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Blueprint For Living - Full program Cover
Blueprint For Living - Full program Profile

Blueprint For Living - Full program

English, Design, 1 season, 528 episodes, 2 days, 9 hours, 57 minutes
About
Blueprint is a weekly rummage through the essential cultural ingredients—design, architecture, food, travel, fashion—for a good life.
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Re-designing the nature strip and re-inventing the suburban backyard

Re-inventing the suburban backyard with regeneration and community in mind; re-designing the nature strip; Elizabeth David's Gratin Dauphinois and Besha Rodell's love of vintage glassware.
4/5/202453 minutes, 56 seconds
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The lost art of dress and a tour of the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show

If you are dressed head to toe in black, polyester, nylon or some combination thereof, you may need a dress doctor. Linda Przybyszewski - Dress maker, historian and author of The Lost Art of Dress: The Women Who Once Made America Stylish - discusses the history of the dress doctors who helped women design, make and choose clothing for the workplace and home. She explains the design principles that guided the Dress doctors and their legacy in contemporary fashion and design.
3/29/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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The alt right diet, meat and masculinity and chef Jo Barrett's last supper

Raw meat, egg slonking, seed oil panic and the war on “soy globalism” -  welcome to the obscurantist dietary fixations of the alt right. Jan Dutkiewicz, Assistant Professor of Political Science in the Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies at the Pratt Institute, explains how diet became a central issue in the culture war; And by way of counterpoint, chef of the year, Jo Barrett takes us to her Lorne restaurant where she cooks the dish she would make if it were her last meal on earth.
3/22/202453 minutes, 57 seconds
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Paris' radical climate plan and a design history of the bicycle

The city of Paris is about to enact an ambitious new climate Plan and we discuss the commitment to building a cyclist friendly urban centre; We also delve into the design history of the bicycle; and visit a man who makes penny farthings.
3/15/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Nam Le on Iowa City, Provincetown and becoming a writer and hors d'oeuvres with Elizabeth David

Internationally renowned designer Bethan Laura Wood is building a library like no other; she gives us a tour of Kaleidoscope-o-rama; Nam Le, award winning author of The Boat, takes us to the two places that shaped him as a writer; and Annie Smithers cooks Elizabeth David's courgettes à la grecque.
3/8/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Solarpunk: a vision of a brighter future, the churn in aesthetics and a museum of disgusting foods

Solarpunk's vision for a brighter future, the churn in aesthetics and why do we find some foods disgusting?
3/1/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Besha Rodell predicts 2024 food trends, Nathan Thrall on Jerusalem and Guy Grossi's last supper

Besha Rodell casts her gaze back on the food scene that was 2023 and makes her predictions for 2024; Journalist and author Nathan Thrall takes us to the city he calls the most divided in the world – his home city of Jerusalem.
2/23/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Aesthetic uniformity, hipster cafes and Neutraface, the ubiquitous signifier of gentrification

Exposed brick, smashed avocado, hanging Edison bulbs, the patina of industry and reclaimed wood furniture – this is the algorithmic aesthetic writer and critic, Kyle Chayka investigates in his new book, Filterworld: How Algorithms Flattened Culture. Also, the history of Neturaface, dubbed the gentrification font; and a conversation with Grand Designs Transformations host, Anthony Burke about the relationship between architecture, economic insecurity and home renovation.
2/16/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Kevin McCloud on good design, Yanis Varoufakis' sense of place and Annie Smithers' homage to Elizabeth David

Kevin McCloud on the definition of good design, why Grand Designs is such a compelling proposition; Yanis Varoufakis reflects on growing up in the shadow of the Parthenon, on his idyllic childhood and its contrast to the brutal political reality against which it was set; and a new series in which Annie Smithers cooks her way through Elizabeth David's French Provincial Cooking. 
2/9/202454 minutes, 7 seconds
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A psychoanalytic account of comfort eating, the fate of COVID-core comfort wear and the design history of the comfy chair

Psychoanalyst Josh Cohen reflects on the contradictions, conflicts and the disordered and divided appetites of the modern individual and Colin Bisset gives a design history of the comfortable chair. 
2/2/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Blueprint For Living: Bee Wilson on loss and cooking, Dan Hunter's last supper and Lucy Treloar on a ghost town in South Australia

This week, a haunted edition of Blueprint: a meditation, through food, cooking and place, on loss and the insistence of the past.
1/26/202454 minutes
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The architectural and environmental legacies of colonisation

The settler-colonial project involved the imposition of European conceptions of natural landscape on the one hand, and the built world on the other. Jack Pascoe, Owen Hatherley and Michael-Shawn Fletcher consider the legacy of colonialism - its persistent myths and enduring imprint on the Australian landscape.
1/19/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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The greigification of interiors and the netural-colours of stealth wealth

From the landlord special - beige-grey laminate, vast empty spaces, and colourless walls - to the neutral-coloured knitwear favoured by todays wealthy elite, we discuss aesthetic conformity and homogeneity in the worlds of fashion, architecture and design.
1/12/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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Cruise ships, cargo ships and capital

Professor Laleh Khalili discusses the movement of cargo, capital and cruiseliners across the globe and the human economy and exploitative labour practices upon which it relies.
1/5/202454 minutes, 7 seconds
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'We're afraid of walkable distances now?' — conspiracies and the '15-minute city'

The polite world of urban planning has become the latest target of conspiracy theorists. In recent weeks, the 15-minute city concept — where neighbourhoods provide life's essentials in 15 minutes by foot or bike — has become a harbinger of big brother in conspiracy-land.
12/29/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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A scholarly paean to leftovers and the festishisation of decay

Tamar Adler explains how to use the Marcella Hazan tomato sauce onion and how to talk about no-waste cooking without moralism; Tom Wilkinson discusses the ideological and political context of the contemporary architectural fetish for decay.
12/22/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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Blueprint x Christmas: a very seasonal romp through food, gardens and design

Rummage through the essential cultural ingredients - design, architecture, food, travel and fashion.
12/15/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Pasta and food writing with Rachel Roddy and the challenges of urban planning in Reykjavik

Iconic food writer, Rachel Roddy, talks pasta, literary influence, Roman food culture, and writing about Italian food as an outsider; and Brent Toderian discusses Reykjavik’s urban development plan competition, the problem of car dependency and the populist backlash to the 15 minute city. 
12/8/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Building modern Australian universities, fashion in the age of AIDS and Tokyo's Yoyogi gymnasium

A survey of the history and legacy of Australian built university campuses; fashion in the age of AIDS; Chef Annie Smithers on what to do with your broad bean leaves and design writer, Colin Bisset on Tokyo's Yoyogi gymnasium
12/1/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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A design history of the sneaker and the legacy of iconic designer Garry Emery

A tour of an iconic designer's city with Garry Emery, a design history of the sneaker and Paul Bangay on his life in gardens.
11/24/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Re-designing the planet with Liam Young, ecological protection and the design history of the mason jar

Filmmaker and architect, Liam Young gives us a tour of his radically re-imagined city of the future; Jack Pascoe explains why recognition of cultural significance is required for ecological protection and Colin Bisset on the design history of the mason jar.
11/17/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Plant detectives and redefining Australian food

Its arguably one of the most universally reviled features of the plant world but pollen has proven invaluable to detectives in solving crimes, from revelations of war crimes to the identification of murderers.
11/10/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Menu uniformity and the scourge of kingfish crudo and a conversation with Carlos Moreno, inventor of the 15 minute city

Critic Jill Dupleix on the ubiquity of kingfish crudo and burrata and Carlos Moreno, inventor of the 15 minute city and target of conspiracy theorists on why proximity should be at the heart of urban planning.
11/3/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Conservation or intervention? How to manage Australia's native forests; and a conversation with Stephanie Alexander

The question of what should follow in the wake of the decision t. o end native forest logging in Victoria has exposed deep divisions over how best to manage Australian forests. Professor Michael-Shawn Fletcher discusses. 
10/27/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Reinier de Graaf on the new language of building and the legacy of Clarence Chai

Sustainability, wellbeing, placemaking, innovation, liveability: welcome to the hollowed-out language of architecture in the 21st century.
10/20/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Kate Reid's journey from Formula 1 to the boulangerie

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, an audience with a croissant engineer, a Turner Prize winner, and the car grille. Stay for the buxus party. 
10/13/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Siegfried Kracauer's analysis of class and urban spaces and garden designer Peter Donegan's favourite tree

Why do todays domestic interiors mimic 4 star hotels and what might Siegfried Kracauer have said about it? Renown garden designer Peter Donegan on why the hawthorn is his favourite tree; and Annie Smithers with a way to prepare asparagus that is sublime in its simplicity.
10/6/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Meat, masculinity and the culture war and a post-war solution to the housing crisis

Raw meat, egg slonking, seed oil panic and the war on “soy globalism” -  welcome to the dizzying dietary fixations of the alt right.
9/29/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Childless cities and the architecture of therapy

Alexandra Lange - award winning design critic, writer, author of The Design of Childhood: How the Material World Shapes Independent Kids - reflects on why our cities seem so antagonistic to children and what a city designed for children might look like.
9/22/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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The ideology of meat consumption and the history of the men's suit in the formation of modern Jewish identity

From 'return to the land' rhetoric of celebrity chefs-turned-farmers to the idyllic pastoral scenes depicted on the packaging of supermarket pork chops, 'meat love' - according to cultural critic and writer, Amber Husain - continues to obscure the violence entailed in and political implications of meat consumption. 
9/15/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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An urban tree recovery initiative and demystifying the meaning of 'plant based'

A visit to Revival Projects where Director, Robbie Neville, has established Melbourne's first inner-city timber mill and kiln.
9/8/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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The effects of franchise-chain capitalism and the history of the Norwegian sweater

The arrival of Wendy's in Australia, a tour of a late winter garden, the implications of our food choices and the history of the Marius sweater
9/1/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Food, national identity and the myth of authenticity and a tour of the National Herbarium

Rummage through the essential cultural ingredients - design, architecture, food, travel and fashion.
8/25/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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George Monbiot's culinary regenesis, and a utopian architect

George Monbiot wants to turn the global food industry on its head – from radical changes in farming practices to 3D-printed steaks. The prolific writer, environmental activist, and rewilder, explores this and more in his latest book, Regenesis. Then it's time to meet an eccentric, little-known modernist architect who fought conventions and eschewed publicity: Bill Lucas. His friends and colleagues Peter Longeran and Julie Cracknell join Blueprint to find his traces in Australian architectural history.  Afterward, resident chef Annie Smithers joins us for another edition of Kitchen Rudimental. This time, she schools us in the five 'mother sauces': béchamel, velouté, espagnole, hollandaise, and tomato. And then it's time for a little bit of magic. Colin Bisset gives us the design history of the magician's wand.
8/18/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Decline of the Australian fashion industry, architecture and acoustics and rewilding Great Dixter

Lucianne Tonti on the decline of a once thriving local industry and the complex set of forces that have produced aesthetic uniformity in the world of fashion. And Tim Entwisle talks to Fergus Garrett, world renown garden designer, about the rewilding of Great Dixter.
8/11/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Decline of the Australian fashion industry, architecture and acoustics and rewilding Great Dixter

Lucianne Tonti on the decline of a once thriving local industry and the complex set of forces that have produced aesthetic uniformity in the world of fashion. And Tim Entwisle talks to Fergus Garrett, world renown garden designer, about the rewilding of Great Dixter.
8/11/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Food culture in Sydney and Melbourne and dam removal across Europe

The ever-changing food landscapes and never-ending rivalry of Sydney and Melbourne and the growing movement for dam removal and river restoration across Europe.
8/4/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Food culture in Sydney and Melbourne and dam removal across Europe

The ever-changing food landscapes and never-ending rivalry of Sydney and Melbourne and the growing movement for dam removal and river restoration across Europe.
8/4/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Cruise ships, cargo ships and capital

Professor Laleh Khalili discusses the movement of cargo, capital and cruiseliners across the globe and the human economy and exploitative labour practices upon which it relies.
7/28/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
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Cruise ships, cargo ships and capital

Professor Laleh Khalili discusses the movement of cargo, capital and cruiseliners across the globe and the human economy and exploitative labour practices upon which it relies.
7/28/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

The greigification of interiors, the netural-colours of stealth wealth and finding beauty in the bare winter garden

From the landlord special - beige-grey laminate, vast empty spaces, and colourless walls - to the neutral-coloured knitwear favoured by todays wealthy elite, we discuss aesthetic conformity and homogeneity in the worlds of fashion, architecture and design.
7/21/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
Episode Artwork

The greigification of interiors, the netural-colours of stealth wealth and finding beauty in the bare winter garden

From the landlord special - beige-grey laminate, vast empty spaces, and colourless walls - to the neutral-coloured knitwear favoured by todays wealthy elite, we discuss aesthetic conformity and homogeneity in the worlds of fashion, architecture and design.
7/21/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
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Reimagining flood plain development and restoring Australia's architectural treasures

As floods increase in frequency and intensity, do geographical realities need to be at the centre of planning decisions in order to protect flood-prone communities? 
7/14/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Reimagining flood plain development and restoring Australia's architectural treasures

As floods increase in frequency and intensity, do geographical realities need to be at the centre of planning decisions in order to protect flood-prone communities? 
7/14/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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The architectural and environmental legacies of colonisation

The settler-colonial project involved the imposition of European conceptions of natural landscape on the one hand, and the built world on the other. Jack Pascoe, Owen Hatherley and Michael-Shawn Fletcher consider the legacy of colonialism - its persistent myths and enduring imprint on the Australian landscape.
7/7/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

The architectural and environmental legacies of colonisation

The settler-colonial project involved the imposition of European conceptions of natural landscape on the one hand, and the built world on the other. Jack Pascoe, Owen Hatherley and Michael-Shawn Fletcher consider the legacy of colonialism - its persistent myths and enduring imprint on the Australian landscape.
7/7/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
Episode Artwork

A scholarly paean to leftovers and the festishisation of decay

Tamar Adler explains how to use the Marcella Hazan tomato sauce onion and how to talk about no-waste cooking without moralism; Tom Wilkinson discusses the ideological and political context of the contemporary architectural fetish for decay.
6/30/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
Episode Artwork

A scholarly paean to leftovers and the festishisation of decay

Tamar Adler explains how to use the Marcella Hazan tomato sauce onion and how to talk about no-waste cooking without moralism; Tom Wilkinson discusses the ideological and political context of the contemporary architectural fetish for decay.
6/30/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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A story of design, technology and material and a cultural history of the gay bar

An exhibition that tells the story of design, technology, material and culture and Jeremy Atherton Lin on the history of the gay bar.
6/23/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
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A story of design, technology and material and a cultural history of the gay bar

An exhibition that tells the story of design, technology, material and culture and Jeremy Atherton Lin on the history of the gay bar.
6/23/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
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An artistic approach to coastal defence and retrofitting earthquake-prone buildings

The Dell Eco Reef is an innovative and artistic approach to coastal defence, installed in the City of Greater Geelong, combining new technology and knowledge of intertidal ecosystems.  
6/16/202354 minutes, 9 seconds
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An artistic approach to coastal defence and retrofitting earthquake-prone buildings

The Dell Eco Reef is an innovative and artistic approach to coastal defence, installed in the City of Greater Geelong, combining new technology and knowledge of intertidal ecosystems.  
6/16/202354 minutes, 9 seconds
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Discovering psychogeography and the hidden cost of electric vehicles

Rummage through the essential cultural ingredients - design, architecture, food, travel and fashion.
6/9/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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Discovering psychogeography and the hidden cost of electric vehicles

Rummage through the essential cultural ingredients - design, architecture, food, travel and fashion.
6/9/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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Sustainable design and construction and the medieval penchant for lamprey

A visit to a workshop where salvaged building materials are repurposed and where a quiet revolution in sustainable design is taking place.
6/2/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Sustainable design and construction and the medieval penchant for lamprey

A visit to a workshop where salvaged building materials are repurposed and where a quiet revolution in sustainable design is taking place.
6/2/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Autumn in the botanic gardens and interrogating interior design

An oak-forward autumn walk and tribute to the humble chestnut.
5/26/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Autumn in the botanic gardens and interrogating interior design

An oak-forward autumn walk and tribute to the humble chestnut.
5/26/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Gaetano Pesce on optimism and design

Gaetano Pesce on optimism, art and design, Paul Bangay on the garden in autumn, tropical island cooking and the history of the Bugatti
5/19/20230
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Gaetano Pesce on optimism and design

Gaetano Pesce on optimism, art and design, Paul Bangay on the garden in autumn, tropical island cooking and the history of the Bugatti
5/19/20230
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Tim Ross on the 80s, and Personal But Not Private- A contemplation on home in public housing

Architecturally trained multi-disciplinary artist, Guled Eylas offers a different perspective on the complex relationship between public housing and home in his latest exhibition, Personal But Not Private for Melbourne Design Week. Resident chef Annie Smithers confronts her nemesis- the lemon tart, and Tim Ross takes us on a trip down memory lane to marvel and cringe at 1980s Australiana. 
5/12/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Tim Ross on the 80s, and Personal But Not Private- A contemplation on home in public housing

Architecturally trained multi-disciplinary artist, Guled Eylas offers a different perspective on the complex relationship between public housing and home in his latest exhibition, Personal But Not Private for Melbourne Design Week. Resident chef Annie Smithers confronts her nemesis- the lemon tart, and Tim Ross takes us on a trip down memory lane to marvel and cringe at 1980s Australiana. 
5/12/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Meet the Afghan fashion designers sewing new lives Australia

This week we hear from creative, bold and powerful Afghan women who are defying The Taliban regime and embracing their culture through fashion design. We also hear about why Blak design matters and ask if Australia can eat meat in a way that's healthy and sustainable.
5/5/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Meet the Afghan fashion designers sewing new lives Australia

This week we hear from creative, bold and powerful Afghan women who are defying The Taliban regime and embracing their culture through fashion design. We also hear about why Blak design matters and ask if Australia can eat meat in a way that's healthy and sustainable.
5/5/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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What makes open plan spaces actually work

This week celebrated designer Mary Featherston and architectural researcher Rory Hyde layout the pros and cons of open plan work and school environments, and the benefits of when they are designed well. With the gig economy here to stay, we speak with food critic Besha Rodell on the etiquette of tipping and our resident chef, Annie Smithers shows us how to make the most delectable and easy French custard tart. 
4/28/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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What makes open plan spaces actually work

This week celebrated designer Mary Featherston and architectural researcher Rory Hyde layout the pros and cons of open plan work and school environments, and the benefits of when they are designed well. With the gig economy here to stay, we speak with food critic Besha Rodell on the etiquette of tipping and our resident chef, Annie Smithers shows us how to make the most delectable and easy French custard tart. 
4/28/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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How design solidarity can transform communities

Design solidarity, the co-designing of projects with communities is a growing area in architecture and design. But how does it work in practice? And how is it used to address inequality in regards to housing, care and labour?  We also look at what recipes say about what we value and yearn for. Plus, how you can create outdoor gardens in even the tiniest of spaces and why the Windsor chair has endured through the centuries.
4/21/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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How design solidarity can transform communities

Design solidarity, the co-designing of projects with communities is a growing area in architecture and design. But how does it work in practice? And how is it used to address inequality in regards to housing, care and labour?  We also look at what recipes say about what we value and yearn for. Plus, how you can create outdoor gardens in even the tiniest of spaces and why the Windsor chair has endured through the centuries.
4/21/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Lakemba's Ramadan night markets, and a tribute to Mary Quant

This week we head to Sydney's Lakemba neighbourhood for their famous Ramadan night markets. It's grown substantially in recent years, but as we hear, that growth hasn't been all together positive. We also look back at the trailblazing fashion of the late Dame Mary Quant's and Annie Smithers offers up her practical tips for even the most humble kitchen gardener.  Plus, Colin Bisset tells the story of a loved symbol of Australian suburbia — the Hills Hoist.
4/14/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Lakemba's Ramadan nights market, and a tribute to Mary Quant

This week we head to Sydney's Lakemba neighbourhood for their famous Ramadan night markets. It's grown substantially in recent years, but as we hear, that growth hasn't been all together positive. We also look back at the trailblazing fashion of the late Dame Mary Quant's and Annie Smithers offers up her practical tips for even the most humble kitchen gardener.  Plus, Colin Bisset tells the story of a loved symbol of Australian suburbia — the Hills Hoist.
4/14/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Food, faith, and more food

It's one of those rare years when Ramadan, Easter and Passover, converge. A time for reflection, dedication and of course the sharing of food with family and community. We also hear about innovative solutions to housing in humanitarian crises and Australia's first purpose built office space for the deaf and hard of hearing. 
4/7/202354 minutes, 8 seconds
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Food, faith, and more food

It's one of those rare years when Ramadan, Easter and Passover, converge. A time for reflection, dedication and of course the sharing of food with family and community. We also hear about innovative solutions to housing in humanitarian crises and Australia's first purpose built office space for the deaf and hard of hearing. 
4/7/202354 minutes, 8 seconds
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Breaking up with the SUV?

SUVs used to be a minority on the roads, but now they are steadily growing in popularity. In 2022, they accounted for 46 per cent of all new car sales worldwide. But what is the cost of these large machines for our roads, cities and atmosphere? Plus, we get a tour of the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show, learn how to start a kitchen garden, and ride on a micro-bike that won over people's hearts. 
3/31/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Breaking up with the SUV?

SUVs used to be a minority on the roads, but now they are steadily growing in popularity. In 2022, they accounted for 46 per cent of all new car sales worldwide. But what is the cost of these large machines for our roads, cities and atmosphere? Plus, we get a tour of the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show, learn how to start a kitchen garden, and ride on a micro-bike that won over people's hearts. 
3/31/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Australia's Filipino Food Revolution, and Perth's first design week

Learn about what influences the diverse cuisines of the Philippines and join Entrée Pinays' celebratory fiesta at this year's Melbourne Food and Wine Festival. We'll also take a stroll through some of the world's most exquisite gardens. Plus, a dispatch from Perth's inaugural Design Week and explore the work of a Filipino architect whose work established a proud and more equable national identity.
3/24/20230
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Australia's Filipino Food Revolution, and Perth's first design week

Learn about what influences the diverse cuisines of the Philippines and join Entrée Pinays' celebratory fiesta at this year's Melbourne Food and Wine Festival. We'll also take a stroll through some of the world's most exquisite gardens. Plus, a dispatch from Perth's inaugural Design Week and explore the work of a Filipino architect whose work established a proud and more equable national identity.
3/24/20230
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Saying goodbye to summer

In this edition of Blueprint For Living we talk a stroll through Melbourne's botanical gardens as it transforms into its autumn hues, indulge in an Italian feast and ponder the phenomenon of teflon. We also peel back the carbon embodied in buildings and explore its impact on the construction industry and the atmosphere. 
3/17/20230
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Saying goodbye to summer

In this edition of Blueprint For Living we talk a stroll through Melbourne's botanical gardens as it transforms into its autumn hues, indulge in an Italian feast and ponder the phenomenon of teflon. We also peel back the carbon embodied in buildings and explore its impact on the construction industry and the atmosphere. 
3/17/20230
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Women writing architecture, and stories of spatial hope

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we discover a new online tool that amplifies women's architectural writing, discover what knives are chefs' favourites, and understand why all architecture is humanitarian now. Then, meet the 18th-century woman who pioneered an artificial stone that has stood the test of time. 
3/10/20230
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Women writing architecture, and stories of spatial hope

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we discover a new online tool that amplifies women's architectural writing, discover what knives are chefs' favourites, and understand why all architecture is humanitarian now. Then, meet the 18th-century woman who pioneered an artificial stone that has stood the test of time. 
3/10/20230
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Design for good

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we ask whether fashion can truly be sustainable, find inspiration in the garden, and introduce a new Australian architecture award recognising projects for the common good. Plus, the origins behind Venetian glass. 
3/3/20230
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Design for good

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we ask whether fashion can truly be sustainable, find inspiration in the garden, and introduce a new Australian architecture award recognising projects for the common good. Plus, the origins behind Venetian glass. 
3/3/20230
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What is queer space anyway?

As the eyes of the LGBTQIA+ world descend on Sydney this month for WorldPride, Blueprint For Living journeys through a range of spaces and places to understand what we mean by queer space in our built environment — both real and imagined.
2/24/20230
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What is queer space anyway?

As the eyes of the LGBTQIA+ world descend on Sydney this month for WorldPride, Blueprint For Living journeys through a range of spaces and places to understand what we mean by queer space in our built environment — both real and imagined.
2/24/20230
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'We're afraid of walkable distances now?' — conspiracies and the '15-minute city'

The polite world of urban planning has become the latest target of conspiracy theorists. In recent weeks, the 15-minute city concept — where neighbourhoods provide life's essentials in 15 minutes by foot or bike — has become a harbinger of big brother in conspiracy-land. Brent Toderian, a keen urbanist and Vancouver's former chief planner, is here to help us understand how a "mundane" urban planning concept has prompted protests in Canada and the UK.  Later, we turn to the disaster zone in southern Turkiyë and northern Syria to understand what shelter is available — and appropriate — for those displaced. Tom Bamforth, a writer and aid worker who who specialises in shelter and settlements, joins Blueprint to canvas what kinds of shelters are available — from Ikea's award-winning flatpack to the DIY . And Blueprint regulars Annie Smithers and Colin Bisset return with some sweets and stories: Annie with the inside scoop on strawberry sorbets, and Colin with the pioneering African American woman who changed architectural history.
2/17/20230
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'We're afraid of walkable distances now?' — conspiracies and the '15-minute city'

The polite world of urban planning has become the latest target of conspiracy theorists. In recent weeks, the 15-minute city concept — where neighbourhoods provide life's essentials in 15 minutes by foot or bike — has become a harbinger of big brother in conspiracy-land. Brent Toderian, a keen urbanist and Vancouver's former chief planner, is here to help us understand how a "mundane" urban planning concept has prompted protests in Canada and the UK.  Later, we turn to the disaster zone in southern Turkiyë and northern Syria to understand what shelter is available — and appropriate — for those displaced. Tom Bamforth, a writer and aid worker who who specialises in shelter and settlements, joins Blueprint to canvas what kinds of shelters are available — from Ikea's award-winning flatpack to the DIY . And Blueprint regulars Annie Smithers and Colin Bisset return with some sweets and stories: Annie with the inside scoop on strawberry sorbets, and Colin with the pioneering African American woman who changed architectural history.
2/17/20230
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Dressing Lydia Tár, and reckoning with monumental history

Cate Blanchett's performance as Lydia Tár —  a beguiling American composer — has sent Oscars rumours abuzz. But it has been Tár's steely, minimalist looks — paired with American baseball caps — that are also generating the film's hype. Costume designer, Bina Daigeler, shares how she visualised this complex character, thread by thread.  Plus, author Robert Bevan shares his insights about what to do with the monuments we'd prefer to put away, and agribusiness expert Elizabeth Jackson explains why Australia's recent natural disasters have exposed the vulnerability of national food supply chains. And later, Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset gives you the history behind the man behind landscape architecture. 
2/10/20230
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Dressing Lydia Tár, and reckoning with monumental history

Cate Blanchett's performance as Lydia Tár —  a beguiling American composer — has sent Oscars rumours abuzz. But it has been Tár's steely, minimalist looks — paired with American baseball caps — that are also generating the film's hype. Costume designer, Bina Daigeler, shares how she visualised this complex character, thread by thread.  Plus, author Robert Bevan shares his insights about what to do with the monuments we'd prefer to put away, and agribusiness expert Elizabeth Jackson explains why Australia's recent natural disasters have exposed the vulnerability of national food supply chains. And later, Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset gives you the history behind the man behind landscape architecture. 
2/10/20230
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Suburbia reimagined, and a history of shock on the fashion runway

A fake lion's head goes viral on the runway. A Kmart gets turned into a community school. Lessons in sugar syrup, and an exit via a Japanese manhole.  All this and more on the latest edition of Blueprint For Living, ABC RN's weekly rummage through the essential cultural ingredients — design, food, travel, gardens and fashion — for a good life.
2/3/20230
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Suburbia reimagined, and a history of shock on the fashion runway

A fake lion's head goes viral on the runway. A Kmart gets turned into a community school. Lessons in sugar syrup, and an exit via a Japanese manhole.  All this and more on the latest edition of Blueprint For Living, ABC RN's weekly rummage through the essential cultural ingredients — design, food, travel, gardens and fashion — for a good life.
2/3/20230
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The imperial roots of Australian wine, and the fruits of Asian-Australian suburbia

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, learn about how wine making was central to the British colonial project, see the legacies of Asian migration in Australia's built environment, and gaze into the eight-ball to find out what 2023 has in store for food and dining. Plus, discover the curious history behind the jumpsuit — from workwear to haute couture. 
1/27/20230
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The imperial roots of Australian wine, and the fruits of Asian-Australian suburbia

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, learn about how wine making was central to the British colonial project, see the legacies of Asian migration in Australia's built environment, and gaze into the eight-ball to find out what 2023 has in store for food and dining. Plus, discover the curious history behind the jumpsuit — from workwear to haute couture. 
1/27/20230
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The best of Blueprint — food

Bite into a new year. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, we're revisiting our favourite conversations about food.  Eric Wareheim's tall order He's a six-foot-seven lover of "spoofs and goofs, food, wine and cats" whose latest book comes with a glowing testimonial from Jack Black. You may also know Eric Wareheim from the comedy duo, Tim & Eric. Ahead of his banquet at the 2022 Melbourne Food and Wine Festival, Eric stopped by Blueprint.  What is a city without a great food writer? Besha Rodell, the recently appointed Chief Restaurant Critic for The Age and Good Weekend discusses the role of a great food writer and why she prefers to remain anonymous. Annie Smithers' Kitchen Rudimental: Salad Dressing In this edition of Kitchen Rudimental, Annie and Jonathan jump into the oily, vinegary, salt and pepper inflected world of salad dressings. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs — Ice Cream Scoop  Just as there's always a debate about whether gelato is superior to ice cream, the means of serving either is open to argument. While there's nothing wrong with using a simple spoon, at least two people thought they had a better way of doing it.
1/20/20230
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The best of Blueprint — food

Bite into a new year. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, we're revisiting our favourite conversations about food.  Eric Wareheim's tall order He's a six-foot-seven lover of "spoofs and goofs, food, wine and cats" whose latest book comes with a glowing testimonial from Jack Black. You may also know Eric Wareheim from the comedy duo, Tim & Eric. Ahead of his banquet at the 2022 Melbourne Food and Wine Festival, Eric stopped by Blueprint.  What is a city without a great food writer? Besha Rodell, the recently appointed Chief Restaurant Critic for The Age and Good Weekend discusses the role of a great food writer and why she prefers to remain anonymous. Annie Smithers' Kitchen Rudimental: Salad Dressing In this edition of Kitchen Rudimental, Annie and Jonathan jump into the oily, vinegary, salt and pepper inflected world of salad dressings. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs — Ice Cream Scoop  Just as there's always a debate about whether gelato is superior to ice cream, the means of serving either is open to argument. While there's nothing wrong with using a simple spoon, at least two people thought they had a better way of doing it.
1/20/20230
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The best of Blueprint — landscapes

This year, plant two feet firmly on the ground. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, we're revisiting our favourite conversations charting gardens, farms and forests.  Bruce Pascoe's farm Jonathan makes the trip to Mallacoota in far-eastern Victoria, land of the Gunai Kurnai people, to visit writer, historian, and Dark Emu author Bruce Pascoe. During a wander around the farm, they discuss native crops and grasses, food sustainability and farming and ducks. Tim Entwisle's Evergreen — The Botanical Life of a Plant Punk Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Tim Entwisle, has put his life among the plants and gardens into a book. The result is Evergreen: The Botanical Life of a Plant Punk. Paul Bangay's Garden Rudimental — Lawns Lawns are completely changing. The mown lawn down to a millimetre, and a big monoculture is largely disappearing from our plots and gardens. Award-winning landscape designer Paul Bangay offers Jonathan lawn substitutes: from gravel to plants and garden beds. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs: Thorncrown Chapel Forests are places of otherness. Which is why they've long been used for human rituals of all kinds. Like the weddings that take place in Thorncrown Chapel, a magical structure nestled among the trees of the Ozark Mountains in Arkansas.
1/13/20230
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The best of Blueprint — landscapes

This year, plant two feet firmly on the ground. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, we're revisiting our favourite conversations charting gardens, farms and forests.  Bruce Pascoe's farm Jonathan makes the trip to Mallacoota in far-eastern Victoria, land of the Gunai Kurnai people, to visit writer, historian, and Dark Emu author Bruce Pascoe. During a wander around the farm, they discuss native crops and grasses, food sustainability and farming and ducks. Tim Entwisle's Evergreen — The Botanical Life of a Plant Punk Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Tim Entwisle, has put his life among the plants and gardens into a book. The result is Evergreen: The Botanical Life of a Plant Punk. Paul Bangay's Garden Rudimental — Lawns Lawns are completely changing. The mown lawn down to a millimetre, and a big monoculture is largely disappearing from our plots and gardens. Award-winning landscape designer Paul Bangay offers Jonathan lawn substitutes: from gravel to plants and garden beds. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs: Thorncrown Chapel Forests are places of otherness. Which is why they've long been used for human rituals of all kinds. Like the weddings that take place in Thorncrown Chapel, a magical structure nestled among the trees of the Ozark Mountains in Arkansas.
1/13/20230
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The best of Blueprint — travel

Come away with Blueprint For Living in this summer edition. We're revisiting some of our favourite conversations about place and travel. This includes:  Nyikina Warrwa woman Professor Anne Poelina explains why she's investing in Indigenous luxury tourism  American-Australian food critic Besha Rodell charts the elevation of the in-flight meal  Comedian and design enthusiast Tim Ross gives us the history of the Australian motel  Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset tells the tale of the world's first cruise ship
1/6/20230
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The best of Blueprint — travel

Come away with Blueprint For Living in this summer edition. We're revisiting some of our favourite conversations about place and travel. This includes:  Nyikina Warrwa woman Professor Anne Poelina explains why she's investing in Indigenous luxury tourism  American-Australian food critic Besha Rodell charts the elevation of the in-flight meal  Comedian and design enthusiast Tim Ross gives us the history of the Australian motel  Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset tells the tale of the world's first cruise ship
1/6/20230
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The best of Blueprint — fashion

Approach the new year in style. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, we're revisiting our favourite conversations about fashion.  This includes:  RMIT's Robyn Healy reflections on the life and legacy of the late Japanese designer, Issey Miyake Author Dominic Janes reveals the scandalous history that birthed the British dandy  Journalist Amy Odell tries to paint a picture of Vogue's editor in chief Anna Wintour Colin Bisset gives you the provenance of the top hat 
12/30/20220
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The best of Blueprint — fashion

Approach the new year in style. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, we're revisiting our favourite conversations about fashion.  This includes:  RMIT's Robyn Healy reflections on the life and legacy of the late Japanese designer, Issey Miyake Author Dominic Janes reveals the scandalous history that birthed the British dandy  Journalist Amy Odell tries to paint a picture of Vogue's editor in chief Anna Wintour Colin Bisset gives you the provenance of the top hat 
12/30/20220
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The best of Blueprint: Design

Design the summer you've always wanted. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, let's help with some of our favourite conversations about design.  XX, XY, sex, letters and stereotypes For Marie Boulanger, a type designer and scholar based in London, it's time we started being critical about the ways that gender influences the way we draw, describe and think about typography. Her curiosity has turned into the book, XX XY: Sex, letters, and stereotypes, and she joins Jonathan to tell us more about why we persist to gender type. Bill Bensley's world of escapism Hotel designer Bill Bensley lives by the motto, if it’s worth doing, it's worth overdoing. The California-born designer has studios in Bangkok and Bali, and book More Escapism: Hotels, Resorts and Gardens features some of the region’s most extravagant resorts. Waterworks — the origins of little boys peeing in fountains Little boys peeing. It's a motif that repeats in neo-classical statues, bas-reliefs, and fountains the world over… officially called the Puer Mingens motif. But did it come from? Amy Boyington, is an architectural historian who has researched the motif's opaque origins. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs — the Lazy Susan Whoever Susan was, we're sure she didn't appreciate being called lazy. Especially when the device named the Lazy Susan does such a fine job of ensuring everyone gets a decent stab at the dishes on offer.
12/23/20220
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The best of Blueprint: Design

Design the summer you've always wanted. In this Blueprint For Living summer edition, let's help with some of our favourite conversations about design.  XX, XY, sex, letters and stereotypes For Marie Boulanger, a type designer and scholar based in London, it's time we started being critical about the ways that gender influences the way we draw, describe and think about typography. Her curiosity has turned into the book, XX XY: Sex, letters, and stereotypes, and she joins Jonathan to tell us more about why we persist to gender type. Bill Bensley's world of escapism Hotel designer Bill Bensley lives by the motto, if it’s worth doing, it's worth overdoing. The California-born designer has studios in Bangkok and Bali, and book More Escapism: Hotels, Resorts and Gardens features some of the region’s most extravagant resorts. Waterworks — the origins of little boys peeing in fountains Little boys peeing. It's a motif that repeats in neo-classical statues, bas-reliefs, and fountains the world over… officially called the Puer Mingens motif. But did it come from? Amy Boyington, is an architectural historian who has researched the motif's opaque origins. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs — the Lazy Susan Whoever Susan was, we're sure she didn't appreciate being called lazy. Especially when the device named the Lazy Susan does such a fine job of ensuring everyone gets a decent stab at the dishes on offer.
12/23/20220
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A blueprint for a very rudimental Christmas

It's the happiest time of the year, and you're invited to a very special lunch with Blueprint's nearest and dearest. We'll meet you at Stonefields, the award-winning home and gardens belonging to landscape designer — and Garden Rudimental's — Paul Bangay. Call this our Very Rudimental Christmas. Start with a stroll in the gardens with Jonathan, Paul, and Tim Entwisle, director of Melbourne's Royal Botanic Gardens. They talk all things landscape architecture, from the Oak lawn to the white garden… drawing comparisons between public and private spaces. Afterward, Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset does his best impression of an Antiques Roadshow dealer. Paul's secateurs and Tim's botanist's hand lens are offered up for inspection. Then it's time to meet the Kitchen Rudimental chef herself, Annie Smithers. She takes Jonathan and Paul through a tour of the veggie garden; a bounty of rhubarb, gooseberries, lettuces and broad beans. Annie gives Colin her shepherd's crook for a brief examination. Finish with a spot of lunch. Annie's put her twist on a traditional Christmas meal; sharing secrets for the perfect brined turkey breast with a flush of sage, served with a roasted garlic mayonnaise sauce.
12/16/202253 minutes, 50 seconds
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A blueprint for a very rudimental Christmas

It's the happiest time of the year, and you're invited to a very special lunch with Blueprint's nearest and dearest. We'll meet you at Stonefields, the award-winning home and gardens belonging to landscape designer — and Garden Rudimental's — Paul Bangay. Call this our Very Rudimental Christmas. Start with a stroll in the gardens with Jonathan, Paul, and Tim Entwisle, director of Melbourne's Royal Botanic Gardens. They talk all things landscape architecture, from the Oak lawn to the white garden… drawing comparisons between public and private spaces. Afterward, Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset does his best impression of an Antiques Roadshow dealer. Paul's secateurs and Tim's botanist's hand lens are offered up for inspection. Then it's time to meet the Kitchen Rudimental chef herself, Annie Smithers. She takes Jonathan and Paul through a tour of the veggie garden; a bounty of rhubarb, gooseberries, lettuces and broad beans. Annie gives Colin her shepherd's crook for a brief examination. Finish with a spot of lunch. Annie's put her twist on a traditional Christmas meal; sharing secrets for the perfect brined turkey breast with a flush of sage, served with a roasted garlic mayonnaise sauce.
12/16/202253 minutes, 50 seconds
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Busting the myths about Indigenous architecture, and a botanical palate

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, hear a revised history of Australian architecture, feast on botanical produce, and learn about how architecture is helping amplify women's agency in rural Fiji. Plus, meet the Italian woman who took on mid-century architecture's boys club and won. 
12/9/20220
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Busting the myths about Indigenous architecture, and a botanical palate

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, hear a revised history of Australian architecture, feast on botanical produce, and learn about how architecture is helping amplify women's agency in rural Fiji. Plus, meet the Italian woman who took on mid-century architecture's boys club and won. 
12/9/20220
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Oslo Davis eavesdrops on the city, and delight with Arent and Pyke

Oslo Davis, the award-winning illustrator and cartoonist, is a professional voyeur. He's made a career out of observing the shared intimacies of urban life and re-interpreting them on the page.  A mix of his new and old work has been compiled in the new book, Oslo's Melbourne — Illustrated Adventures in the World's Most Tolerated City. And for the latest edition of Kitchen Rudimental, resident Blueprint chef Annie Smithers takes Jonathan through the painstaking process of making Eugenies, or candied oranges encased in chocolate (yes, all seven boiling sessions).  Afterward head into the sumptuous interiors of Sydney interior design duo, Juliette Arent and Sarah-Jane Pyke (Arent and Pyke). Throughout their 15 years of practice, they've grappled with the tensions inherent in the field… creating moments of whimsy and delight without it feeling like it's been ripped out of a design glossy. Then put a pin in it… resident design expert Colin Bisset gives us the history of the thumbtack. 
12/2/20220
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Oslo Davis eavesdrops on the city, and delight with Arent and Pyke

Oslo Davis, the award-winning illustrator and cartoonist, is a professional voyeur. He's made a career out of observing the shared intimacies of urban life and re-interpreting them on the page.  A mix of his new and old work has been compiled in the new book, Oslo's Melbourne — Illustrated Adventures in the World's Most Tolerated City. And for the latest edition of Kitchen Rudimental, resident Blueprint chef Annie Smithers takes Jonathan through the painstaking process of making Eugenies, or candied oranges encased in chocolate (yes, all seven boiling sessions).  Afterward head into the sumptuous interiors of Sydney interior design duo, Juliette Arent and Sarah-Jane Pyke (Arent and Pyke). Throughout their 15 years of practice, they've grappled with the tensions inherent in the field… creating moments of whimsy and delight without it feeling like it's been ripped out of a design glossy. Then put a pin in it… resident design expert Colin Bisset gives us the history of the thumbtack. 
12/2/20220
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Kate Reid's journey from Formula 1 to the boulangerie

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, an audience with a croissant engineer, a Turner Prize winner, and the car grille. Stay for the buxus party.  -- This episode briefly touches on an eating disorder. If you, or anyone you know is experiencing body image concerns or an eating disorder, you can call the Butterfly Foundation National Helpline on 1800 33 4673, email [email protected] or chat online.
11/25/20220
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Kate Reid's journey from Formula 1 to the boulangerie

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, an audience with a croissant engineer, a Turner Prize winner, and the car grille. Stay for the buxus party.  -- This episode briefly touches on an eating disorder. If you, or anyone you know is experiencing body image concerns or an eating disorder, you can call the Butterfly Foundation National Helpline on 1800 33 4673, email [email protected] or chat online.
11/25/20220
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Defining the design museum, and a guide to urban foraging

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we ask the Design Museum's Tim Marlow to define the blurred boundary between design and art, and why some design pieces become museum-worthy… while others don't. Then Jonathan forages in Sydney's Queens Park with Italian-Australian artist Diego Bonetto, and afterward, resident chef Annie Smithers serves up some roulade. Plus, Colin Bisset tells us why the chesterfield sofa has had such a long life.
11/18/20220
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Defining the design museum, and a guide to urban foraging

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we ask the Design Museum's Tim Marlow to define the blurred boundary between design and art, and why some design pieces become museum-worthy… while others don't. Then Jonathan forages in Sydney's Queens Park with Italian-Australian artist Diego Bonetto, and afterward, resident chef Annie Smithers serves up some roulade. Plus, Colin Bisset tells us why the chesterfield sofa has had such a long life.
11/18/20220
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Clover Moore's Sydney — an urbanist's guide

In this three-part special, Lord Mayor of Sydney Clover Moore takes Jonathan on an urbanist's tour of the NSW capital. In this tour, learn how design interventions — big and small — respond to the City of Sydney's mission to bring 'design excellence' through its dense, inner urban boundaries.  Plus, Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset introduces the world of passementerie — the French term used to describe the fancy trimmings used in clothing and furnishings.
11/11/20220
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Clover Moore's Sydney — an urbanist's guide

In this three-part special, Lord Mayor of Sydney Clover Moore takes Jonathan on an urbanist's tour of the NSW capital. In this tour, learn how design interventions — big and small — respond to the City of Sydney's mission to bring 'design excellence' through its dense, inner urban boundaries.  Plus, Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset introduces the world of passementerie — the French term used to describe the fancy trimmings used in clothing and furnishings.
11/11/20220
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Flood levee effects, and Sydney's unrealised dreams

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we discover why flood levees may be doing more harm than good over time, find the perfect pavlovas, and see visions of a Sydney that could have been… Plus, a tour of the Parisian apartment that changed design forever.
11/4/20220
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Flood levee effects, and Sydney's unrealised dreams

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, we discover why flood levees may be doing more harm than good over time, find the perfect pavlovas, and see visions of a Sydney that could have been… Plus, a tour of the Parisian apartment that changed design forever.
11/4/20220
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Architects in regional Australia, and the lessons of a California hillside

In this edition of Blueprint For Living: architects in regional Australia, a melting pot of 'inauthentic' Chinese recipes, Vanessa Berry on animals and humans sharing urban spaces, and an inside peek at the Constance Perkins House. 
10/28/20220
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Architects in regional Australia, and the lessons of a California hillside

In this edition of Blueprint For Living: architects in regional Australia, a melting pot of 'inauthentic' Chinese recipes, Vanessa Berry on animals and humans sharing urban spaces, and an inside peek at the Constance Perkins House. 
10/28/20220
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The golden arches in Black America and the history of architecture and acoustics

In this edition of Blueprint For Living: The golden arches in Black America, the history of architecture and acoustics, duck egg pasta and the tower in design. 
10/21/20220
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The golden arches in Black America and the history of architecture and acoustics

In this edition of Blueprint For Living: The golden arches in Black America, the history of architecture and acoustics, duck egg pasta and the tower in design. 
10/21/20220
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King Charles III's architectural battles, and elevating the in-flight meal

In this edition of Blueprint For Living:  Jack Self, architecture critic and editor of the Real Review details King Charles III's architectural battles. Tim Entwisle, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Victoria, takes you on spring stroll along the blooming Oaklawn. Besha Rodell, chief dining critic at The Age, charts the rise and fall of transport dining, from the advent of flying and transcontinental cruises to the mass marketing of airlines today.  And Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset investigates the history of the aqueduct.
10/14/20220
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King Charles III's architectural battles, and elevating the in-flight meal

In this edition of Blueprint For Living:  Jack Self, architecture critic and editor of the Real Review details King Charles III's architectural battles. Tim Entwisle, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Victoria, takes you on spring stroll along the blooming Oaklawn. Besha Rodell, chief dining critic at The Age, charts the rise and fall of transport dining, from the advent of flying and transcontinental cruises to the mass marketing of airlines today.  And Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset investigates the history of the aqueduct.
10/14/20220
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Lucy Sante on New York's thirst, and an audience with old giants

Since its formation, New York has created reservoir after reservoir upstate to quench the thirst of a city that never sleeps. Lucy Sante, a multi-award winning author and critic, has compiled this history in her new book, Nineteen Reservoirs: On Their Creation and the Promise of Water for New York City.  Afterward, journey to Victoria's cool central highlands, home to the world's tallest flowering plant — the mountain ash tree.Jonathan walks the forests with Lachlan McBurney, an Australian National University scientist and co-author of Mountain Ash: Fire Logging and the Future of Victoria's Giant Forests. Then, a journey westward to Annie Smithers' farm, where Jonathan explores her spring garden, complete with peonies, Cockatoo-proof shallots, and rows of hard herbs. And finally, Colin Bisset looks for symbolism in the Green Man — an architectural motif of a man's face surrounded by leaves, sometimes spewing vegetation from his mouth.
10/7/20220
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Lucy Sante on New York's thirst, and an audience with old giants

Since its formation, New York has created reservoir after reservoir upstate to quench the thirst of a city that never sleeps. Lucy Sante, a multi-award winning author and critic, has compiled this history in her new book, Nineteen Reservoirs: On Their Creation and the Promise of Water for New York City.  Afterward, journey to Victoria's cool central highlands, home to the world's tallest flowering plant — the mountain ash tree.Jonathan walks the forests with Lachlan McBurney, an Australian National University scientist and co-author of Mountain Ash: Fire Logging and the Future of Victoria's Giant Forests. Then, a journey westward to Annie Smithers' farm, where Jonathan explores her spring garden, complete with peonies, Cockatoo-proof shallots, and rows of hard herbs. And finally, Colin Bisset looks for symbolism in the Green Man — an architectural motif of a man's face surrounded by leaves, sometimes spewing vegetation from his mouth.
10/7/20220
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Hetty Lui McKinnon's Tenderheart, and kitsch visions of the Queen

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, meet Hetty Lui McKinnon — a cult Australian cook whose latest book, Tenderheart, nods to family and identity.  Then sample the kitsch design paraphernalia generated during Queen Elizabeth II's reign — the teatowels, teaspoons, and other everyday design objects that carried her image. Anni Turnbull, a curator at Sydney's Powerhouse Museum, shares their stories. Afterward, award-winning Australian landscape designer Paul Bangay gives us a primer on the veggie patch, and Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset gives us the history of the object that stuck… teflon. 
9/30/20220
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Hetty Lui McKinnon's Tenderheart, and kitsch visions of the Queen

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, meet Hetty Lui McKinnon — a cult Australian cook whose latest book, Tenderheart, nods to family and identity.  Then sample the kitsch design paraphernalia generated during Queen Elizabeth II's reign — the teatowels, teaspoons, and other everyday design objects that carried her image. Anni Turnbull, a curator at Sydney's Powerhouse Museum, shares their stories. Afterward, award-winning Australian landscape designer Paul Bangay gives us a primer on the veggie patch, and Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset gives us the history of the object that stuck… teflon. 
9/30/20220
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An inside history of the mall and Tim Entwisle on Evergreen

Design critic Alexandra Lange on why the mall is on its deathbed… in America at least, and Tim Entwisle reveals how a study of algae turned into a life botanic. Plus, Annie Smithers gives us the simple truth about sauces, and Colin Bisset on Siegfried Bing — the man whose gallery gave its name to Art Nouveau. 
9/23/20220
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An inside history of the mall and Tim Entwisle on Evergreen

Design critic Alexandra Lange on why the mall is on its deathbed… in America at least, and Tim Entwisle reveals how a study of algae turned into a life botanic. Plus, Annie Smithers gives us the simple truth about sauces, and Colin Bisset on Siegfried Bing — the man whose gallery gave its name to Art Nouveau. 
9/23/20220
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Bruce Mau's design for life, and the Queen's gendered style politics

It's time to meet Bruce Mau. The Canadian graphic-designer turned designer of nations whose mission is to give us the tools to design for life.  Then the New York Times's chief fashion critic Vanessa Friedman invites you to decode the language of power in royal fashion. Afterward, hop on a culinary tour of Turkey and Greece with Australian chef Ela Mittas.  Then finish in Rome. Colin Bisset takes us through the history of Bramante's chapel in Rome — a building that changed the course of architectural history.
9/16/20220
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Bruce Mau's design for life, and the Queen's gendered style politics

It's time to meet Bruce Mau. The Canadian graphic-designer turned designer of nations whose mission is to give us the tools to design for life.  Then the New York Times's chief fashion critic Vanessa Friedman invites you to decode the language of power in royal fashion. Afterward, hop on a culinary tour of Turkey and Greece with Australian chef Ela Mittas.  Then finish in Rome. Colin Bisset takes us through the history of Bramante's chapel in Rome — a building that changed the course of architectural history.
9/16/20220
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Queen Elizabeth II: A royal blueprint

With the second Elizabethan era coming to a close, Blueprint For Living takes a look at the ways that Queen Elizabeth II's reign defined design, food, and landscape architecture.
9/9/20220
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Queen Elizabeth II: A royal blueprint

With the second Elizabethan era coming to a close, Blueprint For Living takes a look at the ways that Queen Elizabeth II's reign defined design, food, and landscape architecture.
9/9/20220
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George Monbiot's culinary regenesis, and a utopian architect

George Monbiot wants to turn the global food industry on its head – from radical changes in farming practices to 3D-printed steaks. The prolific writer, environmental activist, and rewilder, explores this and more in his latest book, Regenesis. Then it's time to meet an eccentric, little-known modernist architect who fought conventions and eschewed publicity: Bill Lucas. His friends and colleagues Peter Longeran and Julie Cracknell join Blueprint to find his traces in Australian architectural history.  Afterward, resident chef Annie Smithers joins us for another edition of Kitchen Rudimental. This time, she schools us in the five 'mother sauces': béchamel, velouté, espagnole, hollandaise, and tomato. And then it's time for a little bit of magic. Colin Bisset gives us the design history of the magician's wand.
9/2/20220
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George Monbiot's culinary regenesis, and a utopian architect

George Monbiot wants to turn the global food industry on its head – from radical changes in farming practices to 3D-printed steaks. The prolific writer, environmental activist, and rewilder, explores this and more in his latest book, Regenesis. Then it's time to meet an eccentric, little-known modernist architect who fought conventions and eschewed publicity: Bill Lucas. His friends and colleagues Peter Longeran and Julie Cracknell join Blueprint to find his traces in Australian architectural history.  Afterward, resident chef Annie Smithers joins us for another edition of Kitchen Rudimental. This time, she schools us in the five 'mother sauces': béchamel, velouté, espagnole, hollandaise, and tomato. And then it's time for a little bit of magic. Colin Bisset gives us the design history of the magician's wand.
9/2/20220
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Inside Only Murders in the Building's envious apartments, and booze-free pairing menus

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, Curt Beech, production designer on the hit show Only Murders in the Building, shares the secrets to creating the perfect Upper West Side fictional apartment. It's these ideas that lead to the design decisions that so boldly colour the homes of the murder mystery's main characters Charles (Steve Martin), Oliver (Martin Short) and Mabel (Selena Gomez). Then, Besha Rodell, chief restaurant critic at The Age, looks at how the hospitality industry is pivoting from its reliance on alcohol mark-ups, with thoughtful combinations of non-alcoholic menus.    Plus, Gaye Naismith gives Jonathan a lesson in the running stitch, and Colin Bisset explores the monkey bike’s place in history as a design pioneer.  
8/26/20220
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Inside Only Murders in the Building's envious apartments, and booze-free pairing menus

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, Curt Beech, production designer on the hit show Only Murders in the Building, shares the secrets to creating the perfect Upper West Side fictional apartment. It's these ideas that lead to the design decisions that so boldly colour the homes of the murder mystery's main characters Charles (Steve Martin), Oliver (Martin Short) and Mabel (Selena Gomez). Then, Besha Rodell, chief restaurant critic at The Age, looks at how the hospitality industry is pivoting from its reliance on alcohol mark-ups, with thoughtful combinations of non-alcoholic menus.    Plus, Gaye Naismith gives Jonathan a lesson in the running stitch, and Colin Bisset explores the monkey bike’s place in history as a design pioneer.  
8/26/20220
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Issey Miyake's quiet radicalism, and the Puer Mingins motif's origins

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, RMIT's Robyn Healy reflects on the life and many legacies of the Japanese designer, Issey Miyake. Then hear how and why the figure of the little boy peeing (aka the Puer Mingins motif) continues to reappear in fountains. Architectural historian Amy Boyington has the story. Plus, Annie Smithers give us the complete lamington collection, and Colin Bisset introduces you to the man who is credited with the home design catalogue. Find more Blueprint For Living via the ABC Listen app or wherever you get your podcasts.
8/19/20220
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Issey Miyake's quiet radicalism, and the Puer Mingins motif's origins

In this edition of Blueprint For Living, RMIT's Robyn Healy reflects on the life and many legacies of the Japanese designer, Issey Miyake. Then hear how and why the figure of the little boy peeing (aka the Puer Mingins motif) continues to reappear in fountains. Architectural historian Amy Boyington has the story. Plus, Annie Smithers give us the complete lamington collection, and Colin Bisset introduces you to the man who is credited with the home design catalogue. Find more Blueprint For Living via the ABC Listen app or wherever you get your podcasts.
8/19/20220
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The trees that make Australia and a chapel in the forest

Exploring Australia's cultural relationship to the Eucalypt, lawns as no monoculture, and the changing face of the country's urban tree canopies. Plus, Colin Bisset takes us to the Throwncrown Chapel — a magical structure nestled among the trees of the Ozark Mountains in Arkansas. 
8/12/20220
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The trees that make Australia and a chapel in the forest

Exploring Australia's cultural relationship to the Eucalypt, lawns as no monoculture, and the changing face of the country's urban tree canopies. Plus, Colin Bisset takes us to the Throwncrown Chapel — a magical structure nestled among the trees of the Ozark Mountains in Arkansas. 
8/12/20220
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The growing field of sensory urbanism, and owning heritage

Plus, chef Annie Smithers on the art of lamington-making and Colin Bisset on the pioneering African American architect Norma Merrick Sklarek.
8/5/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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The growing field of sensory urbanism, and owning heritage

Plus, chef Annie Smithers on the art of lamington-making and Colin Bisset on the pioneering African American architect Norma Merrick Sklarek.
8/5/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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Blueprint For Living

Blueprint For Living explores the things that help make for a good life: food, architecture, desi...
8/5/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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Blueprint For Living

Blueprint For Living explores the things that help make for a good life: food, architecture, desi...
8/5/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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A walk through Madrid's Botanical Gardens and the future of Australian suburbs

Plus Colin Bisset explores the role of streamlining in design
7/29/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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A walk through Madrid's Botanical Gardens and the future of Australian suburbs

Plus Colin Bisset explores the role of streamlining in design
7/29/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Thoughtful design for social and public housing, spotting climate change in 130-year-old restaurant menus, Repair Rudimental, and the design history of the fountain pen

Thoughtful design for social and public housing Two years ago, urban planning and housing experts told us Australia had a shortage of 430,000 social and public housing dwellings. Within 20 years that shortage will be somewhere between 730,000 and one-million dwellings. Increasing the simple supply of affordable housing is crucial, but it's more complicated than numbers. What does it take to design good public and social housing? And what exactly does that good design look like? Director of MGS Architects Rob McGauran joins Cr Bill Harvey from Hobart City Council, and Carly, who lives in social housing in Melbourne's inner-west, to explore the key ingredients needed to deliver good social and public housing design. You can spot climate change in 130-year-old restaurant menus Menus have evolved greatly over the last few centuries. They reflect a restaurant's location, culinary trends and of course the availability of ingredients. Now, scientists are studying 130-year-old seafood restaurant menus in Vancouver, to uncover how climate change is impacting the food making it to diners' plates. Ian Rose is a writer based outside Portland, Oregon. He's charted this study, which sought help from city hall, historical societies, and local museums, to uncover the link between restaurant menus and our warming seas. Repair Rudimental: A hand sewing starter kit To be able to repair something, rather than replace it, puts a fork in the endless road of consumption. But hand sewing is a skill not one everyone has in 2022. Jonathan joins Gaye Naismith, founder and director of The Gaye Abandon School of Sewing and Upcycling, for an introduction to the world of mending. They begin with an essential starter kit: needles, beeswax, buttons, and cloth. Making clothes is but a dream for Jonathan just now, so we begin with learning how to wrangle a needle and thread. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs: The fountain pen Every signature is special. Just ask any autograph collector. It's why the instruments that are used to sign anything from swooning love letters to historic presidential decrees are so cherished. A fountain pen has an old-fashioned quality that conveys gravitas and even decency, in a way that the undiscriminating ballpoint pen can never possess. Colin Bisset explores its design history.
7/22/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Thoughtful design for social and public housing, spotting climate change in 130-year-old restaurant menus, Repair Rudimental, and the design history of the fountain pen

Thoughtful design for social and public housing Two years ago, urban planning and housing experts told us Australia had a shortage of 430,000 social and public housing dwellings. Within 20 years that shortage will be somewhere between 730,000 and one-million dwellings. Increasing the simple supply of affordable housing is crucial, but it's more complicated than numbers. What does it take to design good public and social housing? And what exactly does that good design look like? Director of MGS Architects Rob McGauran joins Cr Bill Harvey from Hobart City Council, and Carly, who lives in social housing in Melbourne's inner-west, to explore the key ingredients needed to deliver good social and public housing design. You can spot climate change in 130-year-old restaurant menus Menus have evolved greatly over the last few centuries. They reflect a restaurant's location, culinary trends and of course the availability of ingredients. Now, scientists are studying 130-year-old seafood restaurant menus in Vancouver, to uncover how climate change is impacting the food making it to diners' plates. Ian Rose is a writer based outside Portland, Oregon. He's charted this study, which sought help from city hall, historical societies, and local museums, to uncover the link between restaurant menus and our warming seas. Repair Rudimental: A hand sewing starter kit To be able to repair something, rather than replace it, puts a fork in the endless road of consumption. But hand sewing is a skill not one everyone has in 2022. Jonathan joins Gaye Naismith, founder and director of The Gaye Abandon School of Sewing and Upcycling, for an introduction to the world of mending. They begin with an essential starter kit: needles, beeswax, buttons, and cloth. Making clothes is but a dream for Jonathan just now, so we begin with learning how to wrangle a needle and thread. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs: The fountain pen Every signature is special. Just ask any autograph collector. It's why the instruments that are used to sign anything from swooning love letters to historic presidential decrees are so cherished. A fountain pen has an old-fashioned quality that conveys gravitas and even decency, in a way that the undiscriminating ballpoint pen can never possess. Colin Bisset explores its design history.
7/22/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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A walk through the National Arboretum, the Anatomy of Colour, Annie Smithers' Kitchen Rudimental, and the design history of The Pedal Bin

Arboretum Canberra Jonathan takes you on an adventure through the breathtaking landscape of the National Arboretum. He is joined by Scott Sadler, Executive Branch Manager of the National Arboretum Canberra and Stromlo Forest Park, as they explore the 250-hectare site's beauty, rich history and scientific importance. Plus, Scott shares the inspiring story of coming back from devastating fires to create a unique, ever-changing garden. The Anatomy of Colour While the natural world paints its own picture, the colours we choose in the spaces we live, and work are deeply personal. From burnt orange to mission brown, when it comes to colour trends for the home historian of architectural paint Patrick Baty has seen them all. He's advised on paint colour for Buckingham Palace, Hampton Court Palace, Tower Bridge, 10 Downing Street, and even BBC's Broadcasting House. Annie Smithers' Kitchen Rudimental: puff pastry continued Have you ever wondered what to do with your puff pastry scraps? Annie has the answers – it's called a rough puff! Plus, she takes you on a step-by-step journey in assembling a vol-au-vent. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs: The Pedal Bin Nearly a hundred years ago it wasn't an induction cooktop that made your kitchen look bang up to date but a pedal bin. Invented by Lillian Gilbreth in the 1920s, it was the result of a new and very twentieth-century preoccupation – the study of time and motion. A pedal bin could save precious minutes in the kitchen. It was emblematic of the emerging interest in efficiency in the early twentieth century, a time when architects wanted houses to work like machines and Henry Ford introduced the production line to the factory floor.
7/15/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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A walk through the National Arboretum, the Anatomy of Colour, Annie Smithers' Kitchen Rudimental, and the design history of The Pedal Bin

Arboretum Canberra Jonathan takes you on an adventure through the breathtaking landscape of the National Arboretum. He is joined by Scott Sadler, Executive Branch Manager of the National Arboretum Canberra and Stromlo Forest Park, as they explore the 250-hectare site's beauty, rich history and scientific importance. Plus, Scott shares the inspiring story of coming back from devastating fires to create a unique, ever-changing garden. The Anatomy of Colour While the natural world paints its own picture, the colours we choose in the spaces we live, and work are deeply personal. From burnt orange to mission brown, when it comes to colour trends for the home historian of architectural paint Patrick Baty has seen them all. He's advised on paint colour for Buckingham Palace, Hampton Court Palace, Tower Bridge, 10 Downing Street, and even BBC's Broadcasting House. Annie Smithers' Kitchen Rudimental: puff pastry continued Have you ever wondered what to do with your puff pastry scraps? Annie has the answers – it's called a rough puff! Plus, she takes you on a step-by-step journey in assembling a vol-au-vent. Colin Bisset's Iconic Designs: The Pedal Bin Nearly a hundred years ago it wasn't an induction cooktop that made your kitchen look bang up to date but a pedal bin. Invented by Lillian Gilbreth in the 1920s, it was the result of a new and very twentieth-century preoccupation – the study of time and motion. A pedal bin could save precious minutes in the kitchen. It was emblematic of the emerging interest in efficiency in the early twentieth century, a time when architects wanted houses to work like machines and Henry Ford introduced the production line to the factory floor.
7/15/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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Connecting ideas of identity and place, a winter walk with Tim Entwisle, the path to Bundian Way, and the Rotary Clothes Hoist

If you were paying close attention to Vivid Sydney just now you might have caught mention of something called the Blak Hand Collective. A forming idea that connects indigenous architects, interior designers, landscape designers and beyond. Award-winning architect and a man of Wailwan and Kamilaroi country Jefa Greenaway is one of the people behind the idea along with Wiradjuri architect Craig Kerslake. It's a wonderful and rich set of possibilities for connecting ideas of design, identity, and place. We take a hike through Bundian Way, an ancient Aboriginal track that runs between Mt Kosciuszko and the NSW town of Eden. Stretching 365 kilometres, it has been used by Aboriginal people for thousands of years. Chair of Eden Local Aboriginal Land Council BJ Cruse shares stories from the ancient pathway that runs from the sea to the mountains and was almost lost to history. A change in season means it's time to explore the array of colours the cooler months have to offer. Jonathan joins Tim Entwisle, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Victoria, as they take a moment for reflection and appreciate the different perspectives the rainy garden has to offer. Even the sun-loving succulents thrive in the wetter months. Plus, some bird watching across the lake. For many of us, the rotary clothes hoist is as Australian as a kookaburra, even given a starring role in the Sydney Olympics closing ceremony, and so it is natural to assume that it's an Australian invention. In fact, it's difficult to pinpoint exactly who created it. Blueprint's resident architecture and design commentator Colin Bisset explores its many variations.
7/8/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Connecting ideas of identity and place, a winter walk with Tim Entwisle, the path to Bundian Way, and the Rotary Clothes Hoist

If you were paying close attention to Vivid Sydney just now you might have caught mention of something called the Blak Hand Collective. A forming idea that connects indigenous architects, interior designers, landscape designers and beyond. Award-winning architect and a man of Wailwan and Kamilaroi country Jefa Greenaway is one of the people behind the idea along with Wiradjuri architect Craig Kerslake. It's a wonderful and rich set of possibilities for connecting ideas of design, identity, and place. We take a hike through Bundian Way, an ancient Aboriginal track that runs between Mt Kosciuszko and the NSW town of Eden. Stretching 365 kilometres, it has been used by Aboriginal people for thousands of years. Chair of Eden Local Aboriginal Land Council BJ Cruse shares stories from the ancient pathway that runs from the sea to the mountains and was almost lost to history. A change in season means it's time to explore the array of colours the cooler months have to offer. Jonathan joins Tim Entwisle, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Victoria, as they take a moment for reflection and appreciate the different perspectives the rainy garden has to offer. Even the sun-loving succulents thrive in the wetter months. Plus, some bird watching across the lake. For many of us, the rotary clothes hoist is as Australian as a kookaburra, even given a starring role in the Sydney Olympics closing ceremony, and so it is natural to assume that it's an Australian invention. In fact, it's difficult to pinpoint exactly who created it. Blueprint's resident architecture and design commentator Colin Bisset explores its many variations.
7/8/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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British Dandies, puff pastry, a sentimental journey of motels, and The Great Bed of Ware

For the dandy, looking swell is a way of life! He prides himself on wit and dress, but their influence reaches beyond fashion and intellect, as Dominic Janes discovers in his latest book British Dandies: Engendering Scandal and Fashioning a Nation. It tells a scandalous story of fashionable men and the role they played in the cultural and political life of Britain. Regular listeners might remember a conversation Jonathan had with Blueprint friend Annie Smithers on the controversial subject of his preference for cold toast. For him, it all goes back to the motels of the mid-sixties and little wax paper envelopes of white toast delivered through the breakfast hatch. If you're an Australian of a certain age or perhaps even a mid-century obsessed hipster, you'll love the country's motels. Author, broadcaster, and architecture nerd Tim Ross sure does. He's been working on a new exhibition at Canberra's National Archives Reception this way: Motels – a sentimental journey. In this instalment of Kitchen Rudimental, Annie Smithers gives Jonathan a puff pastry masterclass. Layers of dough and butter – butter and dough - form a gorgeous silky texture – if you can get it just right! It’s a beautiful process that’s perfect for a Saturday afternoon.  Then, The Great Bed of Ware was intended to wow. And who among us doesn’t feel excited by the prospect of sleeping in any four-poster bed, even one that is half the width? Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset explores their influence as symbols of romance and intimacy, majesty, and class.
7/1/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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British Dandies, puff pastry, a sentimental journey of motels, and The Great Bed of Ware

For the dandy, looking swell is a way of life! He prides himself on wit and dress, but their influence reaches beyond fashion and intellect, as Dominic Janes discovers in his latest book British Dandies: Engendering Scandal and Fashioning a Nation. It tells a scandalous story of fashionable men and the role they played in the cultural and political life of Britain. Regular listeners might remember a conversation Jonathan had with Blueprint friend Annie Smithers on the controversial subject of his preference for cold toast. For him, it all goes back to the motels of the mid-sixties and little wax paper envelopes of white toast delivered through the breakfast hatch. If you're an Australian of a certain age or perhaps even a mid-century obsessed hipster, you'll love the country's motels. Author, broadcaster, and architecture nerd Tim Ross sure does. He's been working on a new exhibition at Canberra's National Archives Reception this way: Motels – a sentimental journey. In this instalment of Kitchen Rudimental, Annie Smithers gives Jonathan a puff pastry masterclass. Layers of dough and butter – butter and dough - form a gorgeous silky texture – if you can get it just right! It’s a beautiful process that’s perfect for a Saturday afternoon.  Then, The Great Bed of Ware was intended to wow. And who among us doesn’t feel excited by the prospect of sleeping in any four-poster bed, even one that is half the width? Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset explores their influence as symbols of romance and intimacy, majesty, and class.
7/1/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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More escapism, Garden Rudimental, Australia's oldest community cookbook plus, and pioneering women designers

Hotel designer Bill Bensley lives by the motto, if it’s worth doing, it’s worth overdoing. The California-born designer has studios in Bangkok and Bali, and his latest book More Escapism: Hotels, Resorts and Gardens features some of the region’s most extravagant resorts. His inspiration comes from treasures around the globe, including a 1930s Vietnamese bamboo hat that provided the design spark for the Hotel de la Coupole in Vietnam. In this week's Garden Rudimental, award-winning landscape designer Paul Bangay takes Jonathan for a stroll through Stonefields, one of Victoria's most beautiful country gardens where exotics and native plants merge to create a definitive style of Australian garden. Cookbooks aren't just a bunch of recipes. They often contain insights into the political and cultural contexts of their time. Never was there a better example of this than Australia's oldest continuous community cookbook, The Barossa Cookery Book. Initially released in 1917 as a war fundraiser it's now in its 33rd edition. Sheralee Menz and Marieka Ashmore, also known as Those Barossa Girls, have begun a companion venture with The Barossa Cookery Book Project. Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier are considered titans of the modern movement but in this week's Iconic Designs, Colin Bisset examines the contribution that women made to their most famous designs. It’s only been recently acknowledged that Lilly Reich was behind much of Mies’s furniture, and Charlotte Perriand behind all of Le Corbusier’s.  
6/24/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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More escapism, Garden Rudimental, Australia's oldest community cookbook plus, and pioneering women designers

Hotel designer Bill Bensley lives by the motto, if it’s worth doing, it’s worth overdoing. The California-born designer has studios in Bangkok and Bali, and his latest book More Escapism: Hotels, Resorts and Gardens features some of the region’s most extravagant resorts. His inspiration comes from treasures around the globe, including a 1930s Vietnamese bamboo hat that provided the design spark for the Hotel de la Coupole in Vietnam. In this week's Garden Rudimental, award-winning landscape designer Paul Bangay takes Jonathan for a stroll through Stonefields, one of Victoria's most beautiful country gardens where exotics and native plants merge to create a definitive style of Australian garden. Cookbooks aren't just a bunch of recipes. They often contain insights into the political and cultural contexts of their time. Never was there a better example of this than Australia's oldest continuous community cookbook, The Barossa Cookery Book. Initially released in 1917 as a war fundraiser it's now in its 33rd edition. Sheralee Menz and Marieka Ashmore, also known as Those Barossa Girls, have begun a companion venture with The Barossa Cookery Book Project. Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier are considered titans of the modern movement but in this week's Iconic Designs, Colin Bisset examines the contribution that women made to their most famous designs. It’s only been recently acknowledged that Lilly Reich was behind much of Mies’s furniture, and Charlotte Perriand behind all of Le Corbusier’s.  
6/24/202254 minutes, 4 seconds
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The perfect potato cake, a peek inside the National Archives, the origin of the match, and copying nature to build our lives

Once regarded as a fringe movement, more designers and architects are looking to nature-based systems to build our lives while reducing carbon emissions. Claire Beale, Executive Manager at LCI Melbourne and a former Design Institute of Australia President, takes us through the Three Bs of organic design; biomorphic, biomimetic and biophilic. The National Archives of Australia records and stores key events and decisions that have shaped Australian history and after one heck of a move has opened the doors of its new facility. With enough shelving to stretch from Canberra to Cooma the purpose-built facility is environmentally controlled, environmentally friendly and energy-efficient. Jonathan Green takes a stroll through its corridors with Sean Debenham, Assistant Director Storage and Lending to check out what’s in there. You sick of potatoes yet? We’re not.  Annie Smithers continues Kitchen Rudimental this week by tempting us to have a crack at making potato cakes (that’s a potato scallop for any Queenslanders and New South Welshfolk). And Colin Bisset takes a strike at the little magic fire stick with a red tip for this week’s Iconic Design. If civilization started when we learned how to create fire then what a link to our beginnings the arrival of the humble match was.
6/17/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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The perfect potato cake, a peek inside the National Archives, the origin of the match, and copying nature to build our lives

Once regarded as a fringe movement, more designers and architects are looking to nature-based systems to build our lives while reducing carbon emissions. Claire Beale, Executive Manager at LCI Melbourne and a former Design Institute of Australia President, takes us through the Three Bs of organic design; biomorphic, biomimetic and biophilic. The National Archives of Australia records and stores key events and decisions that have shaped Australian history and after one heck of a move has opened the doors of its new facility. With enough shelving to stretch from Canberra to Cooma the purpose-built facility is environmentally controlled, environmentally friendly and energy-efficient. Jonathan Green takes a stroll through its corridors with Sean Debenham, Assistant Director Storage and Lending to check out what’s in there. You sick of potatoes yet? We’re not.  Annie Smithers continues Kitchen Rudimental this week by tempting us to have a crack at making potato cakes (that’s a potato scallop for any Queenslanders and New South Welshfolk). And Colin Bisset takes a strike at the little magic fire stick with a red tip for this week’s Iconic Design. If civilization started when we learned how to create fire then what a link to our beginnings the arrival of the humble match was.
6/17/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Genealogy for homes, design to the rescue, Anna Wintour, and the history of the public loo.

Via their Instagram page Design.Emergency Alice Rawsthorn and Paola Antonelli have brought designers together to tackle some of the worlds intractable problems. Journalist Amy Odell discusses her biography of the fashion industry's most powerful influencer Anna Wintour. New Zealanders have kicked off a citizen historian fad thanks to a new book from Dr Christine Whybrew of Heritage NZ called How to Research Your House. It helps you discover the genealogy of your home and uncover secrets of its past. Toilet, loo, powder room, the toot; no matter what you call it you use it everyday. In this week's Iconic Designs Colin Bisset casts his eye over the design evolution of the public toilet.
6/10/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Genealogy for homes, design to the rescue, Anna Wintour, and the history of the public loo.

Via their Instagram page Design.Emergency Alice Rawsthorn and Paola Antonelli have brought designers together to tackle some of the worlds intractable problems. Journalist Amy Odell discusses her biography of the fashion industry's most powerful influencer Anna Wintour. New Zealanders have kicked off a citizen historian fad thanks to a new book from Dr Christine Whybrew of Heritage NZ called How to Research Your House. It helps you discover the genealogy of your home and uncover secrets of its past. Toilet, loo, powder room, the toot; no matter what you call it you use it everyday. In this week's Iconic Designs Colin Bisset casts his eye over the design evolution of the public toilet.
6/10/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Besha Rodell on food critics, Australia's newest herbarium, the Gothic Revival, and potatoes

All the world's great cities have some things in common and fantastic food is one of them. But what happens if a city doesn't have a chief restaurant critic? Besha Rodell, the recently appointed Chief Restaurant Critic for The Age and Good Weekend discusses the role of a great food writer and why she prefers to remain anonymous. Then it's time to visit Sydney's newest herbarium at the Australian Botanic Garden in Mount Annan. Denise Ora, Chief Executive of the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, and Brett Summerell, Director Research and Chief Botanist, join Tim Entwisle for an amble through the new facility and discuss why they're critical to conserving plants and fighting climate change. Annie and Jonathan just can't get enough of the humble spud. In the latest edition of Kitchen Rudimental, Annie Smithers teaches Jonathan how to master a Potato Terrine with Gruyère. And finally, Colin Bisset explores the Tower House in London's Holland Park. It's the work of William Burges, an architect whose small but significant output represents a high point in the Gothic Revival. This is everything that minimalism is not.
6/3/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Besha Rodell on food critics, Australia's newest herbarium, the Gothic Revival, and potatoes

All the world's great cities have some things in common and fantastic food is one of them. But what happens if a city doesn't have a chief restaurant critic? Besha Rodell, the recently appointed Chief Restaurant Critic for The Age and Good Weekend discusses the role of a great food writer and why she prefers to remain anonymous. Then it's time to visit Sydney's newest herbarium at the Australian Botanic Garden in Mount Annan. Denise Ora, Chief Executive of the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, and Brett Summerell, Director Research and Chief Botanist, join Tim Entwisle for an amble through the new facility and discuss why they're critical to conserving plants and fighting climate change. Annie and Jonathan just can't get enough of the humble spud. In the latest edition of Kitchen Rudimental, Annie Smithers teaches Jonathan how to master a Potato Terrine with Gruyère. And finally, Colin Bisset explores the Tower House in London's Holland Park. It's the work of William Burges, an architect whose small but significant output represents a high point in the Gothic Revival. This is everything that minimalism is not.
6/3/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Luxury Indigenous tourism, urban farms, and the English country home's post-war revival

We see Indigenous art and motifs used extensively in Australia's marketing campaigns. But do Indigenous communities and businesses benefit from this branding? Professor Anne Poelina — a Nyikina Warrwa woman from the Mardoowarra River in Western Australia's Kimberley region — is making sure they do. Then we turn to the grand old piles that dot the British Isles. Today, these buildings are more likely to host film and tv crews or tour groups. This is a marked turnaround given many were left in ruins, sold off, or simply demolished as aristocratic families fought over the scraps of empire by the end of the Second World War. Adrian Tinniswood has compiled this history in a new book, Noble Ambitions: The Fall and Rise of the Post-War Country House. Afterward, meet the team behind Growing Farmers — a new community organisation pairing trainee urban farmers with residents who want their empty yards to become flourishing, small-scale market gardens. Jonathan took a trip to meet farm host Sapphire McMulla-Fisher in Melbourne's outer-north, along with Growing Farmers' president Alice Crowe.   Finally, for Colin Bisset's latest edition of Iconic Designs we look at the mighty little box that revolutionised how we store food: the Tetra Pak.
5/27/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Luxury Indigenous tourism, urban farms, and the English country home's post-war revival

We see Indigenous art and motifs used extensively in Australia's marketing campaigns. But do Indigenous communities and businesses benefit from this branding? Professor Anne Poelina — a Nyikina Warrwa woman from the Mardoowarra River in Western Australia's Kimberley region — is making sure they do. Then we turn to the grand old piles that dot the British Isles. Today, these buildings are more likely to host film and tv crews or tour groups. This is a marked turnaround given many were left in ruins, sold off, or simply demolished as aristocratic families fought over the scraps of empire by the end of the Second World War. Adrian Tinniswood has compiled this history in a new book, Noble Ambitions: The Fall and Rise of the Post-War Country House. Afterward, meet the team behind Growing Farmers — a new community organisation pairing trainee urban farmers with residents who want their empty yards to become flourishing, small-scale market gardens. Jonathan took a trip to meet farm host Sapphire McMulla-Fisher in Melbourne's outer-north, along with Growing Farmers' president Alice Crowe.   Finally, for Colin Bisset's latest edition of Iconic Designs we look at the mighty little box that revolutionised how we store food: the Tetra Pak.
5/27/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Ancient odours, wilding your garden, the art of preserving, and the history of voting booths

Film and television shows have conjured up images of ancient cities many times, thanks largely to historical texts and archaeological finds. Now archaeologists are trying to recreate the odours of old civilisations. Barbara Huber from Germany's Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is on a mission to advance the science of olfactory archaeology to understand how ancient people experienced and interpreted their worlds through smell. It's time to dig, mulch and prune with Australia's award-winning landscape designer Paul Bangay. In this edition, Paul throws formality to the wind as he takes Jonathan through The Woodland, where geometry and grids give way to the freedom of wilding. For those of us with smaller green spaces Paul and Jonathan muse on whether you can rewild an urban courtyard. Jams, pickles, and chutneys, oh my! Preserving is an art and Kylee Newton is a master at it. She's also the author of Modern Preserves and calls herself a saint of produce, giving fruit and vegetables another life through her time capsules in jars. She shares ideas on how to use up that glut of keeps, that won't involve toast or crumpets. As Australians make their way to the polls this Saturday, in-house design guru Colin Bisset leans into the election, democracy sausage in hand, as he takes us through the design history of the voting booth. Surprisingly, the idea of voting in private is an Australian one, first used in Victoria in 1856, and later adopted by the British and Americans. But how has it evolved since?
5/20/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Ancient odours, wilding your garden, the art of preserving, and the history of voting booths

Film and television shows have conjured up images of ancient cities many times, thanks largely to historical texts and archaeological finds. Now archaeologists are trying to recreate the odours of old civilisations. Barbara Huber from Germany's Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is on a mission to advance the science of olfactory archaeology to understand how ancient people experienced and interpreted their worlds through smell. It's time to dig, mulch and prune with Australia's award-winning landscape designer Paul Bangay. In this edition, Paul throws formality to the wind as he takes Jonathan through The Woodland, where geometry and grids give way to the freedom of wilding. For those of us with smaller green spaces Paul and Jonathan muse on whether you can rewild an urban courtyard. Jams, pickles, and chutneys, oh my! Preserving is an art and Kylee Newton is a master at it. She's also the author of Modern Preserves and calls herself a saint of produce, giving fruit and vegetables another life through her time capsules in jars. She shares ideas on how to use up that glut of keeps, that won't involve toast or crumpets. As Australians make their way to the polls this Saturday, in-house design guru Colin Bisset leans into the election, democracy sausage in hand, as he takes us through the design history of the voting booth. Surprisingly, the idea of voting in private is an Australian one, first used in Victoria in 1856, and later adopted by the British and Americans. But how has it evolved since?
5/20/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Lake Pedder, potato perfection, Confucius wisdom, and wombat time of year

Rima Truchanas learned to swim in Tasmania's Lake Pedder and watched on with her family when 50 years ago it drowned to make way for the Hydro-Electric Scheme . Her early life was shaped by her parent’s involvement in the campaign to save it. Now, there are plans to restore the Lake to its former glory.  Frances Green has produced a documentary for RN's History Listen about the campaign which spearheaded the Greens political movement in Australia. For Victoria's Kulin nation Autumn is wombat season. For Jonathan, the Fall is the perfect time take a stroll through Melbourne's Botanic Gardens with Tim Entwisle.  Together they ponder the philosophy of flowers, and Jonathan discovers a new pocket of the garden: the compost yard.  Whether it's mashed, fried, baked, or boiled the humble potato is an endless source of tasty treats. Chef Annie Smithers takes Jonathan into the kitchen for a meditation on spuds in this edition of Kitchen Rudimental. Is the potato the perfect vegetable? Colin Bisset's Iconic Design this week takes us to the ancient Confucius Mansion in Qufu, a village in China's Shandong province. Confucius (aka Master Kong), died over two and a half thousand years ago but the venerable sage's impact on Chinese life was immense and long-lasting and it’s still possible to visit the home of his descendants.
5/13/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Lake Pedder, potato perfection, Confucius wisdom, and wombat time of year

Rima Truchanas learned to swim in Tasmania's Lake Pedder and watched on with her family when 50 years ago it drowned to make way for the Hydro-Electric Scheme . Her early life was shaped by her parent’s involvement in the campaign to save it. Now, there are plans to restore the Lake to its former glory.  Frances Green has produced a documentary for RN's History Listen about the campaign which spearheaded the Greens political movement in Australia. For Victoria's Kulin nation Autumn is wombat season. For Jonathan, the Fall is the perfect time take a stroll through Melbourne's Botanic Gardens with Tim Entwisle.  Together they ponder the philosophy of flowers, and Jonathan discovers a new pocket of the garden: the compost yard.  Whether it's mashed, fried, baked, or boiled the humble potato is an endless source of tasty treats. Chef Annie Smithers takes Jonathan into the kitchen for a meditation on spuds in this edition of Kitchen Rudimental. Is the potato the perfect vegetable? Colin Bisset's Iconic Design this week takes us to the ancient Confucius Mansion in Qufu, a village in China's Shandong province. Confucius (aka Master Kong), died over two and a half thousand years ago but the venerable sage's impact on Chinese life was immense and long-lasting and it’s still possible to visit the home of his descendants.
5/13/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Bruce Pascoe's farm and design after disaster

Jonathan makes the trip to Mallacoota in far-eastern Victoria, land of the Gunai Kurnai people, to visit writer, historian, and Dark Emu author Bruce Pascoe. During a wander around the farm, they discuss native crops and grasses, food sustainability and farming and ducks. Then you'll meet humanitarian architect Esther Charlesworth. The co-founder of Architects Without Frontiers joins Jonathan to understand what role design can play in response to disaster. From the floods in NSW and Queensland to the war and destruction in Ukraine, there's a lot for the built environment profession to do now… and well into the future. And finally, resident design expert Colin Bisset gives you the lowdown on the origins of the white picket fence. The plain wooden fence has been around for a very long time, but he asks: who decided to make something prettier?
5/6/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Bruce Pascoe's farm and design after disaster

Jonathan makes the trip to Mallacoota in far-eastern Victoria, land of the Gunai Kurnai people, to visit writer, historian, and Dark Emu author Bruce Pascoe. During a wander around the farm, they discuss native crops and grasses, food sustainability and farming and ducks. Then you'll meet humanitarian architect Esther Charlesworth. The co-founder of Architects Without Frontiers joins Jonathan to understand what role design can play in response to disaster. From the floods in NSW and Queensland to the war and destruction in Ukraine, there's a lot for the built environment profession to do now… and well into the future. And finally, resident design expert Colin Bisset gives you the lowdown on the origins of the white picket fence. The plain wooden fence has been around for a very long time, but he asks: who decided to make something prettier?
5/6/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Katherine Tamiko Arguile, Vita Sackville-West, and protecting Ukraine's cultural heritage

Is there a certain dish, a certain food that triggers your sense memory and takes you right back to a time in your childhood? For British-Japanese writer Katherine Tamiko Arguile, both these things connect her to her heritage, her sense of family and the world around her. The arts journalist and author has released a new book — part memoir, part recipe collection — called MESHI: A personal history of Japanese food. And for the next edition of Garden Rudimental, award-winning Australian landscape designer Paul Bangay reveals his adoration for Vita Sackville-West. While she's best known for her writing, her Bloomsbury Group membership, and her enduring partnership with Virginia Woolf, Sackville-West was also a passionate green thumb. Afterward, it's time to hear from freelance journalist Evan Rail. He recently detailed the breadth of destruction of Ukraine's built environment and cultural heritage — and the efforts to protect it — in an article for the New York Times. Then let Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset drive you away… specifically in a regal three-wheeler.
4/29/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Katherine Tamiko Arguile, Vita Sackville-West, and protecting Ukraine's cultural heritage

Is there a certain dish, a certain food that triggers your sense memory and takes you right back to a time in your childhood? For British-Japanese writer Katherine Tamiko Arguile, both these things connect her to her heritage, her sense of family and the world around her. The arts journalist and author has released a new book — part memoir, part recipe collection — called MESHI: A personal history of Japanese food. And for the next edition of Garden Rudimental, award-winning Australian landscape designer Paul Bangay reveals his adoration for Vita Sackville-West. While she's best known for her writing, her Bloomsbury Group membership, and her enduring partnership with Virginia Woolf, Sackville-West was also a passionate green thumb. Afterward, it's time to hear from freelance journalist Evan Rail. He recently detailed the breadth of destruction of Ukraine's built environment and cultural heritage — and the efforts to protect it — in an article for the New York Times. Then let Blueprint's resident design expert Colin Bisset drive you away… specifically in a regal three-wheeler.
4/29/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Timothy Morton on the hyper-object, pesticides and food, plus typography and gender

The fact of the matter is we live in co-existence with our environment: our cities, our neighbourhood, animals, trees and plants… as well as our ex-lovers, however many billion corpses and the world's garbage and excrement. In the age of the Anthropocene, ecological collapse — and a pandemic — what does it mean to be 'all in this together', especially when there's no getting out of it? Timothy Morton, a Texan-based philosopher and Rita Shea Guffey Chair in English at Rice University, joins Blueprint For Living to help us with these questions and introduce us to the idea of the 'hyper-object'. With ecology in mind, we'll turn to ecologist Francisco Sanchez-Bayo, whose work traces the impact of pesticides on our environment and the world's insect populations. Then it's time to think about type. Letters have no gender, but that hasn't stopped our species ascribing them masculine and feminine qualities. It's a phenomenon type designer and scholar Marie Boulanger examines in her debut book, XX XY: Sex, letters and stereotypes. Afterward, Colin Bisset introduces us to the curious story behind the inventor of the dishwasher, Josephine Cochrane.
4/22/202254 minutes, 3 seconds
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Timothy Morton on the hyper-object, pesticides and food, plus typography and gender

The fact of the matter is we live in co-existence with our environment: our cities, our neighbourhood, animals, trees and plants… as well as our ex-lovers, however many billion corpses and the world's garbage and excrement. In the age of the Anthropocene, ecological collapse — and a pandemic — what does it mean to be 'all in this together', especially when there's no getting out of it? Timothy Morton, a Texan-based philosopher and Rita Shea Guffey Chair in English at Rice University, joins Blueprint For Living to help us with these questions and introduce us to the idea of the 'hyper-object'. With ecology in mind, we'll turn to ecologist Francisco Sanchez-Bayo, whose work traces the impact of pesticides on our environment and the world's insect populations. Then it's time to think about type. Letters have no gender, but that hasn't stopped our species ascribing them masculine and feminine qualities. It's a phenomenon type designer and scholar Marie Boulanger examines in her debut book, XX XY: Sex, letters and stereotypes. Afterward, Colin Bisset introduces us to the curious story behind the inventor of the dishwasher, Josephine Cochrane.
4/22/202254 minutes, 3 seconds
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Friendly design, forensic architecture, and Australia's Vietnamese garment outworkers

UX, or user experience, design has given us an era of near-frictionless design, where incredibly complex pieces of technology — like the smartphone — rarely require an instruction manual. Cliff Kuang is someone who's spent a lot of time thinking about the history and ethics of this field. He's the author of User Friendly: How the Hidden Rules of Design are Changing the Way We Live, Work & Play, and he tells Blueprint about why we should all be a lot more critical about what makes design 'friendly'. Then it's time to meet Eyal Weizman, founder of research agency Forensic Architecture. He helms a research collective using architectural analysis, open-source investigations, digital modelling — alongside traditional investigative methods — to investigate and expose state violence, human rights violations, and urban conflicts. Afterward, delve into an investigation of a different kind. Journalist and illustrator Emma Do and Kim Lam spent several months documenting the lives of Australia's Vietnamese garment outworkers. If you wore the likes of Country Road or Bonds in the '90s, chances are these women made your clothing in the garages and spare rooms of Australia. From Vietnam, we're heading to Brazil, via the work of the renowned Italian-Brazilian architect, Lina Bo Bardi. Colin Bisset has the inside story of the woman who cut through the boy's club of mid-century modernism.
4/15/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Friendly design, forensic architecture, and Australia's Vietnamese garment outworkers

UX, or user experience, design has given us an era of near-frictionless design, where incredibly complex pieces of technology — like the smartphone — rarely require an instruction manual. Cliff Kuang is someone who's spent a lot of time thinking about the history and ethics of this field. He's the author of User Friendly: How the Hidden Rules of Design are Changing the Way We Live, Work & Play, and he tells Blueprint about why we should all be a lot more critical about what makes design 'friendly'. Then it's time to meet Eyal Weizman, founder of research agency Forensic Architecture. He helms a research collective using architectural analysis, open-source investigations, digital modelling — alongside traditional investigative methods — to investigate and expose state violence, human rights violations, and urban conflicts. Afterward, delve into an investigation of a different kind. Journalist and illustrator Emma Do and Kim Lam spent several months documenting the lives of Australia's Vietnamese garment outworkers. If you wore the likes of Country Road or Bonds in the '90s, chances are these women made your clothing in the garages and spare rooms of Australia. From Vietnam, we're heading to Brazil, via the work of the renowned Italian-Brazilian architect, Lina Bo Bardi. Colin Bisset has the inside story of the woman who cut through the boy's club of mid-century modernism.
4/15/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Flower power, the hot cross bun, and why the city is not a computer

It's time to turn a new leaf, because Tim Entwisle, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Victoria, is taking you on a tour of the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show after it returned from a two-year pandemic pause. This includes a stroll through a garden co-designed by tennis champion and current Australian of the Year, Dylan Alcott. Then Blueprint's resident chef Annie Smithers takes Jonathan through the battle of the hot cross buns: Hot or cold? Crunchy or mushy? Chocolate or fruity? Time to rid yourself of this cross to bear. Afterward, Shannon Mattern — a social anthropologist from New York's New School for Social Research — tells us why the metaphor of the city-as-computer doesn't quite fit, and instead, we should embrace a messy city. Plus, Colin Bisset delves into the austere design language of Cesar Pelli, an architect whose skyscrapers have been likened to "the sober aesthetic of a German luxury car or a well cut suit".
4/8/202254 minutes, 6 seconds
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Flower power, the hot cross bun, and why the city is not a computer

It's time to turn a new leaf, because Tim Entwisle, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Victoria, is taking you on a tour of the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show after it returned from a two-year pandemic pause. This includes a stroll through a garden co-designed by tennis champion and current Australian of the Year, Dylan Alcott. Then Blueprint's resident chef Annie Smithers takes Jonathan through the battle of the hot cross buns: Hot or cold? Crunchy or mushy? Chocolate or fruity? Time to rid yourself of this cross to bear. Afterward, Shannon Mattern — a social anthropologist from New York's New School for Social Research — tells us why the metaphor of the city-as-computer doesn't quite fit, and instead, we should embrace a messy city. Plus, Colin Bisset delves into the austere design language of Cesar Pelli, an architect whose skyscrapers have been likened to "the sober aesthetic of a German luxury car or a well cut suit".
4/8/202254 minutes, 6 seconds
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Eric Wareheim's tall order, style on screen, and urban designers raise their voice

Plus Colin Bisset gives the lowdown on manhole covers in Japan.
4/1/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Eric Wareheim's tall order, style on screen, and urban designers raise their voice

Plus Colin Bisset gives the lowdown on manhole covers in Japan.
4/1/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Fuchsia Dunlop's portraits of Sichuan, meeting the Yarra's riverkeeper, and Paul Bangay's tips for water in gardens

Plus, Colin Bisset on the duo who created a better alternative for those serving ice-cream.
3/25/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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Fuchsia Dunlop's portraits of Sichuan, meeting the Yarra's riverkeeper, and Paul Bangay's tips for water in gardens

Plus, Colin Bisset on the duo who created a better alternative for those serving ice-cream.
3/25/202254 minutes, 7 seconds
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San Francisco's quest for the perfect bin, beyond the selfie, and fruit chutney

Plus, Colin Bisset introduces the woman responsible for the Georgian period's stone of choice… and it was completely artificial.
3/18/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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San Francisco's quest for the perfect bin, beyond the selfie, and fruit chutney

Plus, Colin Bisset introduces the woman responsible for the Georgian period's stone of choice… and it was completely artificial.
3/18/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Cheap furniture and Romanian old growth forests, on 'plant-based', feeling safe in our cities and Colin Bisset on Mole Antonelliana

What does the term 'plant-based' do that ‘vegetarian’ and ‘vegan’ cannot?
3/11/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Cheap furniture and Romanian old growth forests, on 'plant-based', feeling safe in our cities and Colin Bisset on Mole Antonelliana

What does the term 'plant-based' do that ‘vegetarian’ and ‘vegan’ cannot?
3/11/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Examining private conservation models, cities and the human body, what to do about tomatoes and a ride on the Ferris Wheel

As late summer plays out, you might be contending with an abundance of tomatoes. Chef Annie Smithers has answers for you.
3/4/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Examining private conservation models, cities and the human body, what to do about tomatoes and a ride on the Ferris Wheel

As late summer plays out, you might be contending with an abundance of tomatoes. Chef Annie Smithers has answers for you.
3/4/202254 minutes, 8 seconds
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Filipinx cuisine, Paul Bangay on soil, Eucalypt of the Year and Colin Bisset on the Pyrex jug

Stringy bark, coral gum, Silver top ash, lemon-scented gum… with over 900 specifies, it's hard to pick a favourite.
2/25/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Filipinx cuisine, Paul Bangay on soil, Eucalypt of the Year and Colin Bisset on the Pyrex jug

Stringy bark, coral gum, Silver top ash, lemon-scented gum… with over 900 specifies, it's hard to pick a favourite.
2/25/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Urban planning on Country, women and horticulture, Annie Smithers on salad dressing, and Colin Bisset on corduroy

If you're a regular listener, you'll have heard conversations with Indigenous experts on the intersection of Country and archaeology, heritage, artefacts and architecture. Now it's time to understand how it's parcelled up, packaged and sold.
2/18/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Urban planning on Country, women and horticulture, Annie Smithers on salad dressing, and Colin Bisset on corduroy

If you're a regular listener, you'll have heard conversations with Indigenous experts on the intersection of Country and archaeology, heritage, artefacts and architecture. Now it's time to understand how it's parcelled up, packaged and sold.
2/18/202253 minutes, 56 seconds
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Suburban liveability in Australia, remembering fashion titan Thierry Mugler and the iconic Tolix chair

Plus a salon concert featuring a replica of Marie Antoinette's harpsichord.
2/11/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Suburban liveability in Australia, remembering fashion titan Thierry Mugler and the iconic Tolix chair

Plus a salon concert featuring a replica of Marie Antoinette's harpsichord.
2/11/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Why Andre Leon Talley is 'the only one', and how the Maori meeting house, Hinemihi, found her way home

Plus, resident design expert Colin Bisset walks us through the cool, concrete convent of La Tourette, and chef Annie Smithers answers the ultimate question: what makes a salad, a salad?
2/4/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Why Andre Leon Talley is 'the only one', and how the Maori meeting house, Hinemihi, found her way home

Plus, resident design expert Colin Bisset walks us through the cool, concrete convent of La Tourette, and chef Annie Smithers answers the ultimate question: what makes a salad, a salad?
2/4/202254 minutes, 5 seconds
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Le Corbusier's bidet, Paul Bangay's garden essentials, and what fire can do for you

Plus, Colin Bisset delves into the design history of the top hat… an item that adorned both King George IV and Madonna.
1/28/202254 minutes, 6 seconds
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Le Corbusier's bidet, Paul Bangay's garden essentials, and what fire can do for you

Plus, Colin Bisset delves into the design history of the top hat… an item that adorned both King George IV and Madonna.
1/28/202254 minutes, 6 seconds
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Feminist architecture, the role of Vietnamese outworkers in Australian fashion, Sense of Place with Kirsty Manning and a trip to Belfast

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
1/21/202218 minutes, 39 seconds
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Feminist architecture, the role of Vietnamese outworkers in Australian fashion, Sense of Place with Kirsty Manning and a trip to Belfast

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
1/21/202218 minutes, 39 seconds
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Heritage and Country, gnocchi and brussels sprouts, an urban farm and a trip to Brasilia

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
1/14/202218 minutes, 40 seconds
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Heritage and Country, gnocchi and brussels sprouts, an urban farm and a trip to Brasilia

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
1/14/202218 minutes, 40 seconds
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Western Sydney heat, waterbirds, goodbye to ANZAC Hall and a trip to Toronto

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
1/7/202218 minutes, 59 seconds
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Western Sydney heat, waterbirds, goodbye to ANZAC Hall and a trip to Toronto

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
1/7/202218 minutes, 59 seconds
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Digital disruptions to domesticity, worn stories, brussels sprouts and a trip to Milan

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
12/31/202118 minutes, 34 seconds
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Digital disruptions to domesticity, worn stories, brussels sprouts and a trip to Milan

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
12/31/202118 minutes, 34 seconds
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Designing for disability, collectivising the pub, Frasier's apartment and a trip to South Auckland

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
12/24/202118 minutes, 45 seconds
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Designing for disability, collectivising the pub, Frasier's apartment and a trip to South Auckland

RN Summer brings you the best of Blueprint and Lost and Found.
12/24/202118 minutes, 45 seconds
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The Murrigellas' Blak Christmas, Annie Smithers and Paul Bangay's festive gifts, and a mistletoe primer

Plus, Colin Bisset explains why the sleigh has been inseparable from Christmas iconography for centuries… and take a Lost and Found trip through Melbourne in full festive regalia.
12/17/202119 minutes, 18 seconds
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The Murrigellas' Blak Christmas, Annie Smithers and Paul Bangay's festive gifts, and a mistletoe primer

Plus, Colin Bisset explains why the sleigh has been inseparable from Christmas iconography for centuries… and take a Lost and Found trip through Melbourne in full festive regalia.
12/17/202119 minutes, 18 seconds
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Australia's hospitality crisis, rethinking fires with Bruce Pascoe and Bill Gammage, and a poet unboxes 1980s Belfast

Plus, Colin Bisset on the post-modern American department stores that could, and a Lost and Found trip to Kefalonia, a Greek paradise.
12/10/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Australia's hospitality crisis, rethinking fires with Bruce Pascoe and Bill Gammage, and a poet unboxes 1980s Belfast

Plus, Colin Bisset on the post-modern American department stores that could, and a Lost and Found trip to Kefalonia, a Greek paradise.
12/10/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Architects for climate action, Annie Smithers makes panforte, rewilding in Florida and kosher sourdough for Chanukah

Plus Colin Bisset on the Butler Sink and a Lost and Found journey to Lisbon.
12/3/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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Architects for climate action, Annie Smithers makes panforte, rewilding in Florida and kosher sourdough for Chanukah

Plus Colin Bisset on the Butler Sink and a Lost and Found journey to Lisbon.
12/3/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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The myths of 'friendly' design, Australia's Highway 1, and a database of a traditional place names

Plus, Colin Bisset on the links between the court of Versailles and one of the most popular chair designs of the 21st-century… and a trip to the city that's taken a bit of Versailles with it… Las Vegas.
11/26/202119 minutes, 17 seconds
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The myths of 'friendly' design, Australia's Highway 1, and a database of a traditional place names

Plus, Colin Bisset on the links between the court of Versailles and one of the most popular chair designs of the 21st-century… and a trip to the city that's taken a bit of Versailles with it… Las Vegas.
11/26/202119 minutes, 17 seconds
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How to put an end to "crap" architecture, make meringues, and travel to 1960s Swansea

Melbourne's Deputy Lord Mayor has introduced two new design review panels. Does this form of advisory city-making actually work? Two experts join Blueprint to discuss the history and merits of this process. Plus, Annie Smithers whips up a meringue, and Colin Bisset takes you on a tour of the Korakuen Garden. And for Lost and Found, eminent Irish-Australian psychiatrist Patrick McGorry takes you to his childhood in Wales.
11/19/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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How to put an end to "crap" architecture, make meringues, and travel to 1960s Swansea

Melbourne's Deputy Lord Mayor has introduced two new design review panels. Does this form of advisory city-making actually work? Two experts join Blueprint to discuss the history and merits of this process. Plus, Annie Smithers whips up a meringue, and Colin Bisset takes you on a tour of the Korakuen Garden. And for Lost and Found, eminent Irish-Australian psychiatrist Patrick McGorry takes you to his childhood in Wales.
11/19/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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Ruby Tandoh's cook as you are, designer Jordan Gogos on Kato Assos, a wake of crows, and a trip to Mexico City

Plus Colin Bisset on the monocle.
11/12/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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Ruby Tandoh's cook as you are, designer Jordan Gogos on Kato Assos, a wake of crows, and a trip to Mexico City

Plus Colin Bisset on the monocle.
11/12/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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Wilderness myths, Amsterdam's night mayor, and the cruise ship that started it all…

Plus, let us send you on your way to the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius with a takeaway pack of Annie Smithers' frittatas.
11/5/202119 minutes, 19 seconds
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Wilderness myths, Amsterdam's night mayor, and the cruise ship that started it all…

Plus, let us send you on your way to the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius with a takeaway pack of Annie Smithers' frittatas.
11/5/202119 minutes, 19 seconds
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Backyard bees, Frankenstein cities, and a walk through the cemetery

Plus, discover the strange but fascinating world of industrialised food production, and the origins of the rubber band.
10/29/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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Backyard bees, Frankenstein cities, and a walk through the cemetery

Plus, discover the strange but fascinating world of industrialised food production, and the origins of the rubber band.
10/29/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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What has gender got to do with type? Plus Annie Smithers on fruit mince, creole classicism in Malaysia and a Lost and Found journey to Bath.

What has gender got to do with type? Well, nothing actually. But that doesn't stop us from ascribing gender to it. Hear from type designer Marie Boulanger, whose new book tries to understand why we keep doing it. Plus, architectural scholar Soon-Tzu Speechley on Malaysia and Singapore's 'creole' classical architecture; Annie Smithers on fruit mince and pudding; and a look at how one person's empathy revolutionised agricultural design… then we're off to Bath.
10/22/202119 minutes, 19 seconds
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What has gender got to do with type? Plus Annie Smithers on fruit mince, creole classicism in Malaysia and a Lost and Found journey to Bath.

What has gender got to do with type? Well, nothing actually. But that doesn't stop us from ascribing gender to it. Hear from type designer Marie Boulanger, whose new book tries to understand why we keep doing it. Plus, architectural scholar Soon-Tzu Speechley on Malaysia and Singapore's 'creole' classical architecture; Annie Smithers on fruit mince and pudding; and a look at how one person's empathy revolutionised agricultural design… then we're off to Bath.
10/22/202119 minutes, 19 seconds
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Love-bombing Tasmania, a sleepy seaside town, and the psychology of fashion

Plus, pay a visit to the Albi Cathedral with Colin Bisset before riding the Hallyu wave to Seoul on this week's Lost and Found.
10/15/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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Love-bombing Tasmania, a sleepy seaside town, and the psychology of fashion

Plus, pay a visit to the Albi Cathedral with Colin Bisset before riding the Hallyu wave to Seoul on this week's Lost and Found.
10/15/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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What if the world stopped shopping? A spring walk with Tim Entwisle and a trip to Western Sydney

Plus, hear Colin Bisset on iconic garden designer Lawrence Johnston.
10/8/202119 minutes, 20 seconds
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What if the world stopped shopping? A spring walk with Tim Entwisle and a trip to Western Sydney

Plus, hear Colin Bisset on iconic garden designer Lawrence Johnston.
10/8/202119 minutes, 20 seconds
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Stephanie Alexander, the crowd in a time of crisis, SA's Nature Festival… plus a trip to Florida with a bit of chintz!

Join chef and former librarian Stephanie Alexander in a wide-ranging discussion about the joys of home cooking. Plus, urban scholar Kim Dovey tells us what the study of informal urbanism can say about the crowd in a time of crisis; a dispatch from South Australia's Nature Festival; and Colin Bisset gets chintzy. Then, a trip to one of America's beguiling states, Florida.
10/1/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Stephanie Alexander, the crowd in a time of crisis, SA's Nature Festival… plus a trip to Florida with a bit of chintz!

Join chef and former librarian Stephanie Alexander in a wide-ranging discussion about the joys of home cooking. Plus, urban scholar Kim Dovey tells us what the study of informal urbanism can say about the crowd in a time of crisis; a dispatch from South Australia's Nature Festival; and Colin Bisset gets chintzy. Then, a trip to one of America's beguiling states, Florida.
10/1/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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A blueprint to breathe, cook, clean, read… and find your bird of the year

What design interventions do we need to improve our indoor air quality? Plus, Annie Smithers on kitchen gadgets and tools, Sean Dooley gives us the word about the birds, and Colin Bisset traces the origins of white goods. Then escape to the world's most enchanting bookshops.
9/24/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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A blueprint to breathe, cook, clean, read… and find your bird of the year

What design interventions do we need to improve our indoor air quality? Plus, Annie Smithers on kitchen gadgets and tools, Sean Dooley gives us the word about the birds, and Colin Bisset traces the origins of white goods. Then escape to the world's most enchanting bookshops.
9/24/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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On speculative design, street vendors, convertibles, bookshops, and rude British geography

How can speculative design help us see our cities beyond the colonial gaze? Plus, hear about the fate of New York's much-loved street vendors, head a trip around the world via bookshops, and discover the UK's profanity-laden geography.
9/17/202119 minutes, 4 seconds
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On speculative design, street vendors, convertibles, bookshops, and rude British geography

How can speculative design help us see our cities beyond the colonial gaze? Plus, hear about the fate of New York's much-loved street vendors, head a trip around the world via bookshops, and discover the UK's profanity-laden geography.
9/17/202119 minutes, 4 seconds
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Healing oceans through 3D-printing, the Bangladesh Accord, a sauna in the Karelia woods and a trip to Belfast

Take a stroll through the woods on the Russian-Finnish border — or your favourite bit of public space — to hear about how 3D-printed ceramics are helping vulnerable coral reefs; why garment workers are celebrating the renewal of an ethical manufacturing accord; and why Linda Bo Bardi is a Brazilian visionary. Plus, discover Belfast's layers of complex history.
9/10/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Healing oceans through 3D-printing, the Bangladesh Accord, a sauna in the Karelia woods and a trip to Belfast

Take a stroll through the woods on the Russian-Finnish border — or your favourite bit of public space — to hear about how 3D-printed ceramics are helping vulnerable coral reefs; why garment workers are celebrating the renewal of an ethical manufacturing accord; and why Linda Bo Bardi is a Brazilian visionary. Plus, discover Belfast's layers of complex history.
9/10/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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On Melbourne modernism, car design, the renaissance, fruitcake and the Torres Strait

A diverse grab-bag awaits in this latest edition of Blueprint, with a pre-lockdown walking tour of Melbourne modernism; an audience with the highly-award car designer Ian Callum; Annie Smithers' family recipe for Father's Day fruitcake; and Colin Bisset's portrait of a prolific renaissance man. Then top it all off with a trip to the Torres Strait.
9/3/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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On Melbourne modernism, car design, the renaissance, fruitcake and the Torres Strait

A diverse grab-bag awaits in this latest edition of Blueprint, with a pre-lockdown walking tour of Melbourne modernism; an audience with the highly-award car designer Ian Callum; Annie Smithers' family recipe for Father's Day fruitcake; and Colin Bisset's portrait of a prolific renaissance man. Then top it all off with a trip to the Torres Strait.
9/3/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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Reknit revolution, Afghan culinary richness and an urban tramp through the enchanted city

It's time to join the reknit revolution — thread by thread. Then it's time for some journeys: a studio visit to artist Pru La Motte; Oxford with Afghan author Durkhanai Ayubi; and Colin Bisset's tour of the Irish manor Angelica Houston once called home. While you're at it, leave some room for some butter courtesy of Annie Smithers. And to top it all off — a journey of the mind through the enchanted city.
8/27/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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Reknit revolution, Afghan culinary richness and an urban tramp through the enchanted city

It's time to join the reknit revolution — thread by thread. Then it's time for some journeys: a studio visit to artist Pru La Motte; Oxford with Afghan author Durkhanai Ayubi; and Colin Bisset's tour of the Irish manor Angelica Houston once called home. While you're at it, leave some room for some butter courtesy of Annie Smithers. And to top it all off — a journey of the mind through the enchanted city.
8/27/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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A wander through the design museum, keeping houses and Country, iconic slippers and a journey to Manila

Design is one of those elusive concepts that's hard to pin down, but if anyone can do it, emeritus director of the Design Museum Dejan Sudjic can.
8/20/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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A wander through the design museum, keeping houses and Country, iconic slippers and a journey to Manila

Design is one of those elusive concepts that's hard to pin down, but if anyone can do it, emeritus director of the Design Museum Dejan Sudjic can.
8/20/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Tools for a resilient and kinder world, the Gothenburg Model, plus a trip to Taipei

What plants will survive in a warming world? Let landscape designer Paul Bangay suggest some options. Afterward, take a trip to Renmark, South Australia, which still is home to a collectivised pub inspired by a curious quirk of Swedish history. Then Blueprint regulars Annie Smithers and Colin Bisset are in to show us through visions of a kinder life. Top it all off with a trip to Taiwan's capital, Taipei.
8/13/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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Tools for a resilient and kinder world, the Gothenburg Model, plus a trip to Taipei

What plants will survive in a warming world? Let landscape designer Paul Bangay suggest some options. Afterward, take a trip to Renmark, South Australia, which still is home to a collectivised pub inspired by a curious quirk of Swedish history. Then Blueprint regulars Annie Smithers and Colin Bisset are in to show us through visions of a kinder life. Top it all off with a trip to Taiwan's capital, Taipei.
8/13/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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The politics of glass in Beirut, the rush of ocean swimming in winter, Kevin O'Brien on architecture and a mind journey to Tokyo

A weekly rummage through the essential cultural ingredients for a good life — design, architecture, food, travel, fashion.
8/7/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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The politics of glass in Beirut, the rush of ocean swimming in winter, Kevin O'Brien on architecture and a mind journey to Tokyo

A weekly rummage through the essential cultural ingredients for a good life — design, architecture, food, travel, fashion.
8/7/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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The politics of glass in Beirut, the rush of ocean swimming in winter, Kevin O'Brien on architecture and a mind journey to Tokyo

Plus Colin Bisset on Russian architect, Konstantin Melnikov
8/6/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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The politics of glass in Beirut, the rush of ocean swimming in winter, Kevin O'Brien on architecture and a mind journey to Tokyo

Plus Colin Bisset on Russian architect, Konstantin Melnikov
8/6/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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A wander through the Nicholas Building, winter soup, Olympic cauldrons and Norman Swan's Glasgow

Inside the campaign to keep Melbourne's Nicholas Building a hub for creativity, as the 10-storey CBD building is up for sale. Plus show regulars Annie Smithers tells Jonathan all about soups, while Colin Bisset takes us through the design history of Olympic cauldrons. Then buckle up for a tour of Glasgow by none other than the ABC's Norman Swan.
7/31/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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A wander through the Nicholas Building, winter soup, Olympic cauldrons and Norman Swan's Glasgow

Inside the campaign to keep Melbourne's Nicholas Building a hub for creativity, as the 10-storey CBD building is up for sale. Plus show regulars Annie Smithers tells Jonathan all about soups, while Colin Bisset takes us through the design history of Olympic cauldrons. Then buckle up for a tour of Glasgow by none other than the ABC's Norman Swan.
7/31/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Greenwashing the Olympics, designing for disability, a winter wander, Wunderlich… and the NZ travel bubble

With another Olympics upon us, we ponder whether the global sporting roadshow can ever be sustainable? Plus, it's time to consider what we mean when we design for those living with disability. Then, Tim Entwisle takes us for a COVID-safe stroll around Melbourne's Royal Botanic Gardens. He followed by Blueprint's resident design expert, Colin Bisset, who introduces us to the three British brothers who transformed Australian rooftops. And finally, take a mental trip across the ditch to discover the possibilities of the New Zealand travel bubble.
7/23/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Greenwashing the Olympics, designing for disability, a winter wander, Wunderlich… and the NZ travel bubble

With another Olympics upon us, we ponder whether the global sporting roadshow can ever be sustainable? Plus, it's time to consider what we mean when we design for those living with disability. Then, Tim Entwisle takes us for a COVID-safe stroll around Melbourne's Royal Botanic Gardens. He followed by Blueprint's resident design expert, Colin Bisset, who introduces us to the three British brothers who transformed Australian rooftops. And finally, take a mental trip across the ditch to discover the possibilities of the New Zealand travel bubble.
7/23/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Timothy Morton, potstickers part two, zoot suits and a trip to London's urban spaces

What does it mean to be "all in this together"? It's a repeated phrase of the pandemic, but philosopher Timothy Morton says it takes on a particular resonance in the Anthropocene. 
7/16/202119 minutes, 14 seconds
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Timothy Morton, potstickers part two, zoot suits and a trip to London's urban spaces

What does it mean to be "all in this together"? It's a repeated phrase of the pandemic, but philosopher Timothy Morton says it takes on a particular resonance in the Anthropocene. 
7/16/202119 minutes, 14 seconds
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Heritage and Country, native plants and seed propagation, Indigenous cuisine and fashion at Barunga Festival

Plus a Lost and Found special on Country.
7/10/202119 minutes, 37 seconds
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Heritage and Country, native plants and seed propagation, Indigenous cuisine and fashion at Barunga Festival

Plus a Lost and Found special on Country.
7/10/202119 minutes, 37 seconds
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Fight for your right to repair, cool, and restore… plus a trip to Budapest via Marton, NZ

This week, join Blueprint as we look at restoration: of our environment, buildings, and gadgets. Plus, Kiwi comedian Guy Williams takes you to New Zealand's haunted town of Marton, while Lost and Found takes us to Budapest.
7/2/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Fight for your right to repair, cool, and restore… plus a trip to Budapest via Marton, NZ

This week, join Blueprint as we look at restoration: of our environment, buildings, and gadgets. Plus, Kiwi comedian Guy Williams takes you to New Zealand's haunted town of Marton, while Lost and Found takes us to Budapest.
7/2/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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London's revolutionary feminist architects, Ellery and upcycling, Potstickers, and Lazy Susans… plus climbing Mount Bogong

Who is the built world designed and made for? For the longest time (and possibly still) the answer was white, able-bodied men. London's Matrix Feminist Design Co-operative sought to change all of that, bringing feminist-centred architecture to the capital from the 1980s. Co-founder Jos Boys joins Blueprint, as London's Barbican mounts a retrospective of her collective.
6/25/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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London's revolutionary feminist architects, Ellery and upcycling, Potstickers, and Lazy Susans… plus climbing Mount Bogong

Who is the built world designed and made for? For the longest time (and possibly still) the answer was white, able-bodied men. London's Matrix Feminist Design Co-operative sought to change all of that, bringing feminist-centred architecture to the capital from the 1980s. Co-founder Jos Boys joins Blueprint, as London's Barbican mounts a retrospective of her collective.
6/25/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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Architectural longevity, Eucalypts and disaster, the brain on food, and a trip to Byron Bay

How long do you think buildings should last for? If you happen to be the Australian War Memorial's Anzac Hall… not very long. Plus, understanding Eucalypts amid climate change, the brain's perceptions of food, and grab your bobby pin… because it's time to do some mending!
6/18/202119 minutes, 37 seconds
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Architectural longevity, Eucalypts and disaster, the brain on food, and a trip to Byron Bay

How long do you think buildings should last for? If you happen to be the Australian War Memorial's Anzac Hall… not very long. Plus, understanding Eucalypts amid climate change, the brain's perceptions of food, and grab your bobby pin… because it's time to do some mending!
6/18/202119 minutes, 37 seconds
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New African architecture, the Murrigellas, pancakes with Annie Smithers, and a trip to Silicon Valley

Scottish-Ghanaian architect Lesley Lokko joins Blueprint to discuss architecture, identity and race. Plus, it's time to introduce yourself to the Murrigellas — a group of friends (all Murri women, plus one Olive fella) inspired by none other than Nigella Lawson.
6/11/202119 minutes, 21 seconds
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New African architecture, the Murrigellas, pancakes with Annie Smithers, and a trip to Silicon Valley

Scottish-Ghanaian architect Lesley Lokko joins Blueprint to discuss architecture, identity and race. Plus, it's time to introduce yourself to the Murrigellas — a group of friends (all Murri women, plus one Olive fella) inspired by none other than Nigella Lawson.
6/11/202119 minutes, 21 seconds
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A new resource for Sydney foodies, reflections on fashion week, a sense of place with Rohan Storey and a trip to Milan

6/4/202119 minutes, 29 seconds
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A new resource for Sydney foodies, reflections on fashion week, a sense of place with Rohan Storey and a trip to Milan

6/4/202119 minutes, 29 seconds
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A new resource for Sydney foodies, reflections on fashion week, a sense of place with Rohan Storey and a trip to Milan

6/4/202119 minutes, 29 seconds
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A new resource for Sydney foodies, reflections on fashion week, a sense of place with Rohan Storey and a trip to Milan

6/4/202119 minutes, 29 seconds
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Mark Bittman on the future of food, gnocchi with Annie Smithers, pre-fabricated houses and a trip to Richard Leplastrier's house

Veteran New York Times food writer and author Mark Bittman says it's high time for those in the developed world to reshape its relationship with food.
5/28/202119 minutes, 22 seconds
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Mark Bittman on the future of food, gnocchi with Annie Smithers, pre-fabricated houses and a trip to Richard Leplastrier's house

Veteran New York Times food writer and author Mark Bittman says it's high time for those in the developed world to reshape its relationship with food.
5/28/202119 minutes, 22 seconds
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Scott Ludlam's Perth, Vietnamese outworkers, and the 'benevolent' asylum

Let a former Australian Greens senator take you for a spin around southern Perth with some Talking Heads. Plus, a new book details the histories of Australia's Vietnamese garment outworkers.
5/21/202119 minutes, 23 seconds
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Scott Ludlam's Perth, Vietnamese outworkers, and the 'benevolent' asylum

Let a former Australian Greens senator take you for a spin around southern Perth with some Talking Heads. Plus, a new book details the histories of Australia's Vietnamese garment outworkers.
5/21/202119 minutes, 23 seconds
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Rethinking Frasier, cut flowers, and Brussel sprouts — plus a trip to St Petersburg

Flowers. Frasier. Fun. They're elements that make a good blueprint. Plus, an re-introduction to the oft-maligned Brussel sprout, and later, a trip to '90s St Petersburg with writer Maria Tumarkin.
5/14/202119 minutes, 37 seconds
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Rethinking Frasier, cut flowers, and Brussel sprouts — plus a trip to St Petersburg

Flowers. Frasier. Fun. They're elements that make a good blueprint. Plus, an re-introduction to the oft-maligned Brussel sprout, and later, a trip to '90s St Petersburg with writer Maria Tumarkin.
5/14/202119 minutes, 37 seconds
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Sartorial stories, the Côte d’Azur, a conversation with Dan Hill and a trip to the Botanic Gardens

5/7/202119 minutes, 19 seconds
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Sartorial stories, the Côte d’Azur, a conversation with Dan Hill and a trip to the Botanic Gardens

5/7/202119 minutes, 19 seconds
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Cities and climate change, jam making and a journey to Berlin

4/30/202119 minutes, 23 seconds
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Cities and climate change, jam making and a journey to Berlin

4/30/202119 minutes, 23 seconds
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Big Weather and Country, a sense of place with Karla Grant and a walk through Queer Melbourne

4/23/202120 minutes, 20 seconds
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Big Weather and Country, a sense of place with Karla Grant and a walk through Queer Melbourne

4/23/202120 minutes, 20 seconds
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World travel with Anthony Bourdain, disrupting Airbnb and a journey to the Greek Islands of Paros and Hydra

4/16/202119 minutes, 12 seconds
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World travel with Anthony Bourdain, disrupting Airbnb and a journey to the Greek Islands of Paros and Hydra

4/16/202119 minutes, 12 seconds
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Designing a new normal, an ode to the slow cooker and a journey to Brasilia

4/9/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Designing a new normal, an ode to the slow cooker and a journey to Brasilia

4/9/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Modern apartment interiors, the birds of Australia's inland wetlands and a journey to Jerusalem

4/2/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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Modern apartment interiors, the birds of Australia's inland wetlands and a journey to Jerusalem

4/2/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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Mary Quant's fashion, Canada's buttergate and a journey to Vilnius

3/26/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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Mary Quant's fashion, Canada's buttergate and a journey to Vilnius

3/26/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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Heat in western Sydney, urban farming and a love letter to the MCG

3/19/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Heat in western Sydney, urban farming and a love letter to the MCG

3/19/202119 minutes, 35 seconds
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Reclaiming the city, fermenting in Preston and a journey to Bergen

3/12/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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Reclaiming the city, fermenting in Preston and a journey to Bergen

3/12/202119 minutes, 36 seconds
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Lesley Lokko on architecture, Case Study Houses and a journey to Toronto

3/5/202119 minutes, 17 seconds
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Lesley Lokko on architecture, Case Study Houses and a journey to Toronto

3/5/202119 minutes, 17 seconds
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Reknit revolution, Afghan culinary richness and an urban tramp through the enchanted city

2/26/202119 minutes, 16 seconds
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Reknit revolution, Afghan culinary richness and an urban tramp through the enchanted city

2/26/202119 minutes, 16 seconds
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Wildfires and land use, food and memoir and a journey to South Auckland

2/19/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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Wildfires and land use, food and memoir and a journey to South Auckland

2/19/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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The great bucatini shortage, climate watching and a journey to Rome with the poets

2/12/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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The great bucatini shortage, climate watching and a journey to Rome with the poets

2/12/202119 minutes, 15 seconds
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Nordic noir

From the genre's Marxist origins to the bleak domestic lives of Scandinavia's rogue television detectives, we explore the past, present and possible future of Nordic noir.
2/8/202113 minutes, 44 seconds
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Nordic noir

From the genre's Marxist origins to the bleak domestic lives of Scandinavia's rogue television detectives, we explore the past, present and possible future of Nordic noir.
2/8/202113 minutes, 44 seconds
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Killing Sydney, fashion and psychoanalysis and a journey to the capital of Nordic Noir, Copenhagen

2/5/202119 minutes, 32 seconds
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Killing Sydney, fashion and psychoanalysis and a journey to the capital of Nordic Noir, Copenhagen

2/5/202119 minutes, 32 seconds
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The architecture of bathing, zucchini pasta, food and class and a journey to Copenhagen

1/29/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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The architecture of bathing, zucchini pasta, food and class and a journey to Copenhagen

1/29/202119 minutes, 34 seconds
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History of the corridor, the invention of the slow cooker, COVID-19 and the meat industry, polar fleece and a journey to Christchurch

1/22/202119 minutes, 17 seconds
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History of the corridor, the invention of the slow cooker, COVID-19 and the meat industry, polar fleece and a journey to Christchurch

1/22/202119 minutes, 17 seconds
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Beyond the North Wind, Rick Morton's sense of place, Tunde Wey and a journey to Lake Burley Griffin

1/15/202118 minutes, 54 seconds
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Beyond the North Wind, Rick Morton's sense of place, Tunde Wey and a journey to Lake Burley Griffin

1/15/202118 minutes, 54 seconds
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The architecture of violence, Jonathan Safran Foer on meat, Felastin, the history of the bowler hat and a journey to Reykjavik

1/8/202118 minutes, 44 seconds
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The architecture of violence, Jonathan Safran Foer on meat, Felastin, the history of the bowler hat and a journey to Reykjavik

1/8/202118 minutes, 44 seconds
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The politics of street food, death of minimalism, the architecture of the swimming pool and a journey to Vienna

1/1/202118 minutes, 33 seconds
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The politics of street food, death of minimalism, the architecture of the swimming pool and a journey to Vienna

1/1/202118 minutes, 33 seconds
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The architects who shaped Jerusalem, Ruby Tandoh, the problem with tiny houses and a journey to Brixton

12/25/202018 minutes, 2 seconds
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The architects who shaped Jerusalem, Ruby Tandoh, the problem with tiny houses and a journey to Brixton

12/25/202018 minutes, 2 seconds
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Bruce Pascoe and Vicky Shukuroglou on Loving Country

Hear the full interview, as recorded for Lost and Found: Country.
12/21/202033 minutes, 9 seconds
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Bruce Pascoe and Vicky Shukuroglou on Loving Country

Hear the full interview, as recorded for Lost and Found: Country.
12/21/202033 minutes, 9 seconds
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A visit to a farmhouse, Christmas cooking, Tim Ritchie on Sydney Harbour and a journey on Country

12/18/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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A visit to a farmhouse, Christmas cooking, Tim Ritchie on Sydney Harbour and a journey on Country

12/18/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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A cultural history of Plexiglass, the Australian love affair with the lawn and a journey to Seoul

12/11/202019 minutes, 20 seconds
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A cultural history of Plexiglass, the Australian love affair with the lawn and a journey to Seoul

12/11/202019 minutes, 20 seconds
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The art of food pairing, an ode to the orchid, how to picnic well and a journey to Montreal

12/4/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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The art of food pairing, an ode to the orchid, how to picnic well and a journey to Montreal

12/4/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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The Big 20: Our century so far in gardens, food, fashion, travel, design and a trip to the Golf course

11/27/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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The Big 20: Our century so far in gardens, food, fashion, travel, design and a trip to the Golf course

11/27/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Letters to Stephanie Alexander

Nigella Lawson, Ben Shewry, Karen Martini and Annie Smithers on the enduring legacy of the doyenne of Australian food, Stephanie Alexander, on her 80th birthday.
11/23/20206 minutes, 43 seconds
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Letters to Stephanie Alexander

Nigella Lawson, Ben Shewry, Karen Martini and Annie Smithers on the enduring legacy of the doyenne of Australian food, Stephanie Alexander, on her 80th birthday.
11/23/20206 minutes, 43 seconds
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Stephanie Alexander's life in food, a springtime botanical walk and a trip to Los Angeles

11/20/202019 minutes
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Stephanie Alexander's life in food, a springtime botanical walk and a trip to Los Angeles

11/20/202019 minutes
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Los Angeles food tour

The spiciest Thai curry, the best hot chicken outside Nashville and num pang in Lincoln Heights: Jenn Harris on the thrilling, diverse, fiery food of LA.
11/16/20207 minutes, 40 seconds
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BLUEPRINT BONUS: Los Angeles food tour

The spiciest Thai curry, the best hot chicken outside Nashville and num pang in Lincoln Heights: Jenn Harris on the thrilling, diverse, fiery food of LA.
11/16/20207 minutes, 40 seconds
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Piinpi, Richard Flanagan on Tasmania and a journey to Los Angeles

11/13/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Piinpi, Richard Flanagan on Tasmania and a journey to Los Angeles

11/13/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Roman Mars on the 99% invisible city, the Bent Spoon and a journey to Naples

11/6/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Roman Mars on the 99% invisible city, the Bent Spoon and a journey to Naples

11/6/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Urban Auscultation, Sarah Wilson on wellness and a journey to Bondi

10/30/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Urban Auscultation, Sarah Wilson on wellness and a journey to Bondi

10/30/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Future of plants and fungi, architecture of the university and an urbanist's tour of Berlin

10/23/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Future of plants and fungi, architecture of the university and an urbanist's tour of Berlin

10/23/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Hunger in Australia, air-conditioned cities and a journey to Jerusalem

Going hungry, Alex Wheatle on Port Maria, Jamaica, air conditioned cities and a journey to Jerusalem
10/16/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Hunger in Australia, air-conditioned cities and a journey to Jerusalem

Going hungry, Alex Wheatle on Port Maria, Jamaica, air conditioned cities and a journey to Jerusalem
10/16/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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The legacy of Kenzo Takada, Hetty McKinnon on ancestry and authenticity and a journey to the Torres Strait Islands

10/9/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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The legacy of Kenzo Takada, Hetty McKinnon on ancestry and authenticity and a journey to the Torres Strait Islands

10/9/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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Regency fashion, urban inequality, chopping onions and a journey to Jakarta

10/2/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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Regency fashion, urban inequality, chopping onions and a journey to Jakarta

10/2/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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The Futurist Cookbook, reclaiming the energy commons, plant societies and a journey to Galway

9/25/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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The Futurist Cookbook, reclaiming the energy commons, plant societies and a journey to Galway

9/25/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Politics and fashion, the Conran effect, David Pocock and a journey to Bergen, Norway

9/18/202018 minutes, 12 seconds
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Politics and fashion, the Conran effect, David Pocock and a journey to Bergen, Norway

9/18/202018 minutes, 12 seconds
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Momofuku's David Chang, fashion after COVID-19 and the Tour de France

9/11/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Momofuku's David Chang, fashion after COVID-19 and the Tour de France

9/11/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Uyghur forced labour, journeys in springtime, the Harry Styles cardigan and a journey through Prague

9/4/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Uyghur forced labour, journeys in springtime, the Harry Styles cardigan and a journey through Prague

9/4/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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New York is sinking, Melania's rose garden, an iconic Soviet cookbook, First Dog on the Moon and a detour to Oahu, Hawai'i

8/28/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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New York is sinking, Melania's rose garden, an iconic Soviet cookbook, First Dog on the Moon and a detour to Oahu, Hawai'i

8/28/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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The politics of face masks, the evolution of chips, Ballet Mécanique and a journey to Helsinki

8/21/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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The politics of face masks, the evolution of chips, Ballet Mécanique and a journey to Helsinki

8/21/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Precarious supply chains, Murrigellas, Martin Margiela, First Dog on the Moon and a journey to Broken Hill

8/14/202019 minutes, 38 seconds
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Precarious supply chains, Murrigellas, Martin Margiela, First Dog on the Moon and a journey to Broken Hill

8/14/202019 minutes, 38 seconds
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COVID-19 and the meat industry, Rick Morton on isolation in far west Queensland, the rudiments of boiling and a trip to Cranbourne Gardens

8/7/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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COVID-19 and the meat industry, Rick Morton on isolation in far west Queensland, the rudiments of boiling and a trip to Cranbourne Gardens

8/7/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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Cyclist dehumanisation, a history of the psychoanalytic couch, in defence of durians and a journey to Buenos Aires

7/31/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Cyclist dehumanisation, a history of the psychoanalytic couch, in defence of durians and a journey to Buenos Aires

7/31/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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The story of sambal, memory and monuments, the principles of cookery and a journey to Mannahatta

7/24/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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The story of sambal, memory and monuments, the principles of cookery and a journey to Mannahatta

7/24/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Against tiny homes, fashion transparency, the intoxicating aroma of fast food and a journey to Brixton

7/17/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Against tiny homes, fashion transparency, the intoxicating aroma of fast food and a journey to Brixton

7/17/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Urban politics of COVID-19, Italy's Pasta Grannies, Bill Henson's garden, Tony Tan on Hong Kong and a journey to Hanoi

7/10/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Urban politics of COVID-19, Italy's Pasta Grannies, Bill Henson's garden, Tony Tan on Hong Kong and a journey to Hanoi

7/10/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Architecture in Jerusalem, the Black Chef Movement, indigenous plant gardening and a journey to Lake Burley Griffin

7/3/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Architecture in Jerusalem, the Black Chef Movement, indigenous plant gardening and a journey to Lake Burley Griffin

7/3/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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The life and death of the corridor, reclaiming the city, food in fiction, Rober Mallet-Stevens and a journey to the farm

6/26/202019 minutes, 39 seconds
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The life and death of the corridor, reclaiming the city, food in fiction, Rober Mallet-Stevens and a journey to the farm

6/26/202019 minutes, 39 seconds
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Forensic Architecture and urban violence, Jonathan Safran Foer on the end of meat, the invention of the slow cooker and a journey to Budapest

6/19/202018 minutes, 54 seconds
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Forensic Architecture and urban violence, Jonathan Safran Foer on the end of meat, the invention of the slow cooker and a journey to Budapest

6/19/202018 minutes, 54 seconds
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Tunde Wey on the death of the restaurant industry, architecture in global socialism, the history of the cable car and a journey to Reykjavik

6/12/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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Tunde Wey on the death of the restaurant industry, architecture in global socialism, the history of the cable car and a journey to Reykjavik

6/12/202019 minutes, 36 seconds
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The story of minimalism, a love letter to Palestinian food, Ellena Savage on Schoenberg and a journey to Zurich

6/5/202019 minutes, 28 seconds
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The story of minimalism, a love letter to Palestinian food, Ellena Savage on Schoenberg and a journey to Zurich

6/5/202019 minutes, 28 seconds
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The death of the office, autumn plants, a granola masterclass and a virtual tour of the Brooklyn Bridge

5/29/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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The death of the office, autumn plants, a granola masterclass and a virtual tour of the Brooklyn Bridge

5/29/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Public transport after COVID-19, ghost signs, First Dog on the Moon and a journey to Patagonia

5/22/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Public transport after COVID-19, ghost signs, First Dog on the Moon and a journey to Patagonia

5/22/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ruby Tandoh on lockdown London, the architecture of psychoanalysis, modern mending and Boston

5/15/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Ruby Tandoh on lockdown London, the architecture of psychoanalysis, modern mending and Boston

5/15/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Lockdown garden and a mind journey to Tokyo

5/8/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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Lockdown garden and a mind journey to Tokyo

5/8/202019 minutes, 35 seconds
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The architecture of dread, mustard museum, seeds after bushfire, Amsterdam

5/1/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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The architecture of dread, mustard museum, seeds after bushfire, Amsterdam

5/1/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Russian food in the Arctic circle, privacy in a pandemic, Japanese curry, Viennese social housing and the Great Barrier Reef

4/24/202019 minutes, 6 seconds
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Russian food in the Arctic circle, privacy in a pandemic, Japanese curry, Viennese social housing and the Great Barrier Reef

4/24/202019 minutes, 6 seconds
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Architecture after COVID-19, First Dog on the Moon, a sourdough library and the empty city

4/17/202019 minutes, 5 seconds
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Architecture after COVID-19, First Dog on the Moon, a sourdough library and the empty city

4/17/202019 minutes, 5 seconds
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Cities in the time of Covid-19, a mind-jaunt around the Botanic Gardens, tomato rudimentals and Samoa via Braybrook

4/10/202019 minutes
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Cities in the time of Covid-19, a mind-jaunt around the Botanic Gardens, tomato rudimentals and Samoa via Braybrook

4/10/202019 minutes
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Stephanie Alexander, Ben Shewry, Hetty McKinnon and more on their lockdown kitchens and a journey to Mount Everest

4/3/202019 minutes, 30 seconds
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Stephanie Alexander, Ben Shewry, Hetty McKinnon and more on their lockdown kitchens and a journey to Mount Everest

4/3/202019 minutes, 30 seconds
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Alison Roman, urban politics of COVID-19, Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and Berlin

3/27/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Alison Roman, urban politics of COVID-19, Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and Berlin

3/27/202019 minutes, 34 seconds
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Urbanisation and COVID-19, an unplanned wandering, Persian new year, budget food and Montreal

3/20/202019 minutes, 28 seconds
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Urbanisation and COVID-19, an unplanned wandering, Persian new year, budget food and Montreal

3/20/202019 minutes, 28 seconds
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Extinction food, Japanese Modernism, a late summer salad, Buenos Aires' Biblioteca Nacional and Moscow

3/13/202019 minutes, 10 seconds
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Extinction food, Japanese Modernism, a late summer salad, Buenos Aires' Biblioteca Nacional and Moscow

3/13/202019 minutes, 10 seconds
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Quarantine cuisine, classical architecture and the far right, John Glover's house and garden and Finland

3/6/202020 minutes, 7 seconds
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Quarantine cuisine, classical architecture and the far right, John Glover's house and garden and Finland

3/6/202020 minutes, 7 seconds
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Neoliberal housing, Jenny Munro on Redfern, the Etch-a-Sketch and Christchurch

2/28/202018 minutes, 56 seconds
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Neoliberal housing, Jenny Munro on Redfern, the Etch-a-Sketch and Christchurch

2/28/202018 minutes, 56 seconds
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Design and the Green New Deal, summer gardens, an embassy in Berlin, the chainsaw, Hanoi

2/21/202019 minutes, 55 seconds
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Design and the Green New Deal, summer gardens, an embassy in Berlin, the chainsaw, Hanoi

2/21/202019 minutes, 55 seconds
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Restaurant criticism's midlife crisis, airport design, bird baths and Vienna

2/14/202019 minutes, 26 seconds
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Restaurant criticism's midlife crisis, airport design, bird baths and Vienna

2/14/202019 minutes, 26 seconds
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Changing ideas of home, cast iron symbols of domesticity, the pedestrian crossing and Silicon Valley

2/7/202019 minutes, 3 seconds
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Changing ideas of home, cast iron symbols of domesticity, the pedestrian crossing and Silicon Valley

2/7/202019 minutes, 3 seconds
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Boris Johnson's architectural legacy, a history of women's pockets, a meteorologist in Antarctica and Jakarta

1/31/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Boris Johnson's architectural legacy, a history of women's pockets, a meteorologist in Antarctica and Jakarta

1/31/202019 minutes, 37 seconds
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Fire and country, architectural history of the swimming pool, politics of street food and Glasgow

1/24/202019 minutes, 22 seconds
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Fire and country, architectural history of the swimming pool, politics of street food and Glasgow

1/24/202019 minutes, 22 seconds
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Urban planning and the real estate state, Melissa Lucashenko on Brisbane, palaces for the people, a Mexican pop-up kitchen and brutality

1/17/202019 minutes, 13 seconds
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Urban planning and the real estate state, Melissa Lucashenko on Brisbane, palaces for the people, a Mexican pop-up kitchen and brutality

1/17/202019 minutes, 13 seconds
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Notre Dame, truth and memory, the politics of nutrition, a tribute to Enrico Taglietti, a trip to the Faroe Islands and Robin Boyd

1/11/202018 minutes, 34 seconds
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Notre Dame, truth and memory, the politics of nutrition, a tribute to Enrico Taglietti, a trip to the Faroe Islands and Robin Boyd

1/11/202018 minutes, 34 seconds
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Ottolenghi on recipes and cooking, Robert Macfarlane on deep time and bubbles

1/4/202019 minutes, 17 seconds
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Ottolenghi on recipes and cooking, Robert Macfarlane on deep time and bubbles

1/4/202019 minutes, 17 seconds
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Oliver Wainwright on form and finance, Fatima Bhutto on Pakistan, Dieter Rams' iconic designs and a garden in Spain

12/27/201919 minutes, 2 seconds
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Oliver Wainwright on form and finance, Fatima Bhutto on Pakistan, Dieter Rams' iconic designs and a garden in Spain

12/27/201919 minutes, 2 seconds
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Clothes and philosophy, Bill Henson, Gary Shteyngart on food, the politics of public toilets and urban surveillance

12/20/201919 minutes, 11 seconds
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Clothes and philosophy, Bill Henson, Gary Shteyngart on food, the politics of public toilets and urban surveillance

12/20/201919 minutes, 11 seconds
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Airbnb housing crisis, a closer look at dog food, neighbourhood street parties and Melbourne Modern

12/13/201919 minutes, 36 seconds
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Airbnb housing crisis, a closer look at dog food, neighbourhood street parties and Melbourne Modern

12/13/201919 minutes, 36 seconds
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Liveability in the city, vegetarian Christmas, late night pastries in Rome and Canberra Modern

with Jonathan Green.
12/6/201918 minutes, 53 seconds
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Liveability in the city, vegetarian Christmas, late night pastries in Rome and Canberra Modern

with Jonathan Green.
12/6/201918 minutes, 53 seconds
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Georgian cuisine, photographing Pyongyang and the art of stonewalling

11/29/201920 minutes, 28 seconds
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Georgian cuisine, photographing Pyongyang and the art of stonewalling

11/29/201920 minutes, 28 seconds
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Carob, Palestinian heritage buildings, Soylent and your Christmas requests with Annie Smithers

11/22/201918 minutes, 46 seconds
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Carob, Palestinian heritage buildings, Soylent and your Christmas requests with Annie Smithers

11/22/201918 minutes, 46 seconds
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Rise of the fake meat industry, New Zealand plants and fortune telling via coffee grounds

11/15/201920 minutes, 37 seconds
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Rise of the fake meat industry, New Zealand plants and fortune telling via coffee grounds

11/15/201920 minutes, 37 seconds
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Preserving with salt, road tripping, fascist architecture and Perth Modern

11/8/201919 minutes, 24 seconds
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Preserving with salt, road tripping, fascist architecture and Perth Modern

11/8/201919 minutes, 24 seconds
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Hypersexual cities, pasta grannies, Tim Flannery and a haptic suit

11/1/201919 minutes, 34 seconds
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Hypersexual cities, pasta grannies, Tim Flannery and a haptic suit

11/1/201919 minutes, 34 seconds
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Book curation, Diwali sweets, Colleen Wills and Sydney Modern

10/25/201919 minutes, 52 seconds
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Book curation, Diwali sweets, Colleen Wills and Sydney Modern

10/25/201919 minutes, 52 seconds
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Fashion in Jane Austen's time, an e-bike for Borroloola and sandstone

10/18/201919 minutes, 42 seconds
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Fashion in Jane Austen's time, an e-bike for Borroloola and sandstone

10/18/201919 minutes, 42 seconds
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Architecture in future cities, cooking a duck, and hot chips

10/11/201919 minutes, 12 seconds
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Architecture in future cities, cooking a duck, and hot chips

10/11/201919 minutes, 12 seconds
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Ethnic aesthetics, Anna Krien on Brisbane, permaculture design and bluestone

10/4/201919 minutes, 20 seconds
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Ethnic aesthetics, Anna Krien on Brisbane, permaculture design and bluestone

10/4/201919 minutes, 20 seconds
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Farming the ocean, springtime in the garden, the history of the carousel and the story of colour

9/27/201918 minutes, 51 seconds
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Farming the ocean, springtime in the garden, the history of the carousel and the story of colour

9/27/201918 minutes, 51 seconds
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Deforestation of the Amazon, the gendered history of chocolate and Christos Tsiolkas on Europe

9/20/201918 minutes, 39 seconds
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Deforestation of the Amazon, the gendered history of chocolate and Christos Tsiolkas on Europe

9/20/201918 minutes, 39 seconds
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Historical truth in architecture, photographing collective urban life in the 21st century, a 1980s yuppie icon and a trip to Budapest

9/13/201919 minutes, 24 seconds
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Historical truth in architecture, photographing collective urban life in the 21st century, a 1980s yuppie icon and a trip to Budapest

9/13/201919 minutes, 24 seconds
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Urban inequality, turbulence and climate change, Alice Bishop on Black Saturday and the history of the hills hoist

9/6/201919 minutes, 19 seconds
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Urban inequality, turbulence and climate change, Alice Bishop on Black Saturday and the history of the hills hoist

9/6/201919 minutes, 19 seconds
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Invisible women, detective noir and knitting on the Faroe Islands, how to cook and egg and Robin Boyd

8/30/201920 minutes, 46 seconds
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Invisible women, detective noir and knitting on the Faroe Islands, how to cook and egg and Robin Boyd

8/30/201920 minutes, 46 seconds
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Housing the future, sacred tree stalemate, rise and fall of French cuisine and a journey to Tokyo

8/23/201948 minutes, 36 seconds
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Housing the future, sacred tree stalemate, rise and fall of French cuisine and a journey to Tokyo

8/23/201948 minutes, 36 seconds
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Australia Modern, Don Walker on St Kilda, how to make a pie and skin

8/16/201919 minutes, 30 seconds
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Australia Modern, Don Walker on St Kilda, how to make a pie and skin

8/16/201919 minutes, 30 seconds
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Architecture and climate change, restaurant success, Cradle Mountain and Toxic

8/9/201914 minutes, 46 seconds
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Architecture and climate change, restaurant success, Cradle Mountain and Toxic

8/9/201914 minutes, 46 seconds
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The politics of nutrition, saving Notre Dame, how to make a pie, Laminex and Everest

8/2/201919 minutes, 20 seconds
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The politics of nutrition, saving Notre Dame, how to make a pie, Laminex and Everest

8/2/201919 minutes, 20 seconds
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Richard Sennett on the open city, Roquefort panic, electric bikes and surveillance

7/26/201919 minutes, 5 seconds
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Richard Sennett on the open city, Roquefort panic, electric bikes and surveillance

7/26/201919 minutes, 5 seconds
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The history of protest foods, designing a fishing fly, the art of sauce-making and frozen

7/19/201919 minutes, 41 seconds
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The history of protest foods, designing a fishing fly, the art of sauce-making and frozen

7/19/201919 minutes, 41 seconds
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Sinking cities, Ben Shewry on New Zealand, lateral cooking and a journey to Naples

7/12/201919 minutes, 36 seconds
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Sinking cities, Ben Shewry on New Zealand, lateral cooking and a journey to Naples

7/12/201919 minutes, 36 seconds
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Matthew Evans on meat, Richard Tognetti on Maribor, Slovenia, and an armchair trip to the ancient city of Fez

7/5/201919 minutes, 8 seconds
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Matthew Evans on meat, Richard Tognetti on Maribor, Slovenia, and an armchair trip to the ancient city of Fez

7/5/201919 minutes, 8 seconds
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The real estate state, the politics of superfoods, Jean Prouvé designs and bubbles

6/28/201919 minutes, 15 seconds
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The real estate state, the politics of superfoods, Jean Prouvé designs and bubbles

6/28/201919 minutes, 15 seconds
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Bauhaus women, deadly plants, couch surfing in Russia and colour

6/21/201919 minutes, 11 seconds
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Bauhaus women, deadly plants, couch surfing in Russia and colour

6/21/201919 minutes, 11 seconds
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Feeding hungry cities, dinner party conversation, Anita Heiss on Wiradjuri Country and Earth

6/14/201919 minutes, 39 seconds
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Feeding hungry cities, dinner party conversation, Anita Heiss on Wiradjuri Country and Earth

6/14/201919 minutes, 39 seconds
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The secret life of clothes, thirsty cities and the problem with minimalism

6/7/201919 minutes, 20 seconds
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The secret life of clothes, thirsty cities and the problem with minimalism

6/7/201919 minutes, 20 seconds
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Reporting from Everest, Palestinian stonemasons and agriculture and climate change

5/31/201919 minutes, 4 seconds
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Reporting from Everest, Palestinian stonemasons and agriculture and climate change