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Big Ideas

English, Social, 1 season, 670 episodes, 1 day, 4 hours, 48 minutes
About
Big Ideas brings you the best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world, casting light on the major social, cultural, scientific and political issues
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Without gender equality everyone loses

Gender equality isn't just about equal pay, it's a health and safety issue. Women perceive safety very differently to men, and that's why they need a seat at the table when policies are being nutted out. Just a month after Australia gets its first Gender Equality Strategy, Stephanie Copus Campbell speaks about her first-hand experience on women's rights and discrimination in Papua New Guinea and many other countries in the region — and her observations as the international Ambassador for Gender Equality. Her verdict: we are going backwards worldwide.
4/22/202453 minutes, 23 seconds
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Trees as an alternative crop — the future of forestry in Australia?

Forestry is a hotly disputed industry in Australia. Environmentalists want to preserve more valuable habitat to protect endangered species. Developers want to lock away forests as off-sets for their projects and at the same time want to clear forests to make space for said projects. Corporations want to buy rights to carbon sequestration. And then there are the landholders trying to make a living from timber. How do we navigate all these competing factors? How valuable are trees as an alternative crop? And what's the role of agroforestry in the future of sustainable farming?
4/18/202453 minutes, 32 seconds
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The shark net controversy — hear the debate at Bondi's Ocean Lovers Festival

They use of shark nets to protect us from sharks is highly controversial. Do they work, what do they do to marine life, are there alternatives, and why are sharks so political?  Join Natasha Mitchell and guests at the 2024 Ocean Lovers Festival for a robust interrogation of of an issue that ignites passions.
4/17/202454 minutes, 58 seconds
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Life on Mars – and beyond

It's a question that has focused the minds of astronauts, scientists, space entrepreneurs and enthusiasts alike – is there, could there be, life on Mars? The race is on to find out, with NASA hoping to land astronauts there by the late 2030s.
4/16/202453 minutes, 38 seconds
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A heart-to-heart with Eric Bogle — his songs and his life

Folk legend Eric Bogle is opening up and talks about his life, his thoughts about death, friendship and love and why having a deeper message for writing songs is so much more important than money and fame. It's a rare opportunity to share a conversation with one of the best and most prolific songwriters of the last several decades. His songs have become Australian classics – like The Band Played Waltzing Matilda or No Man's Land. And as a very special treat – you'll hear the world premiere of his latest song … finished on the way to this event.
4/15/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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The war in Gaza, Palestinians, and Israelis – what can we learn from the past about the future?

What is the future of Israelis and Palestinians in the Gaza strip and surrounding region? Can the past help us understand the tumultuous, horrifying present? And is a two-state solution a realistic response to the war in Gaza or not? Walkley Award-winning Australian journalist John Lyons, Israeli historian and political scientist Ilan Pappé, American essayist and author Nathan Thrall, and American political advisor Bruce Wolpe share their perspectives.
4/11/202453 minutes, 31 seconds
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A mummified mystery! Sealed shut for decades then scientists opened this coffin lid

A wooden sarcophogas is sold in a Cairo market in the late 1800s, transported to Australia, and held in a University of Sydney collection. It remains closed for over a century. And then scientists opened its lid.  What happened next? Two leading Australian Egyptologists join Natasha Mitchell to consider the ethics, history, and science of a quest to understand life and death in Ancient Egypt and get a glimpse into one woman's world over 2500 years ago. But is it really Mer-Neith-It_Es?
4/10/202457 minutes, 30 seconds
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Mary Beard — Empress of Rome 

For decades, Mary Beard has forged her own path through the male dominated field of academia, from the ruins of Rome to the trenches of Twitter, to become "the world's most famous classicist".
4/9/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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Michael Gawenda on Jewishness, the Australian Left, and the State of Israel

The best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world.
4/8/202453 minutes, 23 seconds
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Cheng Lei, Sean Turnell and Kylie Moore-Gilbert on the ruthless practice of hostage diplomacy

What is the best response to hostage diplomacy? Pay the ransom? Sanction the responsible country, or individuals? Go public, or pursue quiet diplomacy? Can countries preserve bilateral relations, while at the same time advocating for the rights of their unlawfully detained citizens? 
4/4/202453 minutes, 14 seconds
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Ripples, resilience, and rivers – the politics of water

Water is life. Rivers give life. But water and the rivers it flows down are also heavily politicised, and at the heart of battles over who gets access to water, what's killing our rivers, and what happens when they kill us during catastrophic floods. Join Natasha Mitchell and guests at this Adelaide Writers Week event with Senator Sarah Hanson-Young, Barrister and author Richard Beasley, grazier and activist Kate McBride, and environmental historian Dr Margaret Cook.
4/3/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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Forging a fire ready future

Australia’s bushfires are more intense, more frequent, and more costly. So how can we prepare for the inevitable – what proactive steps can communities take to protect themselves, and do we have the settings right?  
4/2/202454 minutes, 7 seconds
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What makes a charity successful?

Many of you are involved in a charity: Handing out meals to homeless people, caring for surrendered animals in a shelter, organising soccer games to keep the youth in the neighbourhood on the straight and narrow. But are you sure that your charity is putting the time and also the money that you give up to good use? What makes a charity successful? And how can you future-prove them?
4/1/202453 minutes, 45 seconds
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Julia Baird on how grace saves us from a dark world

Grace is a hard word to define, but in her latest book, author, journalist and broadcaster Julia Baird explores the concept, and how finding and nurturing it in each other – and ourselves - can help us through dark times. 
3/28/202453 minutes, 27 seconds
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The Deficit Myth with Stephanie Kelton — what to ask when governments can't afford to fix things.

When governments say they can't afford to fix climate change or lift kids out of poverty are they speaking the truth? American economist Stephanie Kelton challenges economic orthodoxy in her book The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People's Economy. She joins Natasha Mitchell in conversation at this 2024 National Sustainability Festival event.
3/27/202453 minutes, 57 seconds
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Bessel van der Kolk on The Body Keeps the Score

Bessel van der Kolk, one of the world's foremost experts on trauma, discusses his pioneering research into traumatic stress and its impact on our brains and bodies. Traumatised people experience incomprehensible anxiety, numbing and intolerable rage. Trauma affects their capacity to concentrate, to remember, to form trusting relationships, and even to feel at home in their own bodies. And he explains promising treatments, including neurofeedback, psychedelic therapy, psychodrama … and dance.
3/26/202453 minutes, 44 seconds
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Why are young people more unhappy and worried?

Different generations agree that youth mental health is in decline, but disagree about the causes. We explore generational attitudes to the economic and social drivers of mental ill-health in young people.
3/25/202453 minutes, 18 seconds
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Are you all liberals at heart?

Liberalism is not just a rational political philosophy but the basis of a truly meaningful life. That's the bold statement of philosopher Alexandre Lefebvre. Should individuals be free to pursue their own passions and interests in life? It's very likely you agree with this liberal principle. What about ideals like interdependence or having a higher purpose? Is liberalism all you need to lead a good, fun, worthy and rewarding life — and can you become a better and happier person by taking these beliefs more seriously?
3/21/202453 minutes, 27 seconds
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Imagination and Mindset, and The Importance of Doubt (Boyer Lectures 3&4)

Quantum computing is all about physics, but for those looking to pioneer and revolutionise science, there are certain human qualities needed as well. That is the topic of these final two Boyer Lectures with a global leader in the field of quantum computing, Professor Michelle Simmons.
3/20/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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The Atomic Revolution and the Quantum Promise (2023 Boyer Lectures 1&2)

Imagine a machine with more power than all the computers in the world combined. This is the promise of quantum computing. In these 2023 Boyer Lectures, Professor Michelle Simmons explains why building a machine that operates at the scale of atoms has the potential to revolutionise society, and why Australia is at the forefront of the global race to develop the first one. 
3/19/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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No greater ally – assessing the Australia-US alliance

The US has claimed that it has “no greater ally than Australia”, but with the stability of its democracy in question, what are the risks, and the rewards, of waltzing in step with the world’s greatest superpower? 
3/18/202453 minutes, 52 seconds
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Trump vs Biden vs the world - what will it mean for Australia?

The US has claimed that it has “no greater ally than Australia”, but with the stability of its democracy in question, what are the risks, and the rewards, of waltzing in step with the world’s greatest superpower? 
3/18/202453 minutes, 52 seconds
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I've Been to a Parallel World

Hear from four “many worlds travellers” who have visited parallel worlds to explore themes of Indigenous rights, disability, gender and the climate crisis, to show us that a different way is within reach.  
3/14/202454 minutes, 46 seconds
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The education gap between rural and metropolitan Australia is costing us billions

Can you put a price tag on regional education? In fact, you can. The large difference in the quality of education between people who live in rural and regional Australia compared to those who live in the cities is costing our economy over 55 billion dollars…. AND we also talk about the role of advocates in conflict situations, in particular lawyers, speaking truth to power and speaking up for the weak.
3/13/202454 minutes
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Solving the mysteries of the universe − with philosophy

From dark energy to the nature of time, some of the most baffling mysteries in cosmology point to a surprisingly complex answer: The idea that alternate layers of reality might exist beyond the reach of our current physics, and perhaps even outside the Universe itself. Philosophy can help navigate the many enigmas of physics. In fact, there is a long history of the entanglement of the two.
3/12/202454 minutes, 1 second
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How Russia’s war on Ukraine ends

Two years since Vladimir Putin’s Russia invaded neighbouring Ukraine, the risks are as grave as ever, including the possibility of war spilling into Europe, and the nuclear threat. What next for the Ukraine war?
3/11/202453 minutes, 32 seconds
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Corruption at the crossroads in Australia

We hear from the nation's anti-corruption leaders, including NACC Deputy Commissioner Nicole Rose, about the state of corruption in Australia.
3/7/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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Spending time with Laurie Anderson

Laurie Anderson invites you contemplate the wonders of time. Time is one of the most impermanent forms of measurement that humans have invented to help manage life. We couldn't function without it. Do you feel like you're running out of time? Which way is time going? Are you able to stop time? What is the role of time and duration for ethics and how you experience trauma? Laurie Anderson and Tom McCarthy find answers in arts and literature.
3/6/202454 minutes
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Finding your creativity with Holly Ringland

Best-selling author Holly Ringland says that everyone can be creative – yes, even you! Be it painting, cooking, knitting a jumper or writing a song. It's often self-doubt and the fear of criticism and judgement that's holding you back. The voice in your head telling you that you're not good enough. It doesn't have to be like this.
3/5/202453 minutes, 41 seconds
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Nature for people – how the natural world affects our health

Most of us know that exposure to nature is good for us, because we’ve experienced it ourselves. Doctors can even prescribe time in nature to patients, for the health benefits. But increasingly, we’re understanding – and measuring - just how nature helps us – our minds, bodies, and society. This event is brought to you by the Australian Land Conservation Alliance as part of the National Private Land Conservation Conference held in Canberra on October 17, 2023. 
3/4/202453 minutes, 44 seconds
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The Reith Lectures are unavailable as a podcast this week

Big Ideas is broadcasting the 2023 Reith Lectures this week. It is unable to provide a podcast of the lectures. The audio of the four lectures will be available on the Big Ideas website for a limited time. However, you can listen to the lectures and find transcripts on the BBC website.
2/25/20241 minute
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Swiftposium – the academics of Taylor Swift

Celebrities, and their fans, wield tremendous economic, cultural and political influence – and none more so than US pop superstar Taylor Swift. Academia is getting on board, with university courses now entirely dedicated to studying the icon. But celebrities and their fans have not always been taken seriously, by academia, or broader society – particularly when it’s someone idolised by young girls.   Well, these academics are trying to change that. Ahead of Swift's record-breaking Australian tour, 160 scholars from around the world came together in Melbourne for the inaugural Swiftposium conference, to engage in critical dialogue about Swift’s popularity and its profound influence on society, from feminism, to gender, fandom, popular culture, literature, the economy, the music industry, and more. This event was presented by the University of Melbourne from February 11 to 13, 2024. “The worst kind of person is someone who makes someone feel bad, dumb or stupid for being excited about something.” - Taylor Swift, 2019 
2/22/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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Intuition — the science of knowing WHAT without knowing WHY

Have you ever followed your intuition, or been guided by a gut feeling? Is intuition real or imagined? Can it be learnt and harnessed for good in our lives? Neuroscientist and psychologist Joel Pearson wanted to find out. He joins Natasha Mitchell to discuss his book The Intuition Toolkit – the New Science of Knowing What without Knowing Why.
2/21/202453 minutes, 40 seconds
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Uncivil society – polarisation and breakdown in our conversations

You’ve probably heard the expression “I don't agree with what you say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it”. But in the age of social media, cancel culture, keyboard warriors, fake news, algorithms, corporate influence, far right extremism and all the rest, does that lofty ambition still have currency? What has happened to civil debate and the reasonable exchange of competing ideas in public, to conversations that might lead to productive compromise, or simply agreeing to disagree?  Has civil society always been so... uncivil? This event was held at the Addi Road Community Organisation on October 25, 2023. 
2/20/202453 minutes, 28 seconds
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Changing reality with stories — AND Queer games = fun for everyone

Fiction is a literary seismograph for social conflict and stories can change reality. They have shaped human rights; they have helped fight domestic violence and discrimination. There is nothing like an innocent story! AND… There's an open secret: the games industry is pretty gay. It shouldn't come off as a surprise that one of the most creative professions and hobbies attracts a diverse and passionate collective of artistic individuals. We blitz through a brief history of queer games and at the end you will see that the answers may not be binary after all.
2/19/202453 minutes, 54 seconds
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A queer love letter to libraries

Public libraries are for everyone, but last year, the LGBTIQA+ community became a target for exclusion by anti-queer campaigners, when drag story time events – designed to celebrate diversity and embrace rainbow families –were shut down or postponed due to threats, protests and abuse. Librarians, drag artists, families and council staff were on the frontline of these attacks. To counter the hurt caused by these campaigns, the LGBTIQA+ and library communities joined forces to celebrate and reclaim libraries as safe spaces for everyone.  
2/15/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Be the change you want to see — Chanel Contos, Isabelle Reinecke, Semara Jose, Sarah Brown

Some things feel impossible to change without money and power. Meet four trailblazers didn't let that stop them. Fighting corporations. Stopping violence. Transforming talk on sex and consent. Helping men heal from childhood trauma. They join Natasha Mitchell and an audience of high school students to explore what pushed them to act.
2/14/202453 minutes, 23 seconds
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Nazanin Boniadi — fighting for women's rights in Iran

Women and girls in Iran continue to take to the streets and protest gender oppression and human rights abuses. And too often they risk their lives for this fight. Iranian-born human rights advocate Nazanin Boniadi has used her public profile as an actress to campaign in solidarity with the people of Iran. For that, she's been honoured with the 2023 Sydney Peace Prize. The 'Women, Life, Freedom' movement has demonstrated the unifying power and potential of women's rights as a lever for mobilisation and demands for change. The movement makes the pursuit of women's rights an essential part of any pathway towards fundamental change in Iran.
2/13/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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Caroline Polachek on the art of pop music

US singer, songwriter and producer Caroline Polachek is known as one of the most inventive pop musicians working in the industry today, pushing the boundaries of what the genre is, and what it means for the people who listen to it. Off the back of her acclaimed seventh album, ‘Desire, I want to turn into you’, Polachek opens up about her creative process, her varied career, and why pop should be respected as an artform in its own right. 
2/12/20240
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How to speak freely about topics no one wants to talk about

Speaking freely isn't only about Freedom of Speech legislation, it's equally about social norms, loving your family and courage. Authors Lea Ypi and Hayley Campbell discuss what's difficult to talk about. Death and what happens your body when you die. And whether Albania has experienced more freedom in communist times – only in very specific circumstances. They explore the factors that allow us to speak freely, what forces can constrain these … and what happens when we are unleashed to speak the truth.
2/8/202453 minutes, 7 seconds
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A new way to fix the hot mess of housing in remote Aboriginal Australia?

Housing is a hot mess in many remote Aboriginal communities,  including Tennant Creek, and the rollercoaster of government policies and interventions hasn't helped the situation. What's on offer is often culturally unsafe, crowded, and a climate disaster. But housing is hard to fix too. This group of Traditional Owners, health professionals, architects and others have a vision for how.
2/7/202454 minutes, 4 seconds
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Psychedelics: from magic to medicinal

Psychedelics were once the domain of hippies and cults, but these drugs have come long way from the ‘turn on, tune in, drop out’ countercultural philosophy of the 1960s and 70s. Nowadays, the field of psychedelic research is experiencing a resurgence, with substances like psilocybin, MDMA and ketamine being used in controlled laboratories to treat complex mental health issues. In 2023, Australia became the first country in the world to permit psychiatrists to use psychedelic medicines to treat certain patients. But are psychedelic assisted therapies a silver bullet cure for mental health disorders, or have the regulations gotten ahead of the evidence? 
2/6/202453 minutes, 10 seconds
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Gabriel Krauze — a life of violent crime and literature

Finishing your undergraduate assignments in English Literature in breaks between selling drugs … fighting and hurting people and committing crimes while discussing the finer nuances of human morality. Best-selling author Gabriel Krauze speaks openly about his life as a former gang criminal living on a notorious housing estate in South Kilburn in London - with quite different extra-curricular activities than most other English literature students. Because that's his other side: A passionate student with a love for art and philosophy.
2/5/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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Does Australia need more tiger parents?

Tiger parents: do their methods raise happy and successful human beings, or burnt out, damaged therapy cases? In this hyper competitive age we live in, could their approach bring up a new generation of winners this country needs to get ahead? Six Asian Australian comedians, writers and performers thrash it out in debate form to decide: Does Australia need more tiger parents? The audience’s applause will decide the winner.
2/1/202451 minutes, 47 seconds
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When I grow up I want to be ... why we all need to reimagine aging.

From the moment we’re born, we all age. So why limit the possibilities? The latest Intergenerational Report describes Australia's ageing population as an economical and fiscal challenge ... a burden. Ageism is rife, but to age is to live. So what about thriving too? Find out how there's magic to found when relationships across the generations are fostered and why we all benefit — whether we're young, middling, or older
1/31/202453 minutes, 32 seconds
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Craig Foster on how Australia can pull its socks up on human rights

Craig Foster has a vision for the future: An Australia without racism, with equal access to food and representation and compassion for refugees. But it's 75 years since the 75th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and Craig Foster has a warning for us: Things need to change, and hopefully it doesn't take another 75 years. His passionate insights will leave you with a lot to think about …. heavy and uncomfortable thoughts.
1/30/202453 minutes, 46 seconds
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Escaping the Burrow — Astra Taylor on The Age of Insecurity (2023 Massey Lectures)

In this year’s CBC Massey lectures, renowned Canadian-American filmmaker, writer, activist, rock musician and self described feral intellectual Astra Taylor explores how our society now runs on 'manufactured’ insecurity — and how we can change it. In her fifth lecture, Escaping the Burrow, Astra Taylor offers hope and solutions to our crisis of security. The experience of insecurity can offer us a path to wisdom — guiding our personal lives and our collective endeavors. 
1/29/202458 minutes, 54 seconds
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Beyond human security — Astra Taylor on The Age of Insecurity (Massey Lecture 4)

In this year's thought-provoking CBC Massey lectures, renowned Canadian-American filmmaker, writer, political organiser, rock musician  and self-described 'feral intellectual' Astra Taylor explores how our society now runs on insecurity — and how we can change it. In this fourth lecture, Astra turns her attention to ecological insecurity. This story isn't ours alone to tell. As we incinerate our energy inheritance, nature’s timekeeping methods become increasingly confused. As the climate alters, delicately evolved biological clocks erratically speed up or slow down, causing plants and animals to fall out of sync.
1/25/202423 seconds
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Consumed by Curiosity — Astra Taylor on The Age of Insecurity (Massey Lecture 3)

In this year's thought-provoking CBC Massey lectures, renowned Canadian-American filmmaker, writer, political organiser, rock musician  and self-described 'feral intellectual' Astra Taylor explores how our society now runs on insecurity — and how we can change it. In this third lecture, Astra argues that our innate existential insecurity is also vital to our curiosity,  creativity, compassion, and capacity to care. What role does education have in fostering these? And she explores a paradox — we live in the most prosperous era in human history, but it's also an era of profound insecurity. Why?
1/24/202416 seconds
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Barons or Commoners? — Astra Taylor on The Age of Insecurity (Massey Lecture 2)

In this year's thought-provoking CBC Massey lectures, renowned Canadian-American filmmaker, writer, political organiser, rock musician  and self-described 'feral intellectual' Astra Taylor explores how our society now runs on insecurity — and how we can change it. In this second lecture, Astra Taylor interrogates the history of the fight over our fundamental, shared rights, and asks what do we really, truly need to be secure?
1/23/202453 minutes, 9 seconds
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Cura's Gift — Astra Taylor on The Age of Insecurity (Massey Lecture 1)

In this year's thought-provoking CBC Massey lectures, renowned Canadian-American filmmaker, writer, political organiser, rock musician  and self-described 'feral intellectual' Astra Taylor explores how our society now runs on insecurity — and how we can change it. In this first lecture, Astra introduces us to the Roman goddess Cura, the embodiment of care, concern, anxiety, and worry. That's the human condition — existential insecurity. Capitalism and consumer society exploits the very insecurities it produces, she argues, and makes us all insecure by design. We are living in an era of "manufactured insecurity", says Astra.
1/22/202453 minutes, 25 seconds
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Catherine Deveny, Shannon Burns, and Akuch Anyieth on memoir

Three successful authors Akuch Anyieth, Shannon Burns and Catherine Deveny talk about memoir, and why they're interested in the form. Moderator of the discussion Yves Rees asks the panel to reflect on whether the personal storytelling genre is popular because of voyeurism, a desire for intimacy between writer and reader or just a hunger for trauma porn? 
1/18/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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Will AI render human creativity worthless? The Beaker St Festival Great Debate

Two teams of heavy-hitters debate the fate of human creativity in a world of artificial intelligence. In a Big Ideas first, two A.I debaters are taking to the stage, and with strong opinions! Are the bots coming for Boticelli and the Bronte Sisters? Will humans be thrown in the dustbin of civilisation as our artistic expression is usurped by silicon? Or, will the bots help you unleash your creative potential like never before?
1/17/202453 minutes, 50 seconds
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The day the invisible was made visible — Manus Island detention survivors speak

In early 2020, as Australians were being locked down, something strange was happening in an inner-suburban hotel in Brisbane. A group of men, previously invisible to most Australians, gathered on the hotel balcony wielding hand-made banners. Who were they? And how did this moment change the minds of middle Australia? It's 10 years since Kevin Rudd declared "no one who arrives by boat will ever settle here". The fallout catapulted thousands of lives into a decade-long limbo. Two of the men on that Brisbane balcony join host Natasha Mitchell and other guests at the Brisbane Powerhouse as part of the Portraits of Protest exhibition.
1/16/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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Osman Faruqi — censoring hip hop

It's possibly the greatest ever example of artistic censorship in Australian history. Police have requested hip hop to be taken off online streaming platforms, stopped bands from performing in Australia, and amended visa regulations so local hip hop artists can't perform overseas. Their claim is that hip hop is inciting violent and criminal behaviour. But it's an old debate that first emerged in the birthplace of hip hop more than two decades ago. Osman Faruqi shines a light on parallels to the hip hop wars of 1990s America, the role of police bias and profiling, and concerns for free speech more broadly.
1/15/202454 minutes, 35 seconds
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Safer beaches and guilt-free seefood

From apps that help us swim safely to using Crispr to cut the genes of box jellyfish to technology that identifies the source of a barramundi or coral trout at the fish market, science is at the fore-shore of keeping our oceans and our lives safe.
1/11/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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Safer beaches and guilt-free seafood

From apps that help us swim safely to using Crispr to cut the genes of box jellyfish to technology that identifies the source of a barramundi or coral trout at the fish market, science is at the fore-shore of keeping our oceans and our lives safe.
1/11/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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On ya bike or not? Global movers, shakers, and city shapers reimagining car culture

What do the streets feel like where you live? Unsafe for kids to ride to school, big busy highways, limited public transport, cars reign supreme? From electric vehicles to bike-friendly buses — be inspired by these globally renowned movers and shakers. They're using the regional town of Bendigo and international case studies to re-imagine how we can live and move. Transport accounts for a staggering quarter of global greenhouse emissions. Could one Australian town lead the way and hit zero transport emissions by 2030?
1/10/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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The power, politics and cost of women speaking out

Three influential women explore the power, the politics, and the cost of speaking out. 
1/9/202453 minutes, 2 seconds
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Nuclear technology: the shady beginnings and the uncertain future

The history and development of the nuclear industry is shred in secrecy and contradictions. And its future is throwing up more questions than answers. A scientist, a historian and a poet consider the economic, scientific and social realities of nuclear technology. They discuss how the lessons from the past might shape an uncertain future, and the possible consequences of playing God.
1/8/202453 minutes, 53 seconds
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Greek-Australian identity: Are we WHITE yet?

Are Greek-Australian's now considered to be 'white' in Australia's colourful social fabric? A panel of prominent Greek-Australians discusses questions of identity and belonging. As they have evolved into one of the oldest migrant groups in the country, is the era of Greek 'otherness' over? And what role did anglicising surnames play in our journey towards acceptance?
1/4/202453 minutes, 42 seconds
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I am not my chromosomes — science, rights, and the intersex experience

"Are they a girl or a boy?" That question is often asked about a newborn. But what if you're born with genetic variations in sexual development, also known as intersex conditions, and possess both typical male and female physical traits? New legislation tabled in the ACT is set to limit the scope of medical treatments and surgeries for such children. Intersex activists have campaigned hard for the law saying the human rights of the child to bodily autonomy is paramount. But some argue not all lived-experience voices are being heard, and are concerned the new laws could criminalise clinicians, carers and parents.
1/3/202454 minutes, 5 seconds
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Why thinking in Deep Time is good for your head

The best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world.
1/2/202454 minutes, 6 seconds
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It's not as simple as moving house! Meet climate refugees with a (scaly, sticky, furry) difference

Meet some climate refugees of a different kind. From the Western swamp tortoise to honey ants to whales, can they just up-stumps and move house if things get too hot under the collar? From understanding First Nations science to breaking up the siloed western conservation practices, are there better ways to make life possible for every being on a warming planet? 
1/1/202452 minutes, 28 seconds
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Bri Lee and fellow voyagers ponder the ethics of travel

Questioning whether travel is ethical is probably the last thing on your mind when you decide to go on holiday. But for increasing number of travellers, 'ethical travel' is the preferred mode for tourists who don't want their holiday to just be an extractive exercise. So what are the ethical obligations for those who have the privilege to travel? And what does ethical travel mean in practice… ?
12/28/202353 minutes, 50 seconds
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George Monbiot's Regenesis — you won't think about dinner the same way again

Would you eat protein brewed in a vat from bacteria instead of meat? "Nom nom nom!", you might say. George Monbiot probably agrees. One of the most influential thinkers on the future of of the planet, now he's interrogating what's on our dinner plate, and the staggering business of how it got there. He joins Natasha Mitchell to discuss his provocative book, Regenesis: how to feed the world without devouring the planet. And it all comes down to connecting with the Tolkienesque world beneath your feet.
12/27/202353 minutes, 25 seconds
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(Too) hot right now — life on a sweltering planet

The planet's hotter than it has ever been. July was the Earth's hottest month ever recorded since records began. And the consequences of this warming is increasingly becoming too hard to bear — particularly among those who don't have access to climate control. So what happens to our bodies in times of heat extremes? And what will happen when these extremes become the new 'normal'? It's something the veteran environmental reporter Jeff Goodell explores in his new book Heat: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet.
12/26/202353 minutes, 41 seconds
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Wellmania's Brigid Delaney on the gift of the Stoics

If you can't control it – then don't worry about it. It's one of the core messages of stoicism. Much easier said than done. But if you manage it, it can make your life a lot happier and calmer. That's not to say you should sit back and ignore injustice. The stoics have an answer for that as well. On Big Ideas, you'll hear about the ancient philosophy of stoicism and how to apply its principles to modern life. War, climate change, pandemic and endless social media platforms onto with you can project and amplify your anxieties. It seems like we all can use a good helping of stoicism.
12/25/202354 minutes, 11 seconds
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The buff-breasted button-quail: Is one of our rarest native birds still alive?

For more than 100 years, birdwatchers have searched for evidence that one of Australia's rarest native birds is not extinct. And they might be a step closer to solving the mystery of the Buff-breasted Button Quail. It lives in the humid savannas of Cape York. And we know that this habitat is changing. If we want to have any chance of finding and even saving this bird, we have to act quickly.
12/21/202353 minutes, 45 seconds
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The soul in the machine — anthropologist, technologist, futurist Genevieve Bell and guests

We make machines, but do our machines also make us? And who's in control really? Superstar anthropologist, technologist, futurist, cyberneticist, and Silicon Valley insider Genevieve Bell joins Natasha Mitchell with young cybernetic creatives Hannah Feldman, Matt Heffernan, Ben Swift,   to talk machines, minds, messing with the code and what it would take to make technology and the world better.
12/20/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Sigrid Thornton, Rachael Maza, Sophie Hyde, Anousha Zarkesh — about older ladies in the movies

Movie or TV roles for older women accurately reflecting contemporary, society and experiences are rare. Sigrid Thornton, Rachael Maza, Sophie Hyde and Anousha Zarkesh are asking: Why is that? After decades honing their craft in the industry, older actresses are more talented than ever before, more confident and more attuned to the camera. But cinema is obsessed with the young.
12/19/202354 minutes, 23 seconds
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Infidelity and other affairs

Who doesn't dream of being loved dangerously, thrillingly free from the tethers of restraint? It's a question journalist and author Kate Legge asked after the discovery of her husband's affairs. He was a high-powered media CEO, and she was a veteran journalist who was assured the infidelity was singular (more were to be discovered on the home PC). Having tried (and failed) to keep the marriage going, Kate started to write about it, only to discover infidelities spanning four generations on his side of the family. The resulting book, Infidelity and Other Affairs asks why some choose restraint, while others choose wild abandon.
12/18/202353 minutes, 34 seconds
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Big Ideas

The best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world.
12/14/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The science of happiness

Harvard University has been running the world's longest study into happiness. The Harvard Study of Adult Development has been running since 1938, and in that time of researchers have observed how Americans experience and understand happiness, and how that's changed over time. In an address for the UNSW Centre for Ideas, the study's fourth director, Robert Waldinger, reveals the study's largest findings, and how technology — and changes in society — have inflected the interpretation of the study's data.
12/14/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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If a home is a human right — how can citizens and architects seize control of housing design?

Who sets the agenda when it comes to designing houses? More often than not wealthy developers call the shots. The result is cheaply-made hot boxes, unaffordable to live in, and poorly designed for human habitation. How did it come to this, and how can citizens and architects seize control? Meet 3 international trailblazers who want to change who controls what we get to call home — including an architect from Barcelona who needed an affordable place to call home and had social change on their mind.
12/13/202353 minutes, 37 seconds
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From The King and I to Miss Saigon, Australia’s new generation of stage makers are de-orientalising the canon

In its simplest definition, orientalism refers to the patronising depictions of the 'Eastern world' — a term that encompasses North Africa, the Middle East and Asia — by writers and artists from the West. And it's no stranger to the Australian stage.Major commercial musicals with orientalist underpinnings such as The King and I, Madame Butterfly, or Miss Saigon regularly grace Australian stages, which give a vital leg-up to emerging stage workers. But as more of these workers reflect the multiculturalism of modern Australia, it's prompting a revision of the orientalism embedded in the canon.
12/12/202353 minutes, 14 seconds
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The future of photography under AI

Where once photography gave us images of the world as seen by machines, photography under AI gives us images of machine images… seen by machines.Major global companies including Bing and Adobe are heavily investing in generative image models to produce the next AI advance in photography. But in this moment, what has become of the still image? Does it begin with the shutter, or is it now traced from computational models that power the AI-generated image? Hear from a researcher who's made it her mission to consider the value of photography amid the dawn of artificial intelligence. 
12/11/202353 minutes, 13 seconds
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Test tube trailblazers — the story of Australia's pioneering female scientists

While Australian women were among the first to get the vote in the world, their lives were still constrained for decades afterward. It was only until 1966 when the marriage bar was removed, which forced women to give up their careers once they married.But despite these constraints, generations of Australian women were able to subvert the system. Australia's first female scientists were among them. It's a history that's recently been collated in a new book. But the question remains… how much has changed for women in STEM?
12/7/202353 minutes, 43 seconds
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Being you — a new science of consciousness with Anil Seth

Your internal experience of consciousness – your rich inner life — has had scientists and philosophers completely perplexed for centuries. How does your brain's 100 billion neurons conjure up that distinct sense you have of being YOU? Is it different to your dog's sense of being a 'doggish'? Could that sense be reproduced in artificial intelligence? What happens when you experience altered states of consciousness - take a psychedelic, go under an anaesthetic, or hallucinate? Neuroscientist and bestselling author Anil Seth and psychologist Olivia Carter are on the case, and join Big Ideas host Natasha Mitchell.
12/6/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Has space travel changed what it means to be human? A space archaeologist, poet, theologian, astrophysicist respond

In 1963, as the space race was taking off, the influential political philosopher Hannah Arrendt challenged scientists over their shift away from a humanistic focus to worlds beyond. She was responding to a question posed by the Encyclopedia Britannica: "Has man’s conquest of space increased or diminished his stature?". Replace man with human, and let's ask that question again 60 years on. As we penetrate, populate, and plumb the depths of space evermore.
12/5/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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How calories and coercion do you harm — leading physicians on your healthy body and mind

Mental health problems and chronic diseases are plaguing societies around the world. Both fields need new solutions. We know that lifestyle and obesity contribute to chronic diseases; they can shorten your life by 11 years! But can you use lifestyle to stay chronically healthy? And are we ignoring human rights and social factors in mental health policies and services? For over 40 years a popular response is to prescribe medication. But we are seeing a paradigm shift.
12/4/202354 minutes, 11 seconds
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Food waste is bananas. So what are you going to do about it?

Australians on average chuck out 7.6 billion tonnes of food per year. That amounts to 312 kilos per person, or about $2,500 per household. It's bananas. But in a world that has long prioritised convenience and abundance, disposability has been baked into food chains. But this wasn't always so.In this Melbourne Conversations and RMIT Culture panel, hear from a zero-waste advocates, artists, and foodies about how we got into this mess, and what we could do to get out of it.
11/30/202353 minutes, 44 seconds
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Why do so many of us feel so damn lonely and too ashamed to talk about it?

In a world of hyper-connectivity and social media, why do so many of us feel so damn lonely? Being lonely isn’t the same as being alone, and some people love their solitude. But loneliness is widespread, growing, affects all ages, and seriously sucks for your physical and mental health. Why are we so ashamed to talk about it, and what can help? Four guests join Big Ideas host Natasha Mitchell for a frank, fearless and moving conversation about a very modern challenge.
11/29/20231 minute, 16 seconds
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David Marr's ancestors massacred Indigenous Australians. Marcia Langton's ancestors were among them.

Many people embark on a journey to discover their family's past in order to contextualise their present. But what happens when that journey uncovers something unwelcome?This was the case for the award-winning Australian writer David Marr. His great great grandfather, Reginald, was an officer of the Queensland Native Police — a force whose task it was to hunt and kill Indigenous people. This discovery has informed David's latest book, Killing for Country: A family story, which traces the structures that supported the violence of Australian settlement. Join David in dialogue with anthropologist and geographer, Marcia Langton, whose ancestors were murdered by the Native Police.Please note this discussion features distressing discussions of massacres against First Nations Australians. For further assistance, contact the free, 24-hour Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander counselling line 13 YARN (13 92 76). 
11/28/202353 minutes, 40 seconds
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Love, lost minds, and mortality — how two storytellers met two scientists, made magic, and found meaning

What happens when Australia’s best poets and writers walk into the world of scientists? How do they feed of each other’s brilliant, inventive minds to help us understand one of the most challenging experiences of our lives ... watching a loved one slowly lose their mind?  
11/27/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Newsroom ethics and the Israel-Gaza war — part two

A range of media outlets — including the ABC — have been criticised for their coverage of the latest Israel-Gaza war. There have been protests, apologies, and retractions from the likes of the BBC and CNN. But in a moment where it is notoriously difficult for foreign journalists to gain access to Gaza, what are the obligations of news media when reporting on the Israel Gaza war? Responsibilities of the News Media on Palestine was a University of Technology Sydney webinar, first recorded on November 10, 2023. Note: This is part two of the discussion. Listen to the first part here. Speakers: Monica AttardCo-director of the Centre for Media Transition, UTS, and former ABC broadcaster and foreign correspondentAmy McQuireJournalist, editor, and PhD candidate at the University of QueenslandAntony LowensteinJournalist, film maker, and author, The Palestine Laboratory: How Israel Exports The Technology Of Occupation Around The WorldMartin Newman (moderator)Journalism lecturer and coordinator of media law and ethics, UTS
11/23/202343 minutes, 20 seconds
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Newsroom ethics and the Israel Gaza war — part one

A range of media outlets — including the ABC — have been criticised for their coverage of the latest Israel-Gaza war. There have been protests, apologies, and retractions from the likes of the BBC and CNN. But in a moment where it is notoriously difficult for foreign journalists to gain access to Gaza, what are the obligations of news media when reporting on the Israel Gaza war? Note: This is part one of the discussion. Listen to the second part here. Responsibilities of the News Media on Palestine was a University of Technology Sydney webinar, first recorded on November 10, 2023. Speakers: Rawan DamenDirector-general, Arab Reporters for Investigative JournalismZahera HarbInternational Journalism Studies Cluster lead, City University, London, former war correspondent Karen PercyFederal Media President, Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, former ABC foreign correspondentAntony LowensteinJournalist, film maker, and author, The Palestine Laboratory: How Israel Exports The Technology Of Occupation Around The WorldMartin Newman (moderator)Journalism lecturer and coordinator of media law and ethics, UTS
11/23/202353 minutes, 36 seconds
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Photojournalist Andrew Quilty and activist Zahra Karimi want you to see this Afghanistan

Multi-award-winning Australian photojournalist Andrew Quilty went to Afghanistan on a two-week assignment. He stayed for 9 years.At just 25, Afghan-born women's activist Zahra Karimi found herself facilitating a 5000-strong network of Afghan women.As the Taliban took over in August 2021, and the Republic of Afghanistan crumbled, both had to get out of the country they loved. With a mass exodus, came a mass deletion. Websites, files, records, social media accounts were all wiped to protect people from persecution by the Taliban. So who will tell the stories of Afghanistan as it was before authoritarian rule? Andrew and Zahra want those stories to be heard by the world. They join Big Ideas' host Natasha Mitchell at the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbourne.
11/22/202353 minutes, 38 seconds
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Tracey Spicer: How AI and machine design is failing women

Technology's default setting is 'male' — more precisely a white, or at least, light-skinned male. Tracey Spicer exposes how technology and AI has embedded sexism and racism into the future. It's the next frontier of feminism. But who is responsible? Big Tech, refusing to spend money to fix the problem? The world's politicians, who lack the will to legislate? Or should we all be taking a good, hard look at ourselves?
11/21/202353 minutes, 46 seconds
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There's a sensory world unavailable to humans. So Ed Yong tried to discover it.

In 2020, veteran science journalist Ed Yong intended to write a book about the world of animal senses. But fate had other plans — he was put on the COVID beat for The Atlantic, and later received the Pulitzer Prize for his efforts.But year later he returned to the book and rediscovered an immense world: Flowers growing in electric fields, bees seeing in ultraviolet, the underwater symphony of the Great Barrier Reef. The sublime in the natural world. In his latest book, An Immense World: How Animal Senses Reveal the Hidden Realms Around Us, Ed asks how animals can sense this when we can't.
11/20/202354 minutes, 19 seconds
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Sean Turnell — how a nerdy economist was held hostage by Myanmar

If you find yourself locked up in a foreign prison on fake charges, what would you like your government to do? It's a question that rollicked around economist Sean Turnell's brain when the unthinkable became reality.In November 2021, Myanmar's military junta arrested Turnell — then an economic advisor to Aung San Suu Kyi — and thrust him into solitary confinement. He would be wrongfully imprisoned for another 650 days in one of Yangon's most notorious prisons. This is the story of how Turnell survived that time, and how a global coalition worked to set him free.
11/16/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The F Word — is Feminism too white, too middle-class, or a movement for all?

Has feminism been too white and too middle-class for too long? From India to Australia, five trailblazing women spanning generations, geography, and cultures join Big Ideas host Natasha Mitchell to give their frank and fearless views  on the F Word — what it means to them and how it might evolve.
11/15/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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What would you sacrifice to give peace a chance?

The road to peace is one littered with compromise. From Belfast to Bosnia, Dili to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, peace negotiations after bloody armed conflict have involved incredibly complex choices between what to prosecute and what to pardon. So what would you give up to obtain a lasting peace?This Big Ideas episode was first broadcast on November 10, 2015. 
11/14/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The genius and struggles of Orson Welles

He was one of the most remarkable producer/director/actors to come out of Hollywood. The cinema wunderkind George Orson Welles. But he was also a troublemaker and outsider; maybe too creative and eccentric for his own good. Some of his work remained unreleased, and at the same time his movie Citizen Kane is studied as an epitome of cinematic art all over the world to this day. Big Ideas discusses the legacy of Orson Welles, and the struggles to make Citizen Kane.
11/13/202354 minutes, 2 seconds
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The Doherty's Sharon Lewin on the call that changed the world forever

The director of Doherty Institute for Infectious Diseases was out of office when the first official case of the novel coronavirus was declared. At the time, Sharon Lewin was hiking in remote Patagonia. Then she got a call. Her deputy, Mike Catton, confirmed that Doherty scientists were the first outside of China to grow the novel coronavirus in a lab. This is the inside story of how that was achieved, and the split-second decision making that changed the course of the COVID-19 pandemic forever. 
11/9/202353 minutes, 37 seconds
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I DON’T! Clem Ford argues the case against marriage

Clem Ford, author of bestselling book Fight Like a Girl, Boys Will be Boys, and How We Love, is back with a firey new read. This time she's taking on an age-old institution that she argues harms women, and has throughout history. She wants marriage abolished. From white weddings to wandering wombs, coverture to capitalism, I DON'T: the case against marriage is full of stories of resistance, rage, and re-imagining. It'll shock and rile some, for others it'll be a case of hard relate. Clem Ford is in conversation with Big Ideas' host Natasha Mitchell at the Athenaeum Theatre in Naarm / Melbourne.
11/8/202355 minutes, 28 seconds
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Does sport unite or divide us?

There is nothing like cheering on your favourite sport team; or seeing our Aussie athletes on the top podium at the Olympic Games. A whole nation celebrates. Strangers are falling into each other's arms. Sport can truly unite us. But then… there are racist smirks, fans getting violent. Even in high school can you get a hard time if you're wearing the wrong club colours. So, does sport in fact divide us?
11/7/202354 minutes, 16 seconds
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Can you imagine power without violence?

While it was Mao Zedong who believed power came from the barrel of a gun, philosopher Hannah Arendt saw it differently. Instead, she believed the eruption of violence was less a testament to power, but rather, a stark admission of its absence. These thoughts later culminated in her 1970 essay, On Violence. More than a half century later, can Arendt's insights make sense of our turbulent present?
11/6/202356 minutes, 27 seconds
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How to shut up your inner critic and anxious thoughts — Brigid Delaney, James Kirby and Ahona Guha

How can you quiet those nagging voices inside your head; expectations that you should to better; anxiety how to make ends meet with rising costs of living … or trying to cope with abuse, trauma and loss? How can you turn your 'inner wilds' into 'inner calm' and achieve a more peaceful way of being? At the top of the list: Have compassion toward yourself and be kind to yourself — as well as others.
11/2/202354 minutes, 1 second
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More than a fish kill — how a bunch of boys healed a scientist and found themselves

Sometimes an event so big happens that it leaves everyone gasping in its wake. In this case, more than million fish were left gasping too. A stunning story of how one community rallied. At its heart is healing country, art, science, and ancient knowledge. In the Summer of 2018-2019 and again in 2023, mass fish kills left communities along the mighty Baaka / Darling River — one of Australia's most important river systems — devastated. The scenes of floating white carcasses captured attention worldwide. What happened next? And how were lives transformed in the process?
11/1/202353 minutes, 26 seconds
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Witchcraft in the 21st century  

The witch is a figure that has been around for a long time in many cultures, stretching back to ancient times. In the West, witches have re-appeared in stories for centuries: from Macbeth, to Salem, to Sabrina the Teenage Witch. But in the 21st-century, witches — and the practices associated with them — are being re-appraised, both as a form of contemporary spiritual practice, and a frame to study historical crimes against women.  
10/31/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Why Santilla Chingaipe traces the stories of Australia's African convicts

To write history is to omit. The historical archive is the end-product of a series of choices, and in the wash, particular voices get privileged over others. But around the globe, historians are attempting to identify the gaps in 'official' history, and in so doing, understand how and why they were created. Santilla Chingaipe is among them. Her recent work has told the stories of the hundreds of convicts of African descent transported to Australia during colonial rule. In her 2023 EW Cole Lecture for the Wheeler Centre, Santilla asks the question: Who gets to write history?
10/30/202353 minutes, 52 seconds
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How disinformation disrupts the city

Disinformation is nothing new, but ever increasingly, it is stifling the capacity for governments of all kinds to carry out their day-to-day duties.   It has acutely been felt at the local government level, where public council hearings, and library rainbow storytime events have either been postponed or cancelled due to security concerns. So what can cities (and their elected representatives) do to combat a rise in disinformation’s direct impacts, especially when facts don't convince?  
10/26/202353 minutes, 49 seconds
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Porkies to pork barrelling — real solutions to democracy's accountability crisis?

From politicians telling porkies to pork barrelling — many believe there is an accountability crisis at the heart of Australia’s democracy. What will it take to fix? Meet five who have tried with considerable success. Join Big Ideas' host Natasha Mitchell with Ed Coper, Simon Holmes a Court. Andrea Durbach, Helen Haines MP, Shireen Morris.
10/25/202353 minutes, 22 seconds
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Making cancer treatment work for every body

For every cancer patient, there's a life story that has influenced diagnosis, treatment, and survival. A patient in a vulnerable housing or financial position may not be able to participate in treatment fully, while those incarcerated may only be accessing cancer care for the first time. It's this holistic view of patients that clinicians want to better integrate into treatment — in and outside of the hospital. In this panel discussion from the 2023 NSW Cancer Innovations Conference, learn how experts in Indigenous health, justice, psychiatry, and oncology are getting cancer care to better respond to the social and cultural determinants of health.
10/24/202353 minutes, 48 seconds
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Do we need compassion for men who hurt women … to stop them from doing so?

To change violent behaviour, regulators and assistance services need compassion for the perpetrators. That's the consent of our panel of psychiatrists, psychologists and women who went through domestic violence themselves. You'll hear about the impact of trauma and what it does to your brain; how abuse destroys your identity; the hurt and healing effect of speaking out and what turns a victim into a survivor.
10/23/202353 minutes, 23 seconds
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Why Indy Johar doesn't want you to 'escape' to New Zealand

In a world that's warming faster than ever before, there are some places that are seen as future refuges from the ravages of climate change. New Zealand is high on the list, especially among the ultra-rich. But for architect and social entrepreneur Indy Johar, that escape can't really exist — the world's too entangled. After all, it takes a planet to make an iPhone. So how would a deeper reckoning with this entanglement inform the way we adapt to climate change, and the machine-learning revolution that's on our doorstep?
10/19/202353 minutes, 42 seconds
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Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth I — what we can learn from this extraordinary mother-daughter relationship

Although Elizabeth was only a little girl when her mother Anne was executed, their relationship significantly shaped the later queen's character, religion and reign. Historian Tracy Borman pieces together evidence from original documents and artefacts to show their bond and long-lasting influence; and she tells a story of famous royal women, the significance of symbols and the skills of outsmarting the intrigues of competing male courtiers.d.
10/18/202353 minutes, 55 seconds
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Ladies on the war path — why are women combatants still so disputed?

From the Amazons to the Ukraine conflict, women have always been on the frontline of war. But their role and contribution are still disputed. Big Ideas sets the record straight. How has war become an all-make space? And why were women allowed to be astronauts a full thirty years before they were allowed to fight in combat?
10/17/202353 minutes, 52 seconds
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All aboard the vomit comet! — how Meganne Christian's astronaut dream came true

It was on Antarctica's most remote stations that prompted scientist Meganne Christian to consider a life in space. On Concordia, also dubbed 'White Mars', Meganne did some accidental training. She experienced windchills at –104 degrees, 100 days without sun, and profound isolation — conditions the European Space Agency uses to test future astronauts.  In 2022, Meganne became one of 17 new reserve astronauts for the ESA, out of a pool of 22,500 applicants.  In this keynote for National Science Week 2023, Meganne shares her insights and explains why a ride on the 'vomit comet' is a pre-requisite for any budding astronaut.
10/16/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Content overload — how we consume culture now

The consumption of media is perhaps the most fragmented it's ever been. It's a world swimming in unopened tabs, in-video links, and scrolls that never end: a world of near-infinite choice. In this roundtable from the 2023 Melbourne International Film Festival, an author, a critic, a film buff, and cook join forces to discuss what culture they're consuming, how they're doing it, and why.
10/12/202354 minutes, 24 seconds
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The rise of Australian actors in Hollywood

Nicole Kitman, Errol Flynn, Peter Finch and David Gulpilil… they all are Australian actors who made their fortune in Hollywood. Australian talent is in fact very popular in the glitzy and cut-throat cinema business. Why is that? The book 'Cast Mates' looks behind the Hollywood curtain, from the Golden Age in the 1930s to the streaming wars of today. It follows the lives these four Australian actors and their cast mates and tells a story of how Australian cinema was founded, then faltered, before finding itself again.
10/11/202353 minutes, 36 seconds
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Decolonising Australia's fire science

For fire scientist Philip Zylstra, there are a lot of myths contained in the modern approach to containing bushfires in Australia. Namely, that management practices after colonisation continued pre-colonial Indigenous approaches in the form of prescribed burns. In his view, that's not correct. Instead, he argues the science underpinning prescribed burns isn't sound, resulting in a one-size-fits-all approach whose roots lie in classical England.
10/10/202354 minutes, 16 seconds
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Amputating your foot with a stone — best practice in the stone ages

A 31,000-year-old skeleton with a successfully amputated foot has rewritten the medical history books. The extraordinary find in Borneo challenges modern medicine's amputation record, which stretches back a mere 100 years. An expert panel traces the discovery story and describes a pre-historic caring and medically skilled society.
10/9/202353 minutes, 36 seconds
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The Voice referendum — hope or hype?

For some advocates of the no case for this year's referendum, the proposed Voice to parliament simply doesn't go far enough. Instead, advocates — often referred to as progressive 'no' voters — argue that Indigenous Australians should be given more institutional power to effect change, like dedicated First Nations seats in parliament. So what does this look like? And what alternatives to the Voice does the progressive no camp propose if their vote carries? Find more of the ABC's reporting on the Voice referendum on the ABC News website, or listen to the Voice Referendum Explained podcast with Carly Williams and Fran Kelly. 
10/5/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Legendary designer Mary Featherston: how school classrooms stunt our wondrous natural-born curiosity

Interior designer Mary Featherston is famous for many things. Her trailblazing creations with her late husband Grant Featherston. Their extraordinary Melbourne house designed by the iconic modernist architect Robin Boyd, which has housed four generations of their family. But what Mary's most driven by is her 50-year mission to change the face, feel, and function of Australian classrooms. Classrooms, not just teachers, can be educators too! She joins Big Ideas' host Natasha Mitchell.
10/4/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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'Ok boomer' — the consternation of a generation

Depending who you ask, the baby boomers got it good, and everyone that followed got a raw deal. Here's the common assumption: Millennials are saddled with student debt, unaffordable housing, and increasingly insecure work, while their forebears didn't (and some experienced profound asset gains afterwards). But is this generational binary that simple? Ok Boomer was first recorded at the Sydney Writers Festival in May 2023.
10/3/202354 minutes, 25 seconds
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Hunting for life on exoplanets — but is it life as we know it?

Checking out the Goldilocks Zone. With a team of astronomers and astrophysicists, Big Ideas is exploring the skies — more precisely, exoplanets that orbit around stars beyond our solar system in what is known as the Goldilocks Zone. It's the zone with conditions that might be just right for creating life. What is this zone, what is being discovered and what can we learn about our own terrestrial world?
10/2/202355 minutes, 33 seconds
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Ahead of the Voice referendum, a refresher on referenda

It's been 24 years since Australia's last referendum, meaning there's an entire generation who will be participating in a referendum for the first time. As the nation gears up for the referendum on an Indigenous Voice to parliament, a Monash University panel of legal scholars and constitutional nerds give you a refresher on the mechanics of referenda, the constitution, and why Australian law permits disinformation in political advertising.
9/28/202354 minutes, 21 seconds
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Open arms or closed doors — why do governments celebrate certain migrants but stigmatise others?  

Moving to a new country is hard – do you seek out your own diaspora or find a way to blend in and assimilate? Usually it’s a bit a of both, and what governments do can make a big difference to your life. Why do certain migrants get embraced by certain governments — while others are stigmatised, pilloried, even imprisoned? Two accomplished historians join Natasha Mitchell for a Big Ideas on fitting in and feeling like an outsider. 
9/27/202357 minutes, 24 seconds
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Tony Wellington: How the music of the 60s and 70s changed the world forever 

The 70's was the peak era of musical innovation and creativity. Kickstarted by the rock'n'roll revolution of the 60s, the music of the 70s has transformed the world and defined all styles that came after. Bands co-opted elements of classical, jazz, electronic, world and avant-garde music. And music became visual spectacle via glam, shock rock, disco and punk.
9/26/202353 minutes, 57 seconds
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The future of Australia's literary journals — writing's great pollinators

Chances are your favourite writer got their first break in a literary journal. While they're most often seen as flash-in-the-pan print publications, run on love and free labour, the reality is a lot more complicated. Ahead of of the 2025 launch of Writers Australia — the federal government's proposed peak body for Australian literature — Western Sydney University released a report into the state of Australia's literary journals. It provides a critical snapshot of the working reality of literary journals, which battle chronic funding shortfalls, precarious employment, and patchy digital infrastructure. The report's co-author Catriona Menzies-Pike — an award-winning writer and former editor of the Sydney Review of Books — explains how the report might inform future literary policy.
9/25/202355 minutes, 42 seconds
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Why young people want to break the binaries of the Voice debate

There's a broad spectrum of perspectives on the Voice referendum, but where do the voices of Australia's youth fit into the debate? Recently, the University of Tasmania gathered a panel of young Indigenous and non-indigenous voices to speak to the complexities of this era-defining moment, and what future they want to inherit — whatever the outcome of the vote. 
9/21/202354 minutes, 51 seconds
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Artificial wombs and animal sex — philosophers weigh in on brave new futures

When it comes to biological sex, humans are pretty vanilla. Things are so much wilder in nature. Philosopher of science Paul Griffiths challenges the notion that our biological sex is a rigid, unchangeable thing. Political philosopher Luara Ferracioli contemplates the controversial idea of artificial wombs replacing women’s wombs, with babies gestated entirely outside of the human body. What could that mean for the future of parenthood, motherhood, and our relationship to children? They join Natasha Mitchell for a Big Ideas on sex, biology, and baby making.
9/20/202359 minutes, 27 seconds
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The deeper meaning of travel: Richard Fidler, Kris Kneen, Adam Liam, Vicki Shururoglou

Travelling is fun — but does it have a deeper purpose? It helps us cultivate connections in the world, it shapes our own identity and makes us understand other cultures. But has modern technology made it too easy and fast-paced? What does 'good-travelling' involve? How do you fit into the places you visit?
9/19/202353 minutes, 20 seconds
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Keeping up with the Coppolas

The Coppolas are one of cinema's great family dynasties. The patriarch is Francis Ford Coppola, the Oscar-award winning director of the Godfather trilogy, Apocalypse Now, and many others. His children, Sophia and Roman, have charted creative paths in their own right. Roman — an award-winning music video director and regular collaborator of Wes Anderson — was a recent guest of Melbourne's inaugural Now or Never Festival. He's currently on a mission to democratise film funding through blockchain, and cites Luna Park as a recent source of Australian inspiration.
9/18/202353 minutes, 42 seconds
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Anne Summers and the inside story of a winning campaign — pulling single parents out of poverty

On the same day as her historic misogyny speech, Australia's Prime Minister Julia Gillard introduced a policy that would plunge tens of thousands of single parents into poverty. It had significant consequences for single mothers.  Single parents whose children turned eight no longer had access to the single parent payment, a move many experts believe increased child poverty. But in May, that law was reformed, bumping up payment cut-off to 14.  Join influential feminist campaigners, including Anne Summers, as they reveal the inside story behind that reform: what worked, what didn't, and what other campaigners could learn from their methods.
9/14/202353 minutes, 41 seconds
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David Suzuki's battle-cry for Now or Never

David Suzuki says the global environmental movement – of which he has been an influential figurehead - has failed. His breathtaking book The Sacred Balance: Rediscovering our Place in Nature has just been released as a 25th Anniversary edition.  Now he’s calling for some radical truth telling. Especially from corporate executives and elders. Let his now or never battle-cry galvanise you. He joined Big Ideas presenter Natasha Mitchell as part of the Now or Never festival at the Melbourne Museum.
9/13/20231 minute, 34 seconds
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How to design cities that make us feel again

There are certain sensory experiences that bind us to place. It might be the scent of the city after rain, the way light moves through a street tree canopy, or the texture of a handrail as you move through the day. It is these small details that the field of placemaking is trying to help us rediscover. And it's something that an increasing number of governments and urban planning firms are integrating into their work. But beyond the buzzwords and 'activation' sites, can placemaking deliver on its pitch?
9/12/202353 minutes, 37 seconds
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Why Australia's 'queen of waste' wants to start a revolution

In the mind of Veena Sahajwalla, the way we think about waste is rubbish. The award-winning scientist — who's also been dubbed Australia's "queen of waste" — wants to start a revolution in recycling. For her, recycling doesn't need to replace like-for-like. Instead, she wants us to imagine a future where all things can be unmade into their component parts, like turning old tyres into steel (something Professor Sahajwalla's pioneered). In this talk from the Australian Museum, the inventor of green steel tells us why we're on the cusp of a recycling revolution.
9/11/202353 minutes, 44 seconds
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Cathy McGowan's lessons for lasting change

For Cathy McGowan, change doesn't come about by waiting for government. Nor for that matter, perfecting theories… it's simply doing. And sticking it out when the work isn't sexy, incremental, and the outcome seems unlikely. It's something she learnt around this time a decade ago when she toppled a long-standing incumbent in the Victorian seat of Indi — and became Australia's first-elected female independent. In this National Museum of Australia address, McGowan explains her success wasn't about her. Instead, why it was her community that was central to her campaign, and subsequent parliamentary terms.
9/7/202354 minutes, 54 seconds
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Unseen by design — could a world designed by blind people be better for all?

Seeing is only one way of sensing the world. When you don't have sight, your brain develops another set of sensory superpowers. Meet three trailblazers in design, art, architecture, and advocacy to discover how the world unseen can be so much better for the seen and seeing. 
9/6/202353 minutes, 40 seconds
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Is patenting vaccines a threat to public health?

Pitting innovation against equitable access to medicine: Should drugs and vaccines have patents and fall under intellectual property laws? It's a particularly difficult question in times of a public health crisis. On Big Ideas, a panel of experts will draw on their own experiences and re-think vaccine creation, production and distribution. Do we need to change IP laws, or should we be looking at other measures to ensure those who need vaccines and medication, can access them - regardless of cost, or which country they live in?
9/5/202354 minutes, 43 seconds
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Does politics neglect the needs of younger generations?

What if every law, process, or government department decision was mandated for the well-being of citizens and future generations in mind? That is the case in Wales in the UK. Meet Sophie Howe, the world's first Future Generations Commissioner.
9/4/202353 minutes, 29 seconds
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(Too) hot right now — life on a sweltering planet

The planet's hotter than it has ever been. July was the Earth's hottest month ever recorded since records began. And the consequences of this warming is increasingly becoming too hard to bear — particularly among those who don't have access to climate control. So what happens to our bodies in times of heat extremes? And what will happen when these extremes become the new 'normal'? It's something the veteran environmental reporter Jeff Goodell explores in his new book Heat: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet.
8/31/202354 minutes, 28 seconds
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Is AI coming for what makes us most human — ART? Six whip-smart thinkers to provoke

The Bots have landed. Meet the artist bot. The designer bot. The actor bot. The screenwriter bot.  Paul McCartney says AI was used to produce a new Beatles song using demo tape recording by the late John Lennon. But in Hollywood, screen-writers and actors are striking over their work being used to train up A.I tools — or — their roles being devalued, even replaced by A.I. Authors are suing OpenAI, the makers of ChatGPT, for using their books to train up the chatbot without permission or payment. What does the rise and rise of AI mean for art, its authorship, value, and its central role in what it means to be human? Six whip-smart thinkers join Natasha Mitchell to provoke.
8/30/202316 minutes, 18 seconds
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Osman Faruqi: The war on Hip Hop

It's possibly the greatest ever example of artistic censorship in Australian history. Police has Hip Hop music taken down from online streaming platforms, bans bands from performing in Australia and interferes with visa regulations so that those bands can't travel overseas to perform. Their argument is that Hip Hop is inciting violent and criminal behaviour. But this argument has been dismissed in the US over two decades ago. Osman Faruqi shines a light on parallels to the Hip Hop wars in 1990s America, the role of police bias and profiling, and concerns for free speech more broadly.
8/29/202354 minutes, 35 seconds
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COVID, Zoonotic diseases, and the next pandemic

Throughout human history, infectious viruses have moved between animals and humans without much fanfare. These are known as Zoonotic diseases. But every so often, they set off a chain reaction that can't be contained, like the bubonic plague, or COVID-19. But the collective experience of COVID has given the world many lessons about what to — and what not to do — the next time there's a Zoonotic leap. So what are those lessons, and is humanity able to not repeat the same mistakes?
8/28/202354 minutes, 56 seconds
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From Matildas' Sam Kerr to author Alice Pung — is Australia's Asian identity centre stage?

Australia is a majority migrant nation. Increasingly, that migration skews more Asian than European, with more than 50 per cent of the population either born overseas or having a parent who was. This includes the lauded Australian writer Alice Pung, whose Chinese-Cambodian parents fled the Khmer Rouge. But it's a story replicated across many generations of Australian families, including that of the Matildas' captain Sam Kerr, whose father was born in Kolkata. But abroad, the contemporary story of Asian Australia is lesser-known. The stereotypes of Australia being an outpost of the Anglosphere still lingers, despite generations of Asian-Australian life. So how is this story best told?
8/24/202354 minutes, 24 seconds
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Will AI render human creativity worthless? The Beaker St Festival Great Debate

Two teams of heavy-hitters debate the fate of human creativity in a world of artificial intelligence. In a Big Ideas first, two A.I debaters are taking to the stage, and with strong opinions! Are the bots coming for Boticelli and the Bronte Sisters? Will humans be thrown in the dustbin of civilisation as our artistic expression is usurped by silicon? Or, will the bots help you unleash your creative potential like never before?
8/23/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Jacinda Ardern speaks frankly with Mana Wāhine (powerful women)

Dame Jacinda Ardern's rise to the top wasn't down to destiny. In fact, the first job she wanted was to be a clown. Then she tried (and failed) in audition to be a hobbit in Lord of the Rings. But what would come later would be a bigger role that would eclipse any of her prior attempts at a life on screen – becoming the world's youngest female leader (and a global media sensation) after an unexpected election victory in 2017. For many, Jacinda's story channels what people in New Zealand know as Mana Wāhine -- a Māori phrase that refers to women of strength. It's something that was explored in a recent panel where women across the arts, sport and politics came together to reflect on their journeys, and the responsibilities that emerge once you're at the top.
8/22/202354 minutes, 35 seconds
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Jacinda Ardern speaks frankly with Mana Wāhine (powerful women)

Dame Jacinda Ardern's rise to the top wasn't down to destiny. In fact, the first job she wanted was to be a clown. Then she tried (and failed) in a Lord of the Rings audition to be a hobbit.  But what would come later would be a bigger role that would eclipse any of her prior attempts at a life on screen. After an unexpected election victory in 2017, she became the world's youngest female leader (and a global media sensation).  For many, Jacinda's story channels what people in New Zealand know as Mana Wāhine -- a Māori phrase that refers to women of strength. It's something that was explored in a recent panel where women across the arts, sport and politics came together to reflect on their journeys, and the responsibilities that emerge once you're at the top.
8/22/202354 minutes, 35 seconds
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The uncertain future of the Antarctic and Arctic: why the arctic regions are crucial for global security

Geopolitics and climate change now have immediate consequences for national and international security interests across the Arctic and Antarctic. The world's polar regions are contested and strategically central to geopolitical rivalry. At the same time, rapid political, social, and environmental change presents unprecedented challenges for governance, environmental protection, and maritime operations in the regions.
8/21/202354 minutes, 38 seconds
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Fantastic beasts get it on! Incredible stories of revival and rescue

Why did an earless lizard make politicians take to the podium? (And could it have heard them anyway?). What makes a pygmy possum randy?  (The nose knows).  Why are Africa’s sacred cows so vital? (More than a meaty issue). Genetics to the rescue with hopeful stories and science from three trailblazing women. Join Natasha Mitchell at the Melbourne Museum for the 2023 International Congress of Genetics. 
8/17/202353 minutes, 54 seconds
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Perv — the kink in all of us

What gives you the ick? Though of course, that is inherently subjective. What may be someone's ick could be someone's kink. Jesse Bering is a psychologist specialising in evolutionary psychology and human behaviour whose work has tried to understand what lies beneath 'normal'. In this talk from Vivid 2023, Jesse explores the complex dynamics between repulsion and attraction, and how sexual 'deviance' has evolved over time.
8/16/202355 minutes, 8 seconds
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The Matildas Effect — will FIFA and other codes change their tune on sportswomen?

You see more long braids, a touch of makeup and some curves in professional sports. Women are finally starting to assert their place on the field. But as our expert panel says, creating pathways to inclusion for women and gender diverse people with intersecting identities and abilities remains an urgent task at both grassroots and elite levels.
8/15/202354 minutes, 3 seconds
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Infidelity and other affairs

Who doesn't dream of being loved dangerously, thrillingly free from the tethers of restraint? It's a question journalist and author Kate Legge asked after the discovery of her husband's affairs. He was a high-powered media CEO, and she was a veteran journalist who was assured the infidelity was singular (more were to be discovered on the home PC). Having tried (and failed) to keep the marriage going, Kate started to write about it, only to discover infidelities spanning four generations on his side of the family. The resulting book, Infidelity and Other Affairs asks why some choose restraint, while others choose wild abandon.
8/14/202354 minutes, 49 seconds
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Infidelity and other affairs

Who doesn't dream of being loved dangerously, thrillingly free from the tethers of restraint? It's a question journalist and author Kate Legge asked after the discovery of her husband's affairs. He was a high-powered media CEO, and she was a veteran journalist who was assured the infidelity was singular (more were to be discovered on the home PC). Having tried (and failed) to keep the marriage going, Kate started to write about it, only to discover infidelities spanning four generations on his side of the family. The resulting book, Infidelity and Other Affairs asks why some choose restraint, while others choose wild abandon.
8/14/202354 minutes, 49 seconds
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What we can learn from ancient African kings

Many precolonial kingdoms and dynasties of Africa, have shaped cultures across the continent to this day. But they have been terribly ignored and marginalised throughout history. A pity really – because we could learn so much from their approach to wielding power: like how to reign with mystical stories and through generosity instead of oppression; and instead of wars over borders have the people chose under what king they want to life. 
8/10/202354 minutes, 48 seconds
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What we can learn from ancient African kings

Many precolonial kingdoms and dynasties of Africa, have shaped cultures across the continent to this day. But they have been terribly ignored and marginalised throughout history. A pity really – because we could learn so much from their approach to wielding power: like how to reign with mystical stories and through generosity instead of oppression; and instead of wars over borders have the people chose under what king they want to life. 
8/10/202354 minutes, 48 seconds
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The dreamers and schemers — an adventurous history of Australian politics

Frank Bongiorno is always adventurous with the way he unearths the history of Australia. He's written a history of Australian sex lives, Australia in the 1980s, and now he'll surprise you again with stories of the dreamers and schemers who have shaped Australia's political history. 
8/9/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The dreamers and schemers — an adventurous history of Australian politics

Frank Bongiorno is always adventurous with the way he unearths the history of Australia. He's written a history of Australian sex lives, Australia in the 1980s, and now he'll surprise you again with stories of the dreamers and schemers who have shaped Australia's political history. 
8/9/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Australian foreign policy after Albanese

With a change in government, there comes a new orientation for Australian foreign policy. Under the leadership of Foreign Minister Penny Wong — the first Asian and overseas-born Australian to hold that office — there has been attempts to reset many of Australia's relationships in the region, particularly with China. But a hard reset isn't exactly on the agenda — the Albanese Government is continuing the AUKUS deal and remains steadfast in deepening the US-Australia alliance. So what new directions in foreign policy can the Labor Government define in this moment?
8/8/202354 minutes, 46 seconds
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Australian foreign policy after Albanese

With a change in government, there comes a new orientation for Australian foreign policy. Under the leadership of Foreign Minister Penny Wong — the first Asian and overseas-born Australian to hold that office — there has been attempts to reset many of Australia's relationships in the region, particularly with China. But a hard reset isn't exactly on the agenda — the Albanese Government is continuing the AUKUS deal and remains steadfast in deepening the US-Australia alliance. So what new directions in foreign policy can the Labor Government define in this moment?
8/8/202354 minutes, 46 seconds
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How to stay hopeful and optimistic in dark times

Can you stay positive and optimistic in difficult times? Is it a fool's game even to try? Bill Hayes and Lachlan McIver talk about the difference between realism and pessimism; and why it's imperative to muster up hope in hard times. They know what they're talking about, having gone through tragedy and loss in their lives as well.
8/7/202353 minutes, 49 seconds
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How to stay hopeful and optimistic in dark times

Can you stay positive and optimistic in difficult times? Is it a fool's game even to try? Bill Hayes and Lachlan McIver talk about the difference between realism and pessimism; and why it's imperative to muster up hope in hard times. They know what they're talking about, having gone through tragedy and loss in their lives as well.
8/7/202353 minutes, 49 seconds
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Barrie Kosky — a giant of Australian stage

He's one of Australia's most successful stage exports who cites Kermit the Frog as one of his greatest influences. Over decades, Barrie Kosky has blazed a trail directing theatre and opera across Europe, who in 2022, finished a 10-year stint leading Berlin's prestigious opera house, the Komische Oper. The self-described "gay, Jewish, Kangaroo" is in conversation with the Sydney Theatre Company's artistic director Kip Williams. The two reflect on Barrie's career, the future of theatre post-streaming, and how the weight of German history continues to inspire.
8/3/202353 minutes, 47 seconds
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Barrie Kosky — a giant of Australian stage

He's one of Australia's most successful stage exports who cites Kermit the Frog as one of his greatest influences. Over decades, Barrie Kosky has blazed a trail directing theatre and opera across Europe, who in 2022, finished a 10-year stint leading Berlin's prestigious opera house, the Komische Oper. The self-described "gay, Jewish, Kangaroo" is in conversation with the Sydney Theatre Company's artistic director Kip Williams. The two reflect on Barrie's career, the future of theatre post-streaming, and how the weight of German history continues to inspire.
8/3/202353 minutes, 47 seconds
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Young and healthy (or not)? Here's why DNA screening should be on your radar

You’re young. You’re healthy. Would you open Pandora’s box and take a DNA test to find out your risk of a serious disease?  Scientists say widespread DNA screening of young people will save lives — but who will pay the price?  And if you discovered you carry a high-risk gene for breast or prostate cancer, what can you do with that information, and who else might use it? Could insurance companies or prospective employers discriminate against you on the basis of your genes?  Natasha Mitchell and guests — including Kara who took a test — dive into the science, ethics and economics of population DNA screening.
8/2/202352 minutes, 59 seconds
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Young and healthy (or not)? Here's why DNA screening should be on your radar

You’re young. You’re healthy. Would you open Pandora’s box and take a DNA test to find out your risk of a serious disease?  Scientists say widespread DNA screening of young people will save lives — but who will pay the price?  And if you discovered you carry a high-risk gene for breast or prostate cancer, what can you do with that information, and who else might use it? Could insurance companies or prospective employers discriminate against you on the basis of your genes?  Natasha Mitchell and guests — including Kara who took a test — dive into the science, ethics and economics of population DNA screening.
8/2/202352 minutes, 59 seconds
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Benjamin Gilmour says: We should be talking to the Taliban

Is it necessary to engage with the Taliban to improve conditions in Afghanistan? It's an inconceivable idea for many who have fought in the country of fled from Taliban oppression. But Benjamin Gilmour has done it. At a recent trip to the country, he has been given access to some of the top leaders of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan. Now he shares his experiences and conversations with the Taliban.
8/1/202353 minutes, 36 seconds
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Benjamin Gilmour says: We should be talking to the Taliban

Is it necessary to engage with the Taliban to improve conditions in Afghanistan? It's an inconceivable idea for many who have fought in the country of fled from Taliban oppression. But Benjamin Gilmour has done it. At a recent trip to the country, he has been given access to some of the top leaders of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan. Now he shares his experiences and conversations with the Taliban.
8/1/202353 minutes, 36 seconds
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All about IVF

IVF, or in vitro fertilisation has come a long way since its first successful application in Australia. That was in 1980, at the Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne with the birth of Candice Reed. Forty years on, it's estimated that some 200,000 Australian children have been born via IVF. But despite the technological, legislative, and social changes that have come about in that period, many couples – and single parents – still face stigma for opting to have children this way. Hear from three women who've experienced IVF from all angles.
7/31/202355 minutes, 21 seconds
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All about IVF

IVF, or in vitro fertilisation has come a long way since its first successful application in Australia. That was in 1980, at the Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne with the birth of Candice Reed. Forty years on, it's estimated that some 200,000 Australian children have been born via IVF. But despite the technological, legislative, and social changes that have come about in that period, many couples – and single parents – still face stigma for opting to have children this way. Hear from three women who've experienced IVF from all angles.
7/31/202355 minutes, 21 seconds
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Nothing about us without us

When making change, how do you amplify the voices of youth without being tokenistic? It's a question that was on the minds of many at the once-in-a-generation summit called Wiyi Yani U Thangani, a Bubuna phrase meaning women's voices. Held in Canberra earlier this year, Wiyi Yani U Thangani, brought together around 900 First Nations women to produce a new 'Blakprint', to improve their lives, those of their families and future generations. Integral to this 'Blakprint' was the input of young women, who were invited to imagine what a just future – built on self-determination – might look like for their communities.
7/27/202354 minutes, 9 seconds
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Nothing about us without us

When making change, how do you amplify the voices of youth without being tokenistic? It's a question that was on the minds of many at the once-in-a-generation summit called Wiyi Yani U Thangani, a Bubuna phrase meaning women's voices. Held in Canberra earlier this year, Wiyi Yani U Thangani, brought together around 900 First Nations women to produce a new 'Blakprint', to improve their lives, those of their families and future generations. Integral to this 'Blakprint' was the input of young women, who were invited to imagine what a just future – built on self-determination – might look like for their communities.
7/27/202354 minutes, 9 seconds
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Before Julia Gillard's misogyny speech — meet the feminists who changed Australian politics

Former prime minister Julia Gillard's misogyny speech hit a nerve worldwide. But before that speech, were the feminist rebels, ratbags, and renegades who got Australian politics to that moment. Hear how and why women's lives, against the odds, were first put on the political agenda in Australia… and why Miss Australia wasn't there.
7/26/202355 minutes, 19 seconds
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Before Julia Gillard's misogyny speech — meet the feminists who changed Australian politics

Former prime minister Julia Gillard's misogyny speech hit a nerve worldwide. But before that speech, were the feminist rebels, ratbags, and renegades who got Australian politics to that moment. Hear how and why women's lives, against the odds, were first put on the political agenda in Australia… and why Miss Australia wasn't there.
7/26/202355 minutes, 19 seconds
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Shut up and (write) the hits — song writing in the streaming age

Song writing in the 21st-Century is an increasingly precarious endeavour. We now live in a world where even the slightest similar melodic pattern could send you to court, while AI-driven production could send you packing. But despite this, there's still something magical about song writing. So what keeps compelling people to try their luck at crafting songs in the streaming era? So, enter the writing room (or pub) to hear from four Australian rock legends who've witnessed this magic. Together, they've played for bands including Midnight Oil, Mental as Anything, The Go Betweens, and R.E.M.
7/25/202354 minutes, 3 seconds
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Shut up and (write) the hits — song writing in the streaming age

Song writing in the 21st-Century is an increasingly precarious endeavour. We now live in a world where even the slightest similar melodic pattern could send you to court, while AI-driven production could send you packing. But despite this, there's still something magical about song writing. So what keeps compelling people to try their luck at crafting songs in the streaming era? So, enter the writing room (or pub) to hear from four Australian rock legends who've witnessed this magic. Together, they've played for bands including Midnight Oil, Mental as Anything, The Go Betweens, and R.E.M.
7/25/202354 minutes, 3 seconds
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Why do some people crave risk and extreme adventures?

Would you endure intense physical challenges and privations, extreme temperatures, dizzying heights, hunger and loneliness …. just for the thrill of it? What kinds of people thrive in hostile environments? It takes a special type of person to embark on extreme adventures and sports. It's not just about your fitness and bodily constitution, you mental and emotional strengths can be even more important. What drives people to the depths and edges of the known world, and how do they survive it? And are there lessons the rest of us can learn from them?
7/24/202353 minutes, 45 seconds
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Why do some people crave risk and extreme adventures?

Would you endure intense physical challenges and privations, extreme temperatures, dizzying heights, hunger and loneliness …. just for the thrill of it? What kinds of people thrive in hostile environments? It takes a special type of person to embark on extreme adventures and sports. It's not just about your fitness and bodily constitution, you mental and emotional strengths can be even more important. What drives people to the depths and edges of the known world, and how do they survive it? And are there lessons the rest of us can learn from them?
7/24/202353 minutes, 45 seconds
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Australia's sporting myths

Australia is obsessed with sport — it's become shorthand for our national identity abroad. But there's tension at the heart of this obsession. As keen and disinterested followers of Australian sport have witnessed, sports of all kinds have had a troubled relationship with race, gender, and sexuality.It's something Mununjali writer — and part-time soccer player — Ellen van Neerven considers in their book Personal Score, exploring their complicated relationship with sport in the process.
7/20/202354 minutes, 54 seconds
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Australia's sporting myths

Australia is obsessed with sport — it's become shorthand for our national identity abroad. But there's tension at the heart of this obsession. As keen and disinterested followers of Australian sport have witnessed, sports of all kinds have had a troubled relationship with race, gender, and sexuality.It's something Mununjali writer — and part-time soccer player — Ellen van Neerven considers in their book Personal Score, exploring their complicated relationship with sport in the process.
7/20/202354 minutes, 54 seconds
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Puff Piece — John Safran goes gonzo with Big Tobacco's health spin

As a gonzo documentary maker and author, John Safran goes where others fear to tread. He's been baptised, exorcised, crucified, hung out with extremists. Now he's digging into the spin and shenanigans of Big Tobacco. When is a cigarette not a cigarette when it really still is? An eye-opening conversation about vapes, "heat sticks", and corporate obscurantism. Will John Safran smoke out the truth?
7/19/202353 minutes, 37 seconds
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Puff Piece — John Safran goes gonzo with Big Tobacco's health spin

As a gonzo documentary maker and author, John Safran goes where others fear to tread. He's been baptised, exorcised, crucified, hung out with extremists. Now he's digging into the spin and shenanigans of Big Tobacco. When is a cigarette not a cigarette when it really still is? An eye-opening conversation about vapes, "heat sticks", and corporate obscurantism. Will John Safran smoke out the truth?
7/19/202353 minutes, 37 seconds
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Whatever happened to Australian foreign aid?

We might like to think of Australia as a generous nation, but Australian foreign aid levels tell a different story. We're now ranked 27th out of 31 OECD countries when it comes to foreign aid as a percentage of gross national income. And with the money we do spend, to what extent has national self-interests impeded Australian aid's ability to make the most impact?
7/18/202354 minutes, 12 seconds
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Whatever happened to Australian foreign aid?

We might like to think of Australia as a generous nation, but Australian foreign aid levels tell a different story. We're now ranked 27th out of 31 OECD countries when it comes to foreign aid as a percentage of gross national income. And with the money we do spend, to what extent has national self-interests impeded Australian aid's ability to make the most impact?
7/18/202354 minutes, 12 seconds
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President Penpa Tsering on the challenges and the future of Tibet

After many decades of Chinese occupation, the Tibetan culture is under threat, and a 'stolen generation' of Tibetan children is forced into boarding schools. There are no civil rights, and any protest means risking your life. Despite all, the Tibetans believe in a non-violent approach to solve the Sino-Tibet conflict. Tibet's president in exile is speaking about the challenges for the mountain country.
7/17/202353 minutes, 52 seconds
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President Penpa Tsering on the challenges and the future of Tibet

After many decades of Chinese occupation, the Tibetan culture is under threat, and a 'stolen generation' of Tibetan children is forced into boarding schools. There are no civil rights, and any protest means risking your life. Despite all, the Tibetans believe in a non-violent approach to solve the Sino-Tibet conflict. Tibet's president in exile is speaking about the challenges for the mountain country.
7/17/202353 minutes, 52 seconds
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The art of memoir

Three successful authors Akuch Anyieth, Shannon Burns and Catherine Deveny talk about memoir, and why they're interested in the form.  Moderator of the discussion Yves Rees asks the panel to reflect on whether the personal storytelling genre is popular because of voyeurism, a desire for intimacy between writer and reader or just a hunger for trauma porn? 
7/13/202353 minutes, 10 seconds
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Catherine Deveny, Shannon Burns, and Akuch Anyieth on memoir

Three successful authors Akuch Anyieth, Shannon Burns and Catherine Deveny talk about memoir, and why they're interested in the form.  Moderator of the discussion Yves Rees asks the panel to reflect on whether the personal storytelling genre is popular because of voyeurism, a desire for intimacy between writer and reader or just a hunger for trauma porn? 
7/13/202353 minutes, 10 seconds
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The Dark Cloud — how our digital lives and Big Tech are costing the Earth

Going digital is greener, right? French investigative journalist Guillaume Pitron travelled the planet for his latest exposé — from covertly flying drones over graphite mines in Northeast China to journeying to the cold wilds of Lapland to visit the computer server farms that drive Facebook.  He joins Big Ideas host Natasha Mitchell to discuss his latest eye-opening read, The Dark Cloud — how the digital world is costing the Earth.
7/12/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The Dark Cloud — how our digital lives and Big Tech are costing the Earth

Going digital is greener, right? French investigative journalist Guillaume Pitron travelled the planet for his latest exposé — from covertly flying drones over graphite mines in Northeast China to journeying to the cold wilds of Lapland to visit the computer server farms that drive Facebook.  He joins Big Ideas host Natasha Mitchell to discuss his latest eye-opening read, The Dark Cloud — how the digital world is costing the Earth.
7/12/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The ethics of travel

Questioning whether travel is ethical is probably the last thing on your mind when you decide to go on holiday. But for increasing number of travellers, 'ethical travel' is the preferred mode for tourists who don't want their holiday to just be an extractive exercise. So what are the ethical obligations for those who have the privilege to travel? And what does ethical travel mean in practice… ?
7/11/202353 minutes, 50 seconds
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Bri Lee and fellow voyagers ponder the ethics of travel

Questioning whether travel is ethical is probably the last thing on your mind when you decide to go on holiday. But for increasing number of travellers, 'ethical travel' is the preferred mode for tourists who don't want their holiday to just be an extractive exercise. So what are the ethical obligations for those who have the privilege to travel? And what does ethical travel mean in practice… ?
7/11/202353 minutes, 50 seconds
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Bri Lee and fellow voyagers ponder the ethics of travel

Questioning whether travel is ethical is probably the last thing on your mind when you decide to go on holiday. But for increasing number of travellers, 'ethical travel' is the preferred mode for tourists who don't want their holiday to just be an extractive exercise. So what are the ethical obligations for those who have the privilege to travel? And what does ethical travel mean in practice… ?
7/11/202353 minutes, 50 seconds
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Making health systems work for the user

Thirty years ago, Harlem doctor Harold Freeman saw that the most disadvantaged in America also had the highest cancer deaths, mainly because of late diagnosis and treatment and patients being unfamiliar with hospital systems. So he created a navigation system where patients are chaperoned through the health care system to ensure they get the care they need. Plus, First Nations people are navigating health and healing in a different way, turning to country and using aspects of their traditional culture as a form of holistic medicine.
7/10/202354 minutes, 48 seconds
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The radical act of making healthcare work for YOU, the patient

Thirty years ago, Harlem doctor Harold Freeman saw that the most disadvantaged in America also had the highest cancer deaths, mainly because of late diagnosis and treatment and patients being unfamiliar with hospital systems. So he created a navigation system where patients are chaperoned through the health care system to ensure they get the care they need. Plus, First Nations people are navigating health and healing in a different way, turning to country and using aspects of their traditional culture as a form of holistic medicine.
7/10/202354 minutes, 48 seconds
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The secretive history and uncertain future of nuclear technology

The history and development of the nuclear industry is shred in secrecy and contradictions. And its future is throwing up more questions than answers. A scientist, a historian and a poet consider the economic, scientific and social realities of nuclear technology. They discuss how the lessons from the past might shape an uncertain future, and the possible consequences of playing God.
7/6/202353 minutes, 53 seconds
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The secretive history and uncertain future of nuclear technology

The history and development of the nuclear industry is shred in secrecy and contradictions. And its future is throwing up more questions than answers. A scientist, a historian and a poet consider the economic, scientific and social realities of nuclear technology. They discuss how the lessons from the past might shape an uncertain future, and the possible consequences of playing God.
7/6/202353 minutes, 53 seconds
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The day the invisible was made visible — Manus Island detention survivors speak

In early 2020, as Australians were being locked down, something strange was happening in an inner-suburban hotel in Brisbane. A group of men, previously invisible to most Australians, gathered on the hotel balcony wielding hand-made banners. Who were they? And how did this moment change the minds of middle Australia? It's 10 years since Kevin Rudd declared "no one who arrives by boat will ever settle here". The fallout catapulted thousands of lives into a decade-long limbo. Two of the men on that Brisbane balcony join host Natasha Mitchell and other guests at the Brisbane Powerhouse as part of the Portraits of Protest exhibition.
7/5/202357 minutes, 2 seconds
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The day the invisible was made visible — Manus Island detention survivors speak

In early 2020, as Australians were being locked down, something strange was happening in an inner-suburban hotel in Brisbane. A group of men, previously invisible to most Australians, gathered on the hotel balcony wielding hand-made banners. Who were they? And how did this moment change the minds of middle Australia? It's 10 years since Kevin Rudd declared "no one who arrives by boat will ever settle here". The fallout catapulted thousands of lives into a decade-long limbo. Two of the men on that Brisbane balcony join host Natasha Mitchell and other guests at the Brisbane Powerhouse as part of the Portraits of Protest exhibition.
7/5/202357 minutes, 2 seconds
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Black lives, white law

Has the application of the law been just to Indigenous Australia? Australia's cultural and legal notions of justice stem from British colonial rule, which by its very nature, usurped the law and customs of Australia's First Peoples. Since colonisation, this law has disciplined and punished Indigenous Australians through legal frameworks and theories they didn't consent to. So what would redress look like… in law?
7/4/202355 minutes, 9 seconds
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Black lives, white law

Has the application of the law been just to Indigenous Australia? Australia's cultural and legal notions of justice stem from British colonial rule, which by its very nature, usurped the law and customs of Australia's First Peoples. Since colonisation, this law has disciplined and punished Indigenous Australians through legal frameworks and theories they didn't consent to. So what would redress look like… in law?
7/4/202355 minutes, 9 seconds
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A Blakprint for improving First Nations' lives

Earlier this year, 900 First Nations women travelled to Canberra for a once in a generation Womens Voices Summit. Titled Wiyi Yani U Thangani — a Bunuba word meaning Womens' Voices — the summit aimed at producing a new 'blakprint', to improve their lives, those of their families and future generations.
7/3/202354 minutes, 15 seconds
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A Blakprint for improving First Nations' lives

Earlier this year, 900 First Nations women travelled to Canberra for a once in a generation Womens Voices Summit. Titled Wiyi Yani U Thangani — a Bunuba word meaning Womens' Voices — the summit aimed at producing a new 'blakprint', to improve their lives, those of their families and future generations.
7/3/202354 minutes, 15 seconds
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The complexities of safeguarding endangered species

There are an increasing number of all kinds of species, not just human, but animal and plant are affected by rising seas and climate change. From the critically endangered Western swamp tortoise to honey ants to whales. But how to safeguard these climate refugees and what impact would moving them have on their new fragile ecosystems? From understanding First Nations science to breaking up the siloed western conservation practices, how best to help save endangered species.
6/29/202352 minutes, 22 seconds
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The complexities of safeguarding endangered species

There are an increasing number of all kinds of species, not just human, but animal and plant are affected by rising seas and climate change. From the critically endangered Western swamp tortoise to honey ants to whales. But how to safeguard these climate refugees and what impact would moving them have on their new fragile ecosystems? From understanding First Nations science to breaking up the siloed western conservation practices, how best to help save endangered species.
6/29/202352 minutes, 22 seconds
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Surviving the beach ... and making sure your seafood is sustainable

From apps that help us swim safely to using Crispr to cut the genes of box jellyfish to technology that identifies the source of a barramundi or coral trout at the fish market, science is at the fore-shore of keeping our oceans and our lives safe.
6/28/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Surviving the beach ... and making sure your seafood is sustainable

From apps that help us swim safely to using Crispr to cut the genes of box jellyfish to technology that identifies the source of a barramundi or coral trout at the fish market, science is at the fore-shore of keeping our oceans and our lives safe.
6/28/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Are we living in the war century?

A lot of blood has already been shed in 21st century conflicts. But why does war continue to claim so many lives, why have we not learnt lessons from the past and who are the power-holders who perpetuate the cycle of violence?
6/27/202353 minutes, 38 seconds
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Are we living in the war century?

A lot of blood has already been shed in 21st century conflicts. But why does war continue to claim so many lives, why have we not learnt lessons from the past and who are the power-holders who perpetuate the cycle of violence?
6/27/202353 minutes, 38 seconds
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No place like an (affordable) home

The past few weeks have seen the headlines embroiled in what seems to be an intractable problem — housing. And it's a peculiarly Australian phenomenon. So why has equitable housing become such a vexed and complex issue for Australia? And what are the steps to take if we actually want to tackle the housing crisis once and for all?
6/26/202354 minutes, 17 seconds
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No place like an (affordable) home

The past few weeks have seen the headlines embroiled in what seems to be an intractable problem — housing. And it's a peculiarly Australian phenomenon. So why has equitable housing become such a vexed and complex issue for Australia? And what are the steps to take if we actually want to tackle the housing crisis once and for all?
6/26/202354 minutes, 17 seconds
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Lenore Taylor on defending facts against fake news

Guardian Australia Editor Lenore Taylor takes us through the everyday challenges facing journalists in the digital age, from trying to fact check in a 24-hour news cycle to the potential plagiarism and disinformation dangers of AI and ChatGPT. 
6/22/202354 minutes, 36 seconds
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Lenore Taylor on defending facts against fake news

Guardian Australia Editor Lenore Taylor takes us through the everyday challenges facing journalists in the digital age, from trying to fact check in a 24-hour news cycle to the potential plagiarism and disinformation dangers of AI and ChatGPT. 
6/22/202354 minutes, 36 seconds
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When Jon Faine met Apollo and Thelma

Former ABC broadcaster and lawyer Jon Faine in conversation with Paul Barclay explains how as a young lawyer he discovers the story behind his new book, Apollo and Thelma: A True Tall Tale. 
6/21/202352 minutes, 31 seconds
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When Jon Faine met Apollo and Thelma

Former ABC broadcaster and lawyer Jon Faine in conversation with Paul Barclay explains how as a young lawyer he discovers the story behind his new book, Apollo and Thelma: A True Tall Tale. 
6/21/202352 minutes, 31 seconds
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The buff-breasted button-quail: Is one of our rarest native birds still alive?

For more than 100 years, birdwatchers have searched for evidence that one of Australia's rarest native birds is not extinct. And they might be a step closer to solving the mystery of the Buff-breasted Button Quail. It lives in the humid savannas of Cape York. And we know that this habitat is changing. If we want to have any chance of finding and even saving this bird, we have to act quickly.
6/20/202354 minutes, 23 seconds
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The buff-breasted button-quail: Is one of our rarest native birds still alive?

For more than 100 years, birdwatchers have searched for evidence that one of Australia's rarest native birds is not extinct. And they might be a step closer to solving the mystery of the Buff-breasted Button Quail. It lives in the humid savannas of Cape York. And we know that this habitat is changing. If we want to have any chance of finding and even saving this bird, we have to act quickly.
6/20/202354 minutes, 23 seconds
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The scandals and rivalries that led to the fall of Boris Johnson

Big Ideas brings you a riveting account of the downfall of former UK prime minister Boris Johnson. Scandals over parties in Downing Street breaking Covid restrictions and attempts to change ethic regulations to allegedly help a mate, stories of betrayals and rivalries. This behind-the-scene interview is a timely look at how power is gained, wielded and lost in Britain today.
6/19/202353 minutes, 51 seconds
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The scandals and rivalries that led to the fall of Boris Johnson

Big Ideas brings you a riveting account of the downfall of former UK prime minister Boris Johnson. Scandals over parties in Downing Street breaking Covid restrictions and attempts to change ethic regulations to allegedly help a mate, stories of betrayals and rivalries. This behind-the-scene interview is a timely look at how power is gained, wielded and lost in Britain today.
6/19/202353 minutes, 51 seconds
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Combatting toxic masculinity and violence against women

Can we reprogram masculinity to remove its toxic aspects, or should we focus on harm minimization when it comes to gendered violence? 
6/15/202354 minutes, 45 seconds
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Boys behaving badly and what to do about it

Recent horrifying public headlines betray what is going on behind closed doors. In Perth, a woman is lit on fire. Forty per cent of her body is burnt. In Sydney, a woman is found dead before police can respond to a call. In Melbourne, an ex-Olympian pleads guilty to harassing an ex-girlfriend. Why do some men turn to deadly violence to deal with anger or difficult emotions? What are the root causes, and what can be done to change this brutal behaviour?
6/15/202354 minutes, 45 seconds
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On ya bike or not? Global movers, shakers, and city shapers reimagining car culture

What do the streets feel like where you live? Unsafe for kids to ride to school, big busy highways, limited public transport, cars reign supreme? From electric vehicles to bike-friendly buses — be inspired by these globally renowned movers and shakers. They're using the regional town of Bendigo and international case studies to re-imagine how we can live and move. Transport accounts for a staggering quarter of global greenhouse emissions. Could one Australian town lead the way and hit zero transport emissions by 2030?
6/14/202353 minutes, 47 seconds
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On ya bike or not? Global movers, shakers, and city shapers reimagining car culture

What do the streets feel like where you live? Unsafe for kids to ride to school, big busy highways, limited public transport, cars reign supreme? From electric vehicles to bike-friendly buses — be inspired by these globally renowned movers and shakers. They're using the regional town of Bendigo and international case studies to re-imagine how we can live and move. Transport accounts for a staggering quarter of global greenhouse emissions. Could one Australian town lead the way and hit zero transport emissions by 2030?
6/14/202353 minutes, 47 seconds
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What’s in a word? Multiculturalism

Australia is often described as the most vibrant multicultural nation in the world.  How are our policies and frameworks tracking to support that view?     
6/13/202354 minutes, 39 seconds
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What’s in a word? Multiculturalism

Australia is often described as the most vibrant multicultural nation in the world.  How are our policies and frameworks tracking to support that view?     
6/13/202354 minutes, 39 seconds
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Let's turn a Third of our oceans into marine parks — a good idea?

We need to better protect our oceans – but can we have it all: happy fish and happy fishermen? Currently only 3 per cent of the global oceans are protected. Environmentalists say that needs to grow to 30 per cent to make a difference. How do we get there? And how to design marine protected areas that help everyone?
6/12/202353 minutes, 50 seconds
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Let's turn a Third of our oceans into marine parks — a good idea?

We need to better protect our oceans – but can we have it all: happy fish and happy fishermen? Currently only 3 per cent of the global oceans are protected. Environmentalists say that needs to grow to 30 per cent to make a difference. How do we get there? And how to design marine protected areas that help everyone?
6/12/202353 minutes, 50 seconds
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Are laws to prevent crimes against nature fit for purpose?

Stealing water, smuggling our native species overseas, illegal logging, what are the frameworks to hold perpetrators to account? 
6/8/202353 minutes, 58 seconds
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Are laws to prevent crimes against nature fit for purpose?

Stealing water, smuggling our native species overseas, illegal logging, what are the frameworks to hold perpetrators to account? 
6/8/202353 minutes, 58 seconds
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I am not my chromosomes — science, rights, and the intersex experience

"Are they a girl or a boy?" That question is often asked about a newborn. But what if you're born with genetic variations in sexual development, also known as intersex conditions, and possess both typical male and female physical traits? New legislation tabled in the ACT is set to limit the scope of medical treatments and surgeries for such children. Intersex activists have campaigned hard for the law saying the human rights of the child to bodily autonomy is paramount. But some argue not all lived-experience voices are being heard, and are concerned the new laws could criminalise clinicians, carers and parents.
6/7/202353 minutes, 39 seconds
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I am not my chromosomes — science, rights, and the intersex experience

"Are they a girl or a boy?" That question is often asked about a newborn. But what if you're born with genetic variations in sexual development, also known as intersex conditions, and possess both typical male and female physical traits? New legislation tabled in the ACT is set to limit the scope of medical treatments and surgeries for such children. Intersex activists have campaigned hard for the law saying the human rights of the child to bodily autonomy is paramount. But some argue not all lived-experience voices are being heard, and are concerned the new laws could criminalise clinicians, carers and parents.
6/7/202353 minutes, 39 seconds
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Weaponising the global economy: The new global threat

Economic warfare is possibly the biggest threat the world is facing after climate change. Interdependent financial, trade and information networks have become instruments of state power – and that economic coercion could be the end of a functioning global economy. What are the new chokepoints – and how can we mitigate the new economic vulnerabilities?
6/6/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Weaponising the global economy: The new global threat

Economic warfare is possibly the biggest threat the world is facing after climate change. Interdependent financial, trade and information networks have become instruments of state power – and that economic coercion could be the end of a functioning global economy. What are the new chokepoints – and how can we mitigate the new economic vulnerabilities?
6/6/202354 minutes, 4 seconds
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Where to for the arts and humanities?

There is a deep conversation at all levels, from governments, universities and think tanks on the role of the arts, humanities, and social sciences.
6/5/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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Where to for the arts and humanities?

There is a deep conversation at all levels, from governments, universities and think tanks on the role of the arts, humanities, and social sciences.
6/5/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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First Nations law

From traditional art works that outline democratic processes to dances that narrate ancestral lines, First Nations have lived by sophisticated and complex laws embedded deeply in culture. Exploring how western legal structures and society can learn from and reconcile with Indigenous laws. 
6/1/202353 minutes, 54 seconds
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First Nations law

From traditional art works that outline democratic processes to dances that narrate ancestral lines, First Nations have lived by sophisticated and complex laws embedded deeply in culture. Exploring how western legal structures and society can learn from and reconcile with Indigenous laws. 
6/1/202353 minutes, 54 seconds
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First Nations peoples and LGBTIQ+ communities are challenging colonisation and reclaiming identity 

The scars of colonisation cut deep around the world. So, how do we combat discrimination and achieve equity for First Nations peoples and LGBTIQ+ communities? How do we address gaping inequalities and ongoing disadvantage experienced by minorities?
5/31/202355 minutes, 44 seconds
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First Nations peoples and LGBTIQ+ communities are challenging colonisation and reclaiming identity 

The scars of colonisation cut deep around the world. So, how do we combat discrimination and achieve equity for First Nations peoples and LGBTIQ+ communities? How do we address gaping inequalities and ongoing disadvantage experienced by minorities?
5/31/202355 minutes, 44 seconds
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Aging on screen and on stage — Sigrid Thornton, Rachael Maza, Sophie Hyde, Anousha Zarkesh

Movie or TV roles for older women accurately reflecting contemporary, society and experiences are rare. Sigrid Thornton, Rachael Maza, Sophie Hyde and Anousha Zarkesh are asking: Why is that? After decades honing their craft in the industry, older actresses are more talented than ever before, more confident and more attuned to the camera. But cinema is obsessed with the young.
5/30/202354 minutes, 25 seconds
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Aging on screen and on stage — Sigrid Thornton, Rachael Maza, Sophie Hyde, Anousha Zarkesh

Movie or TV roles for older women accurately reflecting contemporary, society and experiences are rare. Sigrid Thornton, Rachael Maza, Sophie Hyde and Anousha Zarkesh are asking: Why is that? After decades honing their craft in the industry, older actresses are more talented than ever before, more confident and more attuned to the camera. But cinema is obsessed with the young.
5/30/202354 minutes, 25 seconds
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Marie Coleman on feminism ... and breaking through Australia's Bamboo Ceiling

A name synonymous with the women’s movement in Australia over the past 60 years is Marie Coleman. As part of the  2023 Pamela Denoon Lecture series, Marie reflects on her time as the first woman to head a federal government agency in 1973 and her advocacy for universal childcare, single mothers' payments, paid parental leave and the push for equal pay. And.... Nearly 20% of people in Australia self-identify as having Asian ancestry, yet less than 2% of Chief Executives have an Asian cultural background. Julie Chai is the Founder and CEO of the Asian Leadership Project and in partnership with law firm Clayton Utz, she and her expert panel interrogate the discrepancy. 
5/29/202354 minutes, 49 seconds
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Marie Coleman on feminism ... and breaking through Australia's Bamboo Ceiling

A name synonymous with the women’s movement in Australia over the past 60 years is Marie Coleman. As part of the  2023 Pamela Denoon Lecture series, Marie reflects on her time as the first woman to head a federal government agency in 1973 and her advocacy for universal childcare, single mothers' payments, paid parental leave and the push for equal pay. And.... Nearly 20% of people in Australia self-identify as having Asian ancestry, yet less than 2% of Chief Executives have an Asian cultural background. Julie Chai is the Founder and CEO of the Asian Leadership Project and in partnership with law firm Clayton Utz, she and her expert panel interrogate the discrepancy. 
5/29/202354 minutes, 49 seconds
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Making sense of the world when everyone is an expert

One of the most tedious things about social media is the self-appointed authorities spouting commentary on any and every subject. All the while experts are increasingly degraded or ignored in our public discourse. But how do we make sense of the world and who we should be listening to when everyone's an 'expert'?
5/25/202353 minutes, 49 seconds
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Making sense of the world when everyone is an expert

One of the most tedious things about social media is the self-appointed authorities spouting commentary on any and every subject. All the while experts are increasingly degraded or ignored in our public discourse. But how do we make sense of the world and who we should be listening to when everyone's an 'expert'?
5/25/202353 minutes, 49 seconds
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George Monbiot's Regenesis — you won't think about dinner the same way again

Would you eat protein brewed in a vat from bacteria instead of meat? "Nom nom nom!", you might say. George Monbiot probably agrees. One of the most influential thinkers on the future of of the planet, now he's interrogating what's on our dinner plate, and the staggering business of how it got there. He joins Natasha Mitchell to discuss his provocative book, Regenesis: how to feed the world without devouring the planet. And it all comes down to connecting with the Tolkienesque world beneath your feet.
5/24/202353 minutes, 30 seconds
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George Monbiot's Regenesis — you won't think about dinner the same way again

Would you eat protein brewed in a vat from bacteria instead of meat? "Nom nom nom!", you might say. George Monbiot probably agrees. One of the most influential thinkers on the future of of the planet, now he's interrogating what's on our dinner plate, and the staggering business of how it got there. He joins Natasha Mitchell to discuss his provocative book, Regenesis: how to feed the world without devouring the planet. And it all comes down to connecting with the Tolkienesque world beneath your feet.
5/24/202353 minutes, 30 seconds
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The power, politics and cost of women speaking out

Three influential women explore the power, the politics, and the cost of speaking out. 
5/23/202354 minutes
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The power, politics and cost of women speaking out

Three influential women explore the power, the politics, and the cost of speaking out. 
5/23/202354 minutes
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Who is using your data?

Is your personal data safe? Do you know how to protect them from scammers and hackers? As your digital footprint expands, many people are questioning whether the benefits of technological innovation outweigh the potential for misuse of their personal data. But there are options to optimise and safeguard who can access your data. Companies around the world are investing more and more in cybersecurity – but you also need to do your part and practice good cyber hygiene.
5/22/202353 minutes, 21 seconds
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Who is using your data?

Is your personal data safe? Do you know how to protect them from scammers and hackers? As your digital footprint expands, many people are questioning whether the benefits of technological innovation outweigh the potential for misuse of their personal data. But there are options to optimise and safeguard who can access your data. Companies around the world are investing more and more in cybersecurity – but you also need to do your part and practice good cyber hygiene.
5/22/202353 minutes, 21 seconds
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The fantastic realm of fungi

From medicines to restoring damaged soil, the kingdom of fungi is the world's unsung hero playing a huge role in maintaining and supporting our ecosystems. 
5/18/202354 minutes, 2 seconds
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The fantastic realm of fungi

From medicines to restoring damaged soil, the kingdom of fungi is the world's unsung hero playing a huge role in maintaining and supporting our ecosystems. 
5/18/202354 minutes, 2 seconds
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Can science really save the world? World Science Festival Brisbane

What do coral reefs have to do with cancer? What does First Nations knowledge have to do with making the rice on your dinner plate more resilient? Can science save the world? Does the world need saving? Hopeful stories from 4 scientists, all big thinkers turning big ideas into life changing opportunities for humans and the air, water, food we rely on. 
5/17/202353 minutes, 10 seconds
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Can science really save the world? World Science Festival Brisbane

What do coral reefs have to do with cancer? What does First Nations knowledge have to do with making the rice on your dinner plate more resilient? Can science save the world? Does the world need saving? Hopeful stories from 4 scientists, all big thinkers turning big ideas into life changing opportunities for humans and the air, water, food we rely on. 
5/17/202353 minutes, 10 seconds
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Who your friends are makes you succeed in war and peace

Whether you keep the peace or go to war – it often depends on who your friends are. Alliances between nations have shaped our modern world. States make alliances out of self-interest, fear, or ideology, and the ensuing relationships are rarely easy, especially when they are put to the test. Historian Margaret MacMillan looks at the nature, dynamics and different types of alliances, and tells you why some succeed, and others fail.
5/16/202353 minutes, 45 seconds
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Who your friends are makes you succeed in war and peace

Whether you keep the peace or go to war – it often depends on who your friends are. Alliances between nations have shaped our modern world. States make alliances out of self-interest, fear, or ideology, and the ensuing relationships are rarely easy, especially when they are put to the test. Historian Margaret MacMillan looks at the nature, dynamics and different types of alliances, and tells you why some succeed, and others fail.
5/16/202353 minutes, 45 seconds
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Thinking bigger… how can Australian universities best meet future challenges?

University should be a place that nurtures big ideas; where curiosity and creativity thrive. But are our universities struggling with a lack of imagination? Increasingly, higher education in Australia has become transactional, relying heavily on students to bring in revenue. But if Australian universities are to meet the challenges of the future, is it time to rethink the current business model and think more boldly about the purpose and value of universities?
5/15/202354 minutes, 2 seconds
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Thinking bigger… how can Australian universities best meet future challenges?

University should be a place that nurtures big ideas; where curiosity and creativity thrive. But are our universities struggling with a lack of imagination? Increasingly, higher education in Australia has become transactional, relying heavily on students to bring in revenue. But if Australian universities are to meet the challenges of the future, is it time to rethink the current business model and think more boldly about the purpose and value of universities?
5/15/202354 minutes, 2 seconds
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What the ‘alien’ in science fiction reveals about us

Science fiction’s most frequent alternative to human is 'alien', another rich imaginative resource with which to think about what makes us human. Whether aliens are imagined as conquerors or saviours, their superiority has often been used to explore human limitations.
5/11/202353 minutes, 37 seconds
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What the ‘alien’ in science fiction reveals about us

Science fiction’s most frequent alternative to human is 'alien', another rich imaginative resource with which to think about what makes us human. Whether aliens are imagined as conquerors or saviours, their superiority has often been used to explore human limitations.
5/11/202353 minutes, 37 seconds
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Is cancel culture a thing? Zoë Coombs Marr, Courtney Act, Brittanie Shipway, Michael Zavros

Public shaming and boycotting has always been used to control or call out people's behaviour.  But has social media, social activism, and the rise of the keyboard warrior changed how it happens and who does it? Four prominent artists taking risks in the public eye debate the rise of 'cancel culture'. What happens when you are deemed to have gone too far? Is 'cancel culture' making our society better, or is it a punishment without a chance for redemption?
5/10/202353 minutes, 15 seconds
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Is cancel culture a thing? Zoë Coombs Marr, Courtney Act, Brittanie Shipway, Michael Zavros

Public shaming and boycotting has always been used to control or call out people's behaviour.  But has social media, social activism, and the rise of the keyboard warrior changed how it happens and who does it? Four prominent artists taking risks in the public eye debate the rise of 'cancel culture'. What happens when you are deemed to have gone too far? Is 'cancel culture' making our society better, or is it a punishment without a chance for redemption?
5/10/202353 minutes, 15 seconds
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Can liberal democracies 'be friends' with authoritarian states?

How can liberal democracies create a working partnership with authoritarian states – and at the same time maintain their values and succeed as open societies offering political freedom? For some years now, we have seen the splintering of the post war system of international order. The number of authoritarian states around the world is growing, and China is becoming an increasingly important player. The rise of Vladimir Putin and the struggles of Hong Kong offer valuable lessons about how to deal with authoritarian regimes.
5/9/202353 minutes, 52 seconds
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Can liberal democracies 'be friends' with authoritarian states?

How can liberal democracies create a working partnership with authoritarian states – and at the same time maintain their values and succeed as open societies offering political freedom? For some years now, we have seen the splintering of the post war system of international order. The number of authoritarian states around the world is growing, and China is becoming an increasingly important player. The rise of Vladimir Putin and the struggles of Hong Kong offer valuable lessons about how to deal with authoritarian regimes.
5/9/202353 minutes, 52 seconds
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Craig Foster calls for national conversation on Republic

Following the death of the longest reigning British monarch and coronation of a new King, discussion on whether Australia should become a republic is once more in the public sphere. Chair of the Australian Republic Movement, Craig Foster delivers the 2023 Manning Clark Lecture: Australia's Third Act: Reconciled, Independent, Truly Multicultural. 
5/8/202353 minutes, 59 seconds
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Craig Foster calls for national conversation on Republic

Following the death of the longest reigning British monarch and coronation of a new King, discussion on whether Australia should become a republic is once more in the public sphere. Chair of the Australian Republic Movement, Craig Foster delivers the 2023 Manning Clark Lecture: Australia's Third Act: Reconciled, Independent, Truly Multicultural. 
5/8/202353 minutes, 59 seconds
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Warren Mundine, Jacinta Price, Tony McAvoy and Shireen Morris debate the proposed Voice to Parliament

Four distinguished guests argue the motion: 'We need to alter to the constitution to recognise the First Peoples of Australia by establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice', presented by the Centre for Independent Studies
5/4/202353 minutes, 48 seconds
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Warren Mundine, Jacinta Price, Tony McAvoy and Shireen Morris debate the proposed Voice to Parliament

Four distinguished guests argue the motion: 'We need to alter to the constitution to recognise the First Peoples of Australia by establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice', presented by the Centre for Independent Studies
5/4/202353 minutes, 48 seconds
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General Roméo Dallaire — Rwanda's genocide and the search for peace within after war

Renowned humanitarian Lt-General (ret) Roméo Dallaire headed up UN mission in Rwanda during the brutal genocide three decades ago. Today Rwandan survivors wear the scars of machetes on their skins like living shrines. He joins Natasha Mitchell to reflect powerfully on the aftermath of war — for him personally and for countless conflicts to come.
5/3/202353 minutes, 11 seconds
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General Roméo Dallaire — Rwanda's genocide and the search for peace within after war

Renowned humanitarian Lt-General (ret) Roméo Dallaire headed up UN mission in Rwanda during the brutal genocide three decades ago. Today Rwandan survivors wear the scars of machetes on their skins like living shrines. He joins Natasha Mitchell to reflect powerfully on the aftermath of war — for him personally and for countless conflicts to come.
5/3/202353 minutes, 11 seconds
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'Allies in all but name': Japan Australia relations

From pearl divers to post-war trade agreements and the sharing of technology, minerals and cyber security strategies, Japan and Australia have strong historic ties. Just how strong is that relationship and what are the strategies to address the security and environmental challenges ahead?  
5/2/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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'Allies in all but name': Japan Australia relations

From pearl divers to post-war trade agreements and the sharing of technology, minerals and cyber security strategies, Japan and Australia have strong historic ties. Just how strong is that relationship and what are the strategies to address the security and environmental challenges ahead?  
5/2/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Net Zero: what does it mean and is it achievable?

Exploring the jargon that confuses us, the policy deficits, the obstacles, and some of the innovative actions taken to tackle our biggest challenge, Climate Change.  
5/1/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Net Zero: what does it mean and is it achievable?

Exploring the jargon that confuses us, the policy deficits, the obstacles, and some of the innovative actions taken to tackle our biggest challenge, Climate Change.  
5/1/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Barry Humphries: Come to the Cabaret

Cabaret was popularised in Paris at the turn of the 20th century and during the 1920's in Berlin. Today it is in the midst of a renaissance in Australia, with contemporary cabaret performers finding new audiences. Cabaret may be a form of raucous entertainment, but it can also include social and political satire, and sometimes a dash of sexual frisson. The Adelaide Cabaret Festival has helped spawn the revival of cabaret in Australia. In 2015, Barry Humphries took the reigns as artistic director of the festival.
4/27/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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Barry Humphries: Come to the Cabaret

Cabaret was popularised in Paris at the turn of the 20th century and during the 1920's in Berlin. Today it is in the midst of a renaissance in Australia, with contemporary cabaret performers finding new audiences. Cabaret may be a form of raucous entertainment, but it can also include social and political satire, and sometimes a dash of sexual frisson. The Adelaide Cabaret Festival has helped spawn the revival of cabaret in Australia. In 2015, Barry Humphries took the reigns as artistic director of the festival.
4/27/202354 minutes, 7 seconds
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Jurassic Park 30 years on – will we bring extinct animals back from the dead?

It's 30 years ago this year since Steven Spielberg did something scientists have never been able to. He brought the dinosaurs back from the dead. Extraordinarily, now genetic scientists are inching closer to attempting the resurrection of long extinct animals like the Tasmania Tiger.  But even if they could, should they?
4/26/202353 minutes, 29 seconds
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Jurassic Park 30 years on – will we bring extinct animals back from the dead?

It's 30 years ago this year since Steven Spielberg did something scientists have never been able to. He brought the dinosaurs back from the dead. Extraordinarily, now genetic scientists are inching closer to attempting the resurrection of long extinct animals like the Tasmania Tiger.  But even if they could, should they?
4/26/202353 minutes, 29 seconds
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Can the market solve climate change and other social ills?

Do you argue across the dinner table about saving the world? Some say it’s up to individuals, others want governments to fix the problem. Then there’s the follow-the-money view that business and the market will save us. But is capitalism part of the problem not the solution?
4/25/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
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Can the market solve climate change and other social ills?

Do you argue across the dinner table about saving the world? Some say it’s up to individuals, others want governments to fix the problem. Then there’s the follow-the-money view that business and the market will save us. But is capitalism part of the problem not the solution?
4/25/202353 minutes, 56 seconds
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Greek-Australian identity: Are we WHITE yet?

Are Greek-Australian's now considered to be 'white' in Australia's colourful social fabric? A panel of prominent Greek-Australians discusses questions of identity and belonging. As they have evolved into one of the oldest migrant groups in the country, is the era of Greek 'otherness' over? And what role did anglicising surnames play in our journey towards acceptance?
4/24/202353 minutes, 42 seconds
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Greek-Australian identity: Are we WHITE yet?

Are Greek-Australian's now considered to be 'white' in Australia's colourful social fabric? A panel of prominent Greek-Australians discusses questions of identity and belonging. As they have evolved into one of the oldest migrant groups in the country, is the era of Greek 'otherness' over? And what role did anglicising surnames play in our journey towards acceptance?
4/24/202353 minutes, 42 seconds
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Another Australia

What does 'Australia' mean to you? We all have our own version of Australia, shaped by our lived experience. But what happens when our reality sits outside the collective narrative?
4/20/202354 minutes, 37 seconds
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Sisonke Msimang and Mohammed Massoud Morsi unstitching myths in Another Australia

What does 'Australia' mean to you? We all have our own version of Australia, shaped by our lived experience. But what happens when our reality sits outside the collective narrative?
4/20/202354 minutes, 37 seconds
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Why thinking in Deep Time is good for your head

We live our lives for the short term. School semesters, tax years, election cycles, next week. But have you tried thinking in 'deep time' — millions of years before and after this present moment? Some describe it as the 'Long Now', and evidence suggests it's healthy for your head, and for the planet.
4/19/202352 minutes, 15 seconds
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Why thinking in Deep Time is good for your head

We live our lives for the short term. School semesters, tax years, election cycles, next week. But have you tried thinking in 'deep time' — millions of years before and after this present moment? Some describe it as the 'Long Now', and evidence suggests it's healthy for your head, and for the planet.
4/19/202352 minutes, 15 seconds
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Stoicism for the modern day

If you can't control it – then don't worry about it. It's one of the core messages of stoicism. Much easier said than done. But if you manage it, it can make your life a lot happier and calmer. That's not to say you should sit back and ignore injustice. The stoics have an answer for that as well. On Big Ideas, you'll hear about the ancient philosophy of stoicism and how to apply its principles to modern life. War, climate change, pandemic and endless social media platforms onto with you can project and amplify your anxieties. It seems like we all can use a good helping of stoicism.
4/18/202354 minutes, 26 seconds
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Wellmania's Brigid Delaney on how the Stoics can change your life

If you can't control it – then don't worry about it. It's one of the core messages of stoicism. Much easier said than done. But if you manage it, it can make your life a lot happier and calmer. That's not to say you should sit back and ignore injustice. The stoics have an answer for that as well. On Big Ideas, you'll hear about the ancient philosophy of stoicism and how to apply its principles to modern life. War, climate change, pandemic and endless social media platforms onto with you can project and amplify your anxieties. It seems like we all can use a good helping of stoicism.
4/18/202354 minutes, 26 seconds
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When classical music meets pop culture

What happens when classical music meets pop culture? Do we see a clash between two irreconcilable styles? Could smoothing up to pop culture be the way forward for classical music? It's no secret that the genre often struggles to find new and young audiences. Big Ideas explores the role of classical music in society today, where it could go in the future and how pop culture and digital technology can help the genre get there.
4/17/202353 minutes, 29 seconds
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When classical music meets pop culture

What happens when classical music meets pop culture? Do we see a clash between two irreconcilable styles? Could smoothing up to pop culture be the way forward for classical music? It's no secret that the genre often struggles to find new and young audiences. Big Ideas explores the role of classical music in society today, where it could go in the future and how pop culture and digital technology can help the genre get there.
4/17/202353 minutes, 29 seconds
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Media moguls and market domination

The potential fallout of a global media giant and family dynasty on the precipice of generational change. And, the calls to dilute a highly concentrated media industry.
4/13/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Rupert Murdoch meets real life Succession

The potential fallout of a global media giant and family dynasty on the precipice of generational change. And, the calls to dilute a highly concentrated media industry.
4/13/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Rupert Murdoch meets real life Succession

The potential fallout of a global media giant and family dynasty on the precipice of generational change. And, the calls to dilute a highly concentrated media industry.
4/13/202354 minutes, 6 seconds
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Qantas CEO Alan Joyce and former diplomat John Berry on being openly gay

A conversation between Qantas CEO Alan Joyce and John Berry, former US Ambassador to Australia (Retired) on living and working as openly gay men, even when homosexuality was illegal.
4/12/202353 minutes, 28 seconds
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Qantas CEO Alan Joyce and former diplomat John Berry on being openly gay

A conversation between Qantas CEO Alan Joyce and John Berry, former US Ambassador to Australia (Retired) on living and working as openly gay men, even when homosexuality was illegal.
4/12/202353 minutes, 28 seconds
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The state of America

The rise of far-right extremism, conflicts over gun law reform, widening economic gaps, and former President Donald Trump's continued push for influence. Are polarising polemics damaging the reputation of the US? And should there be limits to free speech?
4/11/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The state of America

The rise of far-right extremism, conflicts over gun law reform, widening economic gaps, and former President Donald Trump's continued push for influence. Are polarising polemics damaging the reputation of the US? And should there be limits to free speech?
4/11/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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The wonder of human foresight

From the invention of the calendar to the humble carry bag – and even to the concept of moral responsibility. It all comes down to humans' ability to relive past events in order to predict possible futures. Foresight is the driver behind innovation. On Big Ideas, a panel of cognitive scientists argues that foresight has transformed humans from unremarkable primates to creatures that hold the destiny of the planet in their hands. It might just be the tool that will save us in the future.
4/10/202352 minutes, 59 seconds
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The wonder of human foresight

From the invention of the calendar to the humble carry bag – and even to the concept of moral responsibility. It all comes down to humans' ability to relive past events in order to predict possible futures. Foresight is the driver behind innovation. On Big Ideas, a panel of cognitive scientists argues that foresight has transformed humans from unremarkable primates to creatures that hold the destiny of the planet in their hands. It might just be the tool that will save us in the future.
4/10/202352 minutes, 59 seconds
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Do government apologies for historic wrongs make a difference?

Around the world, governments are apologising for past wrongs and historic injustices - like slavery, the forced removal of children, and institutional abuse. But do these apologies lead to transformational change?   What has been the experience of apologies in Australia to the 'stolen generations', and to those affected by forced adoptions? 
4/6/202354 minutes, 26 seconds
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Do government apologies for historic wrongs make a difference?

Around the world, governments are apologising for past wrongs and historic injustices - like slavery, the forced removal of children, and institutional abuse. But do these apologies lead to transformational change?   What has been the experience of apologies in Australia to the 'stolen generations', and to those affected by forced adoptions? 
4/6/202354 minutes, 26 seconds
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Modern Australia and its place in western civilisation

Are the values of the enlightenment, ideas from ancient times, developed through the centuries in Christian Europe under threat? Some perspectives on the state of Australian classic liberalism.
4/5/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Modern Australia and its place in western civilisation

Are the values of the enlightenment, ideas from ancient times, developed through the centuries in Christian Europe under threat? Some perspectives on the state of Australian classic liberalism.
4/5/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Democracy in Malaysia?

Until recently, one party dominated Malay politics. Now there’s a new multi-government. Could this lead to an era of democratic reform in Malaysia? 100 days after the snap-election, the new Malaysian government looks stable enough. A panel of Asia-Pacific experts discusses the campaign narratives and what they mean for Malaysia's political environment and the challenges ahead for the new government.
4/4/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Democracy in Malaysia?

Until recently, one party dominated Malay politics. Now there’s a new multi-government. Could this lead to an era of democratic reform in Malaysia? 100 days after the snap-election, the new Malaysian government looks stable enough. A panel of Asia-Pacific experts discusses the campaign narratives and what they mean for Malaysia's political environment and the challenges ahead for the new government.
4/4/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Noel Pearson on Australian identity: Ulli Helen Corbett on international Indigenous activism

In the final Boyer Lecture Noel Pearson looks at the question of Australian identity. From the 1993 Boyer's, Ulli Helen Corbett speaks on the importance of raising First Nations voices in the international arena.
4/3/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Noel Pearson on Australian identity: Ulli Helen Corbett on international Indigenous activism

In the final Boyer Lecture Noel Pearson looks at the question of Australian identity. From the 1993 Boyer's, Ulli Helen Corbett speaks on the importance of raising First Nations voices in the international arena.
4/3/202354 minutes, 5 seconds
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Noel Pearson on transforming education: Dot West on media portrayal of First Nation's youth

In his fourth Boyer Lecture lecture, Noel Pearson addresses the educational barriers facing young Indigenous people, and from the 1993 ABC Boyer Lectures, Dot West considers the negative media portrayal of First Nations people.
3/30/20230
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Noel Pearson on transforming education: Dot West on media portrayal of First Nation's youth

In his fourth Boyer Lecture lecture, Noel Pearson addresses the educational barriers facing young Indigenous people, and from the 1993 ABC Boyer Lectures, Dot West considers the negative media portrayal of First Nations people.
3/30/20230
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Noel Pearson on lifting all Australians out of poverty: Ian Anderson on Indigenous health

In his third Boyer lecture, Noel Pearson outlines ways of lifting all Australians including First Nations people from the economic 'bottom million'. And from the 1993 Boyer Lectures, Ian Anderson's vision for developing a new model for Indigenous health and wellbeing.
3/29/20230
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Noel Pearson on lifting all Australians out of poverty: Ian Anderson on Indigenous health

In his third Boyer lecture, Noel Pearson outlines ways of lifting all Australians including First Nations people from the economic 'bottom million'. And from the 1993 Boyer Lectures, Ian Anderson's vision for developing a new model for Indigenous health and wellbeing.
3/29/20230
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Noel Pearson on the road to a 'Voice to Parliament': Jeanie Bell on Indigenous languages

In the 2nd Boyer Lecture Series Noel Pearson traces the long road that led to the final proposal for a Voice to Parliament. And from the 1993 Boyer Lecture Series, Voices from the land, linguist Jeanie Bell the importance of Indigenous language, not just connection to the land but to self-determination.
3/28/20230
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Noel Pearson on the road to a 'Voice to Parliament': Jeanie Bell on Indigenous languages

In the 2nd Boyer Lecture Series Noel Pearson traces the long road that led to the final proposal for a Voice to Parliament. And from the 1993 Boyer Lecture Series, Voices from the land, linguist Jeanie Bell the importance of Indigenous language, not just connection to the land but to self-determination.
3/28/20230
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Noel Pearson on 'The Voice to Parliament': Getano Lui on self determination

In the lead up to a vote on a referendum to enshrine an Indigenous Voice to Parliament in the Constitution, we present some of the debates and visions from First Nations leaders over the years.
3/27/20230
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Noel Pearson on 'The Voice to Parliament': Getano Lui on self determination

In the lead up to a vote on a referendum to enshrine an Indigenous Voice to Parliament in the Constitution, we present some of the debates and visions from First Nations leaders over the years.
3/27/20230
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The problem with carbon credits and offsets

Net zero emissions means we can still burn fossil fuels, and emit carbon into the atmosphere, as long as this is offset by carbon credits. But what if the offsets are not credible, and claims to carbon neutrality misleading?
3/23/20230
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The problem with carbon credits and offsets

Net zero emissions means we can still burn fossil fuels, and emit carbon into the atmosphere, as long as this is offset by carbon credits. But what if the offsets are not credible, and claims to carbon neutrality misleading?
3/23/20230
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Do we need ‘big’ government?

The COVID pandemic, the GFC, and the recent energy crisis, have all required the state to play a bigger role in our lives, and in the economy. Is this a rejection of neo-liberalism?
3/22/20230
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Do we need ‘big’ government?

The COVID pandemic, the GFC, and the recent energy crisis, have all required the state to play a bigger role in our lives, and in the economy. Is this a rejection of neo-liberalism?
3/22/20230
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Democracy and constitutional change

The Australian Constitution is a living document which includes a provision to facilitate reform. But over its 122 year history, it has only been amended eight times. Has Australia lost its constitutional muscle memory?
3/21/20230
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Democracy and constitutional change

The Australian Constitution is a living document which includes a provision to facilitate reform. But over its 122 year history, it has only been amended eight times. Has Australia lost its constitutional muscle memory?
3/21/20230
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Hope in a conflicted world

The best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world.
3/20/20230
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Hope in a conflicted world

The best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world.
3/20/20230
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Work, wages, and fairness

Unemployment may be low, but it is no bed of roses for Australian workers. Real wages are falling, inflation remains high, and interest rates keep going up. For many, it is a struggle to put food on the table and find secure housing. Yet Australia is brimming with money – it is one of the wealthiest countries on earth. Why aren't more of us sharing in the spoils?
3/15/20230
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Work, wages, and fairness

Unemployment may be low, but it is no bed of roses for Australian workers. Real wages are falling, inflation remains high, and interest rates keep going up. For many, it is a struggle to put food on the table and find secure housing. Yet Australia is brimming with money – it is one of the wealthiest countries on earth. Why aren't more of us sharing in the spoils?
3/15/20230
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The global rise of unhappiness

Are you feeling sad, angry, stressed or worried? More so than in previous years? Then you're not alone. Unhappiness is on the rise around the world. And according to Gallup's statistics that's because political leaders don't track people's wellbeing. How can leaders begin to incorporate wellbeing and happiness indicators?
3/14/20230
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The global rise of unhappiness

Are you feeling sad, angry, stressed or worried? More so than in previous years? Then you're not alone. Unhappiness is on the rise around the world. And according to Gallup's statistics that's because political leaders don't track people's wellbeing. How can leaders begin to incorporate wellbeing and happiness indicators?
3/14/20230
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Fairness and Australian politics

What is the legacy of the previous Scott Morrison leadership and what changes have there been since? A panel discussion for the Perth Festival 2023
3/13/20230
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Fairness and Australian politics

What is the legacy of the previous Scott Morrison leadership and what changes have there been since? A panel discussion for the Perth Festival 2023
3/13/20230
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Human rights and Indonesia’s new criminal code

It's our nearest democratic neighbour and a vital ally in the region.  But new legal code laws will ban consensual sex outside marriage, abortion and limits freedom of speech. So where does this leave human rights for our near democratic neighbour?
3/9/20230
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Human rights and Indonesia’s new criminal code

It's our nearest democratic neighbour and a vital ally in the region.  But new legal code laws will ban consensual sex outside marriage, abortion and limits freedom of speech. So where does this leave human rights for our near democratic neighbour?
3/9/20230
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Is end-to-end encryption good or bad?

What is more important to you, that authorities can monitor online messages for crime and child abuse — or that your messages are always completely private? You can't have it both ways, and that's the problem with end-to-end encryption. And what about government exploiting workarounds to access the encrypted messages of political dissidents? Big Ideas investigates the dilemma between possibly necessary online surveillance and privacy.
3/8/20230
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Is end-to-end encryption good or bad?

What is more important to you, that authorities can monitor online messages for crime and child abuse — or that your messages are always completely private? You can't have it both ways, and that's the problem with end-to-end encryption. And what about government exploiting workarounds to access the encrypted messages of political dissidents? Big Ideas investigates the dilemma between possibly necessary online surveillance and privacy.
3/8/20230
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Behrouz Boochani and Arnold Zable: The language of resistance

How do you resist when your identity is reduced to a number? A conversation with Behrouz Boochani and his good friend, writer and human rights advocate, Arnold Zable, about the language and art of resistance.
3/7/20230
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Behrouz Boochani and Arnold Zable: The language of resistance

How do you resist when your identity is reduced to a number? A conversation with Behrouz Boochani and his good friend, writer and human rights advocate, Arnold Zable, about the language and art of resistance.
3/7/20230
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Democracy and dissent

Australia has a long tradition of dissent – with some environmental protections won as a result. But do new laws unduly impede the right to protest and silence dissent?  What are the reasonable limits to peaceful protest in a democracy, especially when facing an existential threat such as climate change?
3/6/20230
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Democracy and dissent

Australia has a long tradition of dissent – with some environmental protections won as a result. But do new laws unduly impede the right to protest and silence dissent?  What are the reasonable limits to peaceful protest in a democracy, especially when facing an existential threat such as climate change?
3/6/20230
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Truth and treaty in Victoria and indigenous archaeology

There’s already plenty of debate, for and against about the need for a permanent Indigenous Voice to federal parliament. Victoria decided to get ahead of the game in 2021 and set up a commission on truth and treaty.
2/23/20230
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Truth and treaty in Victoria and indigenous archaeology

There’s already plenty of debate, for and against about the need for a permanent Indigenous Voice to federal parliament. Victoria decided to get ahead of the game in 2021 and set up a commission on truth and treaty.
2/23/20230
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The new sobriety: why more of us are drinking less alcohol.

More people, worldwide, are becoming 'sober-curious', and questioning their relationship with alcohol. Teenagers and twentysomethings are less likely to binge drink. It's far cry from the situation, Jill Stark, found herself in ten years ago, when she released her book 'High Sobriety', about her 12 months off the booze.
2/22/20230
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The new sobriety: why more of us are drinking less alcohol.

More people, worldwide, are becoming 'sober-curious', and questioning their relationship with alcohol. Teenagers and twentysomethings are less likely to binge drink. It's far cry from the situation, Jill Stark, found herself in ten years ago, when she released her book 'High Sobriety', about her 12 months off the booze.
2/22/20230
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Household energy

Australians are feeling the pinch of cost of living pressures.
2/21/20230
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Household energy

Australians are feeling the pinch of cost of living pressures.
2/21/20230
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Crypto in the world of finance

Cryptocurrencies are revolutionising the finance world as we know it. Fintech has produced a decentralised finance system that exists parallel to the traditional one, and it's difficult to move assets between the two. But is crypo in finance recreating the old problems? Or is it offering new solutions?
2/20/20230
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Crypto in the world of finance

Cryptocurrencies are revolutionising the finance world as we know it. Fintech has produced a decentralised finance system that exists parallel to the traditional one, and it's difficult to move assets between the two. But is crypo in finance recreating the old problems? Or is it offering new solutions?
2/20/20230
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Extreme heat and hybrid learning

Extreme heat has negative effects on your health and we're experiencing more heatwaves due to climate change so how can we protect our health and lifestyle?And online learning versus face-to face....which is best?
2/16/20230
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Extreme heat and hybrid learning

Extreme heat has negative effects on your health and we're experiencing more heatwaves due to climate change so how can we protect our health and lifestyle?And online learning versus face-to face....which is best?
2/16/20230
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'Feared and Revered': women throughout the ages

The 'Feared and Revered' exhibition, currently on display at the National Museum of Australia, explores how goddesses, demons, witches, spirits, and saints, have shaped our understanding of the world.  The exhibition celebrates a diverse range of female spiritual beings across cultural traditions and religions - like the Hindu goddess, Kali - and it examines feminine power and identity
2/15/20230
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'Feared and Revered': women throughout the ages

The 'Feared and Revered' exhibition, currently on display at the National Museum of Australia, explores how goddesses, demons, witches, spirits, and saints, have shaped our understanding of the world.  The exhibition celebrates a diverse range of female spiritual beings across cultural traditions and religions - like the Hindu goddess, Kali - and it examines feminine power and identity
2/15/20230
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Drug policy in Latin America and the war on drugs

Is the war on drugs unwinnable? Illegal drugs are killing hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the largest drug market is the US. Most drugs there come into the country via Latin and Central America. But counter-drug programs, local incentives and changes to drug policies in Latin America don't seem to break the steady supply of drugs. So, is it better to try and reduce the demand – or reconsider to punish drug possession?
2/14/20230
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Drug policy in Latin America and the war on drugs

Is the war on drugs unwinnable? Illegal drugs are killing hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the largest drug market is the US. Most drugs there come into the country via Latin and Central America. But counter-drug programs, local incentives and changes to drug policies in Latin America don't seem to break the steady supply of drugs. So, is it better to try and reduce the demand – or reconsider to punish drug possession?
2/14/20230
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Finland's PM on the Ukraine war and European security

The war in Ukraine has up-ended the security landscape in Europe.The EU is using every measure , short of troops on the ground, to punish Putin and countries like Sweden and Finland want to join NATO .The Finnish Prime Minister , Sanna Marin, visited Australia recently to strengthen trade and security ties.
2/13/20230
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Finland's PM on the Ukraine war and European security

The war in Ukraine has up-ended the security landscape in Europe.The EU is using every measure , short of troops on the ground, to punish Putin and countries like Sweden and Finland want to join NATO .The Finnish Prime Minister , Sanna Marin, visited Australia recently to strengthen trade and security ties.
2/13/20230
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Why the eucalypt tree is so important for Australia

From the bush to our own backyards, the Eucalypt is the stalwart of the Australian landscape. With over 800 species spread across the country facing extreme heat, drought and bushfire, the future of the iconic eucalypt is tied to our own survival. From preserving genetic diversity and experimental adaptations, to applications of traditional knowledge – what solutions do we need to conserve our beloved gum tree?
2/9/20230
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Why the eucalypt tree is so important for Australia

From the bush to our own backyards, the Eucalypt is the stalwart of the Australian landscape. With over 800 species spread across the country facing extreme heat, drought and bushfire, the future of the iconic eucalypt is tied to our own survival. From preserving genetic diversity and experimental adaptations, to applications of traditional knowledge – what solutions do we need to conserve our beloved gum tree?
2/9/20230
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Food, glorious food

The best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world.
2/8/20230
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Food, glorious food

The best of talks, forums, debates, and festivals held in Australia and around the world.
2/8/20230
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Australia's Wild Odyssey

Australia belongs to a club you’d rather not join. We’re losing animal and plant species at an alarming rate. As one species goes extinct, it threatens the complex web of life that’s grown up around it. A three-part ABC TV documentary showcases our unique ecosystems and participants in the series join ABC science editor Jonathan Webb to discuss the need to preserve biodiversity.
2/7/20230
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Australia's Wild Odyssey

Australia belongs to a club you’d rather not join. We’re losing animal and plant species at an alarming rate. As one species goes extinct, it threatens the complex web of life that’s grown up around it. A three-part ABC TV documentary showcases our unique ecosystems and participants in the series join ABC science editor Jonathan Webb to discuss the need to preserve biodiversity.
2/7/20230
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Teaching empathy through story telling

Empathy has power – to maintain relationships and prevent conflict. But can empathy be learned? It seems empathy has never been more important: From natural disasters and fallouts of the pandemic, to the surge of women's voices against harassment and the plight of refugees. It's a quality increasingly in demand in corporate, political and private life. Big Ideas explores how storytelling can improve empathy; and how empathy for fictional characters can get transferred to the real world.
2/6/20230
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Teaching empathy through story telling

Empathy has power – to maintain relationships and prevent conflict. But can empathy be learned? It seems empathy has never been more important: From natural disasters and fallouts of the pandemic, to the surge of women's voices against harassment and the plight of refugees. It's a quality increasingly in demand in corporate, political and private life. Big Ideas explores how storytelling can improve empathy; and how empathy for fictional characters can get transferred to the real world.
2/6/20230
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Can radical centre strategies solve inequality?

In an age of increasing tribalism, how can Australians break through groupthink and achieve bold reforms to address inequality? The answer is radical centre solutions. Shireen Morris was part of collaborative efforts which forged a progressive-conservative alliance in support of a First Nations voice. This taught her the value of engaging creatively across political and ideological divides.
2/2/20230
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Can radical centre strategies solve inequality?

In an age of increasing tribalism, how can Australians break through groupthink and achieve bold reforms to address inequality? The answer is radical centre solutions. Shireen Morris was part of collaborative efforts which forged a progressive-conservative alliance in support of a First Nations voice. This taught her the value of engaging creatively across political and ideological divides.
2/2/20230
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The ingredients to 'ageing well'

What does it mean to 'age well', what gets in the way, and what needs to change? Ageist attitudes can be a barrier to ageing well, as can residential aged care — which tends to discourage older people from being more independent. But we can learn from so called 'blue zones'- those places around the world where people enjoy longevity, coupled with quality of life.
2/1/20230
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The ingredients to 'ageing well'

What does it mean to 'age well', what gets in the way, and what needs to change? Ageist attitudes can be a barrier to ageing well, as can residential aged care — which tends to discourage older people from being more independent. But we can learn from so called 'blue zones'- those places around the world where people enjoy longevity, coupled with quality of life.
2/1/20230
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For the public good and fixing aged care

Governments argue if they spend too much on social services they’ll blow the budget. But economist Richard Denniss says that’s a choice not an iron law of economics. And ageing well at home or in residential care.  
1/31/20230
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For the public good and fixing aged care

Governments argue if they spend too much on social services they’ll blow the budget. But economist Richard Denniss says that’s a choice not an iron law of economics. And ageing well at home or in residential care.  
1/31/20230
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How new is the Metaverse really?

What exactly is the Metaverse? And is it really that new? Big Ideas explores our emotional connections to cyberspace, our feelings of presence and immediacy in online environments and what this means for the intensity of our experiences. Some of the technologies for the merging of the cyber and the physical are already used.
1/30/20230
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How new is the Metaverse really?

What exactly is the Metaverse? And is it really that new? Big Ideas explores our emotional connections to cyberspace, our feelings of presence and immediacy in online environments and what this means for the intensity of our experiences. Some of the technologies for the merging of the cyber and the physical are already used.
1/30/20230
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CBC Massey lecture: On Death

Is there an afterlife? How does your time on earth determine how you’ll spend eternity? Every culture has its own version of the answer to these questions. Tomson Highway says the Cree indigenous community doesn’t fear death. Your body and spirit simply returns to Mother Earth where your ancestors will always be with you.
1/26/20230
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CBC Massey lecture: On Death

Is there an afterlife? How does your time on earth determine how you’ll spend eternity? Every culture has its own version of the answer to these questions. Tomson Highway says the Cree indigenous community doesn’t fear death. Your body and spirit simply returns to Mother Earth where your ancestors will always be with you.
1/26/20230
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CBC Massey Lecture: On humour

Why do humans exist? What is the meaning of life? Cree Indian writer, Tomson Highway,  says joy and laughter is the reason for existence .The Christian doctrine of sin and damnation , so much a part of his Catholic education , does not sit well with Cree Indian mythology. In this Massey lecture on humour, Tomson describes laughter as the elixir of life.
1/25/20230
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CBC Massey Lecture: On humour

Why do humans exist? What is the meaning of life? Cree Indian writer, Tomson Highway,  says joy and laughter is the reason for existence .The Christian doctrine of sin and damnation , so much a part of his Catholic education , does not sit well with Cree Indian mythology. In this Massey lecture on humour, Tomson describes laughter as the elixir of life.
1/25/20230
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CBC Massey Lecture: On sex and gender

Monotheism imposes limits on our understanding of gender and the human body. In the world of Indigenous peoples,“the circle of pantheism has space for any number of genders”. So says Cree writer, musician and humorist, Tomson Highway, in this CBC Massey Lecture.
1/24/20230
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CBC Massey Lecture: On sex and gender

Monotheism imposes limits on our understanding of gender and the human body. In the world of Indigenous peoples,“the circle of pantheism has space for any number of genders”. So says Cree writer, musician and humorist, Tomson Highway, in this CBC Massey Lecture.
1/24/20230
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CBC Massey lecture: On creation

What do Christian, classical, and Cree mythologies contribute to Western thought and culture? And how does North American Indigenous mythologies provide unique, timeless solutions to our modern problems? Let's start with creation. How we think our world came to be shapes how people understand their place in it and their responsibly for nature.
1/23/20230
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CBC Massey lecture: On creation

What do Christian, classical, and Cree mythologies contribute to Western thought and culture? And how does North American Indigenous mythologies provide unique, timeless solutions to our modern problems? Let's start with creation. How we think our world came to be shapes how people understand their place in it and their responsibly for nature.
1/23/20230
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Is Australia 'sleepwalking' to war with China?

Defence and security analyst, Hugh White, is concerned Australia may be 'sleepwalking' to war with China, because of our alliance with America. He believes the US is unable to constrain a growing China in East Asia, nor win a future war against them over Taiwan. What does all this mean for our regional security, and our relationships with the US & China? Paul Barclay speaks to Hugh White, author of the Quarterly Essay, Sleepwalk to War, in which he also criticises the AUKUS nuclear submarine deal, and our strategic and defence planning. Recorded at the Cinema Nova, for Readings bookstore, on June 29, 2022. Originally broadcast on July, 20, 2022. Speaker Hugh White — Emeritus Professor, strategic studies, ANU; principal author, Australia's 2000 Defence White Paper Presenter / producer – Paul Barclay Sound Engineer – David Le May
1/19/20230
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Is Australia 'sleepwalking' to war with China?

Defence and security analyst, Hugh White, is concerned Australia may be 'sleepwalking' to war with China, because of our alliance with America. He believes the US is unable to constrain a growing China in East Asia, nor win a future war against them over Taiwan. What does all this mean for our regional security, and our relationships with the US & China? Paul Barclay speaks to Hugh White, author of the Quarterly Essay, Sleepwalk to War, in which he also criticises the AUKUS nuclear submarine deal, and our strategic and defence planning. Recorded at the Cinema Nova, for Readings bookstore, on June 29, 2022. Originally broadcast on July, 20, 2022. Speaker Hugh White — Emeritus Professor, strategic studies, ANU; principal author, Australia's 2000 Defence White Paper Presenter / producer – Paul Barclay Sound Engineer – David Le May
1/19/20230
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Why too much medical treatment is causing more harm than good

Much of medicine doesn't do what it is supposed to do: improve health. That is the view of orthopaedic surgeon, Ian Harris. He believes too many drugs are being prescribed, too much surgery is being performed, and there are too many unhelpful tests, scans, and overdiagnosis. The 'business' of medicine, Ian says, is taking precedence over what the science tells us. We should go back to the first principles of the Hippocratic oath and 'first, do no harm'. Ian Harris talks to Paul Barclay Recorded at the Williamstown Literary Festival on June 19, 2022. Originally broadcast on July 6, 2022. Speaker Ian Harris — Sydney based orthopaedic surgeon; Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of NSW; co-author, Hippocrasy
1/18/20230
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Why too much medical treatment is causing more harm than good

Much of medicine doesn't do what it is supposed to do: improve health. That is the view of orthopaedic surgeon, Ian Harris. He believes too many drugs are being prescribed, too much surgery is being performed, and there are too many unhelpful tests, scans, and overdiagnosis. The 'business' of medicine, Ian says, is taking precedence over what the science tells us. We should go back to the first principles of the Hippocratic oath and 'first, do no harm'. Ian Harris talks to Paul Barclay Recorded at the Williamstown Literary Festival on June 19, 2022. Originally broadcast on July 6, 2022. Speaker Ian Harris — Sydney based orthopaedic surgeon; Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of NSW; co-author, Hippocrasy
1/18/20230
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Foreign correspondents and the news of the world

In a global community it’s more important than ever to understand what’s going on in the rest of the world. Despite instant communication over the internet there's nothing like the considered view of a seasoned foreign correspondent. They bring you the news from conflict zones, at high powered summits, or the views of ordinary citizens. But are they telling you the stories you want to hear? Who sets the news agenda?
1/17/20230
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Foreign correspondents and the news of the world

In a global community it’s more important than ever to understand what’s going on in the rest of the world. Despite instant communication over the internet there's nothing like the considered view of a seasoned foreign correspondent. They bring you the news from conflict zones, at high powered summits, or the views of ordinary citizens. But are they telling you the stories you want to hear? Who sets the news agenda?
1/17/20230
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Why environmentalists and conservationists can be a problem for the environment

Queensland Chief Scientist Hugh Possingham is very annoyed with his fellow scientists as well as environmentalist and conservationists: They are too conservative, don’t debate respectfully, are too obsessed with growing their own organisations and can’t compromise a bit.
1/16/20230
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Why environmentalists and conservationists can be a problem for the environment

Queensland Chief Scientist Hugh Possingham is very annoyed with his fellow scientists as well as environmentalist and conservationists: They are too conservative, don’t debate respectfully, are too obsessed with growing their own organisations and can’t compromise a bit.
1/16/20230
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Mortals and the fear of death

Make the most of your life and be at peace with death. Easy to say but hard to do.Death is not a topic we’re encouraged to talk about. But its shadow shapes many of the things we do.
1/12/20230
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Mortals and the fear of death

Make the most of your life and be at peace with death. Easy to say but hard to do.Death is not a topic we’re encouraged to talk about. But its shadow shapes many of the things we do.
1/12/20230
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Kylie Moore-Gilbert on being imprisoned in Iran for 804 days

Australian, Kylie Moore-Gilbert, endured a living nightmare. She was arrested and convicted of espionage in Iran, and then sentenced to 10 years in prison. The charges were baseless; the trial was a sham. Kylie became a pawn in a high stakes geo-political negotiation. How did she survive over 800 days of interrogation, psychological torture, and imprisonment, in Iran? What did it take to free her? Why was she arrested in the first place? Paul Barclay talks to Kylie Moore-Gilbert. Recorded at the Queenscliffe Literary Festival, on May 14, 2022. Originally broadcast on June 8, 2022. Speaker: Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert — author; Middle East and Islam scholar.
1/11/20230
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Kylie Moore-Gilbert on being imprisoned in Iran for 804 days

Australian, Kylie Moore-Gilbert, endured a living nightmare. She was arrested and convicted of espionage in Iran, and then sentenced to 10 years in prison. The charges were baseless; the trial was a sham. Kylie became a pawn in a high stakes geo-political negotiation. How did she survive over 800 days of interrogation, psychological torture, and imprisonment, in Iran? What did it take to free her? Why was she arrested in the first place? Paul Barclay talks to Kylie Moore-Gilbert. Recorded at the Queenscliffe Literary Festival, on May 14, 2022. Originally broadcast on June 8, 2022. Speaker: Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert — author; Middle East and Islam scholar.
1/11/20230
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Being healthy on a sick planet, how climate change impacts health

The impacts of climate change on our health are growing, as surely as global temperatures and sea levels are rising. So how can we strive to live as healthy people on an increasingly sick planet? What are the major ways global warming is threatening human health?
1/10/20230
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Being healthy on a sick planet, how climate change impacts health

The impacts of climate change on our health are growing, as surely as global temperatures and sea levels are rising. So how can we strive to live as healthy people on an increasingly sick planet? What are the major ways global warming is threatening human health?
1/10/20230
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The key to happiness and the history of emotions

Is happiness the natural order of things and,  if so,  should you be worried if you’re not happy? And how our emotional experiences have changed over time and in different cultures. 
1/9/20230
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The key to happiness and the history of emotions

Is happiness the natural order of things and,  if so,  should you be worried if you’re not happy? And how our emotional experiences have changed over time and in different cultures. 
1/9/20230
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Hidden homelessness, revealed by those who've lived it

Some 116,000 people experience homelessness every night in Australia, and that number is expected to grow. What is it like to be homeless? What do those who've been in that awful circumstance think is the answer?
1/5/20230
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Hidden homelessness, revealed by those who've lived it

Some 116,000 people experience homelessness every night in Australia, and that number is expected to grow. What is it like to be homeless? What do those who've been in that awful circumstance think is the answer?
1/5/20230
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AI and the rise of smart machines

Artificial Intelligence (AI) will revolutionise medicine, and help to combat climate change. But it also threatens to usher in a new age of automated drone warfare. With smart machines poised to take more decisions out of our hands, how can we ensure these decisions are ethical, moral, and in our interest? Paul Barclay talks to Toby Walsh about his book, Machines Behaving Badly Recorded at the Bendigo Writers Festival on May 15, 2022. Speaker: Toby Walsh — author and world leading researcher in Artificial Intelligence; professor of AI, University of NSW; leads research group at Data61, Australia's Centre of Excellence for ICT Research.
1/4/20230
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AI and the rise of smart machines

Artificial Intelligence (AI) will revolutionise medicine, and help to combat climate change. But it also threatens to usher in a new age of automated drone warfare. With smart machines poised to take more decisions out of our hands, how can we ensure these decisions are ethical, moral, and in our interest? Paul Barclay talks to Toby Walsh about his book, Machines Behaving Badly Recorded at the Bendigo Writers Festival on May 15, 2022. Speaker: Toby Walsh — author and world leading researcher in Artificial Intelligence; professor of AI, University of NSW; leads research group at Data61, Australia's Centre of Excellence for ICT Research.
1/4/20230
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For the love of birds

Are you a bird lover? Were you one of the many people to discover the delights of birdwatching during the pandemic lockdowns? Birds play a crucial role in our ecosystem, but their very existence is under threat. What can we do to protect the future for birdlife? In this discussion, we meet a panel of bird lovers who each share their different perspectives on the enduring allure of birds.
1/3/20230
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For the love of birds

Are you a bird lover? Were you one of the many people to discover the delights of birdwatching during the pandemic lockdowns? Birds play a crucial role in our ecosystem, but their very existence is under threat. What can we do to protect the future for birdlife? In this discussion, we meet a panel of bird lovers who each share their different perspectives on the enduring allure of birds.
1/3/20230
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A life without sex

Is sex really a good thing? It’s one of the most broadly accepted assumptions of society. But a group of people begs to differ. They call themselves Asexuals and insist that no-sex is a distinct sexual identity. What do these contrasting ways of thinking about abstinence tell us about modern sexual anxieties
1/2/20230
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A life without sex

Is sex really a good thing? It’s one of the most broadly accepted assumptions of society. But a group of people begs to differ. They call themselves Asexuals and insist that no-sex is a distinct sexual identity. What do these contrasting ways of thinking about abstinence tell us about modern sexual anxieties
1/2/20230
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Environmental laws to tackle climate change

Without serious action by 2025 the planet is set to warm beyond one and a half degrees. That’s the unequivocal assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To reach the target,  the IPCC says that governments should not approve more fossil fuel projects yet in Australia we continue to do so. A social scientist says our environmental protection laws need to be redesigned to give greater weight to the protection of future generations who’ll face the full impact of climate change.
12/29/20220
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Environmental laws to tackle climate change

Without serious action by 2025 the planet is set to warm beyond one and a half degrees. That’s the unequivocal assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To reach the target,  the IPCC says that governments should not approve more fossil fuel projects yet in Australia we continue to do so. A social scientist says our environmental protection laws need to be redesigned to give greater weight to the protection of future generations who’ll face the full impact of climate change.
12/29/20220
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Electrify everything: a blueprint for decarbonising Australia

By electrifying virtually everything, we can solve the climate change crisis. Electric vehicles, electric heating, electric cooking, a decarbonised grid – all powered by renewables and batteries. This is the future Australia should be pursuing, argues inventor and entrepreneur, Saul Griffith, in his book, 'The Big Switch'..
12/28/20220
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Electrify everything: a blueprint for decarbonising Australia

By electrifying virtually everything, we can solve the climate change crisis. Electric vehicles, electric heating, electric cooking, a decarbonised grid – all powered by renewables and batteries. This is the future Australia should be pursuing, argues inventor and entrepreneur, Saul Griffith, in his book, 'The Big Switch'..
12/28/20220
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The neuroscience of sleep and its disorders

A good night's sleep is anything but quiet: a myriad of processes occupy our brains, crucial for every aspect of our waking lives. Our increased understanding of the neuroscience of sleep sheds light on why so many of us struggle to simply drift off.
12/27/20220
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The neuroscience of sleep and its disorders

A good night's sleep is anything but quiet: a myriad of processes occupy our brains, crucial for every aspect of our waking lives. Our increased understanding of the neuroscience of sleep sheds light on why so many of us struggle to simply drift off.
12/27/20220
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Male fertility

Women are warned that as they get older their fertility declines. The popular view is that men can father children at any age. But age is also a factor for fertility problems in men. There’s also a pronounced global decline in sperm counts. So what can men do to boost their chances of becoming a father?  
12/26/20220
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Male fertility

Women are warned that as they get older their fertility declines. The popular view is that men can father children at any age. But age is also a factor for fertility problems in men. There’s also a pronounced global decline in sperm counts. So what can men do to boost their chances of becoming a father?  
12/26/20220
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Sport or culture? Why not both? Writing about surfing

How do you get to the essence of an activity that is part sport, part leisure, and a large part cultural identity?