagine supplying an entire restaurant. We asked how restaurants in the province are coping with inflation and a shortage of workers.

Restaurants in NL are in trouble. Challenges such as the high cost of ingredients and fuel, as well as a shortage of workers are forcing some owners to increase the price of meals. Many restaurants are just breaking even, and some are closing. Richard Alexander, Atlantic vice- president of Restaurants Canada spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/17 minutes, 8 seconds
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Tall tales, spooky stories, and a children's storytime. It's all part of the new Rocky Harbour Storytelling Festival, happening this coming weekend

To make a long story short...a new festival is happening in Rocky Harbour this weekend, and it's focused on storytelling. François Trépanier is organizer of the first-ever Rocky Harbour Storytelling Festival. He's also interim chair of the Rocky Harbour Business Association, which is also new.
1/1/18 minutes, 43 seconds
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All their relations - The Elmastukwek First Nation in Benoit's Cove is collecting old photos for a project to bring together the band's past AND present

Lots of people LOVE old photos - the way people dressed, the way communities have changed... it's all so interesting. A Mi'kmaw band in the Bay of Islands looks forward to seeing many old photos this weekend. The Elmastukwek First Nation in Benoit's Cove is doing a photo album project, and they're looking for people's help with it on National Day For Truth and Reconciliation this Saturday. Kathy McCarthy is secretary of the Elmastukwek First Nation band, and Erica Samms-Hurley is a descendant of the band's first chief, Wilson Samms.
1/1/18 minutes, 46 seconds
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Hidden homelessness. Chances are the hotels where you stay across NL may also be used to house people who have nowhere else to turn - and it costs the province millions

NL's housing crisis is devastating for the people most affected. But hotels and private shelter operators are making money off the shortage of housing. These businesses are the only safety net available when someone has nowhere else to go. Through access to information requests, CBC News has obtained some details of how much money the province is spending on temporary housing. And that information is shedding light on the geographic spread of homelessness, which is unlike anything we have seen before. Ariana Kelland was in our St. John's studio.
1/1/17 minutes, 22 seconds
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Birds of a feather flock together: Birdwatcher Jared Clarke shared his tips and tricks for successful birding

Picture it: You're standing in the kitchen window with a cup of tea, and suddenly, a bird visits the feeder outside. How often do you know what that bird is? Starling? "Greyjay? Something else? Jared Clarke can help you out with that. He's a full-time birdwatcher and bird expert.
1/1/17 minutes, 34 seconds
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Preparing for the worst: One year after Fiona devastated Newfoundland's southwest coast, The Canadian Red Cross gives us some of the basics of storm and disaster preparedness at home

Earlier this week, CBC Newfoundland Morning brought you coverage of the one-year anniversary of post-tropical storm Fiona. Adam Walsh and Bernice Hillier hosted a province-wide morning show from Port aux Basques (hear our full broadcast at cbc.ca/newfoundlandmorning). As extreme weather events become more and more frequent, the Canadian Red Cross says people everywhere should do some basic planning to be ready for a storm or other natural disaster. Bill Lawlor is interim vice president and he spoke with CBC's James Grudic.
1/1/17 minutes, 36 seconds
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An espresso machine on a bicycle? The owner of one of Corner Brook's newest small businesses pedals the "shop" - and peddles the coffee

One of Corner Brook's newest small businesses is on wheels - literally. It's a coffee shop, that's on a bicycle. The odd-looking vehicle has been around town for the past week or so. The owner set up shop at the Reid Street community garden on Tuesday. CBC's James Grudic went there to check it out. 
1/1/16 minutes, 10 seconds
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There've been NINE robberies reported in the Town of Lewisporte in the last few weeks. The targets - small businesses. A frustrated business owner talked about it

Business owners in Lewisporte are feeling frustrated and on edge lately.That's because there have been NINE robberies reported in the Town in the last few weeks. They're not just limited to businesses, either - residents have also reported sheds and properties are also being targeted. Haley Kinden owns Kinden's Bakery and Cafe told us her location was broken into last week.
1/1/19 minutes, 1 second
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From a shrimp quota, to cold storage, to seniors' housing: St. Anthony Basin Resources (SABRI) has received a provincial award for Industry Leadership and Excellence

The term "social enterprise" wasn't used much in 1997, so not everyone immediately understood the idea of the new, not-for-profit group that owned its own shrimp quota and invested all the money back into the community. St. Anthony Basin Resources Incorporated, or SABRI, had to manage the quota for the benefit of 16 Northern Peninsula communities - from Big Brook to Goose Cove. Now, more than 25 years later, SABRI has been honoured with a provincial award for Industry Leadership and Excellence. Wayne Noel is long-time chair of the board.
1/1/18 minutes, 19 seconds
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Using new technology to help people recover from neurological conditions - we heard from a researcher who is doing just that

New research at Memorial University could change the road to recovery for people with neurological disease symptoms. The research uses robotics to help patients recover and measure how well they're doing. Dr. Michelle Ploughman is a professor of biomedical sciences at MUN.
1/1/18 minutes, 28 seconds
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Feeling blue over a lack of berries. Blueberry pickers in some parts of NL say the berries were scarce this year, and an expert suggests possible reasons

Vehicles pulled off on the side of the Trans Canada with white buckets on their hoods are sure signs that blueberry picking season has arrived. If you're looking to buy blueberries, you can be sure to get some there. Some of you, of course, pick your own. But, this year, many people say that the blueberries were scarce, even in your favorite spots. We thought we'd "pick" an expert to tell us what might be going on. David Percival is director of the Wild Blueberry Research Program and manager of the Wild Blueberry Research Centre at Dalhousie University.
1/1/17 minutes, 59 seconds
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What do you do with a 450-pound pumpkin? You make soup, of course. Lots of soup. A free meal event in Corner Brook today was all thanks to a farmer and a local restaurant

This IS the season for all things pumpkin, and, today, there's a special meal being served up in Corner Brook that is making full use of some locally-grown pumpkins. We're talking giant pumpkins -- 450 pounds each -- grown by Joie de Vivre farm in Irishtown. Adrian Reid is one of the farm's owners. Madison's Restaurant in Steady Brook is turning the pumpkins into a hearty pumpkin soup. Erica Park is food and beverage manager at Madison's. Virender Singh, known to most people as Viru, is executive chef at Madison's.
1/1/19 minutes, 49 seconds
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The sport of disc golf is starting to ride an undercurrent of popularity in NL - and a man who found his passion for the game during the pandemic wants to highlight the benefits of disc golf

You can play it year-round, and it gives you a healthy and inexpensive option for recreation. More and more players are taking part in disc golf, and courses are available in Corner Brook, Stephenville and St. Johns. Johnston Miller, president of Corner Brook Disc Golf and events director for Disc Golf NL met up with CBC's Alex Kennedy, to teach him a thing or two about disc golf.
1/1/17 minutes, 44 seconds
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You've got to get your moose, b'y. But do you know what to do once you've gotten the animal down? We got some tips from a college instructor who gives a seminar on how to field dress a moose

There's a lot to know to be a moose hunter. Of course, you need to do a Hunter Education course and a Firearms Safety course. That's before you even apply for a license. But what about once you've got a moose down? Kaleb Nieuwenhuis is giving a seminar in Corner Brook tonight (Wednesday), on field dressing a moose. He's a former butcher, now a college instructor, in the agriculture technician program at College of the North Atlantic.
1/1/111 minutes, 34 seconds
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Not going to happen. A committee on the Port au Port Peninsula had asked for a federal impact assessment for the Wind Energy GH2 project proposed for Western Newfoundland, but the federal minister said no. We had reaction

It's not every day that people in Newfoundland and Labrador watch closely for a decision by the federal environment minister. But members of the Environmental Transparency Committee were doing that last week, and they didn't get the answer they'd hoped for. The committee is concerned about a proposed wind energy project in Western Newfoundland. World Energy GH2 wants to build hundreds of wind turbines and a hydrogen/ammonia plant. The committee had asked the federal environment minister to give the wind energy project extra scrutiny, in the form of a federal impact assessment. But the Minister said no. Duran Felix is with the Environmental Transparency Committee.
1/1/17 minutes, 36 seconds
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Many Newfoundlanders and Labradorians face poor water quality every day. The mayor of Irishtown-Summerside told us how residents there have dealt with unsuitable water for several years

When you turn on your taps, the last thing you want to see is murky, discoloured water. But poor water quality is the reality for many communities across the province. One affected community is Irishtown-Summerside, on the north shore of the Bay of Islands. Peter Parsons is the mayor.
1/1/17 minutes, 7 seconds
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Can students in Labrador "travel" the province without leaving the classroom? Sure! It's in the cards! A Grade Three class in Labrador is planning to learn about the province through postcards that people send them

A Grade Three class in North West River, Labrador is gearing up to explore other parts of the province - without leaving their own classroom. Laura Pittman has been teaching at Lake Melville School for four years and wanted to try something new with her students. But she needs the help of Newfoundlanders and Labradorians to do it. Pittman is asking people across the province to send postcards to her students, to help them learn more about Newfoundland and Labrador. She spoke with the CBC's Hillary Johnson.
1/1/15 minutes, 39 seconds
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Sick and tired of being the only support for the sick and tired. We spoke with a family doctor who's leaving her practice in Grand Falls-Windsor until the provincial government follows through on promises of support

Last year, the provincial government announced community health hubs in Gander and Grand Falls-Windsor. They were supposed to provide primary care for the thousands of patients who are without a family doctor, and to reduce the demand on emergency rooms. Doctors at the hubs have no overhead expenses, but they do have nursing support and they work limited hours. Dr. Sarah Clancy has been running her own practice in Grand Falls-Windsor for ten years, but now, she's had enough of government delays on promised supports. She's closing up her practice in December. She spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/111 minutes, 31 seconds
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He's visited more places in this province than you or I have - and he's got the paintings to prove it. We spoke with visual artist Jean Claude Roy, who received the Order of Newfoundland and Labrador this week

This province's highest honour, the Order of Newfoundland and Labrador, was presented this week to seven people. One of them, artist Jean Claude Roy, should be even better known to all of us than he is. That's because he has visited more communities in this province than most Newfoundlanders and Labradorians ever will. Roy has painted harbours and hillsides from Harbour Le Cou to Happy Valley, and just every other nook and cranny He emigrated from France in 1971, and still divides his time between this province and France. Bernice Hiller asked Jean Claude Roy how he decided to visit every community in the province.
1/1/18 minutes, 19 seconds
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A gold for a young grappler -- we heard from Corner Brook's up-and-coming Brazilian Jiu Jitsu champion

One of Corner Brook's youngest competitive martial artists has just returned from a national competition with a gold medal. She's just 12 years old, but this is her fourth competitive win in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. She's so advanced that she can roll with other players who are MUCH older than she is - including her dad. CBC's James Grudic went to Anchor Combat Academy in Corner Brook to talk to them.
1/1/15 minutes, 38 seconds
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When it comes to raising money to help animals, you could say a Labrador woman is the cat's pyjamas. The founder of Mission Kitty told us what got her started and what she was thankful for on Thanksgiving Day

ICYMI: If you could ask cats around the province what they're grateful for this Thanksgiving, Mission Kitty would be at the top of their list. The non-profit organization in Labrador West has helped cat rescue groups all over Newfoundland and Labrador - and it all started because of one very special cat, Jingles. His passing in 2016 initially inspired a small online fundraising effort, which led to the startup of a thrift store in Wabush last year, and now an upcoming expansion. Colette Beals is the founder of Mission Kitty.
1/1/17 minutes, 15 seconds
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We met a 95-year-old Innu elder at the Gull Island Gathering in Labrador this year... and headr why she's grateful for her children, her grandchildren, and even her great-great-great-GREAT-grandchildren

You may have heard a few stories from the most recent Gull Island Gathering in Labrador. Hundreds of Innu came together to pitch traditional tents, play games, and just spend time with loved ones on the land. And 95-year-old Mary Odele Penashue wouldn't miss it for the world. She's the oldest Innu elder in her community of Sheshatshiu, and at the Gathering this year, she was giving thanks for her many, many children and grandchildren -- including her great-great-great-GREAT-grandchildren. With translation help from her granddaughter, Florence Penashue, Mary Odele spoke with CBC's Andrea McGuire in Innu-Aimun.
1/1/18 minutes, 37 seconds
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She may be ready for a zombie apocalypse, but a home run derby proved too much for Corner Brook writer Heather Huybregts. She shares her hilarious cautionary tale

Corner Brook writer Heather Huybregts always thought she was destined for greatness. But, as you'll hear, awkwardly handling a puppy in her arms has left her still waiting for her moment.
1/1/13 minutes, 33 seconds
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Newfoundlanders and Labradorians grow just about everything they need for a traditional Thanksgiving dinner...including the cranberries. We talked to a farmer who's harvesting his crops right now

When you think of Thanksgiving dinner, there's the turkey, of course. And, in Newfoundland, there's probably salt beef and pease pudding, as well. But many people would say it's not a full, traditional meal without the cranberries. Corey Reid has been growing them on his farm near Botwood for nearly15 years. The CBC's Leigh Anne Power dropped by to talk to him at this year's harvest.
1/1/15 minutes, 57 seconds
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Literally saving time in a bottle. We met a man from Campbellton, who put a message in a bottle 27 years ago, and we heard about the man from Scotland who found it

Andrew Thornley of Campbellton put a message in a bottle, threw it into the ocean and hoped and dreamed that someone would find it. He was a Grade 5 student at Greenwood Academy. On the note, he wrote about living on a farm and about all the animals that surrounded him. Nearly three decades later, Andrew Park of Scotland tracked him down to say he had found his message-in-bottle. Thornley is not in Grade Five anymore, but he still lives on a farm. And CBC surprised Andrew Thornley by having Andrew Park secretly listening to the interview!
1/1/110 minutes, 52 seconds
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What would make a person want to leave Earth forever? That's the basis for Jawbone, the first novel by NL poet and playwright Meghan Greeley

Imagine a woman whose broken jaw was wired shut for so long that she now has trouble speaking. But in order to win a one-way trip to colonize Mars, she has to tape a 60-second video on why it would be her ultimate escape. That's the premise of a new novel called Jawbone, by acclaimed Newfoundland and Labrador writer Meghan Greeley.
1/1/18 minutes, 10 seconds
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Eelgrass - it's out-of-sight, out-of-mind to most of us. But the underwater plant is vital to the health of cod, shrimp and, well, eels. Researchers in the Gros Morne region are studying how healthy eelgrass helps the planet

Eelgrass grows on the seabed, 40 metres under the water. it's home to numerous species of fish and other creatures, and it helps the planet's marine ecosystem. Researchers in Gros Morne will be learning a whole lot more about eelgrass over the next three years. The Atlantic Healthy Oceans Initiative and the Ecology Action Centre are doing the work, along with Grenfell Campus, Memorial University. CBC producer Hillary Johnson reached two people involved with the project.
1/1/19 minutes, 21 seconds
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Our knowledge of fungi in NL has "mushroomed" over the years, thanks to researcher and author Andrus Voitk. Last week, he received the Order of Newfoundland and Labrador

This province's highest honour, the Order of Newfoundland and Labrador, was presented last week to seven people. On our program, we've already heard from two of the recipients who are connected to our area, Dave Elms and Jean Claude Roy. We caught up with the third inductee who's rooted in our Newfoundland Morning region. Andrus Voitk has a passion for natural history, and he's done a great deal to promote an understanding of and appreciation for the many species of mushroom that grow naturally in this province. Voitk wrote the first field guide to the fungi of Newfoundland and Labrador, and he's even had two species of fungi named after him.
1/1/112 minutes, 4 seconds
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On the (highway-side) fence...or building them? We heard about what the provincial government is planning to help cut down on moose-vehicle collisions

Back in 2012, a wildlife fence stretching over 16 kilometres was installed on the Trans Canada Highway between Gallants and Barachois. It's just one of many attempts to keep moose off the province's highways. Of course, there's still work to be done. Just last week, a 54-year-old man died after hitting a moose on the highway near Birchy Narrows. We spoke with John Abbott, NL's Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure.
1/1/19 minutes, 7 seconds
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A bridge to the past. You'll hear how a Corner Brook artist used rusty rebar, locally foraged plants, and archival photos to create a work of art that's now on display in St. John's

The thing about artists is that they see the world with different eyes than most of us. Take Alli Johnston, for example. She took notice of what was left of an old bridge that used to connect Exploits Islands in Central Newfoundland. And, where most of us might see only rusty old rebar, she drew inspiration for art. The result is an installation of textile art called "The Bridge." It opened at the Craft Council gallery in St. John's last week.
1/1/17 minutes, 36 seconds
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Holly Dwyer on sewing and quilting lessons

Grand Falls-Windsor is focused on the fabric of the community -- literally. Hear how the town's sewing and quilting lessons are helping people find their happy place.
1/1/17 minutes, 26 seconds
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Young hunter Georgia Kean gets her moose

She got her moose and she got it in style. Meet the young hunter who won an all-inclusive guided hunting trip in the province.
1/1/17 minutes, 9 seconds
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Zainab Jerrett brings us the Tombolo Multicultural Expo

The Gander Tombolo Multicultural Expo is back for another exciting weekend. The event celebrates cultural diversity in our community and has something for the entire family. Zainab Jerrett is the executive director of Tombolo Multicultural Festival Newfoundland and Labrador.
1/1/18 minutes, 36 seconds
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Russell Williams on the province's proposed wind mega-projects

Enamored with mega-projects. A political scientist looks at wind/hydrogen projects proposed for this province, and weighs in how politicians are approaching the idea of this brand new industry.
1/1/17 minutes, 33 seconds
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Corporal Jolene Garland tells how police busted a suspect in an alleged grandparent scam

The RCMP often warn people about scammers out to steal their money. Last week in Gander, several seniors were targeted in the so-called "grandparent scam." Thanks to police warnings though, one of the victims recognized the ploy and reported the thief.
1/1/18 minutes, 31 seconds
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NL West SPCA overwhelmed with animals seized by police

A case of animal hoarding has the Corner Brook SPCA overwhelmed. Find out what's happening with the abundance of animals. CBC's James Grudic reports.
1/1/13 minutes, 43 seconds
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Eugene Nippard pleads for more action to reduce moose-vehicle collisions

Moose on our highways are no joke. Hear from a man who really wants to reduce moose collisions in the province. Eugene Nippard is the founder of the Save Our People Action Committee.
1/1/19 minutes, 12 seconds
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Pride Tape banned in the NHL; an advocate for LGBTQ+ sports inclusivity weighs in

This week, in an unexpected move, the NHL has banned the use of "pride tape;" a rainbow hockey tape some players have used to express inclusion. Kurt Weaver is with the You Can Play Project, which advocates for LGBTQ+ people to be welcome in sports. Kristopher Wells is a co-creator of Pride Tape. They speak with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/112 minutes, 46 seconds
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If the stork is scheduled to stop in Central Nfld. this fall, he'll soon be able to drop into the Gander hospital. We gave an update on the reopening of the labour and delivery ward at the James Paton Memorial Hospital

For several years now, if you were pregnant and in the Gander catchment area, you were likely diverted to Grand Falls-Windsor to deliver your baby. James Paton Memorial Hospital had a chronic problem in recruiting and keeping obstetrical staff. Eight months ago, the provincial government announced that it plans to fix the problem and permanently reopen the Gander OBS unit. To find out how much longer people will have to wait for that, the CBC's Leigh Anne Power called Joanne Pelley, the health services vice president for Central Newfoundland region of NL Health.
1/1/16 minutes, 17 seconds
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The provincial PC's crowned their new leader over the weekend. We spoke with Tony Wakeham

Tony Wakeham is the new leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Newfoundland and Labrador. He captured the victory by a narrow margin over Eugene Manning -- on the second ballot. Wakeham is the MHA for Stephenville-Port-au-Port.
1/1/18 minutes, 53 seconds
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Time to have your say. Consultations are coming up about a proposed protected area near Campbellton in Central Newfoundland. We heard from the Wilderness and Ecological Reserves Advisory Council

Protecting our natural environment. Sounds like a good thing to do, right? But proposals for a protected area are sometimes met with mixed reaction. People might be worried that the way they use the land will have to change. It's interesting then that a proposed protected area now being considered in Central Newfoundland was an idea that came from local people. Indian Arm Brook is near Campbellton in Central Newfoundland. Consultations start this week on the idea of a protected area there. Graham Wood is co-chair of the Wilderness and Ecological Reserves Advisory Council, or WERAC.
1/1/16 minutes, 52 seconds
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October is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and the non-profit group Miles for Smiles is highlighting the number of child abuse offences in NL. We spoke with the organization's founder

October is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and unfortunately, the number of child abuse cases across the country and the province continues to rise. The Miles for Smiles Foundation is a non-profit group dedicated to eliminating child abuse. The group is highlighting the number of child abuse cases in Newfoundland and Labrador to help people understand how serious and widespread they are. The CBC's Hillary Johnson spoke with Bev Moore Davis, the founder of Miles for Smiles Foundation.
1/1/18 minutes
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From tracking buoys, to gill nets, and much more. Clean Harbours Initiative is back cleaning up along the shorelines and underwater in southwestern Newfoundland. We found out what they're hauling out of the water

Clean Harbours Initiative is a group out of Twillingate that cleans up along shorelines and under the ocean's surface. A lot of the focus is on so-called "ghost gear," fishing gear that's been lost or abandoned that ends up as a hazard to marine life or to boats. A severe weather event usually means that more fishing gear and other items will be washed out to sea. So, even before post-tropical storm Fiona hit last year, Shawn Bath of Clean Harbours Initiative made plans to be on the ground in southwestern Newfoundland, ready to help. Now, more than a year later, he's back. Bernice reached him in Port aux Basques.
1/1/16 minutes, 50 seconds
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Eight years, multiple reports and appeals later, and two RNC officers are heading to TWO public hearings. But there's a potential roadblock for the man who made the complaints. That story from our Police and Public Trust series

It's been more than eight years since RNC officers knocked on Andrew Abbass's door, read from a piece of paper that he was being detained under the Mental Health Care and Treatment Act, and took him to the hospital in Corner Brook. He stayed there for six days, without medical diagnosis - or criminal charge. But the officer involved in instructing that detainment - and another who called Abbass a "loser,' have yet to go to a public police hearing. Andrew Abbass lives in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. Recently, CBC Investigates reporter Ariana Kelland visited Abbass as part of the series, Police and Public Trust.
1/1/19 minutes, 4 seconds
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Like much of the country and province, Corner Brook is facing a housing shortage. We heard from the mayor about what's needed to address the issue

The lack of affordable housing is a problem right across this country. We've heard a lot about it in recent days in this province. In Corner Brook, some residents of the city recently brought forward their concerns about the housing shortage. Members of the "community partners advisory committee" were looking for the city's help. The housing crisis has been on the council's radar for quite some time. Mayor Jim Parsons joined us in our studio.
1/1/19 minutes, 28 seconds
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The provincial government has faced scrutiny over housing issues. Political leaders have defended themselves by saying they've created 750 new housing options in the past couple of years. But what does that actually mean? The answer may surprise you

It's been a busy first few days of the fall session at the House of Assembly. A tent city is still standing across the street from Confederation Building . Inside, the government rolled out a new five-point plan with incentives for the private sector to build more affordable housing in the province. And there were tough questions about whether they have done enough to address the crisis. Our CBC Investigates producer Rob Antle gave us a reality check about how they've answered some of those questions.
1/1/15 minutes, 38 seconds
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More and more seniors are struggling to maintain housing, but a community group has resources to help

We're all aware of the high cost of groceries, housing, and everything else these days. Some advocates say seniors are feeling the impact of the high cost of living even more than most people But there are resources to help. Connections for Seniors provides emergency accommodations and other services to adults across the province who are aged 55 and older. Mohamed Abdallah is the organization's executive director.
1/1/19 minutes, 30 seconds
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Looking out for our furry friends: An advocate says animals in our province need more protection

We reported last week on another case of animal hoarding, where 30 animals were found in a Corner Brook house. It's not the first reported case of animal hoarding in the city, and we often hear of animal shelters in the province working at capacity. Heather Ballard spends a lot of time advocating for animals in our province, and she's even drafted up a list of proposed changes to the province's Animal Protection Act, which was amended in 2012. Ballard is with an animal rescue called Rescue NL.
1/1/17 minutes, 51 seconds
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Cautiously optimistic:Expectant mothers in the Gander area are encouraged by news that the obstetrics unit at the local hospital is slated by the government to open soon. We heard from a soon-to-be mom

On Tuesday's show, we heard from Joanne Pelley, vice president of Newfoundland and Labrador Health Services for the Central zone. She told us that the obstetrics unit at James Paton Memorial Health Centre in Gander should be open by the end of the fall season. Shauna Adams lives in Gander, she is a mother of one, and is expecting her second child in April. She spoke with The CBC's Troy Turner.
1/1/16 minutes, 4 seconds
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Each one, teach one. But people can only learn if there's someone to do the teaching. We heard about an effort to get more trained literacy tutors in areas around the province.

If you'd like to help people in your community, and you have some time to spare, we might have just the opportunity for you today. Laubach Literacy is looking for people across Newfoundland and Labrador to take some free training and to become volunteer tutors. The idea is that having tutors around the province will make it easier for people to get help to improve their literacy skills. And there's a great need for that. Kelly Taylor-Hulan is a literacy consultant and an ESL instructor who is also a coordinator with Laubach Literacy.
1/1/16 minutes, 42 seconds
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Western Newfoundland Mi'kmaw musician Paul Pike has just been nominated for a Canadian Folk Music Award. He talked about the nomination and the music behind it

Award-winning musician and composer Paul Pike is having a pretty good week. He's just been nominated for a Canadian Folk Music Award. The category is Instrumental Solo Artist of the Year, for his album Echoes of Our Ancestors. The album features the beautiful sounds of the Native American Flute played in a way only Paul Pike can.
1/1/17 minutes, 53 seconds
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It's a story to warm your heart and your hands. We heard about a coat drive for new Canadians in Gander

Fall in Newfoundland and Labrador means you could head out in just a heavy sweater or you may need full on snow gear. We have to be prepared for all of it. That may come as a surprise to newcomers to the province who haven't had to think about winter coats and snow pants before. To help out, the Association for New Canadians in Gander is holding a coat drive. Martin Jones went to speak with Susan Watkins at the ANC's Gander office.
1/1/18 minutes, 10 seconds
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Helping create better school food environments in this province: Food First NL is looking for a School Food Coordinator. We found out more about the job and why it's an important one

Food First NL is looking for a School Food Program Coordinator. The position will focus on coordinating school food advocacy here at home and across the country. It's designed to help facilitate important conversations about food policies in efforts to improve school food environments. Josh Smee is the CEO of Food First NL.
1/1/19 minutes, 12 seconds
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They're calling their musical show "The Far End of Summer." We found out what was planned in King's Point on this upcoming fall weekend

A show that's scheduled to be onstage in King's Point this weekend is putting a spotlight on songs from the local area - and it's part of a bigger project to develop a theatre production for the Rattling Brook Falls trail. The King's Point Theatre Project is gathering music and stories. And some of the songs that are on the list are brand new to most audience members. Jim Card is a local history buff and songwriter who's contributed to the production, and he's also singing in it. Rory Lambert is the artistic director behind the show, which is called "The Far End of Summer."
1/1/18 minutes, 14 seconds
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Giving our animals the best care we can: The province has responded to CBC's questions about possible changes to the Animal Health and Protection Act

UPDATE: Last week, we spoke with Heather Ballard, an animal rescuer and activist for animal rights. She's with a non-profit organization called Rescue NL. Ballard talked about changes she'd hoped would be made to the province's Animal Health and Protection Act. She had communicated about those changes during a meeting last year with the Department of Fisheries, Forestry and Agriculture. CBC asked for an interview with the minister, but we got a written response from the department instead.
1/1/11 minute, 47 seconds
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A retired architect and author told us how he thinks we can solve the province's shortage of affordable housing

Affordable housing has moved to the top of the list of issues concerning people nationwide. Inflation and a shortage of homes have combined to push thousands of people onto the streets and into tents. Jim Case is a retired architect and author, and he's been thinking about how his profession can help solve the problem. Case spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 5 seconds
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Leading the charge. We heard from two electric vehicle drivers in the province on how that's going for them

A report from the International Energy Agency predicts that, by 2030, there will be ten times as many electric cars as there are now on the road worldwide. The appeal of EVs has certainly increased in recent years. In fact, more than half of the electric cars on the road worldwide have been sold since 2021. By 2035, all new passenger vehicles and light trucks sold in Canada will have to have zero emissions.Tara Champion and Mike Goodyear of Grand Falls-Windsor own some of the 800 electric vehicles registered with the province.
1/1/114 minutes, 59 seconds
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Newfoundland man Duane Taylor is back in Europe, helping animals in Ukraine

An animal lover from this province is back in Ukraine. For the past few weeks, Duane Taylor has been bringing pet food and veterinary supplies into the country with his charity, Impact Express. This is Taylor's second time in Ukraine since the start of the war. The CBC's Hillary Johnson reached him in Moldova.
1/1/18 minutes, 31 seconds
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From Frankenstein to Freddy Krueger, Chucky to Pennywise, scary movie characters have been frightening us out of our wits for generations. Film buff Scott Simms told us why we love to be scared, and what some of his favourite scary films are

This week on Newfoundland Morning, we talked about scary movies, about what films would be okay to show children around Halloween, and which ones definitely would not. But, if you're a grown-up, you may absolutely love a good creepy film. Film buff and theatre teacher Scott Simms talked about why we love being frightened and recommended some his favourite frightening films.
1/1/110 minutes, 57 seconds
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A legislative hurdle is preventing a Corner Brook woman from severing ties with her abuser. CBC reporter Ryan Cooke told us the woman fighting to reverse her own adoption

WARNING - DISTURBING CONTENT: A Corner Brook woman is trying to move on with her life after suffering horrific abuse at the hands of a man wo had been trusted to protect her. But she can't get him off her birth certificate. CBC reporter Ryan Cooke joined us to discuss the story of Cynthia Webb, the woman fighting to reverse her own adoption. (WARNING: This story contains details of sexual abuse.)
1/1/15 minutes, 58 seconds
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The wind turbines could soon be fanning out across Newfoundland, but will anyone buy the product? A renewable energy analyst doesn't believe the hype about hydrogen

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came to Stephenville last year, putting his stamp of approval on a new industry for Newfoundland and Labrador. As of today, four proposals for wind-to-hydrogen projects are on the table. Each of them would see hundreds of wind turbines pumping electricity through water, to make hydrogen and ammonia. The product would be shipped overseas to markets like Germany, where energy needs are urgent. But there are hydrogen skeptics in the renewable energy community. The CBC's Jamie Fitzpatrick has been speaking with one of them.
1/1/110 minutes, 17 seconds
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An epic swimming journey by a trio of caribou has amazed wildlife biologists. We heard from a researcher who's been studying Fogo Island caribou for years.

Last week, three caribou wowed the residents of Aspen Cove by swimming there from Fogo Island, a distance of about forty kilometres. Local woman Lorna Coles took video of the animals, as they fought high seas and strong winds in their struggle to come ashore. That video came to the attention of Quinn Webber, a behavioral ecologist at the University of Guelph. He's been studying Fogo Island caribou for years. Quinn Webber spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 48 seconds
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The Town of Gander wants to turn green spaces into residential lots, but not everyone is happy about the proposal. We heard what happened at a public meeting there on Tuesday

The Town of Gander wants to see more affordable housing in the community. To do that, it wants to rezone some of the town's green spaces as residential lots. But council met with a lot of opposition at a public meeting on Tuesday. Gander resident Glenn Blandford and Mayor Percy Farwell were among the people at the meeting, and they spoke with the CBC's Troy Turner.
1/1/14 minutes, 57 seconds
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They hope their product will gain traction, once it hits the road. Atlas Salt Inc. plans to open a salt mine for the community of St George's

People in St. George's are excited about prospects for a salt mine in the area. Atlas Salt Inc. held a public meeting in the community on Wednesday night, to talk about it plans. The CBC's Colleen Connors spoke with the vice-president of corporate affairs, Alasdair Federico, about the proposed project and what it might mean for the area.
1/1/17 minutes, 17 seconds
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Who cares for the caregivers? NL's Citizens' Representative just released a 152-page report, after an investigation that looked at the supports available to families who look after their children with medically complex needs

The new report from the province's Citizens' Representative is called "By a Thread," so you can probably guess at some of its findings. The report finds that parents who look after children with medically complex needs are struggling to hang on - and the caregiving role the report talks about continues even throughout an adult child's life. Citizens' Representative Bradley Moss has some strong words about the challenges those families face and the supports they need.
1/1/113 minutes, 37 seconds
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If grocery prices breaking the bank at your house, you may be interested in a new project called the Provincial Food Network. Its goal is to make more local food available to local people.

Food bank use in NL went up by 12 percent from March of 2022 to March of this year. A major reason is the cost of groceries, which increased by an average of 10 percent each year since the pandemic began. Food security advocates say the best way to fix the problem is by having more local food made available to more people. Dan Rubin is founding chair of the Food Producers Forum, which is responsible for a provincial food network project. Philip Thornley owns the Campbellton Berry U-Pick.
1/1/113 minutes, 33 seconds
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We told you about Project Bombard and why the RCMP says it's driven the Hell's Angels and their affiliated biker groups out of the province

The RCMP in NL made a bold claim this week: that they've officially driven the Vikings Motorcycle Club, closely tied to the Hell's Angels, out of the province. Project Bombard started back in 2014 and has now wrapped up with a final couple of convictions. Inspector Stefan Thoms is with the RCMP's Federal, Serious and Organized Crime division.
1/1/19 minutes, 28 seconds
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The government of NL wants to capture carbon produced by offshore oil production, to help it meet its environmental emissions targets. We asked an expert about that approach and whether it will work here

Last week, the Newfoundland and Labrador government announced its intention to spend money on carbon capture technology. The goal is to trap and store carbon from offshore oil before it gets into the atmosphere. It's part of the province's plan to meet its emission reduction goals, but not everyone thinks it's a good idea. Julia Levin is associate director with Environmental Defence Canada, and she spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 53 seconds
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On to the next chapter. The public library in Pasadena has re-opened after being told it had to downsize. We did a walkthrough of the new space

A public library in the Humber Valley has re-opened after a controversial decision by the Pasadena town council earlier this year. The library is located in the town hall. The municipal council needed to make space for the Town's family resource centre, so it downsized the public library to make room. At the time, a library board volunteer said that it was sad that the library had to give up about half of its floor space and that the decision was pitting user groups against each other. Now, the renovations are done, and the new, smaller library is open. Bernice Hillier went there to speak with Terry Randell, chair of the library board in Pasadena.
1/1/17 minutes, 12 seconds
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If you or someone you care about has an eating disorder, help is available in NL. We spoke with the Eating Disorder Foundation executive director

Getting long-term treatment for mental health issues can be a challenge for people in this province - and that includes people who suffer from eating disorders. But the head of the Eating Disorder Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador says his organization can help. Paul Thomey came to Corner Brook to help spread awareness of his group's work, and he joined us in our studio.
1/1/17 minutes, 34 seconds
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Our Lady of Mercy gets a glow-up. We heard about the effort to restore and maintain one of the province's oldest wooden structures

A church on the Port au Port Peninsula is getting a bit of a makeover this fall. Our Lady of Mercy Heritage Church is no longer used as a place of worship. Construction on the building was completed nearly 100 years ago, making it one of the province's oldest wooden structures. In recent years, the paint has been peeling, and the church building was looking worse for wear. Now, the committee that owns the property is fixing it up. Joanne Rose is vice-chair of the Our Lady of Mercy Complex Committee.
1/1/19 minutes, 43 seconds
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A scenic lookout with a dirty secret....until now. We heard about a big clean-up of garbage at the Birchy Lake lookout, between Deer Lake and Baie Verte junction

We often hear about big clean-up efforts in the spring after the snow is gone. But some members of a volunteer organization pitched in this past weekend, just ahead of our first snowfall. The focus of their efforts was the lookout near the Trans Canada at Birchy Lake. What they found in a small area is a bit shocking. Bruce Armstrong is with the Pasadena Lions Club. He had help from Lions Club members from Pasadena, Baie Verte and Springdale, along with some other people who pitched in.
1/1/18 minutes, 35 seconds
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Conservative MP Clifford Small joined us to share his thoughts on the federal government's decision to give Atlantic Canadians a three-year holiday on paying carbon tax

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced last week that his government would pause the carbon tax on home heating oil for three years in Atlantic Canada. Trudeau also announced new incentives for people in Atlantic Canada to switch to heat pumps. It's welcome news to many, and Conservative MPs have been calling for it for months. Conservative Clifford Small is the MP for Coast of Bays-Central-Notre Dame. The CBC's Leigh Anne Power called him to find out how satisfied he is with the Prime Minister's concessions.
1/1/16 minutes, 20 seconds
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World Energy GH2 has to provide more information to the NL government before a decision can be made on the proposed wind-to-energy project. We spoke with an opponent of the project, and the mayor of Stephenvile

The provincial government wants to know more before it will decide whether to accept an Environmental Impact Statement from World Energy GH2. The company wants to build a massive wind-to-hydrogen project in southwestern Newfoundland. The provincial environment department said yesterday it needs more information on a number of topics related to such things as water use and monitoring, assessment of potential environmental effects, and emergency response and contingency plans. The company will gather and provide that information, and there will then be another public consultation period. Duran Felix is with The Environmental Transparency Committee, made up of residents of the Port au Port Peninsula, as well as other concerned people. Tom Rose is the mayor of Stephenville, the town whose economy stands to gain the most from the wind-to-hydrogen project.
1/1/116 minutes, 10 seconds
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We went out on a limb and took you to the newly-opened Tree House Family Resource Centre in Pasadena

The newly re-opened Tree House Family Resource Centre in Pasadena had its grand opening yesterday. Earlier this year, the centre had to move out of its former location, to make space for a family medical centre. CBC's James Grudic was at the opening party yesterday,
1/1/17 minutes, 23 seconds
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It's play time at a newly-opened park in western Newfoundland. We heard from a mom and her toddler about why they love sensory play

Children and their parents have a new place to play in Massey Drive - and it's different from a regular playground. The play area that just opened has a mud kitchen, a big board full of words and symbols, and much more. It's all designed for sensory play. CBC's James Grudic went there and met up with a mother and her daughter.
1/1/14 minutes, 4 seconds
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A journey of a lifetime with no regrets - we heard from an Ontario widow who started tackling her bucket list beginning in Newfoundland

From St. John's, all the way to St. Anthony, Alice Aubertin took a journey she won't forget. The 62-year-old woman from Sudbury, Ontario, decided to start tackling her bucket list last year. After selling her home and buying a three-wheeled motorcycle, Aubertin set off with her furry companion to explore Newfoundland. CBC's Hillary Johnson caught up with Alice to learn about her travels.
1/1/17 minutes, 36 seconds
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A property developer in Gander says there's no time to wait - the community needs affordable housing now

We've been hearing a lot about the shortage of affordable housing in this province and across the country. Last week, CBC Newfoundland Morning brought you a story about the Town of Gander's plan to rezone some of its green spaces for residential housing. Some residents of the town are opposed to the idea, because they say the green space is needed for recreation and play. Marc Eady owns a property management company in Gander His company does not have plans that involve the land proposed for rezoning, but he says the community is in dire need of affordable housing. He spoke to the CBC's Troy Turner.
1/1/17 minutes, 18 seconds
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The buildup to senior hockey season in Newfoundland has been chaotic at times, but the puck is finally set to drop. The CBC's Alex Kennedy breaks it all down for us

The puck is set to drop on another senior hockey season in central and western Newfoundland — and to say preparations were anything less than chaotic would be an understatement. Some teams had a league, but no players. Other teams had players, but no league. The CBC's Alex Kennedy has been following the story and breaks it all down for us.
1/1/16 minutes, 43 seconds
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No one knows like someone who's been there. We learn a bit about the work of the Candlelighters Association to support a camp for kids with cancer

Many of us have been to summer camp as children, or we've sent our kids to camp. But there's a camp that happens every summer in the province, and the people involved probably wish it didn't have to exist. Camp Delight is for children who've had or who are still battling cancer. It's run by the Candlelighters Association, and this weekend, there's a big event in St. John's to raise money for the camp's expenses. Paul Heppleston of Pasadena, whose family has been affected by childhood cancer, is helping with the effort, and Josh Skinner, a cancer survivor from Massey Drive, is also volunteering with the Candlelighters Association.
1/1/110 minutes, 57 seconds
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A new project to help relieve food insecurity is in the works on the Bonavista Peninsula. We hear from the Northpine Foundation

Tackling food insecurity in the province is no small task, but a project on the Bonavista Peninsula hopes to make a difference. The Saltwater Community Association and the Northpine Foundation are putting $400,000 into it. The plan is to develop an indoor hydroponic farm at the College of the North Atlantic's Bonavista campus. The foundation's Mark Lane spoke with CBC producer Hillary Johnson.
1/1/17 minutes, 28 seconds
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Pharmacist Christine Tulk weighs in on seasonal vaccines

It's flu season, but are people getting vaccinated? We'll take a shot at that question with a pharmacist on the West coast.
1/1/19 minutes, 13 seconds
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Norm Mercer wants fewer protected areas, more space for prospecting

Will a wilderness area pay your bills? That's a question posed by the province's prospectors' association. Hear why that group is objecting to proposed protected areas. Norm Mercer is president of the Newfoundland and Labrador Prospectors Association
1/1/18 minutes, 24 seconds
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Amnesty Rose says bystanders can help prevent sexual harassment

Making a change for the better. Hear how MUN's Sexual Harassment Office is holding training sessions for bystanders if they witness sexual harassment. Amnesty Rose is an adviser with the office.
1/1/16 minutes, 36 seconds
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Off-Broadway Players bring American Idiot musical to Corner Brook

The band Green Day helped bring punk rock into the mainstream in the 1990s. And a Broadway stage musical based on one of the band's albums won two Tony awards. Now, the Off-Broadway Players are bringing that musical, "American Idiot," to Corner Brook audiences.
1/1/112 minutes, 56 seconds
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Vicky Quao, student union representative, on National Day of Action

Students say they are paying the price, for Memorial University's overspending. Hear about a Day of Action for post-secondary students, not just in this province, but nation-wide.
1/1/111 minutes, 26 seconds
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Finance expert says pulling out of Canada Pension Plan is risky

Alberta's government wants to remove itself from the Canada Pension Plan and start its own instead. We ask an expert what that could mean for the rest of us, and the future of the CPP. Sebastien Betermier is a finance professor at McGill University.
1/1/16 minutes, 50 seconds
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Rhea Rollmann talks book, A Queer History of Newfoundland

A story of struggle and immense pride - A Queer History of Newfoundland. St. John's-based writer and Journalist Rhea Rollmann has spent many years compiling interviews and archival material. Hear her conversation on Newfoundland morning.
1/1/18 minutes, 53 seconds
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George's Brook-Milton couple living with polluted tap water

Tony O'Driscoll and his wife stopped using the water in their home a few weeks ago. The George's Brook-Milton couple had their well water tested for pollutants and were shocked at what they found. The problem is even though the community is building a new water system, there are more than a hundred homes yet to be connected.
1/1/15 minutes, 54 seconds
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Deputy mayor Bruce Phillips trying to get townspeople clean drinking water

The town of George's Brook-Milton is hoping to be approved for gas tax money because there are a hundred homes that need to be hooked up to the town's water system, including one with e-coli in its well.
1/1/16 minutes, 48 seconds
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Union House Arts wins national Lacey Prize for community arts

Union House Arts in Port Union are winners of the prestigious Lacey Prize… and 50 thousand dollars! Bethany MacKenzie is their programming director
1/1/16 minutes, 23 seconds
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Mark Clench is cycling from Wabush to Bonavista Bay

When the kindness of strangers is better than a tailwind. A Newfoundland man cycling for charity says the people of Labrador have been so good to him. Hear from Mark Clench as he gets set to cross Newfoundland to the Bonavista Peninsula.
1/1/17 minutes, 50 seconds
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Lt Colonel Lawrence Hatfield with the Royal Newfoundland Regiment

We will remember them. It will be a memorable Remembrance Day in Corner Brook this year. Both battalions of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment will be part of the parade to the cenotaph. We'll speak with a commanding officer of the Regiment.
1/1/16 minutes, 12 seconds
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Jason Gill debuts his song of remembrance: When We Were Only Boys

When singer/songwriter Jason Gill sat down to write a song about the Newfoundland Regiment in the First World War, he couldn't help thinking about how very young some of the soldiers who went "over the top" actually were. Picturing teenagers in uniform, living in muddy trenches and dying too young, the song "When We Were Only Boys" was born.
1/1/19 minutes, 38 seconds
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Snowmobile group introduces new trail guide app

Where you're going and how to get there: hear about a new snowmobile trail app that will guide you through Newfoundland and Labrador's groomed trail network.
1/1/16 minutes, 22 seconds
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Rebecca Morgan flees MUN residence bedbugs; Residence director Bruce Belbin responds

Attending post-secondary can be a challenging endeavour without having to worry about suitable housing. Memorial University student Rebecca Morgan, who is originally from Baytona, is in her third year studying linguistics. This semester, Morgan looked forward to her new accommodations at MUNs Burton's Pond apartment in St. Johns before bed bugs drove her out. Bruce Belbin responds - he is the director of MUN's residences and ancillary services.
1/1/114 minutes, 57 seconds
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Construction is complete, and staff will soon start moving equipment and supplies into the new Western Memorial Regional Hospital in Corner Brook

It's been 16 years this fall since the provincial government first announced plans for a new Western Memorial Regional Hospital. It's hard to think of a building project in this province that has been the subject of so many announcements, sod-turnings and updates. On Friday, there was another: Construction is completed. The building won't have its first patients until sometime next year. But, late last week, people got their first look inside the seven-story building in Corner Brook. Teara Freake, vice president and chief operating officer for the Western Zone with NL Health Services, spoke with reporters in a scrum.
1/1/16 minutes, 20 seconds
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A doctor and his family in Lewisporte are considering leaving the community because of what he says is racial bullying against his young daughter. The CBC's Leigh Anne Power brought us that story

Last Thursday, the RCMP responded to a call at Lewisporte Intermediate School. The police say there was an incident between two students and one of them is now charged with assault. But there's another layer to the story. The victim's father is a family doctor in the community and he says the alleged assault was racially motivated...which is making him think twice about staying in Lewisporte. CBC's Leigh Anne Power went to the community to investigate.
1/1/18 minutes, 39 seconds
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ICYMI: Toys that won't bring joy. An incident of vandalism destroyed thousands of dollars worth of toy donations for Christmas. On Friday, we spoke with a representative of the Corner Brook Firefighters toy drive

ICYMI: This is the time of year when community groups come together to make Christmas merry for all, with food drives, toy drives, and all sorts of fundraisers. In Corner Brook, firefighters collect donations of toys. But, last week, a disappointing incident of vandalism set them back. We spoke with Greg Dinney of the Corner Brook Firefighters toy drive.
1/1/16 minutes, 36 seconds
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A western Newfoundland volleyball player has been recruited to play at Lakehead University in Ontario. Sylvie Lemoine and her coach, Melissa Oates, spoke with the CBC';s Alex Kennedy

A student from western Newfoundland has used her competitive nature and determination to achieve her dream. Sylvie Lemoine, who attends Corner Brook Regional High and has a passion for volleyball, was recently recruited by Lakehead University in Ontario and offered a scholarship to play the sport. CBC's Alex Kennedy sat down with Sylvie and her coach, Mellissa Oates, to talk about the achievement.
1/1/17 minutes, 12 seconds
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An unfortunate blip? Or a cause for concern? The mayor of Corner Brook and the president of the Greater Corner Brook Board of Trade spoke with us about the one-week shutdown at the paper mill

It was not welcome news yesterday morning. The company that owns the Corner Brook paper mill sent out a news release to announce publicly that a shutdown is coming. It’s a one-week temporary shutdown. But the release from Kruger says there could be more shutdowns to come. The reason given? "The difficult business environment in the newsprint sector." Jim Parsons is mayor of Corner Brook (interview starts at 0:32) and Ray Brake is the president of the Greater Corner Brook Board of Trade (starts at 9:22). Kruger declined our request for an interview.
1/1/117 minutes, 17 seconds
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London's calling - and now you can get there straight from St. John's. We spoke with Tourism Minister Steve Crocker about the new Westjet flight...and how much the government is paying to get it here

Back in 2019, Air Canada and Westjet cancelled their direct flights between St.John's and Europe. Ever since then, people who want to cross the Atlantic have had to go through Halifax or Toronto, which added hours to the trip. Now Westjet is bringing back its St.John's-London route, three times a week from May to October. Steve Crocker is the provincial minister of tourism.
1/1/18 minutes, 20 seconds
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The provincial government has a poverty-reduction plan, but seniors are still waiting to see what's in it for them. We spoke with an advocate for pensioners

Last week, the provincial government announced some details of its new poverty-reduction plan. They include extra job support, and more access to better food for young children. Seniors' advocates were expecting to see how the new plan will help them too, but they were disappointed. Sharron Callahan is executive director of the Newfoundland and Labrador Public Sector Pensioners' Association, and she spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 56 seconds
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Rules, but no teeth to enforce them. Five years ago, the province jacked up fines to deter bad behaviour by landlords and tenants. Has it worked?

Allan Kitonsa says he didn’t know where to turn when his landlord and two men arrived at his St. John's rental home unannounced one day in August. They began packing up his things in garbage bags, putting them in a truck, and driving them away. Kitonsa later won compensation at a landlord-tenant hearing, but asked for fines to be imposed on top of that. The answer he got has sparked questions about who, if anyone, is responsible for moving the process forward, to enforce those penalties - and whether changes made to the Residential Tenancies Act in 2018 are actually working as they were intended. Our CBC Investigates producer Rob Antle joined us to break all this down.
1/1/18 minutes, 23 seconds
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What's common about common-law is that partners don't always know their rights. We dug into some of the major differences between common-law and married couples

About one in five couples in Newfoundland and Labrador are in common-law relationships. That, of course, means they haven't been married in a civil or church ceremony. And, while most of us may assume it doesn't make a whole lot of difference, that isn't actually true. Sara Hawkins gave a talk about recently. She's an access to justice coordinator with the Public Legal Information Association of Newfoundland and Labrador.
1/1/18 minutes, 30 seconds
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A doctor and educator in St. John's shared his thoughts on racism in this province and how it could play a role in whether health care workers will come here

Last week, an incident between two students at Lewisporte Intermediate School ended with the RCMP charging one of them with assault. The parents of the victim in the alleged assault are both family doctors in the area. Her father says he feels the incident was racially motivated - and the whole ordeal has him questioning whether he and his family will stay in the town. Dr. Bolu Ogunyemi is a physician in St. John's and a lecturer at Memorial University's 's School of Medicine.
1/1/110 minutes, 18 seconds
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Making Christmas a little sweeter for children this year. The Valley Mall in Corner Brook is inviting people to bring gifts to the Gingerbread House

Earlier this week, the Valley Mall in Corner Brook opened its annual Gingerbread House. The mall and the Salvation Army are asking people to bring a gift, to to help out with the fire department's toy drive. Somebody recently destroyed half the toys that had been collected and stored at another place, so the need is even greater this year, The CBC’s Amy Feehan was at the opening of the Gingerbread House.
1/1/14 minutes, 14 seconds
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The lowdown on the shutdown: We asked an analyst what's going on with newsprint markets that's led Corner Brook Pulp and Paper to shut its mill for a week

It'll have a big impact on Western Newfoundland. The Corner Brook newsprint mill will be shut down for a week, starting on Monday, November 20. The mill's owner, Kruger, says it's because of "the difficult business environment in the newsprint sector." The company also says more shutdowns are possible. Kevin Mason is a forest industry analyst and managing director of ERA Forest Products Research.
1/1/17 minutes, 23 seconds
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The Assembly of First Nations has chosen Brendan Mitchell to represent Newfoundland as this province's first regional Chief at the Assembly of First Nations in Canada

Brendan Mitchell is well-known to many people across our Newfoundland Morning region. He, of course, has been chief of the Qalipu First Nation since 2015. Now, he's officially taken on a new role: to represent Newfoundland as the province's first regional chief at the Assembly of First Nations in Canada. Mitchell has been serving in that role on an interim basis. He spoke with Bernice in our Corner Brook studio.
1/1/113 minutes, 17 seconds
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There could be a danger lurking in your house that you can't smell, see or taste. We learned about about radon gas from Health Canada official Kelley Bush

When you come to the end of a long day, you expect your home to be a refuge from the stresses of the outside world. But Health Canada is warning about a silent danger that may be lurking there - radon gas. Kelley Bush is Manager of Radon Outreach and Stakeholder Engagement at Health Canada.
1/1/16 minutes, 14 seconds
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The Town of Dover may be small, but its mayor is vying for world domination! Tony Keats is a finalist for the title of World Mayor 2023

Ready for some trivia? What do Bristol, England, Oliveri, Italy, Kyiv, Ukraine - and Dover, Newfoundland have in common? Most days...not a whole lot. But right now, each of their mayors is a finalist for the top mayor on the planet. Tony Keats is the mayor of Dover.
1/1/17 minutes, 42 seconds
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Thousands of children are hitting the streets today to ask governments to prioritize their basic rights. We spoke with a young woman from Grand Falls-Windsor, who will be taking part

Today is National Child Day in Canada. To mark the occasion, thousands of young people from across the country were expected to gather and protest a lack of government support for their basic rights. 17-year-old Katie Foley Tremblett of Grand Falls-Windsor was planning to take part in the event. She's a member of the Young Canadians Parliament and Children First Canada’s Youth Advisory Council.
1/1/110 minutes, 28 seconds
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Taking virtual medicine to a whole new level: A webinar series offered to the public this week explores the role that AI could play in healthcare. We heard how the latest tech could impact how we receive care

For years, people in the medical field have been exploring how to streamline our healthcare system - to help attract and keep staff, connect more of us with family doctors, and do it all for less money. The goal seems impossible at times, but researchers believe Artificial Intelligence - or so-called "large language models" - might be a way to do it. Randy Giffen is a solutions architect with IBM and a former physician. This week he'll be part of a webinar called "Large Language Models and Their Potential Role in a Learning Health System."
1/1/18 minutes, 8 seconds
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300 people off the job in Corner Brook, due to a week-long shutdown at the newsprint mill. We heard from Unifor, the union that represents workers at Corner Brook Pulp and Paper

The paper mill in Corner Brook is now on the third day of a week-long shutdown. That's put about 300 people off the job. Kruger said last Wednesday that the shutdown is because of the "difficult business environment in the newsprint sector." The company, which owns Corner Brook Pulp and Paper, says there could be more shutdowns in the coming weeks. Kruger also says repair work required on the mill's main boiler will be done during this current shutdown. Monty Fudge is a national staff rep with Unifor in Newfoundland and Labrador.
1/1/16 minutes, 39 seconds
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This province continues to have the highest rates of antibiotic prescriptions in the country. An infectious disease specialist at MUN tells us why we should even be concerned, and what's been done to remedy the situation

Recent stats show Newfoundland and Labrador writes the most prescriptions of any province. Six years ago, Dr. Peter Daley, an infectious disease specialist at MUN, sounded the alarm about it. He said if something wasn't done to reduce the number of prescriptions, there would be disastrous consequences. This week is World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, and Dr. Daley gave us an update on what's been done since his warning.
1/1/19 minutes, 30 seconds
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Raising awareness of affordable housing and homelessness: A Corner Brook group hopes to do that on today's National Day of Housing

Today is the National Day of Housing, and with the increase of homelessness across the province, a Corner Brook organization is highlighting the crisis in the region with an awareness walk. Paula Sheppard is the co-chair of the Community Coalition on Housing and Homelessness.
1/1/19 minutes, 31 seconds
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Prospectors want to dig and drill and don't want protected areas stopping them. We heard from the group that advises the government on protected areas

What you are allowed to do in wilderness areas is a hot topic. The Wilderness and Ecological Reserves Advisory Council (WERAC), which advises the government on protected areas, is holding meetings in Lewisporte and Norris Arm this week. The province is looking at ten proposed areas right now. The Newfoundland and Labrador Prospectors Association recently told us why it's concerned about the setting aside of land for conservation. Evan Edinger is a member of WERAC and a professor of geography, biology and earth sciences at Memorial University.
1/1/18 minutes, 11 seconds
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No more ER closures - that's what the province is hoping for from a new deal on virtual health care. Minister Tom Osborne explained it to us

In the last year, communities from Bonavista to Baie Verte have protested the repeated closures of their local emergency rooms. Rural ERs have been plagued by a lack of doctors and nurses, which prevents the hospitals from seeing patients. Now the provincial department of health has signed an 11-million-dollar contract with Teladoc, a U.S.-based virtual care company. Tom Osborne, minister of health, spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 42 seconds
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A traveller in pursuit of knowledge: We spoke with a Central Newfoundland man about his many trips to Europe, tracking the history of the First World War

Ed Fewer is an avid traveller with a passion for world history, especially that of the First World War. The 66-year-old from Grand Falls-Windsor has been touring Europe since the 1980s, and has just returned from his 33rd trip there. CBC's Hillary Johnson called him up to ask about his experiences and to find out what keeps him going.
1/1/17 minutes, 1 second
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Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Give Gander International Airport money for a cold storage facility and people could enjoy fish all year round - and all over the world. We'll get an explanation from the airports CEO.

Gander International Airport once had a bustling passenger terminal, but it's struggled, especially since Covid, to keep flight routes. Since then, the airport authority has invested in diversifying the terminal and its services. Now, thanks to a ten-million-dollar investment, the airport will also soon be home to a cold storage facility for fresh fish and seafood products. Reg Wright is the CEO of the Gander International Airport Authority.
1/1/17 minutes, 40 seconds
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Virtually ignored - The province's nurse practitioners want to know why the government is paying millions to a foreign-based company for work they can do right here

The provincial government has entered into a contract with Teladoc Health to provide virtual health care in Newfoundland and Labrador. The contract is for two years, at 11 million dollars a year. That's got nurse practitioners in the province wondering why government is hiring a U.S.-based company to do work they can do right here. Travis Sheppard is president of the Newfoundland and Labrador Nurse Practitioner Association.
1/1/18 minutes, 23 seconds
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The proposed wind-to-hydrogen project on the Port Au Port Peninsula has been top-of-mind for many people. Now, a local artist is using the topic as inspiration for her artwork

An immersive art experience with a strong message. That's how visual artist Lori Deeley describes her latest exhibit, "Sacrificial Landscapes: Gone With The Wind." The inspiration for her artwork stems from World Energy GH2's proposed wind-to-hydrogen project on the Port Au Port Peninsula. CBC's Hillary Johnson toured the exhibition at the Grenfell Art Gallery in Corner Brook.
1/1/17 minutes, 2 seconds
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An NL political scientist wants an apology from the European Union for what she describes as "cultural violence" stemming from the Newfoundland seal hunt

Canada is hosting a meeting in St. John's this week, with representatives of the European Union. Danita Burke thinks it's the perfect time for the EU to apologize for its seal products ban. She also believes sealers in this province are dealing with cultural violence because of the EU's stance on the hunt. Burke is originally from Bishop's Falls, but now works in the political science department at the University of Denmark, and she spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 27 seconds
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We had the "purr" - fect story for a Friday. A young boy recently rescued a stray kitten after searching for three weeks!

A few weeks ago, the Gander SPCA took in a stray kitten which likely wouldn't have survived - if it wasn’t for a young boy's determination. The kitten's two siblings were brought into the SPCA, and some people believed a third was still out there somewhere. 11-year-old Grayson Penney heard about this and started a search. Grayson and his mom, April, came to our Gander studio.
1/1/18 minutes, 14 seconds
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ICYMI: An NL political scientist wants an apology from the European Union for what she describes as "cultural violence" stemming from the Newfoundland seal hunt

ICYMI: Canada hosted a meeting in St. John's last week, with representatives of the European Union. Danita Burke thinks it would have been the perfect time for the EU to apologize for its seal products ban. She also believes sealers in this province are dealing with cultural violence because of the EU's stance on the hunt. Burke works in the political science department at the University of Denmark, and she spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power
1/1/16 minutes, 23 seconds
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We heard from some of the speakers who attended the pro-wind-to-hydrogen rally in Stephenville this past weekend

A rally was held in Stephenville this past Saturday. Over a thousand people showed up to display their support of World Energy GH2’s proposed wind-to-hydrogen project in western Newfoundland. The CBC’s Amy Feehan got to see the crowd, and heard from some of the people speaking at the event.
1/1/15 minutes, 15 seconds
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A local online food store is thriving in Corner Brook. We got an update on how the Western Food Hub plans to expand the business

It's been more than three months since Food First NL relaunched its western Newfoundland food network in Corner Brook. The Food Hub offers locally produced, affordable food in an effort to ensure a dependable supply. Now they're expanding the program. The CBC's Alex Kennedy stopped by the food hub and spoke with program coordinator Richard Butt to get an update.
1/1/17 minutes, 6 seconds
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A U.S.-based company's bid to offer virtual care was three times that of a Newfoundland-based care provider. Yet Teladoc Health got the contract. We asked Dr. Todd Young of Medicuro, about why he feels his company would have been a better choice

A doctor in Central Newfoundland is questioning how the province plans to offer virtual health care. Dr. Todd Young has a company called Medicuro, which promotes itself as "Newfoundland and Labrador's First Virtual Health Clinic." MCP will pay for patients to see a doctor through the company's service. Medicuro put in a bid for a contract to provide government with a virtual care solution, but it was not the successful bidder.
1/1/17 minutes, 6 seconds
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Cooking up awareness. A free online cookbook shares the stories and recipes of young people who grew up in the care of the child welfare system

There's a new cookbook out that tells an important story. It's the story of young people who grew up in the care of the child welfare system. One of the young people featured is from this province. Jessie-Lynn Cross grew up in foster care on the Baie Verte Peninsula. She's now pursuing a Master's degree in Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University in Ottawa. Valerie McMurtry is president and CEO of the Children's Aid Foundation of Canada.
1/1/18 minutes, 4 seconds
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Strength in numbers. We learned about a new national media collective that will help small, local outlets work together to stay afloat

As the concentration of media ownership in Canada tightens, small, local outlets often struggle to compete against corporate giants. When those outlets close down, people can lose touch with their communities and the news that really matters to them. That's why local journalists across Canada are banding together to form "Unrigged DOT ca", a brand-new news collective. Christopher Curtis used to work for the Montreal Gazette, but he was drawn to local coverage and launched his publication called The Rover a few years ago. It will now be part of the new collective, along with a dozen others, including Newfoundland and Labrador's "Independent." The CBC's Leigh Anne Power reached Christopher Curtis in Montreal.
1/1/16 minutes, 58 seconds
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Show me the money. A committee distributing Fiona's relief money has finished its work. We spoke with coordinator Edwina Bateman

People and communities affected by post-tropical storm Fiona have now received all the money from one special fund. The pot of money in question was made up of donations that came directly into the affected area after the storm. A committee set up to distribute the money has finished its work. It handed out a total of nearly 1.1 million dollars. Edwina Bateman is the coordinator of the Hurricane Fiona Donations Management Committee.
1/1/17 minutes, 23 seconds
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Breaking the bank...we found out what happens to rural communities when they lose their local bank branch, and what they can do about it

Last year, Scotiabank closed its branch on Fogo Island, as well as two others in rural communities. This year it's planning to close eight more, including those in Bonavista, Twillingate and Lewisporte. The Bank of Montreal is closing its Botwood branch in the new year. The disappearance of local banking is worrying for those communities, and may open the door for other options. The CBC's Leigh Anne Power looked into the story.
1/1/19 minutes, 15 seconds
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Did federal minister Seamus O'Regan throw caution to the wind last week, when he spoke about the approval process for wind energy projects? A group called Enviro Watch NL says his comments raise concerns.

An environmental group in the province is taking issue with something MP Seamus O'Regan said last week. The federal cabinet minister used the words "red tape" when talking about wind energy projects proposed for the province. O'Regan was answering questions from reporters during the Canada-EU Summit in St. John's. Tara Manuel is a co-chair of Enviro Watch NL, a citizen-based environmental group.
1/1/17 minutes, 41 seconds
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If your dog is coughing, you'll want to listen when you hear vet Maggie Brown-Bury talk about kennel cough, which is running through the canine population in Gander

While you're booking your annual flu shot or your Covid booster, you might want to think about getting your dog vaccinated, too. Dogs can catch an illness called kennel cough that can make them really sick. It's making the rounds in the Gander area, sending lots of pets to the doctor. Dr. Maggie Brown-Bury is past-president of the provincial veterinarians' association.
1/1/17 minutes, 12 seconds
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A crochet Christmas tree project in Port Union towers over expectations for it!

Nowadays it seems there are all kinds of Christmas trees - real ones, fake ones, big ones, even those pencil-thin ones. But have you ever heard of a CROCHETED Christmas tree? The Coaker Foundation in Port Union recently started a project that asks people to donate granny squares they’ve crocheted. Then, they stitch all of them together to make one big Christmas tree. Edith Sampson is with the Coaker Foundation.
1/1/17 minutes, 21 seconds
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Take a bulb. Brighten someone's Christmas. A Corner Brook medical clinic is helping the community this holiday season, and you can find out how you can contribute

A medical clinic in Corner Brook is stepping in to help Santa again this year. For the past ten years, Veitch Wellness Centre has partnered with a local school to make a happier Christmas for students and families. This year, the need is greater than ever - and you can help. Jennifer Veitch is owner of Veitch Wellness Centre.
1/1/16 minutes, 1 second
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Coming, to a town near you: Staff of Qalipu First Nation have been visiting communities within the band's territory. We found out out why, and where you can expect them in the coming days

Nine wards, made up of more than 60 communities. That's the area of Newfoundland covered by the Qalipu First Nation. This fall, the Indigenous band has been getting out to meet more people in more of those places. Staff from Qalipu have been holding Community Conversations. The next one is in Badger next Wednesday. Charles Pender is band manager with Qalipu.
1/1/17 minutes, 47 seconds
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When blood is NOT always thicker than water.... We learned about a Chosen Family Dinner happening in Corner Brook, for members of the 2SLGBTQIA+ community and its allies

The holidays are a time for family - that's something we often hear. But for some people - including members of the 2SLGBTQIA+ community - it can be anything BUT a celebration. That's why Quadrangle NL is hosting a Chosen Family Dinner for the holidays. Charlie Murphy is the executive director of Quadrangle NL.
1/1/18 minutes, 38 seconds
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The United Nations world climate change conference is happening right now in Dubai. We spoke with MUN associate professor Angela Carter, who is attending COP28

The United Nations climate change conference - COP 28 - started yesterday in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates. Representatives from nearly 200 countries are meeting at this year's conference. They'll be talking about reducing carbon emissions and limiting global warming. Angela Carter is in Dubai. She's an associate professor of political science and geography at Memorial University
1/1/18 minutes, 4 seconds
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Being Santa comes with a few perks, like special access. This weekend, in Clarenville, the jolly old elf will be the first to ride over the long-awaited Shoal Harbour Causeway Bridge

Santa is paying a visit to several towns in our region this weekend, as Christmas parades are taking place. In Clarenville, Santa's sleigh will have special access to a brand new bridge. The new Shoal Harbour Causeway Bridge will open to traffic next week - and it's been a long time coming. Safety concerns about the old bridge there were first raised in 2018, so the new bridge comes as good news to not just Santa, but also to Clarenville.Mayor John Pickett.
1/1/17 minutes, 58 seconds
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A team of researchers in Manitoba are looking at how self-managed home care works in this country - and specifically in rural parts of THIS province. Find out how YOU can get involved

Helping people in this province live independently in their homes - that's one of the goals of the Provincial Home Support Program. It offers non-professional assistance for home and personal care. Right now, researchers from the University of Manitoba are looking at that program. Christine Kelly is an associate professor and heads up that research team.
1/1/18 minutes, 38 seconds
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Qalipu First Nation has a new acting chief. We asked Chief Jenny Brake about her priorities as she takes over leadership of the Mi'kmaw band

It's a historic time for Qalipu First Nation. For the first time, the Indigenous band has a woman carrying out the responsibilities of chief. Jenny Brake was selected on the weekend as acting chief of Qalipu. The position was left vacant when Brendan Mitchell became regional chief for Newfoundland with the Assembly of First Nations. It's less than a year until the next Qalipu band council elections, so an election is not required. Brake has been the Western vice-chief since the fall of 2021, and the band council chose her to be the acting chief.
1/1/16 minutes, 10 seconds
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ICYMI: A neighbour in need is a neighbour, indeed! A local Facebook group has made a list of people who need help this holiday season - a LONG list

ICYMI: Right now, LIFE is expensive. Paying for food, fuel, heat and medication is getting harder every day for many of us. In the holiday season, people need help and hope. Enter: Cortney Barber - one of the people behind the Facebook group Neighbours in Need. They help people year-round, but during the holidays, they write up the "Christmas Miracles 2023" list, including people who need a little extra assistance. This year, the "Miracles" list is longer than ever.
1/1/19 minutes, 25 seconds
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Helping the helpers: Some snowmobilers in Western Newfoundland noticed that a search and rescue group needed some new equipment, so they blazed a trail to make it happen

A search and rescue group in Western Newfoundland is getting an early Christmas present this year. It's a new rescue sleigh, and it comes just in time for winter. Western Sno-riders raised money for the equipment, and the snowmobile group is giving the sleigh to the Bay of Islands Search and Rescue organization. Glenn Green is president of Western Sno-riders, and Shawn Street is with Bay of Islands Search and Rescue.
1/1/19 minutes, 33 seconds
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Thoughtful donating...a volunteer with the Gander and Area Food Bank told us about about items you might not think to give, but which are very, VERY welcome

This year, food bank use in Newfoundland and Labrador is up more than 12 percent over last year...and has nearly doubled since 2019. The charities are a vital life line for hungry families, but struggling people often need more than boxes of pasta or cans of soup. That's why food banks keep so-called "extras" on hand. Raelene White is a volunteer at the Gander and Area Food Bank.
1/1/18 minutes, 47 seconds
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Municipalities can't do it alone. Corner Brook's 2024 budget calls for a new federal/provincial capital works program, AND for the province to help reduce the housing crisis

The need for federal/provincial funding for capital works, and a need for provincial help with housing... Those were two of the broader issues referenced in the municipal budget in Corner Brook this week. The City delivered a budget of more than 39 million dollars, that included new spending and, yet, an effort to minimize the impact on taxpayers. There is also a 50-dollar increase in the city's water levy. Jim Parsons is mayor of Corner Brook.
1/1/19 minutes, 18 seconds
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With a budget deficit and increased need in the community, the Salvation Army in Corner Brook is asking for support this holiday season

The holidays have always been stressful, and the rising cost of living has made things even more challenging. Helping hands have always been available for those in need, thanks to organizations such as the Salvation Army. But Maj. Brian Wheeler, Community and Family Services Director for the Salvation Army in Corner Brook, says the organization finds it harder and harder to meet those needs, due to the rise in demand for their services.
1/1/19 minutes, 3 seconds
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Keeping young people safe and tech-savvy....We learned about Safe Tech Tips, provided by the province's English School District

We often joke that the young people in our lives are the most tech savvy. But teaching them to use that tech properly and safely is the key. The Newfoundland and Labrador English School District's Safe and Inclusive Schools program has released a series of Safe Tech Tips on social media. Gwen Carroll is a Safe and Inclusive Schools Itinerant with the NLESD.
1/1/18 minutes, 56 seconds
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Volunteers made all the difference for Alan MacDonald, who was injured while snowmobiling last winter and rescued by Bay of Islands Search and Rescue. He just got a look at the group's new sleigh that will be used in future rescue efforts

Alan MacDonald of Massey Drive will never forget being injured in a snowmobile ride last January and needing to be rescued by volunteers from Bay of Islands Search and Rescue. But the sleigh they used to bring MacDonald to an ambulance was an open sleigh, which gave him a cold, bumpy ride. MacDonald was pleased last evening to see the search and rescue group's new rescue sleigh. He spoke with the CBC's Alex Kennedy.
1/1/14 minutes, 52 seconds
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Queer rights are human rights. That idea has fueled many of this year's provincial Human Rights Awards nominees. Half of the people are LGBTQ+ advocates

International Human Rights Day (Dec. 10) commemorates the day in 1948 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Human Rights Commission in NL was scheduled to present the 2023 Human Rights Awards today. Nine people made the shortlist, and about half of that list were noted for the work to promote the rights of the LGBTQ+ community. Sarah Worthman, executive director of the NL Queer Research Initiative, and Emile Sopkowe, an educator who helped create the Gender and Sexual Diversity Special Interest Council of the NLTA, were nominees.
1/1/112 minutes, 19 seconds
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We met two moms from Central Newfoundland who've lived through the grief of losing children by suicide, and are now reaching out to help others in the same situation

*Warning: This story includes discussions of suicide and self-harm.* No parent ever wants to get the phone call Angela Power received seven years ago. The Bishop's Falls mom had recently sent her teen daughter off to university. Laura Power was bright and beautiful...and suffering from depression. She died by suicide while she was away from home. Now, Laura's mother has started a support group for other moms in the region who are suffering through the same thing. CBC's Leigh Anne Power visited her, and brings us her story.
1/1/19 minutes, 33 seconds
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The Kittiwake Dance Theatre is putting off its annual performance of the Nutcracker across the island. The show is in Corner Brook this weekend

Kittiwake Dance Theatre is doing its annual performance of the Nutcracker across the island this month. The show is at the Corner Brook Arts and Culture Centre this weekend, and the CBC’s Amy Feehan met up with the group during a rehearsal yesterday.
1/1/18 minutes, 27 seconds
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From Sri Lanka to Willie Wonka: A man from the other side of the world came to be a chocolate maker right here in Newfoundland and Labrador

This province is seeing a record number of immigrants making Newfoundland and Labrador their home. They all moved here to start a new life. But, for some, it’s also a chance to start their own business. Over the next few weeks, CBC will be profiling some of these entrepreneurs, starting with one in L’anse au Loup. He's a chocolate maker who sells gourmet sweets from his home, but a few weeks ago, he headed to Corner Brook for a pop-up sale. That’s where the CBC’s Amy Feehan caught up with him.
1/1/15 minutes, 22 seconds
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"Gander Radio " is celebrating 85 years in operation...but the broadcasting that's been going on has only been on radios on airplanes

It's been 85 years since Gander Radio hit the airwaves. But don't expect any of the latest tunes or news headlines on their frequency. "Gander Radio" is another name for the Gander International Flight Service Station, or I.F.S.S.. They're the team that ensure thousands of flights operate safely each day. Alexa Osmond is a flight service specialist for NAV Canada at Gander International Flight Service Station.
1/1/17 minutes, 42 seconds
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Breathing easier. A fire department on the south coast of Newfoundland has just received a big donation from a fire department in Western Newfoundland.

Christmas came early for one fire department in the province last week. The Harbour Breton Fire Department has received a gift of better breathing gear. That's vital for firefighters because it's what they use to breathe when training or fighting fires. The used, good-quality equipment was a generous donation from the Massey Drive Fire Department. Dan Taylor is a fire captain with the Harbour Breton Fire Department.Wayne Giles is fire chief with the Massey Drive Fire Department.
1/1/19 minutes, 2 seconds
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If you're looking for a place to rent in the province, you may find tough competition from an unexpected source. The province's health authority is spending millions on rent for travel nurses and locums - and it's pricing others out of the market

From tent cities in St. John's to waiting lists in Corner Brook, signs of the housing crisis are all around us. When the provincial government attempted to address the shortage of health care workers by bringing in locum doctors and travel nurses, it added to the problem. The province's health authority is paying top dollar for rentals to house temporary staff. Meanwhile, families and people on low incomes say they are being priced out of the market. The CBC's Leigh Anne Power has been looking into the story.
1/1/18 minutes, 30 seconds
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Connecting residents to their communities one book at a time: We learned more about a home reading service that public libraries have been offering for decades

For 50 years, Newfoundland and Labrador Public Libraries has offered a home reading service. The program has reached Corner Brook, Gander, Grand Falls-Windsor and St John's. It has connected many people with their local library - seniors, people with disabilities and those living in long-term care facilities. Sandra Harnum is Regional Librarian for the Western Division of Newfoundland and Labrador Public Libraries.
1/1/19 minutes, 10 seconds
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He's no "elf on the SHELF." CC Loughlin Elementary. in Corner Brook school has a life-sized elf who has already shown up on the roof and on the playground, and who knows where he'll be next

Some homes have a daily visitor this time of year. In the lead-up to Christmas, some families have an elf on the shelf who shows up daily, and helps build the excitement for the holidays. CC Loughlin Elementary in Corner Brook also has an elf who visits from time to time. But this one is life-sized - and it's hard to say where he'll show up next.
1/1/15 minutes, 22 seconds
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A new report finds the minimum wage doesn't nearly cover basic living expenses in NL. In fact, it estimates people need about 9 to 11 dollars more per hour to make ends meet.We spoke with one of the authors of the report

There is a big gap between the minimum wage and the liveble wage in this province. That's according to a new report released yesterday by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. NL's minimum wage is currently 15 dollars an hour, but the report found the livable wage is actually about 9 to 11 dollars more than that. And that means people on minimum wage are not making enough money to meet even their basic living expenses. Russell Williams is co-author of "Newfoundland and Labrador's 2023 Living Wages."
1/1/19 minutes, 57 seconds
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Look waaaaay up and you might see something amazing! A meteor shower is happening tonight

If the sky is clear tonight, you can look up and marvel at the sight. The Geminid meteor shower peaks this week, and if you're lucky, you might see some of those shooting stars. Hilding Neilson is a professor and astronomer at Memorial University.
1/1/14 minutes, 11 seconds
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Generating all they'll need - and more. We heard about World Energy GH2's plans to sell power to NL Hydro as part of its wind-to-hydrogen proposal on the island's west coast

The wind-to-hydrogen proposal from World Energy GH2 on Newfoundland's west coast may be a give-and-take arrangement... or, rather, a buy-and-sell deal. The company is hoping to sell any excess power it generates to the provincial grid in the winter, but will buy power from Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro in the summer. CBC's Ryan Cooke has been following the story.
1/1/16 minutes, 4 seconds
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We’ve got a steamy story for you…we’re talking about saunas, of course! The CBC's Amy Feehan met the owners of Arc Saunas in White Bay and learned how they turned their love for using saunas into a passion for building them

Talk about sweat equity in a business. Pollard's Point in White Bay might become a hot place to be in the next few years. It’s the home of Arc Saunas, a company that designs and builds them. CBC’s Amy Feehan visited the owners in Pollard's Point, to hear about their dedication to their business -- and to their community.
1/1/16 minutes, 49 seconds
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It's a gift that keeps on giving! The 2022-2023 Corner Brook Royals hockey team executive make a generous donation to several local causes

Friday is Feed NL Day, where CBC helps raise money for food banks in the province by contributing what we can. In the spirit of giving, we received an early donation of 500 dollars from the 2022-2023 Corner Brook Royals executive, to pass along to the food bank. But the organization's executive didn't stop with Feed NL. Tony Buckle was president of the 2022-2023 Corner Brook Royals executive. He told us about the charities they are supporting this holiday season.
1/1/13 minutes, 49 seconds
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It takes passion and commitment to dedicate yourself to a cause, and Clara Möller has that in spades. We spoke with the founder of an animal charity that's helping stray dogs and cats in Mexico

Helping to control the population of strays one dog at a time is a work of passion. Ayudog is a non-profit association created to sterilize the largest population of stray animals in Valle de Bravo, Mexico. Clara Möller started the charity in 2018, after she noticed an increase in abandoned, abused and injured dogs roaming the streets. Moller has lived in Corner Brook since 2020, working with her team back in Mexico to continue the effort and grow the charity.
1/1/18 minutes, 21 seconds
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It's unbelievable what strangers will ask you in a grocery store lineup. Negative comments from strangers inspired a woman from Campbellton to go public about her Rosacea flare-ups

Victoria Thornley of Campbellton has a condition called Lupus Milliaris Disseminatus Faciei (LMDF), a variant of Rosacea that can leave her face red, swollen and very sore. The mother of two is also pregnant, which can often make flare-ups worse. Negative comments about her face and her condition left her so frustrated and self-conscious, she fought back with a series of Facebook posts about her Rosacea.
1/1/18 minutes, 55 seconds
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They don't do it for the recognition. The people behind the Facebook group Neighbours in Need have just won a national award for their work

A Facebook group that works to help people in this province has won a national award. Neighbours in Need works to provide basics like food and clothing. Their work has just been recognized nationally by the group Turkey Farmers of Canada with the first ever Wishbone Awards. The award is given to people who help put holiday meals on tables across Canada. Cortney Barber and Peggy Terry are with Neighbours in Need.
1/1/17 minutes, 35 seconds
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Whether you slalom or snowplow, it's that time again for all winter sports enthusiasts! Marble Mountain Ski Resort is preparing for yet another season. We found out what people can expect once the slopes are open

Start dusting off your skis and snowboarding gear. Marble Mountain Ski Resort in Steady Brook is gearing up for another season of winter fun. CBC's Colleen Connors spoke with the people who run the ski hill -- including Richard Wells, general manager, and Bruce Hollett, the executive chair of the board of Marble Mountain Development Corporation.
1/1/17 minutes, 40 seconds
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Paying it forward after the generosity shown to her own family. A Corner Brook woman battling cancer is reaching out to help others

A Corner Brook woman is putting her focus on others this holiday season in spite of what she's going through herself. Amy Tiller is a mother of three. The oldest is 15, and for nearly five years, Amy has been battling cancer. Nevertheless, for the past three Christmases, Tiller has been coordinating an effort to help people who are alone or in need.
1/1/16 minutes, 11 seconds
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Nothing's going downhill here! We learned about some big upgrades planned for the Airport Nordic Ski Club in Gander

Some big changes are on the horizon for the Airport Nordic Ski Club in Gander. They just announced a partnership with the province and ACOA that would see close to a half-million dollars for upgrades to the facility. Dale Foote and Robert Mackenzie are both with the club, and the CBC's Martin Jones drove there to talk to them.
1/1/18 minutes, 48 seconds
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Dean Penney was in court yesterday for the first time since being charged with first degree murder of Jennifer Hillier-Penney. The CBC's Colleen Connors spoke with Hillier-Penney's daughter, Marina Goodyear

The daughter of Jennifer Hillier-Penney is hoping for justice, now that her father has been charged with murder. Marina Goodyear was in court in Corner Brook yesterday when Dean Penney made his first appearance. He's charged with first-degree murder after the disappearance of his estranged wife seven years ago. Goodyear sat silently in court along with members of her family. Afterwards, she spoke with CBC's Colleen Connors.
1/1/14 minutes, 21 seconds
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He cycled the full length of the Trans-Labrador Highway and across the island to his hometown of Princeton, on the Bonavista Peninsula. We caught up with Mark Clench about his time on the road and his efforts to fundraise for a favourite charity

They say life is about the journey and not the destination. But a man from the Bonavista Peninsula sure was glad to reach his destination this week. Mark Clench had been fat biking across Labrador and the island since October 4. He's raising money for an organization called Can'd Aid, a group which provides bicycles and guitars for children. Clench made it home to Princeton on Monday.
1/1/17 minutes, 24 seconds
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ICYMI: Wind and rain warnings continued across parts of the province on Wednesday. We heard how one truck driver deals with rough weather during his travels across western Newfoundlandd Coast

ICYMI: As the rain continued to pour and wind speeds reached up to 140 kilometres an hour in some parts of the province on Wednesday, travelling became hazardous. For truck drivers like Stanley Reid, risky road conditions are a part of his day-to-day considerations. He joined us enroute, from Deer Lake, to give us some insight into tricky weather and driving conditions.
1/1/16 minutes, 45 seconds
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Christmas care for the courier: A courier in Glovertown had a huge surprise on Wednesday. As he was making his usual deliveries, he ended up receiving a surprise of his own

A courier in Glovertown ended up receiving a special delivery of his own on Wednesday. Scott Jewison. was making his deliveries, and a whole bunch of his clients were waiting for him in one spot. But instead of asking for their packages...they had had a surprise for HIM instead: 50 boxes of dog treats and a major Christmas bonus! We spoke with Scott and with Lesley Sheppard, one of the people behind the surprise.
1/1/110 minutes, 58 seconds
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Back to the drawing board: The provincial government is looking - again - for a company to build a new penitentiary in St. John's. The union representing correctional workers says members are frustrated at the delay

The provincial government says it must return to square one in its plans to replace Her Majesty's Penitentiary in St. John's. The money it budgeted for the project is no longer enough, because labour and materials costs have ballooned in the last two years. Now, the union representing corrections workers is concerned its members will have to continue working in what it calls unsafe conditions. Jerry Earle is the president of the Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Public and Private Employees (NAPE).
1/1/18 minutes, 3 seconds
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Sketches from the 1960s get new life in the 21st century. A Corner Brook artist has used colour to transform black and white sketches into her own unique style

The artwork of Bride Field Locke WILL catch your eye when you see it - and the exhibit she has on now in Corner Brook highlights some of her most interesting work.The textile art on display at the Rotary Arts Centre was inspired by a book of sketches You can see them -- and Locke's colourful interpretations -- side by side. Bernice Hillier met up with Bride Field Locke to take a look.
1/1/16 minutes, 17 seconds
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If you think YOU have a big family to feed this Christmas, wait until you meet the Gillinghams. The Glenwood family need the Town Hall for their Boxing Day dinner.

Imagine your family is so big that you need a Town Hall rather than a dining table to fit everyone in for Christmas meals. That's exactly what happens whenever the Gillinghams of Glenwood get together on Boxing Day. Luckily, they don't have far to travel for the meal - since they all live in Glenwood year round. Ivy Gillingham is the head of the family, and Perry Gillingham is one of her sons.
1/1/110 minutes, 27 seconds
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The reward of helping others: We spoke with food bank volunteers in Gander as they filled up this year's Christmas hampers

Most food banks across the province have started handing out their Christmas hampers. These are boxes of food with everything you need for a Christmas dinner. Putting those kits together takes a lot of co-ordination, but for volunteers with the Gander and Area Food Bank, it's one of the most rewarding days of the year. The CBC's Cherie Wheeler stopped by to check it out.
1/1/16 minutes, 40 seconds
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Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro was warning cabin owners about the risk of flooding on Beothuk Lake in central Newfoundland, because of what the corporation calls "unprecedented water levels"' due to heavy rain. We'll checked with the mayor of Millertown

The weather system bringing snow and rain to much of the island is worrying officials at Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro. The utility released a statement last night, saying that despite the corporation's best efforts to manage water levels at Beothuk Lake in Central Newfoundland, flooding could happen in cabin areas in the coming days. The lake serves as a water reservoir for an NL Hydro power generation system. Fiona Humber is the mayor of the nearby community of Millertown.
1/1/16 minutes, 22 seconds
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If you have a book lover in your life, you might be looking for a good read for them this holiday season. We got some recommendations from the staff of a Corner Brook bookstore

It's the last weekend before Christmas Day, and if you’re scrambling to find that final gift on your list, why not look for a book? But with so many to choose from, we thought it would be nice to help you narrow down your options. The CBC’s Amy Feehan headed over to Coles in Corner Brook to ask some employees what they think would make the perfect gift.
1/1/15 minutes, 45 seconds
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Building hope out of grief. We heard the story of a family struck by tragedy over the holidays, and how the kindness of their community and strangers has helped them through

The Keats family in Glovertown is coming out of the worst Christmas season you could possibly imagine. Jason Keats died three days before Christmas Day, just months after he was diagnosed with cancer. Then, on Boxing Day, his wife, Robyn, died unexpectedly from a heart attack. Their only child, fourteen- year-old Simon, lost both of his parents in less than a week. Martin Keats is Jason Keats' older brother.
1/1/115 minutes, 16 seconds
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A cybersecurity issue at Memorial’s Grenfell Campus means a delay for some students and faculty going back to class. We heard from Josh Lepawsky, the president of MUN’s Faculty Association

Class is back in session at most campuses of Memorial University, but students and faculty at Grenfell Campus in Corner Brook are still waiting to head back to the classroom. On Monday, the university announced that there had been a cybersecurity incident over the weekend. That has led to a delayed start to the winter semester at Grenfell Campus. MUN administration held a meeting with faculty representatives Wednesday morning. Josh Lepawsky is the president of the Faculty Association, and he spoke with the CBC’s Elizabeth Whitten.
1/1/19 minutes, 52 seconds
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Hitting the books, analog-style. Classes at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University have been disrupted this week by a cybersecurity attack. We spoke with a member of the Student Union about the disruption

Students at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University weren't headed to classes today. They were supposed to be back yesterday, but a cybersecurity incident last weekend, affecting the campus, has delayed the start of classes until Monday. E-mail and other computer services were still unavailable to students and faculty today. Saif Sayeedi is the Vice-president, Academic of the Grenfell Campus Student Union.
1/1/16 minutes, 30 seconds
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Taking on the best in the world, in their own hometown. Two curlers in Channel-Port aux Basques told us what it was like to curl against Brad Gushue and his daughter, Marissa at a provincial championship

Today was scheduled to be another busy day of curling at the Bruce II Sports Centre in Port aux Basques. The provincial Mixed Doubles championships are underway. But one team has already experienced what is likely to be the highlight of the event for them. David Thomas and his daughter, Sarah Thomas had the chance on Wednesday to play against Brad Gushue and his daughter, Marissa. David Thomas is also president of the Gateway Curling Club and president of the Newfoundland and Labrador Curling Association.
1/1/18 minutes, 50 seconds
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A Clarenville couple’s home went up in smoke last week. We heard how neighbours, friends and strangers came to their aid

You get to see the true meaning of the word "community" in action in times of need. Many people saw it happen with a story last week in Clarenville, when Dave and Marie Ingram's home burned down. After it happened, the people of the town showed up to help. John Blundon, the couple's nephew, spoke with CBC's Gavin Simms.
1/1/17 minutes, 57 seconds
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He's growing his community, one wrap at a time. We met the Filipino man who's building a new life in Gander, along with his own business

NL's provincial department of Immigration and Multiculturalism says thousands of permanent residents have moved into the province in the last few years. Among them is Cesar Ambrocio, from the Philippines, who immigrated to Gander a little more than four years ago. The first step for him and his wife in building a new life in the town was to start a Shawarma restaurant. CBC's Cherie Wheeler stopped by to check it out.
1/1/17 minutes, 44 seconds
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NL's government is handing out millions for towns to build affordable rental units… and one of the funding recipients is the small town of Port Saunders

The province is handing out big bucks to help towns big and small tackle the issue of affordable housing. They’ve earmarked 80-million-dollars for affordable rental projects in 51 communities across NL. One of the towns happy to be on the list of recipients is Port Saunders, on the Northern Peninsula. They’ve just received 1.5 million dollars to build 10 affordable rental units in the community. Chris Biggin is a town councillor and Chair of the town's local Development Committee.
1/1/110 minutes, 26 seconds
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How to identify, speak with, and help someone who has dementia. First responders in the province can take some special training this week to get them better prepared to help people living with dementia

People who respond to emergencies in this province can add something new to their skill sets this week. Training is available for first responders so they can better understand how to help people with dementia. The Alzheimer Society is offering the session. Shirley Lucas is CEO of the Alzheimer Society of Newfoundland and Labrador. Duane Antle is president of the Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Fire Services.
1/1/18 minutes, 11 seconds
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Yesteday's Corner Brook Royals' game at the Civic Centre was the team's first Sunday game in nearly a decade. We heard from team members about the game, the crowd, and sportsmanship

The Central-West Senior Hockey League season has been in full swing for quite some time now. But yesterday was extra special for the Corner Brook Royals. It was the first Sunday game they played at the Corner Brook Civic Centre in nearly a decade, as they battled it out against the Grand Falls-Windsor Cataracts. CBC’s Amy Feehan headed over to the civic centre to chat with some of the Royals.
1/1/15 minutes, 48 seconds
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Big bucks for big dreams...we found out what the Tip-A-Vista Wellness Foundation on the Bonavista Peninsula plans to do with a new half-million-dollar windfall

A wellness organization on the Bonavista Peninsula just got a big boost. The charitable Northpine Foundation is giving the Tip-A-Vista Wellness Foundation more than a half-million dollars. Tip-A-Vista is made up of volunteers who are dedicated to improving the mental, emotional and physical wellbeing of people in the region. Eliza Swyers, coordinator with Tip-A-Vista, spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/111 minutes, 33 seconds
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Young, local hockey players show their excitement for the first professional women's hockey league

The Professional Women's Hockey League is bringing in the crowds since its official start on January 1. Last Saturday, Montreal faced off against Minnesota, with a record-breaking attendance of more than 13-thousand fans. As the number of devotees keeps growing, so do the dreams of young players.Toronto forward and Newfoundlander Maggie Connors is making headlines, and some female athletes in this province might want to follow in her footsteps. CBC's Amy Feehan met up with the female under-18 Triple A team in Corner Brook, to hear what the PWHL means to them.
1/1/14 minutes, 3 seconds
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Back to class, but not back to normal. We heard how the start of the winter semester is going at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University, after IT services were disrupted by a cybersecurity incident over Christmas

Students at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University are back in classrooms again today. They resumed in-person sessions yesterday, after an extended break last week. A cybersecurity incident over Christmas delayed the start of the winter semester. Ian Sutherland is vice-president of Grenfell Campus (interview starts at 0:32 mark), and Vicky Quao is vice-president, external with the Grenfell Campus Student Union (starts at 10:35 mark).
1/1/115 minutes, 50 seconds
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Speaking up on a gripping issue: The head of a minor hockey association talks about those post-game handshakes that are banned by HockeyNL

Some minor hockey teams in western Newfoundland have gone against a directive from Hockey NL. The organization eliminated the traditional post-game handshakes in boys' minor hockey late last month. The handshake is supposed to be a show of sportsmanship, but it has devolved into fights and insults several times. Switching to a pre-game handshake or fist bump was meant to stop those incidents. But a couple of teams in the Port aux Basques Minor Hockey Association decided to shake hands anyway after some games on the weekend. Brock Seaward is the president of that group.
1/1/19 minutes, 1 second
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Show us the money: The federal government still hasn't kept its promise to increase the Canada Music Fund. so MusicNL is planning to start a call-to-action campaign

Musicians across Canada are still waiting for Ottawa to keep its promise, so some of them want to make some noise. Back in the 2021 federal election campaign, the Liberal Party pledged to increase the Canada Music Fund to 50 million dollars a year. But it hasn't happened yet, so music industry groups across Canada are taking part in an online campaign for a call to action. Rhonda Tulk-Lane is the CEO of MusicNL.
1/1/16 minutes, 40 seconds
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Double the shelter space, double the expense. The NL West SPCA is still struggling to care for animals from a hoarding situation discovered last fall

An animal rescue group in Western Newfoundland could use a little help from some friends. The NL West SPCA is working hard to help animals from a hoarding situation that was discovered last fall. Cats, rabbits and guinea pigs were rescued from a residence in Corner Brook, and most of them are still in the care of the SPCA. Frances Drover is president of the NL West SPCA.
1/1/18 minutes, 29 seconds
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More questions than answers. Professors at Memorial University want to know more about the cybersecurity incident that has affected Grenfell Campus. , and they want to know why they weren't included in decisions about when to resume classes

It's been nearly two weeks since a cybersecurity incident that has affected IT services at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University. That led to a delay in the start of in-person classes for the winter semester at the campus. Memorial University has released very little information about the exact nature of the cybersecurity incident. Josh Lepawsky, president of the Memorial University Faculty Association says it's also been excluded from decision making in response to the breach.
1/1/110 minutes, 23 seconds
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Lightening the load.The provincial government is trying to lessen the financial burden on people who have to travel for medical reasons. We spoke with Lisa Dempster, the Minister responsible

The provincial government is making it a bit easier for people to travel for medical reasons. The out-of-pocket cost for some flights, mileage allowances and per diem rates are leaving more money in the public's pocket. Lisa Dempster is the Minister of Labrador Affairs and the Minister Responsible for Indigenous Affairs and Reconciliation. She's also responsible for The Medical Transportation Assistance program.
1/1/19 minutes, 45 seconds
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People who are eager to carve up the slopes this ski season are checking in with White Hills, to find out how prep is going - and when you might be able to break out the skis and snowboards

The snow that many Newfoundlanders have had lately might make them eager to hit the slopes. The folks at White Hills Resort in Clarenville are working hard to make that happen. Marke Dickson is the new general manager at White Hills.
1/1/15 minutes, 5 seconds
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Southwestern Newfoundland is one of the windiest areas of the province, so no wonder a company wants to put wind turbines there. We heard how some people in the Codroy Valley are mobilizing to try to prevent it

The back and forth about proposals to develop a wind industry in this province is ongoing. Some people in the Codroy Valley are adding their voices to the public debate. The group calls itself Codroy Valley United and it is opposed to the wind project proposed by World Energy GH2. People just a bit further north, on the Port au Port Peninsula, have been vocal for more than a year now about wind turbines for their area. But Codroy Valley's inclusion in the project has received much less attention. Claudelle Devoe is with Codroy Valley United.
1/1/18 minutes, 8 seconds
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In their own words...a teacher of the Mi'kmaq language is launching the first online language school in the province

Mi'kmaq in this province are working hard to reclaim their cultural heritage. For decades, many of them hid their identities to avoid racism and discrimination. Now they're proud to identify as Indigenous and re-learn traditional skills, knowledge and - perhaps most importantly - their language. Dean Simon of Bay St. George is a Mi'kmaq teacher who's behind the first online school that offers language instruction.
1/1/18 minutes, 42 seconds
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MUN's Grenfell Campus has been tight-lipped since a cybersecurity attack on the school. An IT expert told us about possible reasons the university is likely staying quiet

It's been weeks since the cyberattack on Grenfell Campus in Corner Brook, but little is known yet about how bad and widespread it was. The attack forced the university to delay the start of the semester and shut down IT services. The lack of information is similar to what happened after the cyber attack on the health care system back in 2021. So why the secrecy and lack of specifics? Sheldon Handcock owns IT Security NL - a tech company based in Gander joined us this morning to help us understand.
1/1/18 minutes, 44 seconds
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A novel from this province was put on a rocket last week and shot into space. No joke! We heard from author Carolyn Parsons about the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and the drama that followed

A writer from Lewisporte has been paying close attention to the fate of the Peregrine Moon lander this weekend. That's because her book is actually on the spacecraft. Carolyn Parsons was one of 125 writers worldwide whose work was saved on a digital storage card destined for the moon. Unfortunately, that's not exactly how it played out. Peregrine One had a fuel leak in space, making a successful moon landing nearly impossible. And while all this has been unfolding over the past few days, Carolyn Parsons has been watching from home.
1/1/19 minutes, 28 seconds
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Remembering Ed Broadbent. The former NDP leader died last week at the age of 87. We'll hear from another former NDP MP - Fonse Faour of Corner Brook - about his memories of Ed Broadbent

People across Canada are sharing their memories of Ed Broadbent. The former NDP leader died last week at the age of 87. Broadbent led the federal New Democrats from 1975 to 1989, and although his party didn't form the government, he is widely considered as being influential. Fonse Faour of Corner Brook benefited from the influence of Ed Broadbent. Faour was a young lawyer when he was first elected as an NDP MP, the first ever from this province. He's been a Justice of the Newfoundland and Labrador Supreme Court for more than 20 years.
1/1/16 minutes, 52 seconds
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The "Stanley Cup" runneth over! The popular travel mugs have become the new craze. We asked people why they think these mugs are so sought-after, and if they’re worth the hype

The Stanley Cup is one of the newest trends. No, not the hockey trophy - the Stanley-brand line of stainless steel travel mugs and cups. They're so popular, some people are even willing to fight for them in stores. But what makes these thermal mugs such a hot item? CBC’s Amy Feehan hit the streets of Corner Brook to ask people.
1/1/14 minutes, 43 seconds
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Sore throats, stuffed-up noses and lingering coughs - a LOT of people in NL are sick these days. We asked a Medical Officer of Health with NL Health Services about the nasty viruses on the go.

Fevers, coughs, and sore throats have been running rampant lately - and there's been no let-up. It seems just about everyone is catching SOMETHING this winter. So... what's on the go? Dr. Nazlee Ogunyemi is the Medical Officer of Health with NL Health Services.
1/1/16 minutes, 53 seconds
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After five decades, Chief Mi'sel Joe of the Miawpukek First Nation is stepping down. We asked him about his long career as chief, and what's next for him

He’s been the leader of his community for five decades, and he says now’s the time to step down. Chief Mi’sel Joe is retiring as administrative chief of Newfoundland’s Miawpukek First Nation. He announced his retirement yesterday, and his last day on the job will be tomorrow. We asked him to look back at his long career and tell us what’s to come.
1/1/110 minutes, 1 second
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You've got your snowmobile all tuned up and you've filled the gas tank, but that doesn't mean you're fully ready to hit the trails. We got some snowmobile safety tips from the Newfoundland and Labrador.Snowmobile Federation

With the winter weather settling in, many of us are getting ready to head out on the snowmobile trails for some outdoor fun. An event was scheduled for Corner Brook tonight (Wednesday), reminding us to be safe while we're at it. Craig Borden is a director at the Snowmobile Federation of Newfoundland and Labrador. He also owns Rugged Edge, a powersports dealership in Corner Brook,
1/1/18 minutes, 47 seconds
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For many musicians, it's the highlight of the year. We heard about the annual Central Newfoundland Kiwanis Music Festival

It's time for young musicians to sign up for the most exciting event of the year. The 57th Annual Central Newfoundland Kiwanis Music Festival in Grand Falls-Windsor is coming up in March, but preparations are already well underway. David Oxford is the chair of the festival's organizing committee.
1/1/18 minutes, 8 seconds
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Rental housing, Part 1 of 2: What should potential tenants consider BEFORE looking for a place to rent in NL - and what questions should they ask before signing a lease? We got answers from renters' rights advocate Sherwin Flight

Finding an affordable rental property to call home is tough in NL right now. Between the lack of availability and the rising costs of rent, competition is fierce. All the more reason to know exactly what you - as a tenant - are getting into before you search or sign a lease. Sherwin Flight is a renters' rights advocate who oversees the Facebook group Newfoundland Tenant and Landlord Support Group. He helped us understand what sorts of questions we should be asking landlords and ourselves.
1/1/112 minutes, 2 seconds
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When a social worker leaves a job, many other people get left behind. Social workers are vital to keeping social programs afloat, but their union tells us that their numbers across the province are dropping

The province still has a dire shortage of social workers. That's how it was in 2020, when CBC reported that there were too few of them right across Newfoundland and Labrador. Back then, the government promised it would hire more people, but four years later the situation has actually worsened. Jerry Earle is the president of NAPE, the union representing social workers.
1/1/17 minutes, 33 seconds
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It's certainly a landlord's market right now in this province. Renters' rights advocate Sherwin Flight returned to talk about what landlords should consider before taking on tenants

Yesterday, we spoke with Sherwin Flight, a renters' rights advocate here in NL. We talked about things renters should consider before they start looking for a place to live - and before signing a lease. Today, we flipped things around. If you're considering becoming a landlord, what should you consider before drafting a lease - and what are you expected to do to make sure the rights of your tenants and you are maintained? Sherwin was back with us this morning, to answer all of our landlord-related questions.
1/1/18 minutes, 28 seconds
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Picking up where they left off. Qalipu First Nation and College of the North Atlantic have just signed another five-year agreement to explore educational pathways for Qalipu members

Five years ago, College of the North Atlantic and Qalipu First Nation signed a five-year Memorandum of Understanding. One of the goals was to help Qalipu members further their education and improve their chances to get jobs. The project was so successful, they've just signed on for another five years. Charles Pender is Band Manager with Qalipu First Nation, and Heidi Staeben-Simmons is the associate VP of Public Affairs and Advancement with CNA.
1/1/18 minutes, 12 seconds
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Leave it where it is: The MP for Gander weighs in on the provincial government's plan to change the air ambulance program

Plans to change the province's air ambulance service aren't flying with the MP representing Gander. Right now, the province uses several airports for the service, but the new plan will see it all based in St. John's and Happy Valley Goose-Bay. And the dispatching which all comes from Gander right now will be moving to the capital as well. Clifford Small is the MP for Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame.
1/1/15 minutes, 38 seconds
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There were a lot of confused kids and worried parents in Corner Brook yesterday. amid high winds and heavy snow. We heard from a mother who says the decision to close schools came way too late, and from the president of the teachers' union

The weather in Corner Brook yesterday was so stormy, the RCMP was asking people to stay off the roads. So when parents learned partway through the day that schools in Corner Brook were closing and it wasn't safe to send the kids home on buses ...well, that caused panic. We heard from Angela Aultman, who has two children attending school in Corner Brook (0:00 mark of podcast) and from Trent Langdon, president of the the Newfoundland and Labrador Teachers' Association (7:53 mark of podcast).
1/1/116 minutes, 9 seconds
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A Port aux Basques business owner has been able to pay back her CEBA loan...but is speaking out for other small businesses that aren't so lucky.... We'll hear from her, coming up next.

The deadline for repaying the Canada Emergency Business Account has passed. Thousands of businesses and not-for-profits took out loans of up $60,000. They were originally interest-free...and meant to help during the Covid lockdowns. But as of yesterday, that loan is due...and collecting interest. Some business owners are speaking out about the federal government's decision NOT to extend the deadline. Rebecca LeRiche (0:00 mark of podcast) owns Starboard Side Guest House in Port aux Basques. Federic Gionet (8:14 mark of podcast) is a senior policy analyst for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business in the Atlantic Region.
1/1/114 minutes, 18 seconds
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Space to spare could be space to share. We heard about an online platform that matches older adults who have a spare bedroom, with students who need a place to live

People in Central and Western Newfoundland have a chance this week to learn about something new to help students -- and seniors. It's an online platform called SpacesShared, and it's been operating in parts of Ontario since last April. Now, it has teamed up with post-secondary institutions in Newfoundland and Labrador. SpacesShared is doing a community engagement tour in our region this week. Rylan Kinnon is CEO of SpacesShared, and Colin Burridge is principal of Academy Canada's Corner Brook campus.
1/1/19 minutes, 58 seconds
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Snow days when there's no snow...regular classes when it seems stormy out. Many of us wonder what goes into deciding when its a snow day. We got the details from NL Schools

When you live in this province, especially in winter, your daily activities are often determined by the weather. For students, it can make the difference between classes as normal, or getting the ever-incredible snow day! And as we saw last week in the Corner Brook area, there can often be confusion about the decisions to close schools. Terry Hall, the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education Operations, and he explained what actually goes into that big decision.
1/1/111 minutes, 46 seconds
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Speech therapists, dietitIans, counsellors, social workers and multitudes of other public sector health professionals prepare to walk off the job. The Association of Allied Health Professionals walked away from conciliation with government last week

The Association of Allied Health Professionals in the province is inching nearer to a strike. The association represents physiotherapists, dietitians, psychologists, social workers, audiologists and a multitude of other medical professionals - 800 of them in all in Newfoundland and Labrador. Last week they walked away from conciliation talks with government, saying the two sides are so far apart, it's pointless to go on. Gordon Piercey is president of the Association.
1/1/112 minutes, 20 seconds
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When a fact is, in fact, not a fact. We learned about a program teaching teens how to decipher truth from lies on the internet

Most of us have been fooled by something we saw or read on the internet. From doctored photos, to fake videos. to political lying, it can be really tough to know what's true and what's not. The Canadian group Media Smarts is hoping to curb the spread of false information by teaching teens how to fact-check online. Kathryn Hill, the executive director of Media Smarts, spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/17 minutes, 9 seconds
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From hockey player to figure skater. We learned about a young athlete pursuing her dreams on the ice

It takes dedication, grace and many hours of practice to perfect the art of figure skating -- a commitment 13-year-old Beau Callahan knows very well. After coaches chose Beau for her talent and potential, the family decided to move to Quebec from Stephenville in 2020 to further her career. Since then, the young skater has excelled in single and pair skating competitions. CBC's Hillary Johnson spoke with Beau's mom, Shantelle Lasaga and with Beau.
1/1/18 minutes, 28 seconds
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We've all checked the nutrition label on packages of food we buy. Now the Shorefast Foundation on Fogo Island is asking people to check its economic "nutrition labels" when they spend money there

The Shorefast Foundation on Fogo Island has borrowed a familiar idea to create something new. The Foundation has developed what it calls "Economic Nutrition Labels," designed to work like the food nutrition labels you're probably familiar with. You look at the labels and use them to guide your decisions about what to buy. Economic Nutrition labels are meant to inform your spending choices, too. Diane Hodgins is the executive vice president of Shorefast, and she spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 44 seconds
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Saying goodbye to a friend and colleague. Former MHA Colin Holloway shares his memories of the late Derrick Bragg

Friends and colleagues of Derrick Bragg are paying tribute to him this week. The Liberal MHA for Fogo Island-Cape Freels died on Monday at the age of 59, having been diagnosed with tongue cancer last spring. When he was elected to the House of Assembly for the first time, Bragg sat next to another political newbie: Terra Nova MHA Colin Holloway. He joined us on the show to pay tribute to the late MHA.
1/1/18 minutes, 28 seconds
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Yes, it's cold today in central and western Newfoundland, but we tried not to let the weather put a chill on our mood. We spoke with a woman in Labrador West who loves the cold and wants you to embrace it, too

There was an extreme cold warning in parts of the province today, and in some places, such as the Northern Peninsula, it was expected to go down to minus-35 with the wind-chill. But we got some perspective when we spoke with Hafeeza Pathan. She lives in Labrador West, where it was expected to reach a -45 wind chill today.
1/1/16 minutes, 41 seconds
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The honours keep coming! Our CBC colleague William Ping told us about a very big week for his writing career and his first novel, Hollow Bamboo, as well as his new role as part of the Giller Book Club

It's been a BIG couple of weeks for our CBC colleague William Ping. He's been named to the longlist for the Dublin Literary Award, one of the most valuable fiction prizes in the world, for his first novel, Hollow Bamboo. It was published last year by Harper Collins and is based on the experiences of Chinese immigrants to Newfoundland - including William's own grandfather - in the 1930s. William is also being paired with one of the shortlisted authors for this year's Giller Prize - for the Giller Book Club.
1/1/17 minutes, 8 seconds
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Building a nationwide network of living labs to tackle agricultural climate solutions - we heard about the NL Living Lab and its work with local farmers

Groups of people are building and strengthening a national network of living labs, to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. That's the idea behind a185-million-dollar project. Each lab collaborates with farmers, scientists and others in the agricultural sector to tackle climate issues. The NL Living Lab has been hard at work since it was launched in 2021. Representatives were scheduled to discuss its work at the Agricultural Industry Symposium in Grand Falls-Windsor today. Rodney Reid is the Project Lead and Knowledge Technology Transfer with the NL Living Lab.
1/1/18 minutes, 15 seconds
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If you're at the bar and need a ride home, or you don't have a car and need groceries, who ya gonna call? If you're in Nain, you call Skiduber. We met the woman behind the service

While the provincial government tries to work out a deal to bring the first ride-sharing service to the island, Nain's Amber Vincent is way ahead of the game. She and her snowmobile provide a ride-share service in her northern community. CBC's Leigh Anne Power spoke with Vincent about her service...Skiduber! (pronounced "Skee-DOO-ber"!)
1/1/15 minutes, 33 seconds
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Tasmania, Australia is about as far from Newfoundland as you can get, but there are a lot of similarities between the two islands. We spoke with two Mi'kmaw chiefs who recently spent time visiting and learning from Indigenous peoples down under

Back in November, Chief Peggy White of the Three Rivers Mi'kmaw Band in Bay St. George South and Chief Joanne Miles of the Flat Bay Band travelled to Tasmania, Australia. Scholars recognize Tasmania as a "mirror island" to Newfoundland. The Chiefs' visit was meant to observe and learn how Indigenous people in Tasmania deal with reconciliation, identity and development for the future.
1/1/110 minutes, 57 seconds
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When he's not outside in the woods, he's posting videos about...being outside in the woods! Meet our new Outdoor columnist, Charlie White from Cold Brook in Bay St. George

For so many Newfoundlanders and Labradorians, getting out in the woods is a great way to spent the day. And no matter the season, there's always something to turn your attention to. For Charlie White of Cold Brook, being outside is the best way to spend any day. He runs the YouTube channel "NL Ghost Wolf", and posts about his adventures out on the land. This winter, he'll be our guide to outdoor life in our series "Chase the Seasons with Charlie."
1/1/15 minutes, 46 seconds
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Schooling may have been sporadic over the years in Indian Cove, Labrador, but the one-room schoolhouse still stands strong. The building has been designated a Registered Heritage Structure

Heritage NL has added several new locations to their Registered Heritage Structure list. One of them is a 1940s one-storey schoolhouse in the resettled community of Indian Cove, on Great Caribou Island in Southern Labrador. Heritage status is generally given to buildings that play a significant role in preserving the cultural fabric of Newfoundland and Labrador. Dale Jarvis, executive director of Heritage NL, told us about the importance of Indian Cove School..
1/1/17 minutes, 52 seconds
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Newfoundland and Labrador artists racked up an impressive 52 nominations for the upcoming ECMAs in Charlottetown, PEI. We chatted with musician Jason Benoit, who’s up for two of those

Newfoundland and Labrador is getting the recognition it deserves at this year’s East Coast Music Awards, with a whopping 52 nominations. Among the nominees is West Coast musician Jason Benoit, who’s up for “Country Recording of the Year” - for his album Time Traveller - as well as “Indigenous Artist of the Year.”
1/1/110 minutes, 16 seconds
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Some teens and tweens, and even younger children are buying anti-aging skin care products. It's a troubling trend that leaves some parents wondering how to talk to their kids about it. We spoke with a registered psychologist

On Wednesday's show, a dermatologist told us about the growing trend of children using anti-aging skin care products. Teens, tweens and even younger children are buying products usually intended for adults, sometimes promoted by social media influencers. It's a troubling trend, and we wondered how parents are dealing with it. Laura Casey-Foss is a registered psychologist based in Corner Brook.
1/1/18 minutes, 41 seconds
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A high school basketball team in Middle Arm on the Baie Verte Peninsula is raising money to support their coach and his family, after he suffered a brain injury earlier this month.

Members of a high school basketball team in Middle Arm on the Baie Verte Peninsula are rallying around their coach after he suffered a brain injury earlier this month. Burlington resident Justin Newbury is known for his community involvement and passion for teaching basketball to young people. Now, his team and community members are giving back to help ease the financial burden of his recovery. The CBC's Colleen Connors spoke with Mayor Rudy Norman. She also spoke with brothers Aiden and Carter Goudie, who are on the team.
1/1/18 minutes, 43 seconds
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Everyone's talking, but no one is listening. A Codroy Valley resident is raising concerns about the tenor of public discussion around wind energy

An Indigenous resident of the Codroy Valley with a keen interest in environmental issues says an open dialogue on wind energy is badly needed. Megan Samms is an interdisciplinary artist and farmer in Millville. Over the past year or so, Samms has attended many meetings about the wind project proposed for the Codroy Valley. She's not in support of nor against the wind-to-hydrogen project at the moment, but she IS concerned that there is no safe arena for open public discourse on the issue.
1/1/18 minutes, 21 seconds
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Four high school students from this province are vying for the prestigious Loran Award. We met one of the finalists, Hannah Moores, from central Nfld.

Four high school students from this province are in the running for the prestigious Loran Award. All 90 finalists across the country will receive $6,000 to put toward their post-secondary studies. BUT 36 of those will get a scholarship valued at $100.000. Hannah Moores is a graduating student at Exploits Valley High in Grand Falls-Windsor, and she's a Loran finalist.
1/1/15 minutes, 59 seconds
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Rabbits or snowshoe hares...whatever you call them, they're still a tasty traditional meal. We jumped into rabbit snaring 101 with our outdoor columnist, Charlie White

So far this winter, the white stuff has not been falling evenly over the province. Parts of the West Coast have lots of snow to play with, while in the rest of the island and parts of Labrador, there's way less than we're used to. But our outdoor columnist, Charlie White, has a suggestion for something to do all winter long, regardless of how much snow you have. This morning, we got a jump on rabbit snaring in "Chase the Seasons with Charlie."
1/1/17 minutes, 50 seconds
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City crews in Corner Brook sprang into action when some pipes sprung a leak on Saturday. We got an update from the mayor

The Millbrook Mall in Corner Brook was closed again this morning, as a result of a waterline break. That waterline was NOT on City property, but another waterline break on Saturday evening WAS the City's responsibility. The two waterline breaks in a short timeframe led to a flooded road and a flooded parking lot. Jim Parsons is mayor of Corner Brook.
1/1/16 minutes, 30 seconds
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it was a nail-biter of an election, but in the end, Brad Benoit squeaked by to become new Chief of Miawpukek First Nation. He defeated his closest competiton by just five votes

It was a close election, but Brad Benoit emerged on the weekend as the new chief of the Miawpukek First Nation in Conne River. Benoit received 114 votes, just five votes more than his closest rival, Harvey Drew. Another candidate, Mike Drew, was only slightly behind, with 100 votes. Now the hard work begins, as Benoit takes over from long-time Chief Mi'sel Joe. Chief Joe retired earlier this month, and has taken a role as traditional chief. Miawpukek administrative chief Brad Benoit spoke with us..
1/1/15 minutes, 39 seconds
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A home doesn't have to have four bedrooms and a couple of baths. The Town of Grand Falls-Windsor has some ideas for new, less expensive ways to house people

The shortage of affordable housing as rents continue to climb is causing policy makers to get creative. In the town of Grand Falls-Windsor, the council is looking at a couple of new options that could increase the number of homes available. Amy Coady is the chair of public works and development with the council.
1/1/110 minutes, 14 seconds
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44 counts of causing or permitting pain, suffering or injury to an animal. A woman in Bay St. George South faces charges related to the treatment of livestock

A woman in Bay St. George South is scheduled to appear in court February 5 on charges related to the treatment of animals. The charges against the woman from Heatherton go back a couple of years to a report received by the RCMP in April of 2022. Corporal Jolene Garland is media relations officer with the RCMP in this province.
1/1/17 minutes, 55 seconds
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An inspiration for people serving their local communities. Tony Keats, the mayor of Dover, has just won a prize at the World Mayor 2023 competition. We learned about the award and how that small town made such a big impression

This next story is proof that just because a town is small in size doesn't mean it can't make a BIG impact. Back in November, we chatted with Tony Keats, the mayor of the Town of Dover. He had been nominated for a 2023 World Mayor Award and had just made the shortlist - the Final 9. That's a global competition that singles out mayors who have shown integrity, courage and imagination. Keats won The Community Award.
1/1/17 minutes, 33 seconds
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School in McKay's stinks...literally. A concerned mom of two told us about sewer problems at E.A. Butler All-Grade School

If you ask your children about school, they might tell you it stinks. They don't mean it literally, of course, but Hope MacDonald's children mean it. MacDonald has two children attending E.A. Butler All Grade School at McKay's, in Bay St. George South. She says sewer backups and the odours that come with them are a major concern. MacDonald spoke last week with CBC producer David Newell.
1/1/16 minutes, 52 seconds
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Ottawa's recent announcement of a temporary, two-year cap on study permits is creating some fears for international students in this province. We spoke with the vice president external of Grenfell Campus Student Union about her concerns

Students and administrators at post-secondary institutions are still trying to figure out what a new cap on study permits will mean for them. The federal government announced the two-year cap last week. Ottawa says about 360,000 undergraduate study permits will be approved for 2024, which is a 35-percent reduction from last year. There's no word yet on how the cap will affect this province, but it has left international students feeling uneasy. One of those students is Vicky Quao, Vice-President External of Grenfell Campus’ Student Union.
1/1/16 minutes, 54 seconds
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History was made over the weekend as Danielle Mills became the first female referee in a Newfoundland Senior Hockey League game

2024 is shaping up to be a big year for women in hockey in this province. We don’t only have players like Maggie Connors making big moves in the Professional Women's Hockey League - we also have referees making history. Over the weekend, Danielle Mills of Grand Falls-Windsor was the first woman to ever ref a game in the Newfoundland Senior Hockey League.
1/1/17 minutes, 40 seconds
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Getting fit, feeling better and beating the January blues...we visited an older-adult fitness class

A group of women in Corner Brook have found a way to beat the winter blues. More than 50 of them show up at the city's Civic Centre twice a week for an older-adult fitness class. The workout means a whole lot more than just cardio and weights. As the CBC's Colleen Connors found out, it's a way for these seniors to get out and socialize.
1/1/16 minutes, 18 seconds
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We're gonna blow the lid off Stanley mugs! We dove deep into 'Stanley' and discovered why this new trendy travel mug is taking over

Stanley Mugs are all the rage and have been featured on social media platforms by many users. The gigantic travel mug was on many Christmas wish lists in 2023 - and even caused fights in some stores. But why is everyone getting so worked up over these insulated mugs?! Newfoundland Morning reporter Amy Feehan looked into it.
1/1/17 minutes, 42 seconds
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She's living proof that age is just a number. We spoke with a Clarenville woman who turns 104 today

We have a birthday to celebrate today. And it's a big one. Louise Pelley of Harcourt turns 104 years old. This year, Louise is asking for one-hundred-and-four birthday cards. Today's the big day but, last week, Newfoundland Morning’s Gavin Simms called up Louise Pelley. Joining her on the call were staff workers Selina Kendall and Bonita Taylor.
1/1/18 minutes, 5 seconds
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Expanding their beat. Massey Drive and Mount Moriah will be policed by the RNC as of today. We found out what led up to the change

People in two West Coast communities who make a 911 call today will notice a difference in who responds. The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary is taking over policing in the towns of Massey Drive and Mount Moriah. Those communities have been in RCMP jurisdiction until now. John Hogan is the Minister of justice and public safety.
1/1/17 minutes, 20 seconds
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Tough pill to swallow. Some people in Corner Brook were left in the lurch after a waterline break shut down their pharmacy for several days. We asked the province's pharmacy board for some tips on what to do when the druggist is NOT in

Things are getting back to normal at the Millbrook Mall in Corner Brook. The mall was shut down from Saturday until Tuesday after a waterline on the mall property broke. Perhaps the place people were most eager to see re-open was the pharmacy at Shoppers Drug Mart. During the three days that the mall was closed, some people scrambled to figure out how to get prescriptions filled or whether they even could. Noelle Patten is the registrar and CEO of the Newfoundland and Labrador Pharmacy Board.
1/1/16 minutes, 6 seconds
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We took a look back at the life of beloved actor Rick Boland of Corner Brook, as we spoke with his sister, Bobbie-Ann Boland

The news of Rick Boland’s passing led to a wave of tributes across the province on Wednesday, The beloved actor was a pillar of the province's theatre community, and co-founder of Rising Tide Theatre in Trinity. His talents were featured in countless movies and TV shows - including "Hatching, Matching & Dispatching," and "Republic of Doyle." Rick Boland died this week at the age of 70. Although his career took him to the east coast of the island, Rick was born and raised in the Curling area of Corner Brook. HIs sister, Bobbie-Ann Boland, joined us to talk about those earlier days and beyond.
1/1/110 minutes, 30 seconds
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A keynote speech in Ottawa and a chance meeting with the Prime Minister....we spoke with Brian Button, the Mayor of Port Aux Basques

The Mayor of Port Aux Basques was in the nation's capital this week, speaking about post-tropical storm Fiona and the immense impact it had on his town in 2022. He even found himself in a one-on-one meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
1/1/17 minutes, 44 seconds
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It's been part of the landscape for more than 80 years. But, soon, the Gut Bridge near Stephenville Crossing will be no more. We spoke with the Mayor

The Gut Bridge near Stephenville Crossing is getting loads of attention this week. The now-abandoned bridge has spanned Main Gut for more than 80 years. But it's deteriorated so much that it needed to be removed. That demolition and removal is now underway, and that work is attracting spectators. Lisa Lucas is the Mayor of Stephenville Crossing.
1/1/16 minutes, 30 seconds
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Over a hundred people in Bay St. George have been without water for over a week - and there's no improvement in sight. We heard about what's been happening in the community of Barachois Brook

The community of Barachois Brook hasn't had running water for more than a week - and some people there are asking for a state of emergency to be declared. Tiffany Parsons lives in the community (interview starts at beginning of podcast), and Gerard Lee is the chair of the Local Service District of Barachois Brook (interview starts at 6:47 mark).
1/1/114 minutes, 1 second
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They typically spend their days hauling trash out of the ocean, but earlier this week, the Clean Harbours Initiative helped secure an ancient shipwreck near Cape Ray

Talk about making a splash…The remains of an old shipwreck at Cape Ray nearly broke the internet this week. The giant wooden wreckage washed up along the shore last week, and since then, it's captured the imaginations of people all over the world. Not long after the wreck's discovery, workers tried to secure the vessel, to keep it from disappearing for perhaps another hundred years. Divers with Clean Harbours Initiative just so happened to be working in nearby Port Aux Basques this week, so they switched gears to help out. Trevor Croft is the manager of Clean Harbours Initiative.
1/1/18 minutes, 58 seconds
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Celebrating the Year of the Arts while featuring some of the best films this province has produced - we learned what PictureNL has planned for movie lovers on the island's west coast

Calling all movie lovers! PictureNL has some big plans for fans of the big screen on the west coast of the Island. To celebrate the Year of the Arts, the agency has organized monthly film screenings. The best part is that the screenings feature some of the best films produced in this province. Jennifer Hawley is the industry development manager with Picture NL.
1/1/18 minutes
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Build it and they will come. We met a man in Change Islands who's turned an old pit into the hottest spot in town

We're at peak winter here in Newfoundland and Labrador...which for a lot of people means it's time to break out the skates. There hasn't been a public rink in ages In the town of Change Islands, but this winter, resident Dennis Flood decided to remedy that. And now the whole community has a pretty unique place for to go for a skate.
1/1/15 minutes, 22 seconds
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Coming up from the rabbit hole. We learned how a former conspiracy theorist uses comedy to help others break the fake news cycle

A man who used to be caught up in conspiracy theories himself is now helping others distinguish between fact and fiction - and Bryan Bakker is using humor to do that. Bakker's experience with conspiracy theories goes back to 2007. Like many of us, he was getting his news on the internet, and much of what he read and heard made him fear for his safety. Bakker eventually learned how to tell the truth from lies online, and now he wants to help others do the same. He founded Newsload.ca, which gives the news of the day a comic twist, which he hopes will make people more open to looking for the truth.
1/1/17 minutes, 19 seconds
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A violent act committed inside a Corner Brook school. The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary told us about an assault at Corner Brook Intermediate last Thursday.

Police say a violent act happened INSIDE a school in Corner Brook last week. Two young people are facing charges after an assault at Corner Brook Intermediate on Thursday. A 14-year-old male student at the school was seriously injured during the incident. A 15-year-old male youth is charged with assault causing bodily harm, and a 14-year-old female youth is charged with assault. Constable James Cadigan is spokesperson for the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary.
1/1/16 minutes, 39 seconds
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Do you have photos of the old Twin Ponds camp at the time of 9/11? Twin Ponds Wilderness Lodge is looking to find some

The new owners of an old church camp near Glenwood are looking for your help to preserve a bit of history. Raleigh Drilling owns the former Twin Ponds camp, now the Twin Ponds Wilderness Lodge. The company's workers stay in some of the bunkhouses, but the Lodge also has other rooms to rent to visitors. As the property looks forward to a new future, one of its staff is also trying to pay tribute to the past. Danielle Coates is with Twin Ponds Wilderness Lodge.
1/1/16 minutes, 35 seconds
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An Ontario couple planned to restore a historic church in the resettled community of Petites. Now, they're now looking for some new hands to take over the massive project

Julia and John Breckenridge, a couple from Ontario, fell in love with an historic church in Petites on Newfoundland's south coast during a holiday here years ago. They decided to restore Bethany United Church. The couple bought the building and had nearly finished the roof restoration, when post-tropical storm Fiona struck - and that's when their plans went off the rails. Now, the Breckenridges say they're looking for someone else to take the reins on the project.
1/1/16 minutes, 27 seconds
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Calling all birdwatchers! Researchers are monitoring declines in bird populations and want to know what you're seeing in your area

Bird scientists are worried about a decline in bird populations, even common ones, like crows. They seem to be everywhere, from the smallest island to the biggest city, so it's concerning that crow populations and other species are dropping. Allison Binley is an ornithologist at the Cornell Ornithology Lab monitoring Canadian bird populations. She spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/17 minutes, 26 seconds
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A trip to a tournament turned into a weekend of wild weather. Hear from a Newfoundland hockey team that was caught in that big snowstorm in P.E.I.

A half-dozen triple-A teams from Newfoundland and Labrador were in Prince Edward Island for The Spud hockey tournament, when a big snowstorm hit. It left them stranded at their hotel with roads blocked, the Confederation Bridge closed and the Gulf ferries cancelled. Rodney George is coach of the Western Crushers Under 16 triple-A team. He spoke with CBC News literally minutes after getting off the ferry in Port aux Basques, two days later than planned.
1/1/15 minutes, 34 seconds
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Oh Buoy! A Pasadena Man has spent most of his life crafting model boats

We all have hobbies we enjoy. Some people like to garden, some like to paint, and Dave Murphy builds model boats. The Pasadena man has been lucky enough to devote time to his hobby for nearly 50 years now, and he says he's built enough models to fill a museum. Newfoundland Morning's Amy Feehan went to visit him.
1/1/14 minutes, 46 seconds
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A virtual care clinic specifically for the Western region is helping patients and taking the pressure off emergency rooms

If you've ever been without a family doctor, you know how stressful that can be. Depending on where you live in the province, there might be walk-in clinics, health hubs, or virtual care services that you can use. In the Western region, the health authority has a regional virtual care clinic that it's getting the word out about. Erica Parsons is regional director of primary health care with the health authority and talks about the service you can access by phone.
1/1/17 minutes, 21 seconds
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Thousands of people in this province have been hurt or died in moose-vehicle collisions. We'll hear how Banff National Park has reduced those collisions by more than 95 per cent

There are hundreds of moose-vehicle collisions in Newfoundland and Labrador every year. But in Banff National Park in Alberta, ecologists have managed to cut crashes by more than 95-percent. Jesse Whittington is an ecologist and team lead at Banff. He spoke with the CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/17 minutes, 11 seconds
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February, Psychology Month, Part 1: We've started a four-part series that looks at specific therapies. Today, a psychologist told us how people in the profession are trained in this province

Understanding our thoughts, feelings and actions is the very foundation of the science of psychology. February is Psychology Month in Canada, to highlight the contributions of Canadian psychologists and the crucial work they do. Every Thursday this month, we'll focus on psychology in THIS province. In Part One, Dr. Sheila Garland, director of clinical training for the Doctor of Psychology program at Memorial University told us what psychologists do and how they're trained.
1/1/110 minutes, 8 seconds
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When your relationship with food goes sour and starts to impact your physical and mental health: We asked the executive director of the Eating Disorder Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador about what help is available in this province

Many people who hear the term "eating disorder" might THINK they know a lot about anorexia or bulimia, but they may have misconceptions, rather than real knowledge. We might think that eating disorders are rare, when, in fact, they are not. They affect a million Canadians, and the death rate due to anorexia is higher than that of any other mental illness. This is Eating Disorder Awareness Week and we spoke with Paul Thomey, executive director of the Eating Disorder Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador.
1/1/17 minutes, 52 seconds
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Engaging Emily with embroidery: The Corner Brook Public Library offers people the chance to create scenes from LM Montgomery's classic book, Emily of New Moon

Lucy Maud Montgomery's classic Emily of New Moon was first published in 1923. Back then, as it is now, the craft of embroidery was a great pastime for people who loved stitching. The Corner Brook Public Library is inviting you to come and embroider scenes from the novel, and the CBC’s Amy Feehan dropped by the library earlier this week.
1/1/17 minutes, 30 seconds
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There's a new ferry in the Marine Atlantic fleet. The corporation has taken possession of the Ala'suinu

Marine Atlantic's newest ferry will soon be taking passengers and freight between Newfoundland and Nova Scotia - and from all reports, it will be a pretty impressive ride. This week, the corporation took official possession of the Ala'suinu. Darrell Mercer is a spokesperson for Marine Atlantic.
1/1/14 minutes, 40 seconds
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Happy Birthday...Happy? The Town of Pasadena is celebrating the birthday of its winter carnival mascot

We don't usually mention birthdays on CBC Radio, But we couldn't let this one go by without marking it in some way. In Pasadena on Saturday, there's a very special birthday party. They'll be wishing happy birthday... to Happy, the town's winter carnival mascot. Wanda Wight is the recreation director in Pasadena, and told us what's in store.
1/1/18 minutes, 37 seconds
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Hundreds of students from across the country are in for a wild ride in Clarenville this weekend, hitting the hills on concrete toboggans

This is the opening weekend for White Hills in Clarenville. And even if you don't ski yourself, you'll want to be there for a pretty incredible event. It's called The Great Northern Concrete Toboggan Race, and involves hundreds of students from more than a dozen universities nationwide. Regan Hogan is one of the organizers of this year's race.
1/1/17 minutes, 2 seconds
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Is this time of year cold enough to give you a brain freeze... or a "freeze brain"? The Freeze Brain music and art festival is happening this weekend in Corner Brook

A new music and art festival is happening tomorrow in Corner Brook. It's an immersive experience showcasing local artists and musicians. Organizers are calling it Freeze Brain, and it's the winter counterpart to Wash Brain, a popular event held last summer in the city. 62 Broadway is the arts venue hosting the event. CBC's Amy Feehan met up with an event coordinator and two musicians performing at the festival.
1/1/16 minutes, 34 seconds
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A big concert event with a big-name headliner in a small town on the Northern Peninsula, Danny Pond of Gunners Cove is turning a dream into reality with Food, Fibs and Fiddles

A man on the Northern Peninsula is thrilled with the interest so far in a big event he's planned. Danny Pond of Gunners Cove created the Food, Fibs and Fiddles festival last summer. His idea was to grow the festival as the years went by, And he sure has done that. This year, he has Blue Rodeo as the headline act.
1/1/17 minutes, 4 seconds
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Three town councillors in Stephenville have resigned since the beginning of the year, and one of them is now accusing the mayor of bullying

Three town councillors in Stephenville have resigned since the beginning of the year. One of them is now accusing the mayor of bullying, and says that what he calls the “toxic culture” on council played a major part in his decision to step down. Our colleague at Radio-Canada, Patrick Butler, was in Stephenville last week.
1/1/16 minutes, 25 seconds
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Residents of Cape Ray are hopeful they can turn the shipwreck on their shores into a tourist attraction

Residents of Cape Ray hope the mysterious appearance of a shipwreck on their shores will increase tourism for the community. But before that happens, they must get the wreck on dry land. Anne Osmond is the chair of the local service district in Cape Ray, and spoke with the CBC's Colleen Connors.
1/1/15 minutes, 57 seconds
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Feline like a change with your hairstyle? The Strand Salon in Gander loves fostering cats from the local SPCA

When you go to a hair salon, you're usually looking for a great haircut or maybe a new colour. You're probably not thinking of adopting a cat, but the owners of the Strand Salon in Gander are. Co-owners Amber Hanlon and Amy Cheeks run the successful salon, which has now fostered 16 cats. Hanlon and Cheeks spoke with the CBC's Martin Jones.
1/1/18 minutes, 36 seconds
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The provincial health authority explains why it's taken nearly a year to reopen the OBS unit in Gander, and a advocate for maternity services reacts

The obstetrics unit at James Paton Memorial Hospital in Gander has still not reopened for deliveries. The provincial health minister announced last February that the unit will reopen, but locals want to know what's taking so long. Hear from N.L. Health Services CEO David Diamond, and maternity services advocate Samantha Abbott.
1/1/112 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Town of Grand Falls-Windsor wants to hear from you about cell service in the community

A town councillor in Grand Falls-Windsor wants to hear from you. But don't call his cell depending on where he is, because he might not get your call thanks to the town's spotty service. Dave Noel is a town councillor in Grand Falls-Windsor.
1/1/16 minutes, 5 seconds
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The ultimate revenge while supporting a great cause. That's the plan behind a fundraiser by the Exploits Valley SPCA

The Exploits Valley SPCA wants to help you combine the joy of helping a deserving cat with cold, hard revenge! Ok, there's nothing too sinister here - just a bit of fun - but it IS the idea behind the shelters latest fundraiser. It's called Neuter Your Ex for Valentine's Day. Sarah McLeod is the social media liaison with the Exploits Valley SPCA in Grand Falls-Windsor.
1/1/17 minutes, 47 seconds
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Wanda Clarke is sharing photos and videos of N.L. from quite the view - the pilot seat of an airplane

A pilot with Provincial Airlines has been getting lots of views on social media, of HER view from above. Wanda Clarke has been flying for more than a decade, with her trusty camera in tow. She takes photos and videos of cities and towns, and all sorts of natural wonders. She posts them online for everyone to enjoy, and spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 43 seconds
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Is a new VRBO commercial offensive to Newfoundlanders, or no big deal? We'll hear both sides

A commercial for the vacation rental site VRBO might have caught your eye (or ear) over the past week or so. Some people from this province are calling it out as offensive while airing at the Grammys and the Super Bowl. Now, the province's tourism industry association says it wants the commercial changed. Host Bernice Hillier has been looking into it.
1/1/18 minutes, 23 seconds
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A house fire in Conche on Saturday has left the owners without a home or possessions

It was a homeowner's worst fear realized on Saturday in Conche when a woman ran out to do an errand and returned to her home, and her possessions burned to the ground. Glenn Symmonds is the Chief of the Conche Volunteer Fire Department. He spoke to Morning Show producer David Newell.
1/1/14 minutes, 6 seconds
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Corner Brook seniors share their tips to making love last

Some relationships don’t last very long, while other can last for decades. Either way things aren’t always easy, but how do you keep a love that lasts? CBC’s Amy Feehan got to visit Mountain View Retirement Home in Corner Brook and chatted with some residents about the key to having a long lasting relationship.
1/1/16 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Town of Pasadena could be expanding its boundaries

Two communities in the Humber Valley are exploring the idea of a new, long-term relationship. The Town of Pasadena is looking at extending its boundaries to take in the nearby local service district of Little Rapids, about eight kilometres down the highway. Darren Gardner is Pasadena's mayor.
1/1/14 minutes, 3 seconds
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Turns out different flowers send different messages! We'll hear from an author who breaks it down

Back in 1794, Scots poet Robert Burns wrote, "My love is like a red, red rose." Ever since, red roses have represented passion and romance. But roses aren't the only flowers you can use to send a loving message...or a not so loving one. Jessica Roux is the author of "Floriography: An Illustrated Guide to the Victorian Language of Flowers. She speaks with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 28 seconds
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Love stories and love songs: How two musicians found love and their band

Spencer Fitzgerald and Sarah Newell were both music students, but they didn't really talk. That is until Sarah's friend took her to a show where Spencer's band was playing. They talked that night, he asked for her number... And now, six years later, they're engaged AND they have a band of their own -- With Violet. They spoke with the CBC's Sarah Antle.
1/1/16 minutes, 41 seconds
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Part 2 of our series marking Psychology Month, exploring Dialectical Behavioural Therapy

February is Psychology Month in Canada, highlighting the contributions of Canadian psychologists and the crucial work they do. Every Thursday throughout the month, we'll be focusing on psychology in this province. This morning we'll look at Dialectical Behavioural Therapy, or DBT. It's a model of therapy that helps people learn and use new skills and strategies so that they build lives they feel are worth living. Dr. Jodi Spiegel is a registered psychologist in this province and offers DBT.
1/1/19 minutes, 26 seconds
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Volunteers on the Isle of Man are babysitting seals to help them prepare for adulthood

Seal harvesters in this province are getting ready to head out to the ice next month. In the United Kingdom, seals are drawing interest as well...but not for their meat or skins. The Manx Wildlife Trust on the Isle of Man is looking for volunteers to babysit seal pups. Lara Howe is a marine wildlife officer there, and she speaks with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.
1/1/16 minutes, 37 seconds
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Snowmobiler warming shelters in Newfoundland have been experiencing incidents of vandalism

Warming shelters like the Shiver Shack in Corner Brook are essential for any snowmobile rider during a long day of travel or to use in emergencies. Unfortunately, some locations in Western and Central Newfoundland have been subjected to vandalism. Glenn Green is president of Western Sno-riders, and spoke with host Martin Jones.
1/1/18 minutes, 15 seconds
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A non-profit enterprise in St. Anthony wants to harness the wind to make affordable power and cut greenhouse gas emissions

A non-profit enterprise on the Northern Peninsula wants to get in on wind power. But if you're imagining hundreds of turbines dotting the landscape, that is NOT what this is about. St. Anthony Basin Resources Incorporated, or SABRI, is interested in a small-scale wind development - and it's already started the legwork. Christopher Mitchelmore is executive director of SABRI.
1/1/15 minutes, 27 seconds
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A Grand Falls-Windsor addictions support group says the province is dragging its heels in approving funding for them

Shift Recovery is a group based in Grand Falls-Windsor that offers peer-support for those dealing with addiction. They say concerns of overdose and addiction are serious in Central Newfoundland, and the need for programming like the ones they offer is essential right now. Despite this, the group says its facing major red tape in getting funding from the provincial department of health. Without that money, they say they face the possibility of reducing or eliminating their services. Fred Habib is the chairman of that group and Mark Gray is a facilitator.
1/1/110 minutes, 54 seconds
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This crab fisherman fears this season could be much the same as last without a proper price-setting formula in place

Last spring's crab fishery started six weeks late after a price dispute, and ended with low pay and little satisfaction for harvesters. The best way to determine the value of a pound of crab has been an issue for years, and after last season, the province set up a price-setting review panel to fix the problem. The government wanted to see a new pricing formula in place by the end of January. But that hasn't happened, and fishermen like Bay Bulls' Jason Sullivan are getting worried.
1/1/18 minutes, 20 seconds
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Leif The Lucky highlights some events happening at the Corner Brook Winter Carnival

Corner Brook Winter Carnival starts today, the fifty-first winter carnival in the city. Over the next ten days, people will take part in fun activities, and there will be no end to the the breakfast, lunch and supper meals you can eat. This Sunday, the Leifling gala will be taking place. Leif the Lucky himself, David Elms, joined us this morning.
1/1/16 minutes, 59 seconds
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More than 500 photos over 20 years: Meet the man showing Elliston to the world

It's one thing to take pictures of practically anything when you're out and about, but it's another when you do that week after week for 23 years simply because you want to put your community and its story on the map for all to see, enjoy, and hopefully visit. Folk artist Neal Tucker manages the Town of Elliston and Root Cellars website. The CBC's Nabila Qureshi called him up in Elliston to learn more about building community through photography.
1/1/18 minutes, 10 seconds
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Hear from Ryan Cleary on his latest attempt to organize inshore fish harvesters into a co-operative

Former politician Ryan Cleary has been trying to improve the fishery for years now. First, it was FISH-NL, which attempted to replace the Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union. After that, Cleary launched SEA-NL, which united individual harvesters in a single voice. He left that group in January, and now he's launching FPC - the Fisheries Protective Co-operative.
1/1/18 minutes, 43 seconds
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The first person ever born in Gander has died. Rob Blackie shares memories of his dad, Dr. Peter Blackie.

Gander lost a very special resident last week. Dr. Peter Blackie was the first baby born in Gander when it was a brand new town in 1940. He grew up to be the first Gander native to graduate from medical school and contributed greatly to preserving the town's history. His son, Rob Blackie, shared memories of his dad with Host Martin Jones.
1/1/111 minutes, 10 seconds
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A plan to restrict access to gender-affirming care in Alberta is upsetting to trans people everywhere

The topic of medical care for trans people has been in the news lately. That is, of course, because of a recent announcement from the provincial government in Alberta. The Alberta government plans to restrict access to gender-affirming care for young people in particular. If you don't know much about gender-affirming care, it may be hard to understand Alberta's policy direction and why some are critical of it. Dr. Mari Lynne Sinnott is a family physician in St. John's who has hundreds of gender-diverse patients, including some in Central Newfoundland.
1/1/18 minutes, 6 seconds
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A family doctor in this province says her patients who are trans youth are worried about Alberta's plan to restrict gender-affirming care. We continued a conversation we began on Monday's show

A plan to restrict medical care for trans youth is unfolding in Alberta, but that policy direction is having an impact on people in this province. The Alberta government has said it will restrict access to gender-affirming care, for young people in particular. On Monday, we started a conversation with a medical doctor in THIS province who has hundreds of gender diverse patients. Dr. Mari Lynne Sinnott is a family physician who told us about the evidence to support gender-affirming care for trans youth. Here's part two of Bernice Hillier's interview with Dr. Sinnott.
1/1/15 minutes, 38 seconds
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The provincial winter games kick off in Gander this weekend, and there are still lots of ways you can help out - whether you live there or not. We talked about volunteering

Things are getting pretty exciting around Gander this week. In just a few days, 1,800 athletes and coaches will descend on the town for the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games. Of course, with an event this size, it takes many hands to lighten the work load. Bettina Ford is the director of volunteers for the games.
1/1/19 minutes, 20 seconds
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Cleaning up Fiona's mess - The MP for Long Range Mountains. Gudie Hutchings told us about plans to rebuild 90 houses in Port aux Basques

People in Port aux Basques continue to rebuild their community, almost 17 months after post-tropical storm Fiona smashed into the town. On September 24th, 2022, it killed a woman and destroyed more than a hundred houses. Dozens of other homes were seriously damaged. Now, the Goverment of Canada's Housing Accelerator Fund will help speed up the rebuild. Gudie Hutchings is the MP for Long Range Mountains, and the federal minister of rural economic development.
1/1/17 minutes, 49 seconds
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Developing a closer relationship with the business community on Fogo Island - We heard about the newly-formed Fogo Island Chapter of the Gander and Area Chamber of Commerce

Starting today, Fogo Island will have its own Chamber of Commerce presence. There will be a chapter of the Gander and Area Chamber of Commerce, and it will work to build closer relationships with businesses in the area. Jonathan Dalton will be the chair of the Fogo Island Chapter.
1/1/16 minutes, 4 seconds
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A winter activity to make your heart "smelt" ....our outdoor columnist Charlie White talks ice fishing

If you love to fish, you don't have to hang up your hook and rod for winter. February is the start of the ice fishing season in Newfoundland and Labrador, and for our outdoor columnist, Charlie White, that means smelt fishing!He has all the tips for us in the latest Chase the Seasons With Charlie feature.
1/1/17 minutes, 14 seconds
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How can young people ever withstand the endless barrage of unrealistic body images that social media throws at them? The CBC's Hillary Johnson examines what's at stake in her three-part series, "Skin Deep"

The old saying, "Beauty is only skin-deep" means a person's intellectual, emotional, and spiritual qualities are more important than how they look. But the message probably doesn't get through to many young people because social media floods them with body images they can never live up to. Hillary Johnson's new, three-part series, "Skin Deep, " tells how the toxic influences of diet culture, body trends and more cause teens to struggle for impossible standards, In Part One, Hillary speaks with Chelsea Hudson, a registered psychologist in NL.
1/1/18 minutes, 59 seconds
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First, give people a place to live, and THEN deal with the rest. That's the thinking behind a project in Finland that aims to end homelessness by 2027

If people in this province want to put an end to homelessness, they might want to look to Finland. A not-for-profit group in that country is -- with government support -- reducing homelessness by giving people a place to live. But the Y-Foundation ALSO gives people support to become more self-sufficient. Juha Kahila, head of international affairs, spoke with the CBC's Bernice Hillier.
1/1/15 minutes, 53 seconds
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NL taxpayers are paying millions and millions for travel nurses in this province, for everything from salaries, to taxis, to cable bills. We spoke with president of NAPE

The province is spending millions and millions of dollars on travel nurses. An investigative story by the Globe and Mail is outlining just how some of that money is being spent......and it has outraged the nurses union, the opposition and others. The Globe and Mail says the province spent 35 million dollars on nurses from private agencies between April and August of 2023, and the provincial government paid more than 300 dollars an hour for some travel nurses.. The province paid out millions in other expenses, too... from travel, to meal allowances, furniture, cab rides - even cable bills. The report also says the private nursing firm the province hired charged nearly DOUBLE the rate of similar agencies in Canada. Jerry Earle is president of NAPE - which represents almost ten-thousand workers in the health care system.
1/1/110 minutes, 36 seconds
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Canada's federal intelligence service warns everyone that this year could be dangerous for 2SLGBTQ+ people. Human rights activist Gemma Hickey told us what that means for their community

Last week, CSIS - Canada's national intelligence agency - issued a warning for people in the 2SLGBTQ+ community. The notice says extremists could "inspire and encourage" serious violence against the community, and will almost certainly continue to do that over the coming year. A CSIS spokesperson says "the ecosystem of violent rhetoric within the anti-gender movement, compounded with other extreme worldviews, can lead to serious violence." Gemma Hickey is a human rights and 2SLGBTQ+ advocate.
1/1/19 minutes
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We spoke with Tony Wakeham, the Leader of the Provincial Government's official opposition. about a Globe and Mail report that says millions are being spent on travel nurses in Newfoundland and Labrador.

We've been hearing a lot of fallout this week over a Globe and Mail report. It revealed that the provincial government spent more than 35 million dollars, from April to August last year, on travel nurses. Other expenses for those nurses - everything from cab rides to an air fryer - totaled millions more. Tony Wakeham is the member of the House of Assembly for Stephenville-Port au Port, and the Leader of the Official Opposition.
1/1/17 minutes, 6 seconds
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People in Point Leamington have questions - and the answers are blowing in the wind. We heard some of their concerns about a proposed wind energy project in their "backyard"

Residents of Point Leamington and the surrounding area met last night to talk about wind. Their area is slated for the construction of a large number of wind turbines and an ammonia plant. Wind energy is widely touted as a greener alternative to fossil fuels, but not everyone is buying that. Robert Loder and Leanna Paul organized Wednesday night's meeting.
1/1/19 minutes, 26 seconds
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We got the NDP's take on the millions that NL's government is paying to bring in travel nurses. We spoke with MHA Lela Evans

We've been hearing a lot this week about the high cost of bringing in travel nurses to work in this province. A recent Globe and Mail report revealed that the Newfoundland and Labrador government had spent more than thirty-five million dollars between April and August of 2023. Lela Evans is NDP Health Critic.
1/1/16 minutes, 48 seconds
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"You are never enough" - teenagers get that scary message from social media. A local teenager talked to us about body image, impossibly high standards and the pressure to conform, on our series, Skin Deep

The world is constantly changing, but it seems that one thing stays the same: It is not easy to be a teenager. We've all been there, but for today's younger generations, growing up with technology and having access to social media have led to a whole slew of other issues. 16-year-old Amy Dwyer describes being a teenager as complex,... with social media driving unrealistic expectations. In part two of our series, Skin Deep, the CBC's Hillary Johnson spoke with Amy about how the diet culture and body trends reflected in social media are affecting teens.
1/1/17 minutes, 19 seconds
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If the Province is offering incentives and searching the globe to fill nursing positions, then why are so few graduating nursing students being offered full-time permanent positions? We heard from two of those students who are asking that very question

The Provincial government is casting a wide net in search of nurses to work here in Newfoundland and Labrador. Efforts are underway o fill positions in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, St. Anthony and Gander, using trained nurses from India. There are also Come Home Incentives of up to 50-thousand dollars, being offered to nurses who have been living outside the province for six months. We' also heard this week about millions being paid to agencies providing travel nurses to this province. It's all an effort to fill about 700 vacant nursing positions. Chloe George and Hayley Cheeseman are fourth-year nursing students at the Centre for Nursing Studies in St. John's. They say they're confused with the effort and money spent on recruiting nurses -while the majority of their graduating class aren't even being offered full-time permanent positions.
1/1/111 minutes, 8 seconds
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February is Psychology Month. Part 3 of our series looks at specific therapies. Today, Dr, Sarah Pegrum talks about Acceptance and Commitment Therapy or ACT

February is Psychology Month in Canada, as people highlight the contributions of Canadian psychologists and the crucial work they do. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, or ACT is a type of therapy that helps people learn NOT to avoid negative emotions, but rather live a good life in the face of them. Dr. Sarah Pegrum is a registered psychologist in this province and offers ACT.
1/1/19 minutes, 19 seconds
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The deadline for the 2025 Union House Arts artist in residence program in Port Union is coming up. We spoke with their programming director

An Artist in Residence program in rural Newfoundland is once again offering up space to create. Union House Arts in Port Union has been a home to many artists over the years, and it's already looking for artists to visit in 2025. Bethany Mackenzie is programming director of Union House Arts.
1/1/19 minutes, 26 seconds
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If there are so many vacant nursing positions in NL, why are so few graduating nursing students being offered full-time, permanent jobs? We spoke with the VP of human resources at NL Health Services and opposition health critic Barry Petten

On Thursday, two fourth-year nursing students at the Centre for Nursing Studies - Chloe George and Hayley Cheeseman - said they were surprised and frustrated at receiving only temporary job offers, rather than permanent positions. It turns out that only 23 of their graduating class of 103 had landed permanent jobs in this province. Nurses are interviewed and they provide their top three preferences for job location and department.We spoke with Debbie Molloy, vice-president of human resources with NL Health Services (interview starts.at beginning of podcast), then with Barry Petten, the Progressive Conservative Shadow Minister of Health (interview starts at 7:57).
1/1/114 minutes, 28 seconds
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"Rise Again": A teenager from Pasadena is rising to the occasion. For his first solo show, musician Jay Adey-Rideout is doing a Stan Rogers tribute

A young musician from Pasadena is doing his first solo show this weekend. If you love folk music, and Stan Rogers in particular, you will want to be there.17-year-old Jay Adey-Rideout has been performing with his dad for many years, but his current obsession with the music of Stan Rogers led him to decide that his first solo show would be a Stan Rogers tribute. It's happening Saturday night at the Rotary Arts Centre in Corner Brook.
1/1/17 minutes, 20 seconds
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The curling rocks have aligned as this year's "Curling is Cool" day coincides with the Scotties Tournament of Hearts. The CBC's Amy Feehan hit the streets to ask "Is curling a cool sport?"

The sport of curling is in the spotlight right now as the Scotties Tournament of Hearts continues in Calgary. According to the internet, today also happens to be "Curling Is Cool Day." CBC’s Amy Feehan hit the streets of Corner Brook to ask people the burning question: Is curling really cool?
1/1/12 minutes, 20 seconds
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Gander will be the hub of sports and sportsmanship next week during the provincial winter games. We heard from two local sports ambassadors about what it all means to them

Hundreds of young athletes are making their way to Gander today for the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games. That brings back a lot of memories for Blair Sparkes. He's an ambassador for boys' basketball this Games, but back in 1982, he was competing in the Games himself. 16-year-old Grace Whalen is an ambassador for girls' hockey, in which she'll also compete with the host team.
1/1/18 minutes, 26 seconds
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An online group for people with body types that are often marginalized through social media is reclaiming the word "fat." Producer Hillary Johnson spoke with a co-creator of "Fat Babes of Newfoundland," on our new series, Skin Deep

The body-positive social movement is all about accepting people of all body types, no matter their size, shape, skin tone or gender. In 2023, the Facebook group "Fat Babes of Newfoundland" was created to provide a safe space for gender-diverse people with marginalized body types to share experiences and develop friendships. In part three of our series, Skin Deep, the CBC's Hillary Johnson spoke with Sarah Murphy, the co-facilitator and co-creator of "Fat Babes of Newfoundland."
1/1/18 minutes, 14 seconds
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When things went downhill on the weekend with the torrential rain, the crew at Marble Mountain rose to the challenge. We spoke with the manager of the ski hill and with Steady Brook Mayor Bill Dawson about tackling major flooding

The ski hill in Western Newfoundland was hit hard by flooding on the weekend. Heavy rain led to water pouring down over the hillside at Marble Mountain. Marble Mountain Richard Wells spoke this morning with Bernice Hillier (interview at start of podcast), and Steady Brook Mayor Bill Dawson spoke on Sunday with the CBC's William Ping (starts at 7:00 mark).
1/1/110 minutes, 5 seconds
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Not the night they hoped for: We heard from a parent at the NL Winter Games, who says accommodations in Gander were not what was promised. Then, we got a response from the Games' co-chairs

Sunday was the first day of competition for athletes competing in the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games in Gander. Unfortunately, some people say they had a rocky start because of issues with sleeping arrangements at the athletes' village. Arch Pardy is a parent from Happy Valley-Goose Bay, whose son plays with Team Indigenous (interview is at the start of the podcast). Tara Pollett and Geoff Goldsworthy are co-chairs of the Gander host committee for the Games (interview starts at 4:17).
1/1/111 minutes, 35 seconds
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Saturday marked two years since Russia launched its war on Ukraine. We spoke with retired General Rick Hillier for his thoughts on what needs to be done to end the death and destruction there

This past weekend marked two years since Russia launched a full-on invasion of Ukraine. Tens of thousands of Ukrainian civilians and soldiers have died or been wounded in the attacks. The bombs have turned towns and cities to rubble, and have led many people to flee the country. Canadian retired General Rick Hillier of Campbellton is doing what he can to help the Ukrainian military. The former Chief of Defense Staff is also urging Canadian governments to do more to help re-settle the flood of refugees who have come here. Hillier is chair of the Strategic Advisory Council that provides support and advice to the Ukrainian World Congress.
1/1/18 minutes, 30 seconds
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There was singing, dancing and celebrating sports in Gander on the weekend. We heard some of the excitement at the opening ceremonies of the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games

The Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games are in full swing in Gander this week, and hundreds of athletes from across the province are competing for a spot on the podium. But, during Saturday's opening ceremonies, it was all about celebrating together. The CBC's Cherie Wheeler was there for it.
1/1/15 minutes, 36 seconds
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When being yourself requires a transition. A young transgender man from Central Newfoundland talked about the joy he felt after starting to transition, and why restricting medical care for trans youth is so scary to him

A transgender man from Central Newfoundland is keeping a close eye on policy changes that affect trans people in parts of Canada. Alberta has announced plans to restrict medical care for trans youth in that province. The plan would limit access to puberty-blocking medications and gender-affirming surgery.20-year-old Elliott Blackmore grew up in Grand Falls-Windsor and now lives in St. John's. He says turning medical care for trans people into a political issue is wrong.
1/1/16 minutes, 54 seconds
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Frozen in time at the Games - we met two members of a team of photographers at the provincial winter games in Gander who are capturing the experiences of the athletes and sharing them on social media

All this week on Newfoundland Morning, we've been hearing from athletes, coaches and volunteers at the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games. Gander has been buzzing since Saturday, and people taking photos with cell phones are everywhere. But, now and then, you'll see someone wearing a bright green volunteer shirt. A team of photographers, using professional-grade cameras, are documenting the Games. Scott Cook and Sandra Mills are two of those photographers,
1/1/17 minutes, 13 seconds
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Sisters - and teammates! We met two table tennis players competing in the provincial Winter Games in Gander

Today is the last day of competition for half of the athletes at the provincial winter games in Gander this week. Tomorrow, they'll head back home and the next set of competitors will take their place. Win or lose, table tennis player Divine Aseo will be leaving with a smile. At 18 years old, this will be her last provincial games - but it was the first one for her sister, Courtney. The two members of team St. John's North spoke with CBC's Cherie Wheeler yesterday.
1/1/15 minutes, 26 seconds
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ICYMI: Marble Mountain recently named a ski slope in a person's memory for the first time. Andrew Jesso was an instructor there before he died in 2022 - and his mother told us what it meant to have a memorial ski at his favourite place

ICYMI: Marble Mountain now has a ski trail named in memory of a person - and It's the first time it's been done. "Drew's Drop" was named on February 18 to honour Andrew Jesso - a ski instructor, DJ, fitness coach, and member of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment. He was nearly 20 years old when he died in a car accident in 2022. A charity in his name - the Andrew Jesso Foundation - helps provide children with the chance to learn to ski and snowboard. Andrew's family and co-workers gathered at Marble Mountain on February 18 to honour him. CBC's Sarah Antle spoke with Andrew's mother, Laura Jesso.
1/1/18 minutes, 54 seconds
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The Newfoundland pine marten, long on the province's endangered species list, seems to be making a comeback. We spoke with one of the scientists who monitors their population

An animal most of us have never seen is making a comeback. The Newfoundland pine marten is one of only 14 mammals native to the island. It's been on the province's endangered species list since the list was created in 2002. Now, more than two decades later, the risk to the pine marten's population has been downgraded to "vulnerable." Brian Hearn is chair of the Newfoundland Marten Recovery Team.
1/1/19 minutes, 12 seconds
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Residents of Change Islands are baffled by changes to their ferry schedule that will mean fewer crossings to their community. We spoke with 'the chair of the Change Islands transportation committee

Some residents of Change Islands were left feeling confused at a recent change to their ferry schedule.The Kamutik W is in service among Change Islands, Fogo and Farewell, while their usual vessel - the Veteran - is having a refit. The recently updated schedule sees a reduction in the number of crossings to Change Islands.The fewer trips are only believed to be a temporary measure, but the residents say it's much more than a simple inconvenience. Dennis Flood is a councillor for the community of Change Islands and the chair for their transportation committee.
1/1/19 minutes, 40 seconds
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The provincial Winter Games continued in Gander today. Martin Jones chatted with a coach and members of the St. John's North boys' hockey team as they went for gold

The Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games continue to entertain sports fans in Gander and area today, and the St. John's North Boys' hockey team went for gold at the Steele Community Centre. Connor Donaghey is one of their coaches. Ben Yabsley and Ben Veitch are players.
1/1/16 minutes, 51 seconds
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They came to race, but they all wanted to win. We heard about the incredible show of sportsmanship in cross-country skiing, at the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games in Gander

It was quite a moment on Tuesday at the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games in Gander. As the first racers crossed the finish line in the Girls' 5K Cross Country Skiing race, three competitors from different teams decided to cross the line together - in fact, they came in arm in arm. Juliette Colbourne and Georgia Wiseman are from Team Western, and Jocelyn Coates was racing for Team Eastern. They spoke with CBC's Cherie Wheeler.
1/1/14 minutes, 50 seconds
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All in the family. We spoke with a Gander family and their Turkish exchange student. They're all volunteering together at the winter games

if you attended a badminton match at the provincial winter games in Gander this week, you probably saw at least one member of the King family keeping score. Or, if you picked up a snack at the athlete's village, it might have been the King family feeding you. The family love to volunteer, and they love to do it together. Tara King and her daughter Sara were in our studio. Engin Diraman, the family's Turkish exchange student, was there, too. He takes part in the volunteer effort, as well.
1/1/18 minutes, 40 seconds
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Keeping everyone informed on the action at the NL Winter Games is no easy feat! We met one volunteer who is up for the task

It's Day Five of the Newfoundland Winter Games, and there is a pause in the action as athletes head out and move into the athlete's village. There are still a lot of events to look forward to, but if you missed any of the action, you can always get caught up on social media. Content Creator Abby Moss has diligently posted on the NL Games Facebook page. She joined us in the studio to tell us more about her role and the work of the communications committee.
1/1/18 minutes, 1 second
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All aboard! St. Anthony is getting a new public transit system to connect communities in the area

St. Anthony and surrounding areas are about to get a new public transit system. The Northpine Foundation and St. Anthony Basin Resources Inc. announced the investment on Wednesday. SABRI Transit Solutions will receive $250,000 over the next two years for the project. The system will connect about 600 residents living and working in St. Anthony and the surrounding region, Chris Mitchelmore is the Executive Director of St. Anthony Basin Resources Inc.
1/1/17 minutes, 28 seconds
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The first out of the gate gets a multi-million dollar loan from the federal government. Ottawa has agreed to give a 128-million dollar loan to World Energy GH2 for its proposed wind-to-hydrogen facilities. We heard from Envirowatvch NL

The federal government is giving a 128-million-dollar loan to a company that wants to generate wind power in Western Newfoundland. World Energy GH2 has an agreement with Export Development Canada for a loan of up to 128-million dollars. The announcement was made yesterday. The loan is meant to support the development of one of Canada's first commercial scale wind-to-hydrogen facilities, proposed for Stephenville. It will be powered by wind turbines on the Port au Port Peninsula and the Codroy Valley. Federal minister and Newfoundland and Labrador MP Seamus O'Regan made the loan announcement yesterday. Nick Mercer is an expert on renewable energy and is on the executive of Enviro Watch NL. The group that has been urging caution throughout the approval process for wind energy in this province.
1/1/111 minutes, 27 seconds
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He's the proud mayor of the host town, but he's also a former NL Winter games athlete himself. We spoke with Gander's Percy Farwell

We're now into the second half of the provincial Winter Games, and over the next couple of days girls hockey, wrestling, figure skating and basketball will be in full swing. That brings a lot of excitement to the town of Gander and especially Percy Farwell, the mayor. He's a former Winter Games athlete himself.
1/1/18 minutes, 49 seconds
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Measles cases are popping up, and you might not be as safe as you think. We asked the province's chief medical officer of health about who might need another measles vaccine

A disease most of us haven't thought about in years is back in the news. Measles cases have been popping up across North America and Europe. There's a vaccine against it, so most people have been immunized. But for some of us, it's been many decades since our last shot. So how might a measles outbreak affect us? Dr. Janice Fitzgerald is Newfoundland and Labrador's chief medical officer of health.
1/1/16 minutes, 31 seconds
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This morning on our Psychology Month series, we heard the fourth and final instalment. We heard about Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing or EMDR

February is Psychology Month in Canada, which highlights the contributions of Canadian psychologists and the crucial work they do. Every Thursday this month, we've been focusing on psychology in THIS province, discussing a specific form of therapy and meeting a psychologist who provides it. Today in the final part of our series, we looked at Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, or EMDR. This therapy helps people ease the distressing symptoms associated with trauma. Laura Casey Foss is a registered psychologist who is trained in EMDR.
1/1/18 minutes, 1 second
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An abrupt -- but anticipated -- halt to a contract with a private company meant extra-long shifts for some nurses in Corner Brook this week. We heard from the nurses union

Some nurses in Corner Brook had to work extra-long shifts this week, after a contract with a private company came to an end. The contract with Canadian Health Labs was to supply travel nurses to work in the Western region. The arrangement was for a one-year term, starting on February 27 of 2023. But, instead of there being a plan to ensure nursing shifts would be covered when the contract ended, this week, some local nurses were mandated to work 21 out of 24 hours. Yvette Coffey is president of the Registered Nurses Union of Newfoundland and Labrador.
1/1/16 minutes, 44 seconds
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Who's nine feet tall and the hottest person at the NL winter games in Gander? It's Blaze the Torch. We catch up with the provincial games mascot and his best bud, Commander Gander

Athletes are into the final push of the provincial winter games, and no matter where you go in Gander, there's so much support for those young competitors. But two characters keep stealing the show. Commander Gander and Blaze the Torch are mascots for the Town of Gander and the provincial games. CBC's Cherie Wheeler caught up with the two 11th graders under the costume.
1/1/15 minutes, 4 seconds
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Ottawa is lending a wind energy developer in this province 128 million dollars. Why should taxpayers help out World Energy GH2? We put that question to the company's CEO

The company that wants to develop wind energy in Western Newfoundland received a big boost this week. World Energy GH2 is getting a loan of 128 million dollars from the federal government. The company is proposing to build a wind-to-hydrogen plant in Stephenville, powered by wind turbines on the Port au Port Peninsula and the Codroy Valley. The company had said in the past that it wouldn't require government money for the five BILLION dollar project. Sean Leet is CEO of World Energy GH2.
1/1/17 minutes, 27 seconds
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For some students, free tuition sounds like a dream come true. But what if it was a reality? We heard from Memorial University students

Medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City got some fantastic news this week: Their tuition will be free later this year. The announcement came from former professor Ruth Gottesman, who donated one billion dollars. While free tuition doesn't go into full effect until later this year, all fourth-year students will be reimbursed for their current semester. That made the CBC's Amy Feehan wonder: What if something like this happened here? She headed up to Grenfell Campus, Memorial University in Corner Brook, to see what students had to say.
1/1/12 minutes, 53 seconds
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We went to Lewisporte to get the "inside edge" on what it takes to compete in figure skating at this year's provincial Winter Games

Lewisporte was one of the two alternative sites for competition in the provincial Winter Games, along with Glovertown. The Mike Austin Arena is where many of the figure skaters showed their hours of practice. Leila and Payton Mercer from Team Labrador and coach Alice Peddle spoke with the CBC's Martin Jones.
1/1/17 minutes, 36 seconds
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Gander wasn't the only place you'd find athletes from across the province this week. We spoke with the person responsible for keeping the figure skating competition in Lewisporte running smoothly for the NL Winter Games

All this week, we brought you stories from the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games in Gander. But Lewisporte was part of all the excitement, too. That's where the figure skating competitions took place. Susan Dean was the convener of the events there, and she spoke with Martin Jones now, at the Mike Austin Arena in Lewisporte.
1/1/16 minutes, 30 seconds
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The Town of Trout River wants its residents to be aware of a danger lurking under the snow. It issued a warning last week about people finding used needles around

It's a tidy little town with the most amazing views, but Trout River is also dealing with an unexpected hazard.The Town issued a warning last week about used needles being discovered as snow began to melt. Natalia Crocker is mayor of Trout River.
1/1/15 minutes, 12 seconds
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The good old hockey game is new to a lot of women in Lewisporte, but dozens of them have come out to play in a senior female league

When the Professional Women's Hockey League launched in January, the whole country...including women who never played the game...took notice. In Lewisporte, they were inspired. Two local female players decided to put out a call for women to come out and play recreationally. They had no idea what would happen.The CBC's Leigh Anne Power visited the Mike Austin Arena to find out.
1/1/15 minutes, 35 seconds
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The NL Winter Games wrapped up in Gander on the weekend, and Team Indigenous might have been the proudest group there! We met some members of the squad

Last week was an exciting one for young athletes across the province, as Gander hosted the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games. Not only was it the first Winter Games since the pandemic, it was only the second one ever for Team Indigenous. Port au Port's Candice Simon was the manager with the Team Indigenous female hockey team. Keira Evans-Rice of Makkovik and Lacie Bennett of St. George's played on the team. The CBC's David Newell spoke with them before they hit the ice Friday afternoon.
1/1/16 minutes, 25 seconds
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A week of competition, sportsmanship and a whole lot of fun came to an end Saturday in Gander. We took in some of the music and voices of the Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games' closing ceremonies

There were a lot of smiling faces and some sad goodbyes in Gander on Saturday, as the 2024 Newfoundland and Labrador Winter Games came to a close. About 12-hundred athletes, coaches and officials took part in the week-long event. CBC's David Newell brought us some of the voices and sounds from the show.
1/1/15 minutes, 12 seconds
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Hockey NL says it will induct eight people into the Newfoundland and Labrador Hockey Hall of Fame in June. We spoke with two of them

It's a great honour to be inducted into the Newfoundland and Labrador Hockey Hall of Fame, but if you ask Andy Brake and Ivan Hapgood, it was never their goal. The two men are being recognized for their dedication to hockey and their communities. Hockey NL will induct them into the Hall in June, at a ceremony in Gander. Brake has been the backbone of Deer Lake Red Wings hockey for more than three decades, Hapgood, who's originally from Arnold's Cove - has devoted more than fifty years to hockey in Clarenville. The two joined us by phone this morning.
1/1/111 minutes, 48 seconds
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Lewisporte is a bustling little town, and it'll soon have a new plan to bring in the tourists. We heard from a business owner who's connecting not only the town, but neighbouring communities

Lewisporte is about to have a new tourism strategy....one that organizers think will make the town a hub for visitors to the area and connect all of the surrounding communities. Lewisporte is growing, with bakeries, cafes, shops, restaurants, and Airbnbs. Haley Kinden is one of the people spearheading the Tourism Association. She owns Kinden&#